The East Carolinian, February 23, 1995







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February 23,1995
Vol 69, No. 74
Circulation 12,000
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
18 pases
ECU inks deal with ESPN
Minimum of eight
football games to
be shown over
term of contract
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
ECU and ESPN Communica-
tions signed a multi-year television
agreement Tuesday that will assure
the Pirates of having national foot-
ball coverage, as well as select
women's athletic events during the
term of the contract, which starts
in 1996.
Mike Aresco, ESPN's director
of College Sports, and Dave Hart.
ECU'S director of Athletics, joined
forces at a Tuesday afternoon press
conference to make the announce-
ment.
Pirates
on the
Street
"On the heels of last night's na-
tionally televised basketball game
on ESPN2, which was the first for
our basketball program Hart said,
"we are pleased today with what we
think is an exciting and significant
announcement relating to future
television exposure for our football
program, as well as a foundation
for additional broad-based visibilty
for ECU athletics on a national
level
Months of negotiations ended
with the agreement that will secure
the football program exposure into
the next decade.
ESPN and ESPN2 will televise
a minimum of eight Pirate home
football games over a five-year span,
starting in 1996.
As of 1996, ESPN will own all
rights to ECU home football games.
NBC's contract with Notre Dame in
football coverage is the only other
in the country similar to the ECU-
ESPN deal, for the number of
games and seasons.
The agreement would also sur-
vive if ECU joins a conference dur-
ing the term.
Whatever games ESPN does
noi choose to broadcast could be
shown by other networks, who
would have to negotiate with
ESPN.
As for regional exposure, such
as the Pirate Sports Network, ECU
would continue to broadcast above
and apart from the new agreement,
and could have four to six games
televised each season.
"We wanted to ensure that East
Carolina got the exposure it needed
in other forms Aresco said.
"Obviously we feel that our
commitment is a major one - we
are committing to at least one game
a year. On that basis, a regional
o you think
cheerieading
should
confllaer
sport
See ESPN page 15
Photo by LAURA JACKMAN
Staff members may have noticed fewer parking spaces available. Several have been
blocked off due to construction outside of the General Classroom Building. Weather
permitting, the construction should be completed within several weeks. When finished,
the handicap access will be improved and more handicap parking will become available.
Cheerieading debate unites squad
Funding is nonexistent for cheerieading competition despite national ranking
Michael Mulvlhlle, Junior
Yes, because they work
just as hard as any other
athletic docs.
Brian Paiz
Sports writer
Harper Holscher,
freshman
No, because you don't
keep score and there are
no points involved.
Lauren Vaughan, Junior
Sure, because it is a
strenuous activity and a
lot of time and effort
goes into it. I think it's a
competitive sport.
Paige Abbott, Junior
yes, because I used to
cheer and they don't get
enough credit for all their
hard work. They practice
like any other team.
Photos by LAURA JACKMAN
Controversy once again reigns
between the ECU cheerleaders and
the athletic department. After failing
to go to the national competition on
a paid-for basis last year, the ECU
cheerieading squad, although finish-
ing 15th in a recent national compe-
tition, failed once again to gain a paid-
for invite. They qualified, but will have
to pay their own way to the National
Cheerieading Championships in Or-
lando in May.
The problem is that the Univer-
sal Cheerieading Association (UCA).
which sponsors the event, will only
fund the top 10 teams that qualify.
The ECU cheerleaders feel the ath-
letic department should help send
them, since they did qualify for the
event
"We are extremely supportive of
our cheerleaders in what they accom-
plish here at ECU said Lee Work-
man ECU assistant athletics director
for tickets and promotions. "We try
to be fair in our policies and decisions
related to all areas of our athletic pro-
gram. Unfortunately we can't always
say 'yes The cheerleaders' primary
purpose at ECU is a student support
group for our athletic teams and an
ambassador for the University.
"I understand that the competi-
tion aspect is important to our cheer-
leaders, and we are proud that they
were ranked nationally
The NCAA does not recognize
cheerieading as an official sport,
therefore, no money is lequired to be
allotted to the program, and any
money given by the schools is up to
them.
Interim Athletics Director Henry
Van Sant said a decision had not been
made about the national competition
because he had not yet received a re-
quest from the cheerleaders that they
wanted to go to the national competi-
tion.
"This is the first I've heard about
it said Van Sant. "I have not received
any type of request from the cheer-
leaders here at ECU
Chancellor Eakin was also un-
aware of the situation.
"I am in the dark about this situ-
ation so I cannot comment, but I am
sure I represent the whole ECU com-
munity in giving congratulations to
the cheerleaders on their 15th-ranked
finish in the national competition
he said. "1 have had the personal op-
portunity to see the cheerleaders
throughout the year, and they are a
great talent and credit to ECU
The athletic department, not un
der any NCAA regulations, does pay
for travel and lodging to all away foot-
ball and some basketball games, and
give the cheerleaders allotted
weightlifting time and regular use of
the sports medicine treatment.
"We allow one fundraising
project per year for our athletic teams.
The cheerleaders are usually given
two to help them out One is appear-
ance fees, and the second one is the
high school competition which they
hold in the spring. However, this
spring the cheerleaders are not hold-
ing the competition
Senior Pirate cheerleader David
Coates said that he feels the cheer-
leaders deserve a chance to prove
themselves on a national level, and
that the athletic department should
be proud to send them.
"The way I look at it is regard-
See CHEER page 6
Movie sparks controversy
. . � .J - - Vw fivct fima
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
The movie A Reason To Believe
stirred up controversy last night, not
because of the language and nudity,
but because the plot, about date rape,
took place in a Greek setting.
Over 1,000 people showed up at
Hendrix Theater to view the movie,
but only about 800 were permitted to
stay due to seating capacity, said
Heather Zophy, health education co-
ordinator at Student Health Services.
Due to the large amount of students
who wanted to see the movie, it was
shown a second time for those who
were turned away the first time.
Immediately following the first
viewing, a panel discussion was avail-
able to answer questions regarding
the movie and the issues it addssed.
"People were concerned about
Greeks being stereotyped, but this
See RAPE page 6
cwun SOUL f QOD
Blackened ftshand Black Beans Klce
Ingredients:
2 cups cooked brown rice
I lb. cooked black beans
(dr beans work better)
4 lbs. 6 oz. catfish steaks
(tuna steaks can be substituted)
To blacken fish:
Baste fillets in butter
Cover in fish-blackening powder
(your choice of spice indeO
fry at medium heat
or
Grill until desired tenderness
Qarnishina our entree:
Layer fish over rice and beans
Season with salsa
ftsparaus serves as an excellent side item

Hecipe courtcs; of Chris Arline (The Cajun Mag
HFfcyle
7tt4&Ce
TEC jerks Jerky Boys aroundpa9e
cru �nc conu Kin 0306 "
ECU fans score big





Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
Visually-impaired take to the wheel
u�� ���� ii anM thov al i future to teach other activities unt ei
February 16
Marijuanaparaphernaliaweapon possession - Two students were
issued state citations and campus appearance tickets for possession of
marijuana and paraphernalia in Jones Hall. One student was also cited for
possession of a butterfly knife.
Larceny - A staff member reported the larceny of two fire extinguish-
ers from the second floor of Aycock Hall.
Solicitation to commit a felony - A student reported a male subject
left a message on his answering machine indicating he wanted to have sex
with him.
Breaking and entering - A resident of Jones Hall reported the break-
ing and entering of his room. Several compact discs were taken from the
room while the victim was asleep.
February 17
Breaking and entering - A staff member reported the breaking and
entering of two state vehicles parked at the Central Receiving parking lot
A gas card was taken from one vehicle, no signs of forced entry were found.
Misdemeanor breaking and entering - A staff member reported some
one entered her office and configured her computer so that a message
would appear. She reported that several days ago someone had entered her
office and rearranged her Rolodex.
February 18
Damage to property - A resident of Garret Hall reported the tires on
his vehicle were punctured while parked in the Fifth and Reade Streets
parking lot
February 19
Financial transaction card fraud and theft - A resident of Aycock
Hall reported that he applied for a credit card in December, but never
received the card. The victim reported receiving a bill for charges he never
made.
February 20
Trespassingresisting, arrest - An officer responded to Jones Hall
on a complaint that two non-students were in the hall around the drink
machine. When the officer notified them that they were under arrest for
trespassing, they fled. One broke the west glass door as he exited. Both
subjects were located in Scott Hall and placed in custody and banned from
campus.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from offical ECU police
reports.
Tandem bikes
gives visually
impaired chance
of lifetime
have support vehicles an�
ready have some tours laid out.
Tandem bikes are being
for a number of reasons.
ril
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Challenges Inc a newly formed
organization based in Greenville, is
now offering new experiences for vi-
sually and physically challenged per-
sons.
"Challenges is a non-profit or-
ganization said Myra McCall. ex
ecutive director of Challenges Inc.
"What we do is pro-
vide recreational op-
portunities for people
who are physically
challenged, visually
challenged and hear-
ing-impaired. People
who don't normally
get to enjoy some of
the recreational op-
portunities that every-
body else does
McCall said the
organization works to
contact and contract
with businesses to
help set up the events.
In the case of its first
project, which is for
the visually impaired,
the organization is
working with Two for
The Road, a tandem bicycle tour
company of Greenville. Tandem
bikes are basically bicycles built for
two.
"To be able to provide these rec-
reational opportunities, we find
people who are already doing some
of these things McCall said. "Like
our tandem bike ride, we are con-
tracting Two for The Road tandem
bike tours because they have the bi-
cycles, they have all of the equip-
ment, they have the helmets, they
"A tandem bike has two peoi
on it McCall said. There is thi
tain up front and our visually un
paired person would be our stoker.
They don't have to worry about the
steering of the bike. The communi-
cation between the captain and the
stoker is important because the cap
tain has to let the stoker know when
they are coming to a turn, what kind
of traffic is around and the stoker
is there pedaling.
"A great thing about th.it 1
there are two people- on the bifc
so it won't be as physically demand-
ing for the visually impaired per-
son
M c C a 11
said the tan
deni bike tours
are also open to
the physically
impaired.
L o c a 11 y
scheduled hike
tours are
planned for
Greenville on
April S possibly
at the Farmville
High School
parking lot and
for Raleigh on
a McCall April'2t
In the tu-
executive director of ture McCall
Challenges Inc. said there are
plans to take
captain-volun-
teers and visually impaired partici-
pants on paid weekend tours to dif-
ferent places like the coast.
McCall said many of the visu-
ally impaired have been contacted
through the cable stations, social
workers, newspapers and on the
Internet's Blind News Network. In-
formation can be taken from the
Internet audibly, printed out in large-
print or in Braille.
Plans are also being made for
the future to teach other activities
Mich as horseback riding and types
ot water sports to both the visually
hysically impaired.
Two foi d will be tram-
ma captains-volunteers during week
ends in March. Training usually lasts
for two days. Also, McCall said vol-

Some ol tl Is volunl
will learn include SUgg
ting with perso
ties, 1" rules of i' ���
blind, competent km
See BIKE page 6
Rally pulls minority
community together
Project Outreach
rally scheduled for
Saturday
"A great thing
about that is that
there are two
people on the
bike, so it won't be
as physically
demanding for the
visually impaired
person
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
February is not only the month
ot love with candy and flowers from
your sweetheart. It is also an educa-
tional month. Black History Month
falls in February and Project lutreach
is sponsoring an African-American
Awareness Rally on February 25 from
1-5 p.m. at the Eppes-West Greenville
Gym on the comer of Fourth and
Nash Streets to celebrate many of the
African-Americans in our history.
Project Outreach is a community
outreach program that lends a hand
and reaches out to people in the com-
munity who might be HlY-intected,
addicted to drugs or alcohol, living
on the street or living any other high
risk lifestyle, said Michele Pace health
educator for Project Outreach.
"We would like our program to
be more recognized and we are spon-
soring the Rally to let the people know
we are herePace said. "Many people
do not realize what available resources
are out there
The Rally will include several ex-
hibitions from the Pitt County Health
Department, the Boys and Girls Club,
the Housing Authority, Picasso and
the West Greenville Community De-
velopment Cooperation, Pace said.
Another main attract
gospel singers from local churi
choirs and young peo
lie housing center. Moyewood Cen
ter. who will recite different �
manes of important people i
history. KISS 102 will be broadcast
ing live throughout the day, Pact
said.
��Project Outreach, has I i
the Greenville area foi
and some ask what we do. Pa
"Our main function is to refer people
to the community resources thai
out there for them
Pace hopes that Saturday's rally
will help open up many eyes and edu-
cate the community in general as
what is available for them if thi �
help.
ECU offers many different club.s
and organizations for minority -
dents, said Dr. Brian Haynes assis
tant Dean of Minority Affairs
Haynes said Project Outreach
a town program and that student-
can get involved in the college pro-
grams for minorities that will
ca.e and support the student al
college level as well, such as the Na-
tive American Student Organization.
the African-American Gospel Choir.
the Chancellor Minority Student
Leadership Program and the Purple
Pride Program (P2).
"Our office works mainly with
undergraduate students but some
graduates do come to us H
said. "We are here to support the mi-
nority students on ECU's campus and
to make sure they stay
Ansel Adams.
Alfred Stieglitz.
Annie Leibovitz.
You.
(But your first name doesn't
have to start with "A)
Like those above, good photographers
need experience with different subjects,
equipment and deadlines.
The East Carolinian can give you that and
pay you for your efforts. 7!m
Students interested must have a 2.0 GPA
and working knowledge of photographic
equipment and developing skills.
Apply at our offices in the Student
Publications Building, Second Floor.
(across from Joyner).
THE STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE PRESENTS
AN EVENING WITH
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CAROLINIAN
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ECU STUDENT UNION HOTLINE 328-6004






a o
-i"
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
r
I
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n
BAD HAIR DAY?

� Hair Cutting
� Permanents
�Hair Color
�Manicures
"Listed in Ladies Home
j Free Consultations Journal As
Long Hair Maintenance One of Top Salons
in The US"
I
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Walk-ins
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and Late Evenings
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Across km fla ifcma
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(919) 830-5593
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Soup searching for students
Volunteers needed
to serve soup to
homeless, needy
Andrew Davis
Staff Writer
Any volunteers? The Greenville
Soup Kitchen is now open and taking
all they can get. Located on Tyson
Street in York Memorial AME Zion
Church the Soup Kitchen is now serv-
ing.
"On an average we are serving
about 35 (people a day, but the num-
bers are growing said Martha
Dawson, a kitchen coordinator.
The Greenville Soup Kitchen pro-
vides homeless and needy individuals
with a meal at no cost. The Soup
Kitchen is the only one of its kind in
Greenville. Another soup kitchen in
Greenville, located on Fifth Street,
operated for three years but was forced
to close in August of 1994.
The ECU Student Volunteer pro-
gram, under the direction of Judy
Baker, used to supply the
kitchen with a large number of volun-
teers. After the Soup Kitchen closed
in August, it was removed from the
program. Since being opened at a new
location and under new coordinators,
it has yet to be reinstated.
An organization of York Memo-
rial, headed by Dawson and Barbara
Taft, started by serving on Saturdays
but quickly found that was not enough.
"We felt we had to do something,
and the response was such that it
needed to be done daily Dawson said.
The Soup Kitchen runs entirely
from private donations, a fact that both
coordinators are particularly proud of.
Seven area churches are the source of
most of these contributions, along with
some help from sororities. Several of
the churches have a specified day. On
that particular day the church's team
of volunteers prepares and serves the
food, and cleans up afterward.
The organization has even
thought of transportation. York
Memorial's Church van picks up at
Shepard Library on Evans Street and
at the Greenville Community Shelter
Monday-Friday at 10:30 a.m.
"There were 18, maybe 19 people
on a 15-passenger van when it left here
Friday said Jim Vadnais, resident at
the Greenville Community Shelter.
The Greenville Soup Kitchen
serves people from 11-12 p.m Mon-
day-Friday.
"We feel we are really doing a
good and needed service for our com-
munity Dawson said.
Anyone is welcomed to volunteer
time or contribute canned goods. Con-
tact York Memorial between 9:30-12:30
p.m. at 758-6077 if interested.
TOHIGHT!
Cool Aid V
KNOCKED
DOWN
SM1L1X
Here we are!
The. Greenville
Comiivumtjj Shelter.
rr.Tic
Doors
Photo by LAURA JACKMAN
Having trouble finding us? Well, we are right under your nose. The East Carolinian is just
across from Joyner Library in the Student Publications Building. We're on the second
floor, you can't miss us, especially now that you know where we are.
I
I
THERE'S MORE
TO LIFE THAN
BOOKS AND
PROFESSORS.
THURSDAY
80S DANCE PARTY!
LADIES IN FREE ALL NITE!
.75 CENT BOTTLE BEERS ALL NITE!
$1.00 SCREWDRIVERS & TEQUILA DRINKS!
Take a break and enjoy the
Perfect Pizza at the Perfect
Price �fresh and steaming
hot. We'll even include our
special garlic sauce and pep- Perfect Pizia.
peroncinis � all at no extra Perfect Price.
cost! So if you get the hun- Everyday.
gries for great-tasting pizza,
call your Papa. It's that easy!
FRIDAY
CLASSICS NITE!
1 cent draft all nite!
pluslots more bar specials!
admission s2.00 members $3.00 guest
Saturday, February 25th
RAVE
until Dawn !
Doors open at 2:30 UNTIL??
Admission $4.
The Elbo Presents
De&trtM Vm f&fatf Pizza
1322 East 10th Street
Serving ECU Campus
& Eastern Greenville
757-7700
I
One Small Pizza
with One Topping
and One Free Coke
Only $4.99 tax
fplMJOHNS
Moil PieicJii Coupon
One Extra Large Pizza
order of Stix
2 Drinks
Only $11.98 tax
One Large Pizza
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Only $6.98 tax
PAPAJOHXs; piAJOHTsij
Tuesday, February 28th,1995
Fraternity
SUMO
Wrestling
Doors open at 9:00pm
I" IPO, 2WD 50. 3"
Moil Present (-�up�
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Miui PicvmiL Coupon
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KB
" 4.
Thursday, February 23,1995
The East Carolinian
General assembly experiences busy day
Here's the run
down of a day in
the life of the
General Assembly
(AP) - On Tuesday at the Gen-
eral Assembly:
- A House committee debated
a proposal that would lift the state
prison cap in January 1996 and al-
low private prisons for the first
time.
- Correction Secretary
Franklin Freeman asked a Senate
committee to approve a bill allow-
ing the department to hire private
companies to build and operate
state prisons.
- State Treasurer Harlan
Boyles criticized a teacher lobby-
ing group for using "scare tactics"
in telling retired educators their
pension benefits might be reduced.
� The House Finance Commit-
tee learned that a formula used in
a GOP-promised bill to limit the
growth of state spending would re-
quire the state to spend at least
$156 million less in 1996 than cur-
rently anticipated.
- The House delayed a final
vote on a bill giving businesses a
reduction in unemployment taxes
because of concerns about an
amendment that would make such
reductions automatic.
- The House gave final ap-
proval and sent to the Senate a bill
that would require Superior Court
judges to be elected by districts,
not statewide.
- The state Child Fatality Task
Force recommended graduated li-
censes for teenagers, automatic li-
cense revocation for underage
drinkers who drive and requiring
smoke alarms in all dwellings as
ways to reduce child deaths.
- The House and Senate sched-
uled early floor sessions for
Wednesday so that about 66 mem-
bers can fly to Fayetteville to tour
Fort Bragg.
- The House voted to reduce
the threshold for food stamp fraud
felonies from $2,000 to $400.
- The House approved an ex-
emption for firefighters and emer-
gency workers carrying axes or
other tools that may be described
as weapons from a state law that
makes it a felony to carry weapons
on school grounds.
- Environmental and commu-
nity groups called on the Legisla-
ture to pass regulations that would
lessen the impact massive hog
farms are having in eastern North
Carolina.
Electronically bugged fish stolen
(AP) - Largemouth bass im-
planted with tiny electronic bugs
helped hook a black market ring that
illegally sold more than 40,000
pounds of fish, authorities say.
State Department of Natural Re-
sources agents buried the tiny bugs,
which measure about three-eighths
of an inch long, under the skin of
about 3,000 wild largemouth bass as
part of a program to track their
growth and movement.
The bugs, which give off radio
signals to a hand-held box, helped re-
veal illegally caught bass from the
Potomac River that were being stored
in a fish farm run by 47-year-old Den-
nis Patrick Woodruff, The Sun re-
ported Tuesday.
The fish were set to be shipped
to wholesalers who would sell them
to Asian markets and North Ameri-
can restaurants, officials said. Au-
thorities say Woodruff and three ac-
complices made a profit of more than
$150,000.
Woodruff was charged with con-
spiracy and nine counts under a fed-
eral law that prohibits the interstate
sale of protected wildlife. Each count
carries a maximum penalty of five
years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
Also charged last week were
three men who allegedly supplied the
fish to Woodruff.
The Potomac below Washington
is known as one of the best bass-fish-
ing rivers in North America.
Although it is legal to raise and
c
a r e e r
o r n e r
3
VISIT THE CAREER SERVICES
RESOURCE ROOMS
Having trouble deciding on a possible
career?
Maybe you have ideas, but need a few
answers.
WHERE CAN YOU GO FOR
ANSWERS?
� CAREER DECISIONS ROOM � a great
location to find publications like the
Occupational Outlook Handbook and
computerized assessment tools like SIGI-
Plus (which helps assess your skills and
research possible occupations that match
your talents and preferences).
�CAREER PLANNING ROOM � the place
to find graduate school bulletins and
manuals that can help you select graduate
study programs, or attend workshops for
tips on resume and letter-writing, dressing
for interviews, and obtaining work
experiences while in school.
�EMPLOYER INFORMATION ROOM �
the spot to find employer information files,
schedules for on-campus interviews, and
applications for teaching in and out of NC.
Career Services is located at 701 E. Fifth Street,
328-6050.
Still
haven't
found the
person?
sell largemouth bass on fish farms,
it is illegal to catch them and sell
them because their numbers are too
small to withstand large-scale com-
mercial fishing.
Anton Gill and Chuckle
Robinson say adieu to
Williams Arena and
ECU basketball this
Saturday night. We
know you'll want to
be there to say goodbye.
Hidden Qdset Inc.
Sale
Bathing Suits $19.99
Reg. $58.00
Greenville's complete catalog clothing store.
Hidden Closet Inc.
University Shopping Center
(Next to Harris Teeter)
Vl-Fri 10-7 � Scit 10-6 � Sun 1-5
Our Free Gift To You!
Check our
personals for
your match.
FINAL DAYS! FINAL DAYS!
Team Players" It's Clinique Bonus Week.
Clinique's winning line-up of (ooksmakers, in handy, take-along sizes, give skin home court
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Cftnique purchase of 13.50 or more.
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One bonus per customer, please. All this week. While supplies last. Hurry in.
Allergy Tested. 100 Fragrance Free.
February 12th-25th
Shop The Plaza daily 10-9; Sunday
1-6pm.Enjoy the convenience of a
Brady's charge account!
CLINIQUE
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p
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
Senate debates prison cap
. i , ij �.u " �� comrats hill that allows nri
(AP) - Lifting the state's
prison cap in January 1996 would
cost the state $14 million, but sup-
porters of the House committee
proposal say it would be worth it
to keep more inmates behind bars
longer.
Waiting just 90 days, until
March 1, would save the state S13
million of that money, but Rep.
Sean Lemmond. R-Mecklenburg,
told the House Judiciary 11 Commit
tee Tuesday that waiting three
months would mean emergency
paroles for about 1.800 additional
inmates.
�"You're looking at 1,800
people we wouldn't want back on
the streets said Lemmond. who
chaired a subcommittee that devel-
oped the proposal. "Basically, we
decided it was worth the price.
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PERSON
EXPIRES MARCH 2
! Tonnection
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Division of UBE
That's what we wrestled with
The state Senate already has ap-
proved lifting the cap in September
1996. when the state is expected to
have enough prison beds to house
all its inmates. But Lemmond said
waiting that long would put 3,185
inmates on the streets on parole.
"We felt that the Sept. 1 date
approved by the Senate was essen-
tially smoke and mirrors in that it
repealed the prison cap after it was
no longer needed Lemmond said.
The proposal from Lemmond's
subcommittee would do much more
than just lift the prison cap on Janu-
ary 1. It also would allow private
prisons to operate in the state for
the first time, would allow contract-
ing with counties to build and oper-
ate facilities for the state, and would
loosen restrictions on the Depart-
ment of Correction for renting out-
of-state prison beds in emergencies.
Under the Senate plan, the state
would have to spend no additional
money next year on out-of-state rent-
als or other emergency measures be-
cause its construction program is ex-
pected to catch up with prison ad-
missions.
Several committee members
questioned whether allowing private
companies to build and operate pris-
ons is a good idea.
"As to whether private contrac-
tors become the primary housers of
prisoners down the road, or the
state, is something that the cost fac-
tors and the market will determine
Lemmond said. "The point is giving
private facilities a chance
Correction Secretary Franklin
Freeman told members of the Sen-
ate Judiciary II Committee Tuesday
that allowing private prisons would
let the state's prison capacity ex-
pand and contract based on need.
it's like an accordion Free-
man said. "Once our needs for those
prison beds are through, we'll con-
tract the accordion
The Senate panel is considering
a separate bill that allows private
prisons.
Freeman said the state's expe-
rience housing inmates at privately
run prisons in Tennessee. Oklahoma
and Rhode Island has been gener-
ally positive. The state has 1.000
inmates housed in those states, the
maximum allowed by the Legislature
last year.
The Correction Department
pays as little as $54 a day per pris-
oner in Oklahoma to a high of $78
a day in Rhode Island. Potential
prison operators have said they
could provide the service for about
$50 a day, Freeman said.
The state now pays an average
of $62.50 a day for medium-custody
inmates, the kind of prisoners
housed out-of-state, he said.
"The reason the costs are high
in North Carolina is there are over
30 medium-custody prisons in this
state that have less than 100 pris-
oners in them Freeman said.
Sens. Tony Rand, D-
Cumberland, and David Hoyle, D-
Gaston, asked Freeman to compile
figures that include prison construc-
tion costs in the department's per-
day cost of holding inmates.
"Private companies would be
able to do it for considerably less if
you built in the true cost Hoyle
said. "We should try to get the state
out of the construction business of
building prisons
Both the Senate and House
committees are expected to debate
the bills again Thursday.
Milk � not so
good after all
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CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
University Housing And Campus Dining Services
(AP) - Milk can do a body bad.
That's the latest message from
the Center for Science in the Pub-
lic Interest, the group that has
made waves telling people the hor-
rors of fat-laden movie popcorn and
Chinese takeout.
"People have to
get a little more so-
phisticated at read-
ing between the
lines said Art
Silverman. spokes-
man for the Wash-
ington-based center.
"Yes, milk can do a
body good, but it can
also do a body harm
and the trick is to
choose low-fat
milk
The nonprofit
center began a seven-week pilot
project Wednesday in Clarksburg
and neighboring Bridgeport to see
whether a public awareness pro-
gram focused on one item - milk -
can change people's consumption
habits.
The campaign willfeature slick
television, radio and newspaper ads
encouraging 25,000 residents in
the towns about 100 miles south
of Pittsburgh to switch to either 1
percent, half of 1 percent or skim
milk.
Grocery sales records and tele-
phone surveys will be used to track
"Yes, milk can do a
body good, but it
can also do a body
harm and the trick
is to choose low-
fat milk
� Art Silverman
A 'xTouck oi C�assj
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results and determine whether the
project could work in other cities.
"We are offering people one
simple, painless choice that will
yield significant health benefits for
themselves and their families said
Michael Jacobson, executive direc-
tor of the cen-
ter.
Bill Reger.
director of
wellness for
West Virginia
University and
a member of
the research
team, said
whole milk is
the biggest
source of calo-
ries in child-
hood diets and
the second-largest source of satu-
rated fats for adults.
While 2 percent milk is labeled
low-fat. 40 percent of its calories
come from saturated fat, Reger
said. One percent milk gets 23 per-
cent of its calories from saturated
fat while skim milk ranges from
zero to 10 percent.
"One glass of whole milk has
the artery clogging fat of five strips
of bacon and 2 percent milk isn't
much better but 1 percent and skim
milk give you all the great taste
Silverman said.
In West Virginia, health offi-
cials say. obesity and heart disease
rates are nearly 20 percent higher
than the national average.
Jim Barr, head of the National
Milk Producers Federation, dis-
missed the notion that certain
forms of milk are bad and said
whole milk is important to grow-
ing children. The federation repre-
sents 100,000 dairy farmers.
"They make an assumption
that everybody would be better off
if they totally eliminated fat from
their diet and this is simply not
based on any scientific fact they
can point to Barr said from his
Arlington, Va office.
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Thursday, February 23, 1995
The Ed nlinian
BIKE
imp
Greenvi

it
u trom page I
iding on tin
aid volunteers will at
and will
.isually
thai
� is sponsored sho
said she pians no
sponsors all final
CHEER
nn:i
McCall said there arc different my
ways that businesses can sponsor in .
the organization like giving cash do-
eve i
ig up one "i t!i
i! they want to .sponsor an
: i � tain level of it like ;
Mc( . nament.
Business sponsors receive pub- Sixl
licity when the organization sends are fully
out flyers or participants wear t- 65th goes hom
d t us, not 10 lea
only are they getting a tax deduc- team;
tion which is great for them and the Easl �
physically challenged are getting the rank
opportunity to do all oi these won- competii
derful things, but the companies are and ail
in fact getting some advertising, regu
McCall said. "This
McCall said �he has always been polk
active in the community and has ers
worked with the Special Olympics fyingfoi
and the Children's Miracle Network, only be
Now. she said she has decided to get a paid pi
involved with helping the physically Th
and visually impaired.
Our physically impaired popu- pi pei
lation is :i large piece of our popu- ment, and tw
lation McCall said. "You see unless il
things on TV like wheelchair has- We -
ketbail. well, that's not available to our program
everybody. They don't have the Pirated
funds. They don't know how to get
involved in it.
Not unly do our physically
challenged people need the oppor-
tunity to participate in these
things, but the public needs the op-
portunity to see these people do-
ing something land to be able to
locus on what they are capable ot
instead of what their disabilities
are "
For more information, volun-
teers can contact Myra McCall at
the toll-tree number. 1-800-641-
0814.
RAPE from page 1
situation can happen to anyone, an even second;
athletic team, a group of people in a shouldn't ap
dorm or even a group
of people at
McDonald's Zophy
said. "I hope people
saw the purpose ot
the film and that it
can happen to any-
one
"I think it's too
bad we're even dis-
cussing the fact that
it was stereotypical at
-�11 said Ron Speier.
dean of students.
The ECU Cheerleaders win be worklng as bard , ra.se fends to ���
ir�t�Q riurina athletic events. (Below) Shern Sands (I) and Tonya Webb (r) spread the
:� a tSSst fan. Both Sands and Webb are member: of the varsity cheerlead.n, .
If you're cool
you'll grab
ioo of your
closest friends
and be at
Minges this
Saturday
night.
Orand Slam U.S.A.
Indoor Baseball & Softball Batting Range
Full Court Basketball with Slam Goals
� Concessions � Pro Shop � Video Games
Bring Coupon In For:
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Comer of Evans & 14th Streets
830-1759
�H Tf TW tP'� m.HJJ w.n, ' ?�- ' � �
Photos Court
Newman Catholic
Student Center
SUNDAY MASS
11:30 AM
& 8:30 PM
(757-1991)
953 E. 10th St.
(2nd house from Fietcher musk
"I think it's too
bad we're even
discussing the fact
that it was
stereotypical at
all
Ron St
"The discussion
should he centered around responsi- ation.v
bilities and the abusive behavior of "Then
alcohol tha
"I think it was a good movie and them, said 1 Ir.
it sent a good message, but I think it selor at the Co
also made it seem like rapes only hap- chair of the Sexual Al
pen in sorority and fraternity situa- "There's us It!
tions said Nan Patterson, president and Student I
of the Alpha Phi sorority. both on camr.
"It got its messages across and of charge. Ai
any non-Creek got that, but the inci- Heal Crisis (i
dent in the movie should have been anonymous and I
directed at a non-Greek group galprocessi i
�The stereotypical issue is not She;
staff at both ci
� in dealing with these types
tions and urges anyone who
imethinglike this hashap-
m to make an appoint-
t.ilk to omeone
�. don't give names to the
per or 1 reach confidentiality.
important she said.
i! was another point
ed during the panel dis
novie, the victim went to
up for support, which is
like our Counseling Center
honoring confidenti-
Zophy said. "1 hope
eal issue. People told
at the girl was not raped
ack of education
� � . low-up discussii i, we
ere to help
I hope StU-
than be-
: ,vt are
nportai "u'd kv&v.
their own values beyond
. Shepherd said.
st reotypes lie in ever.1 organi-
get past that
� rii.it 5 what
SYLVESTER
SHARON
STALLONE STDNE
the government
TAUGHT HIM TO KILL
NO. HE'S USING
MIS SKILLS TO HELP
ONE WOMAN SEEK
PEVENGE AGAINST
THE MIAM: UNDEPWOP .0
THE
"3F

All films start at 8:00 PM unless
otherwise noted and are FREE
. to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24
SUNDA.Y, FEBRUARY 26
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
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trouble
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. � ��-� ���.
wfTA
I
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
GILBERT NEVER TOLD THE GUYS HE DIALED HIS GIRL 1-800-COLLECT
FOR FEAR THEY'D ACCUSE HIH OF DEING THE SENSITIVE TYPE.
1-800-COLLECT
SaveThe PeopleYou Call UpTo 44,
t





8
Thursday, February 23, 1995 The East Carolinian
Our View
ECU fans proved
Monday night
that we are in-
deed as great as
our hoopsters.
Last night the
trend continued,
as the Pirates
toppled UNC-
Charlotte by a
whopping 10
points, But let's
not forget about
Saturday. Anton
and Chuckie
need a proper
farewell. Well
miss you guys!
Kudos to the entire Williams Arena crowd for their
never-ending support of the Pirates in a losing cause
on ESPN2 Monday evening. The national TV cover-
age may have slightly-restricted attendance and pre-
vented the game from being a sellout, but you wouldn't
have known it from the amount of crowd noise and
activity present throughout.
Although the top few rows of the Williams stands
were sprinkled with Pirate fans, all in the arena came
alive that evening, armed with ESPN signs and a de-
sire to show the nation the true spirit - Pirate style.
The Minges Maniacs came out in full force and
school spirit, easily discrediting claims by an overly
sensitive ECU "fan" (who labeled a certain group of
the student section as "absolute goons" and "want-to-
be Blue Devil fans" in the Feb. 9 edition of TEC.)
This group, centered between the two team
benches, have become the leaders of the Maniacs, and
should be commended for their efforts in trying to
make Williams arena as hostile as possible for the
opposition. If the refs (who, by the way, were horrible
on Monday night) aren't offended enough by their
actions to give them a tech, why should one of our
own raise a stink about it?
Pirate fever, after 10 home games, finally spread
throughout the rest of the coliseum, and made all the
difference. Head coach Eddie Payne, although ending
up with a tough loss, was able to gain the much talked
about "sixth man" -edge from the excellent fan sup-
port. Heck, even the people that paid for their tickets
were on their feet cheering the whole game.
The entire group of fans rocked visiting Old Do-
minion players and coaches (along with the aforemen-
tioned referees) with deafening cheers and chants,
while continually lifting the spirits of the purple and
gold throughout - what they are supposed to do, and
exactly why nationally-recognized student sections are
nationally recognized.
Simply put, it was louder in Williams Arena on
Monday than it has been for any other game this sea-
son. With Saturday's huge match-up with interstate
rival UNC-Wilmington looming on the horizon, the
fans need to come out strong and prove that Monday's
pep and spirit wasn't just a one time deal.
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens. General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. LassHter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langiey, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bart els Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor,The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Traffic problems abound
The only major complaint I have
about Greenville, NC, is the traffic. I
moved here a little over a year and a
half ago and for the most part I've
enjoyed the town. Greenville is a nice,
quiet little town, maybe a little too
quiet occasionally but overall a pretty
friendly place. Unfortunately, the
friendly inhabitants of Greenville
can't drive. And I'm not talking about
just the year-round residents. ECU
students apparently acquire this de-
ficiency once they get in to town. (I,
of course, am immune.)
First let me ask a question: Is
no-one in this town ever in a hurry
to get anywhereThis is my first
experience living in a town where the
majority of people drive five to ten
miles below the speed limit Even
the Department of Motor Vehicles is
aware of this problem apparently.
When I went to get my North
Carolina driver's license there were
four questions related to minimum
speed limits and how driving too
slow can cause traffic accidents.
There was only one question about
exceeding the speed limit and that
was about going more than twenty
miles over the limit. Somehow I
doubt that is big concern here in
Greenville.
Andi Powell Phillips
Opinion Columnist
The Emerald City
has major flow
problems and
they appear to
be contagious.
Another local traffic problem I
have encountered is the Stoplight
Phenomenon. This is when I am sit-
ting at a traffic light behind a line
of cars, the light turns green and
nothing happens. I continue idling
at a dead stop for another few sec-
onds before I see the car ahead of
me gradually begin to roll forward.
By the time the light turns red all
of three cars have managed to creep
across the intersection. It doesn't
matter though, because five more
cars follow after the light turns
red.
It seems that the only time
Greenville residents are in a hurry
to get somewhere is when they see a
red light. I figure it works on the
same principle as waving a red cape
in front of a bull. I've seen so many
red lights run I'm beginning to think
red doesn't mean the same thing here
as it does everywhere else. From
what I've been able to tell, red means
hurry, green means go eventually
and yellow has no meaning at all.
This traffic light thing reminds
me of a silly joke my dad told me
when I was a kid. There was this guy
who was always running red lights.
He knew it was safe because his
brother did it all the time and noth-
ing ever happened to him. One day
he was driving along with a friend in
the car and he came upon a green
light. He slammed on the brakes and
screeched to a stop. "The light was
green the friend said. "You could've
gone "Are you kidding?" the guy
asked. "My brother might've been
coming the other way
Think about this the next time
you hit the road: If you drive at the
posted speed limits, you won't have
to run those red lights to get where
you're going on time. And you never
know when your brother may be com-
ing the other way.
Y
Repubs want us to pay up
Children need welfare reform
��� child is bom unto
d an underprivileged
ier Rather than face up to the
cution of society and the eco-
nomic disparity uf raising a child on
her own. the mother gives the child
up to an orphanage.
Hey. the above may have been the
to handle the situation dur-
ing the times when Dickens wrote the
classic novel Oliver Twistnotice I
left out the term timeless), but not in
ours. These days we have a better
idea.
I speak for Uncle Sam when I say-
keep the child we'll pick up the tab.
Need a place to live, food, aiid some
threads? No worries, we're the Tax-
payers and we've got what you need.
If the above angers you just a
little, don t worrj you are not alone.
The fad of the matter is that this is
becoming an all too frequent occur-
rence in today's society. The question
that arises is: Why?
According to UC LA professor
; a rational
render
the forma - tble two parent
families ui try. These benefits,
according to Wilson, have induced
women wanting to have babies and a
home of their own to acquire both at
public expense and have convinced
young men that sexual conquest need
not entail any personal responsibili
�MHMMMMHMK
Chris Arline
Opinion Columnist
Increased
welfare
legislation and
grants during the
'60s prompted
high illegitimacy
rates.
ties.
This belief is supported by num-
bers that show that states with higher
welfare payments have higher ratios
of illegitimate births to mothers who
are welfare beneficiaries.
As a result of increases of wel-
fare legislation and grants during the
early 1960s, illegitimacy rates skyrock-
eted between then and the mid 1980s.
There has been much recent de-
bate over the possibilities of institut-
ing new policies mandating the insti-
tution of government run orphanages.
1 don't believe in taking children away
from their mothers and I don't see
where society could allow this to oc-
cur.
Recently Hillary' Clinton argued
that she doubted weather Bill Clinton
or Newt Gingrich's mothers would
have given them up without one heck
of a fight.
The solution to the problem is
simple; attack it at the source. Re-
vamp the welfare system. Its time to
cease funding For illegitimate children
born while the mother is on welfare.
My argument has always been:
Why try to get something if you can't
pay for it in the first place. I'm not
alone in my findings, the numbers
speak for themselves. Ninety four
percent of Americans feel that the
welfare system is in definite need of
revamping. Of that 94 percent 64
percent feel that we should no longer
continue to fund for illegitimate chil-
dren born while the mother is on
welfare.
The lack of responsibility is over-
whelming and we should no longer
tolerate or pay for it. One of the big-
gest responsibilities our society faces
is returning the responsibility of pro-
viding for children back to parents.
According to Wilson, that change re-
quires the emancipation of the indi-
vidual from the restraints of tradition,
community, and government.
Americans have always been the
kind of people that believe in helping
out their fellow neighbor. But, we
should no longer be stuck raising their
children.
You know, this won't be the first
time or the last time I criticize one of
Newt Gingrich's policies, but this one
hits home.
Republicans have been known for
their apathy toward young adults.
When Clinton appeared on MTV in '92,
Bush refused to appear on the popu-
lar network, not wanting to appeal to
a bunch of "teeny-boppers
I could go on and debate over the
Republican's disdain for the college
generation, but that's not the point
College loans are important to a lot of
people, but the repayment of these
loans is a definite problem.
I should know, I have a Stafford
loan and college would be real diffi-
cult without it There are people less
fortunate than I who depend on loans
to pay for all college costs; tuition,
books, spending money, etc.
These are all loans that must be
paid back in full. For a student who
just graduated, paying back the loan
can be an inconvenience. He or she
may be looking for a job, seeking
graduate education, or looking for a
place to live.
Fortunately, for most loans, while
we are in school we are given the op-
tion to defer the loan payment until
we are no longer in college. The in-
stant we leave school, we are then ex-
pected to commence payments.
I feel this system is a great one,
designed to help people pursue a col-
lege education who otherwise might
not be able to. The usual stringent
Larry Freeman
Opinion Columnist
���gMMH
The Gingrich
Who Wants to
Steal Our Grace
Periods. Stop
him, fast!
demands for loans are relaxed to ac-
commodate college students. One dis-
tinguishing characteristic of a non-col-
lege loan is interest.
In most situations, when one bor-
rows money interest accrues on that
money until it is paid in full. Anyone
who has used a credit card knows what
this is all about.
The Speaker of the House wants
interest to accrue while we are in col-
lege. I think I speak for most college
students when I say we have enough
problems to worry about apartment
rent, electric bills, phone bills, grocery
bills and. hopefully, a little bit of spend-
ing money.
For many, times are financial
difficult in college. Tuition increases,
parking increases and other fees are
commonplace. Let's not forget a few
"pit stops" at the Croatan can cost a
small fortune.
For example, say that I go to col-
lege for five years, getting a $2,000
loan per semester. Besides paying
$20,000 back, I would have to fork over
$1,000 in interest
The cost of attending college is high
enough. I don't want to get into a parti-
san debate over this subject but it's a
fact that President Clinton is concerned
about the costs of college; anyone who
saw him during Campaign '92 can at-
test to that
I know some people are saying,
"Criticize Newt Gingrich? Hey buddy, get
in line I do not want to fuss about Rep.
Gingrich - there are a number of ques-
tionable democrats as well. I actually
admire Newt for his candor. The guy does
tell you what's on his mind. I don't hate
him, I just disagree with many of his
policies.
Were a democrat to offer this pro-
posal, i would be just as vehement about
it It just doesn't surprise me that the
GOP backs this measure. When are re-
publicans going to realize that trickle-
down economics don't work? Forget capi-
tal gains, and worry about the little
people, the ones who "ratified" your
contract
Don't we have enough monetary
hardships as it is? You would think a
former history professor would have a
little more compassion for the struggling
college student I just hope that any rep-
resentative or senator who doesn't like
this policy will stand up for the students.
After all. we're voters, too!
ISf Letters to the Editor
Correction
In Tuesday's paper, a misprint occurred in Keith W. Cooper's Forum piece. The sentence which read. "It is
beyond mv comprehension as to why women people would ally with powerful corporate interests should have
read, it is beyond my comprehension as to why some people would ally We regret the mistake.
To the Editor:
There's been some concern
voiced in the last week about the pro-
posed increase of out-of-state tuition
at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, North Carolina State
University and the North Carolina
School of the Arts.
Few of the stories and editorials
have given a full picture of the facts
that support the proposed increase.
It was originally proposed by the Gov-
ernment Performance Audit Commit-
tee (GPAC), the widely-applauded in-
dependent ajdit of state government
conducted in 1992. GPAC's rationale
was that out-of-state students ought
to pay the full cost of their education.
North Carolina taxpayers may not
realized that they now subsidize as
much as 25 of the tuition cost for
out-of-state students at L'NC and N.C.
State, footing the bill for some $2,100
a year for an out-of-state student at
UNC.
There is no such subsidy at sev-
eral of the UNC campuses, including
UNC-Charlotte, UNC-Greensboro.
UNC-Wilmington and Appalachian
State University. In fact, those schools
actually charge out-of-state students
more than the cost of their education.
It should be noted that even with
this increase, the cost of a UNC edu-
cation is still a good deal for out-of-
state students - still less than the
tuition charged by comparable state-
supported schools like the University
of Virginia, the University of Michi-
gan and the University of California
at Berkeley.
This budget recommendation is
based on the view that the taxpayer-
financed subsidy is something our
state can no longer afford, given the
other pressing needs we face. Those
needs include tax relief for working
families with children, strengthening
the state's efforts to fight crime, re-
ducing class size in the first grade and
improving direct services for children
in their early years.
Marvin D. Dorman, Jr.
State Budget Officer
�i





Thursday, February 23,1995 The East Carolinian
NICK O'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
It's A Cartoonists Meeting!
There will be a meeting of all current Pirate Comics
artists next Thursday at 530 at
The East Carolinian offices.
Topics of discussion include upcoming Spoof Page,
plans for next year's page and the overthrow of a
certain unnamed television network.
(Say your prayers, Seinfeld)
PHOEBE
BY STEPHANIE SMITH
rjTcAN T 00 AKt
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60GUS AS "100 "RE
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JUST WHOM ARE yOU A
SEEKING TO IMPRESS?,
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THE LAVA SOAP AND
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THERE'S NO TIME TO LOSE
you CANT THINK with ,
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A Pl.ANE�A CAAIY MAN,
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THE BLOOD OF THE LAMB
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BY DAVID HISLE
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Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb 1S)
Absorb your findings today. Truth comes out Jrf writing.
Logic is your friend; things will fall neatly into place after
such a hideous slew of disorder. Sit back and say. "I'm
finally caught up .for the nKfment Then brace yourself.
Pisces (Feb. 19-Marcri"2cj
Le poisson plays Cupftrtodaf glowingly or unknowingly.
Pisces (lover of variety) mm 4pe special discretion, and
conveniently feign arrtnesja. vfien the match-up doesn't
work. Old music, caffeine play major parts in your day.
Aries (Mar 21- April 19)
It's time to send the worries packing. You've been
dreaming of a bevy of Fs tap-dancing on your forehead,
Mom and Dad withholding the pity check, your mam
squeeze the topic of juicy gossip. RELAX. Those are
the symptoms of hypochondria. jA
Taurus (April 2.0- May 20) g
You'll be asked endless favors today. At first, you'fssent
with grace. Beware. It may start an insu'rfhofrtable
epidemic of favor-asking. You may find yourself reduced
to shaking the welcome mat out over the head of that
lousy-timed unfortunate.
Gemini (May 21- June 21)
Some domestic adjustments are in order; take this
however you wish. Someone who had all the effrontery
to underestimate you will be eating his words! Gloat,
but quietly, put on a class act.
Cancer (June 22- July 22)
O, unrequited love! You're living out the saga of
Cathy and Heathcliff, and someongs pining
passionately. A retreat is in olfer. Get
philosophical�your verbal skills aworking
9
Leo fjuly 23- Aug22)
Try something you've never tried before: cold borscht, a
good sneaz� (wfth your eyes wide open). "Passion" is the
word of the day. Don't spend it all in one place.
Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22)
Virgo stages a brawl, and watches carefully to see who the
real friends are. (Plemembar the last time you were in a
cop car?) BloocMNrsty passer-by are crushed to see it's
all a game. Your ffl&fjouldnt be smoother right now.
Libra (Sept. 230bfc. 23)
Let no one take the credit for your ideas! Protect them,
whether they're worth your weight in rubies or they're pure
caprice. Pottery, books, poetry is in your future.
Scorpio (Oct. 24- Nov. 21)
You're waxing nostatcfaren't you? Youcoff at silly
sentimentality, but feel compelled to listen to old tapes. Read
some old letters Hazard an Interpretation of an old flame s
illegible scrawl. And get on Wfth it.
Sagittarius (Nov. 21- Dec. 21)
Sagittarius, thy name is toast. Don't go outside! On the
other hand, staying indoors isn't such a hot idea either.
Find yourself a nice doorjamb. Run to a fellow suffering
Sagittartan and find solace in hisher ability to find the humor
in it all. All is lost, otherwise.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) m
Those who have mistaken you for a "doormat" will have it
suddenly yanked out from under your feet. Send these
foolish ones "thank you" notes, adding a personal touch.
L
surprisingly well for one in such a tumuJH
i





w
10
Thursday, February 23,1995 The East Carolinian
The Jerky Boys dial
the wrong number
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
For those who have never heard
the caustic, insolent barbs hurled by
the Jerky Boys onto unsuspecting
persons who pick up a phone, a new
film, aptly titled The Jerky Boys,
promises to acquaint you with these
two phone pranksters.
I first heard the Jerky Boys
while huddled in my brother's car
last Thanksgiving outside my par-
ents' house. Something about the
surreptitious manner in which we
listened to my brother's tape added
a thrill to what we heard. The mate-
rial seemed too illicit to listen to
with Mom and Dad around. A cer-
tain excitement about doing some-
thing not quite socially acceptable
filled the car as we anxiously
awaited to hear what these brazen
men would do next
My two brothers and I laughed
uproariously at the audacity of these
two callers. The Jerky Boys would
call anyone, in any situation. They
called a clinic claiming to be suffer-
ing from hemorrhoids and called a
talent agency pretending to be the
Egyptian Magician. The nonstop
barrage of insults spewed by these
' two New Yorkers left all three of us
short of breath from laughing so
hard.
The two men, Johnny Brennan
and Kamal Ahmed, who play them-
selves in the film, talked to listen-
ers on the receiving end of their
calls with harsh, brazen impudence.
I cannot be certain that the calls
were not staged, but the possibility
of the calls being real made the com-
edy truly stimulating. The thought
of these two Jerky Boys really jerk-
ing someone around until the per-
son finally hung up added the spice
necessary to make the comedy up-
roarious.
Why anyone thought that a
Jerky Boys film would be a good idea
baffles me, however. Every call
within the film is obviously staged
and therefore lacks the energy of the
tapes. Plus, seeing the callers re-
moves the thrill of imagining what
might be going on with the poor
person on the receiving end of the
line.
Worse yet is that the writers
(helped by the Jerky Boys) tried to
fit a story around which the prank-
sters could make their calls. They
also made a wrongheaded decision
to try to fit in routines from their
tapes. The Egyptian Magician se-
quence is hopelessly out of place.
The Jerky Boys call a gangster
and get him to think they are two
goodfellas from Chicago, working
for a don named Frank Rizzo (an-
other bit from the tapes). They get
to meet with Ernie Lazarro (Adam
See JERKY page 10
Photo Courtesy of Touchtone Pictures
They'd better hide their faces! Our reviewer gave phone pranksters the Jerky Boys (pictured
above) the lowest rating possible for their new film, imaginatively titled The Jerky Boys.
Giants walk the Ritz
Mark Brett
lifestyle Editor
I honestly didn't think this show
would be that great
No, really! On my way to the Ritz
Sunday night, I didn't expect to be
dazzled by They Might Be Giants.
Sure, they're one of my favorite bands,
but I figured their peculiar brand of
polka-heavy alternative pop was too
studio-bound. I expected to enjoy
myself, mind you, but the best I was
hoping for was to hear some of my
favorite obscure tunes, like "Kiss Me,
Son of God" or "Dead Anything
more seemed unlikely.
Okay, so I was wrong.
But before I get to how very
wrong I was, I need to give the open-
ing act their due. Fresh-faced noise-
CD. Reviews
"Out of respect for
you the two
Johns said,
"we're not gonna
play any bad
songs. That's
right! No bad
songs, only the
good ones
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
1 never thought that Belly
would be able to top their last al-
bum, Star, but their new release,
King, is a surprising change of
pace for this multi-talented four-
some.
The album starts off with a
rather upbeat song called "Pu-
berty Singer and guitarist Tanya
Donelly gives us a taste of her
abundant musical abilities on this
song with her guitar riffs and
beautiful melodic voice. Even
though 1 enjoyed the song thor-
oughly, it ended up being one of
my least favorites on the album.
"Seal My Fate" shows the
band's knack for writing slower
songs that explode into powerful
choruses with ringing guitars, up-
beat drumming and loud harmo-
nious vocals. This song also shows
Donelly's skill at writing song lyr-
ics. "Unholy and dirty words I
gathered to me Thinking the
point was keep what's mine for me
While he's laughing Hear my
faith Seal my fate The lyrics
she writes seem to just flow along,
and that in turn makes the songs
themselves flow better too.
The third track on the album,
"Red follows the same slow-to-
fast pattern as "Seal My Fate but
it doesn't fall into the trap of
sounding just like another song.
There were a few moments when
"Red" made me think of the song
"White Belly" from their last al-
bum, but this song has a lot of
merit, and is much more maturely
written than some of their past
pop melodies.
"King the title track, is a
very fast-paced song that has
Donelly's voice slightly buried un-
der distorted guitars. It then
jumps into a very straightforward,
almost standard rock chorus,
which makes the song sound a
little unorganized. The song does
boast a short but sweet guitar solo,
and the lyrics are pretty good, too.
As the title track, this song has a
lot of potential because it has that
almost-cluttered sound to it that
everyone is so crazy about these
days.
Currently playing on MTV is
the first release off King, called
"Now They'll Sleep This song is
incredible. It has all the elements
of a great song. Musically, the song
is well constructed, and flows to-
gether very well. The lyrics are also
interesting: "Now I've lost the plot
I'm not the hero I could be
But not the dog I was It's so
catchy that after the first time I
heard it, I sang it for at least three
days.
For the most part, every song
on the album is well-constructed.
Drummer Christopher Warren is
a very capable drummer, and his
ability shines through on King
much more so than on Star. He
has this great style that uses a lot
of buildup techniques. These build-
ups really help the listener know
that something big is about to
happen within the song.
King also boasts a great deal
more harmonization than Belly's
last album. I hear more backup vo
cals by Bassist-Gail Greenwood
pop outfit the Dambuilders, despite
delaying the show's starting time by
nearly two hours, got things off to a
snappy start Their skunk-haired vio-
linist stole the show with her distorted
violin stylings. Capable of far eerier
sounds than a guitar, this instrument
separates the Dambuilders from the
alternative pack and makes them wor-
thy of opening for They Might Be Gi-
ants, who are themselves nothing if
not different
Proving just how different they
really are. the Giants opened with "0
Do Not Forsake Me This song, a
dirge-like number with three-part har-
mony on their John Henry album, was
delivered with a lounge jazz snap by
primary Giants vocalist John
Flansburgh and keyboardistaccor-
dion player John Linnell. Grinning like
a fool by the second verse, I knew I
was about to see something amazing.
I wasn't disappointed. The Giants
took us through a whirlwind of a
show. "Out of respect for you as an
audience the two Johns told us,
"we're not gonna play any bad songs.
That's right! No bad songs, only the
good ones
See GIANT page 9
Coming soon for your edification and amusement
Thursday. Feb. 23 The Specialist
at Hendrix Theatre
(action)
Ominous Seapods
smell a bit Phishy
Brandon Wadded
Staff Writer
See BELLY page 10
Last week, I heard a track on WZMB
from a band called Ominous Seapods. It
sounded real Phishy to say the least but
it was definitely worth giving a onceover
listening. So when I found their new CD,
Econobrain, I grabbed it Their sound is
not totally jazzy, bluesy or funky; it's all
these things combined.
One aspect of their sound that cer-
tainly made a favorable impression is that
it was recorded live. Few record compa-
nies will release a band's first effort as a
live album because they can't have the
producers change the music in the stu-
dio to make it sound more commercially
appealing. Most likely, in a release such
as this, what you hear is what you get
That's why I also assumed that their live
show would be as good as what I heard
on disc.
For the most part, it was. The
Seapods are from upstate New York and
Greenville is the furthest south they've
ever been while touring. They're suppos-
edly one of the most successful bands
on the East Coast However, consider-
ing the size of the crowd at Peasant's
Cafe Saturday night I think it would be
quite difficult to find someone around
here who would agree with that claim.
The show did go much better after
1 am but this was probably due more
to the fact that the audience had a larger
amount of alcohol in their system than
the show actually getting better. Among
the 50 or so spectators at Peasant's Sat-
urday night the majority of the people
were more into in-depth conversations
with each other than checking out the
band they paid a 5 dollar cover to see.
Overall, the Seapods did not have
too bad of an introductory performance
in Greenville. Hopefully they won't be
scared away from our little town simply
because they didn't blow the roof off of
Peasant's. Many bands that come
through Greenville do not have a pleas-
ant first outing and never come back.
Hopefully, though, the Seapods will come
back to see us in the future
Open Mic
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
(poetry)
Cool Aid Benefit
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Shake
atO'Rock's
ECU Symphony
and North Carolina Symphony
at Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Mother Sound
and Bluesberry Jam
at Tau Kappa Epsilon House
Bring a can of food for
Salvation Army food drive
The Specialist
at Hendrix Theatre
(action)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, Feb. 24
Cravin Melon
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Ella
and Green Bone Dance
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, Feb. 25
Bloodstul
and How Town
at O'Rock's
(metal)
Gibb Droll
and Hard Soul Baets
at the Attic
(roots rock)
The Specialist
at Hendrix Theatre
(action)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Sunday, Feb. 26
Nostalgia Comic Book Convention
at Ramada Inn
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Free Admission
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming eent
that you'd like listed in our Coming
Attractions column? If so, please
send us information (a schedule
would be nice) at
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publications Bldg.
Uieenviue, nv aiooo
Photo courtesy Ominous Sea Pods
Here we see the Ominous Seapods not looking very omi-
nous at all. posing on the steps of an impressive building.
Fact: The stratospheric
ozone layer is a layer of a
chemical called ozone, high
in the atmosphere. The ozone
layer shields the earth from
destructive ultraviolet radia-
tion. Most agree that chlorof-
luorocarbons (CFC's) deplete
this protective ozone layer.
Tip: Don't top off your
auto air conditioning with do-
it-yourself cans of freon. You
will likely allow CFC's to es-
cape. Take your car to a con-
scientious professional.
� 1995 Kevin A. McLean. Tampa, FL






I
11
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
MEETING
THURSDAY, FEB. 23RD
General Classroom 1012
FREE PIZZA & DRINKS
For further info contact Harold Wise 830-5160
Gross sweets make splash
NEW ORLEANS (AP) - Cummi
"worms" hide in crumbled chocolate
cookie "dirt" Mouth Muck makes you
foam at the mouth. S.N.O.T. drips out of
a plastic nose.
Is there nothing too gross for kids
to buy?
"No. Well, there probably is. but 1
don't know what it is said Lori Bassett
of Sherman Confections Inc.
Her display at the American Whole-
sale Marketers Association's 36th Na-
tional Winter Convention and Candy
Exposition included Super Nauseating
Obnoxious Treat sold in a nose-shaped
container. Sherman also makes Spew,
which foams and stains the spewer's
mouth, and Mad Dawg Super Spew
Bubble Gum.
Then there's the high-tech option:
bubble gum in plastic compact discs. CD
players and boom boxes; toy beepers and
cellular phones with candy inside.
Add the more straightforward
Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, M&M's,
Snickers, Hershey's Kisses, Butterfmgers
and Mounds and you have a fraction of
the sweet treats at the convention that
is the world's biggest candy shop.
It's clear that tasting good isn't good
WILSON ACRES
STUDENTSTEACHERS
Earn $$ This Summer? TmnwmmomNm
Moritoiii Cotton fields MAERBlMtO:)4eSi
May to Sept PA & V
5.75 per hour NC MX
C25 per mile Or fcr nQ3M!2S
LOCATED JUST MINUTES FROM
Greenville, Kinston New Bern
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water Sewer �Cable �Draperies
�Self-cleaning Oven �Frost-free Refrigerator
�WasherDryer Connections �Utility Room �Patio with Fence
�Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks �Walk-in Closets
FEATURING
�Swimming Pool �Basketball Court
�Tennis Court 'Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease �Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE
MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
Join the Stampede
i to bw'3
Try our Daily Lunch Specials.
MonGartage Dog Combo$2.99
Tues20e WingsV Day!
WedBeef-on-Weck Combo$2.99
ThurChicken Breast Combo$3.99
Fri14 lb. Weckburger Combo$2.99
enough for kids today.
Amurol Confection Co. sells a vis-
cous, neon-colored liquid in a clear
squeeze bottle shaped like a lava lamp.
The display trumpets. Lava Lick: A great'
taste eruption There's Gobble-D-Goo
day-glo goo in a glue bottle.
Leaf Inc. sells Mouth Muck, bubble
gum balls that make you foam at the
mouth.
Candy makers have a word for
sweets that make people say
"Eeuuwwww. gross
No. not revolting.
Interactive.
Kids want to play with their candy.
"When 1 was in Europe, they had
excrement-shaped candy, and it was sell-
ing like hotcakes said John Schultens
of Triple C. Inc a Canadian distributor.
"They also had a product called Bart
Triple C. doesn't sell those.
"We actually have certain stan-
dards Schultens said.
There's a lot of fizzy candy out there, i
too. Magic Fizz popping candy. Cherry '�
Bomb lollipops. Remember Pop Rocks?
"I haven't seen them for years said
Denise Perryman, a buyer for Wal-mart
Stores Inc.
However inventive these new can
dies may be. tradition remains the best"
seller. Reese's Peanut Butter Cups is the -
national favorite, followed by Snickers -
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"Students for Christ" presents three intriguing nights of drama
in Hendrix Theater at Mendenhall Student Center
by Dace Delaney Ministries.
3n5irirfmr:
- The Apostle John -
His Struggle to Comprehend Jesus
ou haiif atirrnhiri into a classroom
on tht famous of fee
SriaotmaJkbottlat'Spiritual (terrmiam
Jt is loratro in the pit. tfe bntuele of Me'd
Sir courst of stuou is Minbgamta JW.
(D) instructor - jsafcm, bimstif.
is training his Bratantr Army.
Sooefrnn.
Jo bistort
Qiioistnrtt
So confuse
foXir.
-j&o iJfeu emi fake uuu baton -
H$�4$f M!�kf, Fiktutft? - 7:00 p.m.
We love glory and grandeur.
World Champions.
The richest.
The smartest.
The strongest.
We look for the glory.
But the most dazzling display of glory
came at a time and in a way we would
have never guessed.
It might not even make sense to you.
So, tonight, well hear from
the Apostle John.
He will personally share his struggle to
see the Glory � God's Glory- blazing
through Jesus Christ's
last few tormented hours on earth.
r�W�r tyK Ffbntff tt - 7:00 p.m.
As a reporter from the loth century, you have been
prtvilesed to crave! some
3300 years inco the past.
Your assignment:
To interview the famed prophet, Elijah.
As you approach Elijah, you find him in the midst
of a tense competition with 450 prophets of the
false god, Baa At state
The honor of the Name of the Lord Cod
Maybe it wasn 'c such ,? good idea you
came a day early. . .
'Note: Eliijih, .Wan of Cod is based on events
as recorded m I Kings, chapters r6 - ig.
To receive maximum benefit, it is recommended
that you first read these scriptures.
W4,s4f Mfkt, t - 7:00 p.m.
Come early to guarantee seating. Doors open at 6:30pm.
from page 8
Considering how few bad songs �
there are in the They Might Be G-j
ants repertoire, this was a pretty safe ,
claim to make. Giant standards like,
"Particle Man "Ana Ng" and "Don't,
Let's Start" (their first hit) were care-j
fully mixed in with lesser-known stuff j
like "1 Palindrome I" and "Mammal
In the eyes and ears of the audience, (
our beloved Johns were right: There
wasn't a bad song in the bunch.
Showing off some impressive,
musical talents all the way through
the Giants surpassed the studio veis
sions of just about every song they
played. On "Spy for instance, they-i
expressed their love of '60s spy movie
theme songs and improvisational jazz'j
with a lovely, jumbled climax loosely J
conducted by Linnell.
But the big surprise for the'
evening was "Why Does the Sun
Shine?" A song plucked from some
educational children's record of the)
'50s, this one was released last year j
to mixed reviews. The somewhat myo-
pic tone grated on some ears, and this'
track became infamous as a love-it-or-
hate-it song.
For the show, however, the Giants
relieved the song of any myopic quali- j
ties it might have possessed. Speed-�
ing things up. they almost gave this �
one a punk edge. I still can't believe ;
Linnell kept a straight face delivering J
lines like "The sun is a huge, atom
smashing machine" over the driving
beats being laid down by his'
bandmates.

But the giggles were infectious i
at this show. The audience (a pecu- j
liar mix of alty kids, skinheads and
the utterly normal) started moving as J
soon as They Might Be Giants took
the stage and rarely stopped. A mosh'
pit briefly broke out near the stage
and didn't really seem out of place,
despite the light tone. A rash ofj
pogoing broke out. and a conga line �
snaked around the crowd for a while, J
but soon found itself stopped dead in J
its tracks by people surging up from J
the back of the room.
All in all. I've seldom seen a hap-1
pier crowd: I didn't even see any vio- �
lence break out. Considering how i
tightly we were all packed onto the �
Ritz dance floor, that's pretty amaz- j
ing. Perhaps downtown audiences J
could learn from this example
It's even more amazing when you
consider the subject matter of a lot
of the music. They Might Be Giants j
play happy little songs about hoi i ibk i
little people, but that's their charm.
On the surface, their music might
appear frivolous: a friend of mine ac- J
tually called them a novelty hand But
beyond the bouncy beats is a core oi
cynicism that underscores neatly ev- J
ery song. �
As the Giants themselves say. "No �
one in the world ever gets what they �
want and that is beautiful. Everybody j
dies frustrated and sad and that is ;
beautiful Perhaps not words to live j
by exactly, but certainly something to
think about.

-
millmipjiMH ill �'I





12
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
BELLY from page 8 JERKY from page 8
than I ever did before. This is a great
asset on an album because if you
like to sing a long in the car like I
do. it will be pretty hard to get bored
since there are so many parts to sing
to.
One other great thing about
King is that none of the songs sound
exactly alike. With both Doneliy and
Thomas Gordon playing guitar, both
of their sounds shine through. This
adds more variety to their songs and
shows their ability to put their own
creative effort into the band with-
out trying to outshine each other.
Overall. King is a great album.
There are maybe one or two songs
that start to grate your nerves be-
fore they are over, but I've forgot-
ten which ones they were because
I got so wrapped up in the disc.
1 highly suggest this album to
anyone who is a Belly fan. You will
not be disappointed. 1 will admit
that 1 was a little thrown off when
I first started listening, but I can
already tell that I will like King just
as much, if not more, than I liked
Star.
Arkin) in a hopelessly contrived situ-
ation that saps any comedic energy
right from the film.
The Jerky Boys. Brennan and
Kamal, still have humor. Brennan
called into Letterman last week and
got laughs even with his toned-down
language. But the film lacks story,
originality and acting. Not one aspect
of The Jerky Boys warrants praise.
The Jerky Boys detracts from
the comedy of the phone calls. Ev-
ery joke falls flat, which makes the
film painful to watch. Despite cam-
eos by Tom Jones and Ozzy
Osbourne, the film sinks to the low-
est possible depths of cinema, thus
according it the lowest possible rat-
ing. The Jerky Boys need to stay on
tape and away from celluloid.
On a scale of one to ten, The
Jerky Boys rates a one.
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECU
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The ECU Media Board welcomes
APPLICATIONS FOR EDITORS AND
GENERAL MANAGERS OF THE STUDENT MEDIA
The board is seeking full-time students interested in serving as editorgeneral
manager for the following campus media: The East Carolinian, Expressions, The
Rebel and WZMB.
Ail of the media heads are paid a monthly stipend during the 1995-96 academic
year. All applicants must have a minimum 2.5 grade point average.
For information, contact: University Media Board office
' 2nd floor, Student Publications Building
328-6009
Deadline for applications is Friday, March 17 at 5 p.m.
Conveniently Located
Near Campus
One or two bedroom apartments
available immediately. Walking distance
to campus. WasherDryer hook-ups,
Free water and sewer. ECU bus service.
Very reasonable rent rates.
Call 756-4052 for more information.
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Q Buy pizza at closing time.
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3�� Eat Ramen noodles.
Make friends with a Senior.
Come June, they'll be more than glad to give
you their old Poly Sci books and couches.
3�& Donate blood.
Save a life and get a free lunch to boot.
y Pick up a Citibank Classic card.
There's no annual fee.
"Guitar Legend In The Making
cr?viiNi
SATURDAY FEB. 25
Special Guest
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Tuesday Feb. 28
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UMgWOW





13
Thursday, February 23,1995 The East Carolinian
ODU tops ECU on ESPN
Mullin hits 11 of
12 in big 81-73
win over Pirates
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Damon VanWeerdhuizen has
given Coach Payne quality
minutes as a point guard.
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
Monday night at Williams
Arena, the Pirates played in front
of a national TV audience on
ESPN2, and had the opportunity to
knock off the No. 1 team in the
CAA in front of a very enthusiastic
crowd of 6,865.
Then came Mario Mullen to
break up the spirit.
The junior
from Virginia
Beach connected
on 11 of 12 field
goal attempts for
27 points in lead-
ing the Old Do-
minion Monarchs
to a 81-73 victory
over ECU. Petey
Sessoms added 17
points for the
Monarchs, who
improved to 11-2
in the CAA and
16-11 overall.
"Were lucky
to get a win down
here First year
ODU coach Jeff
Capel said. "It is a very tough place
to play - they've got a really good
situation down here at East Caro-
lina with what they have done to
the arena
The Pirates, led by Anton
Gill's 13 points, held a 35-33 lead
at halftime, but the Monarchs hit
17-of-23 field goals in the second
half to pull away.
"You look at the stats and it
was amazing that we had a chance
to win the game ECU head coach
Eddie Payne said.
"They shot 70 per-
cent for the sec-
ond half and 60
percent for the
game
The game was
closely contested
throughout until
the Monarchs
went on a 17-6
run in the second
half to take a 68-
58 lead with just
under five min-
utes remaining.
Jeff Capel "i thought it
First year ODU coach was a well-played
basketball game
said Capel. "Both
teams competed very hard. Some-
times when you play hard, as both
of these teams played, it is not a
pretty game. We just got some
See PIRATES page 15
"It is a very tough
place to play-
they've got a really
good situation
down here at East
Carolina with
what they have
done to the arena
��� �

Runnin
the
floor
Danielle Charlesworth is
the on-court leader for
head coach Rosie
Thompson and the ECU
Lady Pirate basketball
team. She transfered to
ECU after her first
season at the University
of Richmond after playing
her high school ball in
Raleigh, N.C.
Photo by HAROLD WISE
J
Former four-event H.S.
track star adapts to ECU
Two-sport star gives up football to focus on Pirate track team
Edwards leads off 1995
Former Clinton
star returns to
natural position
Lamont Edwards
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Early this season, Lamont
Edwards has stepped up in a big
way filling two new roles for the
Pirate baseball team. The starting
second baseman and leadoff hitter
is hitting .429 after three games,
and leads the team in runs scored
and stolen bases. He has also been
impressive in the field, committing
just one error so far this year.
Success has not come easily for
Edwards, who waited his turn as a
freshman in a reserve outfield role
before finishing fourth on the team
in batting last year with a .317 av-
erage.
After a productive summer
with the Arlington Senators in a
Washington D.Carea summer
league, expectations are high for
Edwards. He led the Senators in
batting (.360) and stole 17 bases.
"Lamont Edwards is a player
that has paid his dues Overton
said. "He was a backup player on a
outstanding 1993 squad. Last year,
he proved he is a Division-1 hitter.
I have every confidence that this
year he will prove to everyone as-
sociated with college baseball that
he is an outstanding prospect for
the professional scouts
Edwards has the size (6-2,
200), speed and natural ability to
play second base. He has good bat
speed and a strong arm that he
developed playing in the outfield.
"The couple of scouts that I
have talked to want to see me hit
for more power and work hard at
my new position Edwards said.
"I'm not too worried about getting
drafted and all of that stuff. 1 just
try to concentrate on school and
baseball
With the loss of First-Team All-
CAA outfielder, Jamie Borel to the
Detroit Tigers organization Coach
Overton has to replace ECU'S all-
time stolen base leader, who was a
star leadoff hitter during his ten-
ure as a Pirate.
"1 knew somebody had to step
up and be the leadoff hitter
Edwards said. "I felt like I had the
speed to be a productive
baserunner and a good eye to not
swing at bad pitches and get on
base. So far, it has worked out real
well, and we are scoring a lot of
runs
Edwards was an All-State selec-
Brian Johnson
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
See EDWARDS page 15
��
Vllii
NOTES
?
��
r?
�5d
Not one, two or three, but four
state high school-level track titles in
one dayit's a collegiate track coach's
recruiting dream. At ECU, it's a real-
ity, in the person of sophomore Brian
Johnson.
While at Beaufort (S.C.) High
School, Johnson was a four-year
letterman in track and football as a
wide receiver. The home-state recruit-
ers from the University of South Caro-
lina and Clemson actively courted
Johnson, but it was the word of an
impressed colleague that brought
Johnson to the attention of veteran
yy
Pirate track head coach Bill Carson.
Carson was at his first indoor-out-
door meet of the 1992-93 season,
when he got the tip from a rival coach
about a South Carolina senior who
could do both track and football.
"The coach from University of
South Carolina came up to me and
said, 'Coach, there's a kid in South
Carolina that I think would really fit
the nature of your program Carson
said.
When Carson returned to
Greenville, he did his homework on
Johnson and made several efforts to
contact him, but was not able to reach
him that week.
Within a couple of days, Carson
received a call from the Pirate foot-
ball office. They were looking at a com-
bination football-track athletc.named
Brian Johnson.
"Well, a little light bulb went off
Carson said. "So then when I talked
with Brian, and saw his size, I knew
what he could do because I had
checked that out. His times and all
were very legit 1 knew that he was
going to have a good high school
senior year
Both athletic offices worked to-
gether with Brian in an effort to sign
him to both sports for the Pirates.
"I told Brian if ECU football did
not take him, that I would, and give
him a full scholarship Carson said.
"He could participate in football if he
chose to
"Well, that's exactly what hap-
pened Carson said. "Football signed
the primary people. They didn't take
Brian - and I did. Brian chose not to ;
play football just simply because of j
academics. He's about a 2.4 GPA stu- ;
dent now, his decision was good. It's
worked out well
The transition from high school
to college was fairly smooth for
Johnson.
"I felt like I could adapt easily be-
cause Greenville is a small town kind
of like my hometown Johnson said.
Johnson's freshman year as a
track athlete was far from easy,
though. Trouble began during the
second indoor-outdoor meet of his
. first season.
"He hurt a hamstring outdoor
trying to race two All-Americans
Carson said. "He led them at the 200,
and then poof
"Last year was doomed from the
beginning, because I got hurt and I
got red-shirted for the rest of the sea-
son Johnson lamented. "Then I fi-
nally started running outdoors, and I
got hurt again - so 1 never got the
chance to run open events, I just ran
See JOHNSON page 15
"Operation Bass
kicks off Red Man
Drew Bourque led the charge
with five goals as the ECU lacrosse
club team dominated their season
opener in a 13-2 rout of the UNC
Tarheels on Saturday.
ECU easily controlled all phases
of the game, winning 13 of 16
faceoffs while taking 23 shots on
goal (57 success rate), compared !
to the Tarheels' 9 (22).
Brendan McGlaughlin added
three goals to the Pirates' total,
while John Provost registered two
more. Steve Ditmars. Sean Sullivan
and Bernie Hunsicker also found net
in the victory.
ECU will face off with UNC-
Wilmington on Saturday before play-
ing Wesleyan on Sunday. Both
games are at the allied health fields
at 2 p.m.
(SID) - ECU'S women's track
team competed in the Collegiate In-
vitational, hosted by George Mason
University, in Fairfax, Va. last Sun-
day. Lady Pirate Alexis Jacks placed
third in the 500M preliminaries with
a time of 1:17.61, a new ECU indoor
record.
Freshman Saundra Teel fin-
ished fourth in the high jump with
a leap of 5-04.25, also a new record.
Cindy Szymanski
Lady Pirate Cindy Szymanski
also broke an indoor record in the
1000M with a time of 2:58.37.
On Friday, Feb. 17, they com-
peted in the UNC Indoor Invite in
Chape! Hill. ECU was represented
in the shot put. jumping events, 55M
and the 55HH. Lady Pirate Lave
Wilson finished sixth in the triple
jump with a mark of 37-08.0.
See NOTES page 15
First of the six-
event season
begins on Mar. 5
Operation Bass will conduct the
first Red Man bass fishing tourna-
ment of the Piedmont Division.
March 5, 1995, on Kerr Lake at
Henderson Point, signaling the start
of the six-event Piedmont Division
Red Man season. Entry deadline for
the event is Feb. 22. Late entries are
accepted with a late fee.
Five other Operation Bass-man-
aged Red Man events will make up
the Piedmont venue of 1995 as fol-
lows: March 26, Gaston-Easton
Ferry, entry deadline March 15; May
7, Potomac River-Smallwood State
Park, entry deadline April 26; July
9, Kerr Lake-Henderson Point, en-
try deadline June 28; Aug. 27, James
River-Osborne Landing, entry dead-
line August 16; and Sept. 17, Kerr
Lake-Henderson Point, entry dead-
line Sept. 6.
The top 30 fishermen in the
Piedmont Division after the six
qualifying events will advance to one
of five Regional Championships
Crawdads go on-
line to sell goods
where they will compete with 90
other "working" men and women
anglers for a $40,000 "Dream" bass
fishing rig consisting of a Chevrolet
pickup and a fully rigged Ranger
boat powered by an Evinrude or
Johnson outboard motor.
Those anglers that enter all six
qualifying tournaments within a di-
vision and do not qualify for another
regional will qualify to compete in
the "Wild Card" regional. The top
six finishers will qualify for the pres-
tigious Red Man Ail-American Cham-
pionship.
The top eight from each of five
jgionals, the top four from the
Western regional and the top six
from the Wild Card regional will
advance to the Red Man All-Ameri-
can where the winner will be
awarded $100,000.
Each Red Man qualifying tour-
nament has a $75 entry fee and a
guaranteed first place cash award of
$1,000. Each divisional point leader
is also a guaranteed winner on
$1,000. Additionally. Red Man an-
glers will be competing for the fol-
lowing awards throughout 1995: Bill
See BASS page 15
N.C. minor
league franchise
joins the Internet
(AP) - Already one of the hot
merchandising commodities in the
country, the Hickory Crawdads
have become the first minor league
baseball team on the Internet-
Internet surfers can check out
the catchy crustacean logo on the
full-color electronic catalog, and
download order forms for Crawdads
caps and T-shirts to their printers.
Wired-in baseball junkies can
catch up on team news, trades,
schedules and even send questions
to the team's management.
Still to come: Game statistics,
and player profiles, with photos,
and ultimately. E-mail souvenir or-
ders.
"Everything I read says this is
the wave of the future in market-
ing and merchandising, and we
wanted to catch it early Marty
Steele. the Crawdads' vice presi-
dent of baseball operations, told
The Charlotte Observer.
The Crawdads. the Chicago
White Sox affiliate in the Class A
South Atlantic League, aren't the
first baseball team on the Internet.
The major league Seattle Mariners
beat them to that distinction.
The Crawdads connection is
the latest feature of North Carolina
Networks, a service offered
through the World Wide Web. The
Web is an increasingly popular seg-
ment of the worldwide computer
network called Internet, which re-
quires a fee to access.
John Ellis, a Catawba Valley
Community College professor,
started Networks about two
months ago to offer tourism infor-
mation for visitors' bureaus in 13
North Carolina cities. It also car-
ries advertising, for a fee, for
Hickory's furniture dealers and for
the upcoming Southern Spring
Show in Charlotte.
But it's the Crawdads connec-
tion that draws the surfers.
Before Feb. 2, when the
Crawdads went on-line, the most
people who had tapped into Ellis'
service in one day was 845. On Feb.
6, Ellis, who gets a fee from the
Crawdads for providing access to
the Internet, got 3,140 "hits
See CRAW page 15
��





14
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
Drug use hurt '80s Mets
(AP) - The New York Mets partied
even harder than they played in the
1980s, according to former star Darryl
Strawberry.
In the Feb. 27 issue of Sports Illus-
trated. Strawberry says widespread alco-
hol and drug abuse hurt the Mets.
"If we wouldn't have partied so
much, we would have won more says
Strawberry, who played for the Mets from
1983-90. "We had a team full of drunks.
We'd go into a town and couldn't wait to
go out drinking and partying, always
asking each other, 'Hey, where you go-
ing tonight?'
"If we had 24 guys on the team in
those days, at least half of them were
hard drinkers or drug users. That was a
hard-living team
Strawberry and former Mets team-
mate Dwight Gooden are featured in a
cover story entitled "The Dead End
Kids Both were National League Rook-
ies of the Year, both have been troubled
by alcohol and drug abuse, and both are
currently suspended from major league
baseball.
Former Mets trainer Steve Garland
said that after Gooden got out of a re-
hab center in 1987, the pitcher told him
the team had a drug problem.
"He talked to me about how preva-
lent the drug use was on the team Gar-
land told SI. "He started calling off
names. He rattled off more than 10 -
more than half the team. Probably
around 14 or 15. And I thought the '84,
'85 and '86 teams were wilder
The story traces the downfall of
Strawberry and Gooden, who helped the
Mets win the World Series in 1986.
Strawberry was released by the San
Francisco Giants and suspended from
baseball for 60 days on Feb. 6 after test-
ing positive for cocaine.
"It became a lifestyle for me Straw-
berry says of his alcohol and drug use.
"I played games when I was drunk, or
just getting off a drunk or all-night par-
tying or coming down off amphet-
amines
Gooden, who became a free agent
last October, was suspended twice last
year after flunking drug tests. The sec-
ond suspension covers the entire 1995
season.
Gooden says his problems started
with beer, which led to haid liquor, then
cocaine.
"If I don't drink, I have no desire to
use coke he says. "You could put a
bag of coke in front of me right now and
I'd have no desire for it at all.
Gooden and Strawberry have been
treated for alcohol and drug problems,
but both have suffered relapses.
CRAW from page 13
The Crawdads had the second-
most popular logo in all of minor
league baseball in 1993 and will fin-
ish in the top five in merchandise
sold for the 1994 season, Steele
predicted. Other popular teams in-
clude the Durham Bulls, the
Rancho Cucamonga (Calif.) Quakes
and the Toledo Mud Hens.
Under the licensing agreement
with Major League Baseball, how-
ever, minor league teams get only
9 percent of the revenue from such
merchandise as caps and jackets
bearing their logo. That s because
the minors are piggybacking on the
majors souvenir-distribution sys-
tem.
But the Crawdads keep all the
profit on anything they sell out of
their own warehouse at one of
the Crawdad s Hole stores or
through their printed catalog,
Steele said.
Right now, the Crawdads don t
have enough computer power to get
on the Internet from their offices,
much less accept electronic orders
for their wares. Internet shoppers
will have to pnnt the team's order
form off the computer and mail or
fax it in.
"But by the end of the season,
we'll have our computers upgraded
and be ready for E-mail orders
Steele said.
Basebail executives will be
watching the Crawdads' Internet
experiment closely, said Miles Wolff,
publisher of Baseball America, a
weekly newspaper that covers minor
league baseball.
"If they are successful, they'll
have everyone else in minor league
baseball copying them said Wolff,
who owned the Durham Bulls for 12
years until he sold the team in 1991.
"Until the world is a little more
plugged in computer-wise, I see this
as having a limited impact on the
sale of team-logo merchandise to
start with. But you never know. This
could be the start of a trend
For those who want access:
Networks' address is URL http:
wwww.hickory.nc.usncne tworks.
From there, access the Crawdads
menu by clicking on the words "pro-
fessional sports" on the main
screen. Or click on the main icon,
and when the N.C. state map comes
up on the screen, click on the
Hickory locator dot.
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a





F
15
Thursday, February 23, 1995
The East Carolinian
PIRATES from page 13
EDWARDS from page 13
JOHNSON from page 13
breaks down the stretch, made some
big plays, got some big rebounds and
made some clutch free throws
The Monarchs were 19-of-26
173) from the line, while the Pi-
rates were 5-of-7. Chuckie Robinson
added 12 points and a whopping 13
rebounds to ECU'S totals. Tim
Basham added 12 while guards
Skipp Schaefbauer Tony Parham
each added 11 for the Pirates, who
dropped to 16-10 overall and 6-7 in
the CAA, holding fourth place.
"Our kids played hard and tried
in spurts, but there was a little slight
toughness that ODU had tonight
said Payne.
The Pirates wrap up the regluar
season on Saturday night at Will-
iams Arena when they host in-state
rival UNC-Wimington. ECU will try
to avenge an earlier loss they suf-
fered from the Seahawks. Tip-off is
set for 7:00 p.m.
BA5 from page 13
Lewis Live Releases Award, C1TGO
Cup Challenge Award, Old Milwaukee
NA Rookie-of-the-Year, Abu Garcia Big
Bass and EnergizerEveready Win-
ning Combination Award.
Catch and release is practiced at
every Red Man tournament and Op-
eration Bass maintains a 98 percent
live release rate in 147 events nation-
wide.
Sponsors of the 1995 Red Man
Tournament Trail include: Red Man
NOTES from page 13
ECU will break from competition
for two weeks in preparation for the
ECAC Indoor Championships to be
held on March 4-5 in Syracuse, N.Y.
Carla Powell, Shantell Carter, Cindy
Szymanski, Jennifer Kalanick,
Saundra Teel and Amanda Johnson
Chewing Tobacco, Ranger Boats, Abu
Garcia Rods and Reels, Armour
Vienna Sausage, Chevy Trucks, Stren
Fishing Lines, Evinrude and Johnson
Outboards, Evinrude and Johnson
Electrics, Techsonic Industries
(Humminbird Electronics), CITGO
Super Premium Gasoline, Fleetwood,
Energizer and Eveready Marine Bat-
teries. Beer Nuts, Aladdin Stanley,
Old Milwaukee NA and Bill Lewis
Lures.
will compete in the championship
meet
"We have six going to the ECAC
indoor meet, which is impressive be-
cause it is the most we've ever sent to
the indoor championship said ECU
coach "Choo" Justice.
Writer's meeting at
4:15 today, not 4:30.
tion at second base, lettering four
years when he played for Clinton
High School. He also earned all-
conference honors in football and
basketball.
Making the transition from the
outfield to second base hasn't been
easy because of the 30 pounds that
he has put on since last playing the
position. The weight gain has both
positive and negative aspects.
"It isn't uncomfortable, but I
just have to get used to carrying
this weight Edwards said. "I have
spent a lot of time in the weight
room since I started school here,
and it has really helped me to im-
prove my power
As far as goals go, Edwards
doesn't set any individual goals ex-
cept getting on base a lot and im-
proving his batting average. Areas
he wants to improve on are steal-
ing more bases by getting a better
jump on the pitcher, and to cut his
swing down to make better contact
with the ball.
The double-play combination of
Edwards and shortstop Chad
Puckett looks to be outstanding
because of Puckett's experience at
the position and Edwards' out-
standing range and strong arm.
"I really like playing with Chad
because he has played the position
for a couple years now, and he is
one of the best defensive players
on the team Edwards said. "Once
we get used to playing together we
should really be good at turning the
double play. One thing I have to get
used to is pivoting and making the
throw to first when runners slide
and try to take me out. You have
to make the tag and throw really
fast to get the job done
The team was picked to finish
fifth in the CAA, a prediction based
upon the graduation of the major-
ity of the pitching staff.
"We are a young team, but we
do have a lot of talent Edwards
said. "I think we can finish first in
the conference because this is a
much closer, unified team than last
year. Coach Overton is a great
coach. He teaches us to play with
reckless abandon, and play as hard
as we can every inning
Edwards began his career at
East Carolina as a two-sport athlete,
playing football and baseball. At
wide receiver Edwards excelled in
several spring scrimmages, but base-
ball has always been his first love.
"I was going to be drafted, but
I decided to give football a shot be-
fore I was committed to baseball full-
time Edwards said. "I think it just
takes a lot of hard work to practice
both sports, and it wore me out. Be-
sides, baseball is definitely my favor-
ite and better sport, so I feel like I
made the right decision
Making the right choices is very
important for the information pro-
cessing major, and he regularly
speaks with young people In the
community as a role model.
"I talk to a lot of kids about
baseball, but I realiy like to tell them
how important it is to stay in school
and out of trouble he said, if they
want to play sports they have to
work hard in the classroom and at
their sport
relays
Johnson has had a summer and
fall of good health and recuperation
to prepare him for his sophomore year.
"Over the summer, 1 was just
working outlaying lowjust trying
to recover from the injury Johnson
said.
At the moment, the worst enemy
of the men's track team is the combi-
nation of the cold, wet weather expe-
rienced continuously for a two-to-
three week period in February, plus
the flu is making the rounds with all
of Carson's athletes.
"Our team is sick coach said.
"We've had the flu just rampage
through us. We have nowhere to work
out I have an NCAA Relay Team right
now - but we can't get it there
In the past 27 years that Carson
has guided the men's track program
for the Pirates, he has built a strong
reputation for ECU track, especially
in the relays. ECU, however, is one of
the few Division I NCAA schools with-
out an indoor track practice facility;
when the weather is wet and under
40 degrees outside, he can't afford to
run the health risk of practicing his
athletes hard.
Once the weather breaks and
Carson can get his runners outside,
everyone expects a strong effort from
the Pirates.
"It's going great, really Johnson
said. "We're getting real close to quali-
fying for the nationa!sand once we
get everybody healthy, and get over
the sicknesses, we should be able to
do it
Carson intends to shift Johnson's
role in the relays from the first leg to
the second leg of a four-man relay
team.
"I've been using him as the lead-
off leg Carson said. "I'm going to
switch that. I'm going to lead off with
sophomore Lewis Harris, and put
Brian second, because I don't think
anybody around is going to have a bet-
ter second leg than what Brian is, with
his speed and the combination
"The second leg is just as impor-
tant, if not as important, as the anchor
leg coach explained. "Brian can take
the baton on the second leg, make that
cut stay a little wide, don't get dragged
down into Lane One, and use his long
stride and he'll be very beneficial
Considering the problems
Johnson has experienced in the past
several months, his mind is focused on
one area the strongest.
"For this year, my main goal is to
stay healthy Johnson said. "Through-
out college, I want to get All-American
- maybe run in the trials for the Olym-
pics
Johnson, in reviewing his team-
mates, has a very balanced view of the
men's track squad.
"We don't have really one standout
performer Johnson said. "Everybody
contributeseverybody basically runs
the same thing, and no matter who runs
the event or what relay, the times will
pretty much be the same. Instead of just
depending on one person, it's more like
a group effort"
All in all, Carson is confident that
Johnson will carry his part of the load
for the 1994-95 meets.
"I think that he's going to have a
very good year Carson said. "He's very
sound
LUalk-ins Anytime
ELTORO
men's hair styling shoppe
2300 E. 10th St.
Eastgate Shopping Center
Hcross from Highway Patrol
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Mon-Fri. 9-6
Walk-ins Anytime 752-5518
$6.00
Haircut
Say PIRATES & Get Haircut
For $6 Everytime
JEi5lr .N from page 1
forms, would still be committed for
non-ESPN games
"This particular TV agree-
ment Hart said, "which is very
unique in nature, will be the foun-
dation for ECU athletics to plan
and implement the first comprehen-
sive exposure package that will take
this program into the next decade.
L
THURSDAY
DIES NIGHT!
154 DRAFT
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"ECU will have a chance to
wrap the ESPN coverage with re-
gional and local exposure, and be-
yond football and basketball, to in-
clude baseball, women's soccer,
volleyball, and to have some tele-
casts that will truly maximize the
exposurefor the total program as
we approach the turn of the cen-
tury
ESPN has televised live five
previous football games involving
ECU - the 1994 Liberty Bowl, 1992
Peach Bowl and regular-season
games against Illinois (1991),
Southern Miss (1992) and Syracuse
(1993).
"ESPN is pleased to have en-
tered into this multi-year agreement
which includes football coverage on
both ESPN and ESPN2 Aresco
said. "This unique arrangement will
provide ESPN the opportunity to
showcase quality ECU football and
will continue our successful
assosciation with ECU athletics
By 1996, ESPN is projecting to
have a viewing market of 65-70 mil-
lion homes, while ESPN2 will teach
at least 30 million homes. ESPN2,
since its inception two years ago,
has been accepted by many cable
systems, is currently available in
over 18 million homes and is grow-
ing at a more rapid pace than did
ESPN when it began.
"We have a uniform signal,
meaning we are broadcast nation-
ally Aresco said. "We have be-
come, in many respects, the na-
tional outlet for college football.
What you have now among the net-
works is a regionalization, with the
exception of the Notre Dame games
on NBC
Over the years, a combined
Thursday-Saturday package of Pi-
rate football will be seen on the two
networks, with approximately a 50-
50 split on each network.
The Thurday night football
games are some of the most
watched each week, because they
are nationally televised. Also, a
Thursday night game kicks off the
weekend, thereby monopolizing
major media college football cover-
age in both print and television,
until Saturday's games take place.
ESPN has major football deals
in place with teams in the ACC,
SEC, Big East. Big Ten and the
WAC conferences. All of the deals
have ESPN and ESPN2 compo-
nents, as ESPN2 will be covering
more football in the coming years
than during the past two seasons.
'In looking at East Carolina
down the road Aresco said, "there
are obviously some very attractive
games - Miami visits, West Virginia
visits, Syracuse, Kentuckythere
are a number of attractive games
that we will look at carefully.
"We feel that to have ECU as
part of that will provide ESPN with
quality football and will also pro-
vide ECU a chance to show the
nation the kind of football it plays
l
??TAKE A RIDE ON THE WILD SIDE
Attention ECU Students
Don't have a car? Need a ride to Church?
The First Pentecostal Holiness Church would like to offer you free transportation.
Sunday Morning 11:00am � Sunday Evening 7:00pm Wednesday Nights 7:00pm
CALL 756-3315
(Monday - Friday, 9am to 4pm)
Find it in our
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Used Boots-
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Mon. - Sat. 9 - 7
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i����" " �'��
i






16
Thursday, February 23,1995 The East Carolinian
Utt
Help wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.). Seasonal and Full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53624
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe. KS
66051. Immediate response.
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY Clean,
High volume Adult Club needs YOU now.
Confidential employment Daily pay Top
Commissions. Some to no exper ience. If
you've called before call again. Playmates
Massage Snow Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
S10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own hours!
RUSH Self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298-8952.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
:Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-251-4000 ext
1576. Leave Name, School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS of
North Carolina this summer? For summer
employment and housing information call
Paul at 800-662-2122
PART TIME-FLEXABLE HOURS night
and weekends - Cleaning, Assembly &
mold waxing at local Boat Man ufacturing
Plant. Fill out applicat ion at North Ameri-
can Fiberglass - 758-9901
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK SUM
MER IN MYRTLE BEACH, SC : Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession Work-
ers. Earn good money while working on
the Beach $$ Salary plus bonuses $$
FREE HOUSING To apply or for further
information, callfax Sun Beach Service
at 803-2724170
SZECHUAN GARDEN - 909 S. Evans St
Experienced wait staff and cashier needed.
No phone calls please. Apply in person
between 2:00 pm and 6:00p.m.
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
ors Thermal Card - $5.00 per hour plus
bonus. Easy work, Flexible hours start to-
day. Call 355-2515.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED to teach camps in NC & SC.
Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free week-
ends! Strong skills and great personality
necessary. College experience not re-
quired. For a great summer job, CALL
ESPRIT! CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-
3223!
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK. Make
up to $2,000-$4,000mo. teaching basic
conversational English in Japan, Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For information
call: (206) 632-1146 ext J53623.
WANTED
Computer Whiz
Graduate Computer Science Major
TO DEVELOP MEDICAL DATABASE AND LINKAGE.
MUST BE WILLING TO WORK WITH, AND TOLERATE
computer illiterates! Call: Lawrence
Brown or Heramba Prasad at 816-2154
ECU School of medicine, division of EMS
For Sale
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, we'll pay you to! Make
your A's pay by calling Student Supple-
ments today. I'll pay you cash for going
to class. Give us a call at 752-HELP.
APPLY NOW. $10.25 TO START. G.ow
ing firm has openings in Greenville. Posi-
tive, friendly people needed to work with
our custumers. Flexible hours. Good re-
sume experience. Call 919-881-0034
COURTYARD TAVERN will be serving
lunch and dinner daily and we are now
accepting applications for Management as
well as WaitBarCookDishwasher
staffs. 703 Greenville Blvd S.E. 321-0202.
"Greenville's New Gathering Place"
POOL MAINTENANCE TECHS: Spring,
Summer, Fall 95. GreenvillePitt County.
Call Bob 758-1088.
LIFEGUARDS: Spring, Summer.
Greenville, Goldsboro, Smithfield,
Tarboro. Call Bob 758-1088.
"IntantReady-To-GoMail Or der
Business "Learn how I made over
$500,000 and how 1 can set you up in
yout oen instant ready-to-go mail order
business! Simply send $3.00 and a
SASE to Arendt & Wells Assoc. PO
Box 2612 Greenville, NC 27836-0612
NEW NATIONAL STAMP consolidation
Co. now hiring reps, to enlist people to
send the Co. their used and cancelled
postage. In exchange (as your clients will
be paid a handsome commission check
for their stamps), the Co. is willing to pay
each rep. a direct $50 check for every
person they sign up. No personal selling
is necessary. For registration and materi-
als send $4 and one 32$ stamp to : Post
Rider Enterprises, Eastern Reginonal
Division, 1906 West Road, Kinston, NC
28501
BRODY'S is accepting applications for
ReceivingWarehouse Associates. Verify
incoming freightprice merchandise.
Some lifting required. If you are sitting
out of school this semester or have plenty
of free time, we would like to talk to you.
Applications accepted Monday and Thurs-
day, l-3pm, Brody's, The Plaza.
Having trouble finding where to drop off
Classifieds and Announcements?
Well look no more!
Forms for Classifieds and Announcements
can be picked up in Mendenhall and
dropped off in the Student Pubs building.
Joyner
Library
Mendenhall
We are
here
Student Pubs
Building,
2nd floor
Greek Personals
SONY 10-DISC CHANGER $200 obo Call
752-9319
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR
GPA OR EXAM SCORES? We have the
edge you need to succeed. Student Supple-
ment of feres study guides based on the
notes of the "A" student in your class.
Give us a call at 752-HELP.
KINGSIZE WATERBED BOOKCASE
HEADBOARD with mirror and heating
accessories included $200.00, microwave
$50.00 Call anytime 321-7805
PERFORMANCE MOUNTAIN BIKE.
Manitou III suspension fork. Oeore Lx
with rapidfire plus shifters. Bontrager
rims. Vetta saddle, and more. Call Kevin
at 758-6205
6'2" ACTION COMPETITION SURF-
BOARD excellent condition, front and
rear deck. Pro Lite board sock, brand new.
Reef gutter racks. $175 Call David 752-
0392
SNES BRAND NEW, 5 top 10 games, all
boxes and papers. $200 Call David 752-
GENUINEACURAACCESSORIES: Set
of 6-spoke Pol. Alum 14" rims, 250.00 obo
Vg cond. Fits 90-93 integra sunroof de-
flector: $25.00 (752-2000 ask for John)
JL AUDIO 10" SUB IN 1.5 ported,
dynamat lined box, moster cable powerline
internal wiring, black carpet covered.
$200.00 (752-2000 ask for John)
SPECIALIZED STUMP JUMPER 18"
MTB, Carbon shock, many extras. $900
obo. Will take parts off for less . Jeff 757-
1961.
N��JCASHm
We Boy CD'S,
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Well pty up to $5 eaJi lor
Downtown 73H-j02
SIGMA NU - From the brothers of Sigma
Nu to the sisters of Delta Zeta. we want to
thank you for a great time, and hope to get
together again soon.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA basketball
on another great season! Love Your Sigma
Sisters
THE SPRING BREAK COUNTDOWN is
on! Only 9 more days. Do you know where
your going? Think quick and plan for a great
time! Love the Sigmas
TKE - Thanks for the social on Thursday.
We had a great time. Love the Alpha Phis.
ALPHA PHI - Congrats Tami Hakooz on
your initiation into Order of Omega. Love
your sisters of Alpha Phi
ALPHA DELTA PI we had an incredible
night as usual with you and the r eds at the
RN social. Can't wait to do it again. Love
Sigma Pi.
Services Offered
TYPING Reasonable rates Re-
sumes-quick & professional, Term papers,
Thesis, other services. Call Glenda: 752-
9959 (days); 527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call 1
900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min. m ust be
18 or older. Find that special someone!
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-2636495 ext F53623
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE your GPA
or exam scores? We have the edge you
need to succeed! STUDENT SUPPLE-
MENTS offers study guides based on the
, notes of the "A" students in your classes.
Give us a call at 752-HELP
SnL,
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mobile
Music Productions is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and experi-
ence of any Disc Jockey service in the area.
Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates
booking fast Call early, 7584644 ask for
Lee.
NEED TYPING? Campus secretary offers
speedy service, familiar with all formats.
Low rates. Call Cindy. 355-3611.
DEPENDABLE ECU STUDENT majoring
in childpsych looking for babysitting jobs.
Day andor night babysitting during the
week or weekend. I have many refs. Call
328-7635
XSEARCK MHRMAINK
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ALPHA XI DELTA: We are looking for-
ward to a great time tonight at the pre-
downtown. Love, the brothers of Delta
Chi!
CHI OMEGA: Looking forward to trav-
eling "Around the World" again Satur-
day night Love, the brothers of Delta Chi.
ZETA - Margaritaville was a blast Every-
one knew that come Monday everything
would be alright Can't wait to get to-
gether again. Delta Sig
DELTA SIGMA - The brothers of Delta
Sigma Phi would like to Congratulate
Stefan Lewis and Neal Terrel for your ini-
tiation to the Order of Omega. Also to
Joe Elder on his induction to Golden Key
Honor Society. The Bros of Delta Sig
CONGRATULATIONS TRACY
HATCHER - Welcome to AOPi Love the
sisters and new members.
TO THL BROTHERS OF SIGMA AL-
PHA EPSILON - We would like to thank
you for Thursday night - Adam Sandier
was a hit! Let's definitely do it again-
Soon! Love AOPi
CONGRATULATIONS RAEGAN
COLEMAN on getting lavaliered to
Randy - he's such a lucky boy! Love your
AOPi Sisters!
IT ALL STARTED OUT on a dark rainy
night at the AOPi pub, from house to house
we performed like champs and were re-
warded with clues. By the way Steph, how
did you like your water? As the clues came
together, our destination was revealed.
Thanks Kappa Sig and t he Beta Chi's for a
sister party we'll never forget Love the
AOPi Sisters
TO THE BROTHERS OF DELTA SIGMA
PHI, thanks for the great predown-town.
Hope to do it again soon. - L ove the Sis-
ters of AOPi
AARON - Thanks for everything you have
done for us. Mardi gras would not have
been the same without you. You're the
greatest! Love Pi Delta Sisters.
PI DELTA Mardi gras was a blast! Thanks
to Kerri and Ashley for all of their hard
work. Some dates were strangers and oth-
ers were just strange. The Pi Delta mixer
made for a crazy night and the girls danc-
ing on the counter was quite a funny sight
Get ready to grab those dates again girls,
semi-formal is just around the corner!
DELTA ZETA: Thanks for an awesome
Redneck Social. We had a great time clap-
ping our hands, and stomping our feet with
you. Let's do it again soon. Love, the broth-
ers of Pi Lambda Phi.
SIGMA NU: Friday's social was a blast!
Once the men whom our ties belonged to
revealed themselves, the party really
started! We all had a great time at Mai-Tai,
hope to do it again. Love, Delta Zeta
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5 DAY LIFT TICKET 5 NIGHT S LODG-
ING (LUXURY CONDO) 5 DAYS
INTERCOLLEG1AT ACTIVITES (Drink-
ing Age 18), Sponsors Include: Labatts,
Molson and MT. ORFORD Quebec.
CANADA (Just across the Vermont Bor-
der) Group Leader Discount s. Campus &
Greek Reps Needed. Call Ski Travel Un-
limited. 1-800-999-SKI-9.
0392
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
We Also Buy
GOLD
SILVER
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
T.V's.
VCR's
CD Player's
Student Swap Shof
STUDENT SWAP SHOP DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,130-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
La " OWRDRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 1 bedroom
apartment at 810 Cotanche St, Rent $225
month Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 1 bedroom
apartment available March 3 and Two
bedroom apartments available for Rent
Free Cable. Call 758-1921.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 7 - $1500.00
per month; sleeps 8-9 - $2100.00 per
month (804) 850-1532
A STEAL 1 Bedroom Apartment near
hospital, $275 No security Deposit if you
assume lease thru Aug. (Lease is month
to month after August), (n) 752-6255 or
8304559, Leave message.
TAR RIVER ESTATES Male roommate
needed before March, $172 rent, 14 utili-
ties, and phone. Located on river. Call
Kevin at 758-6701.
APAR TMENT FOR SUBLEASING: 2
Bedroom apt. in Wilson Acres Complex.
Available after May 3rd. Sublease through
December. Very nice unit! Call 830-4940.
2 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE. 1 12 bath,
fireplace, fenced porch, lots of extra stor-
age, washerdryer hookups, pool, tennis
courts, private parking, pets ok. $440.00
Brookhill. Call anytime 321-7805.
4 BEDROOM HOUSE NEAR WILD
WOOD VILLAS. 2 rooms available. $70
rent, 14 utilites phone, Call Wayne 752-
7540. pager 551-5257.
WHAT A DEAL! Move into a new 2 Bed-
room, 1 Bath appartment by March 17 and
pay no security deposit! Call now for more
info. - 830-2270.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share two bed-
room apartment. Close to campus, roomy,
on ECU bus route. $197.5012 utilities.
Call 752-1033 late afternoons and early
evenings.
SPRING BREAK '95!
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
. Jamaica
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY beach
Florida, from $91 per person per week
Free Info 1-800-488-8828
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring Break
- How about it in the Bahamas or Florida
Keys. Where the Party never ends. Spend
it on your own private yacht One week
only $385.00 per person. Including food
and much more. Organizers may go for
free! Easy Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-
7834001.
SPRING BREAK-Time to Book y our week
at one of the Hot Spots Daytona$99
Panama$109 Padre$119 Cancun$399
and more Call Chris at ICP 1-800-828-
7015.
Bahamas
Special Group Rates & Free Travel
Sun Splash Tours j
7 1-800-426-7710 v1
Lost and Found
STOLEN: 10-Foot hammerhead shark
from Omar's Omar offering $50 reward
for the return of the shark or information
leading to its return. Call 752-6948.
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $250 per
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSrY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
�FREE AUGUST RENT
"Special Student Leases"
also Mobile home rentals
my'
7f
756-781 5758-7436
Drop-ad with:
�1 No lines.
�1 No waiting.
�! No headaches
Coming soon from Trie East Carolinian





Km
Thursday, February 23, 1995 The East Carolinian
.
ECU HONOR BOARD, SGA
Individuals interested in serving on the
BCD Honor Board may pick up applica-
tions starting Friday. February 24 at 210
Whichard Bldg. or the SGA Offices in
Mendenhall Student Center. Completed
applications are due Tuesday. March 14
at 210 Whichard. Karen Boyd. Advisor:
for further information call 328-6824.
EXSS MAJORS CLUB
EXSS majors club workshop, presented
by the UNC-W Majors Club. Where: Minges
142-143. When: Saturday February 25.
Professor

Eating &
STARTING THE 25TH OF
T
9
C
FEBRUARY AND LASTING
THRU THE 28TH,
THE PROFESSOR WILL BE
JAZZING IT UP JUST A LITTLE,
YEAH RIGHT, JUST A LITTLE.

LIKE YOU COULD JAZZ IT UP
JUST A LITTLE WITH:
-GULF SHRIMP -CRAWDADS
-CHICKEN GUMBO -HURRICANES
-RED BEANS AND RICE
ALL SERVED WITH A LITTLE
DIXIELAND JAZZ.
Free to all members, majors, and int ended
majors. Workshop from 3-5 pm. Social
from 5-6pm. and ECU vs UNC-W game at
7pm.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi wil meet on Tuesday.
February 28 at 5:00pm in Mendenhall
room 244. All members are asked to at-
tend
COOL-AID BENEFIT
Phi Kappa Psi is having their 5th annual
Cool-Aid Benefit for the Greenville Com-
munity Shelter at The Attic with Knocked
Down Smilin' February 23rd. Call 758-
6649 or 830-9536 for advance Tickets. All
proceeds will benefit the shelter.
ECU CAMPUS MINISTRY
ASSOCIATION
ALL STUDENTS AND FACULTY are in-
vited to participate in a simple, pancake
meal and act of worship to mark the be-
ginning of the pre-Easter season of Lent
Lent is a time of sacrifice and reflection
to prepare for Easter. The pancake sup-
per will be held Tuesday. February 28 at
the Methodist Student Center, 501 E. 5th
St at 5:30pm. A free will offering will be
taken up for the support of the Homeless
Shelter.
ASH WEDNESDAY AT THE
NEWMAN CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce special March 1 Ash
Wednesday Masses with the distribution
of ashes: 8am at the Newman Center, 12
Noon in the Great Room of Mendenhall
Student Center and 5:30pm at the
Newman Center. The Newman Center is
located at 953 E 10th St 2 houses from
the Fletcher Music Bldg.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GOSPEL CHOIR
Annual Anniversary. Theme: "Let the
Glory 6:00pm in Wright Auditorium on
February 25. 1995, Sat Featuring various
Choirs from around North Carolina. Ad-
missions: $2.00 for Students. $3.00 for the
Public.
MARDI GRAS EAST CAROLINA
STYLE
Friday, February 24, 9:00pm - 2:00am,
Mendenhall Student Cent er. Sponsored by
the ECU Major Events Committee, No one
under the influence will be admitted, Ad-
mission by valid ECU ID, One guest per
person.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
We will have a Full membership meet ing
for all old and new members Th ursday Feb
23 starting at 5:00pm in Mendenhall
Room 221. Please bring pen & paper &
$5.00 for dues. If you wish to order a T-
s'uirt for you (and your friend) bring
$10.00 for each order. This meeting is for
Big Friends ONLY. If you are unable to
attend please tell your Director of Service.
(Buying a T-shirt for your little friend is
optional).
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
There will be an ODK membership meet-
ing at 5:15pm, February 23, 1995, MSC
Great Room 3. All fall tappees and mem-
Coffee � Tea � Pastries
104 West Fifth Street
757-1070
Sun-Thurs 7am-12am Fri-Sat 7am-1am
bers are encouraged to attend. We will
discuss new member selection, the wall
of honor, the mentor program, and the
initiation ceremony. Call Lisa at 328-4796
or Thomas at 758-6587 for more informa-
tion.
RACQUETBALL SINGLES
TOURNAMENT
Recreational Services will be hosting a
Racquetball Singles Tournament in
Minges Coliseum beginning February 26.
Poole play will conclude on Wednesday,
March 1. A single elimination tournament
will begin Tuesday. March 14. Interested
parties should sign up in Christenbury
204 prior to 5pm on Thursday, February
23. For more details call Recreational Ser-
vices at 328-6387.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS
Anyone interested in becoming a Softball
official for Recreational Services should
attend the softball officials meeting on
Wednesday, March 1 at 5pm in BB 102.
For additional information call Recre-
ational Services at 328-6387.
MIDDLE GRADES
ASSOCIATION
The Middle Grades Association will be
meeting on February 27, 195 at 4:00pm
in Speight 308.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Pig and Chicken Pickin' at the Baptist
Student Center Feb. 25 10am-3pm. For
advance ticket information call Todd at
752-4646.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
February 23 through February 27. Events
will be held at A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
and FREE, unless otherwise noted.
FRI FEB 24-FACULTY TRIO CONCERT,
Fritz Gearhart, violin: Paul Tardif, piano:
and Steven Laven, cello (8:00pm). SUN
FEB 26-CHAMBER SINGERS, Rhonda
Fleming, Conductor(Immanuel Baptist
Church, Greenville, NC 3:00pm). MON
FEB 27-FACULTY RECITAL, Elliot
Frank, guitar, and Christine Gustafson.
flute (8:00pm). TUES FEB 28-JUNI OR
RECITAL, Matthew Blake, guitar(7:00pm).
For additional information, call ECU-6851
or the 24-hour hotline at ECU 4370.
PERSPECTIVES Noon Time
Lecture Series, Spring 199S
Monday, February 27, 12:30-l:30pm,
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Hum mid si
College Hi
liivcimllL Nt 27SSS
7S7-(i7h 757- ill� 1
LENT BEGINS:
SPECIAL ASH WEDNESDAY MASSES
and DISTRIBUTION OF ASHES
Wednesday March 1
12 nooii in Great Room of Mendenhall Student Center
5:30 pm at the Newman Catholic Student Center
;Vit
CAftdUNAS
DISCOUNT MEMBERSHIP
ECU FacultyStudents yearly dues $32.00
W
CAHOUNAS
Join Today for AAA protection,service and peace of mind.
Emergency Road Service
Towing, Battery Service, Flat Tire Change,
Fuel Delivery, Locksmith Service, and Service
anywhere in the US and Canada
Auto Touring
World-Famous AAA Maps, Tourbooks, Cibbooks,
Campbooks, and Trip Tiks.
Travel Agency
Gaurenteed Lowest Available Airfares
-Cruises-special AAA member values-
Please call
DONELLADZENGELESKI
your AAA representative for a Discount Application at
919443-7117 or 1800-765-7117
junu
i
ONLY A FEW POOL-SIDE SPOTS LEFT!
�Large Balconies
�Town Houses & Flats
Energy Efficient Construction �
Kitchen includes microwave
Dig into our sand volleyball courts
Swim or relax in our sparkling pool
Fullsize WashersDryers in each unit
�Each bedroom is wired for cable TV and phone
�Private bedrooms w individual mirrored closets
Enjoy a game of tennis or basketball
�Workout in our full featured fitness area
Catch your favorite programs on our giant screen TV or
shoot a game of pool in our clubhouse.
PLAYERS CLUB
A. P A R T M . E N IS
"Live where weekends last all week long" Lease Today for Fall!
4 BEDROOM WITH 2 OR 3 FULL BATHS 321 7613
Brody 2W-50. "Through the Mora! Maze:
Searching for Absolute Values in a Plu-
ralistic World Robert Kane. PH.D Pro-
fessor of Philosophy. The University of
Texas at Austin. Sponsored by Department
of Medical Humanities 816-2797. The pub-
lic is invited to attend.
B-CLAD
B-CLAD (Bisexuals. Cays, Lesbians. &
Allies for Diversity) will meet next Mon-
day, February 27th at 8pm in the Multi-
purpose Room of Mendenhall Student
Center (First Floor).
ECNAO
ECNAO will be meeting in Mendenhall Rm
14 on March 1st at 7:00pm. If you have
any questions please contact Kim
Sampson 752-2319.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Academic Motivation-Overcoming Procras-
tination: 227, 3:30pm-5:00pm. Schedul-
ing & Time Management: 227,2pm-3pm.
Test & Performance Anxiety: 228. 2pm-
3pm. Exam Preparation: 33, lpm-2pm.
Exam Strategies: 31, 1 lam-noon. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
NATIONAL STUDENT
EXCHANGE
There is still time to consider a student
exchange or study abroad experience for
next fall or spring but time is running
short! You can study in California, New
York, Colorado, or one of many other
places including Alaska, Hawaii, and
Puerto Rico next semester or year! Pay
ECU tuition and study at another loca-
tion! International sites also available!
Visit International Programs on 306 E.
9th St, behind McDonald's, before spring
break for the best selections!
CHALLENGES INCORPORATED
Volunteers wanted to participate as Cap-
tains for tandem bike tours for the Visu-
ally challenged. Training Classes are sched-
uled in Pitt County in March. Are you or
do you know a visually challenged per-
son? Challenges is now providing tandem
bike excursions. There will be a ride in
Pitt County on April 8th. Call Challenges
Inc. 1-800-641-0814.
CYPRESS GROUP NEWS
ENVIRO-DRAMA "The Day the Music
Died" Saturday, February 25, 4:00pm
Elmhurst Elementary School. A play for
children and adults about wildlife on the
Tar River. Fun for all ages: Music, song,
dance, acting, participation. For more in-
formation, call 321-6028.
ST PETER'S CHURCH
St Peter's Church is sponsoring a second
International Dinner in the Parish Hall
on Saturday, March 4, 1995. The hearty
German menu will feature Roulades of
Beef and end with fresh apple pie. Tick-
ets may be purchased after Mass, or from
the Church Rectory, as well as at the door.
Adults $7.00 and Children $3.50 (Children
under five admitted free). Proceeds will
benefit St Peters Church and School.
LOU RAWLS BENEFIT
CONCERT
Tickets are on sale for the upcoming Lou
Rawls Concert to be held Saturday April
1st 8:00pm at Wright Auditorium on the
campus of East Carolina University. Pro-
ceeds from the concert will go toward the
St Peter'School Activity Center. General
Admission Tickets ar $30.00. Tickets may
be purchased from St Peter's School: 752-
3529 and Mendenhall Cent ral Ticket Of-
fice: 328-7488. For other information
contact: April Perry, 355-3506 or Rhonda
Jordan, 355-5735413-1737.
HONORS SEMINAR
PROPOSALS FOR SPRING
SEMESTER 1996
The Honors Program Committee will be
pleased to consider proposals for Spring
1996 Honors Seminars at its meeting on
Tuesday, March 21, 1995, beginning at
1:00 in Rawl Annex 142. (In cont rast pro-
posals for Honors sections of existing
courses should be arranged through your
Unit Head and the Director of the Hon-
ors Program, Dr. David Sanders.)l- To
propose a seminar, use your own modi-
fied format of the basic ECU Course Pro-
posal Form giving the proposed course
number and title (from the list on the back
of this sheet) and the course information
following the format of Part II: "The Na-
ture of the Course" of the ECU Course
Proposal Form. All proposed seminars
should be intended to be anproved as
Writing Intensive. And each proposal
should also indicate the Unit Head's ap-
proval. 2-Submit 15 copies of your course
proposal either to the Faculty Senate Of-
fice or to Doug McMillan as the Chair of
the Honors Program Committee by March
13, 1995. 3- If at all possible, plan to ap-
pear at the March 21. 1995. Honors Pro-
gram Committee meeting. Contact Doug
McMillan to schedule an approximate time:
Doug McMillan (English) Honors Pr ogram
Committee Chair. CG 2119. Ext. 6667 or
6041
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure to
pick up your FREE video yearbook. Avail-
able at the Student Store. The East Caro-
linian. Joyner Library. Mendenhall and the
Media Board office in the Student Publi-
cations Building.
j . H.l.l.l. .11 III I I
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Friday, February 24
9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
THE LADY LUCK CASINO
BOURBON STREET BINGO
D J. DANCE
BOWLING & BILLIARDS
VIDEO KARAOKE
FREE CAJUN BUFFET
TATTOO CARICATURISTS
JAZZ MUSIC
PLUS A CABARET
FEATURING:
u?X
J t
D r
� BEST CARNIVAL MASK CONTEST
� CROWNING OF THE KING & QUEEN
Sponsored by the ECU Mafor Events Committee � NO ONE UNDER THE INFLUENCE WttL
BE ADMITTED � Admission by valid ECU U � One guest per person.

j(





Title
The East Carolinian, February 23, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 23, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1061
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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