The East Carolinian, March 28, 1995







March 28,1995
Vol 69, No. 85 '�
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
14 pages
SGA candidates prepare for spring elections
Presidential
candidates eagerly
await returns
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Student Government Associa-
tion (SGA) elections will be held to-
morrow. Wednesday March 29. The
presidential candidates are current
SGA President Ian Eastman and
junior class President Janet Stubbs.
Two debates are scheduled for
the candidates running in
Wednesday's election. WZMB
broadcasted a debate at 9 p.m. last
night. Another is planned for 9 p.m.
Ian Eastman
tonight in Jones Residence Hall.
Eastman's platform is based on
experience. He is currently presi-
dent of SGA, has served in the leg-
islative for more than three years
Vandals attack
campus building
someone shot
Willis Building
one of several
sites of marble hits
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
An ECU building and several
area merchants were hit Sunday
night by what Greenville police
cslled vandalism. ECU police located
a single white
marble near the �jt j j Uke
site of one hit, but
witnesses said the
holes appear to
have been created what looks like a
by a gun. .
Jamie BB 111 OUr
Easterbrook, assis- j �
tant manager of WUIOOW.
Dominos Pizza at
1201 Charles .
Blvd was not on duty during the
time of the attack, but described the
hole as 1 12" in diameter.
"It looks like someone shot
what looks like a BB in our window
Easterbrook said. Easterbrook said
the employees heard a shot and hit
the floor. No bullets, marbles or BBs
were found. The employees on duty
immediately notified the Greenville
police.
Members of the lrates Ultimate
Frisbee team were left stunned when
their party was interrupted by glass
shattering in the door at Sub Sta-
tion II on Fourth Street.
"We were in the midst of the
ultimate party and we had a store
full of people and somebody drove
down the street and shot something
at our door said Jim Sullivan,
owner of Sub Station II.
Unlike the other locations
which were vandalized, the projec-
tile shattered the glass rather than
creating a small
hole.
"We had glass
from one end of
the dining room
to the other
Sullivan said. �
Sullivan said
he immediately
notified the police
- Easterbrook wno informed him
that Sub Stationll
was the third victim. Sullivan, who
said no one was able to identify the
car, blamed the incident on "pure
ignorance
Mack Simpson, assistant direc-
tor for Communication's Develop-
ment at Regional Development In-
stitute, was in the Willis Building
using the copying machine when
his building was hit.
�����
See VANDAL page 3
and is former Interfraternity Coun-
cil president. Eastman. 22, is a mar-
keting major.
"The Student Government As-
sociation has such a high turnover
rate, when a president gets in and
learns all the right steps as far as
who to talk to, who not to talk to
by the time by the time you start
to accomplish the policies you've
run off of at the beginning of the
year, it's time to get back out
Eastman said. "When you come in
cold-footed. I can tell you it took
me a semester just to find out the
right people to talk to. Now we have
a chance to establish consistency
and we've got an opportunity to set
some standards for representation
across the university
Stubbs is SGA's junior class
president, serves as co-chair of the
student welfare committee, has
been in SGA for two years, is the
Panhellenic rush director and a vice
president in the University of North
Carolina Association of Student
Governments (UNCASG).
"Last year a lot of people made
promises and of course a lot of
Janet Stubbs
things didn't get done that they
promised Stubbs said. "I don't
want to promise anybody anything
because once you get in the office
you have all kinds of pressures, but
this agenda is definitely something
I want to work on to get as many
things accomplished as possible.
"Not only that, but internally
SGA has a lot of changes that they
need to make with student interest
in SGA and also how we recruit
people and keeping them in there
and their attendance once their in
there
Stubbs, 21, is a business mar-
keting major and has an "agenda
for change She has distributed
flyers stating that among her goals
are to implement a text book rental
system, training for academic advi-
sors, a council of student organiza-
tions, a student run television sta-
tion, voter outreach drives and rep-
resentation at city council meet-
ings.
Eastman rebutted Stubbs
goals by giving evidence against
their validity. He showed TEC state
legislation that would prohibit a
textbook rental system at ECU. He
said an academic guidance program
is already present at ECU referring
to an article that printed in TEC
last semester titled, "Students re-
ceive academic support Eastman
further explained that an organiza-
tion leadership group is already
being formed by Lisa Shibley, di-
rector of student leadership devel-
opment programs and that ECU stu-
dents already run television shows
through public television. He cited
another article in TEC about "Cue
One" a student run television show.
Eastman also pointed out that a
voter outreach drive was held and
promoted by several members of
SGA including senior class Presi-
dent Bill Gheen as a combined ef-
fort between ECU's college Demo-
crats and Republicans.
The reverse side o( Stubb's
flyer states that Eastman has failed
to attend any city council meetings.
only 37 percent of faculty senate
meetings and only one out ol three
Parking and Traffic Committee
meetings.
Eastman said he is not a mem-
ber of the city council as Stubbs
had earlier suggested, but that he
receives city council minutes and
sends representatives whenever is-
sues concerning ECU are ad-
dressed. City Clerk Wanda Elks said
that SGA representatives were
present for one city council meet-
ing.
Eastman said that he delegated
controlling authority of the faculty
See SGA page 3
Students save beached whale
Aaron Tuell
Staff Writer
Some ECU students who were
camping on a deserted island got more
than just lazy days in the sun when
they saved the life of a beached whale.
The campingcanoe trip to Bear
Island, March 18-19, was part of ECU
Recreational Services Outdoor Adven-
ture Program. The whale swam ashore
at Hammock's Beach State Park.
In an interview with TEC, group
leader Rob Spurgeon sa. lie a'
some other campers weu?ying on tkc
beach March 19, when a park ranger
pulled up asking for their help. There
was a beached whale down the beach,
and the ranger was unable to contact
any help by radio.
The group readily agreed and
crammed into the back of the pickup.
"This was like big-time pursuit. There
was absolutely no more room in this
truck and we were going down the
beach about 50 mph said Spurgeon.
Over a mile down the beach,
they reached the eight ft 900 lb. baby
See WHALE page 3
Follow the leader!
Photo Courtesy of Rob Spurgeon
Students participating in a Recreational Services camping, canoeing weekend. March 18-
19, helped to rescue a beached whale at Hammock's Beach State Park.
Greeks hash out problems
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Chancellor Eakin addresses members and inductees of Omicron Delta Kappa, national
leadership honor society, at the induction ceremony held Sunday at the amphitheater.
Laura Jackman
News Writer
In an effort to promote unity and
to focus on problems within the Greek
system, the Interfraternity Council
(1FC) and the
Panhellenic Council
are inviting all
Greeks to an open
forum in Hendrix
Theater.
At 7 p.m. on
Wednesday, March
29, each of the 17
fraternities and nine
sororities on campus
will have two min-
utes to speak about
issues affecting the
Greek community.
"The focus of
Wednesday night is
to address some
problems the Greek system has and to
find solutions for them said IFC Sec-
retary Reid Griffin. "We want to have
more Greek unity and that's why we're
doing this
Instead of working separately
from each other, the two councils are
planning on working together from
now on.
"I think the forum will provide
dialogue between the men's and
women's groups so
that in the future
we can plan more
things together
said Panhellenic
Adviser and Assis-
tant Dean of Stu-
dents Laura Sweet
The idea for
the forum was gen-
erated after the
IFC saw some prob-
lems within the sys-
tem that needed
addressing.
According to
Griffin, those prob-
lems include: a lack
of attendance at events, a push for
higher rush turnouts and the problem
with rush dates coinciding with the at-
traction of downtown to prospective
"It's not going to
be about Greek-
bashing at all, it's
about finding
solutions and
helping each other
out
� Justin Conrad
IFC President
rushees.
"It's not going to be about Greek-
bashing at all. it's about finding solu-
tions and helping each other out" said
IFC President Justin Conrad.
During the allotted two minutes
of time, each organizations' president
or another delegated representative
will have the opportunity to talk about
issues that have helped them grow in-
dividually or anything else that might
be of importance to the system as a
whole.
"1 think it will be a good activity
and it will provide time for us to ad-
dress the strengths and weaknesses of
the Greek system so that we can take
that information and use it in positive
ways said Sweet
"Doing events like tiiis will help
bring Greeks together to work on a
common goal said Griffin.
Both councils are hoping the first
step towards that goal will be a high
Creek attendance on Wednesday night.
"It will be really helpful to have
the entire Creek community there to
talk about the positive things we need
to do for the future Conrad said.
�1
Ur&y!e
)9teide
Venter's gets a down-home thumbs uppage
OP!
tueacUify
Where's the money for the real heroes?page
lrates defend tournament titlepage
9
Tuesday
Sunny
'pvtecttet
High 65
Low 48
Wednesday
Sunny
High 69
Low 40
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from Joyner
th





. 2
���111 ' ' "l'l-��glliw�
Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
hattin
vit&t6e
g
hancellor
Students walk for special cause
On the failed bond referendum
"I was disappointed with the outcome of the bond vote in that I
had hoped the voters would see fit to provide these moneys for the schools
of Pitt County
On acquiring the Eppes property
"We, as the university, still have a very strong interest in acquir-
ing the Eppes property. $6 million is what we have available
Eakin said Board of Trustee members say the offer will stand good
until their next meeting on May 5. At that point ECU's offer will no longer
stand and other options will be explored.
On changing the name of Public Safety to ECU Police
"I think it is a good idea to be listed in the phone book as ECU
Police. 1 think it is a generally accepted description for law enforcement
Eakin felt that ECU Police would be easier for someone in a panic to
locate in a phone book than Public Safety.
On ethnic diversity in the university workplace
"I think it is very important for us to have a diversity of persons
on the campus. It helps all students aspire to higher levels of accomplish-
! ments. I think it is an important goal for us to have
On the Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs search
"There are four candidates who came to the campus. They are all
from the outside
Eakin said the candidates are from New Mexico, Hawaii, West Virginia
and Washington.
On interviewing and being interviewed
"It is, on the one hand, exhilarating. It gives you the opportunity
to meet people. It's also quite stressful. It's a real test of one's capacity to
'I'll be a quick learner and to go through the ordeal
On being interviewed at the University of Louisville
I found my visit to Louisville to be quite exhilarating and just
plain fun
Eakin said the formal announcement of the candidate selected for the
r position of President of the University of Louisville will be April 4. Eakin
y be in Seattle for the NCAA championship on April 4.
On the NCAA tournament
"I think I will have to predict the University of North Carolina at
, Chapel Hill. I just think they are going to win
Eakin serves on the NCAA president's committee which holds its an-
nual conference during the NCAA tournament
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
nuniiiniiiiiimmiim i�iiumiii �ni�iiiiiumiimm
The ECU chapter of Gamma Beta
Phi sponsored a five-mile walk-a-thon
Saturday, March 18 to benefit the Pitt
County Special Olympics Organiza-
tion.
"The walk was to raise money
specifically so the Pitt County mem-
bers could compete in the local games
which are being held on Wednesday
April 12 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m said
Rob Gluckman, president of Gamma
Beta Phi.
According to Gluckman, the idea
to have the walk-a-thon came from
Gamma Beta Phi member Krystal
McKinney, who has been doing work
with the Special Olympics for some
time.
"We had between 45 and 50
people participating said Tammy
Putzier, member of Gamma Beta Phi
and one of the participants. "It was
cold because there were no trees
around the Town Commons to block
social aspect because it gave the mem
bers, new members and non-members
a chance to talk and get to know each
other
The members will continue to
raise money until their April 10 dead-
line to turn in the proceeds.
"I would ballpark the amount of
money raised at around $2,000 be-
cause the chapter will also donate
funds Gluckman said. "We just have
to vote on it at our next general busi-
ness meeting
In addition to the Special Olym-
pics Walk-a-thon, Gamma Beta Phi is
also involved with their yearly educa-
tionally based service project
"Typically our service project has
been Project Literacy, but this year we
did a pilot program with Omicron Delta
Kappa called Safety Net" Gluckman
said. "Safety Net is where upper
classmen are assigned to new incom-
ing freshmen or transfer students to
assist them with the adjustment to
campus life. They tell them where to
get tutoring, where things are, etc
There are several smaller fund-rais-
the wind, but it was great. 1 liked the ing events sponsored by Gamma Beta
Photo by JACK SKINNER
Members of Gamma Beta Phi gathered March 18 for a five-
mile walk to raise funds for the Pitt County Special Olympics.
ciety open to all majors, whose mem-
bership has increased in the last two
years from 45 to 285. Membership is
by invitation only.
"To be in Gamma Beta Phi you
need a minimum 3.0 GPA and you need
to maintain it Gluckman said.
Phi as well.
"We have a lot of car washes for
various causes each year Putzier said.
"Last Saturday we had one to raise
money to go to the National Conven-
tion this year
Gamma Beta Phi is an honor so-
� �.w op�wovi.u vjy uauuiw ucu � � "�"�i jj- vj muiiiuiiii ii, oiucKman saia.
Students get into political science
Laura Jackman
News Writer
With politics in the public eye
as the new election year approaches,
the political science department is
using this time to get students in-
volved in important political issues.
At 10 a.m. on Friday, March 17,
Carol Swain, a professor at Princeton
University, spoke to approximately 80
members of the faculty and student
body about issues that she believes
are important to political campaigns
and party affiliations.
"Swain was invited by myself
and Dean Sparrow of the College of
Arts and Sciences said Dr. David
Conradt, chair of the political science
department. "She is very important
to the study of political science
Swain addressed topics such as
district realignment, affirmative ac-
tion, the African-American power in
Washington and Democratic trends
in office during past elections.
Swain believes that "re-
districting alone can not be held ac-
countable" for the 1994 Democratic
loss in Congress. She said that other
things such as voter anger and Presi-
dent Clinton's standing at the polls
are to blame.
Swain also informed her audi-
ence about trends in voter turnout.
"No Republican incumbent lost
at the state or federal level, that's very
unusual she said. Swain went on to
say that "1994 was not a good year
for African-American politicians" be-
cause the African-American turnout
was lower then than it was in 1992.
At Princeton, Swain teaches her
� ADVERTISED ITEM POUCY: Each of these advertised Items Is required to be readily available for sale In each Kroger Store, except as specifically
, -noted In this ad. if we do run out of an advertised Item, we wHI offer you your choice of a comparable Item, when available, reflecting the same
savings or a ralncheck which will entitle you to purchase the advertised Item at the advertised price within $0 days. Only one vendor coupon will
- "be accepted per Item purchased.
COPYRIGHT 1995 -THE KROGER CO. ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY, MARCH 26, THROUGH SATURDAY, APRIL
1.1995 IN GREENIU.E. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO UMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS.
Iways Good.
roaer)) filways Fresh.
filways Kroger.
Full Service
Pharmacy Available
Your Total Value Food Store.
r
CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI, MOUNTAIN DEW,
Diet Pepsi
or Pepsi
COld2-Uter
Limit Four 2-Liters Please
Kellogg's
Corn
Flakesiso
� ASSORTED VARIETIES
: Quaker
instant
ij Oatmeal12-1s-oz.
Save At Least 49$
U.S. INSPECTED CHUB PACK
2$
3
2SQ
Campbell's
Tomato
SOUP10.75-OZ.
CORN, PEAS, MIXED VEGETABLES OR
Stokely's
Green
Beansitt&z.
2$
3SI
Save At Least 11KA Can
Ground Beef
�(
Sold in
or5-ib.
Pkgs.
KROGER HOT DOC OR A
Hamburger
Buns
8-Ct.
CAESAR, SPINACH, EUROPEAN, AMERICAN
OR ITALIAN RIVIERA
Fresh Express
Salads
10-
14-oz. Pkg.
THORN APPLE VALLEY SLICED COOKED HAM,
TURKEY HAM OR
Sliced Turkey
Breast Pkg.
VN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE;
HOUSE OF RAEFORD
GOURMET TURKEY BREAST OR SMOKED
Turkey Breast
2J
vm
S199
lb.
-4
�qpf
ASSORTED VARIETIES g tfrMB
Ragu Spaghetti
Sauce27.5-30-oz. mr
Muellers 3$9
Spaghettii6-oz. am
�IN THE DELiPASTRY SHOPPE' - � - -
WISCONSIN CHUNK C t8Q
Cheddar Cheese� dr
students about public policies, affir-
mative action, political parties and
minorities in politics.
"She is also doing work on
women in politics Conradt said. "And
that interests us because we will have
a new Women in Politics course next
year
Currently, Swain is editing a book
on affirmative action and her last
book, Black Faces, Black Interest,
won the Woodrow Wilson Award for
the best book of the year about politi-
cal science.
"She's on the cutting edge in this
area Conradt said.
Conradt stressed his appreciation
for Swain's visit. "We were very
pleased to have her here and I know
she was pleased to be here
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209-B S.Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
I
yooy �hy rvw
' KEN BONFIELD - finger
Wednesday, March 29 � 1:30 - 3:00 PM � In Fro
Co-Sponsored By ECU Dining Services and
We're
More
Than
Barefoot!
For More Information,
Call me
Student Union Hotline
at 328-6004.
arroil JJashieii ana btudents
from tke School
Wednesday, Marck 29l?95at
Room 244 � Mendenkall Student Center
FREEH!
All films start at 8:00 PM
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to
Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed)
with valid ECU ID.
"A FANTASTICSEXY THRILLER
�Pot CoOmi, WWOI-tV
JulUJlnL
Sl5B.
Thursday, March 30 � Friday, March 31 � Saturday, April 1
CULTURAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE, ECU NATIVE AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION, & WOMEN'S STUDIES PRESENT:
STACY KABOT
TUESDAY, APRIL 18 � 8:00 PM � HENDRIX THEATRE
SHARON BURCH
SATURDAY, APRIL HI � 2:30 - 4:00 PM
POWWOWATTHE BASE OF THE HILL
f. �vv
MICHAEL BRAMWELL
JbundvgjJo tA& Seconds ffilej?siusn
Exhibition
Friday, March 24 - Friday, April 14 � Mendenhall GaUery





Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
Staying in school may cost some students
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
ECU is making efforts to inform
students on the penalties that oc-
cur when they stay in school too
long.
"We're interested in students
being on top of those policies that
the legislators are passing that af-
fect them so that they can be wise
users of the resources that are avail-
able said Dr. Dorothy Muller, dean
of undergraduate studies.
In 1993 the North Carolina Leg-
islature mandated that students who
take more than 140 credit hours will
be charged an additional 25 percent
in tuition fees.
"For instate students - that's
an amount, it's not nearly so scary
as for out-of-state students said
Muller.
ECU administrators have tried
to make this clear to students by dis-
tributing pamphlets to faculty mem-
bers, printing an ad in last
Thursday's The East Carolinian,
and mentioning the subject during
freshman orientations.
Last falls transfer and freshman
student will be the first to be ef-
fected by this new legislation, said
Caroline Ayers of the Academic Af-
fairs office.
"We spent some time in each
of the orientation sessions this past
summer.mentioning it to
studentsthat we're trying to make
sure that they haven't forgotten
Muller said. "We want them to avoid
having a monetary addition to their
tuition
Courses that are dropped, failed
or transferred also count, with the
exception of 98 or more transfer
hours. Transfer students must take
thirty hours from ECU and there-
fore only 98 transfer hours apply,
Muller said.
"For freshman though, they
won't feel the affect until they've
reached the 140, so the first people
who will feel the effect of the sur-
, charge are the transfer students
Muller said. "Hopefully we can do a
good job in helping them review
their records and make the best use
of their time
AP courses taken in high school,
higher placements such as in foreign
languages or mathematics and other
special courses are exempt from the
surcharge, as well as summer school.
"And courses taken at a UNC-sys-
tem school during the summer don't
count summer school at East
Carulina or any of our sister institu-
tions in the UNC-system do not
count Muller said. emphasize
UNC-system schools because right
now the law states that if that stu-
dent went to a private college or
to a community college, those hours
would count
Students attempting to earn a
second undergraduate degree will be
liable for additional charges after 110
percent of their additional required
hours have been exceeded.
"Their purpose, was not to be
punitive; they are trying to encour-
age students to graduate in four
years Muller said. "One of the nice
things is that if the student does
graduate in tour years it doesn't mat-
ter how many hours the student has
Muller said the legislature is try-
ing to keep students from staying in
school longer in order to cut costs.
The state of North Carolina pays
$6,542 for each in-state student per
year in supplementing education.
"Even though you pay tuition,
we are still a state supported school
and they provide a lot of finding and
a great deal of tuition assistance
Another mandate set forth by
the legislature is a requirement that
students average 15 hours per semes-
ter by '97, Ayers said.
"This mandate says that we
should have our students averaging
at least 15, we don't average that
right now Muller said.
"Our average course load in
1993 was 14.85 hours per student
they're looking at the average
course load for full-time students
VJ A from page 1
senate meetings to SGA Vice Presi-
dent Sheila Boswell and that he
serves only on the Course Drop Ap-
peals Committee. He said the com-
mittee met three times: the first
time Eastman was not on the com-
mittee, he attended the second
meeting and the third meeting was
held during Christmas vacation and
he was therefore unable to attend.
Eastman said Treasurer
Michael Carnes was delegated to
the Parking and Traffic Committee,
and Eastman took over after the
vote to increase parking sticker
prices was passed.
Eastman has filed a complaint
against Stubbs for publishing mis-
leading and untrue information.
Stubbs will face the honor board
this week, a board she believes is
biased because Eastman appointed
some of the students who will hear
her case.
Eastman said that is untrue, he
said he only appointed the attor-
ney general to her position after a
recommendation from advisor Dr.
Ronald Speier, dean of students
and other positive recommenda-
tions.
"I don't want to be associated
with any negative campaigning
Eastman said. "We run on issues,
not negativity
As president of SGA, Eastman
has installed a tuition payment
plan, deducted $11 from student
fee increases, helped to determine
high risk areas for the installation
VANDAL from page 1
"I heard nothing he said.
Simpson discovered a campus po-
lice officer in the building who told
him what had occurred. Simpson
said the holes appeared to have
been from a gun.
"It looked like three 22-caliber
bullets Simpson said. The ECU po-
lice handled the incident.
According to the ECU police re-
port, one white marble was discov-
ered under a bush on the North
side of the Willis building.
"I believe that this was done
by someone using a slingshot dis-
charging white marbles reported
Lawrence W. Watson, officer on
duty.
Damage was estimated at
$400. The window was repaired
Monday afternoon.
Greenville Police Public Rela-
tions Officer William Harris said
the report of the incidents had not
reached the investigations division
by press time.
Harris said there were no leads
in the case, but he did not think a
gun was the weapon used.
"It does not appear toJve
been a gun Harris t�id. �
According to an employee in
the records division, the only re-
ported Greenville merchants shot
at were Sub Stationll and Dominos
pizza.
of 40 new lights across campus and
established 24-hour study halls
during exam week.
Three new air-conditioned
buses have been purchased by the
transit board which is run by SGA
and a new bus route, the red line,
has been added to the medical
school without raising student fees,
Eastman said.
Eastman said SGA has also
added hundreds of bike spaces
across campus and has established
110 commuter parking spaces
around the new recreation center.
PLAYERS CLUB
A P A R T M E- N T S
THE PLACE TO PLAY
ECU
Get Your
Spot
'�Soon
l52Mharlcs Blul.
Across 1 join Minucs'
20 DISCOUNT FOR
STUDENTS
UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
DRIVE-THRU. WE'RE EAT5ER TO SERVE
AND WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS.
IScott't @le4teu
3 LOCATIONS!
111 W. TENTH STREET
300 SW GREENVILLE BLVD.
FIFTH STREET
If re-elected, Eastman is pro-
posing a campus wide vote for stu-
dents to express their views to
Eastman. He said he would take
those ideas to the board of trust-
ees and he wants to have the re-
sults of faculty surveys published
and distributed during registration.
Stubbs said the people she has
met in UNCASG have taught her a
lot and given her a lot of ideas for
ECU. She said she will try to get
involved with extending visitation
hours in the residence halls.
Eastman said the same.
Stubbs is concerned with try-
ing to improve interest in SGA and
student involvement. She said if
elected, she would try to get SGA
members more involved in the ex-
ternal processes of student govern-
ment. She also wants to improve
public relations between the legis-
lature and the campus.
Students must present a valid
identification card to vote at
tomorrow's elections. Among the
poll sites will be Joyner Library, the
Student Stores, General Classroom
and the bottom of College Hill.
wmmmmmmm
WHALE from page 1
pilot whale stuck in a shallow hole in
the tidal wash. The hole was formed
by the receding tide slowly washing
the sand away from under its body.
"The hole was about half a foot
deepwe couldn't just slide her out
with a big wave Spurgeon says. No
one was sure what to do, and the
ranger thought of the idea to roll it
over out of the hole.
"We had to roll
her a complete roll
so we didn't leave
her upside down on
her blowhole, so
she could breathe
Spurgeon says.
There were
two big problems
with moving the
whale beyond its
sheer size. First, the
gray and white
whale had a very
slick skin texture.
Secondly, her prone
position offered
little to grip.
"No one knew if they were going
to hurt the whaleor how to grab it
Spurgeon recalls.
"wp mostly got the guys and a
couple girls Spurgeon says. The
campers waited for big waves to wash
in for some buoyancy, and after five
unsuccessful tries, they rolled it out
of the hole.
"The first roll was just incredibly
hard, but once out, on the second half
of the roll, she'd be coming around
and you could grab her dorsal fin and
side flippers said Spurgeon.
Everyone then joined in to keep
the whale rolling. The campers would
wait for the right waves, roll her a few
times and stop, then wait again. Waves
broke on the whale constantly, and
some people helped keep her steady,
while others rubbed her to keep her
wet and calm.
According to Spurgeon, she
seemed passive, as if she knew they
were helping her; however, she would
dangerously flap her tail in occasional
bursts of energy.
Once the group reached knee
deep water, it wasn't necessary for all
"We saw her come
up and blow air a
couple times then
she disappeared.
Right before she
took off, she was
almost gasping for
air.
Spurgeon
10 campers to participate, and some
came ashore. With the water depth,
the whale could be more easily slid
across the bottom. Crashing waves
pushed the whale back, but the camp-
ers countered it
"We were edging her out real
slow, it took forever says Spurgeon.
"We got her to a point where her body
ran parallel to the beach - she wasn't
�, pointed to the deep
water In thigh-
deep water, she
was able to kick off
with her tail; how-
ever, she was disori-
ented.
Spurgeon was
chest-deep, directly
over top of the
whale, when he
was shot in the face
point-blank with a
burst of air from
M her blowhole. "I
saw directly inside
of it It was a slit
that opened fully
into a square shape, and it was all pink
inside like somebody's mouth
In the final stage of the rescue,
only Spurgeon and Ashley Bames
were guiding the whale, in an attempt
to direct her towards deep water. They
pushed her nose toward the deep, and
eventually she lunged out in one great
fluid movement
"We saw her come up and blow
air a couple times then she disap-
peared. Right before she took off, she
was almost gasping for air said
Spurgeon.
Back on the beach, the campers
were ecstatic, yelling "Free Willy and
making jokes. "There was a whole lot
of emotion there. I'll probably never
have a chance to do something like
that again. We totally saved that
whale's life
The whole rescue is estimated by
Spurgeon to be 15 to 25 minutes. "It
seemed like an eternity
Those campers involved with
the saving of the whale are: Rob
Spurgeon, Ashley Bames, Joanna
Clark, Chris Whitaker, Herb
Zimmerman, Dora Faircloth, Mike
Counselman, Michelle Dzendzel, Jeff
Jackson and Christine Tyndall. "We
all had to de-individualize and work
together as a unit Spurgeon s?ys.
The Adventure Program camp-
ingcanoe trip to Hammock's Beach
began in Swansboro on March 18.
Departing from there, the students
canoed two hours through a shallow
salt marsh on a designated trail tak-
ing them across the Intercoastal Wa-
terway to Bear Island.
Once on the deserted barrier is-
land off the coast they hiked to their
campsite and enjoyed the run of the
island. "It is the most beautiful sun-
set in North Carolina. There are three
and a half miles of endless beach, and
the island is ours for the weekend
The group was led by Spurgeon
and Chuck Stutts, senior Recreation
and Leisure Services majors.
Spurgeon has worked with Recreation
Services for two years as a
windsurfing instructor and group co-
leader. Stutts previously worked on
Bear Island as a maintenance super-
intendent
Upcoming trips offered by the
Adventure Program include
windsurfing, rock climbing, canoeing
and backpacking. There are two a
month, and some summer programs
will be available.
News
Writers
needed fo
summer!
Also accepting
applications for
Assistant Newt
Editor.
Apply now at
Student Pubs,
rtdg.
Hastings
PIRATE
BATTALION, ARMY ROTC 5 JV RUN
Saturday, April 1,1995,11:00am
Greenville Hilton Inn
Greenville, NC
rt?EiSlirjj
�SaE2
Name
Address
City
-State
Registration begins 9:30am. Races commence at 11:00am.
$10 individuals, $25 corporate team, $75 military team.
Sex: M�FDate of Birth��
Team:) Corporate) Military
Zip
Daytime Phone�- �T-shirt
Are you ECU facultystaffstudentalumni (circle)
Social Security � - � - � Year Grad
� Team name:
size:MLXL
.Dept.
ALL PARTICIPANTS WILL BE REQUIRED TO SIGN A WAIVER ON RACE DAY. PARTICIPANTS UNDER
THE AGE OF 18 WILL REQUIRE A PARENT OR GUARDIAN SIGNATURE. ALL CORPORATE AND MILI-
TARY TEAM REGISTRATION FORMS MUST BE MAILED IN TOGETHER WITH TEAM MEMBER AND
CORPORATE MILITARY TEAM NAMt FILLED IN.
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: ARMY CADET ASSOCIATION. DROP FORM & FEE AT THE ARMY ROTC
OFFICE, 346 RAWL BLDG. BY 31 MARCH 1995. FOR MORE INFO. CALL 328-6974.
, i.





Tuesday, March 28,1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
With Mike Tyson free from jail on Saturday after serving a
four year sentence for raping Ms. Black America contestant,
Desiree Washington, both boxing fans and sports enthusiasts
will await his first prize fight
Obviously in great physical condition, Tyson will make his
comeback with his former manager, Don King. However, we
atT�C believe that in one fight, he will accrue more money
than all of the department chairs' salaries at ECU combined,
and that is preposterous.
We ztTEC believe that too many of the today's athletes are
asking for too much money to compete in sports which ath-
letes 20 years ago (sorry auto racing) were never able to accrue
more than a million dollars a year.
It is unfair to those in the job fields of education and ad-
ministration (our professors, chancellors, etc.) who do not re-
ceive such extraordinary salaries, because they are the people
who build our futures and mold us as independent thinkers in
a democratic society.
The fact is tfyat Tyson will face one formidable opponent,
after being released, and will make any easy $100 million or
more in his first fight What does that say about America and
our commitment to education?
Our university, especially with the rocky split of the com-
munication department a year ago, seems to regularlly present
a school permeated with innertension. The need to advance
our school as a formidable institution in the state of North
Carolina has always been a goal and a commitment of our ad-
ministration. But with a limited budget compared to Carolina
or State, money allocated for different departments has lately
turned into a struggle. Take into account the salaries of both
professors and the administration, many will never amass the
amount of money a baseball player nets in a year (except if he is
on strike, of course).
There has to be some sort of middle ground, where if Mike
Tyson pummels his first opponent in the first round of his first
match back, he should receive only 40 percent of his earnings
while the other 60 goes toward education.
Yes, an education. An education that he didn't have as he
was growing up, because maybe education would have prevented
Tyson from ever being in that situation with Miss Washington
in the first place.
But why are America's athletes asking for so much cash to
line their pockets? Do they really deserve it? It is definitely
hard to analyze because each sport has different stakes, and
the difference remains in each sport's average career.
Understandably, for the amount of punishment that a foot-
ball player receives compared to the mechanics of an average
baseball player, there should be no comparison for a pay scale.
First of all, the money rewarded to people involved in foot-
ball should be far greater because of the shorter career span
(four years), while baseball players can play forever (i.e. Nolan
Ryan).
Unfortunately, sports salaries far exceed there total limit in
all sports. The money should go to those people that educated
the Deion Sanders of the world.
We as students should be thankful for our professors, be-
cause we will be in their position someday (if not already) as we'
will have the ability to shape minds and sculpt free thinkers.
Mike Tyson is a
convicted rapist
who makes
millions of
dollars in the
blink of an eye
(or the
blackening of
an eye ). But
what about the
champions of
the education
field, who are
the true role
models? They
work for their
money, but that
money is
scarce, and not
comparable to
athletes' bank
accounts!
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor.
Holding the office of Student
Body President is an experience like
no other you could hope to have as
a student One day you are going to
classes like everyone else, the next
day you are elected to office, handed
a salary, an office, and thrown into a
whirlwind of speeches, meetings, pub-
lic appearances, and big decisions that
will affect the whole university.
You can easily be overwhelmed
by these responsibilities and the en-
joyable perks;however, one can de-
velop a false feeling of self-importance.
As a responsiblePresident, you must
do your best to serve the student body
and then move on. It can be quite
tempting when you are on top to want
a second term, but you must show
the maturity of the leaders before you,
and realize you would only be serv-
ing yourself anddenying some other
capable students, This is a rare honor
which they have only four years to
strive for.
No matter what excuse you may
consider running for another term,
the next president can carry on your
agenda, just as effectively. The real
reason can only lead back to you
and not the student body.
That is why we now call upon
you, Ian Eastman, to show the
same deference which was passed
along on your behalf. Step aside,
concentrate on eventually graduat-
ing, and allow the presidency to serve
the students of this university. Be
remembered as another president
who did his job, and not one who
was so self-involved he couldn't
let go.
- Scott Thomas, SGA president
'8788; Tripp Roakes, SGA president
'8990; Allen Thomas, SGA president
'9091; Alex Martin, SGA president
'91'92; Courtney Jones, SGA presi-
dent '9293; Keith Dyer, SGA presi-
dent '9394
To the Editor:
The time has come for the stu-
dent body of ECU to elect an SGA
President I was fortunate enough to
have served as SGA Speaker and on
various committees within student
government and over the years 1
worked with many outstanding SGA
Presidents, people like Tripp Roakes,
Allen Thomas, Alex Martin, Courtney
Jones, and Keith Dyer. I also knew
Ian Eastman.
Mr. Eastman has one, and only
one, reason for wanting to be SGA
President himself! He will say any-
thing to get elected and make prom-
ises he knows he can't keep to get
your vote. It's not about helping you
and I, the students of ECU, it's about
helping himself.
As IFC President Mr. Eastman
drove that organization into finan-
cial debt and SGA (your money) had
to bail him out I was SGA Appro-
priations Chairman when this hap-
pened, so I know. As SGA President
he has abused his position, using
SGA funds (your money), to buy a
laptop computer, pager, and other
perks.
As a former SGA member I am
appalled that Ian would even have
the nerve to ask the students of ECU
to re-elect him after he has grossly
misused the position of SGA Presi-
dent. There is only one thing you can
count on about Ian Eastman, he will
always lookout for himself first any-
one that has known him for any
length of time will tell you that.
Brynn Thomas
SGA Speaker 1993-1994
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Printed on
-reeycW -�;
Stephanie B. Lassrter, News Editor
Tambra Zlon, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Jack Skinner, Photographer
Randall Roiiell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Patrick Irelan, Photographer
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Ail letters must be signed. Letters should
be addressed to Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353 For information, call (919)
328-6366.
m
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Congratulations to Janet Stubbs!
In her campaign for SGA President
she has succeeded in mimicking the
pitiful, dirty world of actual politics.
In a weak attempt to dethrone and
discredit a president who has accom-
plished more than the last 3 SGA
presidents combined, Janet has side-
stepped all issues, viciously attacked
her opponent with false propaganda,
and while working so hard on this ill-
tempered campaign, she has neglected
many duties she is responsible for.
For her campaign, she has made
several promises: 1. An ECU TV sta-
tion; there is a station now. in its sec-
ond season. 2. Council of Student
Organizations; we already have one,
in the office of leadership develop-
ment 3. Textbook rental program; an
issue candidates have run on (and
failed) in the past. Due to the
Umstead Act, it is not legal to have
such a system. I guess Janet is just
misinformed.
Janet also is attempting to mis-
inform the student body. She is mak-
ing accusations that the current SGA
President hasn't done anything posi-
tive since taking office. Thanks to Ian
Eastman, the current SGA President
we now have 24 hour computer labs
during exams, and tuition payment
plan. He serves on committees such
as the Athletic Director Search Com-
mittee. He is also the only SGA Presi-
dent to succeed in lowering student
fees.
Ian Eastman has proven himself.
Janet says she will work hard for us.
Can we believe her? I think not. She
serves as Panhellenic Rush Chairper-
son. She, being in charge of rush,
missed a workshop she was supposed
to direct, leaving all in attendance
hanging! Why? She was to busy work-
ing on her campaign. Janet also
serves as SGA Student Welfare Chair-
person. This should be by far the
most active committee on campus.
Have you heard of any bills passed
or reports from this committee
lately? I don't think so.
Janet is too busy trying to com-
pensate for her lack of ability by talk-
ing negatively about a president who
has done, and will continue to do,
more positive things than she can
imagine.
Scott Gibson
Senior
Environmental Health
To the Editor:
I am writing in regard to the
campaign for the SGA Presidency.
The Student Government Association
has done a fine job during the past
academic year under the leadership
of President Ian Eastman. In the past
year, 1 have seen a greater change in
policy of this institution as a direct
result of Eastman's leadership than
in any of my two previous years as a
student. In the past it seems that the
SGA has been a body all unto itself,
separated from the university and its
students. During this past year I have
seen a greater deal of student involve-
ment in the SGA and the campus as
a whole. Ian has changed ECU Stu-
dent Government to serve the needs
of its students. Hardly a week goes
by in which I don't read an article in
The East Carolinian that contains
some change in University policy as
a direct result of the SGA and Ian's
leadership. Several examples include
the change in tuition payment that
allows us to pay monthly, an increase
in funding for the fin arts organiza-
tions (Marching Pirates, Gospel
Choir, ECU Playhouse and The Gray
Art Gallery) and improvements in
campus security.
The choice is now ours. In a few
weeks, we will have to select the
course of this institution's future. Do
we revert to the SGA of old, or do
we keep the school in its present
course towards excellence. The
choice is easy. Ian Eastman has
charted this new course and we
would do well to entrust his leader-
ship for another year.
J. Scott Leandro
Junior
Political Science
To the Editor:
The purpose of this letter is to
provide Ian Eastman with my full sup-
port in his bid for reelection as SCA
President. Mr. Eastman is a proven
leader who has taken on everyone -
including the administration - in his
efforts to enrich the campus life for
all students at East Carolina Univer-
sity.
He has many accomplishments
from his first year as President that
have improved the college experience
for us all. Under Mr. Eastman's di-
rection, we now have a medium that
will allow us to pay our tuition bills
on a monthly payment schedule. This
option will be available to the stu-
dent body beginning next fall, and
will reduce the headache of being
required to pay for our education all
at once.
He has also made being a stu-
dent less costly. During this academic
year, Mr. Eastman facilitated a reduc-
tion in student fees by 19, saving
students over $171,000. At a time
when the trend is to increase student
fees to underwrite university
projects, we need someone to lead
us who has our best interests at
heart, and has a proven track record
in this area.
Another success of Mr.
Eastman's term has been the estab-
lishment of 24-Hour Study Areas
during exams. Currently, Mr.
Eastman is also pushing the concept
of 24-Hour Computer Labs during
the last two weeks of every semes-
ter. These innovations to student life
will allow students the opportunity
to fulfill their academic needs while
meeting their other responsibilities.
In addition, Mr. Eastman has
given his full support to graduate stu-
dents. He fully understands the dif-
ferences between undergraduate and
graduate education, and has been
equally supportive of both. He is very
attentive and attuned to the needs of
all students here at East Carolina Uni-
versity, and progressively attempts to
improve this campus with his efforts.
In conclusion, we would be miss-
ing out on a lot if we did not reelect
Ian Eastman as our SGA President
He has proven to the student body
that his proposed policies are in best
interests. He has fought against tu-
ition and student fees increase as well
as increases in parking permit costs.
The students of East Carolina Univer-
sity need the leadership and vision
that Ian Eastman brings to the SGA
Presidency, and we should support
him in his efforts to be reelected.
Shaw D. West
Graduate Student Body President
To the Editor:
I am writing to support the nomi-
nation of Penn Crawford for SGA Trea-
surer. I have had the experience to
witness Mr. Crawford's dedication of
several fronts including the SGA, and
I believe that his dedication is what is
needed to fulfill the responsibilities
of the SGA Treasurer.
Mr. Crawford has served both as
Secretary and as a legislator for the
SGA where he served more than ably
on the Appropriations Committee.
Experience is no stranger to him, and
he is known for his fiscal conserva-
tism. More importantly, Mr. Crawford
has shown time and again that he will
fight for the best interests of his fel-
low students.
Earlier this semester, Mr.
Crawford left for Raleigh in the wee
hours of the morning to protest the
General Assembly's efforts to raise
tuition while the other candidates for
Treasurer remained in Greenville.
This episode is a clear example of his
commitment to the students of East
Carolina University. Also, in order to
provide students with some protec-
tion from increasing college ex-
penses, he wants to piace caps on
student fees.
In conclusion, Mr. Crawford has
shown that he is an ally of the un-
dergraduate student, but clearly un-
derstands the value of graduate stu-
dents to the diversity of this campus.
He is not a resume politician, and
firmly believes in his ideas and opin-
ions. It is rewarding to know that we
have a fresh face with fresh ideas
with which to lead the students of
East Carolina University into the fu-
ture. We can all look forward to the
day Penn Crawford is elected as our
SGA Treasurer.
Shawn D. West
Graduate Student Body President
'�
To the Editor:
As last year's Panhellenic Presi-
dent I have had the opportunity
to work with many campus leaders.
I have learned to respect individu-
als such as Janet Stubbs and
Maureen McKenna who sacrifice
their time and efforts in service to
the school and fellow students.
I have been involved with Janet
Stubbs in many aspects of campus
life, and can say that she has a
genuine concern for the students
of this institution. She is currently
Junior Class President. Co-Chair of
the Student Welfare Committee,
and Rush Chair for Panhellenic.
Janet has been elected to many
leadership positions, therefore it is
obvious that I am not the only per-
son who shows confidence in her
abilities.
Maureen McKenna is currently
Junior Class Vice-President, Co-
Chair of the Student Welfare Com-
mittee, involved in many Honor Fra-
ternities, and is now my successor
as Panhellenic President. She has
already showed initiative in leading
our organization in a responsible
and professional manner. She is an
excellent example of student and
leader and is definitely a person
that I would trust in controlling a
budget as large as the SGA's.
I have confidence in Janet and
Maureen not because of what I have
heard, but what I have seen. If you
take the time to read Janet and
Maureen's "Agenda for Change
the first words you will see are, "No
PromisesJust Progress
I strongly encourage you to
Vote JANET STUBRS for SGA Presi-
dent and MAUREEN MCKENNA for
SGA Treasurer!
Tiffany Ferretti
Panhellenic President
"j- "� mi" �� ���� i ii y ��
mmm





f�
Tuesday, March 28,1995
The East Carolinian
The Best Way To Save Money
On Stuff (Other Than Borrowing
YOUY ROOfflHidte S.) Roommates tend to get a little
weird when you borrow their stuff. (They're funny like that.) Better to get
yourself a MasterCard� card. Then you could use it to
buy the things you really want. And with these
College MasterValues� coupons, you'll save up to 40. And until you get your
own place, it's the smartest thing you can do. Roommates are weird enough
as it is. MasterCard. It's more than a credit card. It's smart money
MasterCard
L
k
VNNfff SPOKTS
FREE Pair of Shorts (A $23 Value)
Run away with savings and our shorts, too. Receive
a FREE pair of shorts (a 23 value), when you pur-
chase 65 or more on your next catalog order and
use your MasterCard'card. Call 1-800-551-5558
for a free catalog or to place an order. Mention offer
RRP-0720.
Offer valid 21 95 to 531 95. Offe. valid
on purchases using a MasterCard card. Coupon
cannot be combined with any other discounts,
points or oners. One free pair of shorts
per customer.
only COLLEGE
AfetaV'
r
jjEjjg EXPRESS
Save 40
Join the cluband save 40 off the 25, three-year mem-
bership fee when you use your MasterCard card. Enjoy
discounts of up to 50 on contact lenses, glasses, designer
sunglasses and much more at "America's 1 Vision Care
Service For more details, call 1-800-USA-LENS and
mention offer 101.
Offer and coupon valid 2195 to 53195.
Offer valid only on purchases using a
MasterCard card. Offer void where
prohibited by law.
7iu"C
Save $2 Off A CD Or Cassette
Here's music to your earssave J2 on one CD or cassette
priced 8.99 or more when you use your MasterCard' card.
One 2 discount per coupon.
COUPON 493
Offer and coupon valid 21 95 to 53195 Offer valid only on purchases using a
MasterCard card. Cash redemption value 120 Offer void where prohibited, taxed
or restricted. Coupon may not be combined with
any other discount. Limit one CD or cassette per
order. Exclude sale merchandise.
Offer Not Valid Without This Coupon
r-
SAVE 15 ON YOUR NEXT
PURCHASE OF $75 OR MORE
Shopping is easy at America's premier specialty retailer of gift, fit-
ness, recreational, travel, apparel and more. Use your MasterCard
card and save 15 on a purchase of 75 or more when you shop
at any one of our 70 store locations or by mail order. Call 1-800-
344-4444, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to find the store nearest
you or for a FREE catalog.
Oder valid 2195 to 53195 Offer valid only on purchases using a MasterCard
card. Offer not valid on certain purchases. May not be combined with Frequent
' �" Program. Price Matching Policy, auction purchases, or other discounts or
Bayers
promotions. Not valid on purchase of gift certificates or on
previous purchases. The discount is applicable to. and the
minimum purchase based on merchandise prices only, and
excludes tax, shipping and tax on shipping.
Coupon Required. POS CODE: H
SAVE 25 ON THE BEATLES'
GREATEST HITS ON CD
Choose either the Red album, with hits from 1962 to 1966
(26 hits including: A Hard Day's Night, Ticket To Ride
and Help) or the Blue album, 1967 to 1970 (28 hits including:
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, All You Need Is
Love, and Revolution). Buy one 2-CD set for 25.98 (a 31.98
value) or get the pair of CD sets for M7.98. To order call
1-800-313-3323.
Offer valid 2195 to 53195. Offer vahJ only on purchases
using a MasterCard card Offer may not be combined with
any other offer or discount. Shipping and handling additional.
(J3.50 per address in the U.S.A.) Please add applicable sales
rax. Offer void where prohibited.
AfcterV
for a change
Save 15 On Your Next Purchase
Your dorm or apartment could use a few changes. You could
use a good deal. Pier 1 can supply both. We'll take 15 off
your total purchase of all regular price items, from colorful
pillows to tun framed art. All the supplies school calls for, plus
15 off when you use your MasterCard card at Pier 1.
Offer and coupon valid 2195 to 53195. Offer valid only on purchases using a
MasterCard card. Offer valid on regular priced merchandise only, excludes clearance and
sale items, delivery and other service charges. Coupon must be redeemed at the time of
purchase. Offer does not apply to prior purchases and cannot be used to purchase Gift
Certificates. Coupon is not vahd in combination with
any other coupon or discount. Coupon is valid at all
Pier 1 company scores and participant franchise stores.
Coupon 446.
Offer Not Valid Without This Coupon.
VcOOltf ROSE"
SAVE UP TO 25
Show the special people in your life how much you care!
Save 20 on all floral arrangements and gift baskets of 28.45
or more, and get 25 off a dozen roses when you use your
MasterCard card. Call 1 -800-THE-ROSE before 1pm and
have your special gift delivered the same day!
Offer valid 2195 to 53195. Offer valid only on purchases using a MasterCard
card. Offer valid on products priced $28.45 or more.
Applicable sales tax and service charges are additional.
Coupon is not valid with any oth special offer or
discount. Offer valid only on deliveries within the
Continental United States Sunday deliver.
no. guaranteed AfeuSrV?'
cUb
MOTOPHOTO
50 Off Film Developing
Hold on to the good times and your money, too.
MotoPhotothe best place for better pictures guaranteed!
Take 50 off the regular price of processing and printing when
you use your MasterCard card. Call 1-800-733-6686 for the
location nearest you. Limit 1.
Offer and coupon valid 2195 to 53195. Cash redempoon value 120. Offer vahd
only on purchases using a MasterCard card. Limit one coupon per customer.
Cannot be combined with any other offers. Offer valid
on C-41process. 35 mm film, and standard sue prints
only. Offer valid at participating stores only
Offer Not Valid Without This Coupon
lfeterVc�
RTCARVED
Coil�g� J�w�lry
1
SAVE UP TO $120
Your college ring, from ArtCarved, is a keepsake
you'll always treasure. Save $30 on 10K gold, $60
on 14K gold or $120 on 18K gold. Call 1-800-
952-7002 for more details.
Offer valid 21 95 to 53195. Offer vahd only on purchases using
a MasterCard card. Coupon may not be
combined with any other coupon or discount.
Offer does not apply to shipping and handling
Limit one order per person. Some limitations
may apply.
r i m �
A R N � R
rW(5
GET ONE VIDEO FREE .
WHEN YOU BUY THREE
Video values just for you! Enjoy a full selection of top-quality
videos at discount prices. All videos are priced at 9.95 or less
and are 100 satisfaction guaranteed. Act now and get one
video FREE when you buy three and use your MasterCard
card. Call 1-800-862-7100 for your FREE catalog and ask for
the COLLEGE MasterValues offer.
Offer valid 2195 to 53195. Offer valid only on purchases
using a MasterCard card. Offer may not be combined with any
other offer ot discount. Offer valid for U.S. residents only.
Void where prohibited.
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL.
49 Off A Special
12-Week Subscription
Invest in your future and stay on tcp of current devel-
opments with The Wall Street Journal For a limited
time only, pay just 23 for a 12-week subscription
to the nation's leading business publication. To take
advantage of this special offer, call 1-800-348-3355
and please refer to source key 75NE.
Offer vahd 2195 to 53195. Offer valid
only on purchases using a MasterCard card.
H Carnival.
THE moot ma mm UNE IN THE WORLD.
CRUISE AND SAVE, PLUS RECEIVE A
FREE FANNY PACK
Cruise the "Fun Ships"and save up to $400 per cabin on
3- or 4-day cruises when you use your MasterCard card.
Cruise for as little as $299 per person. 3rd and 4th passengers
cruise FREE! Call 1-800-352-3454 tor information and
bookings. West Coast callers dial: 1-800-633-0220.
Ask for COLLEGE MasterValues" Savings! Offer valid on selected sailings through 1995.
holiday blackouts apply. Must book by 53195. Ofier valid only on purchases using a
MasterCard" card. Rates are per person, double occupancy, cruise-only with air add-ons
available. Port chargesfees and taxes are additional
Offer subject to availability and not combinable with
any other discount Ship's Registry Liberia, Bahamas
�Double-zipper nylon "parachute" pack with black
adjustable warn snap fefSutf
t 'WAtulrrfjnf Inlrmmmjl limJiporalM
fo6
OH
liivn
S .
bo.z
taab
�sf
aVS.1
�nst
wot

sn
"W
Mmuimmmm





Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
yinc
Oscars drop in ratings
The annual award
show gets smaller
ratings each year.
LOS ANGELES AP) - Ah.
March, when Hollywood's fancy
turns to thoughts of self-love.
The month that opened with
the Grammys and closed with last
night's Oscars has become an
awards orgy, with no sub-group too
humble to shower itself with statu-
ettes, trophies, plaques and obe-
lisks.
The screenwriters, directors
and producers each had their glitzy
galas this month. So did the film
editors - not to be confused with
the cinema editors, who also had
awards.
Also honored this month:
youth in film, lifetime achievement
in film, independent film. Western
film and film promotion. There was
even a ceremony for entertainment
figures who helped advance animal
issues.
Does anyone actually care
about the more than 60 awards
shows throughout the year? And
does anyone actually win besides
Tom Hanks?
"I think the strain is showing
now. People just aren't that inter-
ested said Mark Crispin Miller, au-
thor of the bock Seeing through
Movies.
"There's a certain hollowness
to the whole process
Even insiders acknowledge the
field is getting overcrowded.
"The shows themselves begin
to cheapen each other said Hal
Kanter. who has written for 26
Academy Awards shows.
The Academy folks turn up
their noses at the likes of the Soap
Opera Digest Awards, Premiere's
Readers Poll Awards, Digital Holly-
wood Awards and Television Movie
Awards, not to mention the
People's Choice Awards or the Sat-
urn Awards honoring science fic-
tion films.
Miller, a professor of media
studies at Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity, said declining public interest
has spurred an awards boom that
accelerated in the last 10 to 15
years.
"As people become more blase,
it becomes more and more impera-
tive to try to capture attention with
some new fuss or another he said.
"Anything to stoke the waning
mass interest, to even vaguely (stir)
interest for 10 seconds. Anything
to rev up the marketing machine.
It's very depressing
Kanter attributes the prolifera-
tion to a lack of imagination by in-
dustry executives seeking to boost
movie revenues. But he also thinks
the boom reflects a genuine public
appetite that is borne out by the
ultimate arbiter, television
viewership.
Ken Ehrlich, the producer of
14 Grammy shows, agrees.
"Stars do something most of
us can't, and the recognition they
get seems to touch something for
the people who are watching said
Ehrlich, who in June will produce
the first Blockbuster Entertain-
ment Awards honoring film, home
video and music.
"People really do like these
shows he said.
The producer of the Academy
Awards show, Gilbert Cates, said
television ratings will decide which
shows survive.
Cates' Oscars have delivered
healthy ratings recently, after with-
ering in the mid-1980s. Last year
the Oscars show was watched in
29.3 million households, the sec-
ond-best showing ever.
But television ratings compiled
by the A.C. Nielsen Co. show a
steep slide for both the Grammys
and the Emmys.
The Emmys' audience plunged
from 20.2 million homes in 1986
to 13.9 million last year. Viewership
nose-dived when the program
switched from NBC to newcomer
Fox in 1987.
Kanter. the Academy Awards
writer, feels that the TV audience
isn't going anywhere.
"Anything connected with Hol-
lywood he said, "people tune in
to sneer or to jeer
Bucke
1 Drop in the Bucket" is just
what it claims to be: a very tiny drop
in the great screaming bucket of
American media opinion. Take it as
you will.
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
1 call it label mania.
MPAA rating labels on films.
FDA labels on food.
Labels to warn and inform.
Labels designed to provide a pub-
lic service.
Labels, labels, labels.
Labels on movies serve the pur-
pose of informing parents about the
violence and pornography content of
a particular piece of art. But this la-
beling system has been abused. En-
tertainment Weekly recently ran a
scathing attack on the Motion Picture
Association of America (MPAA) Rat-
ings Board. The article pointed out that
a small coterie of stodgy elders rate
films based on their own puritan be-
liefs. A film must be sometimes cut to
avoid an NC-17 rating (the commercial
kiss of death for a film). Thus by caus-
ing re-editing, the board exerts outside
control on artistic expression. Too of-
ten the viewer cannot watch a film by
the way a director intended it to be
seen solely because the MPAA refused
to give the film an R rating.
Music labels nominally serve the
same purpose as film ratings, but mu-
sic labels serve less of a purpose than
movie ratings. How many parents ac-
tually buy music with their children?
Most parents never know if music has
offensive language or themes unless
they happen to hear it The labels rarely
get seen by parents, and the youth buy-
ing the record usually could care less
about the label. If the labels do any-
thing, they draw attention to a particu-
lar release. Why can't the music stand
alone without labeling it?
Even food now must be labeled
with clearer markings. I'm still not con-
vinced the majority of Americans have
benefited from these new labels, be-
cause most still don't know what the
difference between fat percentage by
grams or by calories actually means. I
will not go so far as to chastise the
FDA for their labels, but hasn't their
campaign gone to extremes? Aren't
there more fruitful ways to spend tax-
See BUCKET page 8
A defibrilator
awaits at Venter's
THE Crossword
Brandon Waddell
Staff Writer
�� -
ACROSS
1 Norse god
5 Rocky peak
9 City near Atlanta
14 Ponselle or
Bonheur
15 Funny Jay
16 Hole �
17 Satan
19 Events for
shoppers
20 One � miihon
21 Buys stocks eg
23 Old lang
24 Outdoor area for
socials
26 Fury
28 Biblical ending
29 Varieties of
speech
33'Fountain drinks
36 Gator s km
37 ERA eg
38 Pitcher
Hershiser
39 Express
gratitude
40 Forum wear
41 Gift of the �'
42 Chops down
43 Quite fat
44 Reproves
harshly
46 Sedan
47 Headliner
48 Indelder
52 Crony
54 Areas
57 Work by Keats
58 Nautical call
60 Baseball
62 Bmd again
63 Jason s ship
64 Angered
65 Inclination
66 Youthful suffix
67 Uncanny
DOWN
1 Distinguishing
feature
2 Smger Lena
3 Acting
award
4 Stadium cheer
5 Settle
conclusively
1 2 3 4:185 67"22 2691011a i13
14I1516
17251927
202130233132
24�"
"f1
333435r"
MJj"
41"495051
44
Ml"� 59I
S253"15556"
58to1
6263t
6S66P
�1995 Tribune Media Services. Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
6 Actor
Christopher
7 � Boleyn
8 Deities
9 Prayer book
10 TV actress Alicia
11 Tax or garbage
end
12 Draft status
13 Cozy home
18 Decrees
22 Train rail
25 Follower of
pragmatism
27 Hand motion
29 Sketches
30 Charged
particles
31 License and dog
32 Remain
33 Search carefully
34 verbal
35 Pass laws
36 Mrs Bono once
39 "� you go
again
43 Outdated
45 Took a sip
46 Johnny or Kit
48 Pianist-comic
Victor
49 Watered silk
50 Poisonous
snake
51 Indigent
52 Role
53 State firmly
55 Conversation
56 Ripped
59 Moral lapse
61 Hasten
Answers
to the
crossword
puzzle are
on page 8.
Around campus and the surround-
ing area there are 20 or 30 restaurants
for students to gorge on pizza and
burgers. There simply is no place in
Greenville to sit down and enjoy some
down-home food. It's
almost like we're in a
fast food jungle and
there is no way to es-
cape the perils of "Big
Macs" and combo
meals. If this is how
you have feel when de-
ciding on what to do
for breakfast or lunch
you haven't checked
out Venter's Grill. It's
a short five minute
drive from campus and it's just like eat-
ing at Grandma's, only Venter's won't
make you eat your brussels sprouts.
After pulling into the gravel park-
ing lot go inside, sit down and look
around. The first odd thing that will
strike you is that there are no menus.
Venter's cooks only a specified amount
of each item each day, and when it's
gone, it's gone. They have six chalk-
boards set up inside the dining room
and after around 2 p.m waitresses are
wiping items off the menu.
While sitting at your table, some-
thing else will catch your eye. On each
table, there is a Lazy Susan equipped
with condiments that most doctors
would not recommend: molasses, salt
and butter. As you spin the Lazy Susan
around to get some molasses for bis-
cuits, arteries begin to harden and a
coronary is perhaps on the way. But the
biscuits melt in your mouth and you
"As you get some
molasses, arteries
harden and a
coronary is
perhaps on the
way
don't care, because there is always time
to start eating right - tomorrow. Each
table is also provided with a pitcher of
sweet tea and a bucket of ice. If you
desire a soda of any kind, you have to
go outside and get one from the soda
machine. All ihis, and we haven't even
ordered lunch yet
There are iew places, especially in
Greenville, to get a
fantastic home-
cooked meal.
Venter's has the
market cornered.
The price is right
too. One meat two
vegetables, home-
made desserts, and
all the ice tea and
biscuits you can
binge on will onby
cost around 5 dol-
lars. For my review, I tried some items
on the menu I hadn't had before: bar-
becued pork chops, collard greens (with
plenty of vinegar), Mac ard cheese,
homemade banana pudding and, of
course, cheese biscuits with rr.olasses.
I say, "of course" because the only
day of the week I'll dine at Venter's is
the one day they bake cheese biscuits:
Friday. Everything I ate at Venter's was
simply fantastic. I just had to pace my-
self when the waitress brought out the
cheese biscuits because if I'm not care-
ful, I'll eat so many I can't finish my
meal.
Venter's also has no tolerance for
profanity. So don't go in thinking it's
like a bar downtown where no one cares
about foul language. Venter's will put
you out the door and ask you not to
come back. I only hope that never hap-
pens to me, because I don't ever want
to miss a "cheese biscuits" Friday.
Tunes at Noon
Photo Courtesy of ECU Student Union
Finger-style guitarist and folk singer Ken Bonfield will be playing tomorrow from 1:30 p.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Wright Place as part of the ECU Popular Entertainment Committee's Noon
Day Tunes series.
Shakespeare
comes to campus
Health
F. Y. I.
S. Seinlanguage, by Jerry
Seinfeld. ($5.99.)
� Observations on life's
pleasures and ordeals.
2. Disclousure, by Michael
Crichton. ($6.99.)
� Sexual harassment in a
West Coast electronics firm.
3. The Shipping News, by
�nnieProulx. ($12.00.)
� Reporter returns home
ifter his wife's death.
4. Homicidal Psycho Jungle
Cat, by Bill Watterson.
($12.95.)
� Calvin & Hobbes.
5. Chicken Soup for the
Soul, by J. Canfield and M.
Victor. ($12.00.)
� Stories for heart and
spirit.
6. Interview With the Vam-
pire, byAnne Rice. ($6.99.)
� The novel that launched
The Vampire Chronicles.
7. Wouldn't Take Nothing
for my Journey Now, by
Maya Angelou. ($5.50.)
� Essays.
8. The Vampire Lestat, by
Anne Rice. ($6.99.)
� Vampire turns rock star.
9. Embraced by the Light, by
B. Eadie with C. Taylor.
($5.99.)
� A woman's near-death
experience.
10. Little Women, by Louisa
May Alcott. ($5.50.)
� Story of a New England
family based on Alcott's life.
Sexual innuendo
marks the Bard's
Twelfth Night
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
"If you will laugh yourself into
stitches, follow me" - right to the
ECU Playhouse performance of Wil-
liam Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.
That line, spoken by the maid
Maria, barely does justice to
Twelfth Night. From be
ginning to end, this hi-
larious story will have
you rolling in the
aisles.
Twelfth Night
opens after a ship-
wreck has separated
Viola (Kelly Cates)
from her twin brother
Sebastian. Each of the
twins believes the other to be
dead. Viola is washed up on the
shore of Illvria, where she dresses
up as a man to gain employment as
a page to Duke Orsino (Justin
Allen).
The Duke is in love with Olivia
(Thea Mills), a lady of Illyria. He
sends Viola to Olivia with messages
of love. She does such an excellent
job of courting Olivia that the lady
falls in love with Viola instead of
the Duke. Meanwhile, Viola herself
has become enamored of the Duke.
As if this love tr ingle doesn't
provide enough amusement, there
is a second plot to Twelfth Night.
Malvolio (Ryan Cox). Olivia's arro-
gant steward, is disliked by the rest
of Olivia's servants. Her maid Maria
(Heather Melton), with the assis-
tance of Olivia's uncle, Sir Toby
Belch (Jeff Hirsch), devises a plan
to make Malvolio look like a fool
in front of the court. The two
schemers send Malvolio a love let-
ter supposedly from Olivia. The let-
ter instructs Malvolio to do certain
foolish things if he return's Olivia's
love, which he follows explicitly. His
odd behavior leads Olivia to believe
he is demented, and she has him
locked up.
Because Twelfth Night is a pe-
riod piece, the costumes and set are
sure to be a delight to see.
The set has been con-
structed on two lev-
Is, which makes for
an extremely inter-
esting stage pic-
ture. The cos-
tumes will un-
doubtedly catch
the eyes of the au-
dience. But the most
interesting part of the
show will undoubtedly be
the humor that lies in the script,
just waiting for the audience to pick
up on it.
Twelfth Night opens at 8 p.m.
this Thursday and will run through
Tuesday, April 4, with a matinee on
Sunday. Tickets are $4.50 for ECU
students with a valid ID and are on
sale now at the box office in
McGinnis Auditorium. So if you're
interested in an evening of classi-
cal Shakespeare, if you want to see
a brilliant piece of literature come
to life on the stage or if you simply
want to enjoy an evening of blatant
sexual innuendos and bawdy hu-
mor, buy your tickets now. Twelfth
Night has something for everyone.
John R. Smith
ECU School of Medicine
wmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmummmmm
You may have noticed over the
past couple of years mat most food
you buy in the grocery store has a
label called "Nutrition Facts The
label is a big help to consumers,
especially
those who
are on a low-
fat or low-
salt diet.
At the
top oi the la-
bel, there is a
line that
shows the to-
tal number
of calories
per serving
and the number of calories from fat
per serving. This gives you an idea
of how many fat calories are in your
food. Also, you can see how much
fat, cholesterol, salt, carbohydrates
(starch) and protein are in the food.
The numbers on the right-hand
side of the label are percentages of
the fat, cholesterol, salt, carbohy-
drates and protein that are in the
food, if you are eating the amount
of food people normally eat. Sugar
is listed, too.
I f
you
want
t o
learn
more
about
t h e
food
label and how you can use it to help
you eat better, ask your doctor or
call your local health department.
3
c
.
:3





Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
CD. Reviews
Annie Lennox
Medusa
Gregory Dickens
General Manager
You can judge a CD by its cover.
On the front of Annie Lennox's
debut solo work, Diva, Lennox is
decked out in carnival garb; sequins,
feathers, and coats of makeup that
nearly hide the singer from view. She
peers out from behind her headdress
looking stiff and solemn - understand-
able for a singer who is branching out
on her own after 11 years and seven
albulms as the face of the Eurythmics.
Her costume is analogous to the
heavy production that went into Diva,
a lush, smart, and beautiful CD that
proved Lennox wasn't merel the eye-
catching frontwoman while Dave
Stewart worked the keyboards and
produced their work.
Medusa, however sports a cover
with Lennox unclothed and with
much less cosmetic cover, smiling
slyly, but still with reservation,
through the fourth wall. It's a much
more relaxed facade than that oiDiva,
but. as is reflected in her 10 new
songs, it isn't a confident expression.
Medusa is a cover album, sadly
enough. Covers are a trend that even
the best of today's pop singers-Luther
Vandross, Gloria Estefan, Brian Ferry,
Sinatra (redoing his songs, again-
have succumbed to, and Lennox is
Offer your feliow students a
service they will always need.
OPPORTUNITY
You can help them publish
their career desires and
educational accomplishments
in front of over 25,000 of the
nation's largest employers.
BECOME A PARTNER!
We will help you start your own
business, representing Career Shop
to students searching for a career.
ifiREER
another who's been lured by sentimen-
tal motives to croon a few classics.
'Course, the potential commercial
success of a cover is enormous these
days, especially if it's revamped
enough to have a current sound or
rhythm applied to it. While Lennox
isn't relying on Stewart to bolster her
vocal talent, she is relying on familiar
tunes that have built-in popular and
financial failsafes. Even if she destroys
a song, at least it wasn't one of her
songs: she can move relatively un-
daunted to her next work.
But it'd take someone like Tay-
lor Dane or Mariah Carey to ruin these
songs. Al Green's "Take Me To the
River Procol Harum's "A Whiter
Shade of Pale the soul classic "I
Can't Get Next to You and Paul
Simon's "Something So Right" are
just too sturdy to be harmed, and
other selections-Train In Vain" by
the Clash (!), Neil Young's "Don't Let
It Bring You'Down and Bob Marleys
"Waiting In Vainare streamlined
into the same hues of production that
make up Medusa to fit in even if they
are an eclectic mix.
While producer Steve Lipson
has kept Lennox from merely repeat-
ing herself after Diva. Medusa is still
synthesizer-heavy, and the artificial
sound is made more evident by star-
tling intrusions of actual Spanish gui-
tar and flutes. In fact. Medusa lapses
into disco overproduction ("I Can't
Get Next To You" and "Downtown
Lights"). Sure, programmed music
can create a mood that haunts, as
"Whiter Shade of Pale" shows, creep-
ing into Julee Cruise territory, but
for Lennox's remarkable singing abil-
ity, the stark contrast of science and
nature just rings hollow. When
Lennox performed on "Saturday
Night Live" last weekend, she had her
own full band and she kicked. Why
not have them on the album?
Medusa has moments. The first
single "No More I Love You's is glo-
rious pop. It epitomizes Lennox's
flair for theater, gothic lyrics and a
layered vapor of sound, bringing to
mind Cruise, Kate Bush, Cocteau
Twins and Laurie Anderson. She
shows soul both Motown-influenced
("Train In Vain" and "Take Me to the
River") and blue-eyed ("Something
So Right" and "Don't Let It Get You
Down"). And her chameleonesque
tendency to become the narrator of
the song eliminates any danger of
emotional detachment from the song.
But covers? Annie. Shame. Diva
proved you could work with your
own material. Why this? No matter
how good it looks on paper, Medusa
is a high-gloss cop out with a few
treats.
Mike Watt
Ball-Hog or
Tugboat?
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
National On-line Career Databank!
For an Immvdlat Interview
contact T�nKy, Inc.
800-639-2060
FOR
� School
Fun
�Social
Activities
THURSDAY. MARCH 30. 1995
SEMINAR: NIH SUPPORT OF BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH
Speaker: Marion Zatz. Ph.D. Chief of the Development and Cellular
Processes Branch of NIGMS
106 gemjHill Hall. UNC-CH campus noon- 00p.m
PANEL DISCUSSION: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD GRANT
AN OPEN FORUM ON THE GRANT PROCESS
Panel Members: Dr. Marion Zatz: Dr. Dorothy Browne, associate professor of
maternal and child health at UNC-CH: Dr. Henry Frierson. associate dean of the
Graduate School at UNC-CH: Edith Hubbard. associate director of the Office of
Research Services at UNC-CH; Dr. Brian Herman, professor of cell biology and
anatomy at UNC-CH
105 gerryhili Hall. IANC-CH campus 3 00 -4 45 p m
OfflCE OF RESEARCH SERVICES ANO
DEPARTMENT OF CHI BIOLOGY AND ANATOMY
UNTVERSTTY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HOI
CONTACT BRIAN HERMAN �19) 962t)3�
I
I
I
'I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Players Cliib L The Elbo Room Free caver for Player's Club
cordially invite you to Players meanbers: Watch for free
Club "Night On The Town" passes in the mail.
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENT -5
Just Because we are NEW we are starting
something NEW for you.
"Players Club Night On The Town
Giveaways Galore:
Vacation on us to Emerald Isle Beach Music Festival!

If there was any justice, Mike Watt
would be one of the biggest names in
alternative music. With the Minutemen
and later Firehose, Watt was behind
some of the most intellectual punk
music of the '80s. Firehose especially
pushed the boundaries of punk, bring-
ing jazz influence to a musical genre
that seemed mired (some would say
rightfully) in a general lack of musical
talent
It's no surprise, then, that Mike
Watt's new solo album, Ball-Hog or
Tugboat?, is so very good. Watt is ac-
companied in this effort by some of
the greatest stars of alternative music,
including Henry Rollins, Flea, Thurston
Moore, J. Mascis and Frank Black. The
result is music that reminds me of
Firehose but is still a natural progres-
sion for Watt
This is manly music, the kind of
energetic, testosterone-driven rock &
roll that makes you want to jump
around and break stuff. I imagine that
a lot of red meat and beer were con-
sumed during the recording sessions
for this album. Even the cover is manly
in it� own way, with its vaguely
homoerotic picture of two wrestlers
accompanied by the phrase, "Sex with
you is like watching scientific wres-
tling In fact, the whole album was
designed around a wrestling motif, and
nothing is more manly than wrestling.
So it's a nice touch that one of
the album's manlier tunes, a cover of
Sonic Youth's "Tuff Gnarl features a
woman, Carla Bozulich, on lead vocals.
Despite the presence of Sonic Youth's
own Thurston Moore, it's not quite a
biting or noisy (and therefoie not as
manly) as the original. But that one
was sung by Kim Gordon, who is liv-
ing proof that manliness is not dictated
by sex.
Also manly is "Against the 70s
an outright punk number reminiscent
of Watt's days with the Minutemen
sung by Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder. The
delicious irony here, of course, is that
Mr. Vedder has made a career out of
aping '70s rock styles.
So imagine my glee to hear him
singing stuff like, "The kids of today
thould defend themselves against the
70s! It ain't reality Just someone
else's sentimentality Even better is
stuff like "Baby boomers selling you
rumors of their history' Forcing youth
away from the truth of what's real to-
day The idea that the whole 70s .etro
fad is a sad scheme concocted by ag-
ing boomers to relive their own youth
through their children is so incredibly
perverse that I have to love it I want
to see a video for this one!
But Ball-Ho or Tugboat? is filled
with such perverse gems. The Spanish
jazz number "Intense Song for Ma-
donna to Sing for example, features
no lyrics; its entry in the linear notes
says, "Choose the words you yourself
can hear her doing The funky "E-
Ticket Ride" features Red Hot Chili
Peppers' bassist Flea and the baby wail
of Gordon Moore (son of Thurston
Moore and Kim Gordon of Sonic
Youth).
Also, in the midst of all this manly,
funky, sweaty, jazzy, aggressive groove
sits "Sidemouse Advice This one's a
nice little cool cat jazz number, com-
plete with upright bass, quiet horns
and a bouncy piano. Flea plays pocket
trumpet, and "Tuff Gnarl" singer Carla
Bozulich belts out vocals like Billy
Holiday.
Another jazzy number (this one
really disjointed) is "Heartbeat
Though not a particularly stand-out
track on its own, this one features an
answering machine message from
Kathleen Hannah of Bikini Kill.
Hannah insults Watt accuses one of
his guest stars of statutory rape and
then asks for Watt to return her Annie
soundtrack. Current debate among
people who own Ball-Hog or Tugboat?
centers on whether or not she's jok-
ing. I'll say this: If she's not, she is one
annoying human being.
Finally, we have "Sexual Military
Dynamics words and vocals by the
manliest of men, Mr. Henry Rollins.
This one's about nasty, spitting, fight-
ing sexual relationships and how
screwed up they are. It's a sweaty,
punch-in-the-face kind of tune. Rollins
hasn't sounded this good (or made this
much sense) since the Black Flag days.
Maybe he should have taken notes.
All in all, Mike Watt's Ball-Hog
or Tugboat? is a more than satisfying
experience. Musically this album is all
over the place and handles all its vari-
ous styles with ease. It's 60 minutes
of manly fun, and it won't disappoint
Ball-Hog or Tugboat? is good music
by some of the best in today's rock
scene, and everyone should have a
copy.
STUDENTSTEACHERS
Earn $$ This Summer! (need dependable transportation;
Monitoring Cotton Fields MAIL RESUME TO: MCS1
May to Sept
5.75 per hour
C25 per mile
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM
Greenville, Kinston, New Bern
P.O. BOX 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Or Fax (919)637-2125
-CDs
-Movie Passes
-Gift Certificates
-Awesome Door Prizes
-Tanning Packages
-Cash Prizes
-1 Month Free Electric Bill
-Free Phone Hook-Up
-Free Cable Cable Hook-Up
-Fitness Center Memberships
Come By Players Club
office to register for
additional FREE trips.
1526 Charles Blvd.
(Across from Minges Coliseum)
Call 321-7613
Saturday Hrs. I I
1
Mondays: 9 oz. Prime Rib
(includes choice of starch and salad) only $9.95
Pargo Size Draft-Domestic Variety (33oz.) only S2.50
Pargo Size Imports only S3.50
Wednesday: "Restaurant Appreciation Night"
2 for 2 until 2
($2.00-2oz. rail highballs until 2 AM)
Staying open longer for your business!
Sundays "12 price appetizers" - 9 PM until close
Every Night: "Pargo Goes Progressive"
(Today's college selections after 9PM)
'We serve full Menu until the minute we close"
(M-TH 12 AM, Fri & Sat 1 AM, Sun 11 PM)
I I I I I I I I I I I II I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I !
- �- �-





8
Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
Fact: Every year each American senerates roughly 1500 pounds
of solid waste. This amounts to about four pounds per had, 1.6
of which is waste paper.
Tip: The best method of reducing waste is to avoid its creation.
At the store, buy in bulk and avoid unnecessary packaging. The
suppliers will take notice that Americans do not want excessive
packaging.
Please send your tips to:
Green Tips
Suite 280
4830 W. Kennedy Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33609
� 1995 Kevin A. McLean, Tampa. FL
LOOKING m A SUMMtft JOG?
BUCKET from page 6
payers' money?
The next logical extension will be
labels on books - labels similar to those
labels on music releases and labels on
classics as well as new releases. Or per-
haps we should just ban the books in
the first place.
A friend wrote to me incensed at a
JtBcent conversation on This Week with
ZXkivid Brinkley concerning the banning
Z Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn.
' Seems that some people (conservatives?
minorities?) want to ban the work be-
cause of Twain's use of the word nigger.
Seems that children reading the book
will not understand that Twain wrote
in the vemacula; at the day, and thus a
child will misinterpret the meaning of
the work.
My friend became appalled that
such a conversation even takes place in
1995. Book banning?!? Only in the dark
recesses of 01r nation's past should that
phrase appear. Book banning has gone
. the way of the witch trials, hasn't it?
The word nigger labels Huck's
friend. The critics therefore label Huck
Finn unreadable. Perhaps the book
could have a warning label attached
to the cover to warn people of the rac-
ist language contained therein. Can you
imagine great works of literature with
warning labels?
The ridiculousness of labeling
books pales in comparison to the ab-
surdity of banning them. Does the na-
tion fear that children today fail to de-
velop critical and analytical reading
skills? Teachers and parents have failed
at their jobs to properly educate the
nation's youth. Instead of trying to
remedy the problem, a vocal minority
would have a ban on ideas. Thus the
children would never have to face the
concepts presented in a complex work
of art like Huckleberry Finn and thus
could not misinterpret those ideas.
Eliminating certain books from a
child's education seems akin to rewrit-
ing history. Is the United States ap-
proaching the state of affairs Orwell
depicted in 1984 where history books
are constantly changed to reflect the
current state of affairs? Is an underly-
ing reason for wanting to ban Huckle-
berry Finn because we, as a country,
want to deny that racial intolerance was
ever as bad as that depicted in Twain's
book?
Whether the labels appear on
films, music, food or books, their ex-
istence presents a disquieting omen.
Label mania seems to be a symptom
of a society in decline. Much like build-
ing more prisons to fight crime, la-
bels only scratch the surface of the
problem. Education of youth 'is the
more effective, albeit more difficult,
approach to fighting crime, and that
same education would serve to elimi-
nate the need for labels. But such
long-term thinking requires fore-
thought. Be. ause books have been
banned in the past, many Americans
lack the mental faculties to correlate
ideas so far ahead. Therefore the
short-term and short-sighted fix gets
implemented because it provides the
most obvious, though incorrect, solu-
tion.
Books are not taught in a
vacuum. Teachers, and especially par-
ents, can help children understand a
work of art like Huckleberry Finn in-
stead of hiding the book from the
children. But in order to be effective
parents and teachers, the educator
must possess critical and analytical
skills. Because of book banning in the
past, many of those skills are lacking
in many parents and teachers. Thus a
vicious cycle operates to lower the
collective intelligence of a nation.
Label mania threatens to cause
complacency. Parents and teachers
may tend to relax a bit if they think
that a watchdog has safeguarded their
child's mental development. The edu-
cators may also find teaching critical
and analytical skills difficult without
complex works of art for students to
develop those skills. Any parent or fu-
ture parent needs to be reminded of
the dangers of close-minded thinking.
Label mania??
That way lies madness.
ANSWERS
tfzAr
Natural life I �
The average cost of a DUI is about $3,500: including fines,
courts costs, legal fees & increased car insurance.
-NIRSA Natural High Flyer
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
William Shakespeare's
Classic Romantic Comedy
Twelfth Mght
McGinnis Theatre
East Carolina University
Main Campus
Call-328-6829
General Public: $7.50
ECU Students: S 4.50
Children:4.50
3Mlui
AH33N331aN3ai
a3bi00av3113a
3aiH3sa0HiSVAV
3a0Sa0i33'SB1Vd
NVW 1sVa??DO
�V3SU3DS118
AsandsMi3H13Vw
V00iD�NVH113a0
JLVis30a3LiV103
Si33V1a� hl3
HEOD B3Vaa31
lV1� Si 1s3AN1VN1
s31Vs1�H313IH3aV
3N0NI�H31Vs0a
H03Vw�Va3u0Hi
UNO ONE !N OUfi ClASSIfM!
I
Work on Campus
University Housing Services will joon be hiring students for
part-time employment for the 1995-96 School Year.
Candidates should be fuutime students and must be in
good academic and judicial standing with the university.
Customer service skills are extremely important for these
positions. Priority wiD be given to students who live in the
residence halls.
Positions available include: communfty service desk
representatives; front desk assistants; and game room
assistants. To apply, drop by 214 Whtchand Building and fill
out an application form. The deadline to submit
applications is Friday, March 31 �
If you have questions, call
University Housing Services at 328-6450-
Now that you're going to
graduate school, how
do you plan to pay for H?
Ask us.
t
For Graduate Students
(pursuing all types of advanced
degrees such as law, engineering,
nursing, etc.) The Citi-
Graduate Loan Program
offers Federal Stafford Loans

jg gj WJMjM and our exclusive Grad-
m hhjBkjfl Assist Loan.
�ff No matter what �p you study or where you currently bank, you can countAnd, all of the Citibank Grad- uate Loan Programs offer: j � easy repayment,
5Son Citibank, the nation's� low interest rates,
28number one originator of� no application fees,
9student loans, to help finance your education. For Medical Students (pursuing allopathic and osteopathic medicine) The CitiMedical Loan Program� an easy application process, I � fast approvals, � and one toll-free number to call for answers to all your questions.
offers Federal StaffordFor more information
Loans and our exclusiveand an application for a
,MedicalAssist Loan.Citibank Graduate Loan,
�For MBA Students The CitiMBA Loan Program offers Federalcall 1-800-692-8200, and ask for Operator 256.
Stafford Loans and our exclusive MBAAssist Loan.CiTIBANKO
Call 1-800-692-8200, ext. 256
��S! I want more information
and an application for the following
Citibank Graduate loans:
All Federal Stafford Loans
Citibank MedicalAssist Loan
for students of allopathic and
osteopathic medicine
Citibank MBAAssist Loan
for business students
Citibank GradAssist Loan
for graduate students
Mail this coupon to:
Citibank Student Loans
P.O. Box 22948
Rochester, NY 14692-2948
V-
-Zip.
telephone
Students Social Security
bttw ����- SB in (to Social Seotntj Humbti vn
Student is currently in D College Graduate School
Year of Graduation Field of Study
Name o( allege iraduate School
Arc you a previous student loan borrower?
Or for faster service,
call 1-800-692-8200,
and ask for
Operator 256.
!Yes
No
CIT!BAN0
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
�������





Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
Spiders bomb Pirates
Casey flaunts All-
American skills in
leading Richmond
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
After giving up two home runs
in the first inning and watching a
lead elevate from then on, the Rich-
mond Spiders did anything but
creep past the Pirates on Saturday
in the first game of a doubleheader.
8-2.
Coach Overton and the Pirate
squad were attacked early in both
games as ECU fell to 1-4 in the Co-
lonial Athletic Association and 17-
8 overall.
"We tried to silence their bats
ECU Coach Gary Overton said. "We
knew they were an offensive team,
and we could no1 afford to fall be-
hind by large margins
The Spiders (7-2 in the CAA)
were riding on the success of their
much heralded star first baseman,
after they generated eight runs of
offense in the first game.
Junior first baseman Sean
Casey once again showed his Ail-
American potential when he broke
open the Richmond scoring with a
two-run homerun in the first inning
of the first game. Two batters later,
Ed Tober drilled a shot over the
outfield wall for another two-run
homer to up the score to 4-0.
The Pirate pitchers were
shaken early in both contests as
senior Jason Mills (3-3) gave up his
starting role to John Payne in the
seventh inning. Finishing the cause
was junior Jeff Hewitt, who closed
the door on the Spiders scoring as
he completed the last two and two-
third innings recording two
See BASE page 11
Here
comes
the
hotstepper
Pirate halfback Jerris
McPhail rushed for 84
yards on 10 carries in
the Pirates' second
spring scrimmage on
Saturday. He's the heir
apparent to fill the void
left by "All-Everything"
running back Junior
Smith. For more on the
scrimmage, check out
SID Notes.
File Photo
Irates defend
turf, win big
ECU wins Ultimax
XXIV tournament
before home crowd
Steven Lienert
Staff Writer
Ten of the top 15 college ulti-
mate frisbee teams from across the
country descended on Greenville
this past weekend to try capture the
championship of ECU'S prestigous
Ultimax XXIV Ultimate tournament.
In the end, however, all were turned
away as East Carolina's Irates suc-
cessfully defended their home turf
and firmly secured themselves as the
best college ultimate team in the
Photo by PAUL WRIGHT
Derek Lindsay, freshman Pirate third baseman, has played big in his first collAgiate baseball nation.
season for Coach Overton, and ripped his second career homer off UR's Bobby St. Pierre. After an easy day of poo
ECU's
play
MRTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
(SID) - East Carolina's football
squad went through a two-hour.
136-play scrimmage Saturday in
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
Several young players were
given extra repetitions during the
workout, in order to get more ex-
perience.
Sophomore quarterback Dan
Gonzalez (Neptune, N.J.), com-
pleted 23 of 43 passes for 214 yards
with two touchdowns and an inter-
ception. Gonzalez, who usually
runs second team behind Marcus
Crandell, played mostly with the
first team on Saturday.
"I wanted to give our young
quarterbacks a chance to work with
out first and second units said Pi-
rate coach Steve Logan. "Dan got
a chance to work a lot with our first
unit, while Ernest (Tinnen) worked
a lot with our second unit
Tinnen (Burlington, N.C.). a
redshirt freshman, completed 9 of
22 passes for 34 yards and a touch-
down.
Crandell (Robersonville, N.C.),
in very limited action, completed 8
of 17 passes for 108 yards and a
touchdown.
"I was real pleased at how the
quarterbacks performed added
Logan. " I thought it was a good
scrimmage overall. The offense was
able to protect the football and the
defense held its own. We had a lot
of installation (of plays) this past
week, and they took to it pretty
well
Gonzalez two scoring strikes
went to Larry Shannon (17 yards)
and Jason Nichols (57 yards).
Nichols, a sophomore from
Norcross, Ga caught 7 passes for
116 yards. He also caught an 11-
yard scoring pass from Crandell.
Daryl Jones, a reshirt freshman
running back from Rockledge, Fla
had a six-yard touchdown catch
from Tinnen and also had a 26-yard
scoring run. Jones finished with 62
yards rushing on eight carries.
Running back Jerris McPhail
(Clinton, N.C.), the heir apparent to
ECU record-setter Junior Smith, led
all rushers with 84 yards on 10 car-
ries. He also had a 15-yard scoring
run. McPhail also caught 3 passes
for 22 yards.
Defensively, freshman Travis
Darden (Kelford, N.C.) had four
sacks for minus 19 yards and se-
nior Jermaine Smith (Eden. N.C.)
had three sacks for minus 22 yards.
Shep Sepaniak (Brookside, N.J.),
Tavares Taylor (Fayetteville, N.C.)
and Andrew Barrett (Mooresvlle,
N.C.) recorded interceptions.
The Pirates will have one more
full week of practice before another
scrimmage next Saturday in Dowdy
Ficklen Stadium. The spring prac-
tice schedule will conclude on April
8 with the annual PurpleGold
Scrimmage at 2 p.m. in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium. The scrimmage is
part of the 12th Annual Great Pi-
rate PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out
Party.
In ECU Softball news, the Lady
Pirates earned a 3-3 record at the
Winthrop Invitational after a
quarterfinal loss to Toledo, 0-3. The
Lady Pirates are 24-11 on the sea-
son.
On Saturday, ECU defeated
UNC Wilmington 9-0. No additional
statistics are available for that
game.
At 3 p.m ECU lost to Kent
State, 0-2. Jennie Alldering of Kent
State was the winning pitcher, re-
cording nine strikeouts and allow-
ing only two ECU hits. She im-
proved to 2-0 from the mound.
Danielle Bodner was 2-2 and Pam
McBride was 1-3 with a RBI. For
ECU, Tracie Podratsky allowed two
runs off four hits and from the
plate, Joey Clark doubled.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Pirate head football coach Steve Logan is getting his 1994
Liberty-Bowl returnees back into shape for the new season.
ECU. the No. 3 seed in Pool A,
advanced to the first round of the
single elimination playoffs that be-
gan at 7 p.m. They faced GMU. who
was ranked No. 2 in Pool C. The
Lady Pirates shut out the Patriots,
8-0, in five innings. Jami Bendie
improved to 12-3 on the hill, allow-
ing two hits, with one walk and four
strikeouts. Tonya Oxendine tripled
and Dana Hulings hit a homerun.
For GMU, pitcher Kim Tuffy earned
the loss. She allowed eight runs off
nine hits. Stacie Elliot was 1-2 with
a double. Their overall record is 8-
10.
At 9 a.m. on Sunday. ECU ad-
vanced to quarterfinal competition.
They lost to Toledo, 0-3. Christie
Davis and Teryn Ford in a losing
effort for ECU. Tonya Oxendine and
Joey Clark each went 2-3 at the
plate. The win improved Toledo's
record to 9-4. giving pitcher Desiree
Abrego her fourth win of the sea-
son (4-3).
The Lady Pirates' next game is
set for March 29 when they travel
to Wilson, N.C. to face Barton for
a 2 p.m. doubleheader.
The Lady Pirates tennis team
trekked to Norfolk this weekend,
only to find themselves pitted
against three of the top 15 teams
in the region. The Lady Netters
faced JMU, Rutgers and Old Domin-
ion, dropping all three matches and
falling to 11-4. 1-2 in the CAA, on
the year.
Freshman Rachel Cohen
helped account for three of the Pi-
rate wins, winning 6-1, 6-3 against
Rutgers. She provided two wins on
Sunday, taking a 6-3, 6-0 win from
ODU, and teaming up with
Courtney Hargett at No. 1 doubles
to win. Hollyn Gordon was the only
on Saturday in which the Irates
outscored their opposition by a com-
bined score of 45-14. ECU seemed a
little flat in their uuarterfinal vic-
tory over SUNY-Binghamton.
They weren't the only top-
seeded team to come out sluggish
as the previously second-ranked
University of California-Santa Bar-
bara Black Tide were eliminated by
NC State 12-7. This opened the door
for UNC-Wilmington to have easy
walk to the finals, where they would
meet ECU in a rematch of last week's
College Easterns Championship
game.
In one of the best college Ulti-
mate games of the year, ECU and
UNC-W battled each other point for
point for more than three hours.
Although UNC-W was smoth-
ered by the Irate swarm the week
before, the Seamen gave ECU all
they could handle. The Irates, fac-
ing adversity for the first time, never
lost their composure and proved
once again why they are the best
team in the country. ECU eked out
a 17-15 win in what may have been
a preview of the college National
Championship game.
After a few subpar perfor-
mances in previous tournaments,
ECU's women's team, the Helioses-
tablished themselves as a force to
be reckoned with.
Cornell learned that first hand,
as the Wild Roses, ranked second
in the tournament in the women's
division, fell prey to the Helios' pow-
erful 2-3-2 zone defense and were
defeated 12-11. This win cleared the
path for the Helios to make their
first appearance in the finals of a
tournament this season.
Although the ECU women were
defeated by the national power-
house from UNC-W in the champi-
onship game, they were proud of the
strides they had taken to become
successful. A possible second
straight trip to nationals may be in
the cards for the Helios.
Special consideration must be
given to Ultimax's Minister of Com-
petition, Keith Lewis. He made
Ultimax the most competitive col-
lege tournament of the year, and the
tournament ran as smoothly as pos-
sible. Congratulations again to the
Women's Champion, the UNC-W
Seaweed, and the Men's Champion,
the East Carolina Irates.
The Week Ahead
Tuesday. Mar. 28
W. Tennis vs. UNC-W, 2
p.m.
Wednesday. Mar. 29
Baseball@Campbell,
Buies Creek, N.C, 3
p.m.
Softball@Barton (DH),
Wilson, N.C, 2 p.m.
Thursday. Mar. 30
Softball@Richmond
Invitational, Richmond,
Va.
M. Tennis@William &
Mary, Williamsburg, Va
2:30 p.m.
Friday. Mar. 31
Softball@Richmond
Invitational, Richmond,
Va.
Golf@Cleveland Classic,
Forest Hills Country
Club, Augusta, Ga.
Saturday. April 1
Baseball vs. George
Mason (DH), 2 p.m.
.Softball@Richmond
Invitational, Richmond,
Va.
Men's Track@Sun
Angel Invit Tempe,
Ariz.
Men's Tennis@Wake
Forest Invit Winston-
Salem, N.C.
Women's Track@N.C
State, UNC-Charlotte,
Raleigh, N.C.
Golf@Cleveland Classic,
Forest Hills Country
Club, Augusta, Ga.
Sunday. April 2
Baseball vs. George
Mason, 2 p.m.
Men's Tennis@Wake
Forest Invit, Winston-
Salem, N.C.
Golf@Cleveland Classic,
Forest Hills Country
Club, Augusta, Ga.
Va. Commonwealth
joins Colonial in '95
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
See SID page 11
As if Virginia needed another
college to represent themselves in the
Colonial Athletic Association, the ad-
dition of Virginia Commonwealth may
in fact raise the level of athletics for
the entire conference.
After all but getting kicked out
of the much heralded Metro Confer-
ence, the sports administration at
VCU should be more than elated to
have such great hospitality from the
CAA as they will join the eight mem-
ber conference on July 1.
Former members of the Great-
Midwest Conference, Alabama-Bir-
mingham, Cincinnati, DePaul,
Marquette. Memphis, and St. Louis
along with Houston from the South
west Conference have all officially
See CAA page 11
-





T'
10
Tuesday, March 28,1995
The East Carolinian
from prison among rumors
(AP) - Mike Tyson is out of
prison. Is Don King out of the pic-
ture?
Various published accounts on
Monday suggested that promoter
King has lost his hold on the former
heavyweight champion, released on
Saturday from an Indiana prison,
where he served time for a rape con-
viction.
"Today, I don't think Don King
is out, but we'll know in a couple of
months promoter Dan Duva said
from his office in Totowa, NJ.
"1 think King is out promoter
Bob Arum said from his office in Las
Vegas. "I don't care that much, ex-
cept it facilitates a Tyson-Foreman
fight"
The 46-year-old Foreman, pro-
moted by Arum, more likely would
fight Tyson if King, Arum's archrival,
is not involved.
Phone calls to King's office in
Florida and his Ohio home, located
near Tyson's residence in
Southington, were not returned.
There were reports that Tyson
sent King away after the former
champion returned to his home on
"Saturday.
Promoter Butch Lewis was
quoted in Monday's New York Daily
News as saying "I was told that
there's some sort of rift between King
and Tyson. I was told that Tyson
wanted privacy and asked everybody
to leave, including Don
On Monday, Lewis told The As-
sociated Press that "all the rumors
being circulated are second and third
hand. I'm not surprised, nor should
anyone else be, after being incarcer-
ated for three years that the kid
would want privacy. People are read-
ing too much into it. I don't take it
as a sign that Don is on his way out
The New York Post reported
Tyson was angry when he found a
Showtime crew in his home, taping
footage for a documentary to be
aired in April. The newspaper re-
ported it had been told King had
made a $20 million deal on
Showtime, with whom King has
worked for some time, for a combi-
Jordan airs it out in New York
(AP) - In 1991, 1992 and 1993,
the New York Knicks didn't represent
the Eastern Conference in the NBA
Finals. The Chicago Bulls did - and
went on to win the championship each
year.
The New York Knicks didn't have
Michael Jordan. The Chicago Bulls
did.
Last year, neither team had Jor-
dan, who was playing minor league
baseball forf he Birmingham Barons.
The Knicks finally overcame the Bulls
in an emotional seven-game series and
reached the Finals.
"That was their window of oppor-
tunity Chicago coach Phil Jackson
said Monday.
The window might have slammed
shut. Jordan is back. And if the sea-
son ended now, his Bulls would face
the Knicks in the opening round of
the playoffs.
"Bring him on was the initial
reaction of Knicks president Dave
Checketts when Jordan's un-retire-
ment became official last week.
Checketts & Co. get their first
chance to check out Jordan, Part II,
on Tuesday night when the Bulls visit
the Knicks.
Jordan, who lit up Atlanta on
AMERICAN LEAGUE
WLPet
Texas156.714
Oakland138.619
Chicago149.609
California119.550
Milwaukee1311.542
Minnesota1513.536
Boston1313.500
Cleveland1214.462
Seattle1012.455
New York1114.440
Kansas City814.364
Detroit815.348
Toronto617.261
x-Baltimore00.000
NATIONAL LEAGUE
wLPet
Houston185.783
Los Angeles187.720
Colorado159.625
Chicago139.591
Pittsburgh139591
Atlanta1211.522
Cincinnati1211.522
Philadelphia1011.476
St Louis1113.458
Florida912.429
Montreal912.429
San Diego815.348
New York614.300
San Francisco616.273
Saturday in the best of his four games
back, will be playing at Madison
Square Garden for the first time since
his 29 points led the Bulls to victory
in the pivotal fifth game of the 1993
conference finals.
"It's a measuring stick. New York
is a contender. We have to see how
well we stack up he said. "It's a
tough situation. We have to prepare
ourselves for a good battle, physically
as well as emotionally. The Knick team
has always rebounded the ball
strongly and played solid defense
The last time the teams met,
March 2 in New York before rumors
of Jordan's return had surfaced, the
Bulls blew a big lead and lost
Jordan's presence Tuesday will
"bring a renewed effort" from the
Knicks, Jackson said. "I think they
were rather bored with us the last
time; that's one of the reasons we got
a lead. This will bring them to a full
alert immediately
Jackson said the Knicks' trip to
Chicago on April 16 - one week be-
fore the regular season ends - will be
a more accurate measuring stick.
"That's going to be a drawn-out
battle in which we're going to wage a
little bit of playoff spirit he said.
"We're going to be at full strength,
Michael Jordan will be conditioned,
our team will be adapted to his style
of play and our chemistry will be
back
If the Knicks want to avoid open-
ing the postseason against Jordan,
they might actually be better off los-
ing Tuesday.
Chicago, with the sixth-best
record in the East is only 2 12 games
behind fifth-place Cleveland. If the
Bulls pass Cleveland, they'd face the
No. 4 seed, probably Charlotte or In-
diana, and the Knicks would get the
Cavaliers.
Before Jordan's return became
official, Knicks coach Pat Riley said:
"It would change the thinking of who
and who cannot win
But Knicks general manager
Ernie Grunfeld pointed out that
Jordan's supporting cast isn't as
strong as it was during the Bulls'
championship run.
"What you have to remember is
they're a different team he said.
"There's no Grant, there's no
Cartwright there's no Paxson
The Knicks have changed little.
They're still formidable and physical,
with Patrick Ewing, Charles Oakley
and Anthony Mason. And they're still
embattled, with Mason having just
returned from a five-game suspension
for showing up Riley.
"They've battled with themselves
mentally, which is part of trying to be
a champion said Jordan, a master of
mind games. "But I think they still
have the fundamentals to win
NOTE: Split-squad games count in standings. Ties or college games do
not (x-Baltimore is not participating)
Monday's Games
Boston 3, Minnesota (ss) 1
Chicago White Sox 5, Minnesota (ss) 2
Cincinnati 6, Kansas City 2
Atlanta 4, Florida 3
Los Angeles 5, New York Mets 2
Houston 5, St Louis 0
New York Yankees 3, Montreal 1
Texas 9, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 16, Toronto 2
San Diego vs. California (L)
San Francisco vs. Milwaukee ID
Colorado vs. Seattle (L)
Oakland vs. Chicago Cubs (L)
Detroit vs. Cleveland (L)
$600 A WEEK POTENTIAL
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Summer is the busy season in the
moving industry and we need your
help'to handle the load. North
American Van Lines is now accept-
ing applications from college students
and staff for its Summer Fleet
Driver Program.
TRAINING - Free
MOTELMEALS WHILE IN
TRAINING - Free
POTENTIAL EARNINGS (AVERAGE)
- $600 A WEEK
We will teach you how to safely
operate a semi-tractor trailer and how
to loadunload household goods
cargo. We pay for your motel and
meals while in training. Once you
receive your Commercial Driver's
License, you have the potential of
earning an approximate average of
$600 a week.
To qualify, you must be at least 21
years old, meet North American Van
Lines qualifications, and be available
for training the end of April or eWly
May. We promise you an adventure
you'll never forget!
Call 1-800-348-2147, Dept. U-29.
northAmericanc
Do ya know
sports? Well,
come on
down and
write for us!
You get paid
well(sorta),
tooCall
328-6366
and ask for
Eric or Dave.
If you will be a returning
�student in the fall. University Housing
Services will be hiring painters for
the paint crew this summer. Full and
part-time positions av-ailable. For details and
applications, please come to 2 I 4 Whichard.
nation of the documentary and
rights to telecast Tyson's first come-
back bout.
Several phone calls were made
to the cable TV network, but
Showtime would not comment.
"I don't think the public cares
who promotes Mike Tyson because
I think they'll buy tickets to see
Mike Tyson fight, not because Don
King is the promoter Duva said.
Arum, however, contends the
public is interested in whether King
resumes his promotional relation-
ship with' Tyson.
"The public wants to know ini-
tially that King is out Arum said.
"King has painted himself as the
devil. People interested in Tyson are
rooting for him to succeed in his life
and they know the worst thing for
Tyson as a person is King
Arum admitted that if King is
the promoter, "1 think people will
go to see Mike fight, but the whole
aura changes
There were reports Tyson was
upset because King had arranged for
a welcome-home spread that in-
cluded champagne and shellfish.
Alcohol, shellfish and pork are for-
bidden by Islamic law.
Reports that Tyson had married
his 28-year-old girlfriend Monica
Turner, a Georgetown University
medical student, in a Muslim cer-
emony in prison were denied on
Monday by Phil Slavens, assistant
superintendent at the Indiana Youth
Center.
It also was rumored that Tyson
was thinking about changing his
name to Malik Abdul Aziz.
"He ain't changing his name"
said Muhammed Siddeeq, Tyson's in-
structor in Islam while he was in
prison, told an Associated Press re-
porter at a mosque in Plainfield,
Ind where Tyson prayed after be-
ing released.
"Change of name is not crucial,
unless the name has meaning Dr.
Sayyid Mohammed Syeed, secretary
general of the Islamic Society of
North America, said Monday. "We
think Mike Tyson is a nice name
COURTSIDE
Across from the courthouse.�'On the corner of Evans
St. Mall and Third St. �
"AST: Sit down breakfast for under $5.00
LUNCH SPECIALS:
(French Fries and Tea)
i Patty Melt3.50
Cheeseburger3.25
Hamburger3.00
Hot Dog1.95
Open Monday - Friday
8am - 5pm
Thursday
80's � Dance PartyI
Ladies' in FREEI
75 Bottle beers
1.00 Hi-balls
50 Jello Shots
25 Draft
2.50 Sex on the Beach
The best in 80's & 90's Dance music all night!
Friday
Players Club Party!
PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
1 Coors Light Draft
1.25 Domestics and Hi-balls
Many other bar specials too!
Admission 2.00 members
3.00 Guests
Register At the door for Cash Prizes!
Trips to Emerald Isle Beach Music Festival Lodging and Tickets!
CD's � Restaurant Passes � Movie Passes
T-Shirts � Gym Memberships � 1 Month FREE Utilities
FREE Phone Hook-ups � FREE Cable Hook-ups
If you already have a lease with The Players Club,
Watch your mail for FREE admission passes 111
It's Players Club's way of saying THANKS
FOR CHOOSING US AS YOUR NEW ECU HOME!
For more information call 758-4591
i





sr
11
Tuesday, March 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
Reich brings his
skills to Panthers
(AP1, - Quarterback Frank
Reich, who plays backup quarterback
for the Buffalo Bills, has signed with
the Carolina Panthers as an unre-
stricted free agent.
The signing was announced to-
day by Panthers president Mike
McCormack.
"Frank giver us a veteran who
has played on the highest level of the
National Football League said Pan-
thers general manager Bill Polian.
"He brings the experience and lead-
ership qualities that are important
in developing a young team, and we
look forward to having him with the
Panthers
During his career as backup to
the Bills' Jim Kelly, Reich completed
nearly 60 percent of his regular sea-
son passing attempts and threw 18
touchdown passes with 12 intercep-
tions. In his career, he has completed
222 of 377 passing attempts while
making eight career starts inc uding
the last two regular season games in
1994. He also made two playoff starts
for the Bills.
"I'm excited about the opportu-
nity to be involved with a new fran-
chise like Carolina Reich said. "It
was great playing for an organization
like Buffalo, and I feel fortunate to
join another great organization in the
Panthers
Reich is remembered for bring-
ing the Bills back from a 32-point
deficit to a 41-38 overtime victory
over Houston in the 1992 AFC wild
card game. Reich played a similar role
in college when he led Maryland from
a 31-0 deficit to a 4240 victory over
Miami.
Reich, 34, an 11-year veteran,
was drafted in the third round in
1985.
The Panthers previously had ac-
quired quarterbacks Jack Trudeau
and Doug Pederson through the vet-
eran allocation draft. Reich is the
13th unrestricted free agent signed
by the Panthers.
Dibble suspended for comments
(AP) - The Chicago White Sox
suspended pitcher Rob Dibble one
day after he was quoted saying re-
placement players would be stuck
with the label for life "like child
molesters
Dibble was suspended Sunday
"for conduct unbecoming to a
White Sox player general man-
ager Ron Schuele said, adding that
Dibble "criticized our major league
players
Dibble was quoted in
Saturday's Chicago Tribune as say-
ing replacement players were "go-
ing to be labeled like child molest-
ers for the rest of their lives. You're
never going to get rid of that la-
bel
Dibble also referred to replace-
ment baseball as a "beer league"
and said Chicago's minor-leaguers
could beat the strikebreakers.
Asked whether Dibble's talk
played a role in his suspension,
Schueler said, "It might've
Schueler said he would not re-
instate Dibble until he talks to
Dibble's agent, Dennis Gilbert. He
would not say whether he thought
the suspension would hurt Dibble's
chances of making the team after
the strike ends.
The White Sox signed the two-
time National League All-Star to a
minor league contract this year.
LAA from page 9
joined with the Metro to form an all-
sports conference.
The Metro Conference who's
members already inlcude Louisville,
UNC-Charlotte, South Florida, South-
ern Mississippi, and Tulane have
agreed to pay both Virginia Tech and
VCU $2.27 million dollars.
That is a tremendous amount of
money for a school that will go into
one of the less-advertised athletic con-
ferences in the nation.
However, their immediate impact
will probably not be felt, except when
next season's Rams hoopsters will give
basketball coach Eddie Payne a few
headaches.
"They have a fine athletics pro-
gram interim athletic director Henry
Van Sant said. "They are very strong
in basketball, very good in baseball,
and volleyball
In addition to raising revenue for
the CAA, VCU will have plenty of rea-
sons to compete. First of allt they will
bring a baseball program that has had
five strong seasons in the Metro. Also,
after finaling in the NIT, the Rams will
bring a solid basketball program to
the CAA, which might give James
Madison or Old Dominion a run for
first place.
Strengthening an already Vir-
ginia dominted conference, the thrill
of competition and economic gains is
rewarding too, especially for ECU and
UNC-Wilmington. Not since Navy and
David Robinson can the CAA look to
rather promising years.
Both VCU's athletic director
Richar Sander and president Eugene
Tani will be embraced by a better
group of athletic administrators in the
CAA rather than the cold UNC-C chan-
cellor J.H. Woodward and the merci-
less Metro Conference advisery com-
mittees.
VCU's augmentation into the
CAA will reap more benefits for the
CAA and ECU than for the subpar
Metro Conference.
SID
r4
5
i
EAST CAROLINA MOTOR SPEEDWAY
ROBERSONTVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
(38 Mile High Banked Asphalt Tri-Oval)
Saturday April 1,7:30pQi
Washington Daily News Presents THE LEGENDS
Plus 5
Feature Races (�
Present
Student ID for $2 Discount off
Coolers Allowed - No Glass Cc
Admission Price
ontainers
"Where Racing Is Alive In '95"
ROCKY MOUNT
795-3968
Hwy64
GREENVILLE
AYDEM
KINSTON
Only 18 Miles From ECU
from page 9
Pirate to notch a win against JMU,
winning in three sets, 1-6, 6-2, 6-4.
Senior Elke Garten managed the
only other ECU victory, a 6-3, 6-2
win versus ODU.
The Pirates return home for a
CAA match against UNC-W Tuesday
at 2 p.m. at the Minges Tennis Com-
plex.
The ECU women's track team
performed well in the Raleigh Re-
lays this weekend with an ECAC
qualifying mark in the 4 x 800 re-
lay as they placed seventh in the
finals with a time of 9:20.45.
East Carolina also came away
with fifth place and a time of
1:41.90 in the 4 x 200 relay.
The Lady Pirates won their
heat in the 4 x 400 relay with a time
of 3:56.15. According to Head
Coach Choo Justice, this time of
3:56.15 is the fastest for the 4 x
400 relay in five or six years.
Freshman Lady Pirate Saundra
Tee! broke her own school record
�InwE Mm.
healthy
ECU HEALTH FAIR '9$
Thursday, March 30
10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
MSC Multipurpose Room
Get some
healthy
tips on:
I
Nutrition
Massage Techniques
Vision Testing
Cholesterol Screening $5.00
Relaxation Techniques
Glaucoma Screening
Bicycle & Roller-blade Safety
TB Testing
Fat Testing
Safer Sunning Information
Blood Pressure Screening
student I.D. required for cholesterol screening.
Prize drawings will be held throughout the day.
Mountain Bike
Sponsored by Recreational Services & The Bicycle Post
Sponsored by the Office of Health Promotion & Well Being
on Friday in the 100HH with a time
of 14.88. Teel finished third place
in her best heat and qualified for
the finals. Just behind Teel was
ECU'S Jennifer Kalanick with a fifth
place finish and a time of 15.02.
East Carolina's Keisha Johnson
won her heat in the 400m on Fri-
day with a time of 59.51.
The East Carolina golf team
fired their best round of the spring
season to move up to a tie for 13th
at the Furman Intercollegiate, in
Greenville, S.C. Saturday after-
noon.
ECU, who found themselves in
23rd place after the first round, ral-
lied to shoot a season-best 297, to
move within six shots of a top ten
performance. Trey Jervis followed
up his first round score of 78 with
a 73 in today's round to move in a
tie for 31st place. Teammates Gary
Carpenter and Josh Dickinson are
two strokes off of Jervis at 153. Car-
penter shot a second-round 72.
In team competition, Virginia
and Ohio State will head into round
three with a seven-stroke lead over
Augusta College. Virginia's Lewis
Chitenwga holds a slim one-shot
lead over Virginia Tech's Brian
Sharp heading into the third round.
BASE from page 9
strikeouts.
Richmond ace Bobby St. Pierre
upped his record to a perfect 6-0
after holding ECU to two runs over
eight innings of work. The only Pi-
rate runs came in the bottom half
of the first, when Lamont Edwards
scored on a wild pitch, and on a
Derek Lindsay blast over the left
field fence in the bottom of the sev-
enth inning, narrowing the margin
to six.
Their attack on the Pirates
would continue into the second
game of the doubleheader as the
Spiders would muster three runs in
the first inning and four runs in the
second to cruise to a 7-5 victory.
"It was important to keep run-
ners off the bases when the first
five batters came up to the plate
Overton, who respected the strong
UR hitters, said.
Sophomore Chad Newton (2-1)
suffered his first loss of the season,
as he faced a very tough opponent
in the Spiders.
Leading off the game with a
walk for Richmond was second
baseman Jeff Dorman who would
later score on a Ed Tober single.
Generating more runs in the in-
ning, outfielder Jay Adams hits a
sacrifice fly to right scoring Tober
making the early lead 3-0.
However, in the bottom half of
the first, the Pirates would answer
with two runs of their own. Henry
Ogden faced a tougher Pirate
lineup in the second game, as he
upped his pitching mark to 3-0.
Sophomore Lance Tigyer
scored the first of the Pirates runs,
scoring from second on a Jason
Head single to left. Head would
later score on a wild pitch making
it 3-2.
But as soon as the Pirates
closed the gap, the Spiders an-
swered with a plethora of runs.
Newton, who was already faced
with the difficult task of trying to
stop the UR bats, had the flood
gates opened on him in the second.
Mark Budzinski, Casey and the
solid-hitting Tober, who capped the
inning off with his seventh
homerun of the season, all contrib-
uted to the Spiders' scoring.
ECU's Lamont Edwards would
contribute two RBI's of his own in
the fourth inning with a single
through second after third baseman
Derek Lindsay got on with a base
hit and Jason DeHart hit a single
through the center of the infield.
"It was very important to sal-
vage a win from Richmond, because
they are 25th in the country
Overton said. "We may have lost a
little bit of confidence if we did
lose, because we have a very tough
non-conference schedule
KINSTON INDIANS
EXHIBITION GAME
VS. ECU PIRATES
7:00PM
APRIL
4TH
Grainger Stadium
1-800-334-5467
:V�je .�!(&& ��! �� Hi
ii
ff MW W� flWP MM
w flu wA Wk Wk Wk Wk
wm
You'll find lots
of options in our
classifieds
WHAT'S NEW AT EAST COAST??
"LOWER PRICES ON NEW MUSIC
(MORPHINE, OASIS, BELLY, MATTHEW SWEET,
REM, WEEN, DAVE MATTHEWS BAND�?$13.98
$3.00 OFF ALL T-SHIRTS
NEW IMPORTS by dave Matthews, tori amos,
BEASTIE BOYS, REM, PHISH, NIRVANA, DOORS & LOTS MORE
?NEED CASH?? WE'RE PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR CISED CDS.
-AND FOR SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW-
WE NOW RENT CD ROM
TITLES INCLUDE MYST, 7TH GUEST & PENTHOUSE INTERACTIVE!
EAST COAST
MUSIC & VIDEO
$3.00 OFF
ANY CD
$15.98 OR ABOVE.
1109 CHARLES BLVD.
758-4251
OPEN EVERY
NIGHT UNTIL
MIDNIGHT.
T
IIMPiWI





�HiTit if r�r - -

12
Tuesday, March 28,1995
The East Carolinian
cms
it
Services Offered

Travel
Help Wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel (Hawaii. Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.). Seasonal and Full-time employment
available. No experience necessary For
more information call 1-20&634-0468 ext
C53624
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. Ail ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY Clean,
High volume Adult Club needs YOU now.
Confidential employment Dairy pay Top
Commissions. Some to no experience. If
you've called before call again. Playmates
Massage Snow Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298-8952.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
:Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-2514000 ext
1576. Leave Name, School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED: Earn
$1000's Weekly working at home mailing
our circulars. Free details. Send SASE:
R&B Distributors, Box 20354, Greenville
NC 27858
ATTENTION: EARN MONEY READING
BOOKS! Up to $500 weekly. Choose sub-
ject matter. For more details call: M206)-
3624304 ext E0073.
EXPERIENCED SERVERS NEEDED
for lunch shifts in Full-Service Restaurant
Call 355-1111 ONLY between 3:00-
5:00pm.
NATIONAL PARKS HIRING - Seasonal
& full-time employment available at Na-
tional Parks, Forests & Wildlife Preserves.
Benefitsbonuses! Call 1-206-5454804
ext N53621.
BRODYS IS ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for additional Part-time Sales As-
sociates for Cosmetics, Junior Sportswear,
and Young Men's Departments. Earn ex-
tra spending money and a merchandise
discount -just in time for your new spring
wardrobe. Flexible scheduling options to
accomdate your busy schedule: 10am-2pm,
12-9pm, or 6-9pm. All retail positions in-
clude weekends. Applications accepted
each Monday and Thursday, l-3pm,
Brady's, The Plaza.
BROKE AFTER SPRING BREAK? Earn
the quick cash you need stuffing enve-
lopes. Send SASE and $1 to Carolina
Enterprises, P.O. Box 3251, Greenville. NC
27836-1251. The sooner you act the
sooner you start making $
TIRED OF HAVING TO CHOOSE be-
tweenand EXPERIENCE for summer
work? Why not go for both? Make $1880
Mo. Call 1-800-242-3958 ext 2761.
SEINE BEACH part-time - Flexible hours
- Tan while working. Located 12 miles
� outside Greenville. 21 or older. Serious
� calls only. (919)975-2265
� A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a degree and
� practical experience is better! We are ac-
'� cepting applications for part-time mort-
i gage reporting processors. A professional
� attitude and good telephone skills are re-
� quired. Flexible hours. If interested, please
mail your resume to: Online Mortgage
! Services, PO Box 8048, Greenville, NC
27835. NO CALLS PLEASE.
PART-TIME SALES POSITION: ME-
! LANGE, Contemporary Women's Cloth-
ing & Accessories. Lynndale Shoppes. Call
355-8771
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
j; ors Thermal Card - $5.00 per hour plus
1 bonus. Easy work, Flexible hours start
' today. Call 355-0210
m RESORT JOBS � Theme Parks, Hotel &
i Spas, MountainOutdoor Resorts, more!
I Earn to $12hr. tips. For more informa-
' tion, call (206) 632-0150 ext R53621
r "
t"
! "STUDENT WANTED" PARTIME- Auto
, detail cleanup person needed. Prerfer
) � student seeking long term employment
Hours 12:00-5:00 or 1:00-6:00. $5.00 per
lour start Must be dependable & have
JL. apply in person only. Jarman Auto
?aies, Inc Greenville Blvd.
VTTENTION LADIES Earn a 1,000 plus
i week escorting in the Greenville area.
�lust be 18 yrs old; have own phone and
i ransportation. We are an established
igency, check out your yellow pages.
PART TIME STUDENT NEEDED to help
with administrative duties and some mar-
keting. Experience in these areas helpful.
Call 752-8585 and ask for Kim.
CAMP PIXEW00D
Summer Camp Staff
COUNSELORS, INSTRUCTORS, fc
OTHER POSITIONS for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed
8 week youth suirmer recreational
sports camp. Over 25 activities,
including water ski, heated
pool, tennis, horseback, art
Cool Mountain Climate, good pay
and great fun! Non-smokers.
For applicationbrochure:
704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood,
Hendersonville, NC 28792.
HELP WANTED
Earn S50-S100 per night
Self-Employed.
Make your own schedule.
Ideal For College Students
Call Gumbys 321-1862
2S�
For Rent
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP 2 Br. Apt
in Wyndham Ct. $200 12 utilities.
Walking distance to campus. Call Tracey
757-1771 or 321-1818.
ATHLETIC, PRE-MED SOPHOMORE
needs mature male roommate to share 2-
bedroom apartment at Wilson Acres by
July 752-3122
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE with
option to renew lease from May - August
Two bedroom, less than a mile from cam-
pus. For more information call Michelle
or Emily at 752-9160
LOOK ATTENTION STUDENTS: Larg-
est selection of campus rentals available
May 1st and August 1st Duplexes, Houses,
Apartments Call HOMELOCATORS 752-
1375
WESLEY COMMONS 1 & 2 Bedrooms:
Free cable, water, sewer, walking distance
to campus. SummerYearly leases. Pitt
Property Management 758-1921
TYPING REASONABLE RATES
Resumes - Quick & Professional, Term
Papers, Thesis, other services. Call Glenda:
752-9959(Days); 527-9133(Eves)
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mo
bile Music Productions is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and expe-
rience of any Disc Jockey service in the
area. Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring
dates booking fast Call early, 758-4644
ask for Lee.
NEED TYPING? Campus Secretary offers
Speedy Service, familiar with all formats.
Low rates. Call Cindy: 355-3611
DATES
GUYS & GALS
1-900-726-0033 EXT.2550
$2.99 per min.
Must be is yrs.
RESEARCH INFORMATION;
Largest Library of information in U.S.
atisubjects
Oder Catalog ToC.iy w:ri Viy ' MC or C0C
ORDERING
HOTLINE
800-351-0222
Of(310:477-8226
Or. rusn S2 00 B Research Information
:?KahoA.ve. t-206 A JJi AngelesCAJCC25.
SIDDENTFARES
NYLONDON299
RDU-TOKYO939
NY - FRANKFURT409
Round trip Taxes extra.
Call for many other fares!
TRAVEL SOLUTIONS
(919)510-5550
FAX(919)510-5551
;
Greek Personals
SPACIOUS 3 bedroom, 2 bath, newly re-
modeled home, washer, dryer, ceiling fans
throughout, fenced backyard, campus
area. 750.00 per month 1 year lease. 524-
5790 or 752-8079.
GRADUATE MATURE STUDENT
wanted to share nice townhouse in
Courtney Square. Female preferred. $220
mo plus 12 utilities. Please call 321-8779
or leave message. Laid back, serious stu-
dent no pets.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female, non-
smoker to -share a 2-Br townhouse.
$190.00 12 utilities per month. Must
love cats. Available May 1st Call Staci 758-
4781.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a two bedroom apartment in Tar
River Estates for the summer months. Call
758-1818.
TAR RIVER ESTATES one male room-
mate needed, located on River.172 rent
14 utilities and phone. Call Kevin at 758-
6701
ROOMMATE NEEDED before April.
$197.50 rent and 12 utilities, cable, and
water included. Near campus with bus
access. Call 551-6941
NEW 1 BEDROOM APT. Dishwasher, w
d hookups. $325month 1 month de-
posit Available May 1st Please call 355-
6883
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE 2 Bed
room apartment 2 blocks from campus, 4
blocks from downtown. $300month.
Take over lease from May 5 to Aug. 15.
Furnished if needed. Call Mike at 752-
4075.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED: Female
nonsmoker(s) easygoing but responsible,
to share 3 bedroom2 bath apt at Wilson
Acres by July. Cost per month depends on
whether 2 or 3 people move is. Utilities
wili be divided. Call Sarah at 758-6591.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE FOR SUB-
LEASE for May, June, and July. 2 Bed-
room, fully furnished apartment located
at Ringgold Towers. Ask for Emily or
Stephanie. 830-8903.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT in 3
bedroom townhous. Plantation Apart-
ments, pool, hot tub, volleyball, tanning
beds, weight room, sauna, dishwasher,
washdry. $265month. 321-2922.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2
bedroom apartment which includes cable,
2 full baths fireplace. Contact Joy at 321-
6240.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to share
3 bedroom house at 101S. Warren Street
200 mo. and deposit and 13 of bills.
Private room with central ac and heat
Call 830-6055 and leave a message.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASING: fully
furnished efficiency apartment at
Ringgold Towers. New carpet couch, and
refrigerator. Water included. Available first
week in May. Call 757-0926
3 BR 2 12 BATH WASHERDRYER
REFRIG, othr furniture available. 640.00
a month incl. cable, wd, refrig, � extras
Sheraton Village. 321-0695 Sheldon (Any-
time).
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED for summer months beginning
May at Village Green. Non-smoker only.
195month 12 utilities. 1st months
rent free. Call 328-7808.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815758-7436
For Sale
rrw Personals
PI DELTA will be sponsoring a "Ronald
Run" 5K run and walk, Saturday, April 1,
1995. AU proceeds will benfit the Ronald
McDonald House of Eastern North Carolina.
For more information contact Honor Nebiker
at 7580598 or Christy Lentz at 328-9728.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA, Kappa Alpha, DELTA SIG: The social was great All
and Phi Tau present The Fist Annual Read- the fruity flavors just made our night! We
ing Day Eve Party - Doug Clark and Hot all had a blast Love, Delta Zeta.
Nuts and Liquid Pleasure. April 24.
BIKEGOLF CLUBS Trek 7000 with
Manitue II shock, bar ends, 2 wb cages,
seatpack, U-lock 550.00 Ping zing copy
clubs with graphite shaft 3-Sw 150.00.
Brain 321-7805
SURFBOARD FOR SALE: 7'6" Action
Longboard, Astro Deck. Tail Path, and
New Leash. Shaped Summer of 94. Excel-
lent Condition, RidesGreat! $290. 757-
3233.
GIORDANA MOUNTAIN BIKE;
Shimano ComponentsLook clipless ped-
als, Fair Condition $225.00 752-7721.
MCAT study materials for sale. Call 830-
4877
HONDA PRELUDE, 1984, red, sunroof,
Ac, 5 spd $2250 call 321-82.
DUPLEX FOR SALE 2108A E. 3rd
Street. 2 bedroom, 2 full baths, fireplace,
dishwasher, ice maker, new Maytag
wahserdryer, range, 950 sq. feet refrig-
erator, only 2 12 years old. Call Hart at
758-3877.
FOR SALE: 12-string Oscar Schmidt Gui-
tar. Mint condition. $200. 6-string
washburn guitar. Good condition $175.
Call Bruce at 752-1373
1985 FORD BRONCO II, XLS, 4-WD,
Power steering and Brakes. Runs good
and looks good. 758-8521.
1991 KAWASAKI NINJA 600A Black.
Excellent condition. New front and rear
sprochet wnew chain. Asking $3500.00
Negoitable
93 DODGE SHADOW - Red with grey
int 27,000 miles. In excellent condition.
$7,995 Call (919)792-6074 or Leave mes-
sage at (919)792-7411.
HOT! HOT! HOT! Some stuff on this page
could be stolen merchandise. Be sure to
ask for a bill of sale if you buy an item
from here. Remember, CITIBANK'S look-
ing out for you.
ATTENTION ECU! The 16th annual
BAREFOOT on the Mall will be held on
April 20. Don't miss it
VOTE: JANET STUBBS for SCA Presi-
dent and Maureen McKenna for SCA Trea-
surer. Let your voice be heard! Bring your
ID and Vote Wednesday, March 29!
Having trouble finding where to drop off
Classifieds and Announcements?
Well look no more!
Forms for Classifieds and Announcements
can be picked up in Mendenhall and
dropped off in the Student Pubs building.
Joyner
Library
We are
here
Student Pubs
Building,
2nd floor
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word
$0.05
Display Classifieds
$5.50 per column inch
Displayed
advertisements may be
canceled before 10
a.m. the day prior to
publication. However,
no refunds will be given.
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for
Thursdays edition
Ail ads must
pre-pafd
For more information,
call ECU-6366.
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announcements section of The
East Carolinian to list activities and events open to the public
two times free of charge. Due to the limited amount of space,
The East Carolinian cannot guarantee the publication of
announcements.
3?





13
Tuesday, Maech 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
fyceAdotf
I lym-
�Id on April
ECU GAIA CLUB Kristina Mel . I28 732, Gaia Club
ECL" GAIA CLUB PRESENTS: An invita President
tion for Greenville businesses and all
Greek organizations as well as ECU stu- SPECIAL OLYMPICS
dents to meet and discuss the future of The 1995 Greenvil
the Earth Day Bike Rally Topics will in- P�cs Spring (
elude funding sponsorship. Bike lanes � ' �
Bike Safety proposed mute, and
attendence. Evei terested meet a1 teersari i
the Howell Building, ! .
Room N102, Tuesday March 28
For more information call Chandler
Madray 752-9538. I assigned a
� � . ' '�;�'
Mo Library.
room I il '�'
�� ttended
1551
SPRING HEALTH FAIR
757-1070
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
Poetry Readings
8:00 pm
104 West 5th St.
Sun-Thurs 7am-12am Fri-Sat 7am-1am

-
:es. live


ot Health Pro
. 93
PRESENTATION TO GREENVILLE
COMMUNITY SHELTER
�: ii himor
f Natii - A I �: mth March
1995. the Ch . tei of Phi Alpha -
National Social Work Honor Society of
East Carolina University will make a pre-
sentation to the Greenville Community
on March 31. 1995 at 12:30pm.
in � will be receiving the donation
on behall facility. Our chapter advi-
I Lewis and president Jane
ilso he attending. Chi Zeta is
ng spoi red by The Pantry, Inc (lo-
cally store 799
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
rts will be sold again on April 2 be-
fore the trip to the farm Meet by 3:00pm
behind Mendenhall. T-Shirts are $10.00
each.
4TH ANNUAL AKA WEEK
Monday. March 27 - "Shades of You: A
Tribute to Minorities in the Arts" 7:00pm
at Mendenhall in Great rooms 1 & 2.Tues-
day, March 28- Sorors will visit the rest-
ills beginning at &:00pm to col-
ibk ' .ds to donate to the
Greenville Community Shelter. Wednes-
: March 29- The ladies of AKA will de-
e food and serve dinner at the
tielter Thursday. March 30-
� . ther in Todd Dining
al prayer of thanks
fortunate we all are
h a plentiful meal. Fri-
day, March 31 We are sponsoring a char-
ketball competition called "Hoops
Homeless It startsat 6:ii0pm and
will be held on the College Hill basketball
court located beside Belk Hall. Register
March 27-31 in front of the Student Store
to compete in the Free Throw Competi-
tion. 3-Point Shoot Out. or the Slam Dunk
Contest. Registration fee is $3.00 and all
proceeds go to the homeless shelter.
Prizes will be donated from various busi-
nesses in the community.
Whichever direction you decide to
take, we can help you get there in styl
with a brand new lord 01 M rcury
1( you're a graduating senior or a graduate student
you can get $400 (lash Back or a Spec ial A I'R'
$400 Cash Back or
a Special A.RR!
when you buy or lease a new 1994, 1995
oi 1996 Ford or Mercury car minivanor
light truck So graduate to a great deal
See your Ford or Lincoln-Mercury dealer or
call 1-800 321-1536 for details
� FORD
? I N OLN
H�J Mercury
SOCIETY FOR TECHNICAL
COMMUNICATION
The ECL' chapter of the Society for Tech-
nical Communication (STC) will hold its
annual Technical and Professional Com-
munication information Exchange Day
tomorrow 9:30am until noon on the first
floor of GCB. Students interested in pro-
fessional writing are encouraged to attend.
For further information call Stephanie
Lassiter 328-6366.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Come to the next AMA meeting on Thurs-
day. March 30th in CC. room 1032 at
3:30pm. Our guest speaker wili be Jeff
Parnell from Overton's. He will be speak-
ing about Direct Marketing. Refreshments
will be served All AMA members are en-
couraged to attend
LIVING WITH & APPRECIATING
PARENTS
Learn strategies for developing pe'sonal
independence while maintaining a rela-
tionship with your family. Can't live with
THEM - Can't live without THEM! Thurs-
day. April 6. 3:30pm-5:OOpm. Counseling
Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Exam Preparation: 4 5, 3pm-4pm, Exam
Strategies: 4 4. lOam-llam. Test & Per-
formance Anxiety: 43, 2pm-3pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
PHI BETA SIGMA
The Weekend of March 31 - April 2 the
Regional Conference for Phi Beta Sigma,
Fraternity Inc. will be held here in
Greenville. A variety of events are planned
which are FREE and OPEN to the public
unless otherwise posted. On March 31
there is a social at The Max from 10-until.
On April 1. there will be a Blue White
Ball at the Ramada Ballroom Tickets are
FREE! For more information contact
Lamont Burns at 355-8796.
CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES
Wednesday March 29 GCB 2019 4pm Dr.
Kelly will speak on "The Balanced Bud-
get Amendment and other Budgetary Is-
sues On Wednesday April 5th, the Re-
gional Coordinator for the John Birch
Society will speak on our Constitution.
Again, in GCB 2019 at 4pm.
MALE DIVERS NEEDED
ECU Swim Team needs male divers. If you
like to Flip and Twist, please contact
Coach Rose at Minges Pool about Spring
Practice and the team for next year.
ECNAO
ECNAO will be meeting in Mendenhall
Student Center on March 28 at 7:00pm
Room 248. Any questions please call Kim
Sampson 752-2319.
JAM-A-THON 95
Musicians are needed to play unplugged
music one weekend on April in the Plaza
or Carolina East Mail, for Jam-A-Thon in
order to raise funds for Disabled Vets of
NC. Musicians who can play and sing
songs from the Vietnam era, such as CCR,
The Doors, Jimi Hendrix. Etc. are in great
demand. If you have a serious interest
please call Rob at 7564916
PSPI (SELF-PACED) PHILOSOPHY
NOT OFFERED
Because course credit for proctors has
been prohibited, the Personalized System
of Programed Instruction can no longer
be employed. Proctors are the key com-
ponent in PSI, making possible self-pac-
ing, immediate face-to-face grading, repeat-
ing until 100 mastery is achieved, guided
review of material, and, through establish-
ing a friendly atmosphere, enhanced mo-
tivation. Thanks and best wishes to the
more than 6000 students, proctors, course
managers and course directors who have
proved that given an effective educational
design, students will succeed. Dr. Ross.
continue to take officer nominations and
will elect officers for the 1995-1996 term.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
TENNIS DOUBLES
Anyone interested in play ng tennis is en-
couraged to register for Recreational Set
vices Tennis Doubles before Wednesday.
March 29 at 5pm in 204 Christenbury.
Men's, Women's, and mixed doubles
leagues are available. For additional de-
tails please call Recreational Services at
328-6387
PASSOVER SEDER
A Passover Seder will be held at Congre-
gation Bayt Shalom on the second night
of Passover. April 15 at 7.45pm Reserva
tions must be made by April � For fur-
ther information, call 355-7374 oi 355-
105a
STUDENT LEADERS MEETING: AN
OPPORTUNITY TO NETWORK
The final general meeting for all student
leaders will be Wednesday. March 2lt. 1995
from 5-6pm. in 221 MSC The East Caro-
linian, Rebel, WZMB. and Expressions
Magazine will be featured. If your organi-
zation needs would like to be on the
agenda, please call 328-4796 by march 27.
1995
EXAM JAM APRIL 25.
Everyone is welcome. Come and enjoy
free food and fun. Play carnival games and
volleyball with your friends and just have
a good time. Bring a friend and relax for
a while - take a break from studying.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
March 28 through April 3. All events held
at AJ. Fletcher Recital Hall and FREE
unless otherwise noted.
TUES MARCH 28- GUITAR ENSEMBLE.
Elliot Frank. Director(7:00pm). SENIOR
RECITAL. Dennis Figgs, piano(9:00pm).
WED MARCH 29- YOUNG PEOPLE'S
CONCERT AND ECU SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Robert Hause.
Conductor(WRIGHT AUDITORIUM.
9:30am). JUNIOR RECITAL. Erik Harris.
euphonium(7:00pm). SENIOR RECITAL.
Amanda J. West, flute(9:00pm). THURS
MARCH 30- PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE,
Mark Ford, Director(8:00pm). FRI MARCH
31- TROPICAL BREEZE STEELBAND
from the University of Georgia, Tony
McCutchen. Directorf.AJ. Fletcher Music
Center, Room 105. 8:00pm). SAT APRIL
1- NC PERCUSSIVE ARTS SOCIETY
DAY OF PERCUSSION. Mark Ford and
Harold Jones. DirectorslAJ. Fletcher Mu
sic Center, 9:30am to 6:30pm) GRADU-
ATE RECITAL. Ruth Hwang,
piano(8:00pm). SUN APRIL 2- SUNDAY
AT THE GALLERY. AN AFTERNOON OF
VOCAL CHAMBER MUSIC, Sharon
Munden, Director (Greenville Museum of
Art 2:00pm) GRADUATE RECITAL. Chris-
topher Grymes. C!arinet(4:00pm). SENIOR
RECITAL. Kenya Tillery.
composition(9:00pm). MON APRIL 3-
CONCERT CHOIR. Brett Watson,
Conductor(8:00pm). For additional infor-
mation. Call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour
hotline at ECU 4370.
PITT VOLUNTEER ACTION
CENTER IS HOSTING THE EASTER
PHOTO BOOTH AT THE PLAZA
MALL APRIL 1-15, 1995
Volunteers are needed to dress and play
the role of the Easter Bunny and to take
pictures of the customers at the Photo
Booth from April 1st through April 15th.
All proceeds benefit the Pitt Volunteer
Action Center, where volunteers interests
and talents are matched to identified
needs in our community. Coine out and
assist us, so that we in turn can assist other
non-profits. Volunteers are needed from
11:00am to 8:00pm Monday-Saturday, and
from 1:00pm to 5:00pm on Sundays. Call
the Volunteer Center to sign up830-
6271.
be i
degree
CONTEST!
ECU Student Stores needs
your help naming our General
Book Department. We've
thought of "Pirate's Perusery
and PeeDee's Booke Shoppe
but these don't seem quite,
right.
We need your suggestion
before April 15th. so stop in
today and fill out an entry
form. We're open Monday -
Thursday, 8 am -to 8 pm.
Friday. 8 am to 5 pm. and
Saturday. 11 am to 5 pm.
If we choose your suggestion,
you'll get a $50 gift certificate
(and our thanks!). Plus, you'll
get the satisfaction of knowing
that of all the signs there are
all over campus, one of them
was YOUR idea'
Centrally Ittcatwl on campus,
in the Wright Annex
(919)328-6731
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next meeting will be Tuesday. March
28 at 5:00pm in MSC room 244. We will
The Price
Is
i
Our classifieds are only
$2 for 25 words with a
valid student I.D.
WANDSWORTH COMMONS
Convenient Central Location.
Close to Intersection of Arlington
and Evans. One and Two Bedroom
Units Available for $300 and
S375 a Month Washer Dryer
Hookups Basic Cable.
Central Heal and Air
CAMPUS SU1THS
located on East 10th Street
One Low Price Cm its Reni and
Utilities! These One Bedroom
Efficiency Units are Perfect Tor the
College Student On a Budjiei
.VolJ Month i eases Available
From S-2V Month
WOODCLIFF APARTMENTS
Located on East nuh Street
Walking Distance to ECl (toe and
Two Bedroom 1 nils Available For
SJIS and &4ii0 a Month Washer-Dryer
Hookups Basic Cable.
Water and Sewer included!
Qzntuos.
The Realt) Group
22 I Commen Street
Greenville N(





�'�'
IT" Til
14
Tuesday, March 28,1995
The East Carolinian
College Life:
A Few Ihings To Know
KHOW wh�'ch �ff-campMj
btoksoirt wl" buy fcflc, yaur"
4ed J'lr fexHook -for rnort tfcn 25 e�cA.
fcWOW W&ck ,30-ry�inu�J-or-in-fr:e
pixxa place alvvayi Tikes exactly 3� minutes;
Know? whtcK cvi
qartCr-Cfttinj laundromat
KVOwXHe cope,
IT AUAtt COST! l�J THA -�oo-
St
Hey, on college campuses those "in the know" are the ones who
rule. And it's not just about being smart in the classroom, it's about
being wise with your wallet as well. So if you want a great low price
on a collect call, just dial 1 800-CALL-ATT It always costs less than
1-800-COLLECT Always.
There are lots of tricky things for you to learn at college, but here's
something that's easy: KNOW THE CODE, and save the person on the
other end some serious money You'll be gjad you did.
Mill n ei pi ei
BE3BH
ODD
ALWAYS COSTS LESS
THAN 1-800-COLLECT.
ABgr.YourTraetoice:
� - �
t
� Promotions exduded 1-800-GOLLECT" is a service mark of Ma
AIKT


awtar
Vh I i i
��� ii hT" i � � ii





Title
The East Carolinian, March 28, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 28, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1068
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy