The East Carolinian, February 16, 1995






1
day
February 16,1995
Vol 69, No. 76 I
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Pirates
on the
Street
Do you think
graduating
seniors should
have to pay an
additional $25
graduation fee?
Torie Smoot,
sophomore
"They pay enough to
get in here, it seems
ridiculous that they
have to pay to get out
TV coverage draws fans, money
Nation's eyes turn toward Pirate basketball with ESPN2 coverage
Maureen Rich
Managing Editor
Geddy Dolecki, senior
No, because the
university sucks enough
out of us as it is, and
therefore it should be
covered in our tuition
Adam Trusty, junior
"Sure, but only for one
more year
Local and regional spotlights are
often on ECU athletics, but this sea-
son the spotlight will shine � om Will-
iams Arena at Minges Coliseum to tele-
vision screens across the country.
On Feb. 20, Eddie Payne's
hoopsters will pass, score, dunk and
sweat in front of a national television
audience when they take on Old Do-
minion University, courtesy of ESPN2.
While this game is the first of
the year to reach a national audience,
the team is seasoned at stopping mid-
court for TV time-outs. At season's end,
the Pirates will have played to living
room audiences 11 times.
"The experience can only be
positive said Lee Workman, assistant
athletic director for ticket sales and pro-
motions. "This is a record for us and
a step forward. The national exposure
helps out number one. our athletic pro-
gram, and number two. our university
Workman said the immediate fi-
nancial gain is minimal.
"You're not guaranteed any dol-
lars he said. "Exposure is the main
thing
Last night's game against James
Madison University was televised on
Home Team Sports (HTS) and the Pi-
rate Sports Network (PSN), but other
games have been seen on WITN7, as
weli.
Workman said ECU has collabo-
rated with a company' called Sports
Productions to schedule the ESPN2
taping. Some of the HTS games were
in conjunction with Colonial Athletic
Association (CAA) conference pack-
ages.
"We've gone out and actively so-
licited our program he said. "I think
regardless of winning or losing if we
show a good atmosphere, if students
go into it good-natured, it can only be
positive
And what about the added pres-
sure on the players?
i think the players will be ex-
cited Workman said. "Any athlete
looks for an opportunity to compete
like this
A major part of that atmosphere
is campus representation at the games.
Students, faculty and staff make up the
support the team needs to boost them
to a win.
"Television likes to go where
there's great atmosphere Workman
said. "If we've got a full house of en-
thusiastic fans, we're going to get this
type of exposure.
"Our students have always done
a great job each time they've come out
We need 'era again
Screaming, cheering fans who
are good-natured often make the dif-
ference, and a capacity audience at
Williams Arena can be a positive cata-
lyst to victory.
"An enthusiastic crowd that fills
seats will make a tremendous state-
ment" Workman said. "We want to pro-
vide an atmosphere that represents our
university with class and enthusiasm
With each bit of television expo-
sure, more attention is drawn to the
university as a whole, particularly dur-
ing the "University Spots" given dur-
ing commercial breaks. Perceptions are
formed of the university from what
people see on the screen.
"Pride, enthusiasm and class.
That's what we need Workman said.
"We're hoping everyone will come with
painted faces - the whole thing
Workman pointed out that while
ECU benefits from national exposure,
the entire region of Eastern North
Carolina will reap benefits from the ex-
tended exposure, also.
"People can learn about the
great things we have here at this uni-
versity
And one never knows when a
young Larry Bird or a young Magic
Johnson is out there, surfing the chan-
nels, looking for the right school to
attend.
Graduation fee
questioned
Concern looms
over fee despite
explanations
Tufanna Bradley, junior
"ECU should not worry
seniors with an additional
fee. They've already paid
enough money throughout
their college years
Photos by LESLIE PETTY
Jeff Lee
Staff Writer
Movie to promote
rape awareness
College begins with a $35 dol
lar fee just to be considered for en
rollment, and in
between are count-
less dollars spent
on activity fees,
computer fees
parking costs, tu-
ition increases and
the list goes on.
Now many
seniors are realiz-
ing it not only costs
to get in and stay
in, but it also costs to get out.
"I'm not sure why we have to
pay it or where the money goes, I'm
just assuming it goes to cover the
price of the cap and gown and
According to the registrar at
the respective schools, seniors at
UNC-W pay a hefty $50 to exit while
those at the University of North
Carolina Chapel Hill pay nothing.
The first ECU graduation fee
was mentioned in the 1935-36 cata-
logue at $5 and remained $5 until
the 1953-54 catalogue when it was
increased to $10. After nearly 30
years at $10 the fee once again in-
creased to $15
then again to $20
in 1986 and fi-
nally was raised
to its present
amount of $25 in
1990.
Some stu-
dents have a spe-
cial dislike for
this graduation
fee.
Now many seniors
are realizing it not
only costs to get in
and stay in, but it
also costs to get
out.
"It's like,
just let me out of here you know?
I've done my time, I have paid my
dues, I would just like to graduate
Kell said.
It's a
family
thing
Rachael
Workman,
daughter of
Assistant
Athletic Director
for Ticket Sales
and Promotions
Lee Workman,
loves the
Pirates almost
as much as her
daddy! Is there
an athletic
position in her
future?
Photo by
HAROLD WILLIAMS
Controversial
movie to be
shown next week
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
If ever there was a reason to be-
lieve that acquaintance rape is an is-
sue that college co-eds face, the movie
A Reason To Believe is one.
At 7 p.m Tuesday, Feb. 21. the
Health Education and Awareness Re-
source Team (H.E.A.R.T), a division of
Student Life, will sponsor the contro-
versial movie in Hendrix Theater, in an
attempt to promote rape awareness.
"There has been so much em-
phasis on AIDS lately, not that it's not
an important issue, but other issues
have moved to the back burner said
Heather Zophy. Health Education Co-
ordinator at Student Health Services.
"Our goal is to use this movie to cre-
ate awareness of the other issues
A Reason To Believe is the first
film to offer a truthful portrayal of what
life is like on college campuses across
America today. The story focuses on a
group of friends whose loyalties are
challenged when one friend makes a
sexual advance on another.
Throughout the movie, the au-
dience will be exposed to the views of
passionate feminist students, fraternity
rituals, philosophical professors, col-
lege administrators and the characters
and settings which speak of life today
on ar merican college campus.
"Tie focus of the movie is to leave
the audience both challenged and emo-
tionally moved.
"The movie shows both female
and male sides of the story and its con-
sequences Zophy said.
The cast is full of familiar actors
and actresses and music from popular
artists of today, such as The Grateful
Dead, Allman Brothers, Nirvana,
R.E.M U2 and more.
"It's an educational scenario but
students can relate to the music and
the college setting Zophy said.
Tuesday's viewing is also the first
time the movie will be shown in North
Carolina.
"Health Educators from State
and Duke and other schools will be
coming to see if they like it and decide
if they want to show it at their schools
Zophy said.
A Reason To Believe is consid-
ered to be controversial because it con-
tains nudity, violence and strong lan-
See RAPE page 3
graduation ceremony said senior
communications major Tracey Kell.
"It was kind of a shock to me.
When I went to apply for gradua-
tion it was like, 1 have to pay now? I
think it's funny that we have to pay
to get in here, pay the whole time
were here and then pay to leave
Kell said.
Many students expressed the
same attitude toward the graduation
fee. Most seniors pay the graduation
fee without knowing where their
money goes once it is handed over
to the cashier.
"The fee goes toward the cap
and the gown, the diploma and the
mailing of the diploma, and the com-
mencement ceremony said Associ-
ate Registrar Bobbie Austin.
What about the students not
interested in receiving a cap and
gown or attending the commence-
ment exercises?
"The students would not be
exempt from this policy, because
they would still be receiving their
diploma and the fee would pay for
the diploma and the mailer the di-
ploma is mailed in Austin said.
"If you don't go to the cer-
emony, then basically what you're
paying for is having the diploma
mailed. Those must be some pretty
expensive stamps said senior me-
dia production major Bryant Dukes.
SGA seeks new members
Day, hail representatives needed to fill vacancies
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
The number of Student Govern-
ment Association (SGA) members has
dropped almost in half this semester
due to inadequate grades, December
graduation and poor attendance, said
SGA Secretary Penn Crawford.
Several committee members
have expressed that the role needs to
be trimmed in order to allow new
members into the organization. Cur-
rently, more than 20 day and residence
hall representatives are needed to fill
empty seats.
"It decreased membership has
an effect, it adds extra strain on the
student representative now said Ian
Eastman, SGA president. "Also, we're
not getting representation from the
residence halls without residence
hall representatives, we are missing
out on a very diverse part of campus
SGA has lost more than 20
members since the beginning of the
semester and has screened on less
than 10 new members. Secretary
Penn Crawford stressed the need to
fill all newly available positions in
SGA.
"We need to be represented by
as many facets of the student body as
possible Crawford said in an earlier
interview.
Representatives are currently
needed for White, Jarvis, Fleming,
Cotten, Belk. Scott. Tyler, Clement
and Fletcher halls. Eastman said.
Progress within SGA has con-
tinued, despite decreased committee
enrollment. During the Jan. 30 meet-
ing. Vice President Sheila Boswell
announced that several faculty senate
positions are open. Boswell and an-
other SGA member gave reports con-
cerning a new professor evaluation
form that will soon go into effect. The
new forms will have spaces to allow
students to write in comments, and
give more in-depth questions.
Senior class President Bill
Gheen asked for SGA sponsorship of
a fund in order to establish a memo-
rial for Detlev Bunger, a Biology stu-
dent who was killed last month.
SGA Treasurer Michael Cames
reported on the fine arts funding
board and explained there could be a
future1 fee increase for student.
"The F-ne arts funding board
is an umbrella extension of SGA for
funding Cames said in a later inter-
view. "Currently the fine arts fund-
ing board gets $4 and receives the
least amount of student tees. Student
services are growing, the whole cam-
pus is growing but fine arts and mi-
nority student affairs are being left
behind we need to give those orga-
nizations a chance to grow
Carnes said most organizations
that receive student funding receive
$10, while fine arts and minority af-
fairs receive only $4. The fine arts
funding board sponsors the Play-
house, Gray Gallery, the Marching
Pirates, the student forum for musi-
cal organizations and the visual arts
forum.
SGA continued to pass and ap-
prove funding for several campus or-
ganizations ranging from ECU'S Folk
See SGA page 2
Newman shines in Nobody's Foopage O
Check your future, those horoscopes are back.page O
SPQff facxtettUf
Pirate football coach heads southpage
8
Thursday
70 chance of rain
High 70
Low 55
Weekend
Cloudy, with huge
chance of downpours
High 55
Low 45
N
teocfi,
6558
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from Joyner





Thursday, February 16, 1995
The East Carolinian
Cool Aid on tap at Attic
Andrew Davis
Staff Writer
February 8
Controlled substance violation - An officer stopped a vehicle on
Ficklen Drive. Upon approach to the vehicle, he detected a strong odor of
burning marijuana and proceeded to search the vehicle at the owner's con-
sent The officer found less than 112 ounces of marijuana and a bone pipe
with residue. The occupants consented to a search of their rooms in Belk
Hall. Additional paraphernalia and small amounts of marijuana were found
in their rooms. Both students were charged with possession of less than 1
12 ounces of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia.
February 9
Alcohol violation - A student in Fletcher Hall was served a sum-
mons for possessing a malt beverage by a person 19 years old.
Trespassing-A student in Tyler Hall reported two males were found
unescorted in the hall. They were detained in the coordinator's office and
banned from campus.
February 10
Solicitation - A non-student was banned from campus after he was
found soliciting food from students in Mendenhall.
February 11
Damage to property - A student reported damage to his vehicle
parked in the Fourth and Reade Streets parking lot. The driver side win-
dow had been broken out but nothing was missing from the vehicle.
Driving while impaired - An officer stopped a vehicle north of Green
Hall for DWI. The driver registered a .05 on the Intoxilyzer, and the magis-
trate found no probable cause. The student was issued a campus appear-
ance ticket for endangering behavior, using alcohol and speeding to elude
arrest
February 13
Assist Greenville PD - A Greenville police officer requested assis-
tance with an intoxicated student at the Stop Shop at Fifth and Reade
Streets. The student was unresponsive and transported to Pitt Memorial
Hospital. �
Tickets for Cool-Aid are on sale
now, but not at the lemonade stand.
They can be found at the Attic, site of
Phi Kappa Psi's annual Cool-Aid ben-
efit for the Greenville Community Shel-
ter.
The event scheduled for Feb. 23,
will be the fifth Cool-Aid Phi Kappa Psi
has staged. This is the third straight year
that all proceeds from this benefit will
be donated to the Greenville Commu-
nity Shelter. The Greenville Commu-
nity Shelter, located off Dickinson Av-
enue and under the direction of Rommi
Drozdov, has become Phi Kappa Psi's
"unoffical charity" according to the
fraternity's president, Chris Warren.
According to Joe Tronto, manager
of the Attic, this will be the second year
the Attic has staged this event Total
money collected at the door will be do-
nated to the Greenville Community Shel-
ter. "Last year we donated about $500
Tronto said.
"A common misconception when
looking at a fraternity's involvement in
such an event is that the fraternity keeps
a percentage of the profit Not true of
the 'Cool-Aid' benefit" Warren said. "All
profits from this benefit go directly to
the Greenville Community Shelter
According to Warren, the frater-
nity donated a total of more than $800
last year, and this year they hope to raise
even more. The event has continued to
get bigger each year with more m ley
being raised.
Phi Kappa Psi has also received
donations from University Book Ex-
change (UBE), S & M Equipment Cor-
poration and CD Alley. T-shirts will be
made in conjunction with UBE. and pro-
ceeds from the sale of the shirts will
also be donated to the Greenville Com-
munity Shelter. The price of admission
to the Attic will be $5 and the projected
cost of the T-shirts is $10. Local bands
Knock Down Smilin' and God's Comics
will be the featured entertainment
This event is being held in con-
junction with Phi Kappa Psi's Founders
Day which is Feb. 19. Warren said the
event usually brings alumni together.
"We usually try to get it as close to the
19 as possible, but this year the 19th
fell on a Sunday he said.
SGA
IFor Your Information I
The article appearing in Tuesday's paper regarding the
Belle Foundation failed to include the contact number. For
further information, call 758-8866
from page 1
and Country Dance Club to the Exer-
cise Sports Science Majors Club. A
Feb. 6 debate on funding approval
lasted over 10 minutes, and ended in
a passing vote.
Eastman said he is still trying
to establish 24-hour study halls dur-
ing exam weeks. He said extending
hours for Joyner Library would prove
too costly, but that other locations
such as the Wright Place and General
Classroom are being considered.
Eastman said SGA is also pre-
paring a student survey.to be distrib-
uted prior to Spring Break concern-
ing the transit and dining systems at
ECU.
m
Mexican
Restaurant
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5
Thursday, February 16, 1995
The East Carolinian
Pivisioji ofi'BE
WAREHOUSE SALE
continues through Sunday
Geat of
jAetcVatl
"ake An Extra
20 Off All
hoes & Boots
210 E. 5th St. Downtown 758-8612 Open 10-6 M-Sat. OPEN SUN. 1-5
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water 'Sewer 'Cable 'Draperies
�Self-cieaning Oven 'Frost-free Refrigerator
�WasherDryer Connections 'Utility Room 'Patio with Fence
�Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadboit Locks 'Walk-in Closets
FEATURINC
�Swimming Pool 'Basketball Court
�Tennis Court �Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease 'Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN FIVE
MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS

"Now Leasing for Summer and Fall
1995
752-0277 Equal Housing Opportunity
RAPEfr.n,page.
guage. "But what makes it a success is
that it's an honest look at college life
and not full of fuzzy body parts or
bleeped words. That would be less ef-
fective Zophy said.
According to Zophy. the movie
has been well received at other univer-
sities in the country. "Syracuse said it
was well written and portrayed real life.
The violent scene in particular was very
realistic she said.
After the movie, which is 105
minutes long, a panel of ECU profes-
sionals from various organizations will
be available for a question-and-answer
discussion. People representing the
Counseling Center, Judicial Affairs, The
Interfratemity Council (IFC), Resident
Life and Peer Health are interested in
feedback about the movie as well as
an open discussion about issues ad-
dressed in the movie.
Some health teachers are requir-
ing their students to go to the movie
as part of their course requirements
and "some residence halls are also
making the movie mandatory for their
residents Zophy said.
The IFC is also making the
movie mandatory for its pledges.
"The younger members of fra-
ternities are the Greek systems' future,
they're the ones who are going to have
to battle these issues in the future
said Justin Conrad, IFC president and
a member of the follow-up discussion
panel.
"I really hope the Greek system
realizes how much they are identified
as individual groups instead of indi-
vidual people Conrad said. "I'd like
the audience to see that Greeks often
get labeled unfairly.
The movie is just another ex-
ample of how ECU is trying to create
awareness. Another is recognizing
April as Rape Awareness Month.
"On April 4, we are organizing a
Take Back the Night March to promote
awareness yet again said Dr. Sara
Shepherd, a counselor at the Counsel-
ing Center and chair of the Sexual
Abuse Committee.
Shepherd said that according to
a study done by Mary Koss, statistics
report that one in six college women
are involved are in an assault or rape.
And that number jumps to one in three
across a lifetime, including childhood
molestation and adult sexual molesta-
tion.
And, 75 percent of men and 55
percent of women involved with an ac-
quaintance rape reported alcohol and
drug involvement This is an important
figure especially on college campuses,
Shepherd said.
"It's really important to talk
about these issues Shepherd said.
"This isn't about male-bashing, it's
about people communicating and be-
ing respectful of each other
Hendrix Theater seats 750
people and the movie is on a first-come,
first-serve basis, so it is advised to ar-
rive early. No ID is required and any-
one is welcome.
"What we hope students get
from it the movie is alcohol aware-
ness, rape awareness and decision
making skills Zophy said.
East Carolina University's Student Union is Now
Accepting Applications for Chairpersons
of the Following Committees for the
1995-1996 Term: specialevents
QUALIFICATIONS:
MINIMUM 2.25 GPA� FULL-TIME STUDENT
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL THE
STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-6004,
OR COME BY ROOM 236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
CULTURAL AWARENESS
MARKETING
VISUAL ARTS
ATTENTION: APPLICATIONS
NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR SGA EXECUTIVE
COUNCIL POSITIONS
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
PRESIDENT, VICE PRESIDENT,
TREASURER, SECRETARY
ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:
MINIMUM 2.0 GPA
FULL TIME STUDENT WITH SUCCESSFUL
COMPLETION OF 48 SEMESTER HOURS
FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
MUST HAVE TWO CONSECUTIVE SEMES-
TERS AT ECU AND MUST BE IN GOOD
STANDING WITH THE UNIVERSITY.

APPLY IN THE SGA OFFICE - ROOM 225
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, BEGIN-
NING ON FEBRUARY 24 AND RUNNING
THROUGH MARCH 3RD. A $10.00 FILING
FEE IS REQUIRED.
UPON COMPLETION OF FILING FOR
THESE POSITIONS, CANDIDATES
MANDITORY MEETING WILL BE HELD
ON MARCH 13TH, AT 4:00P.M.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION OR QUESTIONS
YOU MAY CALL THE SGA OFFICE AT 328-4726
cPF:
Open ThursSat. 10:00pm-2:00am
758-0080
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. qp
Thursday, February 16, 1995 The East Carolinian
4
Our View
What do you do
in your spor
time? Well, 25
volunteers over
at the REAL
Crisis Center are
working overtime
to save lives and
sanity. The least
y'all could do is
drink a few
beers in support
of them. Who
knows, one day
it might be you
calling their
number.
Have you ever felt like you were at the end of your
rope? Do you count yourself lucky that you had some-
body to turn to in that time of need?
Not everyone is so lucky. Every day, people all over
Greenville reach the breaking point and have nowhere
to turn. That's where the REAL Crisis Center comes
in. REAL is there 24 hours a day, seven days a week,
to deal with any personal crisis that may arise. Though
rape and suicide hotlines are the Center's main busi-
ness, operators are ready to handle just about anything.
This service doesn't come cheap, however, so REAL
depends on volunteers, donations and fundraisers to
keep its lines open. At present, 25 volunteers man the
phones. Their work is both time-consuming and emo-
tionally demanding, but these dedicated people are will-
ing to do the job.
The least we can do for them is go out and enjoy
some beer.
Tonightthe REAL Crisis Center's sixth annual Rock
for REAL benefit cor cert will take place at the Attic,
featuring local favorites Breed 13, the Amateurs and
Modern Pilgrims. Rock for REAL is the Center's main
fund raiser for the year, and we urge you to attend.
Tickets are only $5 at t he door, and the beer is
cheap. So even if you don't like the bands, go for the
beer. If you don't like beer, go for the company of all
the nice people who turn out to help. If you don't like
people, go to the door, give them your five bucks and
go home. The point is, the REAL Crisis Center offers a
valuable service to the community and they deserve
our support at least once a year. So get off your butts
and go!
Of course, it would be nice if you could do even
more. REAL is always looking for volunteers. The
phone work is a demanding job that requires many
hours of training and a good ear for listening to people,
and the emotional drain can be pretty severe. Even
the people at the Center will tell you that it's not for
everyone.
But every organization could use an envelope licker
or two. And even if you can't spare that much time (or
your tongue), donations of any kind are appreciated.
We don't mean to sound like Sally Struthers here,
but REAL is a worthy cause. If you must, think of it
this way: one day, your life might fall apart. Wouldn't
you want the REAL Crisis Center there to help?
Gun bans are stupid
i.
Defanged by Hitler's strict gun
controls, the Jews were helpless vic-
tims of Nazi ethnic cleansing. We all
watched the chilling reenactment in
Schindler's List as the German
troops forcibly evicted Polish Jews
from their homes, at gun point
Many viewers may not have
pondered the fact that most of the
Jews who found themselves within
Nazi borders during the Second
World War were unable to effectively
fight back. This was easily made pos-
sible because upon taking power in
Germany, and later elsewhere, Hitler
took immediate steps towards disarm-
ing everyone, except his hirelings, of
course.
The cost - 15 million lives.
A subsequent generation of
Jews, who undoubtedly grew up hear-
ing first hand accounts for Hitler's
genocide, are determined to preclude
any such event from happening
again.
The Jews for the Preservation
of Firearms Owners (JPFO) under-
standably embrace the often heard
historical axiom that those who dis-
regard the lessons of the past are con-
demned to repeat them. And can you
blame them?
History does in fact reinforce
the JPFO's assertions. Time and
again during this century, tyrannical
governments and dictators have suc-
cessfully coupled strict gun laws and
genocide:
From 1915-1917, the Ottoman
Turks slaughtered at least 1.5 million
disarmed Armenians; successful gun
grabbing laws imposed by Stalin in
the former communist Soviet Union
helped squelch over 20 million dis-
senters; Mao Tse-tung's China -
Steven A. Hill
Opinion Columnist
Police and the
military should
not be the only
ones toting
protection. Think
of the rest of us.
listed in the Guinness Book of World
Records as history's most murderous
government - through a monopoly
of armed force, between 1949-1965,
forcibly silenced at least 32 million.
Cambodia's brutal Pol Pot re-
gime went door to door gathering
weapons before killing millions in
what has been called history's worst
genocide; Fuentes' Guatemala and
Amin's Uganda equally cornered the
national arms market before murder-
ing opponents.
It is highly unlikely that such
horrid crimes could be reenacted in
future America. Part of the reason
why such large scale atrocities are
unlikely is due to our Second Amend-
ment privileges.
With the previously mentioned
thumbnail historical sketch in mind,
it is not difficult to appreciate the
wisdom of the Founding Fathers'
who insured that the American
people's liberty teeth could never be
extracted.
However, many would argue
that the Second Amendment is an
outdated notion - the philosophical
dregs of days long gone by. Those
gun-grabbing Americans who view
the Second Amendment as antiquar-
ian residue fail to understand this im-
portant point: The principle of the
Second Amendment was meant to en-
dure - not the Framers' understand-
ing and application of it.
Patrick Henry: "Guard with
jealous attention the public liberty.
Suspect everyone who approaches
that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing
will preserve it but downright force.
Whenever you give up that
force, you are ruinedThe great
object is that every man be armed
What makes America such a unique
experiment in world history is that
so much power has, in fact, been en-
dowed to its citizenry.
Why is it so hard to understand
that gun bans are, well, stupid? Ad-
vocacy of weapons banning is histori-
cally ignorant. It is perhaps the most
visible display of power grabbing a
government can execute.
Contrary to what Bill Clinton
may believe, guns are not only for
hunting ducks and deer, but also for
hunting politicians who deprive the
people of their rights (Thanks B-l
Bob Dornan) The Founding Fathers
understood the latter, and judging
from last November's elections, many
present day Americans do today as
well.
America is a nation supposedly
empowered by the people. Asinine
assault weapons bans snatch power
from the people.
If you still believe that only the
police and the military should be le-
gally armed, take a trip to Auschwitz
and think it over.
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Printed on
100 �
recycled
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor.The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Terrorism hits America
Supporters of the Hamas re-
cently held a rally in Gaza. Hundreds
of participants honored the young
Palestinians who have been willing to
kill and even die in the name of their
god. One young man described how
many young Palestinians feel they
have no recourse but violence.
In recent years there seems to
be a staggering amount of terrorism
directed at the United States and its
allies. Much of it seems to have no
purpose. Some simply grows out of
the frustration of not being able to
change things through non-violent
methods. It often seems linked to the
deep rhetoric that America is a god-
less country and must change' is ways.
However, most terrorist attacks
have one goal in common: changing
the policy of the country being at-
tacked. Webster's II Dictionary de-
scribes terrorism as "the systematic
use of violence, fear and intimidation
to achieve an end We as a nation
must show terrorists the use of vio-
lence will not help them reach their
goal.
Ronald Reagan told us during
his presidency that America should
not negotiate with terrorists. He said
we cannot afford to negotiate with
them, because giving in will only en-
courage more terrorism. Ronald
Reagan was right. We cannot afford
to reward terrorists by giving in to
their agenda.
Recently another frustrated
young man joined the club of terror-
ists willing to take lives in the name
of God. He shares their theocratic
rhetoric and wanted to attack those
he considered decadent This young
man, like so many other terrorists,
Thomas Blue
Opinion Columnist
Violence
continues to
increase in our
own nation. A
jihad in our
America with no
end in sight.
grew tired of diplomatic debate and
decided to resort to violence. His vic-
tims were not in Gaza, Beirut or
Tehran. They were in Brookline, Mas-
sachusetts.
John Salvi killed two and
wounded five in his attacks on abor-
tion clinics in Brookline and Norfolk.
He became the latest assailant in a
series of attacks against abortion pro-
viders. Dr. John Britton was killed in
Florida by fanatic John Hill. Dr. Gary
Romalis was gunned down in another
assault in November 1994. Matt
Trewhella of Missionaries to the Pre-
born is being investigated by the FBI
for having trained and armed people
to kill abortion doctors. Another frus-
trated young man, Michael Griffin,
murdered Dr. David Gunn for provid-
ing abortions.
During the past two years the
intensity of violence has only in-
creased. Arson claimed clinics in
Montana, Toronto and Falls Church,
Virginia. Rachelle Shannon was in-
dicted for shooting a physician in
Wichita in August 1993. Fire bombs
destroyed clinics in Lancaster, Penn-
sylvania and San Rafael, California.
The increasing violence by "pro-life"
fanatics is growing.
Opponents of abortion rights
have grown frustrated after twenty-
two years of diplomatic debate. A few
have even grown as frustrated as
those young men in the Hamas and
are willing to use violence, fear and
intimidation to achieve their goal. The
pro-life movement has not been able
to persuade the government to out-
law abortion in America. The next
logical step in the minds of some is to
use violence.
Government has an obligation
to protect its citizens from violence.
The Congress must lead this fight
against the encroachment of domes-
tic terrorism. This is going to be a
difficult task for this new Republican
Congress. After all, the Republican
Party has become a bastion of anti-
abortion idealogy.
Congress must stand up with-
out reservation in the clash between
violent protestors, terrorists and abor-
tion providers. We cannot allow vio-
lent people to use terrorist methods
to limit decisions for the rest of us.
Although many Republicans may
agree with the underlying theme of
the anti-abortion movement�they
must stand up to the violence it is
interjecting into this debate. We can-
not afford to pause in the fight against
this new breed of terrorism.
I doubt John Hill or John Salvi
felt any kindredship with the Islamic
Jihad or the Hamas. Yet the resem-
blance is strikingly clear. We cannot
afford to give in to either group.
The secrets of an STD
When thinking of sexually
transmitted diseases AIDS, syphilis,
gonorrhea, and herpes often come to
mind. But did you know that hepati-
tis B is also a sexually transmitted
disease?
College students are at high
risk of contracting hepatitis B be-
cause STDs are common on college
campuses. This virus infects an esti-
mated 300,000 Americans every year,
and causes 5,000 deaths. There is an
estimated 200 million carriers. More
than one-third of the 300,000 people
infected are college-age young adults.
Hepatitis B is 100 times more
contagious than HIV. In addition to
being transmitted sexually, it is also
transmitted by contact with blood
and other body fluids. The hepatitis
B virus has been shown to be present
in the bloodstream, saliva, menstrual
blood, semen, and vaginal discharge
of infected individuals.
Unlike HIV and AIDS, people
living in the same household as an
infected person are also at risk. This
virus in not transmitted through the
air. But cuts, scrapes or other breaks
Angela McCullers
Opinion Columnist
Hepatitis B is
100 times more
contagious than
HIV. So read on,
guys and dolls.
We said 700.
in the skin can be an entry point for
infected body fluids or blood.
The symptoms of hepatitis B
infection include vomiting, abdomi-
nal pain, loss of appetite, and jaun-
dice (yellow skin and yellow eyes).
Symptoms usually occur twelve
weeks after infection. In approxi-
mately 90 percent of cases, symptoms
are mild and include fever, fatigue,
and headache.
In most cases, these symptoms
will disappear within six to twelve
weeks. In less then two percent, a
severe inflammation of the liver
known as fulminant hepatitis may
develop. In this case, there is a rapid
destruction of the liver, which may
lead to bleeding, coma or death.
The first vaccine was intro-
duced in 1982. This vaccine provides
nearly total protection against the
virus with no side effects. With this
vaccine you can minimize your
chances of contracting both hepati-
tis B and C.
Hepatitis is a very serious dis-
ease, particularly if not diagnosed
promptly and treated effectively. The
good news is that there are steps
which may be taken to prevent this
disease.
The consequences of casual or
uninformed sexual practices can do a
lot to compromise the quality of life
of individuals. We would like to think
that we are a sexually liberated soci-
ety and are well educated but facts
reveal that we are not Everyone needs
to be educated and informed in all
matters that pertains to sexual health.
To the Editor:
I am writing to respond to
Calvin Arrington's article about
judgmental preaching which was in
TEC on February 7. Though I have
never seen the Christian fundamen-
talists mentioned, it reminded me of
others. I was introduced to a Chris-
tian group here at ECU, but I have
since learned that some of these
people are very judgmental. At least
two of the members have said that I
am not a Christian. I feel like this is
very judgmental. I have heard oth-
ers say these people are more inter-
ested in their group than in God,
and they judge people who are not
like them and who don't spend all
their time with them. I have discov-
ered good things about other Chris-
tian groups here at ECU, so I am
saying people need to be careful not
to get too caught up in the "group
I know that I am a Christian
and a sinner, but the only one who
is qualified to judge me is the Lord.
It bothers me that these people
think they car. judge like this. If they
would read the Bible more carefully
they would see the Lord says. "Man
looks at the outward appearance,
but the Lord looks at the heart
Cod is the only one who can judge
us. since onlv he can see into our
hearts.
I think these people turn in-
dividuals away by judging those not
like them and focusing on their
group more than God. There are
people in this group who have not
judged me and are model Christians.
I just pray that the people who are
judging shape up before they give
more bad images of Christians.
People may say that I am judging
by writing this, but I only want the
group to realize they are turning
people off to Christianity.
Tina O'Bryant
Sophomore
Elementary Education
rs v
tf6j)
3
11

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NICK O' TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
Thursday, February 16, 1995 The East Carolinian
PIR
LAST WE LfFT
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OR. HERO EXPRESSED
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tfPAO THE AGONY COLUMN.
THOUGH. PEOPLE WITH PROBLEMS
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"What's Your
Sign?"
Aquarius (Jan. 2C-Feb. 16)
Today's semantic forecast calls for cloudy half-truths
in high-pressure regions. Throughout the day will be
the drizzling of pretentious talk and maybe a few
stormy tirades. Arm yourself with an umbrella and a
shovel.

Piecee (Feb. 19-March 20)
Pisces is the mystic today. You will perplex. When
besieged by spiritua$feveldJfolis, avoid speaking in
tongues. Translate yourjvjsdorn for the less enlight-
ened. Teach and preach, coi�miunicate the knowledge
that falls upon you like wer. if they're not listening,
sulk loudly.
Aries (Ntef�t- April 19)
The ramjfilrts with fortune. Appeal to your friends in
high places and ride the Luck Plane. Lucky numbers
are 2, 16, and 95. This is a good time to venture into
the farfetched and realize that you can do what you
want. Nobody's paying attention to the rules anyway.
Taurus (April 20- May 20) ' '
You've seen ugly, you've dealt with ugly. And now
you're free! What will you do? Oh, what is Taurus not
capable of? You've cleared your path of fifth and
fraud, been diplomatic without resorting to fightin'
words like "your mama Good show.
Gemini (May 21- June 21)
The word of the day is "madness So, follow that big,
happy madness. P ing someone lunch in class,
shouting "YOU F-GHGOT YOUR LUNCH Give
someone a lucky token. The world is your soapbox.
Keep that 'liming" element in mind.
Cancer June 22- July 22)
You must waterproof yourself today Let a Mt be your
umbrella. Refuse to humor those who kowrow with an
ulterior motive. Humor those who kowtow simply
because your splendid
Leo (July 23- Aug. 22JrK
You have the capacity to Shine4n a group, and it would
be criminal not to tate advantage. The word of the day is
"tribal Ray special Mention to the dynamics of crowd
politics. If they begin atoning you, run. If they applaud,
bow.
Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 22) jM
Avoid redundancy. Don't repeat yourself. Don't say the
same thing over and over and o�r and over. You'll be
experiencing deja vu. So, avoid redundancy and by all
means, don't repeat yourself.
libra Sept. 23- Oct. 23)
Music is the key! Take your talent out of the shower and
into the world. Sing in response to the questions of
others. Sing your answer in class. Sing your order in the
drive-thru ("I'll have the burrito, a medium coke, and
make it snappy") to the tune of "My Way for example.
Scorpio (Oct. i4- Nov.
Scorpio, you're agonerlOday The Great Traffic Monkey
in the Sky is not with, youThe God of Sharp Objects is
not your friend today. Being plucky will not help Your
efforts are lost on othts.Ouick! Pack up whatever
semblance of "comfort" you can and go back to your lair.
Pencil in "A Good Cry" on the slate; tomorrow promises
tenderness
Sagittanue Nov. �1- Dec. 21)
You find-yourseff wasting more time speculating on how
to do something effectively than you would if you were to
do it inefficiently. Lose the pragmatism. Take the long
way around. It's bound to be prettier.
Capricorn Dec. 22- Jan. 19)
Let it slide! Someone who has made a spectacular
mistake in your eyes needs forgiveness. Oh. be nice, be
nice. It's so noble to forgive.





!�
Thursday, February 16, 1995
The East Carolinian
m m mmmmm
Newman is Nobody's Fool
The 70-year-old
actor impresses in
his new film
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The tag line for Nobody's Fool
reads "worn to perfection The epithet
refers to the film's star, Paul Newman,
but could just as
easily describe
the film. The in-
ference is that
Newman fills his
role in the film
so comfortably
that a viewer
would hardly
know that the
star is acting.
This tag
line perfectly
summarizes
Nobody's Fool.
This film is noth-
ing if not com-
fortable. The
story and charac-
ters feel so familiar that sitting through
the film can be likened to the sensa-
tions generated by slipping on a faded
pair of jeans and a favorite sweatshirt
The story and
characters feel so
familiar that
sitting through
the film is like
slipping on a
faded pair of jeans
on a crisp, cool
autumn day.
on a crisp, cool autumn day. A GQ in-
terview recently characterized
Newman as being in the winter of his
life, but his performance in Nobody's
Fool argues strongly for him being
somewhere in the middle of fall.
No actor instantly generates as
much compassion as Paul Newman.
When David Letterman aired his first
show on CBS in the newly renovated
Ed Sullivan Theater. Newman was in
the audience. The crowd immediately
roared their appreciation of the man's
talents while remain-
ing in awe of being in
the presence of an
icon. Newman's line
after being recognized
by Letterman has now
become legendary.
"Where the hell are
the dancin' cats?"
asked Newman as he
strode out of the the-
ater. In one line
Newman added to his
already impressive
hold on the American
consciousness.
Few actors
have contributed so
much of their time
and effort to charity. Newman began
his own food line and now generates
millions of dollars for charity. The com-
passion and humanity of Paul Newman
CD. Reviews
Aquarium Rescue
Unit
In a Perfect World
Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
The Aquarium Rescue Unit is
hardly a typical band. Comprised of a
collection of jazz-influenced virtuosos,
the Unit packs a pretty hefty wallop. 1
have had the good fortune to see this
band live three times and have been
blown away by their spectacular musi-
cianship and resounding energy - es-
pecially by the work of Oteil Burbridge,
who may be the closest evidence to God
on a six-string bass on this planet.
Burbridge and his Unit have
faced a great deal of change of late.
They have weathered the departure of
their frontman Col. Bruce Hampton
and the addition of Paul Henson to fill
his vocal spot Hampton has led the
band for quite sometime, but if their
latest disc is any indication, the ARU
won't be slowing down anytime soon.
In a Perfect World, the latest
from the group, marks a bit of a depar-
ture from the format the band played
under during Hampton's association
with them. The 12-song disc is a col-
lection of blues and jazz-rock mixed
with funk and traditional bop.
The eclectic mix is a veritable
sonic assault that is full of unexpected
turns. Opening with the searing gui-
tar of "Search Yourself the disc be-
gins blazing from the outset Henson's
soulful voice is reminiscent of 70s rock
pioneer Paul Rodgers and provides a
driving focal point for guitarist Jimrny
Herring and Burbridge's busy bass
lines. Burbridge's younger brother Kofi
provides inieresting keyboard and flute
See UNIT page 7
Leo Kottke
Peculiaroso
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Peculiaroso is Leo Kottke s sixth
album for the Private Music label, but it
is his 16 in his 20 years in the music
business. Kottke is a native of Athens.
Georgia, who grew up in Oklahoma and
Wyoming teaching himself to play six-
and 12-string guitars in the traditions of
folk and blues. Kottke spends about 80
percent of his time on the road. In fact
for some strange reason he is coming to
play a special concert at our beloved uni-
versity on Monday at Wright Audito-
rium.
Leo's loyal fans (however few they
may be around here) will be happy to
know that the new CD has 12 tracks,
most of which are originals. Some of the
covers include a treatment of "Wonder-
land at Night the Bert Kaempfert com-
position from the early '60s and a jumpy
little cover of The Platters' "Twilight
Time To top all that Rickie Ie Jones
produced all the tracks and sings a little
background here and theie.
The CU opens with "Peg Leg It
is a great opener featuring the complex,
mutated, folk sound that Kottke is known
for. Then the second track delves deeper
into the American tradition. "Poor Boy"
is Bukka White's blues classic and fea-
tures some excellent slide work by Kottke.
which is a technique he has not explored
on many of his former releases.
The third track, "Parade features
Leo on vocals in a song about an ill-spent
youth in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Leo's
voice is rich, low and touched with a
Midwestern accent. "Turning into
See LEO page 7
show in his selfless actions off the
screen and completely fill the charac-
ters he plays on screen.
In Nobody's Fool Newman por-
trays Donald "Sully" Sullivan, a 60-
year-old handyman who lives, not day
by day. but minute by minute (Newman,
who is 70. is proud to be able to play a
60-year-old). Sully never thinks much
about his actions and has not done so
for 60 years. Yet within the course of
Nobody's Fool, he makes some inroads
See FOOL page 7
cmins
Attracticm
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, Feb. 16
Open Mic
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
(poetry)
Randall Kenan
at General Classroom Building
Room 1032
7 p.m.
(visiting author)
Rock for REAL Benefit
at the Attic
(alternative reggae)
Melanie Sparks
at Peasant's Cafe
(acoustic)
Mary Shelly's Frankenstein
at Hendrix Theatre
(gothic horror)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, Feb. 17
Aquarium Rescue Unit
and Full Stop
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Truth & Rites
and Selah
at O'Rock's
(reggae)
the Almighty Senators
at Peasant's Cafe
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
at Hendrix Theatre
(gothic horror)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, Feb. 18
Not So Dandelions
and Schroeder
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Captain Cook & the Coconutz
at the Attic
(beach)
Ominous Sea Pods
at Peasant's Cafe
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
at Hendrix Theatre
(gothic horror)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Monday, Feb. 20
Mike Cross
and Leo Kottke
at Wright Auditorium �
8 p.m.
(folk jazz guitar)
Wednesday, Feb. 15
Dr. Ruth Wtstheimer
at Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
(sex lecture)
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
"Notes from the Under-
ground" is an irregular column
highlighting entertainment that
normally doesn't see the light of day.
Somewhere, giants walk the
Earth. A family legacy of doomed he-
roes gives birth to the greatest free-
dom fighter of the future. Ancient evils
rise to threaten expanding cities, feed-
ing off the secret sins of architects.
Where do these things happen?
In the world of Japanese animation,
known to its fans as Japanimation. If
you grew up watching Star Blazers,
Battle of the Planets, Captain Harlock
or Robotech. you're already familiar
with this stuff on some level, but now
this colorful genre of film is beginning
to get a real foothold in America, and
it's not all kid's stuff.
Japanimation. though it seems
to deal mostly with science fiction and
horror, tells stories about real people
in serious circumstances. While ifs not
Shakespeare, it is generally better than
the latest Sylvester Stallone flick.
Sex, love and death are usually
primary considerations in these films.
The three are often linked, leading to
epic tragedy to go along with the may-
hem wrought by the main plot So we
have heroes driven by the memories
of their long-lost loves, their fleeting
happiness obliterated by the harsh re-
ality of life in a Japanese cartoon. In
other words, we have the building
blocks of epic adventure, which is
something Japanimation handles well.
The science fiction and honor
genres lend themselves to animation
quite naturally: it's much easier to draw
an eerie aiien race or a horrifying mon-
ster than to make one for live actioa
Even the best special effects are ulti-
mately only latex and wire. In anima-
tion, the "real" world and the imag-
ined world are on equal footing.
Critics of Japanimation often
point to a similarity they see in the
artwork. They think all the characters
have weird baby faces, with huge eyes
and purple hair. While this is true to a
certain extent the similarities really
aren't as close as it might seem The
big eyes in particular are a convention
of the form; American animation op-
erates on similar conventions.
Compare the designs for the
Disney and Warner Brothers charac-
ters, for instance, and you'll find that
nothing much has changed since Uncle
Walt drew the first frames of "Steam-
boat Willie One cartoon animal looks
pretty much like another, except they
have different ears and tails according
to species.
At any rate, Japanimation is out
there and ripe for the picking. A force
in the home video underground for
years, better quality releases are being
nred at a steady pace and are avail-
able at Greenville's finer video stores.
Following is a sampling of
Japanimation titles available locally,
each with its own mini-review. Many
more exist but this might give inter-
ested viewers a place to start One word
of warning, though; this stuff is addic-
tive, and you may run up one heck of
a rental bill.
Akirar. Hailed by many as the
best Japanimation film ever made,
Akira is a cyberpunk science fiction
Japan Invades
video stores
Picture Courtesy of Marvel Comics
Here we have the young hero of Akira, surveying damage
left by his former friend Tetsuo in the city of Neo-Tokyo.
tale about a young gang member named
Tetsuo who develops amazing mental
abilities. Kidnapped and hounded by the
government of the future city Neo-To-
kyo, Tetsuo goes mad trying to discover
the secret of Akira.
The story here is somewhat con-
voluted, but the animation is near-flaw-
less. Action sequences involving motor-
cycle street gangs and the mutating
Tetsuo at the film's climax have to be
seen to be believed. The epic scale of
Akira is exhausting to some American
viewers. The true Japanimation aficio-
nado, however, should he used to it
they're all like that Dubbed and sub-
titled versions are available.
Vampire Hunter l. If you've seen
a Japanimation film, this one's probably
it TBS got their hands on this one some-
time last year, and they've shown a se-
verely censored version several times.
The title really says it all here, but I will
add that the moody, taciturn hero is
typical of these films. Except of course,
for that weird little face growing-the
palm of his hand Dubbed.
Fist of the Northstar. The king
of over-the-top action. Our hero here is
a burly martial artist who inherits the
mantle of the Fist of the Northstar (and
thus a film was named). Lots of insanely
impossible fighting and bloody injuries
are the attraction here: it's like watch-
ing Norse mythology. Our hero's favor-
ite line of dialogue: "You don t know it
but you're already dead A real hoot
Sub-titled.
Doomed Megalopolis. A four-part
video series about the ghost of a slaugh-
tered soldier returning to get his revenge
on Tokyo. Set in the early 1920s,
Doomed Megalopolis deals with the ex-
pansion of Japan's capital and suggests
that angry gods caused the Great To-
kyo Earthquake. This is a wonderfully-
animated horror tale, complete with evil
magic, secret incest and some of the
most amazing transformation sequences
I've ever seen. Sub-titled.
Project A-Ko: I resisted this one
for a long time. Direct from the school
of Japanimation that believes cute teen-
age girls with ear-splittingly high-pitched
voices are not only entertaining hut sexy,
A-Ko is the kind of Japanimation I avoid
like the plague.
However, this film is an exception
to the rule. The story of three school-
girls, A-Ko. B-Ko and C-Ko, this one's
just nutty. A-Ko (an annoying brat) is
the best friend of B-Ko (who is inexpli-
cably super-powered). C-Ko wants A-
Ko to be her friend, and to make that
happen, she builds lots of giant robots
to kill B-Ko. Toss in a bunch of butch
alien women who think that A-Ko is
their long-lost princess, and you've got
a real Japanimation classic Anyone
who thinks American socitty has gone
insane should check out Project A-Ko.
Dubbed.
Arcadia of my Youth: The Cap-
tain Harlock movie! Spanning centu-
ries, Arcadia is another epic. Playing
out like a tragic opera, this film tells
the story of a future Earth under the
control of alien invaders who have
enslaved the population. Living out a
destiny set by an ancestor who flew
fighters for the Nazis in World War II,
Harlock overcomes impossible odds to
become a space pirate and freedom
fighter. With its string of noble deaths
and honor-bound characters, Arcadia
gives a glimpse into Japanese moral-
ity and their point of view on World
War II. Fascinating viewing. Suhtitled.
Urotsukidoji: Legend of the
Overfiend: The best (and perhaps the
only worthwhile) example of the
Japanimation genre of erotic horror,
Overfiend is a paradox On the one
hand thematically rich and epic in
scale, this film is also blatantly porno-
graphic. Scenes of demonic rape and
torture are rendered in appalling de-
tail, but each of these scenes also ad-
vances the plot or adds something to
the carefully-constructed myth cycle
that plays out in the film.
By the end of Overfiend. good
and evil have not only been turned in-
side-out. they've been gutted, filleted
and deep-fried. The story is a bit too
convoluted to explain in brief, but if
you have the stomach for something
that will horrify you on some pretty
basic levels. Legend of the Overfiend
is the film to watch.
Available as a dubbed 100-
minute film or as a sub-titled five-vol-
ume video set that includes scenes re-
moved from the film version (the final
two tapes make up the inferior sequel,
Legend of the Demon Womb).
Sticky gums up O' Rock's
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
�I � OKI
Saturday night was yet another
one of those nights when I wanted to
stick my thumb to my nose and wave it
at all of the people who missed a great
band at O'Rock's.
As usual, the crowd was lacking,
but it didn't stop Sticky from giving the
performance their all. The band's sound,
which ranged from slow and mellow to
fast-paced alternative rock, gave every-
one a taste of what they had to offer.
It seemed that the crowd caught
on to the energy of the band: every time
1 looked around, people were smiling and
nodding their heads. There were even a
lew people out there dancing and shak
ing their booty. It was nice to see people
actually enjoying a band: that in it.selt
made the whole night worth my while.
I also thought that it was really
great the way the band interacted with
the audience. Thev told stones between
their songs and made jokes throughout
the evening. To he honest I was glad
that the opening band ended up cancel
ing at the last minute, because it showed
how well Sticky could come up with
things to do and say to keep the show
interesting. Also, thev had to play a
longer set. and that in itself was cool
I must say that I was caught ofl
guard by how well Sticky pei formed For
me, the one song that made the evening
was their cover of The Velvel
Underground's "Sweet Jane I have
neve heard a hand that could capture
the sound oi one of nv favorite bands
and not even play the whole song, hut
Sticky pulled it off.
Another cover was a Tom IVttv
and The Hcarthreakers tune. "Don't
Come Around Here No Move" it was alsi i
done wry well, because when I closed
my eyes, I could just picture the video in
my head
With both guitarists singinj
.switching off vocals. Sticky kept then
sound fresh, exciting and diverse That
is a great asset for a band to have: it keeps
the audience from becoming bored when
every song sounds the same. There is
nothing more annoying than paying S3
to see a hand when you can't tell the the
first song from the last
Sticky is not one of those hands
who are just trying to catch a ride on
the ever-popular wave of alternative
music. By Matching them perform live. 1
could tell that the hand enjoys what they
are doing Making good music is just what
they happen to do well.
With a newly released CD, this
band is proving to everyone that they
haw nowhere to go hut up. In fact if
vou missed them at O'Rock's on Satur
day, I would highly suggest picking up
then disc: vou won't be disappointed.
Blessed with an energetic set and
wicked personalities, Sticky is a secret
Boone has kepi too long It's time to
Sticky with the rest of the world!
And. to those of you who missed the
show. I've still got my thumb to my nose,
and I'm still waving it at you






Thursday, February 16, 1995
7fte East Carolinian
.Coffee � Tea � Pastries
U INI11 from page 6
work throughout the disc.
The album continues with
"Stand Up People a song about gov-
ernment oppression. The rhythm sec-
tion of Apartment Q258 (Yes that's his
name) and Burbndge shows a strong
example of their incredible tightness
in this number. Their interplay is truly
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amazing and is largely to credit for the
disc's success. "How Tights Yer Draw-
ers" follows, a tune penned by Henson
and Herring, which is one of the
funnest tunes on the project
The next highlight on the disc,
"Swallows is a driving funk tune that
features Herring and the Burbridge
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brothers in searing solos. The five-
minute romp is probably the best track
to get a listener moving and is my per-
sonal favorite. Kofi Burbridge stands
out on "Plain or Peanut" and "Splash
both of which are highly jazz-influ-
enced. These songs may lose the musi-
cal layman as they are both coming
out of a contemporary jazz vein, but
do exhibit an exceptional degree of
composition and musical virtuosity.
In a Perfect World is not exactly
perfect however. Lyrically the album
is a bit weak and falls into cliche at
some points. But this is more than
compensated by the incredible groove
found on the entire record. The sub-
ject matter of the songs may not be
rocket science material, but the record
is very entertaining, especially to those
who hold funk near and dear
Simply the Best Burgers"
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.ullSUII
Thursday, February 16
Friday, February 17
Saturday, February 18
All films start of 8:00 PM unless
otherwise noted and are FREE
to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline ot 328-6004.
uDEA-
ROBE RT Df N 1 I- O r F N.SI
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sprins 95 MON TUES WED THUR FRI SAT SUN
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INSIGHT
12 p.m. to 1 p.m.
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from page 6
Randolph Scott" is another tune featur-
ing Leo on vocals and bears his typically
offbeat lyrics, relating somehow to the
great western film actor Randolph Scott.
The disc closes with a cover of The
Platters' "Twilight Time Jones pro-
tested; she didn't want this song on the
CD. In fact she hated it but Kottke in-
sisted, and the song remained.
If you like acoustic guitar (slide,
blues or folk), this is a release you don't
want to miss. The arrangements are a
little off-center and at the same time
steeped in tradition. The guitar work is
at once beautiful and startling in its com-
plexity. The inclusion of Rickie Lee Jones
to production adds much, and her back-
ing vocals are tasteful as well. Overall
this is an incredibly strong and original
release.
rOvJjJL from page 6
to taking responsibility for his actions.
No major crises erupt that make Sully
change his mind, but instead a com-
fortable (there's that word again)
change occurs to make Sully realize
that he not only has made an impact
on the world, but that he is also su-
premely happy.
Sully lives with his eighth-grade
teacher Miss Beryl (Jessica Tandy in
her final performance). The relation-
ship between Sully and Miss Beryl pro-
vides many light moments. Miss Beryl
worries that her son will put her in a
home and that others don't treat her
like a person. Sully treats Miss Beryl
with the same gruff but gentle de-
meanor wffh which he treats everyone
in the small New York town where he
lives. Sully lacks artifice. He is an in-
genious person with an outlook on life
that makes everyone else comfortable.
Even Carl (Bruce Willis), the owner of
the construction company for which
Sully works, cannot dislike Sully de-
spite being sued by him and withstand-
ing constant verbal barrages. When the
day ends, Sully, Carl, Sully s lawyer and
several other townsfolk gather at the
local bar to play poker. Like everything
else in Nobody's Fool the poker game
seems comfortably familiar, a place
where the events of the day are forgot-
ten until tomorrow, and onty camara-
derie and cards exist
Robert Benton, the director and
writer of Nobody's Fool (he adapted
the film from a novel of the same name
by Richard Russo), deserves as much
credit as Newman for making the film
feel so well-worn and, yes, comfortable.
Benton lets the story unfold in a con-
trolled, unhurried manner lacking in
so many American films today. He
coaxes great performances out of ev-
ery one of his actors. Benton deserves
an Oscar nomination for the work he
does in Nobody's Fool, as does
Newman - in fact Newman deserves
to win. Jessica Tandy also deserves a
posthumous nomination for some of
the finest work she has done on the
screen. Even Bruce Willis and Melanie
Griffith (who plays Carl's wife) give
wonderfully nuanced performances
that make you forget all the other bad
roles they have played.
Nobody's Fool resonates with
warmth and compassion. This film,
much like its star, has been worn to
perfection and will be perfectly remem-
bered for years to come.
If you like the comfort of favor-
ite clothes, then go see a favorite ac-
tor in an outstanding role. It may be
tough to see a better film than
Nobody's Fool this year.
On a scale of one to ten.
Nobody's Fool rates a nine.
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� III
8
Thursday, February 16,1995 The East Carolinian
Pagano flees to Miami
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Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Chuck Pagano has made great strides in the improvement of the ECU secondary. He was
also an excellent recruiter for Coach Logan, drawing praise for signing several key players.
ECU secondary
coach joins Butch
Davis' UM staff
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Chuck Pagano, ECU secondary
coach this past year and outside line-
backer coach the previous two sea-
sons, was hired by University of Mi-
ami head coach Butch Davis to coach
the Hurricane defensive backs.
Pagano worked as a defensive
assistant for Bill Lewis at ECU in 1989
and '90 before taking a defensive co-
ordinator position at UNLV, and re-
turned to ECU the year after.
"I'm hurt that he left, but he
has to look out for himself and his
family Pirate cornerback Emmanuel
McDaniel said. "It was fun to play for
him, he was definitely a player's coacii.
It is a loss to our defense, but the play-
ers have to go out and play and hard
and remember what he taught us
The 34-year-old Colorado native
began his coaching career as a gradu-
ate assistant at Southern Cal before
moving to Miami as a graduate
asssistant defensive back coach in
1986. The Hurricanes played for the
national championship that season,
falling to Penn State in the Fiesta
Bowl.
At ECU, he quickly built an
outstanding reputation as a coach and
recruiter. Pagano signed several play-
ers over the years out of south Florida
before signing several players in this
year's freshman class from New York
and New Jersey.
On the field, the Pirate second-
ary made a dramatic improvement
under Pagano, moving up from 70th
in passing efficiency in 1993 to 18th
nationally this past season, intercept-
ing 22 passes. McDaniel was tied for
18th in the country, finishing with a
team-best five picks. Sophomore free
safety Dwight Henry was named First-
team All-Independent by the Footbali
News while McDaniel and David and
Daren Hart all earned various post-
season honors.
Pagano was hired by Miami on
the same day that Coach Davis hired
Bill Miller from Oklahoma State as his
defensive coordinator Both Pagano
and Miller are very familiar with Davis'
defensive philosophy, which is based
on attacking the line of scrimmage
and creating turnovers.
"Like Bill Miller, Chuck has a
tremendous knowledge of our de-
fense Davis said. "He is another tre-
mendous recruiter. He's got great rap-
port with the players. He's an out-
standing teacher, and a guy that I have
a tremendous amount of trust in. You
can give him responsibility and know
he's going to get the job done
"Both have been position
coaches in the secondary and at line-
backer, so they both have a tremen-
dous knowledge of this type of de-
fense
Pagano was an all-state defen-
sive back at Fairview High School in
Boulder, leading his team to the 1978
state championship. At the University
of Wyoming, he started two years at
strong safety for former Pirate head
coach Bill Lewis, lettering four years.
No replacement secondary
coach has been named yet by Steve
Logan. The Pirates have begun win-
ter conditioning and will not start
spring football until after spring
break.
Dynamic Duo
Photos Courtesy of ECU SID
Pirate tennis teammates Ben Atkinson (left) and Sam Fisher have become a doubles
team for coach Bill Moore. They competed last weekend in the VCU Invitational.
Pirates
win 3-on-
3 tourney
36 teams compete
in Schick Regionals
David Gaskins
Recreational Services
On Saturday, Feb. 11
Christenbury Gym and Williams
Arena were the host to an exciting
display of basketball as the depart-
ment of recreational services admin-
istered the Schick SuperHoops At-
lantic Coast Regional 3-on-3 Basket-
ball Tournament.
A total of 36 teams (24 Men
and 12 Women) competed in the
one-day tournament, which also in-
cluded a Three Point Shootout, Hot
Shots, Free Throws, Slam Dunk and
H-O-R-S-E challenge contests, which
preceded the tournament on Friday
night and Saturday morning.
The tournament featured
teams from colleges and universities
across North Carolina and South
Carolina which participated in
Schick SuperHoops on their local
campuses. Teams qualified for the
event by winning the tournament
championships on their respective
campuses.
A team from ECU captured the
Women's division for the second
consecutive year as Kim-Hoa
Pakowski lead the way with strong
rebounding and a soft scoring touch.
Natalie Lew proved a tough inside-
See BASKET page 9
WFU assistant replaces Steele
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Former Wake Forest assistant
coach Tim Treadway, has joined the ECU
coaching staff as recruiting coordinator,
replacing assistant head coach and re-
cruiting coordinator Dale Steele.
ECU signed a excellent 22-player
class with 10 of the recruits coming from
instate. They also signed players from
as far away as California and Massachu-
setts. According to Rick Kimble, editor
of Blue Chip Illustrated, the Pirate class
is rated in the Top 40 classes in the coun-
try, highlighted by blue-chippers Mpuma
Masimini and Troy Smith.
The transition from Steele to
Treadway has been a smooth one be-
cause of the competence and skill of the
ECU staff who were already involved with
several propects before Treadway was
hired.
"They do a great job of recruiting
here at East Carolina Treadway said.
"The coaching staff has made my job a
lot easier by really doing a good job of
evaluating the talent out there and get-
ting players interested in the program.
We really filled a major need as far as
gaining depth and size with the linemen
we signed and plus we got one of the
finest receivers in the nation with Troy
Smith
Smith is one of the Top 15 play-
ers in the nation at his position in sev-
eral recruiting publications, turning
down Notre Dame and Texas to stay at
home and play for ECU.
Treadway has coached at West
Texas State and Virginia Tech in the past
earning a reputation as an outstanding
recruiter by signing talent like Buffalo
Bills All-Pro defensive end, Bruce Smith.
"Bruce Smith is definitely the best
player I have ever signed Treadway said
"He was a number one draft pick and a
Outland Trophy winner. The only way to
judge how good a job you are doing of
recruiting players is by guaging how suc-
cessful the are the players that you sign
On Virginia Tech's 1984 Indepen-
dence Bowl team 11 of their starters were
Treadway recruits.
Treadway believes that ECU's
bowl success in recent years plus a na-
tional schedule over the next few years
with games against Miami, Alabama.
Syracuse, Illinois and West Virginia will
be extremely attractive to potential re-
cruits.
"There are a lot of factors that
will contribute to our recruiting suc-
cess Treadway said. "Here at East Caro-
lina we have played in two bowl games
in the past four years, we play a very
tough schedule and we have an excit-
ing, high-powered offense plus a good
defense. With all of these things in place
and a excellent academic school and
nice community to go with it we should
be very competitive in recruiting
He has planned a upcoming re-
cruiting weekend, sending out invita-
tions to most of the high school coaches
around the state. This should enable
ECU to make a good early impression
on top underclassmen and get next
year's recruiting off to a good start
"By seeing these players early and
identifying the top junior prospects we
should have a clearer picture of who
we should concentrate on for next year
Treadway said. "We are really deter-
mined to recruit North Carolina hard
and keep the top players at home, espe-
cially in Eastern North Carolina.
Raquetball singles
tourney offered
Mary Pavey
Rereatlonal Ser vices
Preparations for the racquetball
season are well underway for the Spring
semester. The department of recreational
services is offering a racquetball singles
tournament starting Sunday, Feb. 26 and
concluding Wednesday, March 1.
In addition, there will also be a
single elimination tournament within
each division that will begin on Tuesday,
March 14. Pool play schedule will be
posted by 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 24, out-
side 104 Christenbury Gym. Tourna-
ments are open to all ECU students, staff
and faculty.
Anyone interested in participating
should register in 204 Christenbury Gym
before 5 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 23. A
complete entry form including name,
social security number, phone number.
7Hden�t$4,
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
This baseball strike crap has
gotta go. With the "major league" pitch-
ers and catchers reporting to camps
today, something has to be done
quickly. According to many GMs and
owners, loyal fans will still be satisfied
with their Braves, Yankees or Dodg-
ers, etc, because the competitive level
of the game will still be high.
Higher than what? Chico's Bail
Bonds could throw together better
teams than these. At least the Bad
News Bears got to play with a short-
ened outfield fence and 60-foot bases.
The bellies on some of these major-
league "future stars" certainly out-
weigh their potential.
If nothing happens, we can basi-
cally get a chance to see early80s base-
ball rehashed more times over than
Mendenhall food, and all for our view-
ing enjoyment Hmm, I never did get a
chance to see Oil Can Boyd face off
against Leon Durham before. Get out
the Old Milwaukee, Bubba! It's Oil Can!
Yee-haw.
I don't know, maybe I'm just mad
that the Colorado Rockies denied me
the opportunity to play for them be-
cause I haven't played pro ball in the
last five seasons. At least I've picked
up a bat in the last five, more than some
of the butterballs who do get to go to
spring training can admit
As Opening Day grows closer, a
few players are starting to come out of
the closet and admit they just might-
maybe-possibly want to play baseball
come April. All we need is one or two
bignameguys- Hector Villenueva and
Don Wakamatsu won't do the trick,
but players like Bonds and Griffey
would, and if they cross the line, the
walls should come crumblin' down.
Orioles' owner Peter Angelos
said the other day that he thinks the
strike will be settled by the end of the
month. I hope so, but I'm not holding
my breath. It'll snow in San Francisco
before the owners and the players have
genuine respect for each other again.
In fact I think that I'll start getting in
shape.
Just in case the Rockies call
back.
Speaking of snow in San Fran-
cisco, Darryl Strawberry got caught
red-handed (or is it white-nosed?) with
cocaine in his system, and was released
from his second club this year. While
he was at it Darryl went ahead and
admitted to have hidden lots of dinero
from the IRS (who's been on to him
for a while) and his wife (who's been
on him even longer) His former Mets
teammate and buddy Dwight Gooden
failed his second drug test earlier this
year, so both of them are out of work.
Hey, wait a minute. Keith Hernandez
got hit for drugs a few years back, too.
It's too bad that baseball commission-
ers don't have the guts to actually pros-
ecute these guys as if they were nor-
mal people - with all the drugs mov-
ing through Shea Stadium, Rikers Is-
land State Penitentiary could have one
heck of a prison baseball team
Have I got a great idea! Let's
just see if we can squeeze just a little
more money out of this whole OJ. situ-
ation. Why don't we install a 900 num-
ber and get some peon to talk on it?
Then we'll get someone who has no
worth or importance to anyone (other
than the people trapped in the jury
box) to man the phones. Dam, they
beat us to iLAl Cowlings, Simpson's
"chauffeur" through the streets of LA,
has established a 1-900-I'm-a-big-loser-
who's-hard-up-for-money-so-I'll-make-
some-off-of-my-jailed-buddy-OJnum-
ber, so you can hear his side of the
story. Like anybody that's not a no-
life, trailer-trash Geraldo-Iover is gonna
dial Al's digits. Al, buddy, you're 15
minutes of fame are way past expired.
See POND page 10
ECU's

PORTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
address, desired division of play and
schedule availability must be given at the
time of registration.
There will be both a men's and
women's division. Within each of the di-
visions there will be Gold and Purple lev-
els of play. However, Purple divisions will
only be offered if there is an adequate
level of interest Here at ECU there are
two racquetball courts, both located in
Minges Coliseum.
Tournament will be governed by
the American Amateur Racquetball As-
sociation (AARA) rules ta outlined in
Ektelon's Total Racquetball Handbook
Racquets, balls and protective eye gear
will be available for tournament use from
the equipment room located in 115
Christenbury Gym with a valid East Caro-
lina University I.D. at the time of check-
out
Racquetballs will also be available
for check-out at the tournament site.
(SID) - ECU sophomore guard
Skipp Schaefbauer has been named
to the 1995 GTE University Division
Academic All-District III Men's Bas-
ketball Team, announced Tuesday.
Schaefbauer, a native of Elk
River, Minn has started all 23 games
this season, and in averaging 11.5
points, 3.7 rebounds and 3.7 assists
per game. He also has a 3.53 GPA at
ECU, majoring in psychology.
The district comprises the
states of Florida, Georgia, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina and Virginia.
Voting is done by the College Sports
Information Directors of America.
East Carolina senior center
Anton Gill was named Colonial Ath-
letic Association Player of the Week
for Feb. 13, conference officials an-
nounced Tuesday.
Gill, a native of Rochester, N.Y
scored 47 points and pulled down 19
rebounds in two Pirate wins last week.
His jumper with .03.8 left against Rich-
mond Saturday gave the Pirates a 59-
58 win.
It is the second time this sea-
ii
1
son that a Pirate was named CAA
Player of the Week. Chuckie Robinson
received the honor on Dec. 26.
� The Pirates visit James Madison
on Wednesday night Feb. 18 in a 7:30
p.m. tipoff. The game will be televised
live back to Eastern North Carolina
on WNCT-TV (Ch. 9, Greenville) and
tape-delayed on Home Team Sports
at 1 a.m.
ESPN2 will televise Monday
night's men's basketball game be-
tween ECU and Old Dominion live
from Williams Arena at Minges Coli-
seum. Tip-off is 8:30 p.m.
The ECU Men's Track squad
has been forced to withdraw from this
weekend's scheduled Collegiate Invi-
tational in Fairfax.VA. it was an-
nounced Wednesday afternoon.
According to the head coach
Bill Carson, the decision was made
after several members of the team
came down with the flu. "We've re-
ally been hurt by this weather
Carson said. "What did us in was go-
ing up to West Virginia, the cold and
the long bus trip is what did it to us
i





9
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Martin Row





10
Thursday, February 16, 1995
The East Carolinian
mmmmmm m i
POND
from page 8
IGet a life
I was flipping through the chan-
;u Is the other night and started to
�dry-heave when l hit the USA Network
hat they were carrying ex-
erage of the Westminster
� ub Dog Show, the second-
dest spoiling event in America.
.Sporting event? What a freakin'
� Fat women in polyester
s running on Astroturt with
doggies of ail shapes and sizes.
I was hoping that the big oi' German
Shepherd that was being dragged
around would snap and pull a Cuio
on his master, but alas, nothing that
cool would happen on USA - unless
it was on YWVF Monday Night Raw.
of course.
Aw. yeah. Tyson's finally got his
get-outta-jail-free card. He shouldn't
have been there in tlie first place, but
that's in the past now. On March 25th.
His Roval Iron-ness will walk out of the
Indiana Youth Center in Plainfield, III.
a free man. So who's he gonna fight?
It's kind of like one of those double-
edged sword things. If you go up
against Tyson in his first fight back and
lose to him. you'll really look like a
chump - a well-compensated chump.
but a chump no less. If you beat him
down like Jerry County, so what? He's
been caged up for a while, and his con-
centrating on not dropping the soap
has probably led to ring-rust.
209
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GROUP l�D�ll DISCOUNTS
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Selected
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Selected
Ski Gloves
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209c Off
Boots 20 off
Used Boots
$40-$100
GORDON
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756-1003
Mon. - Sat. 9 - 7
Open Wed & Fri Nights til 9 Open Sun 1 - 5
Conveniently Located
Near Campus
One or two bedroom apartments
available immediately. Walking distance
to campus. WasherDryer hook-ups,
Free water and sewer. ECU bus service.
Very reasonable rent rates.
Call 756-4052 for more information.
ra mhi un in mm �. i ma
easants (aje
Toniqht
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Melanie Sparks
Babe with an attitude
Almighty Senators
Best damn politicians you ever did see
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For Mug Night
Releqs Recording Artist
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Every Sunday listen to WSFL 106.5
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Only 2 more Wednesdays for Keller
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Soft
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Cocktailu oz. MgfflS
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1
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Ice Cream
Dressing i60z.
Selected
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12 gal.
President's Choice
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Croutons 6o
President's Choice
Salad 2900 Selected Varieties
Varit
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Buy One 10.5 Oz. Pkg. Of
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Frozen
Oranqe Juice
10090
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12 oz.
PC Extra Raisin
Raisin Bran
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1
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48 oz.
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Prices Effective Through Feb. 21,1995
IM- H
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'Vie I
m





11
Thursday, February 16, 1995 The East Carolinian
If
Help wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.). Seasonal and Full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. Tor
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53624
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY Clean.
High volume Adult Club needs YOU now.
Confidential employment Daily pay Top
Commissions. Some to no experience. If
you've called before call again. Playmates
Massage Snow Hill. N.C. 919-747-7686
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own hours!
RUSH Self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home mail-
ing our circulars. Free details, Send SASE:
R&B Distributors, Box 20354, Greenville
NC 27858
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298952.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
:Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-251-4000 ext
1576. Leave Name, School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
NEED EXTRAFOR SPRING BREAK?
Earn the quick cash you need by stuffing
envelopes. It's easy-immediate response!
Send $1 with SASE to Carolina Enter-
prises, Inc P.O. Box 3251, Greenville, NC
27836-1251
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS of
North Carolina this summer? For summer
employment and housing information call
Paul at 800-662-2122
PART TIME - FLEXABLE HOURS night
and weekends - Cleaning, Assembly &
mold waxing at local Boat Manufacturing
Plant. Fill out application at North Ameri-
can Fiberglass - 758-9901
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK SUM-
MER IN MYRTLE BEACH, SC Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession Work-
ers. Earn good money while working on
the Beach $$ Salary plus bonuses $$
FREE HOUSING To apply or for further
information, callfax Sun Beach Service
at 803-2724170
FULL-TIME SEASONAL EMPLOY-
MENT available as Customer Service
Representive. Will use data entry equip-
ment (CRT) to enter customer orders. Pre-
fer computer skills, or ability to type 30-
40 wpm. Pleasant phone voice and ability
to work with customers. Knowledge of
Marine & Water Sports Equipment is help-
ful. Days and hours are flexible. Applica-
tions will be taken from 9-1 lam and 2-
4pm. Monday through Thursday. Apply at
Overton's Sports Center, 111 Red Banks
Road, Greenville. NC 27834.
SEASONAL PACKAGING & SHIPPING
OPENINGS available. Personnel needed
to fill customer orders and prepare pack-
ages for shipment. Students seeking Full
Time work for Spring and Summer are
encouraged to apply. Days. Mon-Fri; Hours
8am-6pm. Applications will be taken 9-
11am & 24pm MonThur. Apply at the
Overton's Sports Center, 111 Red Banks
Rd Greenville, NC 27834.
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a degree and
practical experience is better! We are ac-
cepting applications for part-time mort-
gage reporting processors. A professional
attitude and good telephone skills are re-
quired. Flexible hours. If interested, please
mail your resume to: ONLINE MORT
GAGE SERVICES, PO BOX 8048.
Greenville. NC 27835. NO CALLS
PLEASE
SZECHUAN GARDEN - 909 S. Evans St.
Experienced wait staff and cashier needed.
No phone calls please. Apply in person
between 2:00 pm and 6:00p.m.
TELEMARKETING - Davenport Exteri-
ors Thermal Card - $5.00 per hour plus
bonus. Easy work. Flexible hours start to-
day. Call 355-2515.
WANTED: Spanish teacher for 13 year
old home schooler. Prefer someone with
teaching skills and Spanish as primary lan-
guage or at least fluency. Call 795-5363.
ARTIST WANTED Mojo Sportswear, Inc.
is seeking an artist for T-shirt Designs.
Applicants need a working knowledge of
Macintosh Computer graphics programs.
Call 7584176 for an interview.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED to teach camps in NC & SC.
Great pay! Flexible scheduling! Free week-
ends! Strong skills and great personality
necessary. College experience not re-
quired. For a great summer job. CALL
ESPRIT! CHEERLEADING 1-800-280-
3223!
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK. Make
up to $2.000-$4,000mo. teaching basic
conversational English in Japan. Taiwan,
or S. Korea. No teaching background or
Asian languages required. For information
call: (206) 632-1146 ext. J53623.
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, we'll pay you to! Make
your A's pay by calling Student Supple-
ments today. I'll pay you cash for going to
class. Give us a call at 752-HELP.
APPLY NOW. $10.25 TO START. Grow-
ing firm has openings in Greenville, Posi-
tive, friendly people needed to work with
our custumers. Flexible hours. Good re-
sume experience. Call 919-881-0034
COURTYARD TAVERN will be serving
lunch and dinner daily and we are now
accepting applications for Management as
well as WaitBarCook, Dishwasher
staffs. 703 Greenville Blvd S.E. 321-0202.
"Greenville's New Gathering Place"
For Sale
SONY 10-DISC CHANGER $200 obo Call
752-9319
FOR SALE: Double Loft - will fit dorm
and Diamond Ring 14 carat Call 830-
0221 or 757-3949
'84 CHEV CAV, RED WAGON, Standard
Shift, Only 98,000mi, Good Condition,
$500 Call Stephanie 758-8479
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE YOUR
GPA OR EXAM SCORES? We have the
edge you need to succeed. Student Supple-
ment offeres study guides based on the
notes of the "A" student in your class.
Give us a call at 752-HELP.
SEARS KENMORE PORTABLE DRYER
- Excellent condition. $150. Has Cotton
sturdy, touch-up, permanent press, air-only
cycles. SOFT HEAT. 756-9642
MARSHALL 2X12 SPEAKER CABINET
200.00 757-0187
N�JCASHm
We Buy CDS,
CmmmtAt, and Lp �
Well pmy up to $5 ek for
OLT,
SALE 2
Featuring
Experienced & Educated
Coats, Jeans, Sweaters, Shirts,
Shoes, etc.
All your favorite brands
TOMMY HILIFIGER
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IN.I I I II I I N I RKIl . I I
r I l )N I )1 V( 1(I A
l)RIl I) H K.IKK)kAKIN(i HI y
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Displayed Classifieds
$5.50 per column inch
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication. However, no
refunds will be given.
Announcements
Any organization may use the
Announcements Section of The
East Carolinian to list activities
and events open to the public
two times free of charge. Due to
the limited amount of space, The
East Carolinian cannot guarantee
the publication of
announcements.
4-All ads must be pre-paid
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
For more information call ECU-6366.
Sfit
For Rent
NOW LEASING 2 Bedroom 1 and 2 Bath
Apartments stove, frig, dishwasher, washer
dryer, water sewer basic cable included. 2
Blocks from Campus. On Site Manager
Call 752-8900
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 1 bedroom
apartment at 810 Cotanche St. Rent $225
month Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 1 bedroom
apartment available March 3 and Two
bedroom apartments available for Rent.
Free Cable. Call 758-1921.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer: central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 7 - $1500.00
per month; sleeps 8-9 - $2100.00 per
month (804) 850-1532
FREE FEBRUARY RENT and NO De-
posit. Female roommate wanted or two
people to sublease a two bedroom apt
Total rent is $380.00. Basic cable, water,
pool and ECU bus service included. Kings
Row Apt Call 752-0845 and leave mes-
sage.
APARTMENT FOR RENT Wyndham
Court-2 bedroom. 1 bath, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer and dryer hook-up,
close to campus. Call Ali or Debra-830-
2270
NEED TO TAKE OVER LEASE, fur
nished, pool, own room and bathroom. For
more information call Heidi 758-9480,
Kingston Place.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED. Private
room in Tar River apts. Rent $156 a
month plus 14 utilities. Call Tracy at 551-
7660. Please leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share Brick
House on N. Harding. 5 min walk to cam-
pus. $200mo 13 utilities. Want up-
perclassman and someone pretty cool
andor laid back. Big Screen TV and trust
fund are pluses. Call Brian at 757-3318.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: nice two room
apartment near campus, roomy and re-
laxed, on ECU bus route; rent $1971
2 utilities. Call 752-1033(late afternoons-
early evenings)
APT. AVAILABLE FOR SUBLEASING.
March until August 30th. Need male or
female to share a 2 bedroom apt with fe-
male. Smoker or Non-smoker. Location:
Oak Mont Square Rent 205 plus 12 utili-
ties. Willing to give $75 of deposit return
in August. I need someone ASAP Please
Call 321-3863
SUBLEASE: 2 Bedroom duplex in Col-
lege View Apts. Immediately! 350.00 per
month plus deposit 757-2763
A STEAL 1 Bedroom Apartment near
hospital, $275 No security Deposit if you
assume lease thru Aug. (Lease is month
to month after August), (n) 752-6255 or
8304559, Leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share 3 Bed
room House 1 block from campus & down-
town; washerdryer: $180 mo. 13 utili-
ties Call Jim 752-4039
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP
For 2 Bed, 2 Bath furnished Apt at
Ringgold Towers 220mo 12 Utilities
Call Jennifer at 321-1825 (DayWk) or
(919) 658-3022 (Night-Home) Please Leave
Message.
TAR RIVER ESTATES Male roommate
needed before March, $172 rent 14 utili-
ties, and phone. Located on river. Call
Kevin at 758-6701.
WHITE, CHRISTIAN, FEMALE needed
to share a 2 Bedroom Apt $170month ?
12 utilities by end of May Call Jeannie
756-7532 after 5 pm.
m.
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Personals
JANET STUBBS - 1 more day until you
are finally 21! Look forward to a night to
remember, my friend! Maureen
TRAVEL COMPANION Venice, Paris.
Newark. Anywhere with you. I'm accepted
at over 12 million locations worldwide,
including motels by truck stops. Call 1-
800-CITIBANK to apply.
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LOST - 50$, If found, just keep it
STOLEN: 10-Foot hammerhead shark
from Omar's Omar offering $50 reward
for the return of the shark or information
leading to its return. Call 752-6948.
M
Greek Personals
Services Offered
TYPING Reasonable rates Re-
sumes-quick & professional, Term papers,
Thesis, other services. Call Glenda: 752-
9959 (days); 527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call 1
900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min. must be
18 or older. Find that special someone!
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext. F53623
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE your GPA
or exam scores? We have the edge you
need to succeed! STUDENT SUPPLE-
MENTS offers study guides based on the
notes of the "A" students in your classes.
Give us a call at 752-HELP
MEET NEW PEOPLE AT ECU Listen to
their voice and reply only if you are inter-
ested 1-900-825-6000 ext. 8318 Procall Co.
(602)954-7420 $2.99min. & 18t
FRENCH TUTORING I'm a French ex
change student and can tutor you in con-
versation or writing. Drm't hesitate to call
me at 328-8159 & askunr Benjamin.
CREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mo-
bile Music Productions is the premier Disc
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SIG EP: Thanks for a great time at the
social Thursday. We had a blast, and can't
wait to do something again soon! Love,
Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS to all sororities
who were honored at the Panhellenic
Awards Banquet last week. We're proud
to be your Panhellenic sisters! Love, Chi
Omega
CHI OMEGA: Great job to our water polo
and bowling teams and Panhellenic Award
recipients: the entire chapter for highest
GPA, Laurie Johnson-4.0 GPA, Debra
Nagle-best new member, Robbyn Cayton-
Hera award, Dee Huskey-Artemis award,
Lucy Goodwin and Jenn McCain-Greek
Hall of Fame, and the chapter for the
Outstanding Panhellenic Service award.
Keep up the good work!
KAPPA SIGMA - The nuts and bolts so-
cial was lots of fun. Hope to get together
soon. Keep the fire burning. Love the Al-
pha Phis
ALPHA PHIS and their dates, came out
Friday night to celebrate. Pam and Scott
were quite a sight Everything for them
was going just right From Courtney's to
the stables, I swear we didn't break the
tables. Melissa survived her 21st birthday
and everyone else had a great Valentine's
Day. Love Alpha Phi
ZETA TAU ALPHA welcomes the Sigma
Pledge Class! Jennifer Holleman,
Catherine Trudell, Allison Lipp, Meg
Watson, Robyn Hawkins. Wendy Houston,
Jennifer Taylor, Angie Greene, Jennifer
South, and Amanda Wall. Congratulations
on making a great decision and good luck!
Love, the sisters of Zet
TAU KAPPA EPSILON - It's all fun and
games Thanks for the awesome social!
We had a lot of fun and we're looking for-
ward to te next time! Love, Zeta.
CATHY: Thank you so much for the won-
derful Valentine's treats You're the great-
est Love, the brothers of Pi Lambda Phi.
PI DELTA: We are looking forward to a
great time tonight at the Rap Social. Love,
the brothers of Pi Lambda Phi.
AOP1 - Thanks for the social last Thurs-
day. Looking forward to getting together
again. Delta Sig
1
J





12
Thursday, February 16, 1995 The East Carolinian
AUDITIONS FOR VOLUNTEER
READERS
Auditions for Volunteer Readers are sched-
uled because of increased programming
planned by the RADIO READING SER-
VICE OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
(RRSENC). If you have some extra time, a
good speaking voice, clear enunciation, and
the ability to read aloud fluently and ex-
pressively, you are invited to audition. The
RRSENC broadcasts The Daily Reflector
news, information, and a variety of topics
to the visually impaired members of our
community, and will soon add magazine
excerpts, stories, interviews, etc. Broadcasts
from the Brody Medical Building of East
Carolina Campus are heard on special ra-
dio receivers, and on Cable access Chan-
nel 36. You need not prepare for the audi-
tion. You will be given something to read
aloud. The audition will be held in Audito-
rium Room 209 of the Robert Humber
Building at Greenville Comm unity College.
Memorial Blvd Route 11. on SATURDAY.
FEBRUARY 18, 1995. 12:00 noon to
2:00pm. For more information call Robert
Lancet at 7584683. or 756-8259.
B-GLAD
B-GLAD (Bisexuals. Gays. Lesbians. & Al-
lies for Diversity) will meet tonight at 8 pm
in the Multi-Pur pose Room of Mendenhall
Student Center (First Floor).
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
ECU CR's meet every Thursday at GCB
1014 at 6pm. Be a winner - Be R epublican!
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The Law Society will be holding its Bi-
Monthly meeting on Monday Feb 20 at
5:15pm in Rawl Rm 206. Our Guest
Speaker will be Joe Blick a District Attor-
ney from Pitt County. All Majors and new-
Members are encouraged to attend.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services office will hold orien-
tation meetings for seniors and graduate
students graduat ing in MaySummer 1995
on the following dates: Tue, Feb 2-1 at
3:00pm and Wed March 1 at 4:00pm. The
program will include an overview of ser-
vices available to help prospective gradu-
ates find employment as well as procedure?
for registering with Career Services. Stu-
dents are asked to meet at the Career Ser-
vices Center, 701 E. Fifth Street
CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES
The ECU Forum for Constitutional Issues
will host a lecture on "Emerging Issues in
Constitutional Law" with Dr. Harbour of
ECU Political Science Dept Wednesday 2
2295 4pm at GCB 2019.
NORTH CAROLINA FOLK ARTS
& ARTISTS SERIES 1995
Tales Old & New (Some of Them Tr ue) from
a Couple of Fish House Liars. Rodney
Kemp and Sonny Williamson trade off leg-
ends and tall tales, jokes and local charac-
ter anecdotes from Down East and the
Outer Banks. Wednesday. February 22.
7:30pm at The Percolator Coffeehouse lo-
cated on Fifth St at the Evans St Mall
entrance in downtown Greenville.
STUDENT NORTH CAROLINA
ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS
The next SNCAE meeting will be held on
February 16 at 4:30 Speight Bldg. in room
308. Alan Bailey, coordinator of LRC
evening services at PCC will be our speak er.
Membership to SNCAE is open to any edu-
cation or educat ion-intending major of an y
class rank.
EAST CAROLINA NATIVE
AMERICAN ORGANIZATION
ECNAO will be meeting Feb. 20 in
Mendenhall Rm 14 at 7:00. If you have any
questions call Kim Sampson 752-2319
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Pig and Chicken Pickin'at the Baptist Stu-
dent Center Feb. 25 10am-3pm. For ad-
vance ticket information call Todd at 752-
4646.
CROSS COUNTRYDOWNHILL
SKI ADVENTURE
ECU Recreational Services will be offering
a week long ski trip to Canaan Valley. West
Virginia March 5-10. Register by February
20 in 204 Christenbury Gym. The cost is
$224 which includes transportation, lodg-
ing, and guides. Call Steve at 328-6387 for
more details or stop by the R.O.C. (Recre-
ational Outdoor Center) in 117
Christenbury Gym.
THE PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MOTOR AND PHYSICAL
FITNESS COMPETENCY TEST
IS SCHEDULED AS FOLLOWS:
Place: Minges Coliseum. Time: 12:00 noon.
Date: Friday. February 17. 1995. A pass-
ing score on this test is required of all stu-
dents prior to declaring physical education
as a major. 1-Maintain an average T-score
of 45 on the six item test battery. 2- Hav-
ing a T-score of 45 on the aerobics run.
"Any student with a medical condit ion that
would contraindicate participation in the
testing should contact Mike McCammon
or Gilian Tyndall at 3284688. To be ex-
empted from any portion of the test, you
must have a physician's excuse. A detailed
summary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance Labora-
tory (Room 371, Sports Medicine Building).
Your physician's excuse must specifically
state from which items you are exempt.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
MARSHALS
Any student interested in serving as a uni-
versity marshal for the 1995 Spring com-
mencement may obtain an application from
Room A-12 Minges. Student must be clas-
sified as a junior by t he end of Fall semes-
ter 1994 and have at least a 3.0 academic
average to be eligible. Return completed
application to Carol-Ann Tucker. Advisor,
A-12 Minges by Friday, February 17, 1995.
For more information call 3284661.
MASSAGE CLINIC
Tense and stressed out? Come to the Physi-
cal Therapy Massage Clinic tonight from 6-
9pm at the ECU Back and Limb Clinic. Tick-
ets $2.50 per 10 min. at t he door. See you
there!
FREE AEROBICS CLASS
There will be a free aerobics class, healthy
snacks, and prizes during the Friday Fit-
ness Fling on Friday. February 17 at 4pm
in 108 Christenbury Gym. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328-6387.
CHOOSING A MAJOR & A
CAREER
Learn how personality affects career choice.
Take five assessment instruments. Learn
how to research career areas that may be
right for you. This five-session workshop is
just what you need. $15.00 Classes begin:
222, 223. Counseling Center. Call 328-
6661 for more information.
Join the Stampede
to bif-3
Try our Daily Lunch Specials!
MonGart)age Dog Combo$2.99
Tues20c WingsV Day!
WedBeef-on-Weck Combo$2.99
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Fri14 lb. Weckburger Combo$2.99
Combo Includes Regular Chip & XZoz. Drink
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Also Available 10 ft. Parallel Printer cable to Memorex
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Send check or money order
plus $3 sh to:
MCM Wholesale PO Box 20306
Greenville, NC 27858
Or call: 321-7416
SHOW WOR 10.
to receive up to
$500
College Graduate Rebate
on selected new cars.
Mercury
Mite rnWMe up to 6 months
prior to gridiutioii
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MEMORIAL DRIVE � GREENVILLE. NC
355-3333
1-800-849-3355
GRE
Review Course
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Designed to prepare you for the format
and content of the April 8,1995
GRE Exam
Course Schedule:
MondayFebruary 27
WednesdayMarch 1
MundayMarch 13
WednesdayMarch 15
MondayMarch 20
WednesdayMarch 22
MondayMarch 27
WednesdayMarch 29
Course Time:
6:30 pm-8:30 pm
Any nx fi. i. iu rf.tuirng .� i inin�l,ii ir�i untkf
AIM J�.u!il i hulk l the Office ol Divnlwlily
Service. 32H-4802
Topics To Be Reviewed:
� Verbal Ability � Includes sentence completion, analogy,
antonyms, and reading comprehension
v Quantitative Ability � Includes matliem.itH.il (oiuepts and
reasoning using arithmetic, algebra, and geometry
� Analytical Ability � Includes analytical and logical reasoning
Location:
General Classroom Building, Room 121
Instructor:
Dr. Rick Niswander, Assistant Professor of Accounting
Texts:
The Princeton Review: Crocking the GRE
. Practicing To Take The GRE General Test
CM of text� included in rcgtMr.nion Uv
EARLY REGISTRATION DISCOUNT:
Only $150 before February 13! $170 beginning February 14
Prrsenlod by
.I.CU School of BusiiH-ss � Prolesiion.il Programs
1200 General Classroom Building 9t9) MB � 637
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�Kitchen includes microwave
Dig into our sand volleyball courts
�Swim or relax in our sparkling pool
�Fullsize WashersDryers in each unit
�Each bedroom is wired for cable TV and phone
�Private bedrooms w individual mirrored closets
Enjoy a game of tennis or basketball
�Workout in our full featured fitness area
�Catch your favorite programs on our giant screen TV or
shoot a game of pool in our clubhouse.
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APARTMENTS
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But not our classifieds.
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SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
North American Van Lines is now
accepting applications from college
students and staff tor its Summer Fleet
Program.
Summer is the busy season in the
moving industry, and we need your
help to handle the load. We will
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cargo - at no cost. We pay your room
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Once you receive your Commercial
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 16, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1059
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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