The East Carolinian, February 28, 1995






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cUtff
Februray 28,1995 �
Vol 69, No. 79
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
Fast Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Briefs
Around the State
High Point � North Carolina's "Booze It & Lose
It" program may have helped cut the number of drunk
drivers stopped at DWI checkpoints in half. Within
three months of the program's start, illegal blood
alcohol levels decreased from 2 percent to 1 per-
cent.
Durham � After imposing hefty increases last
year, Duke University is planning its lowest tuition
increase for undergraduates in a quarter of a cen-
tury. The decreased tuition increases are a result of
the declining high school graduation rates across the
state.
Raleigh � Jurors deliberated for less than three
hours Friday before sentencing James Edward Tho-
mas to die for the 1986 murder of a woman at a
Raleigh boarding house. The death sentence was the
second Thomas has received; in 1987, another Wake
County jury recommended execution for Thomas but
the sentence was overturned as part of a wide-rang-
ing Supreme Court ruling that sent scores of death
penalty cases back for re-sentencing hearings.
Around the Country
Sacramento, Calif. � Governor Pete Wilson en-
dorsed a 1996 ballot initiative to repeal the state's
affirmative action laws Saturday and told Republican
leaders such statutes are unfair. The Republicans
want to repeal all California laws granting state jobs,
contracts and admission to colleges on the basis of
race, sex or ethnicity.
Weatherford, Okla. � The eighth annual World
Championship Hog Calling Contest produced enough
squeals, grunts and manure for all. The title winner,
Roxanne Ward, took home $1,000 for first place af-
ter calling to a crowd of more than 700.
New York, N.Y. � Scientists implanted a gene into
mouse embryos by injecting it into the pregnant moth-
ers. A surprising result may someday let doctors treat
genetic diseases in the womb. Copies of the im-
planted genes may remain active after the mice are
born, leading scientists to believe there may be ways
to prevent serious genetic diseases and conditions
such as blindness, mental retardation and disfigur-
ing skull malformations before birth.
New York � Clouds of junk orbiting the Earth are
made of radioactive debris and may cause future en-
gineers to add more shielding to American space-
crafts. Radioactive and highly corrosive coolants are
leaking from junked nuclear reactors, satellites and
other space junk. The Soviet Union launched 33
nuclear-powered spy satellites during a 20-year pe-l
riod ending in 1987. added with U.S. satellites, a
cloud 600 miles up is threatening to wreak havoc in
Earth's orbit. Droplets in the cloud average the size
of a quarter but pack a powerful punch.
Around the World
Somalia � More than two years after their first
landing, the Marines came ashore in Mogadishu on
Monday to mop up the remains of a humanitarian
mission that fed tens of thousands of starving So-
malis but failed to bring stability. U.S. Marines came
back to the beaches of Mogadishu, returning to pro-
tect the last U.N. peacekeepers evacuating from
Somalia's chaos.
New light to ease traffic
Photo by JAMES THOMPSON
This new traffic light, located right outside Christenbury, is
intended to slow traffic and help alleviate pedestrian risk.
Pedestrian safety
gets a boost with
additional signal
James Thompson
News Writer
Daily car-dodging by
accessing main campus from Col-
lege Mill and drivers eager to get
through the congestion have
prompted the installation of a new
traffic signal on 10th Street.
As part nf a comprehensive
plan. ECU and the North Carolina
Department of Transportation
(NCDOT) aim to maintain a consis-
tent stream of auto traffic, while
enhancing pedestrian safety by
enstalling a traffic light at the
newly constructed intersection in
front of Christenbury
�The bottom of the Mill became
extremely congested, and the i
intersection offers a reasonable and
dleviate
ECl
-tit over more
medies is possible be-
� 10th Street � of ap-
i or three n iads ac-
N'CDOT,
city Lyons said.
: aid for the
NCDO tra ted Rivers and
out of Snow Mill to fol-
low ECU dii to implement a
vet.
The loop begins as traffic en-
� e nne way Brewster lot from
ge Mill Drive and 10th Street.
while the i al releases any
build-up at the exit in front of
Christenbury and Founders Road.
Exiting drivers can make left turns
eliminating a U-turn further down
10th Street. Student foot traffic is
'�.routed.
Pedestrians going from the
See LIGHT page 3
hctfcte
� � ��
Madness, Rhapsody spice up screenpage
QPmtmvxtay
Spring Break dampened by mean profs?page �r
"��� tueidacf
Pirates drown Seahawks in Williamspage





2
Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
hatting
hancellor
Crocodile Dundee � NOT!
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
On Dave Hart's departure
"We all are obviously going to miss Dave. He is not
only a sterling administratorathletic director he has be-
come a very good friend. It's hard to bid adieu to a friend, but
we can not deny him this opportunity
On faculty support at athletic events
"The faculty of East Carolina are much more support-
ive of athletics than any of my experiences at previous univer-
sities
On finding a replacement for Dave Hart
"Obviously we want somebody who will be able to rep-
resent the university well. We are looking for a person who can
help us sustain that reputation (which Hart helped achieve)
"On tuition increase
"That proposal is difficult for East Carolina University
and higher education in North Carolina. I just do not believe
that we should take the risk of harming this higher education
that we are building in this state. I would hate to see the stu-
dents who are currently enrolled suffer the results of this cut
On the governor's budget cuts (including
employee cuts)
"We are quite concerned. We are at a very critical mar-
gin of not having an over surplus (of faculty)
On the March 14 bond referendum vote
"That is really a critical vote for not only the citizens of
Pitt County, but particularly for East Carolina University. I am
hoping the citizens will step forward and support this
For many Americans, images of
Australia are based exclusively on the
film Crocodile Dundee, which stars
Paul Hogan as the good natured, quick-
witted adventurer. But Australia is
more than Crocodile Dundee - just
ask Robyn Hammond.
Hammond is on exchange this
semester from Deakin University in
Melbourne, Australia. She is studying
economics this semester at ECU and
will return home in May. Hammond
already has a degree in elementary
education, but decided she wanted to
change careers.
So far ECU has been a little dif
ferent from her school in Australia, but
Hammond is enjoying herself.
"ECU has far more facilities, as far
as computer facilities, sports and en-
tertainment facilities. ECU has a lot
more to offer and I find that fun
Hammond said.
In Australia, classes have fewer
exams, in some cases only one exam
the entire semester, which Hammond
feels makes classes slightly harder than
here. She added, however, students
only take four classes a semester which
eases the burden some.
"You have one exam at the end of
the year, which is worth anywhere from
60 to 100 percent So you really have
to know everything at the end of the
year she said.
Hammond had
visited the United
States before coming
to Greenville in Janu-
ary. Before her first
visit she had her own
misconceptions about
the U.S.
"My ideas about
America were what I
had seen on the mov-
ies and television
Hammond said. "In
Australia, we really
grew up on American
sitcoms and all sorts of
American TV.
"So generally, I
think Australians think Americans are
pretty crazy people when I got here
I found out that people are really quite
conservative and that surprised me
Hammond feels Americans have
their own misconceptions about Aus-
tralia as well.
"The first thing people ask me is
about Crocodile Dundee, and is it re-
ally like that there, which of course it's
not at all she said. "The majority of
the population lives in the cities in Aus-
tralia; although there are a lot of Croco-
dile Dundee areas, but hardly no one
lives there.
"Australia is
equivalent to the
U.S. in square
miles, but only
has a population
of around 18 mil-
lion; many
Americans are
unaware of that"
She said
she really hasn't
been gone long
enough to miss
anything too
much, but does
Robyn Hammond misf ,ner �
and tnends -
along with fresh
fruits and vegetables and Australian
Rules Football. Additionally, it is sum-
mer in Australia now.
Hammond has visited Los Ange-
les, New York, Washington, D.C. and
Massachusetts and went skiing in Colo-
rado.
Hammond feels the main differ-
ences between the United States and
"The first thing
people ask me is
about Crocodile
Dundee, and is it
really like that
there, which of
course it's not at
all"
Australia are in population and that
Americans "drive on the wrong side of
the road
"Because of the population here,
the economy is so big, and I find in
the shops you can buy anything, and 1
really like shopping here Hammond
said.
She worked for an airline in Aus-
tralia and hopes to work for the air-
line in revenue management after she
graduates.
Before returning to Melbourne,
Hammond will spend a few months in
Tokyo, working on her degree and
teaching English. Hammond feels she
will eventually return to the United
States and hopes to visit more places,
including going deeper south.
"There is a lot to offer here, and I
like the people here; I get along well
with them she said. "I find them to
be motivated people, very friendly and
fun people
Jones parties carnival-style
SPRING IS AT
THE BON VILLA
Residence hall
plans carnival for
students tonight
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Booths will be set up by ECU po-
lice, peer health educators, the
Catholic Center and Alcoholics
Anonymous to let students know
what alcoholism can do, said
Valerie Langford, a Jones Hall resi-
See CARNIVAL page 3
Ladies and gentlemen, step
right up and join the carnival from
7 to 9 p.m. tonight in the old Jones
Cafeteria.
Food and games and some edu-
cation will be provided for every-
one who walks through the door.
l-REE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential�
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
The Bon Villa Offer
� Oceanfront Rooms with
Efficiency
� Balcony Rooms with
Efficiency
� 2 Pools - Cable TV
Student Spring Special M lm
per person minimum 4 people
to room
Weekday Specials
�58P - M5lKJ
for two people.
Located VA Blocks
From Pavillion
Reservations: 1-800-331-4816
1-803-448-1136
SENIORS
Are You Ready For Some
FUN IN THE SUN
MARCH 1, 1995
10:00 a.m. - Until
At the Student Stores - Look for the Giant Purple Pirate Pass
First 250 SENIORS will receive a free beach towel
The next 250 SENIORS receive free sunglasses
GRAND PRIZE DRAWING AT 12:30 p.m.
One ECU SENIOR Will Receive
Two Round Trip Airfares ANYWHERE in North America
(includes Canada, Mexico, and the Islands)
For Free Fare on USAir You Must Have Your
Purple Pirate Pass to WIN.
i nmjunlfwi��
auMiiiiMi'nnni .iliiiji
ijii nil 11M1.1 mm )���!�





' �
Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
ThC GOP llVeS LIGHT from page.
Photo Courtesy of Young Repbulicans
The ECU Young Republicans who gathered to celebrate
Lincoln's birthday play an active role in Pitt County politics.
Professor
r.
Wi'vi
m
I- Eating &
STARTING THE 25TH OF
FEBRUARY AND LASTING
THRU THE Z8TH,
THE PROFESSOR WILL BE
JAZZING IT UP JUST A LITTLE,
YEAH RIGHT JUST A LITTLE.
Hill to the music building and
Brewster can safely cross at the
College Hill intersection, and stu-
dents using the footbridge travel-
ing to the General Classroom
Building and the central campus
area can use the new intersec-
tion Lyons said.
For students not compelled to
walk between the stark white
lines of the freshly painted cross-
walk, ECU is studying plans to
curb them.
"We are currently looking at
putting in landscaping that will
both deter students from ran-
domly crossing 10th Street and
add to the beautification of cam-
pus Lyons said.
The new light is approxi-
mately a 100 yards from the Col-
lege Hill intersection, which irri-
tates some motorists.
"Everything was fine the way
it was, and any moron should have
been able to cross the street with-
out any problem said Keesha
Kerns, graduate student.
"I've been around ECU since
1989 and didn't have as much
trouble driving down 10th .Street
as I do now
Biology freshman Yaqoob
Mohyuddin said, "It is good, be-
cause a lot of people walking and
biking to the residence halls need
some safety measures
NCDOT is responsible for the
timing of the lights, which work
on an East West and North South
cycle and use conventional sen-
sors. Since student safety is em-
phasized in the project, the North
South cycle exiting in front of
Christenbury lasts longer so pe-
destrians can safely pass through.
No writers
meeting Thursday.
Please be in touch
with Stephanie
before break for
story assignments.
Muchas gracias!
CARNIVAL from page 2
I
LIKE YOU COULD JAZZ IT UP
JUST A LITTLE WITH:
-GULF SHRIMP -CRAWDADS
-CHICKEN GUMBO -HURRICANES
-RED BEANS AND RICE
ALL SERVED WITH A LITTLE
DIXIELAND JAZZ.
show ran lb:
to receive up to
$500
College Graduate Rebate
on selected new cars.
Mate available up to 6 month
prior topduation.
Call Georgefor detaib
at3SS-3333
dent adviser.
"(We're doing this to let stu-
dents know about alcoholism and
how easy it is to get sucked into
it Langford said. "Also, the legal
aspects of it, a lot of people don't
understand, if you're goin; down-
town all the time, a lot of people
are proud of getting smashed or
trashed and we're trying to give an
alternative to that
Jones Hall coordinators have
been working hard to bring resi-
dents an alternative to drinking.
Recreation services will have games
setup all night long. Subs, chips
and drinks will be available.
"We're bringing in five games,
pop-a-shot - it's a little basketball
game with a hoop and you throw
the ball in to see how many times
you can score a basket in a minute
said Angela Bowman of Recreation
Services. "We're going to have a
miniature golf game with three
greens and a Frisbee disc golf and
bucket ball game and shuffle-
board
Bowman plans on keeping stu-
dents busy while they roam around
the carnival.
"We looked at what we had
available and what we felt the stu-
dents would be interested in and
what they would like in choosing
games for the event Bowman
said. "It should be a lot of fun
Circus coordinators are plan-
ning to have a great time.
"It started off small, but now
it's grown Langford said. "We
haven't come up with a name for it
yet, but we're probably going to call
it a 'carnival of fun. "
Langford said the carnival is a
celebration in itself.
"We're kicking off using the
old Jones Cafeteria Langford said.
She said the hall's last event,
Mocktales, had a pretty good turn
out and is looking forward to see-
ing a crowd tonight.
"Its going to be real fun,
there's going to be music going on.
It's a festive thing said Leslie
Bethea, Jones Hall coordinator.
COURTSIPE
Across from the cou
urthouseOn the corner of Evans
East Carolina
Auto & Truck Center
Lincoln MercuryChrysler Plymouth Dodge
MEMORIAL DRIVE � GREENVILLE, NC
355-3333
1-800-849-3385
St. Mall and Third St.
FailuesDaYBHeK
feBRUaRV 28TH
Come Get a Taete of
Hew Orieane:
�Red B(?ane and Rice
� Shrimp EtoufrV
�Food Served Between 11:00-2:00
During the week of March 20-24, be sure to guarantee your
housing and dining arrangements for next year.
You can win great prizes in the process
When you live on campus, you're a winner because you can
�Select the roommate, room, resi-
dence hall, and meal plan of your
choice
�Continue to meet exciting and in-
fluential new friends
�Avoid the commute to and from
campus
�Have freedom from daily parking
hassles
�Forget about shopping, cooking,
and washing dishes
�Enjoy easy access to campus re-
sources such as the library, class-
rooms, and recreational facilities
�Have the option to choose from
four flexible meal plans
�Take advantage of job openings
right where you live
�Save money. On-campus Irving is
less expensive than off campus
�Relax and savor your freedom from
summer sublease hassles
Do you live off campus but want to be a winner? Drop by WWchard
214 and we'll show you how!
uu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
University Housing And Campus Dining Services
Ansel Adams.
Alfred Stieglitz.
Annie Leibovitz.
You.
(But your first name doesn't
have to start with "A)
Like those above, good photographers
need experience with different subjects,
equipment and deadlines.
The East Carolinian can give you that and
pay you for your efforts. :m
Students interested must have a 2.0 GPA
and working knowledge of photographic
equipment and developing skills.
Apply at our offices in the Student
Publications Building, Second Floor.
(across from Joyner).
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
T





� �
V�
Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
Yayl Spring
Break is only a
few days away!
We are very
ecstatic, and
know you all are,
too. Now, as for
you professors
who have papers
due either two
minutes before
Spring Break or
two minutes after
Spring Break
Only three more days. OK, two if you're leaving early. One,
if you're leaving VERY early. Y'ali know what we're referring to
- don't act like you're not aching to reach Friday afternoon.
SPRING BREAK IS (almost) HERE!
As the editorial department of ECU's only student-run news-
paper, we hereby declare ourselves wholeheartedly, absolutely,
100 percent in favor of this sacred week. We thank God, Bud-
dha, Mohammed and anyone else who can in any way be held
responsible for granting us weary, overworked and underpaid
students a luscious week of relaxation.
Of course, if you're stuck here in this good ol' Emerald
City, you might not be beaming quite as much, but certainly
any sort of break from the regular same old same old is wel-
come, right?
Well, we have several pointers to share with anyone travel-
ing beyond the confines of ECU and Greenville. But first, some
words of hope and good fortune.
Wherever you're headed, may the sun be always on your
face, the wind forever in your sails, and the beverages always
flowing into your cup. (We mean orange juice, ginger ale, diet
coke, etc etc. of course.)
Remember that if you're planning to tell strangers where
you're from, please represent East Carolina University in a good
light and don't kill anyone. Please refer to our tremendous win
in Atlanta a few years back, our wonderful Medical School, and
our fondness for Dave Hart Elaborate.
Speak positively about our grounds, and expound upon the
glories of our productive construction staff working tirelessly
to develop a high-tech, visually pleasing campus. Shake off those
negative feelings about parking spaces (or lack thereof) and
smile brilliantly as you discuss possible options for a parking
deck. (Go ahead, suggest Chancellor Eakin's house as an ideal
site.)
And above all, send many postcards to all the mean, nasty,
ferocious, down-right heartless professors who thought they
could ruin your week in paradise by assigning papers, and other
nonsense. Laugh in the face of deadlines, because we hear
Chancellor Eakin volunteered to write any papers that are due
after Spring Break. What a guy! If you need his office number,
give us a call -)
I
Like a snowball in hell
An unabashedly pro-Clinton ar-
ticle appeared in the Feb. 21st edition
of TEC. The essay confirmed to me that
President Clinton may not have in-
haled, but the author of the aforesaid
article certainly did. If all said in the
sickening article is true, then Bill and
Hillary should be considered for saint-
hood. Of course, this is not the case.
With his wet finger raised to the
air testing the political winds, Clinton
the chameleon is desperately trying to
portray himself as a moderate Demo-
crat In "Slick Willie's" 1993 State of
the Union Address he desired to see
"what government can do because" he
believed government could, and
should, do more. In other words he
touted big government as the answer
for everything
The next year, Hillary's husband
proudly held up a proposed Health
Security Card and promised socialized
health care for all. Thankfully, partly
because his not so brilliant wife was
on the job, the un-American plan failed.
And in the last State of the Union Ad-
dress. Clinton suddenly wishes to make
government smaller? Yes, he said
"SMALLER
President Clinton's latest "conser-
vative" sounding speech is nothing
more than a hurried attempt to save
his political butt from the soon to come
fire in 1996. Don't be fooled, Bill
Clinton is about as conservative as his
wife.
Steven A. Hill
Opinion Columnist
Clinton fans, your
bubble is about
lobe burst. He
just ain't gonna
make it in '96.
An assertion made by lastweek's
disillusioned Guest Columnist is that
President Clinton loves to "press the
flesh" - and indeed he does. Accusa-
tions by Gennifer Flowers, Paula Jones
and former Miss Arkansas. Sally Per-
due, confirm Clinton's apparently in-
satiable fondness for female flesh.
Allegations by these women are
corroborated by L.D. Cooper, former
president of the Arkansas State Troop-
ers Association (disreputable?), who
has testified that on at least 100 occa-
sions he personally solicited women for
Clinton. So Clinton and Kennedy do
have something in common. Just like
Kennedy, Clinton cannot control his
libido.
Continuing it seems that hardly
a month passes without a member of
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Printed on
�' ricjcled i
paper
Stephanie B. Lasstter, News Editor
Tamhra Zlon. Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Rozzeii, Creative Director
Danyt Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mine O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brohst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Panl D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Edttorjhe East Carolinian, Publications
Building. ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
��
MPRESSlOAABLfcl CHILDREN EVERYWHERE
REACT TO CURRENT TRENDS M "�tT NEWS
seems right to me
the Clinton crew jumping ship. David
Watkins, former White House chief
administrative officer, deservedly left
his post after it was found he was us-
ing the presidential helicopters for
golfing trips. Webster Hubbell stepped
down from his appointed position af-
ter pleading guilty to felony charges.
Former Deputy Treasury Secre-
tary Roger Altman "deliberately lied"
in last year's Whitewater hearings.
Fallout from the Whitewater hearings
also claimed the political lives of White
House counsel Bernard Nussbaum as
well as Treasury officials Jean Hanson
and Josh Steiner. Steiner, Hanson and
Altman, according to the GOP report
suffered from "various degrees of
memory lossdesigned to obfuscate
the truth
According to sources quoted in
the Washington Times " Of about
1.000 FBI background checks of White
House personnel, more man 500 re-
vealed derogatory information that
would have prevented the people in-
volved from obtaining security clear-
ances at the FBI, Defense Department
or the CIA Point being besides dis-
playing por judgement, if you can
judge a person by the people he sur-
rounds himself with, then our presi-
dent is not saint
For the sake of brevity, I must end
here. But to sum things up, allow me
to say that Clinton has not a snowball's
chance in hell for reelection in 19.
Somewhere during the late six-
ties our culture began to punt the idea
of ethical and moral absolutes. Our
grandparents would have laughed at
this notion, but as Allan Bloom, au-
thor of The Closing of the American
Mind, states, "There is one thing a
professor can be absolutely certain of:
almost every student entering the
university believes, or says he believes,
that truth is relative
Now, more than ever in history,
people believe that issues are decided
by individuals and there are no abso-
lutes. Moral dilemmas of our age deal
ing with various ethical questions
such as abortion, euthanasia, premari-
tal sex, and capital punishment thrust
the issue of right and wrong into a
quest for public approval rather than
a pursuit of objective standards. Our
battle cry is "if it is right for you, it is
O.K
It is very easy to say that truth is
relative, (that there are no objective
moral principles), but it is much more
difficult to live as if there are none.
Statistics say that most of us claim to
be moral relativists (as in "1 don't be-
lieve in abortion, but it may be right
for you"). However, our behavior
seems to reveal otherwise. Our reac-
tions when we are mistreated reveal
exactly what we believe about the
nature of morality.
If you honestly believe that truth
is relative, just try this little test to
see how relativ 'ruth really is. Go into
a friends dorm room and unplug his
stereo and take it with you. If he asks
Shane Deike
Opinion Columnist
Almost every
student entering
the unversity
believes that truth
is relative.
you what you are doing, teil him you
feel like taking his stereo and there-
fore it is right for you to do so. If
(when) he objects, explain to him that
truth is relative and what may be right
for him is not necessarily right for you.
You want his stereo, therefore it is in
you moral realm to go and posses his
stereo. Your choice has made it "right
for you
Michael Homer, the Canadian
philosopher, states, "If we truly claim
to be moral relativists, then we must
be willing to concede that it is mor-
ally acceptable for people to steal our
possessions, for our papers to be
graded on the color of the cover, or
for Nazis to kill Jews There are no
absolutes to say who is right or wrong.
If it is all relative, then it is just my
opinion vs. yours, or the opinion of
one culture vs. another. In other
words, Nazis were not wrong, we just
forced our view on them by winning
the war.
Of course many will say the ba-
sis of our moral standard should be
"it is O.K. as long as you are not hurt-
ing someone, or it is not violating their
rights But of course we have no ab-
solutes to determine what these rights
are. We must ask ourselves, "Who
determines who is hurt and by what
criteria?" What may be regarded by
one group as hurtful, can be looked
at by another as a just punishment -
who is to say, because all ideas are
equal.
If ethics were culturally relative,
one could not condemn as immoral
what another culture approves, even
if that is racism, infanticide or whole-
sale genocide. I do not have the right
to impose my belief system upon them
because it may be right for them. My
standard is no better than their stan-
dard.
So what's the point. The point is
that there are absolutes. Moral abso-
lutes. Standards that are right for all
people, for all times, for all places. The
very statement that there are no ab-
solutes in and of itself claims to be an
absolute (and thus is self refuting).
Our opinions are not the guide posts
of right and wrong, but moral law over
rides personal preferences. Cicero, the
Roman philosopher, stated it well
when he said, "Only a madman could
maintain that the distinction between
honorable and dishonorable, between
virtue and vice, is only a matter of
opinion
.
-�i
H
Letters

A4 I
1
1 I
O l
Letters
4
To the Editor
Many Greeks at ECU were an-
gered and upset after last week's
showing of 'A Reason to Believe a
controversial movie regarding the
issue of date rape. Much of the con-
cern voiced in the panel discussion
after the movie dealt with some of
the stereotypical aspects of Greek life
portrayed in the film. Marty Greeks,
myself included, felt as if those ste-
reotypes should have been discussed
before th movie was shown.
Do not confuse Greek's anger
toward the movie to be a lack of con-
cern about this issue. All Fraterni-
ties on this campus have national
policies regarding date rape or sexual
abuse. On the contrary, Greeks were
upset due to the 1970s "Animal
House" portrayal of Greek life. The
Fraternity representation in A Rea-
son to Believe' consisted of a group
of immature alcoholics, drug addicts,
and sexists. Although the Greek as-
pect of the film was by far second-
ary to the central issue, the nearly
700 students who left prior to the
panel discussion had to leave with a
negative opinion of Greek life.
Date rape is a crime. The issue
should not be trivialized in any way.
It effects all Greeks, Clubs, Sports
Teams, Dorm Students, and any
other group. This crime has no place
in our Greek societies or our Univer-
sity Community. I sincerely hope
people do not mistake the concern
of ECU's Greeks about stereotypes
as a lack of compassion about this
issue. And, most importantly, I hope
all Greeks and Non-Greeks who
viewed 'A Reason to Believe' recog-
nized the central message aboui the
crime of date rape.
Justin C. Conrad
Interfraternity Council President
Junior, Political Science
To The Editor:
I am writing in response to the
movie that was shown at Hendrix
Theater or Tuesday, February 21 and
dealt with the subject of date rape
sponsored by Student Health Ser-
vices. While the movie supposedly had
good intentions by teaching aware-
ness of date rape on college campuses,
the prevailing theme that actually
came out of it was totally
antifraternity. Throughout the entire
show fraternity men were portrayed
as drunks, sexists, backstabbers, and
most incorrectly, rapists. While I will
admit that drinking among fraterni-
ties is a problem, it is also the same
among independents. On the subject
of sexism, fraternity men have a name
to uphold. The name and reputation
of their respective letters is something
that is very dear to each and every
one of us. It is a feeling that cannot
be explained to someone who has not
experienced it. nor do i intend to fry
to explain it. I would assume that all
fraternity men feel the same about
their respective brotherhoods. As for
stabbing a brother in the back by rap-
ing his girlfriend is his own bed. I do
not know of, nor have I ever heard of
something such as that ever happen-
ing in iny fraternity. Now 1 am not
denying that no girl has never been
raped by fraternity man, but 1 do take
extreme exception that this poor ex-
cuse for a movie portrayed fraternity
men as the one and only group of men
that rape on college campuses. What
about all the athletes that rape dur-
ing "roid rage" for instance? There
have been many, many more cases of
that on this campus especially in Scott
Hall in the last few years.
In conclusion. 1 am not saying
that date rape is not an important is-
sue, What I am saying is that to at-
tempt to place the blame solely on
fraternity men just because thev are
successful and, most times, affluent
white males and it is now politically
correct to bash fraternities, is com-
pletely and totally erroneous behav-
ior. An organization such as Student
Health should be much more consci-
entious of their position of responsi-
bility to the students, and fraternity
me, on this campus.
Gregg Longworth
Senior
Political Science
Pi Kappa Alpha
Vice-President
Got something on your mind, pal? Well, why
don't you write a Letter to the Editor? We don't
crucify people up here. But if your supporting
argument sucks, well





Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
� ICC
"TKottfe Tevlew
Guitar and Soda
Madness, Rhapsody
offer a change of pace
tyte Shibley
$taff Writer
j On a recent trip to Atlanta 1 be-
came acutely aware of the limitations
of Greenville. I ventured to Phipps
Plaza where two films of interest were
being screened. As
Hooked at the mar-
quee while waiting
for tickets I realized
that 14 films could
be seen in just that
one location
(Phipps only has 12
screens, but two
screens were shar-
ing films). Fourteen
films! That's three
more than can usu-
Fourteen films!
That's three more
than can usually
be seen in all
Greenville.
ally be seen in all Greenville.
Not only were the number of
screens amazing, but the quality of
the cinematic art being projected on
those screens was equally awe- inspir-
ing. The Jerky Boys could not be
found, neither could The Brady
Bunch (although both those films
were being shown elsewhere in At-
lanta). Instead, films recently honored
with Academy Award nominations
were being shown: Quiz Show, Red
and The Madness of King George. An
art house film called The Last Seduc-
tion was also there. The shortcomings
of the films found in Greenville were
all too painfully evident For a film
lover, Phipps could be equated to cin-
ematic nirvana, while Greenville could
be more akin to a level of Dante's
Inferno.
I decided to see two films back-
to-back at Phipps. For those who
haven't been to a big city iately, credit
card purchases can now be made. Un-
fortunately, films cost $6.50, so you
need plastic to pay. 1 got to see two
interesting films that both deserve to
be seen in Greenville, although nei-
ther probably will. One film was good,
the other great.
The good one was
a Woody Allen-
esque film called
Miami Rhapsody,
starring Sarah Jes-
sica Parker, Anto-
nio Banderas and
Mia Farrow. The
great film was a pe-
riod-piece adapted
from a play called
The Madness of
King George.
Watching the two films together
provided an intriguing contrast Mi-
ami Rhapsody provided more enjoy-
ment while watching it. The film, as
directed by David Frankel, sparkles
with comic wit and engaging perfor-
mances. Four different relationships
intertwine and propel the film. Sarah
Jessica Parker makes witty barbs
throughout, like when she tells her
Dad that she lost faith in him when
he voted for Bush, which sparks genu-
ine laughter. Yet despite the warmth
and humor, the film provided only
fleeting enjoyment
Miami Rhapsody centers on
Gwyn (Parker), a spunky advertising
writer looking for a perfect marriage.
What she sees around her is a brother
(Kevin Pollack) cheating on his wife
See MADNESS page 7
PAiofo Courtesy of Student Union
Modern-day folk singer Christine Kane returns to campus on Wednesday when she
performs at 1:30 p.m. in Wright Soda Shop as part of ECU'S Noon Day Tunes series.
Ella is not just a bunch of pretty faces
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
There is something lurking in the
Greenville air that is making the people
dance and sing. That something is Ella.
This foursome knocked O'Rock's to its
knees Friday night and if you weren't
there, you missed out on something
great
Opening for Ella was Green Bone
Dance. They were a definite asset in get-
ting the crowd prepared for the head-
liners. Most of their songs were upbeat
and catchy, and the crowd seemed
pleased with their efforts. I for one re-
ally enjoyed the cover they did of New
Order's "Love Vigilantes It was well
done and crispy around the edges, just
the way 1 like it
The New Order cover ended up
being Green Bone Dance's last song,
and the crowd waited in anticipation
for Ella to take the stage. As soon as
their equipment was on the stage, and
mJ 1
ket
Artist at Work
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
"A Drop in the Bucket" is Just
what it claims to be: a very tiny drop
in the great screaming bucket of
American media opinion. Take it as
you will.
In his insightful and utilitarian
book. How to Read a Book, Mortimer
Adler, with coauthor Charles Van
Doren. suggests that every reader
take an informative and practical ex-
ercise. Adler suggests that readers
imagine that they will have to spend
the rest of their lives on a deserted
island with only 10 books to keep
them company.
What would those books be and
why?
They would be 10 books of ut-
most importance in one's life. Can
most students at ECU choose 10
books that have edified their lives?
Allan Bloom writes in The Clos-
ing of the American Mind that when
he would ask students what books
were important to them, the students
would look at him with blank expres-
sions. Do students still view books
as being important in their lives? Are
books today used either for classes
or as a pleasant diversion but not for
self-edification?
Adler makes very few boundaries
on the books to be chosen for the
island stay. When making my own list
I included books that I have not read,
but I tried to limit my selections to
works by a single author instead of
reference books like the dictionary. I
also forced myself to choose indi-
vidual works rather than a collection
of works in one volume. Thus I chose
only one Shakespearean play instead
of Bard's complete works.
The exercise has proven to be
most challenging - and fun! I h�e
communicated through e-mail with
a friend who has shared his list with
me and have encouraged friends on
campus to think about making such
a list
Lists help one to make deci-
sions that would not ordinarily get
made. Though sometimes difficult
to choose between different works
of art - music film, books, paint-
ings - the process of critically ana-
lyzing one's thoughts proves useful
in an understanding of oneself.
"Know thyself" still seems to be
among the most simple codes for a
life well-lived. No one ever reaches
the goal of knowing thyself, since
the search is a life-long process, but
those engaged in an active pursuit
of understanding themselves usu-
ally lead happier lives because they
have defined more clearly what they
desire from life.
So making a list of books, aside
from being fun, provides one with
insights into one's soul. Plus, if
friends can be encouraged to devise
their own list then truly enlighten-
ing conversation may arise.
Books can enrich lives as well
as provide innumerable pleasures.
A book is the friend that will never
desert you, the stimulating conver-
sation lacking in so much of daily
life, the guide to a deeper under-
standing of oneself, and mostly a
heck of a good time.
Making a list of 10 books may
even stimulate you to reread some
of the books on your list I encour-
age you to take a few minutes (or
preferably longer) and mink about
making a list of the books you would
keep for a lifetime.
File Photo
Here a mysterious masked sculptor works diligently on
what he no doubt hopes will be his latest masterpiece.
after many problems with the micro-
phones, a surprise performer appeared.
Trey Rideout (formerly of the band
Organ), with his guitar in tow, led us
through a reminiscent melody about
all the greatest TV shows. The crowd
went nuts when he stopped playing in
the middle of the song and sang
"Goddamn she rocks the free world
Even 1 was impressed with his musical
abilities.
As soon as the 'amazing" Trey left
the stage, Ella jumped into their first
song, "Break This is a catchy little
number that's very energetic and fun
to dance around to. The crowd seemed
to enjoy it also.
A little later in the set a man with
a red jacket named J.T. was summoned
to the stage. Armed with his trumpet
Ella and J.T. tore through this instru-
mental number, which was appropri-
ately called "J.T Either this song was
a real crowd pleaser or J.T. had a lot of
friends in the house, because the crowd
went nuts again after they finished the
song. I will admit that "J.T is one of
my favorite songs because it shows that
Ella is willing to experiment with dif-
ferent sounds and has enough ability
to make it sound good.
Singer and guitarist John Stancil
had to step away from the microphone
when it came time to sing the song
"Little Murder This song is bass player
Jason Connolly's moment to set the
world on fire with his vocal abilities.
The song was originally done by the
Buck Pets, but Ella's version is much
better. This is also one of my favorite
Ella cover songs, because having more
than one vocalist keeps things moving,
and the people involved in the show.
Ella's set was fast-paced and full
of diverse sounds. One of the songs
that kept the crowd enthralled was the
cover of the Go-Go's hit "Vacation
Mike Westbrook showed his ability
playing the guitar lead, and the rest of
the band backed him up superbly. This
song had the whole place singing and
dancing, which can be a dangerous
thing in O'Rock's.
1 think that my all-time favorite
Ella song is "Leave Me Alone They
saved this one until close to the end
because it is one of those "just when
you thought that we couldn't be any
better, then pow" songs. Brian
Kluender, Ella's drummer, had a great
beat on this song, which helps "Leave
Me Alone" be as good as it is. Even
though this song does have that Green
Day sound it's got a lot of merit and
definitely sounds original.
When it was time for Ella to say
good night they finished their set with
the old tune "Blue Moon Even
though this song was sweet it was also
really funny. I don't think that John
knew all the words to the song because
in the middle of it he started singing
snatches of other great golden oldies
to fill in the vocal lines. Even though I
was out mere dancing to this song like
everyone else, I started laughing just
the same. Even through the little mis-
takes, Ella has proved that they are not
one of those bands trying to be cool.
They just are.
CD. Reviews
One Hit Wonder
Where's the World?
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
With a name like One Hit Won-
der it would seem as if this band was
asking to be joked on. After hearing
their CD, I have decided that is ex-
actly what they want. Lead singer and
song writer Dan Root says, "It's re-
ally about music integrity our mu-
sic integrity. We feel so strongly about
what we do and what we have to say
that by having a name like One Hit
Wonder, we invite the wrath of cyn-
ics that abound, unfortunately, in this
industry. When they're done slagging
and slamming us for it, we'll still be
here, performing the way we expect
ourselves to perform I guess their
intentions are good, but talent and
ambition don't always go hand in
hand.
These guys hail from Orange
County, California, and have been lo-
cal heroes in the Long Beach area for
some time. They call their music an
intelligent blend of raw punk energy
and a large measure of sophisticated
power pop. 1 have to ask if these two
things need to be added together?
Should the ethos of Brian Adams and
the Sex Pistols be amalgamated?
As far as the music goes, it is se-
verely watered-down punk. If you can
imagine Green Day toned down to the
point of harmlessness, that may give
you some idea. Their method is the
power guitar approach with an abun-
dance of bar chords and really pre
dictable structure. This is not punk;
it's not even on the same planet as
punk.
The lyrics are where I really take
offense. I mean, 1 can put up with pre-
dictability, but the lyrics are so bad
that they are laughable at times. Let's
take "Break Your Heart" for example.
"I'm into mind control and like a voo-
doo doll. I'll bring you pain in that
stomach pain Is there some hidden
meaning I'm missing here or is that
really bad?
"Where's the World" takes on
environmental subjects, which is ad-
mirable, but writing badly about it is
not. This opening song and title track
takes on all the standard issues:
See HIT pa 6
O

E �
Fact: Over its lifetime,
the cost of the energy
to run a refrigerator is
typically three times its
original cost.
Tip: When purchasing
a new refrigerator,
consider the yellow
Energy Guide label on
the appliance. You may
very well find that the
more expensive, more
efficient unit will actu-
ally save you money in
the long run.
� 1995 Kevin A. McLean, Tampa, FL
sari
In
�mmMMtfp en s'si wmi





$1 !
I
Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
Visit Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood
NEW YORK (AP) - What do you
expect? A closet tyrant? A clone of the
crazed TV newscaster who goes bonkers
on the air in the movie Network
Not Fred Rogers.
What you see with PBS' Mister
Rogers is pretty much what you get
"People say to my wife, 'What's he
like? Rogers, the star of public
television's longest-running children's
show, said. "What you see is what you
get It's just who I happen to be
Mister Rogers' Neighborhood has
been a fixture since 1968.
The show has been an unexpected
success since the first day and reaches 8
million households and child care set-
tings a week, according to its producers.
"I think the program's timeless, sort
of an evergreen said David Newell,
Rogers' longtime spokesman and the
man who plays Mr. McFeely, the neigh-
bor who runs a speedy delivery service
on Mister Rogers. McFeely is Rogers'
middle name.
"Fred knows exactly who he is and
what his purpose is Newell said. "He's
kind of like an electronic Dr. Seuss.
He has a mission
"He sees himself as a communica-
tor, not as a performer Newell said.
"When he's in New York, he can't
walk down the street" Newell said. "A
lot of Hispanics come up to him and s,
'You taught me English They stumbled
across it (on TV) He speaks right to
the camera, very slowly, simply but cor-
rectly, usually showing something he's
talking about
Rogers has filmed his shows in Pitts-
burgh for more than a quarter-century.
Rogers recalls coming to Manhat-
tan last year to promote a book he'd
written and to appear on Live With Regis
and Kathie Lee.
"It was frantic he said. "1 thought
Is this the pace that people have to live?'
"They say, 'You are a quiet island in
a very hectic day It's who I am. 1 feel
the greatest gift we can give to anybody
is the gift of our honest self
"Of course, I get angry. Of course, I
get sad. I have a full range of emotions. I
also have a whole smorgasbord of ways
of dealing with my feelings Rogers said.
"That is what we should give children.
Give them ways to express their rage
without hurting themselves or somebody
else. That's what the world needs
He writes the scripts, is the show's
puppeteer and also composes the musi-
cal score. Rogers was a music graduate
of Rollins College in Florida.
"I feel these programs are built the
way I'd like to make a composition he
said.
One of Rogers' favorite sayings is,
"Play is a child's work
Though his sweater is on display
at the Smithsonian, Rogers said, "I
have really never considered myself a TV
star. I always thought I was a neighbor
who just came in for a visit"
- The,
COMedY
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Come by Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center
AN EVENING WITH
i�aM�
tmmmmmmmmm
HIT
from page 5
Exxon, the rain forest and landfills. The
writing is immature, and the music is
equally naive. Punk is spoiled, all-see-
ing and certainly not naive, so why does
this band associate itself with this
genre? That's where the money is now.
To round out my negative speech
I will have to add that this is another
casualty of the constantly growing
pseudo-alternative music that is taking
over everything. How I long for the
days when Paula Abdul gave me a clear
and distinct enemy. Don't buy this CD.
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Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
WANTED
Computer Whiz
Graduate Computer Science Major
to develop medical database and linkage.
Must be willing to work with, and tolerate
computer illiterates! call lawrence
Brown or Heramba Prasad at 81 6-21 54
ECU School of Medicine. Division of EMS
MADNESS t
rom page 5
.ind e;
and I'
film never wallows in serious issues
The closest comparison to Miami
Rhapsody is Annie Hall. Both films
with the main character talk-
ing to the camera. Sandwiched be
tween the monologues is the story of
a relationship tulJ as
within a flashback. Despifa the simi-
- though, Miami Rhapsody still
seems fresh and promises better
oner in his own hoi
ful son atten I
throne. The film exp
ol the country when a n
comes ill a
between r

des m imt -
ful episodes in the till
of the film �� � .
�TTfTTTTTTTTTTTTfi
projects for writer-director Frankel. which serves a the
The Madness of King George to the story itself since I i
plods along at a deliberate pace for ness destroys him
two hours. Little action occurs and ness gets overo
characters makes the Madness of King i
story difficult to follow at times. The
director of the play of the same name.
Nicholas Hytner, and star Nigel
Hawthorne (for which tie was nomi-
nated for best actor) make the film
seem like a stage play. The MaJi "
seem like a stage play, the Ma:
of King George tells a truly remark-
able story about George 111. the kini
uhm iiKt thj rnlnnip� to tht' I nitpn
anie story anoui (eorge in. uie miih
who lost the colonies to the United
States, and his temporary madness 6 a
which no cure could be found. George
(Hawthorne) runs through the castle
in his nightshirt and begins to del
ecate anywhere he chooses.
The queen (Helen Mirren in a
marvelous performance) watches help-
lessly as her husband becomes a pris-
The film, though slow .
tional and intellect
Playwright Alan B
insisted that Hyti
be hired for the film. Th
as a play, the lilm transcends
ited sets by the sharp dialogue an
incredible performances Still
seems slow and only a
film to sink in did 1 realize
wonderful a piece ol art I had seei
The next day I constantly th
The Madness of King Geor
rarely even considered Miami
sody.
Perhaps the iistinct
drawn between tht
. film like The Madness
� .ill never he shown
. film like Miami
si ince. While
lg an entire society
iture an opinion that most
� the ability to appre-
� work of art like The
' King George. Too often
iok for a quick entertain-
will pass the time with-
. them Hence the huge sue-
' hollow, shallow film like
p and the failure of a
� � tic masterpiece like
The Madness of King
be seen only by the art-
n iwd and disparaged by every-
ing boring.
� my musings about the
� films in Greenville. 1 rejoiced
tw i quality films being released
inema still thrives and has
impletely replaced by
, S hwarznegger pictures.
see either of these two
should be taken. If not. keep
d for a video rental.
. scale of one to ten. Miami
itesa seven and The Mad-
King George rates a nine.
The Elbo Presents �
Tuesday, February 28th, 1995
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J





Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
ECU stomps Seahawks
& 49ers to finish season
Seniors Gill &
Robinson lead
Pirates in final
home game
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
� ���
The visiting UNC-W Seahawks
couldn't handle a scorching Anton
Gill, who poured in a game-high 26
points as the Pirates clipped the
Seahawks' wings on the way to an
easy 62-46 victory.
"Our seniors stepped up and
played like they wouldn't be denied
ECU head coach Eddie Payne said.
�We had a pretty good year
With a new attendance record
set at Williams Arena (7,670). the
Pirates (18-10. 7-7 CAA) guaranteed
themselves a fourth-place finish in
the conference, as they evened the
season series with the Seahawks (16-
10, 10-4 CAA) at one game a piece.
"We were beaten tonight UNC-
W coach Jerry Wainright said. "East
Carolina is one of the best basket-
ball teams in the conference. They
play well together
ECU fell behind early but played
strong behind seniors Chuckle
Robinson (10 pts) and Anton Gill,
who were making their final appear-
ance in Williams Arena. The Pirates
overtook the Seahawks at the 14:26
mark in the first half on a Gill jumper
and foul shot.
"Anton, offensively, is tough
Coach Payne said. "He can play in
and out. We tried to get Anton the
ball away from the basket a little bit
Tenacious defense was the name
of the game for Payne and the Pi-
rates. Starting by limiting Seahawk
leading scorer Chris Meighen (14.5
ppg) to just 8 points, the Pirates went
on to shut down the perimeter shoot-
ing of guards Mark Byington and
Ganon Baker, and held UNC-W to 38-
percent shooting from the field.
A cold UNC-W team shot the
ball reluctantly in the first half, and
made good on just 35-percent from
the field, while ECU nailed 60-per
cent from the floor.
"It's been a long season Coach
Wainright said. "We relaxed and re-
laxed at the wrong time
In the second half, the Pirates
extended their lead to 16 on a Gill
one-hander in the lane at 17:07. At
the 11:36 mark, freshman guard Tony
Parham landed hard on his shooting
arm. causing alarm to both Coach
Payne and the spectators
enact
Payne sa
has been solid all year.
As the CAA Championships wi
be in full swing March 4-6, the Pi-
rates are preparing to battle the
Eagles of American University.
"We have a lot of momentum
Robinson said. "We have to remain
focused
"We've played pretty well
Coach. Payne said. "Now the real sea-
son begins
On Wednesday East Carolina de-
feated the I NCCharlotte 49ers in
convincing fashion, scoring a 89-71
See HAWKS page 10
Go on
Girl!
Tomekia "Fruky"
Blackmon matched her
season-high points total,
by pouring in 26 during
the Lady Pirates' 64-61
victory over William &
Mary. The senior has
battled knee injuries for
much of her career, but
has become a huge star
in Greenville.
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Pirates at 11- 0, sweep Bison & Hawks
pnii
NOTES
Tomekia Blackmon had a sea-
son-high 26 points to lead the Lady
Pirate hoopsters to a 64-61 victory
over William & Mary on Friday
night. Blackmon was 10-of-15 from
the floor and added six rebounds
for head coach Rosie Thompson's
squad.
Tracey Kelley added 10 points
and a team-high seven rebounds for
ECU, who upped their record to 7-
16 with the win. The Lady Pirates'
next game will be on Wednesday
night at 7 p.m. in Williams Arena.
(SID) - The ECU Lady Pirates
wrapped up a three-day road trip
with a win against Elon College. The
Pirates, now a perfect 3-0 on the
season, got tour single victories to
edge the Fightin' Christians by a 4-
3 margin.
Freshman sensation Rachel
Cohen nabbed her third win to vault
her record to 3-0. The Pirates also
got wins from Lisa Hadelman.
Hollyn Gordon and senior Elke
Garten, at the number three, five
and six seeds, respectively.
Garten and Gordon, playing at
number three doubles, solidified the
Pirate win, upping their record to
2-1 on the year.
Individual match results were
not available, but the Lady Pirates
return to the road next Thursday,
when they travel to the South Caro-
lina coast to take on Coastal Caro-
lina. Match time is set for 2:00 p.m.
The men's track squad re-
turned to action this weekend at
the Mobil 1 Invitational, on the cam-
pus of George Mason University, in
Fairfax, Va. At the annual event,
head coach Bill Carson saw his re-
lay team finish fourth in the finals
of the 4x200 (1:29.77) and fourth
in qualifying for the 4x400
(3:15.73).
In the 4x200, the lineup of
Keith Barker, Steve King, Dwight
Henry and Brian Johnson posted a
time of 1:29.77, and saw St.
Augustine s go on to place first with
a time of 1:25.99. St. Augustine's
time broke the meet record which
was held by East Carolina (1:26.93).
set at the 1992 competition.
"We had some confusion on
the (starting) time Carson said.
"We got on the track late and didn't
have time to warm up or stretch out
but St. Augustine's ran a great race.
They are really good
In the 4x400 race Carson
made a lineup change as Lewis
Harris replaced Steve King and ran
lead-off.
"Lewis did a real nice job
said Carson. "He gave us a good
lead- 1 liked what he did
The Pirates were in control
most of the race until Brian
Johnson and Dwight Henry had
problems with the exchange on the
anchor leg. "We had a bad ex-
change, and Brian had to chase the
kid from Miami and just ran out
of gas. which let the other teams
pass him said Carson.
ECU will travel to Gainsville.
Florida on Thursday to compete
in the Florida Last Chance Relays
and try to qulaify the 4x400 squad
for the U. S. Track and Field Cham-
pionships in Atlanta this weekend.
Carson explained that the Pirates
will have to run around a 3:09.00
to have a shot. "UST&F will tike
ten teams and everyone right now
is around a 3:08.80 or 3:08.90.
We'll go down there and give it a
shot
After three days of competi-
tion. Northern Illinois and North-
western Universities were crowned
co-champions of the 1995 Lady Pi-
rate Invitational Softball Tourna-
ment. Each team had a record of
4-1, therefore the champion was
chosen by run differential. North-
ern Illinois and Northwestern each
had 19, so both were chosen as
champions.
Erin Robson and Susan
Harrelson of Northwestern were
voted members of the All-Tourna-
ment Team. For Northern Illinois.
Denise Bloy and Ann Colgan were
chosen.
Other All-Tournament Team
members are listed below:
Chassity Chronick, Radford
University
Dawn Conrad, East Caro-
lina University
Jen Jewell, Universtiy of Mary
land Baltimore Co.
Courtney McClelland, Towson
State University
Kelly Mcl.ain. Robert Morris
University
Melissa Mullins. Campbell
University
Shannon Salsburg, I'enii
State University
Christina Siuniak. St Francis
College (Pa.)
Edwards triples;
batting .600 in
early season play
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
East Carolina's baseball team,
playing for the first time in nearly two
weeks spotted the Howard Bison a 2-0
lead in the first inning of a Friday
doubleheader before numerous offen-
sive explosions led to a 17-2 victory.
With eight runs in the fifth inning,
the rout was on, highlighted by a two-
run single by freshman Billy Benson
and a RBI triple by leadoff hitter.
Lamont Edwards. Loesner. Tigyer and
Yerys all had RBI singles in the inning.
Chad Newton, a junior transfer
from Brevard Junior College, earned
his first win as a Pirate, pitching seven
innings while allowing only live hits
Kyle Billingsley rounds third after an early-season homer.
Senior golfer sets sight
on NCAA touri
and two unearned runs.
The Pirate batters pounded out
16 hits on their 34 at bats in the week-
end opener.
On Sunday. ECU. led by freshman
I)H Tim Flaherty's second career home
run. defeated Monmouth College 131
in the third game of a tour-game se-
ries. The reserve catcher's three-run
homer came in the bottom of the sixth
inning.
Brian Yerys, Dennis Dunlap and
Lance Tigyer each drove in two runs
to contribute to the Pirate attack.
Senior Jason Mills recorded his
second victory of the season to remain
undefeated. He pitched a complete
game, allowing only three hits and one
unearned run.
The Pirates were 8-0 this week-
end, ainning their record to a perfect
1 l-O. their best start since 1986. Other
scores from the weekend included two
more blowouts of Howard. 15-2 and 10-
See BASE page 10
Eric Bartels
Assistent Sports Editor
As Pirate senioi goll co-captain
David Coates continues his final colle-
giate year under ECU golf coach Hal
Morrison, he will be aiming for more than
a CAA title.
"We are in the toughest region in
the country senior Pirate gotfeocap-
tain David Coates said. "We are con-
stantly lighting with Duke or Maryland
few the last spot. The first six spots are
iranteed to Wake Forest. UNC, N.C.
State. Clemson, Virginia Tech, and Vir-
ginia
1 would like to be a team leader
rfSID
and win two or three more tournaments
Coates said. "I would also like to get at
least, an honorable mention for All-
America
With his first tournament victory
in the Old Dominion Seascape Invita-
tional earlier this season, this may be the
year that ECU not only wins the CAA
title in golf but advances to the NCAA
finals as well.
"He has progressed and is a real
hard worker Coach Morrison said ot
Coates' improvement at ECU. "He has
gotten better every year
The Pennsylvania native, who was
sought after by Ohio State, Perm State,
and Temple, attributes his freshman year
as a missed opportunity to succeed in
St
"I was playing better golf out ot high
school Coates said. 1 red-shirted my
freshman year and lost my competitive
edge. This year. 1 am putting all aspects
of my game together: putting, chipping,
my long game and my short game
A business management major at
ECU who not only excelled in golf in high
school but basketball as well. Coates lists
several prestigious golf courses up and
down the east coast as his "stomping
ground
"We play in the Florida Southern
Tournament in Lakeland, and then we'll
play Augusta - the home of the PGA
Masters Coates said. "We'll play in the
College of Charleston Tournament and
if we don't do well at those three tourna-
ments, we won't have a chance to go to
nationals
With cocaptain Trey tervis, Coau s
will he busy leading the youngei golfers
while preparing himsell foi post CAA
competition.
"1 hope to mate sure that everyone
qualifies, and that we get the five best
players to each tournament Coates said
In the past our coach had to pick five
Ortd&urttyd
ninion Seascape Invitational, David
� team.
See GOI.F page 10
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
This "rah-rah stuff for Greg
Louganis has got to stop. Sure,
he racked up a bunch of medals
at the Olympics, but his failure
to disclose something as lite-
threatening to others such as his
HIV4 status while competing in
Seoul is inexcusable. Although
not required by the IOC to expose
his condition, as the disease was
looked upon in more of a nega-
tive light in 1988, Louganis didn't
even bother to tell the on-site
doctor of his condition - the doc-
tor who stitched him Up unpro-
tected after ol' Greg smacked his
melon on the high-dive. I'm.
Greg? I'd think that especially you
would have known that AIDS
doesn't have a cure. and. due to
your blatant lack o respect and
compassion for others, you could
have infected anyone and every-
one diving in Seoul Book tours
and Barbara Walters can't cover
up your irresponsibility, and the
sympathy hit doesn't work foi
you Magic lohnson quit playing
hoops before he had a chance to
spill tainted blood all over the
hardwood, and still has the re
: ol the sports world You
don t
Sec POND page 9





Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
Magic disagree with NBA
POND
from page 8
(AP) - The Orlando Magic upset
with the one-game suspension imposed
on Shaquille O'Neal by the NBA on Sat
urday. said it wasn't all their man's fault
O'Neal was suspended by the NBA
for an altercation with Boston Celtic-
rookie Erie Montross during Friday's 129-
103 Magic victory He charged Montross
after the two became tangled up while
positioning for a rebound just five min-
utes into the game, lunging and hitting
the Celtics center in the throat area
"We telt it was a shove and some
people teel it was a punch Magic vice
president of operations John Gabriel said
"Rod Thom (NBA vice president of op-
erations) told me it was somewhere in
between, but clearly it was a blow and
that's why they suspended Shaquille.
"The physical play is something
Shaquille has been dealing with every
night this season and if the referees don't
clean it up, he loses his temper. I think
that's what happened in mis case
Magic coach Brian Mill said l f Neal
complained alter the game about
Montross playing dirty. The Celtics de
feated the Magic Thursday night in Harl
ford. Conn.
"Shaq told me it all started the night
before and tins was just a carry over,
Hill said. "He felt that Montross had
played him dirty the night before and it
was happenning again.
I I'NVal was suspended without pay,
which will cost him about $58500. He
ed $5,000 by the league and be-
cause he was ejecu d Friday he must pay
an auti imatic 51,000 fine. That raises the
price of the push to $64,500.
II Neal missed Sunday's home game
against Chicago.
rwo 1 s-
Detroit rk ndei sun and
I. A 's Tommy Lasorda, made strike
�v tions last
' argu
ments tii omeoi
took a stand. Lasorda.
said he bleed- Dodg i blui
proved it by n
with L.Asi rda has
been with the Dodgi i organization
with managing replacement play-
ers He stressed that it was a per
sonal decision, and that he didn't
do it for anyone but himself The
underlying message here is that in
Detroit, a strong union town, even
the beloved Sparky would find tak
ing the field with a bunch of scabs
could become a dangerous and bos
tile act.
Ande
Dodgers, hut mos
a good.solid und
signs his paychei
11 i othei hand, took an
im Del
saving that h
age the
itly. has
; of will)
son on
a
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ATTENTION: APPLICATIONS
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FOR SGA EXECUTIVE
COUNCIL POSITIONS
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
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TREASURER, SECRETARY
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:
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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS
YOU MAY CALL. THE SGA OFFICE AT 328-4726
Sttarky s





10
Tuesday, February 28, 1995
The East Carolinian
GOLF from page 8 BASE from page 8 HAWKS from page 8
random players, because we did not
qualify. Everyone needs to qualify, so we
can take the best five each week
"He is very good in that role Coach
Morrison said. "He has a lot of charac-
ter, and will be very' helpful this season
After the season concludes for
Coates, who will graduate in May. he will
he pursuing a golf career in the PGA.
"I have sponsors lined up as soon
as I graduate fall of '95 Coates said.
"I'll play two or three years, and won't
have to pay the money back. If it doesn't
work out, then I will probably go back to
graduate school
�og gone?
Find it in our classifieds.
Only $2 for 25 words
with a valid student ID.
1, plus a 2-1 decision over the Bison.
Against Monmouth. Gary Overtoil's
squad won another three games (7-1.4-
1, and 9-2).
Through the first 11 games of the
season, second baseman Lamont
Edwards leads the team with a .600 bat-
ting average, plus a team-leading 20
runs scored and nine stolen bases. Lance
Tigyer has made the most of his 24 at-
bats, recording a .375 batting average
and 14 RBIs, a team-high.
On the mound, all of the Pirate
starters have pitched well, especially
Billy Layton and Jason Mills, second and
third on the team in strikeouts. Hard
throwing freshman Patrick Dunham has
made quite an early impression, strik-
ing out 13 batters in just nine innings
pitched. Jeff Hewitt, a transfer from
Methodist College has pitched well out
of the bullpen, and has recorded the
only save for the Pirates this season.
ECU will return to action this Sat-
urday when they play in the Bojangles,
Seahawks Baseball Challenge in
Wilmington, North Carolina. They open
against the South Carolina Gamecocks.
upset over former Farmville Central
star Jarvis Lang and his teammates.
UNC-Charlotte (18-6) was ranked
30th in the Associated Press poll
prior to the contest.
The Pirates were led by CAA
Rookie of the Year candidate Tony
Parham and fellow underclassmen
small forward Tim Basham. who fin-
ished with 18 and 21 points, respec-
tively.
The closest Charlotte would
come to winning the non-conference
contest in Williams Arena was when
Lang scored two of his team-high
19 points on a alley-oop slam dunk
to give the 49ers their first and only
lead of the second half at 65-64.
"That is the best team we have
beaten in this arena Payne said.
"I am really proud of our guys and
the way they competed. We
bounced back from a tough lo
the Pirates '
old Domi ion e ited oui I just to
game plai erywell We made that is as good
Lang v. irk hard for his points and
defeated a very oJ UNC � i "Th
lotte team played up to tl
49ers head coach Jeff Mullins They played a
impres
as anyoi
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i Payne thai
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ild.
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When:Tomorrow MARCH 1st & Thursday MARCH 2nd
EXTENDED HOURS! 7:00am-9:00pm
SHOP EARLY FOR BEST BUYS!
Where:Old Roses store at Stanton Square-Stantonsburg Rd
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Oil and Filter Change $16.95 Everv Day
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3140 MOSLEY DRIVE
GREENVILLE NC 27834





� � T�
P
l
11
Tuesday, February 28,1995 The East Carolinian
CLAS
ehb
For Rent
If-
Help Wanted
NOW LEASING 2 Bedroom 1 and 2 Bath
Apartments stove. Frig, Dishwasher,
Washer Dryer, Water Sewer Basic Cable
included. 2 Blocks from Campus. On site
Manager Call 752-8900
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 1 bedroom
apartment at 810 Cotanche St, Rent $225
month Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 1 bedroom
apartment available March 3 and Two
bedroom apartments available for Rent
Free Cable. Call 758-1921.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASING: 2
Bedroom apt in Wilson Acres Complex.
Available after May 3rd. Sublease through
December. Very nice unit! Call 8304940.
2 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE. 1 12
bath, fireplace, fenced porch, lots of extra
storage, washerdryer hookups, pool, ten-
nis courts, private parking, pets ok.
$440.00 Brookhill. Call anytime 321-7805.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE NEAR WILD
WOOD VILLAS. 2 rooms available. $70
rent 14 utilites phone, Call Wayne 752-
7540, pager 551-5257.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share two bed-
room apartment Close to campus, roomy,
on ECU bus route. $197.50 12 utili
ties. Call 752-1033 late afternoons and
early evenings.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMED LATELY
to share spacious two bedroom apt close
to campus, quiet atmophere $185.00 a
month. Call 758 153
THREE PEOPLE NEEDED to iublease
at Kingston Place. Two bedroom, 2 12
bath, cable and water included. Fully fur-
nished and bus access to campus. For
more information call Abigail at 355-5194
RARE AVAILABILITY: 2 Bedroom
Apartment on 5th Street above Percola-
tor Coffee House. Mint condition. $450.00
a month. Please contact Yvonne at 758-
2616.
ATHLETIC, PRE-MED SOPHOMORE
needs mature male roommate to share 2-
bedroom apartment at Wilson Acres by
July. 752-3122
OCEANFRONT SUMMER RENTALS
1,2, & 3 bedroom cottages at mp 9 in Kill
Devil Hills, NC. 4month student leases
avail, near restaurants & nightclubs. Con-
tact: Elizabeth Newman 919-261-3844
ROOMMATE NEEDED: one bedroom
in Four bedroom house near campus.
$100 a month plus 14 utilities. Call John,
830-9526.
FEMALE NEEDED to share a 2 Bedroom
apt $170month12 utilities by end of
May. Call Jeannie 756-7532 after 5 pm.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.). Seasonal and Full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53624
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY Clean,
High volume Adult Club needs YOU now.
Confidential employment Daily pay Top
Commissions. Some to no experience. If
you've called before call again. Playmates
Massage Snow Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
S1OS400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own hours!
RUSH Self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298-8952.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-2514000 ext
1576. Leave Name, School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS of
North Carolina this summer? For summer
employment and housing information call
Paul at 800662-2122
APPLY NOW. $10.25 TO START. Grow-
ing firm has openings in Greenville, Posi-
tive, friendly people needed to work with
our customers. Flexible hours. Good r e-
sume experience. Call 919-881-0034
POOL MAINTENANCE TECHS: Spring,
Summer, Fall 95. GreenvillePitt County.
Call Bob 758-1088.
LIFEGUARDS: Spring. Summer.
Greenville, Goldsboro, Smithfield, Tarboro.
Call Bob 758-1088.
NEW NATIONAL STAMP consolidation
Co. now hiring reps, to enlist people to
send the Co. their used and cancelled
postage. In exchange (as your clients will
be paid a handsome commission check f or
their stamps), the Co. is willing to pay each
rep. a direct $50 check for every person
they sign up. No personal selling is neces-
sary. For registration and materials send
$4 and one 32$ stamp to : Post Rider
Enterprises, Eastern Reginonal Division,
1906 West Road, Kinston, NC 28501
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED: Earn
$1000's Weekly working at home mailing
our circulars. Free details, Send SASE:
R&B Distributors. Box 20354, Greenville
NC 27858
WANTED: Industrial Technology major
preferred for part-time lab operations,
sophomore or freshman preferred. Part
time in afternoons from 3-7 pm. If inter-
ested contact Diane Barnhill at Doctors
Vision Center at 756-9404 for more infor-
mation.
SZECHUAN EXPRESS - Plaza Mall needs
cashier Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays
114. Extra hours are available if desired.
No phone calls please. Apply in person
11-9.
Having trouble finding where to drop off
Classifieds and Announcements?
Well look no more!
Forms for Classifieds and Announcements
can be picked up in Mendenhall and
dropped off in the Student Pubs building.
Joyner
Library
Mendenhall
We are
here
Student Pubs
Building,
2nd floor
CAMP PISIEWOOD
Suaatr Camp Staff
COUNSELORS, INSTRUCTORS, &
OTH�R POSITIONS for western
North Carolina's finest Co-ed
8 week youth sunnier recreational
sports canp. Over 25 activities,
including water ski, heated
pool, tennis, horseback, art
Cool Mountain Climate, good pay
and great fun! Non-smokers.
For applicationbrochure:
704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood,
Hendersonville, NC 28792.
PART TIME - FLEXABLE HOURS night
and weekends - Cleaning, Assembly &
mold waxing at local Boat Man ufacturing
Plant. Fill out application at North Ameri-
can Fiberglass - 758-9901
CHEERLEADINC INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED to teach camps in NC & SC.
Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free week-
ends! Strong skills and great personality
necessary. College experience not re-
quired. For a great summer job, CALL
ESPRIT! CHEERLEADINC 1-800-280-
3223!
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK. Make
up to $2,000-$4,000mo. teaching basic
conversational English in Japan, Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For information
call: (206) 632-1146 ext J53623.
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, we'll pay you to! Make
your A's pay by calling Student Supple-
mentstoday.rilpayyoucashforgoingto H0 (MIN Olffi CLASSMSl
class. Give us a call at 752-HELP.
LOOKING tOR A SUMMEfi
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
�FREE AUCUST RENT
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
IT. or Tommy Williams
756-78157 58-7436
For Sale
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Displayed Classifieds
$5.50 per column inch
Displayed advertisements may be canceled before 10 a.m. the
day prior to publication. However, no refunds will be given.
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announcements section
of The East Carolinian to list activities and events open
to the public two times free of charge. Due to the
limited amount of space, The East Carolinian cannot
-guarantee the publication of announcements.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Novy Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR
GPA OR EXAM SCORES? We have the
edge you need to succeed. Student Supple-
ment of feres study guides based on the
notes of the "A" student in your class.
Give us a call at 752-HELP.
6'2" ACTION COMPETITION SURF-
BOARD excellent condition, front and
rear deck. Pro Lite board sock, brand new.
Reef gutter racks. $175 Call David 752-
0392
SNES BRAND NEW, 5 top 10 games, all
boxes and papers. $200 Call David 752-
0392
GENUINE ACURA ACCESSORIES: Set
of 6-spoke Pol. Alum 14" rims, 250.00 obo
Vg cond. Fits 90-93 integra sunroof de-
flector: $25.00 (752-2000 ask for John)
JL AUDIO 10" SUB IN 1.5 ported,
dynamat lined box, moster cable powerline
internal wiring, black carpet covered.
$200.00 (752-2000 ask for John)
SPECIALIZED STUMP JUMPER 18"
MTB, Carbon shock, many extras. $900
obo. Will take parts off for less . Jeff 757-
1961.
NEED TO SELLMacintosh LC Com-
puter, GTX stereo, 3D Camera, Uueen
sized waterbed. Great Prices. Please call
Matt at 321-8798.
ELECTRIC GUITAR. Jackson Dinky Re-
verse. Sunburst Purple figured maple top.
Floyd Rose tremelo. Hardshell case. New
$475.00 Call 752-3945
&Sf" Services Offered
J
TYPING Reasonable rates" Re-
sumes-quick & professional. Term papers.
Thesis, other services. Call Glenda: 752-
9959 (days): 527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call 1
900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min. m ust be
18 or older. Find that special someone!
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53623
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE your GPA
or exam scores? We have the edge you
need to succeed! STUDENT SUPPLE-
MENTS offers study guides based on the
notes of the "A" students in your classes.
Give us a call at 752-HELP
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mo-
bile Music Productions is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and expe-
rience of any Disc Jockey service in the
area. Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring
dates booking fast Call early, 7584644
ask for Lee.
NEED TYPING? Campus secretary offers
speedy service, familiar with all formats.
Low rates. Call Cindy: 355-3611.
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library ol information in U.S
all subjects
Oiaer Catjlog Tcxtty witn WSJ ' MC o C0C
3
Travel
800-351-0222
OM3I0) 477-8226
HOTLINE
Of rush S2 00 M Research Inlofmatton
i7iCBnoAyet2Q6 fi JJR AGae'?s?9C'C2JL
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY beach
Florida, from $91 per person per week
Free Info 1-800488-8828
SKI-SPRINGBREAK'95 Intercollegiate
Ski Weeks, ONLY $209. Includes: 5 DAY
LIFT TICKET 5 NIGHTS LODGING
(LUXURY CONDO) 5 DAYS
INTERCOLLEGIAT ACTIVITES (Drinking
Age 18), Sponsors Include: Labatts,
Molson and MT. ORFORD Quebec,
CANADA (Just across the Vermont Bor-
der) Group Leader Discounts. Campus &
Greek Reps Needed. Call Ski Travel Un-
limited. 1-800-999-SKI-9.
AII ads must
be pre-paid
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
For more information, call
ECU-6366.

Greek Personals
DELTA SIGMA PHI - Thanks for the trip
to Margaritaville guys! The T-shirts are
great! We're looking forward to the next
time. Love, Zeta
PHI KAPPA TAU: Thanks for bringing
Spring Break a week early. We all had a
blast especially with your pinata! Love,
Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS to the Chi Omega
water polo team for having a great sea-
son. We are all really proud of you for
putting up a hard fight Love, your Sis-
ters.
PHI KAPPA PSI would like to thank all
those who supported our Cool-Aid Ben-
efit Come again next year.

rj pm m





r
�,
12
Tuesday, February 28,1995 The East Carolinian
ANNOU
ECU HONOR BOARD, SGA
Individuals interested in serving on the
ECU Honor Board may pick up applica-
tions starting Friday, February 24 at 210
Wichard Bldg. or the SGA Offices in
Mendenhall Student Center. Completed
applications are due Tuesday, March 14
at 210 Whichard. Karen Boyd. Advisor:
for further information call 328-6824.
COMMUTER AWARENESS WEEK
The week of February 27 - March 3 has
been designated Commuter Awareness
Week. The purpose of this activity is to
let commuter students know of the many
services and activities available to them
on campus. Stop by the tables in Wright
Soda Shop and the lobby of GCB on Tues-
day. February 28 and Wednesday. March
1 from 11:30am to 1:00pm and 5:00pm to
6:30pm for a chance to speak with repre-
v��
PAIN.
�&r'
COK
CTS
�&�S&&"
For last relief from the nagging ache of taxes, we
recommend TIAA-CREF SRAs. SRAs are tax-
deferred annuities designed to help build add.tiona!
assets-money that can help make the difference
between living and living �fl after your work.ng years
are over.
Contributions to your SRAs are deducted from
your salary on a pre-tax basis. That lowers your
current taxable income, so you start sav.ng on taxes
right away. What's more, any earnings on your SRAs
are also tax-deferred until you receive them as income.
That can make a big difference in how painful your tax
bill is every year.
Ensuring the future
for those who shape it.s
As the nations largest retirement system, we otter
a wide range of allocation choices - from TIAA's
trad.tional annuity, with its guarantees of principal
and interest, to the seven diversified investment
accounts of CREFs variable annuity. What's more,
our expenses are very low.0'which means more ol
your money goes toward improving your future
financial health.
To find out more, call our planning specialists at
1 800 842-2888. Welt send you a complete SRA
information kit. plus a free slide-calculator that shows
you how much SRAs can lower your taxes.
Call today �it couldn't hurt.
I) i ,r. ' Ail ilyli.il P-il-l 1W4 (Quarterly) CREF
�itadW rf �� '� 2� ,19T- ,LT' SlScTi-X �� comply iriM dud charge, ana
7 g�g KEF gggg Z pu. careMUou �, , eney J
sentatives from the various student ser-
vices offices on campus.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CLUB
This is your last chance to buy a T-Shirt
or Sweatshirt Don't miss it! Our next
meeting is Wednesday. March 1st, at 4:30
in Speight 129. Our Speaker is Beth Ward
who is Principal at Wintergreen Elemen-
tary School. She will be discussing what
she looks for in an interview. Be There!
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL
COLLEGE STUDENTS
General College students should contact
their advisers the week of March 20-24 to
make arrangements for academic advising
for Summer Session and Fall Semester
1995. Early registration week is set for
March 27-31.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi wil meet on Tuesday,
February 28 at 5:00pm in Mendenhall
room 244. All members are asked to at-
tend
ECU CAMPUS MINISTRY
ASSOCIATION
ALL STUDENTS AND FACULTY are in-
vited to participate in a simple, pancake
meal and act of worship to mark the be-
ginning of the pre-Easter season of Lent
Lent is a time of sacrifice and reflection
to prepare for Easter. The pancake sup-
per will be held Tuesday. February 28 at
the Methodist Student Center. 501 E. 5th
St at 5:30pm. A free will offering will be
taken up for the support of the Homeless
Shelter.
ASH WEDNESDAY AT THE
NEWMAN CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce special March 1 Ash
Wednesday Masses with the distribution
of ashes: 8am at the Newman Center, 12
Noon in the Great Room of Mendenhall
Student Center and 5:30pm at the
Newman Center. The Newman Center is
located at 953 E 10th St, 2 houses from
the Fletcher Music Bldg.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
OnCampus Interviews for students inter-
ested in working at Radisson Resort's
Kingston Plantation on Tuesday, March
21. 1995 at Cooperative Education, GCB
2300.
1995 GREENVILLE EAST SEALS
VOLLEYBALL CHALLENGE
The 1995 Greenville Easter Seals Volley-
ball Challenge will be held at ECU'S
Minges Coliseum on March 25-26. Pro-
. ceeds will benefit programs in the
Greenville area for disabled children and
adults. Anyone can participate, so come
out for a day of volleyball, fun, and com-
petition. Teams will have the opportunity
to win trophies, dinners, t-shirts, and trips!
For more information on competing or
how you can help, call Melissa Wallace
with Easter Seals of North Carolina at
(800)662-7119
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
February 28 through March 6. All events
are held at A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall and
Free, unless otherwise noted.
TUES FEB 28-JUNIOR RECITAL, Mat-
thew Blake, guitar (7:00pm). WED
MARCH 1-CONCERT BAND. Christopher
Knighten. Conductor (WRIGHT AUDITO-
RIUM, 8:00pm). THURS MARCH 2-SE-
NIOR RECITAL, Kristi Swain, soprano
(7:00pm). SENIOR RECITAL, Daniel
Beilman, trombone (9:00pm). For addi-
tional information, call ECU 6851 or the
24-hour hotline at ECU 4370.
PERSPECTIVES A NOON TIME
LECTURE SERIES SPRING 1995
"Court-Ordered Treatment for an Anen-
cephalic Infant: The Case of Baby K
Monday March 13, 12:30-l:30pm, Brody
2W-40. John C. Fletcher, Ph.D Director,
Center for Biomedical Ethics, University
of Virginia, Charlottesville.
SCHOLARSHIP BALL
Delta Sigma Theta and Kappa Alpha Psi
are sponsoring a scholarship ball at the
Hilton March 18. Two scholarships will be
given away to two area high school teens.
If you are interested in attending the ball,
contact either a Delta or a Kappa. They
have tickets available. Tickets will also be
sold at the Student Stores for the next
two weeks, $10 off the price for the first
100 people who buy tickets.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate students complet-
ing their degree in May who need help in
developing or refining their interview
skills are invited to attend a workshop on
Thursday March 2 at 5:00pm Sponsored
by Career Services, the workshops are also
open to students applying for interships
or coop experiences. They will be held in
the Career Services Center, 701 E. Fifth
St
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services office will have an
orientation meeting for seniors and gradu-
ate students graduating in MaySummer
1995 on Wednesday March 1 at 4:00pm
at the Careeer Services Center, 701 E.
Fifth St The program will include an over-
view of services available to help prospec-
tive graduates find employment as well
as procedures for registering with Career
Services.
UNDERSTANDING GENDER A
COMMUNICATION
This workshop will address differences in
gender communicaiton and their affects
upon interpersonal relationships. Learn
how to talk to the opposite sex! Wednes-
day, March 15, 2:Q0pm-3:30pm. Counsel-
ing Center. Call 3284661 to register.
REGISTRATION FOR
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
FITNESS CLASSES
Registration for Recreational Services fit-
ness classes will be held February 23
through March 2 from 9am to 5pm in 204
Christenbury Gym. The session will run
from March 13 through Aprill 22. The cost
for this twelve class session is $10 for ECU
Students and $20 for Faculty Staff and
spouses, five drop-in class passes are $5
for ECU Students and $10 for Faculty
Staff and spouses. For more information
call 3284387.
INTRAMURAL ACTION
Intramural action heats up on Monday,
March 13 when the NCAA Basketball
Pick'em entries begin at 10am in
Christenbury 104. There will also be a
volleyball officials meeting on Monday.
March 13 at 7pm in BB 102 fo anyone-
interested in becoming an Intramurals
volleyball official. On Tuesday. March 14
there will be a Softball preview meeting
at 4:30pm in BIO 103 and a volleyball reg-
istration meeting at 5:30pm in BIO 103.
For more details call Recreational Services
at 3284387.
THE ADVENTURE PROGRAM
The Adventure Program has four trips that
are quickly approaching. The registration
deadline is March 13 for both the back-
packing trip to Shenandoah National Park
March 17 thru 19 and for the Hammocks
Beach Camping Trip March 18 thru 19.
The registration deadline is March 17 for
both the Canoe Trip to Merchants Mill
Pond on March 26 and the Beach Horse-
back riding to Cedar Island on March 25.
For more details call Recreational Services
at 3284387.
WHAT PERSONALITY "TYPE" ARE
YOU?
Examining "personality" is one way of
understanding yourself and your interac-
tions with others. Learn one method of
personality assessment, the Myers-Briggs
Type Indicator, and how it may be useful
in your life. Tuesday, March 14,11:00am-
12:30pm. Counseling Center. Call 328-
6661 to register.
ENHANCING SELF-ESTEEM
Do you beat up on yourself? Do you find
you compare yourself to others? Is it diffi-
cult for you to accept compliments? This
six-session class will explore the origins
of self-esteem and provide you with the
opportunity to enhance you self-esteem
through group activities. Wednesdays,
3-30pm-5:00pm. beginning March 15.
Counseling Center. Call 3284661 for more
information.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS
Anyone interested in becoming a Softball
official for Recreational Services should
attend the Softball officials meeting on
Wednesday. March 1 at 5pm in BB 102.
For additional information call Recre-
ational Services at 3284387.
ECNAO
ECNAO will be meeting in Mendenhall Rm
14 on March 1st at 7:00pm. If you have
any questions please contact Kim
Sampson 752-2319.
ST PETER'S CHURCH
St Peter's Church is sponsoring a second
International Dinner in the Parish Hall
on Saturday, March 4, 1995. The hearty
German menu will feature Roulades of
Beef and end with fresh apple pie. Tick-
ets may be purchased after Mass, or from
the Church Rectory, as well as at the door.
Adults $7.00 and Children $3.50 (Children
under five admitted free). Proceeds will
benefit St Peter's Church and School.
ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB
Please join us for our mid-semester review
at 5:00 on Thursday March 2 in GC room
3007. There will be an update on the
economy and the performance of the
club's portfolio. This is a great opportu-
nity to learn more about the club and to
learn about some top performing mutual
funds.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Scheduling & Time Management: 314,
lOam-1 lam. Note Taking & Study Strate-
gies: 313,2pm-3pm. Exam Strategies: 3
17. lpm-2pm. Test & Performance Anxi-
ety. 315.1 lam-noon. Counseling Center.
Call 3284661 to register.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
College Republicans meet 6-7 pm next
Thursday March 1st in Rm 1014 GC. Be
part of the winning team!
TREASURE CHESTS AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure to
pick up your FREE video yearbook. Avail-
able at the Student Store. The East Caro-
linian, Joyner Library, Mendenhall and the
Media Board office in the Student Publi-
cations Building.
mllmMmmi
I L" ,QNLY A FEW COURTSIDE SPOTS LEFT!
Large Balconies
Town Houses & Flats
�Energy Efficient Construction
�Kitchen includes microwave
�Dig into our sand volleyball courts
�Swim or relax in our sparkling pool
Fullsize WashersDryers in each unit
Each bedroom is wired for cable TV and phone
Private bedrooms w individual mirrored closets
�Enjoy a game of tennis or basketball
�Workout in our full featured fitness area -
�Catch your favorite programs on our giant screen TV or
shoot a game of pool in our clubhouse.
PLAYERS CLUB
A P A R T M E N T S
Lease Today for Fall!
"Live where weekends last all week long 7RiQ
4 BEDROOM WITH 2 OR 3 FU LL BATHS
Still
haven't
found a
getaway
for Spring
Break?
Find one in
our
Classifieds





Title
The East Carolinian, February 28, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 28, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1062
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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