The East Carolinian, March 30, 1995






r i
March 30,1995 .
Vol 69, No. 86 '
c JjCftst idiroiiiii&ii
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pages
Stackhouse set to wear purple and gold
Basketball
phenom agrees to
become ECU
Athletic Director
Staff Reports
University of North Carolina
basketball sensation Jerry
Stackhouse will not be back in a
Tarheel uniform next season. No big
surprise there, most NBA scouts are
drooling over the opportunity to
sign the Kinston native to a lucra-
tive professional contract.
They'll have to wait at least two
more seasons.
In an unscheduled late-night
meeting late last night, three ath-
letic department sources confirmed
Genetic
to The Least Carolinian that
Stackhouse. the Sports Illustrated
Player of the Year, has agreed to be-
come the next Director of Athletics
for East Carolina University, effec-
tive immediately following the
Tarheels' exodus from the 1995
NCAA tournament.
"I wanted to become Chancel-
lor, but Mr. Eakin didn't know of his
status soon enough for me to make
my decision on that position
Stackhouse said. "It's all good,
though. At least I can still play bas-
ketball
Basketball, you say?
It's true. Under NCAA regula-
tion XVII, section B1.67,
Stackhouse will be allowed to play
out his career simultaneously in the
friendly confines of Williams Arena,
alongside former high school team-
mate Chuck Jones, a present Pirate.
Stackhouse has already made
friends at East Carolina, simply by
purchasing a 19" Zenith color TV
(with Carolina alumni money) � one
that would replace the one stolen
and pawned off by N.C. State's
Bryant Feggins in January.
"It was just a school rivalry
thing Feggins said off-the-record.
"You know, we have to play in
Reynolds Coliseum, which is a
dump compared to their place. I got
30 bucks from Coach Robinson for
that thing
Robinson declined to comment.
Pirate Club members and stu-
dents alike are ecstatic with this sud-
den turn of events, and are already
pushing for the school to rename
the arena the "Stack-House of
Payne
"With Pirate head basketball
coach Eddie Payne and Jerry
around, it will be a whole new ball
game Duke's "Coach K" said in a
telephone interview.
Does that mean he's a Pirate
fan?
"Yes I am he emphatically re-
plied.
This unscheduled announce-
ment comes just hours after State
was booted from the ACC in favor
of the Pirates. State reluctantly
agreed with the move, and placed
into the East o' Mississippi Saluki
conference, along with such power-
houses as the Nashville Auto Diesel
College, Des Moines Academy of
Pavlovian Psychology, and returning
league hoops champ Pansy State.
"Hey, buddy. Pansy's a lot
tougher than they sound Robinson
said uncomfortably. "They aren't
that tough, but they are small, quick
and know how to run
v �� ��?
found in Tar River
Staff Reports
�����������
"The toxins have finally paid
off ECU biology professor David
Naughton Anderson said. "All the
chemicals, sewage and various other
waste products we've been dumping
in the Tar River all these years have
finally given us something 'produc-
tive for our efforts
What Dr. Anderson is referring
to is a strange mutant lifeform dis-
covered Wednesday in the Tar River.
A university research team has de-
termined that the creature, which
they've playfully nick-named Lusty,
is amphibious. Lusty has gills, fins,
and nictitating membranes like a fish,
but is more human-like in other ways.
"Well, while we can't reveal too
much at this time said Dr. Ander-
son, "it does have the rounded skull
and upright build of a human being.
Also, Lusty has two retractable
stump-like appendages that enable it
to walk on land In addition. Dr.
Anderson revealed that Lusty the
Man-Fish, like many hybrids and mu-
tations, is sexless. "So the nick-name
is really kind of cruel said Lusty re-
search team member Dr. Alexander
Cyclops. "But it stuck, so what are
you �onna do?"
It was during one of Lusty's
ground-level excursions that
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Tar River is actually the home to a genetic misfit beast lovingly called Lusty by local officials.
I Lusty is said to be friendly, except when left alone with large quantities of liquor.
Greenville police found and captured
him. "We got an anonymous call that
some kind of monster was stalking
around the Town Commons said
Sgt. Nick O'Hara. "We figured it was
some kind of fraternity prank at first,
but then we got the call from the
Kneecap
Apparently, Lusty had made its
way into the downtown club and be-
gan wallowing in a large puddle of
beer. When asked how Lusty got in
the club in the first place, Kneecap
bouncer Crunch Hardtack replied,
"Well, he looked over 21 to me At
first, the Man-Fish went unnoticed
by the establishment's booze-addled,
under-age patrons, but then it started
acting strangely. "That fish was
tanked Hardtack said. "It came on
to some of the ladies, then picked a
fight with a bunch of frat boys Hard-
tack left his position at the door to
break up the fight but Lusty's sew-
age-born strength proved to be too
much for him.
"That's when we dispatched the
Monster Squad said officer Seymor
Scagnetti of the Greenville police.
The city's elite monster handling spe-
cialists, who apprehended Lusty, are
not called upon often. "We were
thinking about cutting their fund-
ing Scagnetti said, "but with the
river spawning mutant hell-beasts, I
think we'd better re-think our posi-
tion
"I wouldn't call Lusty a 'hell-
beast Dr. Anderson said. "He's ac-
tually quite friendly and loving. He
just makes a mean drunk
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Acting Director of Athletics Henry Van Sant became sugruiy
emotional when told Stackhouse will soon sit at this desk.
Petting zoo should
boost enrollment
Staff Reports
Frog exposes Muppets' many vices
� r � d�,ii ;� Kprmitrenlies "It's realrv not asbac
Kermit has a
marijuna habit,
Miss Piggy prefers
diet pills
Staff Reports
What is it that makes Kermit the
Frog such a lovable guy and a hero to
many? Well, this question was an-
swered and many secrets were revealed
in a one-on-one interview with Babette
Wawa.
"It's simple. I love entertaining the
masses, but I love it even more when
I'm stoned I connect more with the
audience said Kermit to a very
shocked Babette.
When asked about the rest of the
cast, Kermit just snickered and said "If
you really want to know and pro-
ceeded to tell us the ugly truth about
what goes on behind the scenes in the
lives of the Muppets.
"Miss Piggy has always had a little
weight problem explained Kermit.
"She started to take diet pills and
things started going down hill from
there. Now she's strung out
on crystal meth and has vio-
lent fits of rage constantly. It's
really hard being married to
her sometimes. Oh, but
there's more.
"Gonzo, in case you
haven't noticed, suffers from
low self-esteem, so he started
taking steroids in order to
build himself up a little. Poor
Gonzo we never thought
the side effects would be so
bad. First of all, he got
hooked on chickens. He
killed his girlfriend Camilla, and then
his nose started to grow and we
thought it would never stop. Somebody
in the cast told me that he was now-
having an affair with Miss Piggy.
Babette then asked, "How did the
cast get involved in this type of lifestyle?
Was it the pressure of show business?"
Pressure, no. Basically it was
something to do. You know those two
old guys who sit in the balcony and
make fun of everything, right? Well,
they're heavily involved with the Ma-
fia, and ap-
proached
us with an
offer. If we
gave them
a spot on
our show,
then they
would
supply us
with all of
the free
drugs we
could pos-
sibly want. To say the least it was an
offer we couldn't refuse, and that is
how it all started
Babette then cut in and asked "So,
are all the cast members involved in
this deviant lifestyle? How come we
haven't heard about any of this until
r?"
"I love
entertaining the
masses, but I love
it even more when
I'm stoned
� Kermit the Frog
.
now
Kermit replies "It's really not as bad
as you think it is, and most of us have
kept our little habits' under control -
in order to keep it quiet In fact we were
all worried that when we made our move
to Hollywood, people would realize that
we were only doing it to get more drugs.
The movie we made about the move was
just a smoke screen.
Is every body involved in this
lifestyle What do you think? Look at
Animal and his band. Do you really think
that they could do the things they do
unless they were completely strung-out?
And the cook, he lost it the day he took
four hits of acid and tried to bake a cake.
Now he sleeps with his meat cleaver un-
der his pillow. Talk about paranoid
"Well said Babette, "1 must say
that this interview has been informa-
tive and enlightening. Thank you so
much for taking the time to speak so
freely with us
"It's no problem Kermit replied.
"I just hope that people will see that
when I say It's not easy being green'
they'll believe it"
Lions and tigers and bears -
oh my! Even though administrators
don't want you to know, the word
for '96 is animals. Lots of them.
Did you hear about the Lats
workers found in Mendenhall last
week? That was a leak in the se-
cret operation insiders refer to as
Operation New Zoo
In an effort to boost declining
enrollment, administrators are try-
ing to reach younger chil- dren
every year. New plans
incorporate a
petting zoo
set to be
placed in
the middle
of the
Mall. The lo-
cation of the zoo is also convenient
for the campus beautif ication plans
set into ECU's master plan.
"We'll save a bundle on fertil-
izer, I just hope people don't mind
the smell said Ken Udigit. lawn
operations manager.
Kids will be bused in from el-
ementary schools all over the state
and given handfuls of ECU litera-
ture while they pet their favorite
animals.
"It's all a part of the new edu-
cation phenomena that's sweeping
the nation said Smart E. Pants,
chair of ECU's education depart-
ment. "Kids will remember ECU
over any other college -Siate has
the wolf, UNC has the ram, we'll
have them all
One prominent administrator
was overheard saying that the ani-
mals will fit in with ECU's party ani-
mal reputation, but several dis-
agree.
Animal rights activists are al-
ready planning retaliations against
a petting zoo being placed on the
Mall.
"The administrators are totally
trying to disregard the politically
correct campus we have worked so
long and hard to establish said
Ieat Twigs, president of Love Ani-
mals, Don't Eat Them (LADET).
Plans may even be underway
to charge students and faculty-
members admission to the zoo. Sea-
son tickets and reduced rates for
alumni may also be available.
"All proceeds would be used to
prohibit any future student fee in-
creases said SGA President Ian
Eastman. "It's the least we can do
for students
So what are some of the ani-
mals administrators are planning to
put in this zoo? Requests have been
made for Jackasses, monkeys and a
fat cat. Faculty members have in-
sisted that horses he included.
Various departments have put in
various requests, with the excep-
tion of housing - the department
is completely against animals of any
kind. Dining on the other hand, has
requested several pigs, goats and a
few dogs. The art department has
requested colorful animals such as
flamingos and tigers in order to
keep
t h e
area
tneti-
c a 11 y
pleas-
ing. The history department has re-
quested elephants.
Whether they charge admis-
sion or not, the park will need up-
keep, thus opening several student
employment opportunities. The co-
op office has already duplicated lit-
erature on how to clean up after
animals.
The biology department is also
planning to benefit from this ven-
ture by drawing up the legal paper-
work required for them to obtain
all old and decrepit animals. The
animals will be used for dissection
in classes.
LIFfofr&
Pulp Fiction wins Best Picturepage ��
OPNIQ&rJ
MarijuanaLEGAL???page �� I
Stackhouse in purple and goldpage oo-r I C- DO
Today
L I
There is a 70 chance of
lightning striking the
SGA candidates.
Phone: Just ask the operator for new our
cellular number a
The Least Carolinian
On the wrong side ,jL,
Somewhere near Pluto
Located in this galaxy, very far from earth






p
1 I
THU
March 30,1995
Vol 69, No. 86
Circulation 12,000
AROUND THE
STATE
(AP) - The butler delivered
a check for $10.5 million
Wednesday to fulfill a bequest by
Doris Duke to the university, in
Durham, founded in 1924 with
a $40 million gift from her fa-
ther.
Bernard Lafferty, 48, was
Miss Duke's butler and confidant
before she died Oct. 28, 1993, at
age 80. She named him coexecu-
tor of her $1.2 billion estate and
left him $5 million.
The former butler wore a
large diamond earring in his left
ear and his shoulder-length
blond hair was pulled back into
a pony tail. His hands appeared
to tremble as he presented the
check to Duke University Presi-
dent Nan Keohane, who jumped
from her seat to accept it and
spilled papers from her lap to the
floor.
AROUND THE
COUNTRY
(AP) -The notice to Reynold
Kennard was an attention-grab-
ber: Pay up $4,000, more than a
year of child support, or lose
your driver's license.
The threat to the livelihood
of the Fort Fairfield, Maine,
truck driver forced him to accept
a payment plan within a week of
getting the letter.
Last week's bitter debate on
Capitol Hill over welfare reform
found one bit of common ground
for Republicans and Democrats:
a measure requiring states to re-
voke the driver, professional and
sporting licenses of parents who
owe child support.
(AP) - A Los Angeles boy
who was infected with the AIDS
virus at birth apparently fought
off the infection and is virus-free
at age 5, astonishing his doctors.
Dr. Yvonne J. Bryson, a pe-
diatrician and AIDS specialist at
the UCLA School of Medicine in
Los Angeles, said she believes it
is the first carefully documented
case of someone casting off all
signs of infection.
Tests proved conclusively
that the boy was infected for at
least a month during the first
two months of his life. Later ex-
aminations found no sign of the
virus, Bryson said.
AROUND THE
WORLD
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Eastman to remain SGA president
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
For the first time in ECU's his-
tory, a Student Government Associa-
tion President has been elected two
years in a row.
Ian Eastman won yesterday's elec-
tion with almost a 75 percent margin
over Janet Stubbs. Dale Emery was
elected to the vice presidency, beat-
ing out Chad Rasmussen. and Angie
Nix won the treasurer position by a
two point margin over Penn Crawford.
Caren VonHoene ran unopposed for
secretary. Last night's preliminary tal-
lies counted 1,386 votes.
"I'm very excited that students
recognize my ability to create new
policies Eastman said.
Senior class President Bill Gheen
helped Eastman with his campaign.
"We found the issues that were
of the highest importance to the stu-
dent body and brought students out
for the issues Gheen said.
Opposing candidate Janet Stubbs
said Election Chair David Reid and
Vice Chair Dean Brown did an excel-
lent job.
"1 plan on being in SGA next
year and working on the things on
my agenda Stubbs said, adding that
shf would do it all over again if she
could. "Definitely, I've learned a lot
about SGA
After two weeks of campaigning,
most candidates seemed on edge as
they flocked around the polls and
asked students for their vote.
Some questions arose Tuesday
about statements Eastman made in
Tuesday's profile story' in TEC. Dean
of Students Ron Speier questioned
Eastman on the validity of Eastman's
statement regarding the purchase of
three new buses and an added bus
route to the medical school without
the use of increased student fees.
Speier said student fees were in-
creased to make the purchases, negat-
ing Eastman's statements to TEC.
"It's an honest mistake Eastman
said. He said his campaign flyers
stated that increased student fees were
used to purchase the new buses and
add the bus route. "There's so many
things we've done with the transit
board
ECU'S transit system has no as-
sociation with SGA.
"Absolutely not, we were set apart
as our own entity by the board of
trustees said Ryland Walters, direc-
tor of the transit system. He said the
change occurred in the early to mid-
'80s, but as SGA president, Eastman
sits as chair on the transit board. The
board oversees major expenditures.
Speier also questioned Eastman's
sattements regarding the addition of
hundreds of bike spaces across cam-
pus, and an additional 110 parking
spaces around the recreation center
upon its completion.
Speier said SGA was not solely
responsible for these changes.
"Eastman and I) have spoken
about bike racks in the past and there
certainly is a need said Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for business
affairs. Brown said bike racks have
been added across campus. The issue
is also being discussed in the bicycle
safety committee, a committee
See SGA page 4
'Liberating decision' made
i � � � � �� � iL.i :(ik�� J� J�.ita AthlaHo rirtrtnr Havp Hart'
Eakin: It's
Construction
worker injured
Louisville or
nothing
Maureen Rich
Managing Editor
While speaking to an advanced
reporting class on Friday, Chancel-
lor Richard R. Eakin announced his
intentions to retire at East Carolina
if the University of Louisville presi-
dential position does not work out.
Eakin, who is one of three can-
didates for the opening position of
president at Louisville, said he and
his wife came to "a liberating deci-
sion
"First of all, I am very happy at
East Carolina University, and this
visit to Louisville was in no ways an
expression of unhappiness with my
present job Eakin said. "I could be
very happy retiring at East Carolina.
My liberating decision is this: I got
back from visiting Louisville) on
Wednesday afternoon and spent the
rest of the day with my wife.
"We talked about our experience
at Louisville, we talked about what
the future might or might not hold,
and we decided this, that if they de-
cide they want me at Louisville, and
I decide I want to be at Louisville,
that's one decision.
"On the other hand, if that
doesn't work out, then I've decided
that I would like to spend the rest of
my career, as long as East Carolina
would have me, as the chancellor of
East Carolina
The beginning of March marked
Eakin's eight-year anniversary as
chancellor of ECU. Of the 16 chan-
cellors in the University of North
Carolina system, Eakin holds the
fourth longest tenure. He will hold
the third longest tenure in June,
when Cleon Thompson of Winston-
Salem plans to retire.
Only Edward Fort, from North
Carolina A & T, and Jimmy Jenkins,
from Elizabeth City, have held their
positions longer.
Eakin said he plans to call the
search firm and tell them that he no
longer wishes to participate in uni-
versity searches for new leaders. He
said once he and his wife made their
decision, his life "took a turn
"I felt a lot of stress Eakin said
with a laugh.
He estimates the average length
a chancellor or president stays at one
university is five years. He said that,
despite Athletic Director Dave Hart's
departure and last year's departure
of Vice Chancellor for Academic Af-
fairs Marlene Springer, he does not
feel ECU has become a stepping
stone.
"If you're going to want to ad-
vance, you're going to have to move
he said. "I would rather hire some-
one who has extraordinary promise
and might be with us for five years -
maybe three years - and during that
time give us just the most excep-
tional performance you could expect,
even knowing in my mind that they
might be a thriving star it's a much
healthier circumstance than a situa-
tion in which you have people who
have no other prospects
gakin said he has experienced
some negative reactions to his inter-
viewing at Louisville, but they were
in the minority.
"Typical of the East Carolina
University community the over-
whelming number of people have
said, 'We don't want you to go, we'd
like you to stay here, but we want
you to do what's best for yourself
Eakin said.
Louisville's decision is expected
to be announced Tuesday, April 4.
Eakin will be in Seattle, Wa for the
NCAA championship during that
time.
Photo by PATRICK IRLAN
Construction on Joyner took a turn for the worse when an
employee was injured Monday after a floor collapsed.
proving daily
Rodriguez sustained a number
of injuries including a broken hand
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
(AP) - Burundi is a nation
on the run. Refugees fleeing vio-
lence outnumber residents in the
capital - and its second largest
city is now a camp populated by
Rwandans.
It is a country where might
makes right. It is a land where
the tragic lessons of neighbor-
ing Rwanda have been lost.
Life in the Central African
country is "a little like quick-
sand said Frances Turner, the
head of the U.N. Children's Fund
in Burundi.
Cipriano Rodriguez, a man work-
ing on the Joyner Library construc-
tion site, was injured Monday when
a portion of the second floor col-
lapsed and fell to
the first floor
where he was
working.
"Some steel
beams that sup-
port some of the
form work col-
lapsed, allowing
the wet concrete
that was being
poured to fall
through to the bot-
tom floor where
Mr. Rodriguez was
working said
Barry Deemer. on-
siie project man-
ager for J.H.
Hudson Construction Company.
The site is under the direction
of J.H. Hudson Construction where
Rodriguez was working through a
temporary service called the
Mackensie Corporation.
"One of our company represen-
tatives visited Mr. Rodriguez and his
wife in the hospital today said Ken
Mackensie, vice president of the
Mackensie Corporation. "He seems
like he's going to be fine. His condi-
tion has been upgraded from fair to
good and his doctors say he is im-
and was transported to Pitt Co. Me-
morial Hospital where he is currently
listed in good condition.
The accident has brought up
questions of construction site safety
for the companies
"Some steel beams involved as wen as
ECU'S Environ-
that SUppOrt SOme mental Health and
- , - . Safety Office.
of the form work
Operation Awareness
collapsed,
allowing the wet
concrete that was
being pored to fall
through to the
bottom floor
� Barry Deemer
"We've had 10
other major con-
crete pours like
this so far without
any incidents
Deemer said. "This
was an extremely
unfortunate occur-
rence, but it was
not foreseeable or
an act of negli-
gence in any way
According to
Phil Lewis, acting
director of the Environmental Health
and Safety Office, this is the first in-
cident of its kind since he came to
ECU in 1989.
"Our role is very little in this
instance because a construction
property is under the authority of
the construction company Lewis
said. "Once a construction site is on
campus, it is their responsibility to
assure safety. The only time our of-
fice gets involved is if our students
Photo by PATRICK IRELAN
The Army ROTC sponsored Operation Awareness at the bottom of College Hill Tuesday.
The Apache helicopter drew a crowd of nearly 400.
me Apacne nencupiet urew a uunu ui mcohj -rvv.
Minges to hold science fair
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
See SAFETY page 4
The newly remodeled Williams'
Arena in Minges will change from
the recent-ended basketball games
of the season to a whole new ball
game - science.
The annual Northeast Regional
Science Fair will be held on Friday.
March 31, with participants from
grades three through twelve from fif-
teen counties including Beaufort,
Bertie, Camden, Chowan, Currituck,
Dare, Hertford, Hyde, Martin,
Pasquotank, Perquimans, Pitt,
Tyrrell and Washington, said Karen
Dawkins, the science fair director.
Dawkins said there will be a jun-
ior and senior division divided up
into five categories: biological sci-
ence, physical science, earth science,
technology and new this year, math-
ematics. There will be approximately
150 students from 30 schools.
"The participants will set up
around 9:30 and the judges will have
finished their rounds by noon said
Dawkins. "It is all going to be par-
ticularly nice this year since we have
the new Williams' Arena
Dawkins said the judges are vol-
unteers from the ECU science de-
See SCIENCE page 4
Uzlcyte
?et4tde
Meirose Place foretells Menudo reunionpage
Nick OTime still da bestpage
Logan slaughters Independent bozos.
8
6
page I C.
Thursday
Sunny
High 69
Low 48
Weekend
Partly cloudy
High 64
Low 43

Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Buildingjacross from Joyner
mm mKKms
t





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��
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
March 22
Injured student - A student was injured during a Softball game.
Greenville rescue responded to the recreation field north of Ficklen Sta-
dium, but the student was transported to Pitt Memorial by a fiiend. He
was treated for a laceration on his nose.
March 23
Larceny - A resident of Aycock Hall reported the larceny of his
clothes from a dryer in the hall.
Assist rescue � A resident of Garrett Hall was transported by
Greenville rescue to Pitt Memorial Hospital after he was injured playing
Frisbee north of Joyner Library.
March 24
Attempted unauthorized use of a motor vehicle - A student re-
ported that during a dispute with a non-student, the suspect attempted
to use the victim's vehicle without her consent. The suspect left the area
prior to an officer's arrival. No charges were filed.
March 25
Breaking and entering - An officer discovered the breaking and
entering of a vehicle parked at the Allied Health Building. The suspect(s)
unsuccessfully attempted to remove the tape player from the vehicle.
Damage to property � A student reported bottles thrown or dropped
from Scott Hall damaged his vehicle. The vehicle was parked north of
the building.
Marijuana possession � Two residents of Scott Hall were issued
campus appearance tickets for possession of marijuana. The marijuana
and other paraphernalia were found in their room during a consented
search of the room.
March 26
Breaking and entering a vending machine � A vending machine in
Jarvis Hall was broken into and an unknown quantity of items was re-
moved.
March 28
Damage to vehicles � An officer discovered several vehicles parked
in the Fifth and Reade Streets parking lot with slashed tires. The inves-
tigations continue pending contact with the victims.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police reports.
Spring brings helping hands
Spring is ideal
time for Greek
philanthropy
Marguerite Benjamin
Staff Writer
No. it is not Christmas time, but
a lot people feel that way as spring
in Greenville brings volunteers out
of the woodwork.
Since the beginning of Spring
semester, our headlines have been
loaded with stories of fraternities,
sororities and other organizations
who have donated time and effort
to help others. The months of March
and April are proving to be the busi-
est by far.
In Sneeds Ferry, Alexandria
Parsons, 2-month old daughter of 10 so people would know they can
Paul and Darleene Parsons, has
been labeled as having "Moebius
Syndrome a nervous system disor-
der that results in paralysis of the
sixth and seventh cranial nerves, the
result of this paralysis is deformity
and a lack of facial expression. Be-
ca'ise there are only 300 people in
the U.S. diagnosed with this disease,
medical treatments are few and
costly.
Fortunately, the brothers of
Sigma Phi Epsilon, along with the
sisters of Tri Sigma and in coopera-
tion with the Ronald McDonald
House sponsored a philanthropic
event to raise money for Alexandria.
"The Rock-a-Thon went great said
Robert Lewis, Philanthropy Coordi-
nator of Sigma Phi Epsilon.
"We put announcements on
Channel 7, Channel 9 and Channel
send donations for Alexandria to:
Sig Ep Philanthropy 505 E 5th
Street Greenville, NC 27834
Lewis also added that all proceeds
go directly to the Parsons family.
"I think we may have started a
bit of a volunteer movement Lewis
added, "because some other frater-
nity chapters heard about us and
expressed interest in volunteering.
"We are also sponsoring an-
other event tentatively set for one
weekend in April. What we're try-
ing to do is get some people to vol-
unteer at Carolina East Mall or the
Plaza and play unplugged music
from the Vietnam Era. you know,
Jimmy Hendrix, The Doors, anything
from the late 60's early 70's
Lewis says that the event in
April is to raise money for disabled
Vietnam veterans. "Hopefully people
will be moved to put donations in
the guitar cases at the mail) Lewis
said.
These charity events have not
gone unnoticed. According to Lewis.
Sigma Phi Epsilon won the Best Phi
Ianthropy Award, "and we're real
close to winning the National Award
in August
Also getting in on the volunteer
action is the Chi Zeta Chapter of Phi
Alpha, the National Social Work
Honor Society. "We're donating pa-
per supplies and toiletries to
Greenville Community Shelter, be-
cause they don't often receive do-
nations of his type said Jane
Dawson, chapter president. Dawson
added that Chi Zeta is being spon-
sored by The Pantry, Inc (local store
799).
See HELP page 4
Joyner gets stately equipment
Aaron Tuell
Newswrlter
Joyner Library recently received
national exposure for incorporating
state-of-the-art equipment developed
for the banking industry.
Dr. Kenneth Marks, director of
academic library services, was in-
trigued upon demonstration of the
MicroDAX 3000 and recognized its po-
tential, according to the advertising
brochure from UM1.
In an interview with TEC, Marks
states, "We're one of the first aca-
demic libraries to install the equip-
ment and use it. It was a nev option
that just hadn't been there before
The MicroDAX at Joyner Library
is the integration of a microfilm fiche
reader printer and PC with fax capa-
bilities. As the markets' most advanced
model, the MicroDAX costs in the
neighborhood of $20,000, according
to Marks.
"This is the only one says Janice
Rice, librarian in charge of the micro-
forms department, "We're hoping that
one day that we can have this out
where the public can use it Right now.
we manage it, if a student has a prob-
lem or a special requestwe can do
it together
"We invite and expect anyone
who thinks they may benefit from
using it to stop and talk with (Rice)
and to make arrangements to come
and get aquainted with the machine
Marks says.
Marks cites one of the problems
of older reader machines is the ques-
tionable quality of printed images. The
MicroDAX can manipulate and digi-
tally enhance film images to the us
ers discretion. According to the UMI
brochure, the MicroDAX actually "res-
cues" images of documents that were
See TECH page 4
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If you already have a lease with The Players Club,
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It's Players Club's way of saying THANKS
for choosing us as your new ECU Home!
For more information call 758-4591
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jWB��wiMM�nt ftpi mm. my
mmmm





Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
Student TV discusses current issues
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
ECU'S weekly student video
magazine production. "Cue One" is
currently in its second season of pro-
duction. The show airs at 6 p.m. on
Thursdays and 2 a.m. on Fridays on
cable access Channel 7.
"Cue One" is produced by stu-
dents in the advanced video produc-
tion anJ the video performance
classes in the department of library
studies and educational technology.
A copywriting class will also be in-
volved in producing one show.
This semester "Cue One" has pro-
duced shows on topics ranging from
campus safety to construction on cam-
pus. A show focusing on non-revenue
sports also featured editorials on the
possibility of student-athletes being
paid for playing collegiate sports.
Other shows focused on relationships,
the parking problem and resident ad-
visors.
The show produced last week fo-
cused on the opportunities for culture
in Greenville. The culture show fea-
tured specials on the Greenville mu-
sic scene, the ECU Art Gallery and
the Greenville Town Commons.
Robert Caprio. lecturer of elec-
tronic mass media studies and faculty
coordinator for "Cue One hopes to
improve the show by providing more
"visual appeal" to viewers through
additional field camera work and bet-
ter technical equipment.
"We are trying to expand we
want to provide more visual appeal
instead of it just being talking heads
Caprio said.
This semester, approximately 31
students are involved in the weekly
production of "Cue One with an ad-
ditional 15 students involved in the
copywriting class. The show is filmed
each Thursday in the first floor studio
of Joyner Library in the Center for
Academic Communication. Carlton
Benz. an associate professor of com-
munication, serves along with Caprio
as a faculty coordinator.
Caprio said although problems
have occurred due to scheduling con-
flicts and occasional student frustra-
tion or disinterest in topics the pro-
duction of the video magazine has
gone well.
"I've been very lucky. I've had two
very' strong classes so far Caprio said.
Caprio feels producing the show
has benefited students in many ways
in regards to their careers.
"Production is a collaborative ef-
fort they are responsible for the look
of the program and the content of the
program Caprio said. "They learn how
to work togetherWe are giving them
the independence they need to take
that final step they need into the work
world
Caprio feels there are many ways
to improve the quality of the show by
broadening the overall focus.
"What is missing is more shows
with substance. Students have to find
an anglc.we hope to expand the pro-
gram into the community and get stu-
dents more involved with the commu-
nity Caprio said. "We would like to
create a strong brotherhood or sister-
hood with the community
In the future, Caprio would like
to see "Cue One" feature shows on
urban planning in Greenville and city
council meetings and there effect on
ECU students. He feels while all shews
may not be gems, it is an ongoing learn-
ing process.
Security added to Minges
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
awaaaaaaai waaaaaaaaaaM fat
The theft and attempted theft of
television monitors from Williams
Arena in recent weeks has prompted
the installation of a security system in
Minges Coliseum.
"When they steal them and take
them home, they don't get a picture
said Teresa Crocker, director of ECU
police. "I just find it hard to believe
that someone would bust a door to
steal a monitor they can't even use to
watch television
The last attempted theft of a moni-
tor occurred on March 9, when an of-
ficer found a door smashed on the
northeast side of the building and dis-
covered that a monitor was missing.
ECU police reports state the monitor
was recovered when the suspect was
later spotted and dropped the moni-
tor before getting away.
"I thought that was excellent
work said Henry VanSant. associate
director of athletics. "Public safety was
certainly doing their job
The monitor sustained slight dam-
age, but is in working order.
"It's sitting here in my office said
Tom Doyle, athletic video director. "It's
scratched and a little banged up but it
works fine
Doyle said the monitor has not
been put back into place because no
sporting events are scheduled in the
near future for the arena.
Doyle also commended ECU police
for their fast action in recovering the
monitor.
"We increased our patrol in the
area Crocker said. "It's a random pa-
Want extra spending $?
Come to work at TEC
as a News Writer.
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The Realty Group
221 Commerce Street
Greenville. NC
355-2213
SAVE LIKE
NEVER
BEFORE
The East Carolinian is sponsoring
a day full of savings designed
especially for ECU next
Wednesday.
Look for this logo in ads appear-
ing in next Tuesday's paper. It
means savings especially for the
ECU community. Enjoy.
757-1070
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Tonight: Poetry Readings
8:00pm
Friday: Trey Hamlin
Acoustic Guitar 9:00pm
104 West 5th St.
Sun-Thurs 7am-12am Fri-Sat 7am-1am
trot, but they check it often
She said patrols were increased
after the first theft in January, and that
a security system will soon be in place.
�'They're in the process of install-
ing security equipment motion detec-
tors and alarms that would alert us in
our office Crocker said.
Crocker said the need for an alarm
system was a result of the first theft
"We'll put a system in that's rec-
ommended by public safety said
Henry VanSant, associate director of
athletics. "It really is in response to the
first theft, we need some security
VanSant and Crocker hope that
the future installation of a security
system will deter any future thieves
from the temptation of stealing another
one of the arena's 28 color monitors.
Renovations to Williams Arena ex-
ceeded �l 1 million.
DAYTONA'S BAD BOYZ
Friday, March 31
Doors Open 6:00
Show starts 8:00
Tickets $7.00 in advance
$10.00 at door
$ 5.00 w student I.D.
for more information call 75-PARTY
Be a Summer Tar Heel!
Session 1: May 18-June 23,1995
Session 2: June 27-August 1,1995
Students from any college or university, teachers, rising high
school seniors, and others who are not enrolled at UNC-CH
may apply as Visiting Summer Students for first, second, or
both sessions.
UNC-CH offers, during two 5 12 week sessions, over 900
courses in 45 disciplines. A typical course load per session
is 6 semester hours.
Some evening and night courses and three-week short courses
are offered. Spaces still available in three week Summer School
Abroad programs
Approximate Cost per Session: tuition and fees of $125 PLUS
$47 per credit hour for NC resident undergraduates or $341 per
credit hour for nonresident undergraduates.
When requesting a catalog and application, please mention
seeing this ad in The East Carolinian for special attention.
Summer School
CB 3340, 200 Pettigrew Hall
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3340
Phone:919-962-1009
Fax:919-962-2752
EEO Institution
B1MIJIII.IIIBIIWW





w
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
. mmmm
SCjA from page 1
Eastman sits on.
"When I go in front of the board
of trustees and argue for 20 minutes
for spaces around the rec. center and
the development of 110 spaces hap-
pened, 1 consider that an accomplish-
ment of mine Eastman said.
Speier had raised the questions
concerning Eastman's statements and
was hoping to clear the situation by
midday Wednesday.
"My hope is that there'll be no
judicial action Speier said. "We're
very concerned about political speech
and whether or not anyone is harmed
Eastman and Stubbs met with As-
sociate Dean of Students Karen Boyd
around 5 p.m. Wednesday for a discus-
sion. Speier said he hoped a conflict
resolution or some form of mediation
would occur.
After the meeting, both candidates
conferred with each other before speak-
ing to TEC and gave statements that
the charges were not preferred and said
the matter was a non-issue.
"It's not in the best interests in the
SGA and often facts can be perceived
as misleading Eastman said.
Both candidates said they would
work together in SGA next year, and
believe their campaigns went well.
"We've always had a really good
working relationship, but in an election,
you have an opponent if you're friends
or not" Stubbs said. "1 think it's gone a
lot smoother. I think it's been a lot less
negative than in years past
Eastman said he believes the posi-
tive issues have diminished any nega-
tive tones the campaign harbored.
"I feel the direct negativity was a
little more severe than in past years
but I feel 'he positive issues definitely
outweighed any negativity Eastman
said. "I hope people realize that's the
way to go
Stubbs missed the debate sched-
uled to air on WZMB Monday night
because she said she thought the de-
bate was at 9 p.m. (as TEC printed). The
debate was scheduled for 8 p.m. Stubbs
said she did not have time to prepare
for it but thought Tuesday's debate in
Jones Hall went very well.
In a Wednesday afternoon inter-
view, Stubbs said she felt the campaign
was going well, but felt Tuesday's cov-
erage in TEC hurt her.
"I definitely don't think the article
was pro-Janet" Stubbs said. "I wanted
to come in here and talk about myself
She said the presidential profiles did
not sound like profiles, and that Eastman,
"does nothing single-handedly
Eastman and Stubbs are planning
to work together next year to ensure
SGA's progress.
"Regardless of the outcome, we've
both expressed different issues that ef-
fect ECU students that hopefully, we
can work together on Eastman said.
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECU
758-0000
500 OFF
Banana
Split
coupon expires 41595
Limit 1 per customer.
Not Valid with any other purchase
J. J�iCj.H. from page 3
in poor condition before filming.
"In terms of putting together a
research paper and those sorts of
things, there are some very slick fea-
tures allowing faculty and students
to do a much, much better job
Marks says. Integration of filmfiche
images with printed documents is
one of the most desirable features.
According to Rice, dealing with
interlibrary services, the faxing abil-
ity has proven to be one of the most
valuable functions. The MicroDAX
can fax multiple documents to other
universities, sending requests for
documents that are missing or are
not subscribed to in their own librar-
ies.
One thing the MicroDAX cannot
do is read an image directly from any-
thing not on filmfiche. In contrast,
there are things only available on mi-
croform.
"The equipment actually was de-
veloped for the banking industry and
only as an afterthought Marks says,
"somebody said let's look for other
markets, and libraries were identified
as potential markets
"So as we got the equipment in
SCIENCE from page
partment as well as from the School
of Mathematics. Local businessmen
and industries, students from Eliza-
beth City State University and stu-
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
William Shakespeare's
Classic Romantic Comedy
Twelfth Night
March 30, 31, April 1, 3 and 4, 1995 at 8:00 p.m.
April 2, 1995 at 2:00 p.m.
dents from Dr. Claudia Melear's sci-
ence education classes will also be
volunteer judges for the Science
Fair.
"Some of the projects will be
very sophisticated on the junior and
senior level said Dawkins. "Some
have worked on these projects for a
long period of time with the science
and math departments at ECU.
Some of the elementary students
may have worked together on their
project in the classroom
Dawkins said the first and sec-
ond place finishers in each division
will go on to compete at the State's
Science Fair in Greensboro on April
28. Ten of the elementary-level
projects are also eligible to go on
to compete if the students choose
to.
"Campus facilities, a crew com-
mittee and Texas gulf are joining
forces to provide us with a load of
and had the chance to begin to work
with it, the corporate organizations
- UMI particularly was interested in
doing a piece on just exactly how
we've been using it Marks states.
Marks has directed Joyner Li-
brary for five years. He has a mas-
ters degree in library science and
earned a Ph.D in educational admin-
istration at Iowa State.
reject material for a fossil dig
Dawkins said. "This will be held at
the end of Ficklen Drive and chil-
dren will hopefully come to find
such fossils as sharks' teeth
For anyone who might be inter-
ested in browsing through the sci-
ence projects these 150 students
have been working on so diligently,
the Northeast Regional Science Fair
will be open to the public 1:30 p.m.
Friday.
??TAKE A RIDE ON THE WILD SIDE
Attention ECU Students
Don't have a cai? Need a ride to Church?
The First Pentecostal Holiness Church would like to offer you free transportation.
Sunday Morning 11:00am � Sunday Evening 7:00pm Wednesday Nights 7:00pm
CALL 756-3315
(Monday - Friday, 9am to 4pm)
MeGinnis Theatre
East Carolina University
Main Campus
Call-328-6829
General Public:7.50
�CV Students:4.50
Children: S 4.50
mmm
Don't miss the
School of Allied Health
All ECU students are invited!
iKunmr Ail rX I students arc invited:
TIESTA
nigkt
No time tor siesta at this iiesta!
mm, Mi&
FEATURING THE PUBLISHERS
W.B. SAUNDERS
J.B. LlPPINCOTT
APPLETON 8c LANGE
C.V. MOSBY
Springhouse
F.A. Davis
Williams 6c Wilkin
ffee
too
VSIIMB
Thursday, April 6
4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
College Hill Field

H
es
Fiesta Games Include:
Lasso tie Barrel
Tortilla Tossing
Lick It, Slam It. Suck It
Jalapeno Eating Contest
Limbo
Hippity Hop Races
Pin the Tail
Pinatas
Volleyball
Horseshoes
lit Fiesta Cockroach Races
SpJ I R�r-i�-l S C�.p I� I U�� S�-i� �J WZMI1 C. M U ��. fa
H. JbLJr from page 2
"This is the first year I have
been involved, but Chi Zeta tries
to do something like this every
year Dawson said. "Every year we
try to pick a different charity. We
are currently working on a program
to benefit P.I.C.A.S.O, Pitt County
AIDS Service Organization, but
right now no dates have been set
for this event Dawson added.
The date of the donation to
Greenville Community Shelter is
March 31 at 12:30 p.m. The public
is invited to volunteer as well. Jane
Dawson can be reached at (919) 756-
4916. Keep an eye out for upcom-
ing volunteer events in the East
Carolinian and continue the volun-
teer movement.
SAFETY from page 1
or faculty are affected. In this
particular instance we served as a li-
aison between the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) and the contractors
Measures are being taken to try
and avoid another occurrence of this
type, according to Deemer.
"We have eight more pours in
the future Deemer said, "We are
conducting some additional safety in-
spections and making sure all of the
equipment is in order. Anything J.H.
Hudson finds questionable we will
tell our sub-contractor not to use
Mr. Rodriguez could not be
reached for comment. However
Danny Velez of the public informa-
tion office at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital said that Rodriguez should
be fine within a couple of months.
Carol Belk
Building
Tuesday, April
1 O a.m. - 2 p.m
Sponsored by
ECU Student Stores
and Matthews medical
book company

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Tuesday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
We see it everyday, accidents,
war, crime - violence. America's me-
dia keep the population informed
about the world today, be it good or
bad. In recent years there has been
an outcry that the media bring us too
much violence, that the media pro-
mote violence and even glamorize it.
TEC agrees, but face it. There's a
real world out there and our society
teaches us we should know about it.
Arguments can be provoked as
to whether our media promote or
deter violence - but that's psychol-
ogy. Our children's programming win-
ner right now is The Migh Morphin
Power Rangers, does this promote
violence? Do you know what happens
when you spraypaint a car in
Singapore?
It's our job to bring you the
truth. How graphic should descrip-
tions of violence be? Drawing a line
to where a story ends is not some-
thing you always want to be respon-
sible for. Editors under heat have ac-
tually tried to give audiences days
with all good news. Maybe stories
could be labeled before graphics are
shown, but you might get disap-
pointed in the show.
Decision makers have made ef-
forts to slow down on how much we
see, but it doesn't work. Barney won't
always make ratings, the news will.
The media merely give Americans
what they want. When you stop ask-
ing for it, we'll stop giving it.
When everyone in every corner
of the world knows the latest news, it
then becomes glamorized. At times,
we shine our information age light so
bright that everyone gets a little
blinded and scream they've had
enough. We see the same things so
many times that they can become un-
realistic. We get sick of it too: Is OJ.
getting paid for his mini-series?
The Power Rangers don't use
weapons, but real criminals do. Sorry
to tell you, but random violence is
exactly that random. Violence won't
go away if you put your head under a
pillow: we just want you to know its
out there and it could be close to you.
We. the media, are the watchdogs of
America and let the public determine
whether justice is served in our coun-
try.
Congress was working very hard
to prevent lobbyists from giving in-
fluential gifts and other perks before
the news let you know what was go-
ing on. weren't they? If you feel the
Los Angeles officers should have gone
to jail for the videotape we all saw,
that's your opinion. We just watch and
try to bring America the truth the
best we can.
The bottom line is, you don't
have to see it if you don't want to. It
is possible to turn it off and ignore it.
Clinton should be re-elected
It's the sixth round and a bat-
tered Clinton comes out of the cor-
ner, awaiting the bell. He has taken a
beating, but he's still fighting. Yes,
ladies and gentlemen, the end of the
fight is drawing nigh. We're halfway
there; some people think our Presi-
dent has taken this lying down, but
that just ain't true! I'm gonna explain
to you why Clinton should get re-
elected in 1996.
First of all, I'm sick of Republi-
cans saying "The American people
voted for the contract" No we didn't!
Just about every voter who voted had
no idea what the contract was how
many of you had your copy handy?
Let's be honest about the contract,
and its consequences. Economist Rob-
ert Reich determines it will cost Ameri-
can taxpayers $725 billion. Also, 50
percent of this contract applies to
those making $100,000 or more!
Sounds like "Reaganomics Lite" to
me!
I will now list Clinton's main
themes and his action on those
themes: The need for change. Voters
voted for change in 1992 just as they
did in 1994. I think it's obvious
Clinton has rectified several of the
undesirable side effects of the
ReaganBush administrations. The
deficit has gone down for three
straight years; the first time since the
�:�'��
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
happened. Employment has gone up.
The wealthy have also had to step up
and pay their fair share. It's good the
Republicans won their slim majorites
in Congress; now the Democrats can
be back-seat drivers for a change.
Clinton promised to enlarge the
job market, and halfway through his
term, he has done exactly that. Five-
point-six million new jobs sounds like
an enlargement to me. Democrats get
attacked as the party of big govern-
ment when it is Clinton who has
streamlined government. He has cut
100,000 jobs out of the federal bu-
reaucracy. Clinton's commitments to
put more police on the streets are
answered by his successful Crime Bill.
Finally, he vowed to do some-
thing about health care. No, things
didn't work out. Some say it was a
disaster. The fact is, something has
to be done. Congress had the ball.
and they punted it. Health care is in-
deed an epidemic. If you don't think
so, look at the rising insurance pre-
miums, the corrupt practices, and the
people dying. Attacking health care
may have not been the politically fash-
ionable thing to do, but I admire him
sticking to his campaign promise. It's
Bush and Reagan who waffle on that
issue get away scot free while Clinton
is bashed for trying to fix a cata-
strophic problem.
Oh, one more thing. The GOP
had passed lots of legislation, but
there's one thing they didn't pass. The
Democrats introduced a bill to pro-
hibit gifts from Lobbyists. The sup-
posed "party of reform" declined this
measure.
Clinton has promised a smaller,
but more effective government. The
GOP wants to slash government ig-
noring the ghastly consequences. Say
goodbye to Social security and Medi-
care, if they stick around. It'll be great
to watch the "grand demagogue
Newt Gingrich, explain that one away.
Republicans are big talkers. They
rant and rave about deficit reduction
but they haven't done anything. The
president has decreased the deficit by
$700 billion. All Reagan and Bush
could do is quadruple the national
debt It's easy to believe that Clinton
isn't a good president, but he has pre-
vailed where many say he has failed.
, Look at the statistics. Listen to ev-
eryone, Conservatives and bleedin'
heart liberals like myself. Look at
where the President stands on issues
near and dear to your heart. Then,
form your opinion. That is why I voted
for Clinton in '92. and why I'll do it
One of the few academic classes
I've taken in the course of my four-
year stint here at ECU that I've genu-
inely enjoyed has been sociology. I like
it because it gets the mental cogs
working without motivating you to
the sort of arr.1 chair diagnosis that so
irritates your friends and dampens any
conversation you manage to postulate
yourself into.
Last week, the question came up
in class of how to toially eliminate
crime from the country. The class con-
sensus was one of, 'Ha-dream on,
man but that's okay. You don't get
answers without questions, and
there's always more than one answer.
Apparently, it's a poser that has
been the bugbear of more minds than
my sociology professor alone. Turn on
the news or read the morning paper.
The steps are getting weird and radi-
cal.
During the span of my Christmas
break, I was over at my girlfriend's
house (which, incidentally, is in a
neighborhood about as safe as a cer-
tain historical zeppelin), watching a
Current Affair spot about a Michigan
town that had imported a Clint
Eastwood-style sheriff to restore some
law and order to the apocalyptic bad-
lands of the American suburbs. His
solution was to divide the area into
sections, then wall the sections apart
with bricks and wrought-iron gates,
then padlock the whole affair shut
after dark.
Many called foul. Many more said
that it was about time someone took
some affirmative action. For all the
boos and cheers, though, the end re-
sult was undeniable-the crime rate
Brian Wright
Opinion Columnist
We're never
going to
eliminate crime
when people
want what
others have got.
dropped like a silence Mafia informant
down by the bay.
Apparently, as industrious as the
legions of thugs and thieves might
have been at strong-arming old ladies
and heisting car stereos, they couldn't
figure out how to scale a stupid fence.
Back when Clinton was just start-
ing to get the ball rolling with his cam-
paign, he sent to the presses Putting
People First, his manifesto for chang-
ing American and putting the power
back into the hands of the people.
A noble sentiment, but the thing
reads like a political primer for con-
fused refugees from the MTV Forum
With Bill Clinton audience.
He speaks of "cracking down" a
lot. Cracking down on crime, crack-
ing down on drugs, cracking down on
the cracked, but he doesn't actually
say how he's going to go about crack-
ing down on anything, and as
theClinton administration itself began
to show some notable fissures, his
whole plan now smacks of the kind
Truman administration that this has just too bad that other presidents like again in two years.
Lots of crime, few solutions
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Printed on
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recycled
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Eric Barteis, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Jack Skinner, Photographer
Randall Rozzell Creative Director
Darryi Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Patrick Irelan, Photographer
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes i2,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919)
328-6366.
Lawsuits are not solutions
Hey, you get rich quick wannabes.
Ever dream of winning the lottery and
being set for life? Well in case you're
into playing the numbersno pun
intented.there are a few facts you
ought to know. The odds of winning
the Virginia lotteryfor exampleare
about one in over seven million. So
perhaps you would be interested in
option number two: sue.
Next time you're at your neigh-
bors for a cookout, look for a broken
board a on his deck. Trip over it and
you too can be set for life.
Anyone sense a lack of justice
epedemic? Good, you are not the only
one and best of all Congress has a
cure.
On Feb. 27, 1992 a woman pulled
into a McDonald's and purchased a
McBreakfast In trying to get the top
off her hot coffee she spilled the hot
contents in her lap and recieved sec-
ond and third degree bums.
The case was brought to court
and after four hours of deliberation
the jury awarded the plaintiff2.9
million. This fee was reduced by the
judge yet the plaintiff was still
awarded $640,000.
She has become the poster child
for Congress's well overdue tort re-
form (a tort is a personal injury caused
by negligence.) Congress is bent on
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
Americans are
tired of being
sued by people
who are the
cause of their
own injuries.
curbing the number of frivolous law-
suits and excessive of the damage
awards.
The three biggest of these re-
forms affect punitive damage, loser
pays theory, and medical malpractice.
Under punitive damage, juries
could award no more than three times
the cost of medica' bills and missed
work.
The loser pays theory' requires
that in certain cases the loser be re-
quired to pick up the tab for the win-
ners leagal expenses.
Most importantly is medical mal-
practice suit legislation. Juries could
not award more than$250.000 for non-
economic injuries like emotioal stress.
With the lawsuit caps we all stand
to benefit. With lower malpractice'
awards, insurance rates for medical
malpractice will drop. With lower
rates doctors will charge less. In
charging less health care becomes
more affordable for all.
Excluding mass filings such as
Asbestos and the Dalcon Shields, tort
cases make up ten ercent of the
American Leagal System case load:
Between 1985 and 1992 suits went
up in 14 states and down in only 6.
Last year the National Law Jour-
nal found that only five percent of
Americans wanted their children te
be lawyers. Applications to law
schools are down ten percent To-
day there is approximately 1 lawyer
per 290 citizens.
With this many people in frivo-
lous plaintifs' corners, this legislation
could have not come at a better time.
Americans are tired of being
sued by people who are in fact the
proximate cause of their own inju-
riesex. woman who spilled coffee
on herself.)
If you should happen to trip over
a broken board on your neighbors
deck, offer to help him fix it rather
than sueing him for his house and
the rights to his first born.
Delinquency not a birth right
of irony that isn't good for anyone's
blood.
For my part, I suggested that the
only truly crimeless society would be
an anarchy, where the only thing the
letter of the law spells out is "Any-
thing goes
"Good Lord a friend of mine
said later that evening when I re-
counted the discussion, "you can't say
things like that
1 wasn't advocating anarchy, I
replied. I was only saying that we're
never going to totally eliminate crime.
Not as long as there's a single person
who wants what another person has
got. We can only hope to contain it to
the best of our abilities.
"That doesn't matter he pro-
tested. "No one wants to hear things
like that, not even in a college class-
room. You're lucky you weren't
chased down and beaten like the vil-
lage hunchback! All anyone wants to
hear about is that we are winning,
and that the end is in sight
Bag that, you heathen robot. I
told him. That mentality didn't work
20 years ago. and it won't work now.
The only hope we have is to stay as
mercurial as we can manage.
The only grain of humor in all
this, for me. came when he got up
and huffed out of the room, walked
angrily downtown, and ended up get-
ting arrested for being drunk and dis-
orderly.
1 stayed home, running Putting
People First through a borrowed
food processor, rearranging the
frazzled bits of wisdom as they spat
out the dispenser slot, hoping to find
some kind of workable plan in them.
Everyday when we turn on our
television sets or radios we hear
about crime and violence in America.
Crime and violence is a very se-
rious problem. Young teens or ado-
lescents are the perpetrators of many
of these crimes or violent acts. Male
adolescents account for a dispropor-
tionately high percentage of the se-
rious and violent criminal behavior
that occurs in our society.
Many times these kids are mis-
guided youth with no one to turn to
and no where to go. They are young
people whose homes, schools or
neighborhoods have failed to meet
their needs. They have no under-
standing of what it means to be a
good citizen because their environ-
ment has not encourage them to be
a good citizen. They do not see the
good life they could have. They are
only concern with here and now, not
with what they could make of their
lives for future purposes. A large
number of these kids drop out of high
school before they reach the tenth
HHI ��-�"
Angela McCullers
Opinion Columnist
.
No one is born
to be a juvenile
delinquent.
Delinquency is
something that
is learned.
grade only to get into more trouble
on the streets.
No one is bom to be a juvenile
delinquent. Delinquency is something
that is learned. A child leams the ways
of delinquency much as he learns
other kinds of behaviors. When her
wants something, his need drives him
to action. What kind of action he
learns to take over a period of years
determines the kind of person he wf
become.
They do things that interfere wir$t
the lives of others or destroy pror
erty that belongs to others. The sa3
part is that, although these delin-
quents do not realize it. they are hurt-
ing themselves as much as, and often
more than they are hurting others. -
I think, in many cases that as
children they have been hurt very
much and. as a sort of revenge, they
want to hurt others. In other cases, 1
think they are following bad leaders
or just being mischievous and not re-
alizing the damage they are doing.
We young adults need to remem-
ber that younger kids look up to us.
We need to set good examples. A good
environment helps people to become
good citizens. Everyone has an impor-
tant part in building America. Every-
one must do their share. The less
crime, violence and juvenile delin-
quency there is, the better life will be
for all of us. We will have a better
nation and a better world. !
Too many clowns on campus
Alright. I've had it.
You hear it coming from four
blocks away. The ground starts to
thump two blocks awaythen it rolls
byit's cat daddy car driver, alive and
kickin' on campus.
I just have one thing to say. DO
YOU REALIZE HOW STUPID YOU
LOOK?
Let's break this down and ana-
lyze this obscure behavior.
First, I would like to state that I
am all for self expression. That is part
of the college experience. But do you
have to inflict your choice on all of
us? And inflict is the word here - we
all hear you LOUD and CLEAR.
Secondly, what is your motive?
Is it to impress someone? A group of
someones perhaps? Is it to boost self
esteem? If it is. try to make an A on a
test sometime. It's a great way to el-
evate one's self image.
Perhaps the sheer sound of loud
music pleases you. If that is the case,
buy some head phones. I like loud
music, really loud music. But in the
center of campus at high noon This
is not the time or place to stimulate
that need.
Perhaps your motive is to annoy
us. What's the point? If that is the
case � you were successful. I would
not have written this article other-
Frank Hurley
Opinion Columnist
Hey cat daddy
car drivers
DO YOU
REALIZE HOW
STUPID YOU
LOOK?
wise. OK you win � can you please
stop now?
Next I would like to attempt to
paint a mental picture of what you
look like to us. Close your eyes and
picture a great big circus clown jump-
ing up and down in a giant plastic
kiddy pool screaming "Look at me.
everybody! Can you see how cool I
am? Look! Watch me! Weeeeee
Yep. sounds pretty stupid, huh? Well,
you look worse.
And what about the medical rami-
fications? I am sure any physician
would agree that long term exposure
to a gazillion decibels will eventually
cause long term hearing damage.
Finally. I would like to discuss the
short term rewards that you may re-j
ceive from carrying out this specific
behavior. Let's face it, you know that-
you look silly. You cannot honestly
believe that we are impressed. So fc
ask you. do you really feel satisfied
after you complete your performance?
Do you pull over, turn down the vol-
ume, take a deep breath and say, "God.
That was really great. I feel enriched
now. My actions caused good feelings
and I feel that I am a better person as
a result of it
NO. 1 think you should answer
NO.
In closing. 1 want you to know that
I am not deliberately trying to step on
vein egos cam. 1 want to reit-
erate that 1 support self expression.
However, when your actions be-
gin to affect the lives of others, many
others. I think you should consider a
compromise. Besides. IT'S EMBAR-
RASSING.
So next time you have the urge to
pump up the volume, picture that cir-
cus clown screaming and flailing about
and say to yourself. "I am a good and
secure individual who has dignity and
self-worth. 1 am going to park my car,
grab my books and go to class to make
an A Try it - you may actually im-
press someone
�L.





-1
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
TANKED GIRL
BY HAGWOOD, WOULDN'T HE'
CATHETER
BY SMITH
SO HE 6WW n ME
�prjvUSE X. 6CREP W�3 CAN W
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OUTFITS WERE IN STNLE.r Wj&JT
ON O.EAK UttUlP PlETS.I REAP
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V wftS STILL 60REP
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AN ART FCRMX MAKE LITTLE
PEFINITIONS CUT OF THE LITTLE
ISONiES IN LIFFfr TRy CM SKiITTS,
PRESSES, HATS, AND JACKETS ! T
MAKE LISTS! I COUNT
CALOtfltS!
SHOE NUFF
BY DICKENS
THE TROUBLE IS,
10 MEN ARE ALU
ALIKE. VOU ALL WATCH
VIOLENT SP0ffTS,Ou
ALL EAT FATTEN ING-
FOOD, AND (00'Re ALL
PENSE AND INSENSITIVE.

SNAFU SMITH
MEN HAVE no EmPATHS.
I'M A WOMAN WHO KNOWS
WHAT SHE WANTS, AND
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HECK I'LL EVEN SETTLE
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IN TKt tAftTERIK.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb 13)
Your money is fighting for freedom, demanding lib-
eration this week. You never imagined It would be this
hard to repress the urge to SPEND it willy-nilly. Im-
pulse buys leap out at you: smoke bombs, glass-en-
cased pictures of unicorns, sparkly key chains. Fight
it.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Theatrics rule your week. It seems natural for Pisces
to leave dramatic gocgjj-byejwscrawied in lipstick across
a mirror�even if you're only tepping out for a beer.
You fling yourself in afitKouj; of conversations. You
arrive in class fashiohabfclaTe and make the rounds,
treating everyone to your special savoir-faire.
Aries (Mar 21- April 19)
You become three times the scholar you were yester-
day. You weed through interruptions with much
aplomb. Aries must put up defenses today and loudly
chastise those who deliberately misunderstand, if the
melee continues, put an abrupt end to it. Yell "BASTA"
and wield a blunt instrument at the poorly-timed
offender's head.
REGISTER
REGISTRATION 15'
BY CHILDERS
Taurus (April 20- May 20)
You're on another channel today so it's time to take
advantage. Start your own urban legend; better yet,
star in your own urban legend. Someone approaches
you with good newsbad news. This is obnoxious, so
skip away and don't listen. Friends at the top rally in
your favor.
Gemini (May 21- June 21)
Picture yourself coming "unglued Ugly, isn't it? The
word for today is "tenacity Apply thick layers of It or
you'll snap like a crusty rubber band. Get some sleep,
too, or you'll begin hallucinating.
Cancer (June 22- July 22)
That "things to do" list is swallowing up Cancer's life
You're completely preoccupied with your precious list.
You feel compelled!� add things you've already done
to the list for the delicious sake of crossing them off.
You shrug off social engagements so you can be alone
with your listif you lose it, you'll die Little one, re-
lax
Leo (July 23- Au. 22)
Today is a lovely day to experiment with food. Also, cau-
tious role'reversal might be beneficial. Get a good pal to
be you and, in turn, you can be your pal. See how liberat-
ing the art Of mimicry is. Stop when your pal promises to
liberate youf head from the rest of your body.
Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22)
Someone is jive-talking you. You're sent hither and tither
for the proverbial wild goose. Call the offending bete-
noire's bluff. Toss your head. Say smugly. "I thought so
and step lively. Grab up whafs tangible.
Libra (Sept. 23- Oct. 23)
Chew on it for a while whatever it is. Randomness is not
going not to work for you the way it sometimes does.
Decisions can't be rushed, timing is crucial, and you will
perish into useless dust if you don't give yourself a teeny
break.
Scorpio (Oct. 24- Nov. 21)
You're eating rubber biscuits this week, pal. Nourishment
is tantatarngly close, but your food bites you back. Pare
down the incisors and chew carefully. Especially if you
wind up with your foot in your mouth.
Sagittarius (Nov. 21- Dec. 21)
Follow that delusion. Hints are dropped everywhere for
you to pick up and arrange so that they make sense
Stay away from people who insist on rhyming the final
word of every sentence. You find power in the magic desk
drawer that eats up your papers.
Capricorn (Dec. 22- Jan. 19)
Remember last week when you were let off the hook and
told to relax? Hope you enjoyed it. March goes out like a
lamb, but April slaps you in the chops ust for the halibut.
April Fools' Day sounds like fun but wait 'til you meet the
fool. Warning. Drink NyQuil like it's Kool-Aid and snooze
the first week of April away.






Tuesday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
4tede
ECU student signs
Def Jam record deal
"Movie, TZeviee
�r�7
�r�7 ; ; : :
Candyman gets the hook
Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
Michael Waggett has shown that
hard work and dedication to what you
love doing can pay off in the long run.
Waggett. an ECU student, sings con-
temporary R&B and has recently
signed a contract with a record com-
pany called Power Move Productions
(PMP). a partner of Def Jam Records.
The successful rap performer Coolio
is also signed under PMP
Waggett started singing as a child
with his father, who was a choir direc-
tor in their church. "I learned a lot
about harmonizing and was first in-
spired by one of the singers in my high
school singing group Waggett said.
Some other influences for Waggett are
Stevie Wonder, Luther Vandross and
Bobby Brown. After high school,
Waggett began to try to make possible
contacts for solo singing jobs. He con-
tinued to try to find a deal until one
night over Christmas vacation he got
his big break.
Waggett and some friends went
to Chapel Hill to see rap performers
R.Kelly and Coolio in concert Waggett
wanted R.Kelly to notice him, so after
the show, he sang loudly as R.Kelly was
getting in his limo. R.Kelly's bodyguard
grabbed Waggett and took him into the
tour bus. R.Kelly talked to him for over
thirty minutes and told him he had a
great voice and potential The rap-
per also said he wanted to work with
Waggett but not nothing ever came
from this meeting.
Waggett continued to pursue his
goal to sing and went to another Coolio
show. Michael approached Coolio and
sang some R&B for him, which Coolio
Photo Courtesy of Michael Waggett
Here ECU student and new PMP recording artist Michael
Waggett clowns around with rapper Coolio in the studio.
seemed to like. Coolio's manager, Paul
Stewart gave Waggett his card and told
him he wanted to hear some of his
music.
This meeting led Waggett to his
big break when he was asked to come
out to Hollywood for two weeks to stay
with Paul Stewart. Stewart is vice
president of PMP and has managed
such famous performers as Ice Cube,
Warren G House of Pain and now
Coolio. PMP and Paul Stewart ar-
ranged a production agreement with
Waggett for singing under PMP's la-
bel.
Waggett and PMP also made a
three-song demo tape. "I worked hard
singing every day for at least eight
hours in the studio Waggett said of
the recording session. He also earned
the nickname OPE while in LA from
Coolio and others at PMP. He said of
his experience in L.A. that he now
knows more about the business and is
more mature in his singing ability.
When asked how he manages his
time with school and singing, Waggett
said, "1 try to keep it off my mind and
concentrate on school, but it's hard
with all that's going on. I do want a
degree for self-satisfaction because I
am-not a quitter PMP handles a lot
of the production work, so Waggett is
now in a waiting process that gives him
time to do work at ECU.
Waggett's future plans include go-
ing to L.A. again this summer to meet
with Paul Stewart and doing some
work on an album. "I am real excited
about this trip, and I hope it is iyorth
something he said. Look for Michael
Waggett's name in the R&B section of
your local music store soun. With his
determination, he's sure to succeed.
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Clive Barker's short story, "The
Forbidden resonated with a hor-
ror that sprang from common be-
lief in evil. If enough people believe
in a mythical horror figure, Barker
suggested, then that figure could
bridge the gap between myth and re-
ality. The mythical figure of Barker's
story, The Candyman, was a murderer
with a razor-sharp hook for a hand.
People whispered about The
Candyman and, because of their
shared belief, The Candyman lived.
Whenever the myth began to lose its
power, The Candyman would put in
an appearance to reinforce the myth.
Near the end of "The Forbid-
den Barker allows The Candyman
to describe his power to a potential
victim. "It's a blessed condition The
Candyman says (and the reader can
almost hear the evil yet suave tone
of his voice), "believe me. To live in
people's dreams, to be whispered at
street corners, but not have to be
The seduction to become a myth
proves too great for Helen, a student
investigating the power of myth in
urban culture. Helen accepts death
from The Candyman in exchange for
immortal life in the stories that will
be told in the city.
The eerie, seductive power of
"The Forbidden" was captured on
celluloid relatively well in a film
called Candyman. Barker's original
idea remained intact and the film ver-
See CANDY page 9
Rock music is in their nature
Photo courtesy Mother Nature
Perennial downtown classic rock favorites Mother Nature will be celebrating the release
of their eagerly-awaited debut album Saturday night at the Attic. Doors open at 10 p.m.
ren Sumner told TEC in a phone inter-
We try to play something that
Photo courtesy Gramercy Pictures
You shouldn't have said the name! Annie Tarrant (Kelly
Rowan) learns that she shouldn't tempt fate (or Candyman
Tony Todd) in the thriller Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh.
TV Trek boldy goes forward
Deep Space Nine and Voyager carry on the Trek tradition
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
The Star Trek television legacy is
in good hands.
With the departure of Star Trek
the Next Generation for the movie screen
last fall, many fans were worried. The
third Trek series, Deep Space Nine, was
generally disliked (except it seems by me
and a handful of other discerning view-
ers), and the fourth, Voyager, was an
unknown entity. Like the nervous nellies
they are, Trekkies across the country
were crying doom. They needn't have
worried.
In the case of Deep Space Nine, I
tend to think it was an image problem.
For the greater part of its first season,
DS9 was in fact pretty crappy. People
tired of it and stopped watching, plan-
ning to return to it later in the hope that
it would get better. Surprise! It did get
better, and it got better quick - much
quicker, in fact than the show's detrac-
tors expected.
By the final episode of the first sea-
son, DS9 was firing on all cylinders. Sud-
denly, the show found its focus. Unlike
the other Trek shows, DS9 was not about
exploring and conquering. Commander
Sisko can't fly to an alien planet have
sex with some green-skinned alien
woman
and fly off
without
having to
deal with
the conse-
quences of
his actions
like Cap-
tain Kirk.
No, Sisko
is stuck on
that alien
planet and
his actions
have defi-
nite and long-reaching consequences.
Deep Space Nine is, in fact all about
consequences.
At its best DS9 is a show about
making tough decisions and sticking with
them. The crew of this space station is
regularly forced to choose between jus-
tice and the law, or between emotion and
duty. The decisions are never easy, and
the characters often surprise me with
the choices they make.
In one episode, Chief Engneer Miles
O'Brien is forced to confront his hatred
for the Cardassians,
an alien race he
fought against in a
long-ago war. Is he
a racist? In another
story, DS9's second-
in-command Major
Kira is haunted by
a morally-question-
able assassination
she committed dur-
ing her own planet's
war with the
Cardassians. Does
her "just-following-
orders" rationale
make her just as bad as the Nazi-like vil-
lains she fought?
Unfortunately, nobody seemed to
watch the second season oiDeep Space
Nine. It was over-shadowed by the sur-
prisingly poor final season of Next Gen-
See TREK page 8
Mother Nature
releases debut
album at the Attic
Brandon Waddell
ers.
Staff Writer
Since their original formation in
1991, Mother Nature has slowly built a
well-deserved reputation as a hard-work-
ing rock and roll band. "Hard-working"
because Mother Nature is different from
many other bands who frequent the
Greenville area because of the number
of songs they play in each of their sets.
"When we're on stage, we sweat
We try to avoid taking long breaks be-
tween sets for the simple fact that we
appreciate people coming out to see us
play, and we strive to give them the best
show we can give bass guitarist War-
view.
everyone wants to hear, and the only
way we can accomplish this is to play
35 songs or more per show
Mother Nature will be headlining
at The Attic this Saturday night in cel-
ebration of the upcoming release of
their self-titled debut CD. This release
will be one consisting of all original ma-
terial; hence the band is slowly making
the transition from playing 70s and '80s
roots rock covers to original material.
"This transition is a difficult one
to make because a great deal of our au-
dience is a regular crowd who have come
out to see us play quite frequently. For
the most part, those fans have come to
hear cover tunes they enjoy, and we're
trying to steer away from playing all cov-
ers said Warren Sumner. Despite this
desire to change, their show Saturday
night will still be about 60 percent cov-
The quintet was originally formed
here in Greenville by ECU students who
got together to play some original ma-
terial and to do covers of bands such as
The Allman Brothers. The Eagles, Led
Zeppelin and The Beatles. Though these
bands are Mother Nature's primary in-
fluences, they are a pretty diverse group,
with other influences ranging from jazz
to Motown.
For those who have not seen
Mother Nature perform recently, there
has been an addition to the band. Gui-
tarist and vocalist Keith Burkhart joined
Mother Nature eight months ago. The
rest of the band feels that he has im-
proved the group's vocal quality and
flexibility.
Greenville audiences will have a
chance to see if their faith in Burkhart
is well-founded Saturday at The Attic.
The show should start around 10 p.m.
CD. Reviews

Spent
Songs of Drinking
and Rebeliion
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Merge Records did a great ser-
vice to the music world when they
signed the Land Spent. Their new
release, Songs of Drinking and Re-
bellion, has 13 wonderfully-written
songs that make you want to do ev-
erything from dancing to losing
yourself in the depths of depres-
sion.
"Brewster Station the first
song on the album, is a somewhat
slow ballad that is rich in melody
and harmony. The song is very
simple; it has little distortion and
a nice piano part. The addition of
the piano gives this song some
depth and a little more feeling. But,
after listening to it a few times. I
got the feeling that I was listening
to a drugged-out Sonny and Cher.
Simplicity seems to be the
moito of this band, and it works
well for them. The song "Excuse Me
While I Drink Myself To Death is
much more upbeat than some of
the others on the album, but the
instrumental parts are simple and
easy to follow. They do make good
use of distortion, but it didn't
sound like they were using it to
cover up their mistakes or lack of
ability. The lyrics in this song aren't
bad either: "Just make a sour face
after our embrace as the whole
world stares There is also a good
little instrumental part in this song
that has a harder edge to it and
breaks into a nice vocalized har-
mony part by the two male singers
in the band.
One of my favorite songs from
Songs For Drinking and Rebellion
is "Minty Ballad This is a very up-
beat little number that makes the
toes tap and the heads sway. The
lyrics are hard to decipher, but the
vocal melody and the instrumental
parts fit perfectly together to make
one of the best alternative rock
songs I've heard in a while.
A few of the songs remind me
a little of the band Sebadoh. The
song "Sense of Decay" is one of
those. With the guitars going full
blast with distortion, the song
breaks into something completely
different. This song has all the as-
pects of being a great song: great
vocal melodies and harmonies, well-
constructed bass and guitar leads
and a solid drum beat. The lyrics
are well written and sound as
though some thought had been put
into them; "On a time latched shore
A well worn dress Hangs low
tide on one future housewife
With short lived regrets
When I got to the track
"Bottled Mouth I was shocked
when a female began to sing. This
is the only song that the guitar and
piano player, who is listed only as
See SPENT page 9
irr"





8
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
TREK,
:Z �
rom page 7
erotion Even m� re unft .rtunatety. a me last several sh. ws hinted that the series'
of the attempts made to "fix" the show edge was returning as the lazy NextGen-
thisseason (that is. to make it "nice" like eratitm writers who were messing things
the other Trek shows) led toa hatch of up, moved on to the new senes. Voyager.
the wort DS9 episodes ever. But the And speaking of Voyager, things
EAST CAROLINA SCHOOL
OF BARTENDING p
is now offering HOME BREWING
for beer and wine.
Complete home brewing supplies,
equipment, ingredients, & methods.
5lC - xrtancru
15 OpenM-F 10-5:30
seem to be shaping up well for this 6 turth
Trek series. The new east is putting in
marvelous performances, and the writ-
ers have a grasp of the characters that
usually doesn't devek �p 6 ir at least a year
on Star Trek shows. Kate Mulgrew, for
example, shines as Captain Jai leway. She
reminds me a little too muchoi Katherine
Hepburn at times, but 1 suppose there
are worse actresses to resemble.
The other characters are also com-
pelling. Lieutenant Tom Paris is Kirk
gone bad. Ham' Kim could easily slide
into C.eordi LaForge blandness, but he
is consistently given small scenes that
flesh him out Be'lanna Tores. Voyager's
half-human haltKlingon engineer is t m
between her roles as hot-tempered rebel
and responsible officer. Overall, we've
been given a cast that can go places.
The Voyager setup is also compel-
ling, with our heroes lost in space, sepa-
rated completely from the comfortable
All films start at 8:00 PM unless
otherwise noted and are FREE
to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
THURSDAY, MARCH 30
FRIDAY, MARCH 31
SATURDAY, APRIL 1
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
confines of the Star Tick universe.
Unfortunately, they haven't been
separated from cliched Trek plots. The
first episode presented is with a typi-
cally unimaginative "cosmic alien being
who pu's i lurhen es in a reality conjured
by their wn minds. Why the crew would
have a mass hallucination of Walton's
Mountain, however, is beyond me.
()ther episi ides have dealt with such
i iverused plot devices as the shipdestroy-
ing warp-core breach (which seems about
as serious as a bad case of the hiccups
alter seven years of Next Generation)
and the ever-present Trek bugaboo o( the
spatial anomaly (possibly the worst con-
cept in science fiction history).
But as with this season of Deep
Space Nine, the last couple of Voyager
episodes have shown more promise. Char-
acter development has been better-inte-
grated into the plots, and tile plots them-
selves have been new and interesting. 1
especially liked last week's episode in
which the crew of the Voyager encoun-
ters an alien race that has a device ca-
pable of cutting the ship's Tit-year voy-
age home in half.
Unfortunately, this race has a law-
similar to the Federation's Prime Direc-
tive that doesn't allow them to give ad-
vanced science to technologically-inferior
races. Seeing a Trek crew squirm as
they're put on the receiving end of the
Prime Directive made this fan giggle with
delight.
Walking a fine line between Next
Generation's optimism and Deep Space
Nine's pessimism. Voyager is off to a
fine start If they can avoid the Gilligan s
fefandstyte pitfalls of having the crew-
fail to get home every second episode,
this could turn out to be the best and
most popular Star Trek series yet
.
ATiTIC
752-7303
209 E. 5th Street
Greenville, NC
N.C's
Legendary
Rock n' Roll
Nightclub
Now In Its
23 rd Year
THURSDAY MAR. 30
WSFL College Night
MAST
Mth Special Guest One Step Beyond
99c Membership .99c Hi Balls .99c 32oz. Draft .99c Bottle Beer
&0's
Retro
Music
I FRIDAY MAR. 31
JRAZYDIAMONi
Tribute to Pink Floyd
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i�SMT
SATURDAY APR 1
CLASSIC ROCK
TT
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QUICKSILVER
WASH PUB
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WEDNESDAY APR. 5
CoMetf
II
Mike MesmefEves
Ik Worlds Most Powerful Hypnotist
One Big Show
Doors Open at 9pm
MO RFfiFRWATlONR Ar.P.FPTFD
Coming soon tor your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, March 30
Open Mic
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
poetry)
Breakfast Club
and One Step Beyond
at the Attic
'80s retro)
Disclosure
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, March 31
BurMonter
and Railroad Earth
at O'Rock's
Crazy Diamond
at the Attic
(Pink Floyd tribute)
Trey Hamlin
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
(acoustic guitar)
Disclosure
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, April 1
Mother Nature
at the Attic
(classic rock)
Album release party-
Lou Rawls
at Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Unchained
and Se Lah
at O'Rock's
(reggae)
Disclosure
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Tuesday, April 4
Randy Howard
at Sweetheart's
(comedy)
6:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 5
Mike Mesmer "Eyes"
at the Attic
(hypnosis)
Orville Hicks
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
(folk tales)
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming event
that you'd like listed in our Coming
Attractions column? If so. please
send us information (a schedule
would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University-
Student Publications Bldg.
Greenville. NC 27858
ECU and the
Kineton Indians
Catch them in action at
Grainger Stadium
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DINE-IN ONLY





Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
tHMHMMMHMMH
mmmmKmtmmmmmmammmmmmmmmKma
SPENT from page 7
Annie, gets the vocal spotlight. She
has her own style of singing that is
very melodious and floating. In
fact, it is almost haunting. The song
on the whole is very good, and
when I first heard it I thought that
it would be worthwhile to buy the
CD just for this one song.
"Landscaper" is probably the
most different-sounding song on
the whole album. It starts out le-
ally fast, stops and then jumps back
into the song again with a great
flourish. There are many great
buildup techniques used by all the
instruments in the band, which
makes the song fun to listen to.
Another plus for this song is
that the lyrics are really interest-
ing, even though they don't make
much sense: "To be tied to a wheel-
chair Tie a shoe around your neck
And she was confiscating jars
of Blistex Makers of the finest
subtext, But anyway the weather's
nice Like a Spring day in July
The last song on the album,
"Brighter Than Day is a very slow
and depressing song, but it was a
good choice to end the album with.
1 like the way they use just guitar
and vocals to come up with a song
this depressing.
This song makes me think of
something the band Codeine would
put together, but I liked it just the
same.
Spent definitely has a lot go-
ing for them, especially talent.
Songs For Drinking and Rebellion
is a great album that I think many
will enjoy. So whether you are
happy, sad or somewhere in the
middle. Spent has something for
evervone.
CANDY
from page 7
sion generated an unease that un-
nerved the viewer.
As with many successful horror
films, a sequel to Candyman was
made. And like the sequels to most
other horror films. Candyman: Fare-
well to the Flesh is terrible. Barker's
original idea has been subverted into
a sorry excuse to show victims hav-
ing their gullet opened by a hook.
The original, inventive ideas of the
first film have been bastardized by
filmmakers eager only to make a
profit.
The Candyman in Farewell to
the Flesh is the spirit of a black man
named Daniel Robitaille (Tony Todd.
who played The Candyman in the
original). Robitaille was killed in the
1890s because he fell in love with
and impregnated a landowner's
daughter. Because of the illicit af-
fair, Robitaille was mercilessly beaten
by a white mob. The mob cut off
Robitaille's hand with a rusty saw
and then covered his body with
honey to lure bees to him. The girl's
father then showed Robitaille his
own tortured complexion in a mir-
ror just before he died. The spirit of
Robitaille was trapped in the mirror.
and The Candyman was born.
Farewell to the Flesh tries to
tell a mystery story within a horror
film as Annie Tarrant (Kelly Rowan
in a hopelessly lame performance)
searches for her connection to The
Candyman. But the mystery turns out
to be fairly obvious, and the suspense
it generates is minimal. Instead, the
filmmakers, especially director Bill
Condon, try to build suspense by hav-
ing people sneak up on each other or
see a black man who is not The
Candyman. Rather than invest energy
in generating real suspense, the film-
makers use obvious, cliched methods
to scare the audience. This method of
scaring leaves the audience feeling
used rather than genuinely frightened.
Films like Farewell to the Flesh
infuriate me. Reviewing them proves
to be a complete waste of time be-
cause they offer nothing even worth
making an effort to criticize. If view-
ers would stop paying to see such "un-
adulterated pap" (to quote Grandpa
Simpson), the film studio would in-
vest money in quality scripts. But low-
budget stupid, derivative and dull hor-
ror films continue to inundate the
multiplexes of America. Viewers need
to send a message to Hollywood by
just saying "no
On a scale of one to 10,
Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh rates
a two.
Newman Catholic
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OnK We Reserve The Right To I limit Quanuies. None SIJ Tn Deafen We GUdl) Accept Federal Food Stamp





10
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
Pirates burned by Flash
Shannon Swaino
horrers twice in
non-conference
win over ECU
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
course i
in o mtn
goodbrt
ton signed up two non-co
ence opponents in Kent State i
1-bl
and Campbell University this week.
Kent (who took a team bus all
the wa from Ohio, no less), showed
flashes of brilliance Monday after
as they quickly and efficiently shut
down the Pirates 8-4 at Harrington
:
Flashes catcher Shannon
ed the big
'�t �� Patellis was 3-for-5 with
r and two RBIs. The middle of
the order proved to be productive for
coach Rick Rembielek, as the 3-6 hit-
imbined for five extra-base hits
and eight RBIs on a cold and
it ssed senior
Jai'l gun.
walking
striking
totals to
alks - a
blem came
from fpitches Retried
et up his fastball with
ige, and it caught up
fiddle innings, result-
te round-trippers from
Randy Rig ' Chad Puckett
- � game wore on and his
� : little zip. Knartker
turitj and altered his
tic of a
hitting the cor-
ners and I . . ' �- Pirates off-bal-
Pirate starter Hob YVharton
� d to 0-2 on the season, but
3 innings, giving up tour
gistering two
fi � ikeouts.
� i � came on in te-
the seventh inning, but
�vith control problems from
a complete the first batter he faced. IK
to a perfect 1 2 3 innings, walking two !
being yanked in favor ol .hit Hewitt
inder made fev in the ninth.
tsoverthe At the plate. Puckett and Rii
v Knartker was led the ECU offense with tin
it( es, mixing in and second homers ol die season, re-
s (curves, sliders spectively. Puckett. a senior shortstop
.ith a popping
See EC I page 12
Travis Meyer (9) transferred to East Carolina after playing at Ohio State Univers
catcher blasted a huge three-run homer on Sunday against the University of Richmond.
Lady Pirates ground Seahawks
Scott Batchelor
Staff Writer
This is the year of records
After opening the season with an
amazing9-0 record, the Women's ten
ins team had run into a problem- con-
ference play. The Colonial thletic
Association(CAA) boasts four of the
top 15 teams in the East region, and
ECU had the chance to play '
them this past weekend.
ol so good, as
the Lady Pirates dropped both
mate' ' lison and ld
I lominii � the ci itics be
gan to emerge saying this was just
like am in the past, the
lady net' . weren't the
san � 'ill heads and
shoulders abo
When UNC-Wilmington(UNC-W)
can fternoon at the
Ming somplex. the Pira
were readv tor a battle. The winner ot
t&w& 4&ezd
Thursday. Mar. 30
Sofbali@Richmond
Invitational, Richmond.
Va.
M. Tennis@William &
Mary. Wiliiamsburg. Va
2:30 p.m.
Friday. Mar. 31
Softbali@Richmond
Invitational. Richmond.
Va.
GolfCleveland Classic.
Forest Hills Country
Club. Augusta. Ga.
Saturday. April 1
Baseball vs. George
Mason (DH). 2 p.m.
Softball@Richmond
Invitational. Richmond.
Va.
Men's Track@Sun
Angel Invit Tempe.
Ariz.
Men's Tennis@Wake
Forest Invit Winston-
Salem. N.C.
Saturday. April 1
Women's Track@N.C.
State. UNC-Charlotte.
Raleigh. N.C.
Goif@Cleveland Classic.
Forest Hills Country
Club. Augusta. Ga.
Sunday. April 2
Baseball vs. George
Mason. 2 p.m.
Men's Tennis@Wake
Forest Invit Winston-
Salem. N.C.
Golf@Cleveland Classic.
Forest Hills Country
Club. Augusta. Ga.
Monday. April 3
Men's Tennis@Old
Dominion. Norfolk, Va.
2:30 p.m.
Tuesday. April 4
Women's Tennis vs.
Peace College. 2 p.m.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Senior Lady Pirate tennis player Elke Garten enjoyed success
against UNC-Wilmington. earning her 12th win of the season.
this match would probably lock up the
filth seed in the upcoming CAA tour
nament.
The battle began shortly after 2
p.m. in the sun and light wind in the
shadow of the glorious Williams Arena
at Minges Coliseum.
Sophomore Courtney Hargett,
playing the No. 1 spot for the 17th
tune this year, utilized her aggressive
forehand and blazing serve to jump
out to an early lead. Her opponent.
Jillian Perch, found herself in a deep
hole of which she could not recover.
Hargett won in straight sets 6-3, 6-2.
One of the most talented fresh-
man ever to come into the Pirate pro-
gram is Rachel Cohen. The Philadel-
phia, Pa. native has a 15-2 record and
possesses an all-around game that at
times can be deadly. This was such a
time, as Cohen totally dominated
UNC-W's Becky Baker by a 6-1, 6-0
score.
"She plays on a different level
than the other girl men's tennis head
coach Bill Moore said. "It was total
domination from the first volley
Senior Elke Garten also enjoyed
a quick match at No. 6 singles, as she
screamed and grunted her way to a ti-
2. tf-1 victory, her 12th win of the year
The rest of the matches would be
much, much closer.
Second-seeded Chelsea
Earnhardt lost her first set. but then
she recovered against the Seahawks'
l.ee Worrell and won the second set
in a tiebreak Worrell proved to be too
much for the Independance. Ya. na-
tive, as she won the match 6-3, 6-7, 6
Fifth-seeded Lisa Hadelman suf-
fered a similar fate, splitting the first
id not 1
tan �� SI e
two sets, but she d
juice to go the dis
i, 7 3-6
Hollvn i.
from Boulder, Colo
t 2 lead aftei singli
UNC-W's Katie Bi
left-handei
Going into doubles ECI m
just one wm to give thi m thi
fifth place in the league. The I
doubles lean to begin ����
team ol Gordon � ! I: rtei
set went by in a blur. .
blazed their way to
ever. UNC W fought bad
second set in a tiebreak. le l
the fourth thi.
ECU battled gallantly, tar .
match bo. 6-7
Earnhardt and Hadelman �
after their three-
found themselves
tion. They split the first two �
woke up in the thud.
match running awa
The top-seeded team ol Ha .
and Cohen also needed three sel
seal their victory, putting the icinj
the cake b postinj
"The match was in
the 7-2 score indi i en's
head coach Allen Farfour said "We
have lost the doubles, i .
proud of our team We showed we
know how to fight to gel th
The Pirates are i
season, and have woi
in a single season than
Pirate team. The Lad
are m a prime po
in the CAA tour:
whom ECU van compel
Paiz brings unique perspective
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
I got a quiz for you. What is the
major-league baseball players favorite
movie?
It's Mo Money! Ha!
Seriously though. I don't care it
the major league baseball strike ever
ends. It's come to the point now that
I've lost respect for everyone involved
and as the saga continues on and on.
it makes me even sicker
lie maybe Donald Fehr should
grab a legal team just like OJ! I
think Shapiro would scare the owi
� . rad� i � V to the ECU athletic
deparl I for I ling the ECU Pi-
rate cheerleading sqi .d and dance
team attending the National Competi-
tion i Oi do, Fla. next week.
ECI tor of Athletics
Henry V'anSant wasa real professional
during the whole situation (as repi irted
"I th decision
they made can only be beneficial to
Gojo-Shorins kick into competition
ECU places four
team members in
top divisional spots
in Spring Open VIII
Rosalie P. Baird
Recreational Services
(in Saturday March 25, ECU's
GoJu-Shorin Martial Arts Club trav-
eled to Smithfield, North Carolina
to compete in the Spring (pen Ylll
The club's competition '�
faced opponents from many schools
with many unique stvles.
M mbers of Recreat ional
vices Co.lu Shorin Club competed
in Kata and in Point Span ii
Kata. also known as F i
formal exercises that COl
systematically-organized sei �
technique: lormed ii
SID th
�othetor points.
Pointi nig. both
petitare Iequned to wear
. it,iptioiII the item.r hands, feet and isiially
sunshed the dav
wit-is taking the top
spots Ii.1 -sions.
Pan:M;ir. a bsown belt, placed Point Spar-and green
� .1.Kee?Ken,s place thud ill i d; v i s k. a green-t placi. in Point while � 11 tip. Sparring. ti ims next . � impeting i il ional and
i jratula-
d luck
Ill
ECU and the entire athletic squad.
Good luck to coaches Heather Zophy
and Alto Gary's squads.
Oh, by the way. our beloved Ffee
I tee the Pirate also deserves some rec-
ognition. He recently placed 12th in
the national competition for mascots!
Hey hey Pee Dee you look so good to
me!
Speaking of Pee Dee. I hope that
the court at Williams Area is changed.
It just looks so boring. 1 believe a huge
Pee Dee in the middle would look a
lot better (like the Razorbacks at Ar-
kansas) than just having East Carolina
written Uherwise. the arena is a beau-
tiful and high class addition to ECU'
Hey how about the NCAA Tour-
nament. I remember a certain writer
at the East Carolinian (not naming any
names - me!) saying that Old Domin-
ion would have a ch
Villanova. Well, fellow Pii I
pened. Petey Sesi
Monarchs and they sent the W
packing early in one ol the most thrill
ing games in NCAA Toun
tory. Sure mal i
ation (C '�
needed sometlm .
love the CAA! It is an underrati
ference that just I
addition of Virginia Common.
should help.
Now back to the NCAA Ba
ball Tournament. This war's Fin
is an exciting one. UCLA
and yes, the beloved UNC 1
have a chance to cla I
I'm just happy ashee :
See QUIZ page II
Small-town star
makes good at ECU
Jami Lee Bendle
Steven Lienert
Staff Writer
ECU's Lad I
has lumped out I
start. Their performai
utedtothe
steppi d i
ing sensal �

� 11
one in (lino. It's a tow n
it i

SeeSOFTBAII page 12





�t m w �
11
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
Major League owners make "final, best offer"
Jim Litke
Associated Press
By an unofficial count, this lat-
est version of a final, best offer by
the major league owners marks at
least the third time they've resorted
to that tired gimmick.
It suggests that either a) they
can't count, b) they get a kick out
of threatening the hired help, or
most likely, c) they're so used to
working with "yes men" that they
don't know what to do when some-
one says no.
In any case, the most recent
warningandorproposal deliv-
ered by acting commissioner Bud
Selig doesn't appear any more
likely to force a negotiated settle-
ment than the previous two. Not
that it kept him from trying.
Selig staged a dramatic late-
night news conference Monday, and
for those who were too busy watch-
ing the Oscars, imagine someone
who looks a lot like Jerry Lewis try-
ing to look his most menacing:
"After the season starts - Sun-
day night - we can't any more cal-
culate what's going to happen
Selig said. "So this offer has got
to be accepted by this weekend
Considering the competition,
Selig's remarks garnered a surpris-
ing amount of coverage the next
morning, much of it surprisingly op-
timistic. "SIGNS OF HOPE read
the headline in the big-city news-
paper here. But whatever sense of
urgency moved Selig apparently
failed to stir his counterpart.
Said union head Donald "No"
Fehr, when he learned of the offer,
"I'll get back to Bud tomorrow
What Fehr knows, what all of
us should keep in mind as the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board pre-
pares once more to rap their knuck-
les with a ruler, is that for all their
bravado, the last thing the owners
want to do right now is see the re-
placement season begin.
The owners have come up with
all manner of flimsy excuses about
why the games have to be played.
For the little guys: the vendors, the
ticket-takers and the souvenir-sell-
ers. For the big guys: the advertis-
ers. For the really big guy: history.
They have dressed up teachers,
social workers, caterers and black-
jack dealers in pinstripes and road
grays and tried to pass them off as
ballplayers. Instead, like a small lie
that grows, the problems simply
compound: for example at the Cin-
cinnati Reds training camp in
Haines City, Fla a bread truck
driver named Robby Robertson gets
moved from the outfield to first
base. The guy whose mitt he was
borrowing gets cut. So Robertson
checks the deliveries each day wait-
ing for a first-baseman's mitt that
never comes. Neither do the fans.
Just like the pretzels and the
replica jerseys and caps, and the
peanuts and pennants, nobody is
buying. The owners know this now,
too. No wonder Fehr says "I'll get
back to Bud tomorrow No won-
der Bud gets back to him first.
"This proposal is much less
than the clubs hoped to achieve,
and I'm sure it will not thrill you
either Selig said in a letter sent
Tuesday to all major league play-
ers.
"But both the clubs and the
players are at the point in this dis-
pute where they must swallow hard
and make an agreement. Other-
wise, we will continue to do dam-
age to this industry, which ulti-
mately will cost the clubs and play-
ers far more than the amount at
stake in this negotiating
The owners' growing despera-
tion is obvious. This latest final,
best offer is a variation on the
stop-me-before-I-hurt-myself-and-
others plea. But it will not impress
the players. Any sense of compas-
sion and all sense of proportion
was lost long ago.
Over the weekend, White Sox
owner Jerry Reinsdorf likened Don
Fehr to cult leader Jim Jones. Soon
after, one of Reinsdorf's hirees,
Need a
�u
this
summer
If you wi II- be a returning
student in the fall. University Housing
Services will be hiring painters for
the paint crew this summer. Full and
part-time positions available. For details and
applications, please come to 2I4 Whichard.
HOW TO HANG ON TO YOUR DOUGH.
(WITHOUT CRAMPING YOUR STYLE)
& Separate "needs" from "wants
Hint: A bed is a need. A Mr. Microphone
is a want.
Split the bill but only pay your share.
Why put in for someone else's swordfish
if all you got was soup?
A Set aside money for emergencies.
Unless youd rather call your parents
for it instead.
�a
Keep your eye on your wallet.
Have a Citibank Classic card in case you
lose it.The Lost Wallet Service can get you
emergency cashC a new card, usually within
24 hours, and help replacing vital documents.
"Based on available cash line
� 1995 Citibank (South Dakota). N.A
former "Nasty Boy" reliever Rob
Dibble, said "replacement player"
was a label that would stick for life,
"like child molester
On Friday, a judge will decide
whether to grant an injunction re-
quested by the National Labor Re-
lations Board. Then the players
will decide whether to walk back
into the game. The best guess now
is that both things will happen and
not long after, a deal will actually
get done.
Then the owners and players
will make a pitch to the rest of us.
Come back for half-price tickets,
good-faith productions, the un-
matched tradition, and so on.
It's all right to go back, but
don't run. Let them sweat a while.
When the last best offer arrives,
respond the way Fehr did:
"I'll get back to you tomor-
row
�MMMHMMHHM
v, ��- . r �: Vi � � ���
v� U l-i from page 10
Wallace has come at peace with him-
self and has toned down his crying af-
ter every foul. Then I wake up and the
dream is over. Anyway, 1 think the sen-
timental favorite to win it all is Okla-
homa State. Coach Eddie Sutton went
through a whole scandal at Kentucky
a couple of years back, and he has fi-
nally shaken the rap. And yes. I'm on
the "Big Country" bandwagon. He's a
great player who could be coming to a
movie theater near you soon starring
in a role as himself in the highly ac-
claimed film "Cow Chips
There has been a Mike Tyson
sighting. Yes he's back and more
"ekthtatic" than ever. Reports say that
he has converted to being a Muslim.
Hopefully he is at peace with himself
because boxing just was not the same
without him - and Mike do us a favor.
Fire Don King!
My top 5 reasons why Michael
Jordan came back to basketball.
5. To give news reporters some-
thing else to talk about besides the 0 J.
story-
4. To help save Scottie Pippen
from blowing up owner Jerry Krause's
home for not trading him.
3. The Air Jordan cleats just were
not selling.
2. He got tired of his kids asking
for Shaquille O'Neal gear.
1. Hello everyone! The baseball
players are on that little strike, and he
was afraid that McDonald's would
come out with a McJordan Replace-
ment burger (something like the
McJordan but with a meat substitute).
There are my viewpoints! I know
you will rush home and have a discus-
sion over dinner about this article, but
before you do remember one thing,
"I'm good enough, I'm smart enough,
and gosh darn it, I like the views of
Mr. Paiz I'm out. PEACE!
Caregivers of
Pitt County
presents
Associate Sponsor
io benefit Caregivers of Pitt Co.
Hole Length:
100 yds.

Come Take Your
Best Shot At
Winning
A Million
Dollars
SHOOT
OUT
Corporate Sponsor: Burroughs Wellcome Co
r.
April 6 &. 7
April 8
April 9
12-8pm
10-8pm
l-5pm
I
FREE BALL
COUPON
i
i
i�
Prizes Include:
Full Set of Golf Clubs, Gift Certificates, Clothing apparell, and much more.
Driving Range adjancent'to St. James L'nited Methodist Ch.
2000 E. 6th St.
(Directly behind Wilkerson Funeral Home. 4 block easi ot main campus)
"p-uable in level monllih niilallmenls lor 10 ears
for more info call: 7 5 2-2 398
SAVE LIKE
NEVER
BEFORE
The East Carolinian is sponsoring a day full
of savings designed especially for the ECU
community next Wednesday.
Check next Tuesday's issue to find out just
how much you can save. The ads for busi-
nesses participating in this special day will
use the logo shown below in their ad next
Tuesday.
themerchants
already signed
on to offer
discounts on this
special day:
Attic
Kinston Indians
Rose Nails
Scott's Cleaners
Economy Mini Storage
Wilson Acres
Weslev Foundation
Winn Dixie





12
Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
Winn-Dixie Presents
Student - Faculty
Appreciation Day I
Thursday, March 30, 1995
FREE
6-Pak Cans Cokes
with $5.00 Purchase and ECU I.D. Card!
All Day Thursday, March 23,1995
Plus, Register To Win A Pair Of
Tickets To The Following Concert :
Tom Petty
April 12th At Walnut Creek
Courtesy Of WSFL FM
LOWEST PRICES ON
Beer, Wine And Soft Drinks!
10 OFF Bag Chips & Snacks!
609 S.E. Greenville Blvd (264 ALT.)
At Arlington Blvd Greenville, N.C.
SOFTBALL frompage 10
pitcher town.
In her senior year of high school.
Bendle's softball team was an impres-
sive 30-1. More impressively, though,
was Bendle's individual win-loss
record, an astounding 25-1.
When meeting the team for the
first time, Bendle 5ot the impression
the team was very unified. She bought
into this concept just hoping she
would gel the opportunity to contrib-
ute.
In her last outing against George
Mason. Bendle gave up just two hits,
while striking out four and walking
only one. improving to 12-3. That's
contribution.
� It helps that, being a freshman,
I am in a four-pitcher rotation. We re-
ally help each other out said Bendle.
"What makes it even easier is that we
don't have to strike everybody out. We
just put the ball in play an let the
players behind us take care ot the
rest
"The team has really made me
feel like 1 belong. That's important.
because a pitcher can't get anywhere
without the players behind her If No.
17 and the rest of the Lady Pirates'
good fortunes continue, the sky is the
limit.
ECU
from page 10
who notched career-highs in virtually
all offensive categories a year ago,
blasted his first-ever collegiate home
run to left center in the seventh in-
ning of the loss. He'd finish 2-for-3
with a walk on the afternoon.
Rigsby. a freshman first baseman,
tied the game at one with his solo shot
to right in the fourth inning. However,
that would be his only hit to go with
two strikeouts.
Pirate leadoff batter Lamont
Edwards continued his torrid hitting,
lending a 2-for-4 hitting performance
to the Pirate cause. He also made an
error in the first, but it did not lead
to any Kent State run production af-
ter Wharton shut down the Flash at-
tack with the bases loaded.
All in all. the Pirate were flat- ,
out beaten by a better team on Mon- .
day afternoon. With the George Ma- i
son Patriots coming to town on Sat-
urday. Coach Overton will have to get '
his team back playing good, funda-
mentally-sound ECU baseball, or suf
fer yet another setback for the young
club.
Brad Oldham, Dave Pond and .
Dill "The Thrill" Diller of 91.3 iVZMB 'i
Sports will be broadcasting live the
first game of Saturday's double
header with the Patriots, as well as '
Sunday afternoon's contest from '
Harrington Field. Both games start �
at 2 p.m.
S &tolna �ast 4
STARTS FRIDAY MARCH 31
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmMmmemmmm






Thursday, March 30,1995
The East Carolinian
For Sale
EARN $500 or more weekly stuffing en-
velopes at home. Send Long SASE to:
Country Living Shoppers, Dept S32, PO
Box 1779. Denham Springs, LA 70727.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
S1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298-8952.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-2514000 ext
1576. Leave Name, School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED: Earn
$1000's Weekly working at home mailing
our circulars. Free details, Send SASE:
R&B Distributors. Box 20354. Greenville
NC 27858
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY READING
BOOKS! Up to $500 weekly. Choose sub-
ject matter. For more details call: l-(206)-
3624304 ext E0073.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING � Seasonal
& full-time employment available at Na-
tional Parks, Forests & Wildlife Preserves.
Benefitsbonuses! Call 1-206-5454804
ext. N53621.
BRODY'S IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for additional Part-time Sales As-
sociates for Cosmetics, Junior Sportswear,
and Young Men's Departments. Earn ex-
tra spending money and a merchandise
discount - just in time for your new spring
wardrobe. Flexible scheduling options to
accomdate your busy schedule: 10am-2pm,
12-9pm, or 6-9pm. All retail positions in-
clude weekends. Applications accepted
each Monday and Thursday, l-3pm,
Brody's, The Plaza.
BROKE AFTER SPRING BREAK? Earn
the quick cash you need stuffing enve-
lopes. Send SASE and $1 to Carolina En-
terprises, P.O. Box 3251, Greenville, NC
27836-1251. The sooner you act the
sooner you start making $
TIRED OF HAVING TO CHOOSE be
tweenand EXPERIENCE for summer
work? Why not go for both? Make $1880
Mo. Call 1-800-242-3958 ext 2761.
SEINE BEACH part-time - Flexible hours
-Tan while working. Located 12 miles out-
side Greenville. 21 or older. Serious calls
only. (919)975-2265
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a degree and
practical experience is better! We are ac-
cepting applications for part-time mort-
gage reporting processors. A professional
attitude and good telephone skills are re-
quired. Flexible hours. If interested, please
mail your resume to: Online Mortgage Ser-
vices, PO Box 8048, Greenville, NC 27835.
NO CALLS PLEASE.
PART-TIME SALES POSITION: ME-
LANGE, Contemporary Women's Cloth-
ing & Accessories. Lynndale Shoppes. Call
355-8771
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
ors Thermal Card - $5.00 per hour plus
bonus. Easy work. Flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210
RESORT JOBS - Theme Parks, Hotel &
Spas, MountainOutdoor Resorts, more!
Earn to $12hr. tips. For more informa-
tion, call (206) 632-0150 ext. R53621
"STUDENT WANTED" PARTIME - Auto
detail cleanup person needed. Prerfer
student seeking long term employment
Hours 12:00-5:00 or 1:00-6:00. $5.00 per
hour start Must be dependable & have
DL. apply in person only. Jarman Auto
Sales, Inc. Greenville Blvd.
ATTENTION LADIES Earn a 1,000 plus
a week escorting in the Greenville area.
Must be 18 yrs old; have own phone and
transportation. We are an established
agency, check out your yellow pages.
PART TIME STUDENT NEEDED to help
with administrative duties and some mar-
keting. Experience in these areas helpful.
Call 752-8585 and ask for Kim.
HELP WANTED: Kinston Indians Minor
League Baseball Club. Part-time summer
Employment evening hours. Call Dave at
1-800-334-5467.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP 2 Br Apt
in Wyndham Ct $200 12 utilities. Walk-
ing distance to campus. Call Tracey 757-
1771 or 321-1818.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE with op-
tion to renew lease from May - August
Two bedroom, less than a mile from cam-
pus. For more information call Michelle
or Emily at 752-9160
LOOK ATTENTION STUDENTS: Larg
est selection of campus rentals available
May 1st and August 1st Duplexes, Houses,
Apartments Call HOMELOCATORS 752-
1375
WESLEY COMMONS 1 & 2 Bedrooms:
Free cable, water, sewer, walking distance
to campus. SummerYearly leases. Pitt
Property Management 758-1921
ROOMMATE NEEDED to sublet 2 Bed-
room Duplex 3 blocks from ECU 182.50
month 12 utilities. Move in May 5-Aug.
25. Call John 7584444. Male Preferred
TWO PEOPLE NEEDED to sublease bed-
room in a three bedroom townhouse be-
ginning May 1st Rent $131.25 each plus
14 utilities. Two blocks from campus.
Call 758-8521.
ECU SENIOR has 2 rooms to rent in my
house. Private Room, shared bath, South
of Greenville. $150.00 - Chris 758-5151.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a two
bedroomtwo bath apartment 12 block
from campus. $238 per month12 utili-
ties. Call at 830-9098.
FEMALE NEEDED to take over lease
from May - August 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath,
ECU bus service, pool; furnished if needed.
$163.00month 13 utilities. Call An-
gela - 752-8070.
GREAT DOWNTOWN LOCATION! One
responsible, non-smoking roommate
needed to sub-lease apartment May-Au-
gust Call Renee at 758-9962 for details.
PRIVATE ROOMS: 15X15 available Im-
mediately for Summer and Fall, walking
distance from campus. $165-175mo 1
4 utilities. Call Mike Carey @ 830-5577.
PUPPIES AVAILABLE in 6 weeks. Lab
Shepard mix. Born March 7th. Adorable.
If interested call Greg 757-7777.
FOR SALE Ringold Tower 1 bedroom 1
bath new carpet furniture. Great for
personal use or rental. 757-8787.
BIKEGOLF CLUBS Trek 7000 with
Manitue II shock, bar ends, 2 wb cages,
seatpack. U-lock 550.00 Ping zing copy
clubs with graphite shaft 3-Sw 150.00.
Brain 321-7805
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 7 6 Action
Longboard. Astro Deck. Tail Path, and
New Leash. Shaped Summer of 94. Excel-
lent Condition, RidesGreat! $290. 757-
3233.
MCAT study materials for sale. Call 830-
4877
DUPLEX FOR SALE - 2108A E. 3rd
Street 2 bedroom, 2 full baths, fireplace,
dishwasher, ice maker, new Maytag
wahserdryer, range, 950 sq. feet refrig-
erator, only 2 12 years old. Call Hart at
758-3977.
FOR SALE: 12-string Oscar Schmidt Gui-
tar. Mint condition. $200. 6-string
washburn guitar. Good condition $175.
Call Bruce at 752-1373
1985 FORD BRONCO II, XLS, 4 WD,
Power steering and Brakes. Runs good
and looks good. 758-8521.
1991 KAWASAKI NINJA 600A - Black,
Excellent condition. New front and rear
sprochet wnew chain. Asking $3500.00
Negoitabie
93 DODGE SHADOW - Red with grey
int 27,000 miles. In excellent condition.
$7,995 Call (919)792-6074 or Leave mes-
sage at (919)792-7411.
87 HONDA CIVIC AC, Cassette, 5-speed,
high mile. 1500 obo. 8304838.
1987 HONi A ACCORD LX for sale.
Power windowslocks, AC, AMFM tape
player, Excellent condition. Call 757-3069
and leave message.
LOW-PRICED FURNITURE sofa bed
$50. Recliner $50, Large microwave w
stand $25, Ent. Center $25, obo, Moving
must sell. Call 758-6448.
MOVING SALE - Couch, 2 end tables,
HtcMng coffee table, 2 bar stools, kitchen
table, and 3 ceramic table lamps. Call 758-
5889 and leave a message.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
We Also Buy
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy.
Stereo's
T.V's.
VCR's
CD Player's
Student Swap Shop
STUDENT SWAP SHOP DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
Ned CAM!?
We Buy CDS,
Cewtf�, moA Lp�
Well pay np to $5 eaak for
err.
'CD. "
ALLCV
Downtown 758 502(5
Lost and Found
FOUND - 3-5 month old puppy, found
near Cypress Glenn (East 3rd St.) Call
758-8472 leave a message
LOOKING K� A SIM
HMD ONt IH 0� OASSBffiSffi!
gf Services Offered
CAMP PIXEWOOD
Summer Camp Staff
COUNSELORS, INSTRUCTORS, Sr
OTHER POSITIONS for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed
8 week youth sur-er recreational
sports camp. Over 25 activities,
including water ski, heated
pool, tennis, horseback, art
Cool Mountain Climate, good pay
and great fun! Non-smokers.
For applicationbrochure:
704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood,
Hendersonville, NC 28792.
HELP WANTED
Earn S5O-S100 per night
Self-Employed.
MakevOtarown schedule.
Ideal For College Students
Call Gumby s 321862
ATTENTION LADIES: We are looking
for Ladies that are interested in working
a flexible schedule and making a good sal-
ary. Call 758-2737 4pm-until. Executive
Dating & Escort Agency.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED for days
and evenings at the Big Splash Golf range.
Sales and grounds keeping positions
needed. 20hrsweek. 752-1341
CAMP COUNSELORS, waterfront high
adventures, cooks, and kitchen staff
wanted for girls' camp near Lenior, NC.
June 7 - July 24. Call Deb at 1-800-328-
8388 or 704-328-2444.
FEMALE STUDENT to keep children
part-time during the summer. Call Kim at
752-8585 or 756-0674.
HERE'S AN OPPORTUNITY
TO JOIN A GROWING TEAM
BRINGING GOOD FOOD
AND GREAT TIMES TO
GREENVILLE, WILSON
AND BEYOND!
WE'RE LOOKING FOR AN ASSISTANT
MANAGER, SOMEONE COMMITTED TO
BRINGING GOOD FOOD AND FUN TO
THE PEOPLE OF EASTERN NORTH
CAROLINA. PLEASE CALL FOR AN
APPOINTMENT FOR AN INTERVIEW
355-2946
GEORGETOWN APTS. 2 Females
needed to share large bedroom. Close to
campusdowntown! Must be responsible
non-smokers. Rent $165. For more info,
call 752-3019.
FOR RENT: 4 or 5 bedroom house, 2
full baths, large 1 acre lot fenced in. with
built in patio and brick barbeque grill
perfect for students. $700 month. Call 321-
2030.
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
I.T. or Tommy Williams
756-781 S758-7436
BOOKCASE STYLE Entertainment Cen-
ter. $50, 321-8296.
FOR SALE! Mattress, Box Spring and
Frame. Call Heather. 752-0009 Best Of-
fer!
BIKE FOR SALE - KHS Montana Descent
Rock Shox Mag 21, Clipless pedals, Great
for someone getting serious about riding.
Call Sean 758-5026.
TYPING TREASONABLE RATES
Resumes - Quick & Professional. Term Pa-
pers, Thesis, other services. Call Glenda; 752-
9959(Days); 527-9133(Eves)
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mobile
Music Productions is the premier Disc Jockey
service for your cocktail, sorial, and formal
needs. The most variety and experience of
any Disc Jockey service in the area. Specializ-
ing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates booking fast
Call early, 7584644 ask for Lee.
NEED TYPING? Campus Secretary offers
Speedy Service, familiar with all formats. Low
rates. Call Cindy: 355-3611
DATES
GUYS & GALS
11-900-726-0033 EXT.2550
$2.99 per min.
Must tie 18 yrs.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library pi information in U.S. �
all subjects
Order Catalog ToCay w :n V.s.1' MC or COO
fEHk 800-351-0222
KatSr Of 1310) 477-8226
Or rusfi $2 00 to Research Inlormation
i:j:Z:airioAyeL2Q� 6 J.os AngeiesCA9Crj25.
HELP WANTED!
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYSTEM
needs package handlers to load
vans and unload trailers for the
AM shift hours 3-7 AM, $6.00
hour, tuition assistance available
after 30 days. Future career
management possible.
Applications can be filled out at
104 United Dr.
752-1803
M
Greek Personals
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
l bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
PI DELTA will be sponsoring a "Ronald
Run" 5K run and walk, Saturday, April 1,
1995. All proceeds will benfit the Ronald
McDonald House of Eastern North Caro-
lina. For more information contact Honor
Nebiker at 75&0598 or Christy Lentz at
328-9728.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, Kappa Alpha, and
Phi Tau present The Fist Annual Reading
Day Eve Party - Doug Clark and Hot Nuts
and Liquid Pleasure. April 24.
CONGRATULATIONS to Pi Delta's new
executive board: Pres-Jennifer Keller, VP-
Christy Lentz, Treas-Michele Rudder, Sec-
Angelina Pavone. Good luck to all new
officers!
KAPPA SIGMA - We are excited to finally
be having a social with you all. Love, Al-
pha Delta Pi
DELTA CHI - We are looking forward to
our pre-downtown tonight Love Alpha
Delta Pi
KAPPA SIGMA: Thanks for making our
Spring a little brighter. We all enjoyed
celebrating the tropical sun with you guys.
Love - Chi Omega
THANK YOU KELLY JONES for being a
wonderful DJ ad Thanx to Julie Thomp-
son and Misty Wilson for setting up the
whole event We really appreciate your
hard work in making cocktail a success.
Love, Chi-Omega
e�
Travel
STUDENT FARES
NY. - LONDON299
RDU- TOKYO939
N.Y. - FRANKFURT. .409
Round trip Taxes extra.
Call for many other (ares!
mXVELSOULTIlONS
(919)510-5550
FAX(919)510-5551
DIbl
For Rent
J
Personals
FEMALE NEEDED to share a 2 Bedroom
Apt 170$month12 utilities by end
of May. Call Jeannie 756-7532 after 5 pm.
GRADUATE MATURE STUDENT
wanted to share nice townhouse in
Courtney Square. Female preferred. $220
mo plus 12 utilities. Please call 321-8779
or leave message. Laid back, serious stu-
dent, no pets.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a two bedroom apartment in Tar
River Estates for the summer months. Call
758-1818.
TAR RDER ESTATES one male room-
mate needed, located on River. $172 rent
14 utilities and phone. Call Kevin at 758-
6701
NEW 1 BEDROOM APT. Dishwasher, w
d hookups. $325month 1 month de-
posit Available May 1st Please call 355-
6883
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE 2 Bed
room apartment 2 blocks from campus, 4
blocks from downtown. $300month.
Take over lease from May 5 to Aug. 15.
Furnished if needed. Call Mike at 752-
4075.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2 bed-
room apartment which includes cable, 2
full baths fireplace. Contact Joy at 321-
6240.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to share
3 bedroom house at 101S. Warren Street
200 mo. and deposit and 13 of bills.
Private room with central ac and heat
Call 830-6055 and leave a message.
3 BR 2 12 BATH WASHERDRYER
REFRIG, othr furniture available. 640.00
a month incl. cable, wd, refrig, extras
Sheraton Village. 321-0695 Sheldon (Any-
time).
I NEED 1 GRASS PASS for Tom Petty's
sold out show at Hardee's Walnut Creek.
Sell me your extra ticket Call Greg at 758-
3943 and Leave a message.
EVERY&NE! If and Only if ECU's Fac-
ulty, Staff, and StudenU have the Best Per-
sonalities in the United States of America
then and Only then East Carolina Univer-
sity will become the Best school in the
Universe.
RANDI G Congratulations on getting
your intAiship at Duke this Summer. You
deserve ft! Have fun!
HAPPY 30TH BIRTHDAY Steve
Harding, oh sorry we mean RIP
on-the-job
training
JESUS has risen
You are invited to worship our
risen Savior with us. Hollywood
Presbyterian Church. 5 mi. south of
Pitt Plaza on Hwy. 43 S just before
D.H. Conley on left. Sunday
School. 9:45; Worship. 10:45 a.m.
on campus.
We're looking for ad
representatives for The
East Carolinian.
These positions offer
invaluable business,
communication and
sales experience.
If you want EARN while
you LEARN, contact us
at 328-6366 or drop by
our offices in the
Student Publications
building.
But don't wait too long.
!�� �
�.
'





Thursday, March 30, 1995
The East Carolinian
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1995 Greenvilk-Pitt Co. Special Olym-
pics Spring Games will be held on April
12th at Rose High School Stadium in
Greenville (rain date: April 13th). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympians.
Volunteers must be able to work all day-
from 9am-2pm The First ones there will
be assigned a position). A required orien-
tation meeting will be held on April loth
(Monday) 5:ii(i-(S:(i!i in Old Joyner Library.
room 221. Free lunches and volunteer t-
shirts will be provided the day of the
games to all volunteers who have attended
the orientation session. For more infor-
mation contact Lisa Ihly at 8304551.
SPRING HEALTH FAIR
Various ECU departmetns will be hosting
the Spring Health Fair on Thursday.
March 30, from 10am-2pm in the Multi-
purpose Room at Mendenhall Student
Center. There will be snacks, prizes, live
entertainment and plenty of information
on achieving a healthy lifestyle. For more
information, call the Office of Health Pro-
motion and Well-being at 32S-6793.
"ATTENTION ALL
ORGANIZATIONS"
This Friday. March 31, 1995 is the last
day to turn in your registration and $15.0(1
fee for your booth at BAREFOOT ON THE
MALL You may return them to the Cen-
tra! Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
Center, by 4:00pm. If you have any ques-
tions call the Student L'nion Office at 328-
4715.
RONALD MCDONALD RUN
Pi Delta Sorority will be sponsoring a 5k
run and walk on Saturday. April 1, 1995.
All proceeds will benefit the Ronald
McDonald House of Eastern North Caro-
lina. For more information and applica-
tion for entering, contact Honor Nebiker
at 758-0598.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
Seniors and graduate students graduat-
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
FIESTA NIGHT
dime to Recreational Services Fiesta
Night on Thursday. April 0 from 4:00pm
to 6:00pm on the College Hill Field. There
will be tree fond, fun games, prizes and
music. For more information call Recre-
ational Services at 328-6387.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Get ready for fun m the sun with Recre-
ational Services Intramural Sports on
Tuesday. April 4. The Colt Singles Entry-
Deadline is at 5:00pm in 204 Christenbury
Gym and at 8:30pm there will be a Sott-
ing in May Summer 1995 who wish to Dai skills-n-Thrills Competition at the
Ridden Fields. For more information call
528-6387.
UJalk-ins Hnytime
2808 I iOth St.
Eastgale Shopping Center
Bcross from Highway Patrol
Behind Car-Quest
Mon-Fri. 9-6
lHalk-ms Hnutime 752 3318
men's hair styling shoppe
$6.00 Sa? PIRATES & Get Haircut
Haircut "r�r f-vert'me
register with the Career Services Office
are invited to attend an Orientation meet-
ing on Wednesday. April 5 at 4:oiipm or
Monday. April 10 at 4:00pm at the Career
Services Center. 701 F. Fifth Street. The
program will include an overview ot ser-
vices available to help prospective gradu-
ates find employment, as well as proce-
dures for registering with Career Services
and extablishing a credentials tile.
NORTH CAROLINA FOLK ARTS
& ARTISTS SERIES
Wednesday. April 5. 7:30 in the RDI Willis
Building. First and Reade Sts JACK
TALES. PREACHER JOKES. & PER-
SONAL EXPERIENCE
NARRATIVES! Which Get Taller in the
Tellingl A Beech. Mountain Heritage of
Folktakes told by (irville Hicks. Jack Tales
and their trickster, youngest son hero have
a special place among North Carolina sto-
ries. Rooted in 18th century folklife, the
tales are notably traditional among the
Hicks and Harmon families in Appalachian
North Carolina.
B-GLAD
B-CLAD iBisexuals, Gays. Lesbians. &
Allies for Diversityl will meet tonigh at
8pm in 'he multipurpose room ot
Mendenhall Student Center.
Parkviczv I Kingston Place
is now
KINGSTON
CONDOM
N I U M
New Look New Management
New and newly renovated 1 and 2 bedroom, 2 bath
condo units, large and small, furnished or unfurnished,
with washers and dryers, free cable and water.
Pool, clubhouse & more. ECU bus service.
KINGSTON
RENTALS CO.
758-7575
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
TShirts will be sold again on April 2 he-
fore the trip to the farm. Meet by 3:00pm
behind Mendenhall. T-Shirts are $10.00
each.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Come to the next AMA meeting on Thurs-
day, March 30th in GC, room 1032 at
330pm. Our guest speaker will be Jeff
Parnell from Overtoil's. He will be speak-
ing about Direct Marketing. Refreshments
will be served. All AMA members are en-
couraged to attend.
LIVING WITH &
APPRECIATING PARENTS
Learn strategies for developing personal
independence while maintaining a rela-
tionship with your family. Can't live with
THEM - Cant live without THEM! Thurs-
day. April 6. 3:30pm-5:OOpm. Counseling
Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Exam Preparation: 4 5. 3pm-4pm. Exam
Strategies: 4 4. lOam-llam. Test & Per-
formance Anxiety: 4 3. 2pm-3pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
PHI BETA SIGMA
The Weekend ot March 31 April 2 the
Regional Conference tor Phi Beta Sigma.
Fraternity Inc. will be held here in
Greenville A variety ol events are planned
which are FREE and OPEN to the public
unless otherwise posted. On March W1
there is a social at The Max from 10-unttl.
On April 1. there will he a Blue White-
Ball at the Ramada Ballroom, Tickets are
FREE! For more information contact
Lamont Burns at 355-8796.
MALE DIVERS NEEDED
ECU Swim Team needs male divers. It you
like to Flip and Twist, please contact
Coach Rose at Minges Pool about Spring
Practice and the team for next year.
JAMA THON 95
Musicians are needed to play unplugged
music one weekend on April in the Plaza
or Carolina East Mall, for Jam-A-Thon in
order to raise funds for Disabled Vets of
NC. Musicians who can play and sing
songs from the Vietnam era. such as CCR,
The Doors. Jimi Hendrix. Etc. are in great
demand. If you have a serious interest
please call Rob at 7564916
PSPI (SELF-PACED)
PHILOSOPHY NOT OFFERED
Because course credit for proctors has
been prohibited, the Personalized System
of Programed Instruction can no longer
be employed. Proctors are the key com-
ponent in PSI, making possible self-pac-
ing, immediate face-to-face grading, repeat-
ing until 100 mastery is achieved, guided
review of material, and. through establish-
ing a friendly atmosphere, enhanced mo-
tivation. Thanks and best wishes to the
more than 6000 students, proctors, course
managers and course directors who have
proved that given an effective educational
design, students will succeed. Dr. Ross.
special
a pier
star ' -
Collegi H
:� : .
-
the Free Thro
Shoot i ut O! �
Registratioi
go 1
commui
PRESENTATION TO
GREENVILLE COMMUNITY
SHELTER
of Nal
1995, the v ; ' '
Natioi il - �'� ;
East I ai � a
entation to
Shelter on Mai-
Mrs. Pearce will
on behalf of the fa
sor- Professor 1.1.
Dawson will als
being sponsore I
cally s;ovc 799
PITT VOLUNTEER ACTION
CENTER IS HOSTING THE
EASTER PHOTO BOOTH AT
THE PLAZA MALL APRIL 1 15,
1995
STUDENTSTEACHERS
Earn $$ This Summer! (.need dependable transportation)
Monitoring Cotton Fields MAIL RESUME TO: MCS1
May to Sept. �-Box 37�
5 75 per hour Cove City, NC 28523
C25 per mile Or Fax: (919)637-2125
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM
Greenville, Kinston, New Bern
PASSOVER SEDER
A Passover Seder will be held at Congre-
gation Bayt Shalom on the second night
of Passover. April 15 at 7:45pm. Reserva-
tions must be made by April 3. For fur-
ther information, call 355-7374 or 35d-
1058.
4TH ANNUAL AKA WEEK
Thursday. March 30-Sorors will dine to-
gether in Todd Dining Hall. We will say a
Volunteers arc I
the role of the East'
pictures oi the
Booth from April 1st
All proceeds benefit the
Action Center, v h
and talent are
needs in our commu
assist us. so that v :
non-profits. Volunti i
11:00am to 8:00pm M
from LOiipm to 5
the Volunteer Cente
6271.
.
.
. and
The Party of All Parties
(This Means a BIG Party!)
PLAYERS CLUB
Player's Club 8v The Elbo Room Free cover for Player's Club
cordially invite you to Players members: Watch for free
Club "night on the town" passes in the mail.
Giveaways Galore:
-CD's
-Movie Passes
-Gift Certificates
-Awesome Door Prizes
-Tanning Packages
-Cash Prizes
-1 Month Free Electric Bill
-Free Phone Hook-Up
-Free Cable Cable Hook-Up
-Fitness Center Memberships
Come By Players Club
office to register for
additional FREE trips.
Drawing ends April 24.
�"� � � � � � �
� ������ '
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS

y�
1526 Charles Blvd.
(Across from Minges Coliseum)
Call 321-7613
y
� � �





or
��in r �
15
Thursday, March 30,1995
The East Carolinian
College Life:
A Few Things To Know
KNOW' whcK off-campuj
hookshrz wH buy bck your
kSd Snr ttxHooks -for more than Z$4 �cA.
pizza place alway5 Tak�5 exactly 3� mnutes.
Know: wh eviF
ijMarfCr-eatinj laundromat
Mack'ihes 4o avoid.
KAOW THf cope
ITAIVAtt C05TJ IF3J TWAAf l-00-COUFCT
Hey, on college campuses those "in the know" are the ones who
rule. And it's not just about being smart in the classroom, it's about
being wise with your wallet as well. So if you want a great low price
on a collect call, just dial 1 800-CALL-ATT It always costs less than
1-800-COLLECI Always.
There are lots of tricky things for you to learn at college, but here's
something that's easy. KNOW THE CODE, and save the person on the
other end some serious money You'll be glad you did.
KHJIIIM El Bi El
BBBD
ALWAYS COSTS LESS
THAN 1-800-COLLECT.
AESST. Your True Voice:
,�
Promotions excluded. 1-800-COLLECT is a service mark of MCI.
AT&T
iii'i�ii urn ii iin
mmmmmmmr
�1995 AT&T





Title
The East Carolinian, March 30, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 30, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1069
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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