The East Carolinian, February 9, 1995







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February 9,1995
Vol 69, No. 74
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
Greenville offers culture
Photo Courtesy of Kenji Fujrnaga
While many students stayed close to home for the holidays, students like Kenji Fujrnaga,
whose family resides in Japan, traveled 7,000 miles alone to get a second look at
California. Here, he rests outside of Giradelli Square in San Francisco.
Japanese students
travel far to see
the land of
opportunity
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
So, you thought leaving home
to come to Greenville was difficult?
Try leaving from halfway around the
world. For three students at ECU,
leaving their homes in Japan wasn't
difficult, instead it was the opportu-
nity of a lifetime.
Kenji Fujmaga's hometown is
in Hiroshima, but he attended col-
lege in Osaka until 1987 and then
worked for the next six years for a
trading company before coming to
America. He is a graduate student
here working toward an MBA in busi-
ness.
"My mother is a kindergarten
teacher back home and heard about
ECU from a friend Fujrnaga said.
"I chose to come here because it's
not a big city and I like the climate,
but the business school was the main
reason
See CULTURE page 4
Earthquake
victims seek help
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
Exchange: Japan has placed
270 Japanese instructors in nearly
150 universities and colleges across
North America since 1986. Of the
instructors cur-
rently in the pro-
gram, six are from
Kobe City, with
family and friends
back home in need
of relief. Unfortu-
nately, a couple of
participant's
relative's homes
have been de-
stroyed and every-
one has broken dishes.
In order to alleviate some of
the devastation, Exchange: Japan
has set up an earthquake fund to
be sent to the residents of Kobe and
surrounding devastated areas.
"As of Tuesday, over 175
people have donated almost
$4,000 said Celia Gargaro, pro-
gram associate for Exchange: Japan.
"Donations have come in from in-
structors currently in the program.
alumni of the program and people
in our area
Exchange: Japan has re-
quested donations starting from
$10 but, "any dollar amount is ap-
preciated,a Gargaro said. What
ever people feel comfortable with
The funds are being sent to
the Asahi
S h i m b u s ,
Japan's largest
newspaper, and
as of Tuesday,
the first $4,000
was wired there.
The do-
nation money is
"As of Tuesday,
over 175 people
have donated
almost $4,000
-Celia Gargaro u"
things from
clothing to high-
way reconstruction Gargaro said.
Exchange: Japan is still ac-
cepting donations from anyone
willing to help. They should be sent
to: Exchange: Japan. P.O. Box
1166, Ann Arbor, MI 48106.
Checks should be made payable to
the Exchange: Japan. Earthquake
Fund.
For further information call
Exchange: Japan at (313) 665-
1820.
Man of the Year named
Jack Edwards
Founder of local
merchant chosen
as Pitt County
Man of the Year
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Jack Edwards has accomplished
quite a bit in his 70 years. Edwards was
commended for his efforts last month
when he was named Pitt-Greenville's
Chamber of Commerce 1994 Man of the
Year.
Founder of University Hook &
Exchange (UBE), Edwards has done ev-
erything from presiding over Greenville's
Rotary Club to swimming competitively.
A W ��'Id War II veteran. Edwards lived
in Greenville most of his life, leaving tor
Chapel Hill in 1946 to go to school.
ill tell you exactly why I did it
Edwards explained. "I went to ECTC
(East Carolina Teachers College). I was
drafted at 18 when I got out of the
army I had the GI Bill
Edwards got his degree in jour-
nalism from tJNC.
"I majored in journalism, then I
realized if I made it - I'd have to go to a
big city Edwards said.
When he decided Greenville was
the place he wanted to call home,
Edwards went into the auto parts busi-
ness with his father. Edwards wrote a
newspaper column for The Daily Reflec-
torfor five years and attended East Caro-
lina College for graduate school.
"When I got my master's in busi-
ness, they asked me to teach Edwards
said. "I got my master's on a Thursday
and started teaching the next Tuesday
Edwards has owned six businesses
at one time in Greenville and claims del-
egation is the key to being successful in
business.
Edwards said he attributes his
success to his family.
"My greatest asset is my family,
especially my wife he said. "We were
the only people in the class of '42 that
married each other and never had a date
in high school Edwards told the tale of
how he won his wife's heart
The guy she was in love with
in high school, they
ended up being en-
gaged he recalled.
"i wrote in her high
school annual if H.R.
ever steps aside, look
out"
Edwards later
learned his future
wife Rachel and her
fiance had broken up
while he was away at
war.
"I got back
from the army and
"1 love East Carolina Edwards
said. "A lot (�f people who go to Carolina,
they're blood turns to light blue, mine
never did - it's always been purple
Edwards attends most ECU games
and has been president of the Pirate Club.
"Right now I'm loving the scouts
Edwards said. He was the Hoy Scouts'
Distinguished Citizen of the Year in 1992.
Edwards stays busy with the Boy
Scouts, spending time with his family,
drinking coffee with his buddies and
swimming.
"I'm a competitive swimmer. I
swim at least five times a week he said.
"1 swam in the senior games. I hold four
state records
Edwards re-
mains involved in
Greenville. The list
of Edwards" achieve-
ments spans three
pages: he was given
an Award of Merit
from the American
Radio Relay League
for his amateur ra-
dio operations fol-
lowing the hurri-
cane Hazel disaster.
He has been presi-
Dance fever!
"A lot of people
who go to
Carolina, they're
blood turns light
blue, mine never
did � it's always
been purple

m
Photo by HAROLD WISE
During halftime of each home game, the Pure Gold Dancers entertain the crowd with
their dance routines. Don't miss the Pirates and the Pure Gold Dancers at the next
home game at 7 p.m Feb. 18 against William and Mary.
round out they had
broken up. it took 11
months from that
time to get her to the altar
Edwards was a sophomore at I INC
when his first child was bom.
"We had no money, no car and
lived in one room Edwards said. He
waited on tables to support his family.
Edwards said at that point, becoming
Man of the Year was far from his mind.
"I was hoping to be able to sup-
port a wife and a family Edwards said.
It was a weird feeling - here was this
beautiful baby, and I'm looking at this
wonderful miracle and saying 'how am I
ever going to pay for college for this kid?
Education has always been high
on Edwards' priority list
"College really concerned me at
the birth of both of our children
Edwards said.
The man who once struggled to
get through college has helped provide
an education tor many students at ECU.
UBE has given away more than 147
scholarships since 1983.
- lack Edwards dent of the Rotary
Club, held several
positions in the or-
ganization and chaired several commit-
tees.
He was the first recipient of
Greenville's Small Businessman of the
year Award and the first recipient of the
Rotary Senior Citizen of the Year Award.
Edwards also held several positions with
Greenville's Jaycees, and stays involved
with numerous community projects in-
cluding chairing the Redevelopment
Commission and being president of Rose
High School's Booster Club.
Edwards has also helped raise
millions of dollars tor ECU.
Awards and honors adorn all four
walls of Edwards' office in UBE. At least
50 swimming metals are also hung on
the walls, as well as a picture of his fam-
ily.
Edwards has a son and a daugh-
ter. His son Don went to UNC and now
runs UBE: his daughter Nancy gradu-
ated from ECU.
Grad. school enrollment up
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Despite overall enrollment de-
creases, more older faces are being
seen around campus. As of the fall of
1994, graduate student enrollment,
including medical students, reached
3,070.
According to information in the
1993-94 ECU Fact Book, graduate
school enrollment has increased ev-
ery fall since 1990. In fall 1990, 2,693
graduate students were enrolled at
ECU, 2,807 in fall 1991, 2,913 in fall
1992 and 2,959 in fall 1993.
"There has been a steady in-
crease over the years from about the
'8889 academic years to the '9495
academic year, and we expect that
increase to continue in graduate stu-
dents said Dr. Therese Uawler, in-
terim associate vice chancellor for
research and dean of the graduate
school.
Uawler attributes the increase
in graduate school enrollment to sev-
eral factors.
"I think people are returning to
graduate school after being out in the
work world to a larger extent than
before Uawler said. "We have an in-
creasing number of older graduate
students who have been out of bacca-
laureate programs for 10 to 15 years
who realize that they would like to
have an area of specialization in which
they are current.
"They very often are looking for
a mid-life career change and coming
back to graduate school is one way to
enable that Uawler said. "I think we
have maybe a constant number of stu-
dents who go right from baccalaure-
ate t" graduate programs, our in
crease is greater in the older gradu-
ate students
Uawler said she feels the gradu-
ate school is improving in overall qual-
ity as more programs are being offered
for graduate students to pursue.
"We are. in fact, hopefully go
ing to have three new graduate pro
grams that will admit students for the
first time next fall she said. 'We have
already gotten a masters in anthro-
pology approved by the board of gov-
ernors and UNC general administra-
tion.
"We are in the process now ol
having a masters in computer science
and a masters in economics approved
See GRAD page 3
4&fle
VtMieU
Crosswords� you asked for em, you got 'empage
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tundcuf,
Find out what the future has in store for youpage O
Baseball team faces challenging seasonpage
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Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6538
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from Joyner





Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
�iiiiii'fi iTt� '
CRIIpSENE
February 2
Assault - A swim coach was assaulted at Minges pool by a student
who was cut from the swim team.
Tampering with a motor vehicle - ECU police observed two stu-
dents removing a license plate from a vehicle parked in the Fourth and
Reade Streets parking lot.
February 3
Breaking and enteringlarceny - An officer observed a student
getting out of a Jeep in the Fourth and Reade Streets parking lot and
hiding an object under his coat. When approached by the officer, the
suspect ran. The officer stopped him and found stolen property on the
student.
February 4
Assist Greenville PD - A Greenville police officer requested infor-
mation concerning a student found in the city under the influence of an
LSD drug overdose. The student was transported to Pitt Memorial Hospi-
tal.
Damage to property - A student was issued a state citation and
campus appearance ticket for breaking the glass portion of a bulletin
board in the lobby of White Hall.
February 5
Simple assault - A non-student was arrested in Mendenhall's So-
cial Room after striking a student in the upper body with his fist.
Possession of stolen property, resisting arrest and damage to prop-
erty - A non-student was observed discharging a fire extinguisher on
several vehicles parked west of Mamie Jenkins Building. The non-student
was apprehended west of Joyner Library. He was arrested.
February 6
Breaking and enteringlarceny - Residents in Aycock Hall reported
the breaking and entering of their room. A compact disc player, several
CDs, books and other items were taken from the room.
February 7
Assist rescue � A student was transported to Pitt Memorial after
he had a seizure at Christenbury Memorial Gym Pool. The student fell in
the water during the seizure, but was pulled to safety by another student.
Compiled by Tambra Zion.
Taken from official ECU police reports.
Students could get tax credits
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Tax time. It's approaching and
the clock is ticking. Some ECU stu-
dents who have jobs may qualify for
a new tax break.
Initially, the Earned Income
Tax Credit. (EITC) was created then
passed in Congress in 1975 for
people who earn such a low amount
of money that they do not owe any
income tax to the government. With
EITC, people could still claim credit
and get a return check.
Juanita Broadnax, public af-
fairs officer for the district office for
the Internal Revenue Service in
Greensboro, NC, said the EITC had
expanded this year to include more
people, ones who are without chil-
dren and who are not considered
anyone else's dependent
"This year if you earned less
than $9,000, have no children, are
at least 25 to 64 then you can claim
this Earned Income Tax Credit
Broadnax said.
The maximum credit this per-
son could receive from the govern-
ment would be $306.
Other ways to claim EITC are
if a person has one child living with
him or her for more than six months
and earns less than
$23, 755 or if a per-
son has two or more
children and earns
less than $25, 296.
Broadnax
said students are
likely to fill out the
1040EZ tax forms.
"Usually, the
1040EZ form is the
simplest form
Broadnax said. "On
that one, the person
earns below
$50,000 and has no
dependents
Also, married
couples who file a
joint return but have no children can
use the 1040EZ form.
Forms that other people are
familiar with and use are the 1040A
and the 1040.
Today, students do not have to
mail their returns in but have a few
options.
Broadnax said people can file
their returns electronically within the
next few weeks
by going to des-
ignated, local
IRS walk-in loca-
tions.
"The error
rate is lower for
electronically
filed returns
Broadnax said.
"It is safer and
more accurate
than mailing it
Another
option is by using
the 1040PC com-
puterized tax
form on personal
computers.
Broadnax said that people who use
their personal computers cannot get
the needed software from IRS loca-
tions.
"This year if you
earned less than
$9,000, have no
children, are at
least 25 to 64 then
you can claim this
Earned Income
Tax Credit
� Juanita Broadnax
"You have to go to a software
store to get that Broadnax said.
Students who have trouble fill-
ing out tax forms can get help by go-
ing to an IRS walk-in office.
"The walk-in office will help
you for free Broadnax said. "We
don't charge for that help
In Greenville, the walk-in office
is located in the Riverview Building
at 101 West First Street and is
opened from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Also, students who have
changed addresses and have not re-
ceived their tax packets in the mail
or are filing for the first time can get
the packets at the walk-in office.
Broadnax said the individual
has to decide whether or not to do
his or her own tax form or to seek
professional assistance.
"Well, that's up to the person
and the type of form you are filling
out Broad;lax said.
For more IRS information, stu-
dents can call the toll-free number
1-800-829-1040, Mondays through
Fridays between 7:30 a.m. and 5:30
p.m.
New support programs offered
Jeff Lee
Staff Writer
As the student population at
ECU grows, so does the need for var-
ied and improved student counseling
programs. The ECU Counseling Cen-
ter has identified these needs by of-
fering new and expanded programs for
the Spring semester, including work-
shops for Adult Children of Alcohol-
ics, Sexual Abuse and Anger Manage-
ment.
The counseling center will of-
fer three-part workshops for Adult
Children of Alcoholics (ACOA) and
female sexual abuse survivors in an
effort to help students resolve prob-
lems that cause emotional distress and
interfere with personal goals and aca-
demic success.
The ACOA workshop is struc-
tured to help show students how the
dysfunctional alcoholic family affected
them then and how it impacts their
life right now. The three-part work-
shop is scheduled to include informa-
tion about family roles, alcoholism and
to suggest goals.
The Sexual Abuse Survivors
Workshop for female survivors will
also be a three-part workshop that will
deal with emotional and psychologi-
cal issues stemming from childhood
sexual abuse or incest This workshop
will also deal with family behaviors,
rules and roles with attention to how
these affect current relationships and
personality.
Anger Management Support
Group, a five-part workshop, will pro-
vide support and help for students
that have difficulty managing their
anger especially with others. Con-
structive anger management will be
the focus with an emphasis on under-
standing feelings, beliefs and reactions
involved with anger.
"We find that we have a lot of
students that lose their temper and
break something or hit somebody and
get sanctioned and that doesn't feel
so good said Dr. Will Ball, director
of the ECU Counseling Center.
"What we try to do is offer the
student a way to deal with the anger
before it gets to far out of hand
The counseling center also of-
fers individual counseling to students
that have personal or individual needs.
"I was in a very co-dependent
relationship for almost two years, and
it got so bad that I had to get help
from an outside source other than my
friends to make me see that I was in a
very destructive relationship said
Mike, a senior communications stu-
dent
"I had one 50 minute session a
week for about six weeks, and it
helped me tremendously. Sometimes
you need someone to help pull you
outside of the problem so you can get
a clear view of what's really going on
The counseling center also has
many support groups and counseling
See SUPPORT page 3
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t m
Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
International travel becomes possibility for students
Chance offered to
see the world,
learn the culture
Ben Duran
Staff Writer
Many ECU students do not
think they ever stand a chance to
see the world, but a new educa-
tional program is making it more
likely. Europeska Ferieskolan (EF)
International Language Schools
offer educational travel programs
allowing students to learn French
in France, German in Germany.
Spanish in Spain and Italian in
Italy.
"With a network of 20 lan-
guage schools and 35 admissions
offices worldwide. EF is the larg-
est and one of the most experienced
private educational organizations
in the world said Lynne Kadela.
an admissions officer for EF. "The
school provides an opportunity for
people who want language immer-
sion, it is an invaluable experience
for people who want to actually live
the language said Kadela.
Kadela is a graduate of Si-
enna College in New York and a
former student at the EF office in
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Books
Postcards
Nice. France. She currently works
in their Cambridge. Mass. admis-
sions office.
"My experience in France was
wonderful, travel is what I love
Kadela said.
While learning their particu-
lar language of interest, students
have the choice of living with na-
tive families or in university resi-
dence halls.
"Most of the students are ei-
ther between college and graduate
school or between high school and
college, and many plan to go on and
teach the language that they
study Kadela said.
EF offers specialized courses
which range in both ability level
and duration of stay. The courses
can be as short as a two-week lan-
guage vacation, or as long as an
academic year abroad.
"The majority of programs
are short-term, some people save up
for it like a vacation, but some stu-
dents take out loans and pay for it
that way too Kadela said.
An academic year abroad
costs between $9,100and SI 1,600,
depending on where vou plan to
study. The two-week courses are
just under $1,000. but that in-
cludes educational materials, a
place to stay and two meals a day.
"We"re developing a program
where we're going to try and give
one or two trips away each year,
but it is still in its formative stages
Kadela said.
EF has not been accredited by
a university, so getting credits for
the program here at ECU is not
guaranteed.
"We are in the process of get-
ting accredited Kadela said.
"Right now we are looking at sev-
eral schools, but we haven't made
a decision yet. Students have got
credit in the past, but you have to
go to your advisor and show them
the curriculum and your certifi-
cate
Not only does EF offer stu-
dents an opportunity to see the
world, but it gives them a chance
to meet the peonle who make up
the world.
"The best thing about EF is
that you meet people from around
the world, right now there are only
2 North American students in the
Academic Year Abroad Program
said Kadela.
For more information about
EF's study abroad programs and
language vacations call 1-800-992-
1892 between 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m
or send them a fax at (617) 252
62(�7.
GRAD
SUPPORT from page 2
from coping with the loss of a loved
one. gay lesbian and bisexual students
to classes designed to help students
decide on a major.
The counseling center is accred-
ited by the international Association
of Counseling Services and staff mem-
bers belong to the American Coun-
seling Association, the American Psy-
chological Association as well as spe-
cialty organizations.
Anv student interested in indi-
vidual counseling or support groups
can stop by the counseling center lo-
cated at 316 Wright Building or call
328-6661 to set up an appointment.
"The students really do use the
center as a resource, we probably see
around 100 people individually and
between 1000 and 1200 students in
groups or classes Ball said. "We're
here in a support capacity
Last .ame was omitted to pro-
tect privacy of source.
from page 1
we are going to submit a proposal
to establish a doctorate in coastal re-
sources management sometime in the
next academic year
Lawler said graduate schools
are only as strong as their faculty. She
pointed out that several ECU faculty
members teaching graduate classes
have national and-international repu-
tations in their fields.
Despite the increase in gradu-
ate enrollment, the majority of the
graduate school students did not re-
ceive undergraduate degrees from
ECU. According to Lawler. 70 percent
of the students enrolled in graduate
school attended other institutions for
their undergraduate studies. Lawler
attributes this to the increased num-
ber of older students coming bark to
graduate school.
While other universities across
the United States are seeing increases
in graduate school enrollment. 1-awler
said most of them are not seeing as
large of an increase as ECU.
"I think-the reputation of the
.university in graduate studies has
been growing and growing and grow-
ing and has a very positive reputation,
and now, our catchmen area for gradu-
ate students is becoming interna-
tional Lawler said.
Lawler said the graduate school
also is doing active recruiting for the
first time.
"We have an assistant dean for
the graduate school who has come on
board in a half-time capacity in the
fall, and he is developing a marketing
plan for the recruitment of graduate
students and has indeed made many
visits to small liberal arts campuses
Lawler said. "He has also gone to all
of the predominantly black schools in
the university system, because we are
certainly looking to attract a greater
minority presence in our graduate
enrollment.
"We should see that increase go
up even more sharply in the next few
years, because we are doing now some
intensive recanting, we are doing joint
recruiting with the admissions also
�D
ALLEY
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East Carolina Playhouse
presents
Mike Cross &
Leo Kottke
TrftB
&e
anAfy
se
�f Darnel Rocket
February 9, 10, 11, 13 and 14, 1995 at 8:00 p.m.
February 12, 1995 at 2:00 p.m.
&.
McGinnis Theatre
East Carolina University
Main Campus
Call-328-6829
General Public:7.50
ECU Students: S 4.50
Children:4.50
i c r 8:00PM K, r
Monday, February Id,1995
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tickets are (Male It the Central TSeltet Office!
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Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmammum
CULTURE from page 1
Before starting school here,
Fujrnaga had already visited the
United States four times "I'd been to
Hawaii, California. Washington. D.C
and New York He liked California
so much that over Christmas break,
he packed up his "cheap and problem-
prone" car and made the 7.000-mile
round trip back there. "The trip was
very exciting but a little lonely he
.said.
Upon graduation (�hopefully in
two years"). Fujrnaga would like to
move out West, "but I'm excited to go
back to Japan also he said.
In the meantime. Fujrnaga en-
joys playing tennis when he can. "I
play about once a week he said, and
going to Raleigh for "real good food
Like many people in America,
Fujrnaga has friends in Kobe. Japan,
the site of last month's 7.2 earthquake
that destroyed most of the city in 20
seconds.
"I have no family there but my
friends that are there are all okay
he said.
Another student here also has
ties to Kobe. Yoshiyuki Yasui. an un-
dergraduate majoring in communica-
tion, is from Kobe and his parents and
grandparents still live there.
"My grandparents house was
totally destroyed, but my parents
home is okay said Yasui. "Right now.
my grandparents are living with my
parents until they can find an apart-
ment to move into
"They his family tell me every-
thing is collapsed, so I'm curious to
see what it's like. I plan to go home
and visit during summer vacation if
the transportation is okay and I can
get to my home
Until then. Yasui will continue
to go to classes and enjoy his time in
Greenville. "My aunt and uncle live
here, and they told me about ECU. I
was interested in the world out there,
and America is very international in
terms of mixed cultures he said.
In order to grasp the English
language better, Yasui spent three
months at Guilford College to learn
his second language. Then he went
to Pitt Community College for two
years before transferring to ECU last
fall. He too, has approximately two
more years left until graduation.
Then he would like to go back
Japan and work for "TV, radio or
magazine. Anything in the media he
said.
But while he is in America,
Yasui enjoys playing tennis and bas-
ketball and writing in Japanese. He
also loves watching movies. "My goal
is to watch 200 movies while I'm here,
but right now I'm at about 30
He has also done some travel-
ing. "I've been to Boston and Provi-
dence and I went to New York with
the ECU trip. I also traveled to At-
lanta and Florida and went to Disney
World
i liked it there, but it was very
expensive he said, jokingly.
Another student enjoying her
stay here is Japanese instructor and
sociology graduate student Tomoko
Ueda. Unlike Fujrnaga and Yasui.
Ueda is a member of an international
exchange program called Exchange:
Japan.
Exchange: Japan is an organiza-
tion incorporated in Michigan which
provides Japanese language training
for high school and college teachers
of Japanese. In exchange for their
teaching, American schools provide
room, board and further education.
Ueda teaches two levels of Japa-
nese in addition to pursuing her gradu-
ate degree in Sociology and working as
an assistant in the department
In Japan, Ueda received her un-
dergraduate degree in Italian. Using her
knowledge of the language to her ad-
vantage. Ueda was put in charge of the
Italian division of a Japanese trading
company.
"After about two years, I lost in-
terest in it she said. "Then I saw an
advertisement in a newspaper about
Exchange: Japan.
"Even though I had no choice as
to where I could go. I like it here, espe
dally my students
While in Greenville, Ueda enjoys
cooking and the pleasure of teaching
her native language to her students. She
also enjoys going to her own classes and
assisting in her department.
Since arriving here in August she
has traveled to Atlanta but looks for-
ward to "seeing more of the country
soon
Ueda plans to receive her master
degree in Spring 1996 and hopes to
work for a foundation that sets up other
programs like the Exchange. Japan pro-
gram.
"Everything here has been a
great experience for me she said.
WE GLADLY
ACCEPT
FOOD
STAMPS
Hamsfeeter
CAROLINA
OWNED
AND
OPERATED
SINCE 1936
IVALENTINE
Stuffed Balloons
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WE DELIVER
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34
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PARTYMAKERS
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Beside Brake Shop
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Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dances 1 lpm-larr
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�Contestants need to call register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
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$Dancers wanted$
A 'xTouck oi C�asa
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$5
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0
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We dd fta Baehdor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Parties & Divorces
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
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Hunter Farms Truly Merita
Chocolate 200 Sweet 16 Sugar
Milki aV& Donuts
1
tss
M
�m
In The
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Buy One 8 Inch
Cherry Pie
Get One
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. LD. Required
GREAT VALUE LOW PRICES
m
MexicanRestauian
Selected Varieties
Duncan
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16 oz.
-f 09
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11:00-3:00
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V&T
Duncan Hines
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Selected
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18.25-
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oz.
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Regular
Root Beer i
2 Liter
OB
ea.
18"
f Valentine
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Cherry
Ll00 Heart Shaped
J Donuts
Prices Effective Through Feb. 14,1995
Prices In In Ad Effective Wednesday. Februarj I Through February 7. iw In ,� Greem.lle Stores
mo None Sold To Dealers WeGladh ocept Federal Food Stamps
Only Wc Reserve IV Right 1 I ilmit Quwitii





5

Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
4
Our View
� �.� ' "
We think it's time
to pay a bit more
attention to the
graduate
students. We're
not asking for
much � just
some housing!
They are as
much a part of
this university as
any freshman, so
let's help them
out. Think about
it � then they
might be tempted
to donate money
once they're
millionaires!
When entering college as a freshman, there was one
thing we all could be sure of - our housing and our meal
plan. Our parents wouldn't dare have let us out of their
sight without a guaranteed three meals a day and a safe
roof over our heads, especially one that didn't include
members of the opposite sex.
While the thought of living on campus mortifies many
students who have entered the world of apartment living,
it did once provide a "safety-net" (so to speak). When ev-
erything else seems to be drastically changing around us,
one thing remained stable, our dorm life. Pardon moi, our
residence hall life.
When it seemed frustrating that we had to usher out
our significant others at 1 p.m or when we couldn't drink
a beer in the privacy of our own dorm - er residence hall
room, we could be sure of one thing, that room would
always be there, as would be our roommate and our resi-
dence hall adviser. Although having a guardian seemed a
little too close to home, it was calming to know there was
someone who knew a little more about downtown, regis-
tering or acquiring a football ticket right down the hall.
This nicety isn't so nice for students who come to ECU
as graduate students, or worse yet, as older, non-traditional
students. During the 1993-94 school year, there were 2,959
graduate students at ECU. With graduate students mak-
ing up nearly one-fifth of the student population, one would
think their housing situation had been considered. Sure,
they could live in the dorms, but how would you feel as an
18-year-old freshman to have a 24-year-old roommate, or
worse, a 50-year-old, non-traditional, student roommate?
This type of culture shock can ruin a freshman's first-year
experience. Many of these students were all but dying to
get away from home and the chaperone scene.
Not all graduate students are natives of ECU or
Greenville. In fact, most of these graduate students or older
students are as lost as that timid 18-year-old freshman who
peeked into your door one late August afternoon. Find-
ing the cashier's office, the athletic ticket office or per-
haps General Classroom may be a feat in itself for these
students, but unfortunately it isn't as easy for them to
turn to their newly acquired roommate and ask for some
help.
Perhaps providing a residence hall for older students
is not the obvious answer, but their needs should be con-
sidered as the needs of other non-traditional students needs
are being considered. The necessities of honor students
have been answered with the all-honors Fleming Hall, and
students with health problems such as asthma are given
priority to air-conditioned residence halls. Simply because
a student is older does not mean they are wiser or any
more comfortable starting a new quest at a new school.
Watch the heart goggles!
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Prison
100
recycled
paper
Stephanie B. L assitcr News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryi Marsh, Asst Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Danlel,Secretary
serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Edftorjhe East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Are cultural roots dying?
Art in America is in a state of
steady decline. The arts have dimin-
ished considerable in comparison to
the importance they held 20 or 30
years ago. Are the arts still an impor-
tant cultural undertaking for Ameri-
cans in this decade or is our society
witnessing the progressive deteriora-
tion of its artistic expression and its
creative freedom?
Before answering this, question,
I should label those areas that consti-
tute the so-called "arts Traditionally,
the arts have consisted of music,
drama, visual arts, literature and
dance. Since there are a number of
styles and variations within each cat-
egory. I have listed general area rather
than attempt to give a detailed analy-
sis of each one. Obviously, there are
several t,pcs of music, dance, etc.
While it maybe true that there
is a continuing output in each area,
the types of things that are being cre-
ated should be viewed cautiously. I
am in no way trying to assert my sub-
jective belief that certain kinds of art
are better than others. This attitude
would be intellectual snobuery. How-
ever, I do feel that the creative pro-
cess is one of continued self-discov-
ery and experimentation and not
merely churning out a finished prod-
uct.
The so-called "Music Industry"
turns out, or should I say churns out
dozens of records every year that
make the pop charts for a few weeks
before being relegated to the discard
bin at your local music store. Mean-
while, members of the leading orches-
tra and jazz groups in America, many
of who have studied and practiced
countless hours at some of the
nation's top-notch schools, are sitting
in rehearsals preparing and refining
performances of some of the world's
Joshua White
Opinion Columnist
So many
avenues of
history throug
art are being
ignored daily.
R
mam
greatest and most long existing musi-
cal creations.
The public library is a store-
house of some of the greatest works
penned by humankind. One can spend
hours going through the stacks and
discovering a wealth of ideas and ad-
ventures secured between the pages
of these volume. American writers,
foreign writers, religion, science, fic-
tion and non-fiction-all of these exhila-
rating subjects awaiting our attention.
Instead, one can sit home and read
the latest issue of Better Homes and
Gardens or read about people's imag-
ined sexual experiences in tawdry pe-
riodicals with names that are offen-
sive in polite company.
Nowadays, people are so intent
on relying on immediate and catchy
diversions that they neglect to get in
touch with their cultural heritage and
elements that make that heritage spe-
cial. Most importantly, people are al-
lowing Hollywood and our society's
bogus commercial sensations to re-
place their personal right to exercise
individual creativity or enjoy more
enriching experiences during their
free time.
Another problem affecting ouii
society's attitude towards the arts is
its blind faith in the government's
ability to iudfie what is art and whafr
is not. Government officials like Jesse;
Helms are continually begrudging
money from the arts and citing ex
ample of eccentric artists such as
Robert Mapplethorpe to make a?
strong argument against funding for-
worthwhile organizations like the
National Endowment for the Arts
(NEA). Faulty reasoning like that used
by Helms helps to impede other art-
ists who are not interested in contro-
versy but just wish to practice their ,
craft with perhaps a little support-
from their government
We have a crisis in America to
day. Our society has lost touch with
its humanity and its feelings. Every
one is susceptible to the rising tide of �
apathy and helplessness that is invad
ing the general welfare. I believe that,
this present condition is an example
of what happens when human exprasv
sions and needs take a back seat to
economic and selfish personal gains.
The way a society expresses itself cul-
turally and artistically tells much
about the happiness and well-being of.
the members of that society. America
is not happy and it is definitely not
fulfilled artistically or otherwise.
America's concert halls and
stages are becoming museums while'
people sit back idly allowing their
cultural root to die out What kind
of artistic legacy will we as Ameri
cans have left to leave our children
television and video games? If we do'
not take the time to preserve what'
we have created and continue to cre-
ate, what will we have to show for all,
the suffering and meaninglessness of
life?
EH Letters to the Editor
r
Since Valentine's Day is com-
ing up next Tuesday I feel that I
should warn those single people
out there who are feeling left out
to beware of Valentine's hallucina-
tions.
These hallucinations work on
basically the same principle as beer
goggling. The difference is that
massive amounts of Hallmark cards
and red paper hearts instead of
Budweiser cause people to over-es-
timate the attractiveness (inner and
outer) of the people around them.
Maybe there is some guy or
girl (man or woman, he-freak or
she-freak, whatever you prefer to be
called) in one of your classes that
has caught your eye. Or maybe
there is a neighbor or an acquain-
tance you haven't really paid atten-
tion to before, but ever since the
grocery store put out those displays
of candy hearts with cutesy mes-
sages on them, you've been seeing
something somehow different about
them. This is probably a Valentine's
Day hallucination which will disap-
pear with the red streamers and
heart-shaped doilies on Feb 15.
Before you do something rash like
sending your Valentine's crush a
single red rose and an invitation to
'be yours think about the story I
am about to relate.
A friend of mine, we'll call her
Cupid's Victim or C.V for short, de-
veloped a crush on a guy she had
Andi Powell Phillips
Opinion Columnist
Blind hope
could lead to
mushy tacos
and vino a la
lasagna not
an anniversary.
never talked to before,
but had seen around campus. She
had Valentine's fever, so when she
found herself in line with him at
the cafeteria she invited him .to
have lunch with her, hoping it
might lead to a Valentine's date. It
was all very romantic until he be-
gan mashing up his iaco. shell and
all, and spooning it into his choco-
late milk. He shared his fondest
dreams and aspirations with C.V.
while slurping bits of soggy ground
beef and tortilla shell through a
straw.
Needless to say that
Valentine's date never happened.
But just imagine if C.V. hadn't
found out about her Prince Charm-
ing in time! She might have made
that date, gotten all dressed up and
gone out to a romantic little Ital-
ian restaurant only to find him
mushing up his lasagna and dump-
ing it into his wine glass!
I don't mean to sound like a
Valentine's grinch, I actually think
it's a great holiday if you're already
with someone. But Valentine's is
one of those occasions like your
senior prom and New Year's Eve
when expectations almost always
far exceed reality. You should just
stop and think before you send that
20 pound box of chocolates, do you
really want a valentine that badly?
One iast thing, if you really
are pining for someone and you
know it's not just something in the
air this time of year, go ahead and
do it! Ask them out, send a silly
card-you never know. And if you
do, maybe my husband and I will
see you out on the town. We'll be
celebrating the fifth anniversary of
our first date.
To the Editor:
1 am writing in regard to a cer-
tain student section in the renovated
Williams Arena at Minges. The one
section in particular (in between the
two teams' benches and behind the
scorer's table) stands out amongst the
others. A near handful of want-to-be
Duke Blue Devil fans, yelling and
screaming profanity at the opposing
teams, coaches, and referees.
I believe team and school spirit
is healthy, along with some minor
heckling as well, but the people in this
section are absolute goons. There
seems to be a leader to this clan of
idiots, whom I have personally seen
yelling obscenities and performing
absurd hand gestures toward the
court. This is uncalled for, and I am
totally embarrassed when I see this
kid yelling at the other teams, his head
swelling until it's about to explode.
If I was visiting here from an-
other school, county, state, or coun1
try, I would have to say the section
behind the scorer's table acts like
fools. Unfortunately, they stand out
and take away from the student body
as a whole, giving us a bad name and
reputation. To sum it up, just don't"
do this. j�
Kent Linkner
Junior
EXSS
1
To The Editor:
I'm writing in response to
Maureen Rich's article which ap-
peared in the Jan. 31 issue of TEC.
I'm in total agreement with the RHA
and their views on political correct-
ness and think that in addition to
substituting "residence hall" for
"dorm" we should also consider a few
other changes that could make our
school seem more "homelike" and
"educational
For exampl, we shall no longer
refer to "College Hill" simply as "The
Hill" anymore, but instead we should
use the term "the brothers and sister
whom we wish were closer" when we
SDeak of those of us who live over
here. A more loving atmosphere seems
to congeal as result. We can also
change the nasty reputation our
school has acquired by no longer us-
ing the terms "partying" or "going
downtown
We now "attend public forums
of consumption held by various com-
mittees We also no loner "cut class
however one might "seek enlighten-
ment from within" And guys, we shall
cease use of words like "babe" or
"chick" when we refer to women; they
sould be called "goddess' of fertility
And if women were not aware of it
guys do not "lie" although we might
"tell elaborate variations of the mat
ter at hand But let us not stop there j
NO! NO! Women no longer have a j
"vagina" but possess "the essence otg
beauty at its greatest strength Men,
also have no "penis but now have
acquired an "organic tool used for
stimulation 4'
I would like to invite the entire"
student body to take part in using
these new and improved terms so that-
we can make everything sound bet-7!
ter without actually having to do any
thing at all. Dorm, dorm, dorm, dorm
dorm, dorm! �
Chris Searcy
Sophomore
Hey! If you want to write a letter to the editor, that's great
But we do have a few rules. Read em!
The East Carolinian welcomes all Letters to the Editor. However,
all letters, In order fo be considered for publication, must be
typed, under 250 words, and contain your name, class rank,
major and a working daytime phone number. Send these to:
Letters to the Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg
ECU, Greenville, NX. 278584353.

;
.
wmmmmmmm.





c .man,q loos The East Carolinian
Thursday, February v, two
NICK O'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
PHOEBE
rfSuSSw APRIL Hff-M'
O'CLOCK PM. A BAL N16HT,
TUE KiNO OV N'GHT MAKES A
BOD CURL UP WITH A 8CTTUE
OF T"uNDE91R� AND A GOOD
PAL AND GWE THE UJOR.P
��COCkEVEP" NEW MEAKiG
TTf I HAP NO SUCH�au5lOKS.
X WAS vjjRAPP"& up A
LOH& TtRM PROitCT AND
HAO NO TIME TO MUDDLE
AftOONO-
"What's Your . vumc�c4 ty
W PIGS COVLP FLV
"ZpZ uow&ht ant 11
'PROMISE M'f �t
BY PAUL HAGWOOD
"V DiOwV HAVE A, cwovce 5ut TO &O :t I
fK WCfif A.LREATN -PCLE wAmvJ AMI
UAiTiN-rne-oAc
v.HAt .S-THAT
soul vie &$??�
Aauarius (Jan. 20-Feb 1ft)
Oh. to be an Aquarius today. Hold out your hands. Do
a jig and yell "HOSANNA Give the mirror a big soul
kiss. Make sure nobody's watching. What was once a
menacing, hulking threat is now of no consequence.
. laces (Feb. 19-March 20;
You're doomed today. You didn't see it coming, did
you? Damned if you &, dawned if you don't. Gravity
is not your friend. Fear not. little soldier. There's still
time to run, run. run! QoUacWo your little warm nest,
get under the cover and Stay there until tomorrow.
Aries (Mar 21- April 19)
You'll find yourself biting your tongue. A little restraint
here, a lot there, makes for a surprisingly pleasant
day. And a sore tongue. Reward yourself. Go get
some ice cream, and in this particular case, lose
control.
Taurus (April 20- May 20)
You have something they want. The flattery is
wonderful, the praise sounds almost genuine, the
hopeful smiles seem so warm. Itmakes you feei
terrific all over. Believe every word of it and don't give
them a thing.
Gemini (May 21- June 21)
Avoid such fate-tempting phrases as "piece of cake"
today. And no "swearing up-and-down" either. There
will be good news from afar-in the form of a snow-
ball. The stars are in your favor�whoever tagged you
might just be your soulmate.
Leo (July 23- Aug. 22)
Those who attempt to undermine your leonine authority
will be thrown to the den. You have many people on your
side. A veritable cheerieading squad. You'll give them a
hearty thankssay it with pasta.
Virgo (Aug. 23- Sept. 21;
A drama unfolds. There's scandal�melee, riots, food
fights, heated, catty exchanges. You're living in Melrose
Place. Don't cave in to all your wicked urges. Watch out
for fire hazards. Check Robert's Rules of Order and let
the cooler heads prevail.
Libra (Sept
y-
ct. 23)
"Oh, those deliberate fools you find yourself saying. You
find that you understand what people are saying mosf of
the time. Sometimes it sounds like utter nonsense.
Swallow your pride, quit nodding and ask "What in the
world are you talking about?"
Scorpio (Oct. 24- Nov. 21)
Say it with flowers. Say it with an Italian accent. Diaboli-
cal charmer, you're snapping up admirers with your
charisma. Today would be a terrible time for a gaffe.
However, tell someone the utter truth tonight.
Sagittarius (Nov. 21- Dec. 21)
Put on your spectacular x-ray specs, take your psychic
shovel and tear down facades�theirs, yours' Open your
weary eyes and reaze the spry superhuman under the
bulky front. Realize that the ass is always leaner on the
other side of the pants. Tell it like it is.
Capncom Dec. 22- Jan
Avoid plastic. Find solace in natural fibers. Like it or not.
you may be forced into a peacemaking situation today.
Take this opportunity to flex that Diplomatic Muscle.
You'll be surprised at the response to a little detente-at-
gunpoint.





(Mi
Thursday, February 9, 1995 me East Carolinian
"Jftwte Review
Singleton fails the grade
with Higher Learning
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
In fio�f� A7 tfie Hood writer-di-
rector John Singleton tapped into
the fear and pain associated with life
within a ghetto. By focusing on a
young black man as his main char-
acter, Singleton touched on many
issues but never lost his focus. He
also shaded his cautionary tale with
mixed hues instead of black and
white. Determining the villains in
Boyz N the Hood would depend on
each viewer's reaction to the film
because Singleton artfully included
ambiguity.
The promise of Singleton's
first film still seems to be only a
promise. With his third film, Higher
Learning, Singleton has the same
story to tell as in his first feature
but seems to have lost his artistic
sense. Rather than maintaining a
steady pace by focusing on a single
character, Singleton includes a bevy
of characters and in doing so loses
step with his audience. The ambi-
guity of his first film also gets left
behind as Higher Learning suc-
cumbs to the Oliver Stone school of
writing and directing: in order to
effectively hammer a point into the
viewer's mind, don't settle for a ball
peen hammer when a sledgehammer
will work just as well. The villains
in Higher Learning are clearly de-
fined, thus taking the burden off the
viewer's shoulder to decide for them-
selves who are the responsible par-
ties. The viewer is also kept from
The promise of
Singleton's first
film still seems
to be only a
promise.
feeling guilty. Amidst the ambigu-
ity of Boys N the Hood, the viewer
could feel that he is the villain, but
in Higher Learning the viewer sits
comfortably distanced from the
events on the screen because Single-
ton clearly identifies his antagonists.
Higher Learning unfolds on
the campus of fictional Columbus
University somewhere in Southern
California. The film begins by follow-
ing an incoming freshman class as
they orient themselves to college
and then ends sometime in the
middle of the term. By ending the
film mid-term, with only a few shots
of a December graduation, Single-
ton leaves the film without a real
conclusion: the film just seems to
end rather than conclude. Singleton
would have been better advised to
follow the term to conclusion rather
than build toward a climactic shoot-
ing incident on the quad.
The shooting incident high-
lights many of the problems with
See HIGHER page 9
A little
off the
top
Fifth Street has gotten a
haircut. In the name of
safety, the greenery
surrounding the Fifth
Street ravine has been
chopped down. Long
rumored to be a home
for illicit sex and drug
use, the newly-bald gully
may become a home to
more wholesome
activities.
Photo by LESLIE PETTY
Gym offers students Flex Appeal
m ,c� increments where they can leam h(
Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
cminfi
AttractJciis
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, Feb. 9
Open Mic
at the Percolator Coffeehouse
(poetry)
Jazz Jam Session
at Fletcher Music Building
Room 101
8 p.m.
AH are welcome to play or listen
Roily Gray and Sunfire
at the Attic
(reggae)
Melanie Sparks
at Peasant's Cafe
(acoustic)
Jason's Lyric
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
"The Rise and Rise of Daniel
Rocket"
at McGinnis Theatre
(comedy-drama)
8 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 10
Mother Nature
at the Attic
(classic rock)
Sodapop
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
DSF Earthcore
at Peasant's Cafe
(deadhead)
Jason's Lyric
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers
at Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
(bluesgospel)
Saturday, Feb. 11
Sticky
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
- Full Stop
and Knocked Down Smilin'
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Cloud 9
at Peasant's Cafe
Jason s Lyric
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Monday, Feb. 13
Ontario and Quebec-
Wild and Wonderful
at Hendrix Theatre
4 p.m. and 8 p.m.
(travel adventure film series)
Wednesday, Feb. 15
Bob Nelson
and Peter Pitofsky
at the Attic
(comedy zone)
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming
event that you'd like listed in
our Coming Attractions column?
If so, please send us
information at
Coming Attractions
The East Carolinian
East Carolina University
Student Publications Bldg.
Greenville. NC 27858
Anyone who's grown tired of
their hum-drum beer-and-pizza-pol-
luted body pay close attention, be-
cause there may just be a way out of
it that's waiting for you.
Flex Appeal, a personal train-
ing service located across from
Hardbodies gym on the Evans St. Mall,
is ready and waiting to heip bum off
unwanted fat and build a leaner body
with a comprehensive nutrition and
exercise program geared for notice-
able results.
Bradley Cain, the owner and
operator of the business, said that he
was prompted to start Flex Appeal af-
ter he realized the benefits a personal
trainer can provide. Cain said that his
experience working with a trainer
when he began bodybuilding has been
invaluable.
'(Having a personal trainer) is
basically just like having a coach he
said. "You're not born knowing how
to play soccer and you
have to practice
when you play
basketball: the
same thing ap-
plies to work-
ing out.
Guys I
know
some-
times
equate
weightlifting with a lack of intelli-
gence, and they say 'I should know
how to throw weight around I'm not
saying that weightlifting is like rocket
science, but there are a lot of little
things you may never pick up on if
you are just in there doing things by
yourself.
Cain said that he feels he works
well with college students and said
that he still maintains a college-like
lifestyle, which he believes may give
him an advantage in under-
standing the obstacles
such clients may face in
making improve-
ments in their body
and overall health.
He also said that 80
percent of his clients
are female, and the
majority of them are
new to weight-training and
need a guiding hand to help
them train safely and effectively.
"We set people up on eight-
week programs where we train with
them four days a week and we'll have
a personal trainer with th '11 four
of those times. We help them get on
a diet and nutrition program that is
suited to where they're atwe go in
increments where they can leam how
to eat properly
Cain offers a number of pay-
ment programs for his service in or-
der to help students meet his fees. He
also accepts credit cards. He said,
however, that someone shouldn't pay
the money to start the program with-
out being willing to do the work in-
volved with making the program a
success.
"My program isn't based on
magical pills or any guarantees that
you'll lose 40 pounds in eight weeks
he said. "It's basically just good, sound
nutrition along with a good, solid work-
out program, and it works if you fol-
low it. It's a lot of hard work, but last
year I trained 71 people and never had
anyone ask for their money back. That
doesn't mean that I had 71 people
walking around looking like Mr. and
Mrs. Olympia. but the ones that made
dramatic improvements will be the first
to tell you that they did what I said
CD. Reviews
THE Crossword
.1 I
Todd Snider
Songs for the Daily
Planet
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
This is just what the world
needs now - another folk singer. Todd
Snider's new CD. Songs for the Daily
Planet, is a mixture of folk and coun-
try sounds. The whole disc is one long
ballad of the same music and redun-
dant lyrics. Todd Snider's attempt to
capture the truths about life are me-
diocre at best; this is very predictable
stuff. When listening to the CD, it
seemed as though 1 knew what he was
going to say before he did. Snider's
style is very cliche, and it gets pretty
annoying after about three songs.
Songs for the Daily Planet can
best be described as radio music. Good
times, a few beers and being lurt by
women are a few of the brilliantly
original topics Todd sings about. This
album would be In the perfect atmo-
sphere if played at the Sports Pad or
any pool hall. "Trouble" talks about
how a woman's good looks are going
to get him into trouble. The second
cut is entitled "Easy Money in which
Todd talks about well, how he wants
to make some easy money. Wow, it's
so hard to find music that discusses
important or even relevant topics
these days and here is a man of the
times. 1 can really relate to his music
(yawn).
Perhaps the fact that this CD
was released on Margaritaville
Records explains why Snider sticks so
hard to the Buffet style of music. 1
can almost hear the man himself sing-
ing Todd's songs for him. A lot of har-
monica, acoustic guitars, hand slappin
and foot stompin make up this album.
Due to his weak vocals, none of the
songs rock hard enough to even men-
tion as a good song to listen to. The
rest of the songs are one big copy of
all the cliches in the world. "Turn It
Up" was Todd's last request for the
night, and according to his fifth song,
he's an "Alright Guy
The only thing that took me by
surprise was that there is a "ghost
track" after the last song. This was
the only tune 1 had heard by him be-
fore, called "Talkin Seattle Grunge
Rock Blues This hidden track pokes
fun at the Seattle music scene and
the fact that if your band is from Se-
ACROSS
1 Ostentatious
display
5 Whirl
9 Courage
13 Always
14 Borders
16 Ore deposit
17 Facility
18 Surveillance
19 Tournament
type
20 Synthetic
materials
22 Cheerful
24 Orient
25 Whitewali e.g.
26 Waltz eg
2B Alcoves
32 Freight carrier
33 Cash
34 Pastry
35 Fad
36 Stories
37 Created
38 Frost
39 Soft flat cap
40 Gaited horse
41 Omens
43 Liquid measure
44 Terminates
45 Color
46 Sense ot taste
49 Difference
53 Employs
54 Chair rung
56 Reflected sound
57 Fishing cord
58 Binge
59 Atmospheric
hazard
60 Girl
61 Sea gull
62 Stitches
DOWN
1 Sound from a
nest
2 Elliptical
3 Tableland
4 Pleasing bearing
5 Correct
manuscripts
6 Public decree
7 Incites to action
8 Hawaiian
garland
01995 Tribune Media Services, Inc
All Rights Reserved.
9 Light bulb
covers
10 Large cord
11 Notion
12 Canvas shelter
15 Artificial
channels
21 Short nail
23 Victim
25 Doctrine
26 Constellation
27 Boring tool
28 Paris for
actors
29 Area
30 Downy sea duck
31 Prophet
32 Journey
33 Selling places
36 Proffers
37 Bed pad
39 Talent
40 Pub measure
42 Tantalizes
43 Shade tree
45 Photographic
solution
ANSWERS
OCBB QBBO
HLDU BBBDB BOOB
UUUfJ OrjrjJQD BBBB
IIUUOIIUUH I1HUUOB
nuiin BULIB
tI Bo BDDDD BBOB
Uliri HBBUCI FJUtulIJI!
UtlBBBBBB BULJKIB
BOI1E1 DBDB
Lltirill Hill HIM til IB
UUUB BBBUB BBUB
Mill ill DBBP DC
46 Influence
47 Continent
48 Optical glass
49 Heal
50 Highest point
51 Display
52 Clothing
55 Make a choice
See PLANET page 9
See FLAN fci page
The average person has 500,000 good laughs and 3,000 good
cries in a lifetime.
-New Body
This message
NATURAL
mi
��CM�T�0IUU
tos been brought to you by Recreational Services and Houstng Services.





,1-
8
Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
Highlander
Bugs called racist
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
mmmmx' ' "
Connor McCloud, bom of the
Clan McCloud in the year 1586 and
doomed to walk the Earth for eter-
nity in a pair of bad Nikes.
In a nutshell, that's what the
Highlander films are all about. The
original Highlander is a great
movie, filled with sword fights and
centered around a cool premise.
Immortals live among us, able to
survive any wound except the re-
moval of the head. Over the course
of centuries they've been honing
their combat skills in preparation
for the Gathering, a grand final
battle that will leave only one im-
mortal alive and decide the fate of
mankind.
Of course, that final battle
happened in the first film, so you'd
think sequels would be out of the
question. But no, Hollywood made
us suffer through Highlander 2, a
film best forgotten by all; it may be
the worst sequel in movie history.
Now they've brought us High-
lander 3: the Final Dimension, and
we're suffering again.
The first 20 minutes are great
guns, though, with a flashback se-
quence set 400 years in the past.
The young Connor McCloud (Chris-
topher Lambert) wanders across
Europe and Asia to Japan, where
he meets up with an immortal sor-
cerer, played by neato Chinese char-
acter actor Mako, best-remembered
as Arnold Schwarzenegger's wiz-
ard companion in Conan the Bar-
barian. This sorcerer teaches our
hero Japanese sword-fighting tech-
niques and forges the weapon that
McCloud used in the original film.
Despite some choppy editing on a
rape-and-pillage sequence featuring
villainous immortal Kane (Mario
Van Peebles), this opening se-
quence is super-cool.
Unfortunately, the film as a
whole is for die-hard Mako fans
only, as Highlander 3 takes a quick
nose-dive as soon as the wizened
actor leaves the screen. Incredibly
sloppy editing ruins Mako's final
scene, as he is beheaded by Van
Peebles' Kane. The i word swings to-
ward Mako's neck, there's a cutting
noise, and the next thing we see is
Mako's headless body lying on the
floor.
That's right, they cut out the
beheading. The whole movie is
about cutting off people's heads,
and they cut out the beheading!
And it wasn't just once; they cut
every beheading in the film! What
were they thinking?
They were thinking about get-
ting a PG-13 rating is what they
were thinking. The producers de-
cided, apparently at the last minute,
to market this flick to a younger
age group. So the only hack-and-
slash you'll see in Highlander 3 is
in the editing. The problem is, con-
sidering that violence is inherent
to the film's concept, this decision
is ludicrous.
Anyway, as the film moves
into the present day it gets even
worse. Kane is imprisoned in the
sorcerer's stronghold for 400 years,
only to be released by excavation
for some sort of factory. The fac-
tory set looks like something out
of a Godzilla movie. The camera
focuses on it so much that 1 as-
sumed there'd be some point to the
ridiculous thing, but no. Like ev-
erything else in Highlander 3. it
was just empty stage dressing.
Equally empty are the char-
acters' relationships. McCloud has
adopted a son since the original
film that we barely see, yet are sup-
posed to care about when his life
is threatened. Later, McCloud sup-
posedly falls in love with an arche-
ologist who discovers his secret.
The only real backing his feelings
are given, however, is the fact that
she resembles someone he was in
love with during the French Revo-
lution. Now, there's a great basis
tor a relationship!
Other problems abound. Kane
inexplicably kills one of his immor-
tal henchmen immediately alter es-
caping into the modern world, ap-
parently just to prove to the audi-
ence how ruthless he is He just
spent 400 years trapped in a cave
with this guy! You figure he'd have
bumped the guy off a long time ago
if he wanted him dead that bad.
I'm not even going to go into
the inconsistencies with the ending
of the original film, which left
McCloud mortal and with the power
to see into men's minds or some
such nonsense.
I don't need to. because I
haven't mentioned the worst thing
about Highlander 3 yet. Once Kane
escapes from the cave, this film is a
virtual copy of the original. Van
Peebles has stolen Clancy Brown's
villain routine from the first film al-
most verbatim, leering and cackling
like a madman. He tracks McCloud
down, kidnaps his son (instead of
his girlfriend), and they have an ex-
plosive final battle in an abandoned
factory. The only tiling missing is
the Queen soundtrack, and consid-
ering the music they did choose.
Freddie Mercury would have been a
welcome intrusion.
This is a bad film, all the way
around. Forty minutes in. 1 was won-
dering how much trouble it would
he to sneak into the theater next
door to catch the end of The Ad-
ventures of Yellow Dog. Even if you
don't compare it to the wonderful
original, it stinks. Don't see it. Don't
rent it. Forget it ever happened.
Unless, of course, you really love
Mako.
Out of ten stars, Highlander
3: the h'inal Dimension rates a sad
two.
I OS ANGELES (AP) - A World
War ll-era cartoon that shows Bugs
Runny passing out bombs to Japanese
people he calls "slant-eves" and "mon-
key lace" is being pulled from the Golden
Age ofLooney Times video
The 1944 "Bugs Nips the Nips" is
one of several cartoons on (he MC.M-i'A
Home Video tape, which has been in
stores since September 1993. About
8.0(10 copies have been sold
One scene shows Bugs giving ice
cream cones concealing bombs to a
crowd of Japanese as he remarks: "Here's
you go bowlegs. heiv you go monkey face,
here you go slant-eyes, everybody gets
one
See PC page 9
? ?TAKE A RIDE ON THE WILD SIDE
Attention ECU Students
Don't have a car? Need a ride to Church?
The First Pentecostal Holiness Church would like to offer you free transportation.
Sunday Morning 11:00am � Sunday F.vcning 7:0Opm Wednesday Nights 7:00pm
CALL 756-3315
(Monday - Friday. 8am to 5pm)
Wte 3W 'W)aM w 1 Review Course
dUmavu i0, 1995
Designed to prepare you for the format
and content of the April 8, 1995
GRE Exam
ALBERT MCNEIL JUBILEE SINGERS
8:00 A �� � 'llrKfi'itftfortttH
800-ECU-ARTS OR 91 9-328-4788
TDD 919-328-4736
Course Schedule:
MondayMmnry n
WednesdayM.mh i
MondayMjrrh 1
Wi'dnevl.iy March 15
Monday Manh 20
WednesdayManli U
Monday Match 27
Wi'dni-Mlay March 29
Course Time:
( ill pin - H:10 pin
Any iiwlivi.lti.il t,�umitR (omwl.ili.ii, IrtdM
ADA rflOUkl i '� I �� UH.tr �l DiMUtl
S.vi 128 4IKIJ
topics To He Kcvievved:
� viili.il Ability � im ludM wnttm � i umulaUon, anatugy.
antonyms, and raacfingi i omprthimion
� Quantitative Ability � includti nvath�nvaiii al i imtuulha
reasoning mlng irtihmaili, algebra, and geometry
� Analytical Ability � Indudttanalytical and logli � rea
Location:
Central Oaaaroom Budding, ki 1021
Instructor:
Dr. Ku it Nlnwander, Aasldanl Profit o( At i minting
Tests:
Die Princeton Review: Cracking the CM
Practicing To r.isr The CM General 'el
I m i mImtalInwaiiirnHanfcwl
EARLY REGISTRATION DISCOUNT:
Only $150 before February 13! $170 beginning February 14
Prf�cntc
tCU School of Bu
Is'llIK.ctirr.tl I l.i
(919)120 � 6177
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee Presents
1
I

A
m i
m
fcv
I!
1
aj
A
i
fcjii
1995)
To be held on Thursday, April 6,1995, at 7:00 PM on the Mall
Grand Prize: Opening Band at Barefoot on the Mall (Thursday, April 20,
Second Prize: $100 in Cash
� Deadline for demo tapes is Friday. February 17,1995.
� Five Bands will be chosen to perform at the Battle of the Bands.
� PA will be provided by the Popular Entertainment Committee.
� Five finalists will be notified the week of February 27.
� Winners will be determined by judges,
audition for the Battle of the Bands, please submit a demo tape containing
three songs, a Press-KitBio, and the Entry Form below to the Student Union
Office, Room 236, on the second floor of Mendenhall Student Center or Mail to:
W Popular Entertainment Committee
Battle of the Bands Entry Form
,
236 Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
Name of BandContact Person:
Address
Phone Numbers:





. � �
Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
75
OFF
1
t-
"Love Letters for
Valentines Day
Start February 9th.
All fall and winter clothing. Selected jewelry
and accessories. Some spring and
summer merchandise.
919 Red Banks Rd.
Arlington Village M-Sat. 10-6 Thurs. 10-8
M: from page 8
"We are very offended said Lori
Fujimoto of the Japanese-Americans
Citizen's League. "It hurts that a large
corporation is so insensitive to rerelease
this video to children
Spokeswoman Anne Corley said
the company received one complaint The
tapes will be recalled and no longer dis-
HIGHER from page 7
Higher Learning. When a skinhead
opens fire on a peace rally the audi-
tributed; the other cartoons on the tape
probably will be rereleased.
"When we were compiling the
video, we were putting together a his-
tory of animation Corley said. "As much
as it is distasteful, it was part of history
at the time and reflected Hollywood's
part in the war effort"
� �����
Vm i I.A M. II I JUi�. Xf&A
Peasant s Caje
Thursday:
Showcase for the economically impaired
with Melanie Sparks
Drink Specials out the ying-yang $2.00 Cover
The Reflectors
Come Look at Yourself
ence clearly detects the deception in
Singleton's story. The skinheads are
meant to represent the white author-
ity fostering the prejudice and rac-
ism in today's society. But skinheads
represent such a small, reactionary
segment of society - and rarely pose
a threat to campus harmony - that
Singleton seems to use them as a sim-
plistic substitute for more complex
racial problems. This simplification
disengages the viewer from the film
and keeps Singleton's point from be-
ing clearly made.
PLANET from page 7
attle, you will make a million dol-
lars. Even if the band's "thing is to
not play any music at all. they will
still make a million dollars. It is a
funny song, but it's about six or
seven months too late. The Seattle
scene is as tired as the rest of this
album.
Singleton works more effec-
tively when he exposes racism
through slight gestures as opposed
to gunshots. When a young, white
freshman female named Kristen
(Kristy Swanson) rides in an eleva-
tor with a young black freshman male
named Malik (winningly played by
Omar Eppes), she slowly brings her
hands closer to her pocketbook caus-
ing Malik to roll his eyes. The slight
movement says more about racism
and sexism than many of the grandi-
ose gestures in the film. Singleton's
Saturday:
Cloud Nino
with the
Fountainhead Experiment
Next Wednesday &
Every Wednesday in February
Keller Williams
No Cover for members
Every Sunday listen to WSFL 106.5
8pm - The Sunday Night Alternative
rwmMMWSEmmmmmmA
E8 MailBoxes Etc.
Valentine Headquarters!
$2.00 off purchase of
$10.00 or more.
Choose from a
variety of balloons,
baskets, and plush
animal assortments.
Order early for the best
selection. Limit one
coupon pvisit
pcustomer.
Expires 2-14-95
Pirate's Poinle Shopping Center
740 Greenville Blvd Suite 400 TEL 919 321-6021
Greenvile, NC 27858 FAX 919 321-6026
An Independentty Owned and Operated Franchise
Todd Snider's Songs for the
Daily Planet failed to impress me
hoih musically and intellectually. If
folk-type country Jimmy Buffet style
music is your gig, then you might
want to check it out. But remember,
as Snider himself says. "Silence is
music's original alternative
small scene in the elevator works
with much greater force than the
large scale scene of the shooting.
The characters in Higher
Learning are all caricatures. One
weakness of Boyz X the Hood was
the stereotypical characters. Instead
of improving his character writing,
Singleton worsens it by making his
characters too simplistic. Malik is the
track star with an attitude; Kristen
is the white bread girl who experi-
ences confusion and pain about col-
lege: Deja (Tyra Banks) is an intelli-
gent black woman who tries to help
Malik only to suffer unjust .retribu-
tion for her efforts; Remy (Michael
Rappaport) is the confused loner who
becomes a skinhead; Fudge (Ice
Cube) is the vocal black activist sup-
posedly well-read and intelligent but
in his sixth year of school. Other ste-
reotypes exist in a soft-spoken,
friendly lesbian (Jennifer Connelly)
and a stately, wizened, bearded pro-
fessor of political science (Laurence
Fishburne).
Higher Learning still contains
many powerful moments and a strong
message that needs to be heard. But
the filmmaking decisions undercut
the raw power of the film. Singleton
makes the film seem like an adver-
tisement for his message rather than
a complex, interesting story contain-
ing strong opinions.
Singleton is still young. He may
yet live up to the promise of being
an artistic success. But with Higher
Learning, much like the students he
presents in his film, he is just coast-
ing.
On a scale of one to ten,
Higher Learning rates a six.
SEXUALLY
SPEAKING
WITH
DR. RUTH
WESTHEIMER
BASKETS BY CHOICE
Wednesday, February 22,1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
Contact the Central Ticket Office
1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787)
or Locally at 328-4788
Student Ticket - $3.00 � At The Door - $10.00
Sponsored By the Student Union Lecture Committee
.
�;�.juiiW
Carolina East Centre � Greenville, NC
321-0709 � 746-4633
Carolina East Centre
Beside Carolina
East Theater
WE DELIVER!
321-0709
Open 7 days a week
Daily 10-9
Sunday 1-6
Adult Novelties
The Raciest Gifts in Town
Adult Party Games
Motion Lotion and More
Tanning Special
1 Month Unlimited
$29.00 When you bring in this ad.
"�
11 I1HBWWBWW
'�jmmMmmammmmiimmimmmmaiiimi"
afPWHWL "I





Thursday, February 9,1995 The East Carolinian
Bye Bye, Eddie!
Baseball season starts
Gary Overton
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
The 1995 ECU baseball team
will play it's first-ever, all-Division-
I schedule, highlighted by games
against ACC opponents North
Carolina, N.C. State, and Duke.
These games, plus playing in the
competitive CAA conference (rated
fifth best in country), represent
quite a challenge for head coach
Gary Overton's squad.
With 10 lettermen returning,
however, and 17 highly-touted new-
comers joining the program, they
should finish much higher than the
fifth place finish predicted for them
by several publications.
This prediction is based upon
the Pirates' loss of several out-
standing players to graduation and
the major league baseball draft.
Sophomore pitcher Michael Jacobs
was selected by the Boston Red Sox
in the 14th round.
Richie Blackwell and Johnny
Beck, who holds the all-time ECU
record for career strikeouts, were
drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates
and Philadelphia Phillies in the
17th and 34th rounds, respectively.
1994 All-CAA centerfielder
Jamie Borel, who broke the all-time
ECU stolen base records in a sea-
son (43) and for a career (61) was
drafted in the 29th round of the
amateur draft.
"We did lose five pitchers
that were an integral part of our
program last year Overton said.
"Our schedule is rated as one of
the best in the country. Three of
our conference opponents are pre-
dicted to be the best in some time.
Those two factors are the reason
we are only picked to finish fifth.
We do feel we are more than ca-
pable of finishing in the upper ech-
elon, but we will have to play good
baseball to do that
This year's team does have a
considerable amount of talent, led
by senior outfielder Brian Yerys.
Yerys played in all 54 games a year
ago after transferring from
Louisburg (N.C.) Junior College,
and finished "94 with a .364 bat-
ting average, led the team in RBI's
with 59 and led the team in total
bases with 119. The Charlotte, N.C.
native accomplished all of this, even
though he didn't play baseball un-
til his senior year at Providence
High School.
"The number one thing about
Brian Yerys is that he is a very-
tough competitor Overton said.
"That makes him a quality player
in itself. In addition, he is also the
most improved player on the team
in terms of strength, power and arm
strength. A very underrated part of
his game is his speed on the base
paths. All of these factors combine
to make him an. outstanding pros-
pect. Brian has proven he can com-
pete on the Division-1 level
Fellow outfielder Jason Head
also returns and provides leader-
ship and experience to this young
team. This is his third year as a
starter, hitting .313 last year and
finishing second on the team in
runs scored and doubles to gain
Second-Team All-CAA honors.
"Jason can hit anywhere in
the batting order and has played
Photo by HAROLD WISE
No ECU men's hoops coach Eddie Payne didn't get a job at FSU but he is preparing
"o lale his Plates on a two-game road trip, starting Saturday mght ,n Richmond. Va.
Hart announces resignation
at Tuesday press conference
See BALL page 11
Dave Hart, Jr.
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
"This is a great, great place
ECU athletic director Dave Hart. Jr.
said. "I hope that 1 will be in a posi-
tion to help East Carolina in the fu-
ture
ECU'S athletics director for-
mally announced his resignation in
a Tuesday afternoon press confer
ence.
"I leave feeling good about this
program Hart said at a Tuesday
press conference. "The future will be
bright for East Carolina and its ath-
letic department
Hart, only the fifth ECU ath-
letics director, saw two different foot-
ball teams reach postseason bowls,
and the men's basketball team reach
the NCAA's for the first time since
1972.
"1 would like to meet with the
people at Florida "State and share
some philosophical views so mat we
can move that program forward Hart
said.
Hart will join the Florida State
staff on March 15. Until then, he will
be busy meeting with his Greenville
constituents, and finalizing plans for
exposure of ECU'S football program
next season.
"Every athletic director has
moved this program forward he said.
i hope that I've moved the program
forward.
In his seven years at ECU, Hart
played an integral part in shaping the
program. His emphasis on developing
the student-athlete, while molding the
athletics program into a contending
school with other I-A programs has
made Hart a great asset to ECU.
His implementation of the
"Great Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin
Pig-Out" increased the popularity
around spring football. Hart, who was
hired at ECU for his expertise in mar-
keting, also created the "Ain't It Great
to Tailgate" atmosphere for the foot-
ball program, bringing in some of the
largest crowds to Dowdy-Ficklen since
1983.
An emotional Hart thanked the
numerous people responsible for their
involvement with him and the athletic
department.
"Thank you to the media, thank
you to Chancellor Dick Eakin Hart
said, as he addressed everyone from
the faculty to the student body at the
press conference. "1 have a lot of fond
memories of East Carolina
His influence and insight will
be a great asset to Florida State, as
his departure from ECU will leave a
enormous space to fill.
Photo courtesy of SID
l luesuay iiiicmiuun F
Allpress delighting fans
iit: I, Anrtroo in
Harrington Reld is home tothe ECU baseball team. The ballpark has a sea�ncapacity of
2 5�0 although 3,000 attended the ECU-N.C State game on Apnl 18,1993.
Parham gives ECU
big win over Mason
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
East Carolina snapped a three-
game Colonial Athletic Association
losing streak when freshman point
guard Tony Parham hit a three-
pointer with iess than a second left
on the clock, giving the Pirates a
84-82 victory over CAA opponent
George Mason.
Parham caught the inbounds
pass fom Chuckie Robinson and
sprinted towards the middle of the
court before firing a off-balance
jump shot that found the square of
the backboard and banked in for the
win.
"I was kind of confused at first
because I looked up and saw the 35-
second clock still on Parham said.
"Then I looked over the top and saw
I had four seconds, so I was think-
ing to myself I had to get it over half
court and get a shot up. What I was
trying to do is draw a foul if I
couldn't make the shot, but it went
in
Mason took their first lead
since scoring the first bucket of the
game when Nate Langley hit a three-
pointer with 0:53 remaining to give
the Patriots a 82-81 lead.
Tony Parham turned the ball
over when he attempted to hit open
teammate Chuckie Robinson with a
pass on the baseline giving the Pa-
triots' possession with just over 40
seconds to go.
ECU head coach Eddie Payne
wanted his team to do anything but
foul Mason's hot shooting guard
Curtis McCants (25 points).
"Once they got the ball to
McCants, we just decided we would
get the ball back, no matter what
and we would just take our
chances Pirate head coach Eddie
Payne said. "I didn't necessarily
want to foul him. because I think
the way he was playing, he would
have knocked them in
McCants missed a open jump
shot and the Pirates rebounded, get-
ting the ball to Parham who hit the
winning shot.
"We were lucky, but Tony is
the type of athlete and has the type
of head which gives you a better
chance of being lucky Payne said.
The Pirates led by as many as
18 in the first half before letting Ma-
son dictate the pace of the game in
the second half, playing their up-
tempo style.
Senior center Anton Gill kept
ECU in the ball game when GMU
made their run. scoring 23 points
and grabbing 12 boards on the
night. Vic Hamilton added a career-
high 11 points and 10 rebounds in
only 15 minutes of action. Parham
scored 16 points, more than double
his average.
Parham has started all 22
games for the 14-8 (4-5 in CAA) Pi-
Bobbitt
leads RS
program
English guard
'loves to play in
front of a crowd
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
(RS) -If you are searching
for challenging and ex-citing fun,
recreational services offers the
Adventure Program. Organized by
Steven Bobbitt, this semester's pro-
gram provides the fun and variety
of activities you may be looking for
in your free time.
As a new staff member,
Steven Bobbitt is in charge of the
entire Adventure Program. His cre-
dentials include an undergraduate
degree in education from Virginia
Tech, a degree in recreation for lei-
sure services from Radford Univer-
sity, and he has directed a small
parks and recreation department.
"The Adventure Program
is made of four semi-separate com-
ponents Bobbitt said.
The first component is the
Recreational Outdoor Center
(ROC). This is where camping, ca-
noeing and other outdoor equip-
ment can be rented at affordable
rates for faculty, staff and students.
The ROC is located downstairs in
the northeast corner of
Christenbury.
The second component con-
sists of adventure trips that are
offered throughout the year. Trips
this spring include backpacking,
canoeing, skiing, beach horseback
See ECU page 12
See REC page 12
Lady Pirate fans have been
watching 5-foot-6 sophomore
Justine Allpress, from Barton-Un-
der-Needwood, England, show no
fear of shooting from the three-
point range. Then again, she ac-
tively cultivates her relationship
with those fans.
"I love to play in front of a
crowdAllpress said. "That's just
the way I am, probably a bit of a
performer
Allpress earned her starting
position at guard last month,
though she has played critical a
role on the team for the past 1 and
12 seasons.
"When she plays under con-
trol, we could ask for none better
ECU women's basketball head
coach Rosie Thompson said.
"She really can help us, be-
cause when she's playing real hard
on defense, she's a big plus' for
us Thompson continued. "In ad-
dition, when she takes her time on
her shots she's helped usl, because
she has sparked the team several
times with her outside shooting
Recruiting players from over-
seas is nothing new to the Lady Pi-
rates' program. Gaynor O'Donnell
(198993) still holds the Lady Pi-
rate career record in assists and
was the beginning of a link between
ECU and England's John Taylor
High School.
�She had an excellent three-
point shot Thompson said of her
first impressions. "Just the actual
shooting, in addition to knowing
Justine Allpress
how quick she was, you know, once
you get those two characteristics
combined, it makes for a fine bas-
ketball player
Moving from one continent to
another, certain adjustments are ex-
pected - but none of them were ma-
jor adjustments for Justine.
"At first, we thought just from
the fact of her coming over here
from England not knowing any-
body - but she mixed in real well
with the rest of the kids Thomp-
son said. "In fact, we've been
blessed that, once you become a
Lady Pirate, off the court, you're
sort of like a little family, and ev-
erybody gets along real well
"It was hard at first, being so
far away from home, being com-
pletely lost, not knowing what was
going on Allpress admitted. "The
adapting here was easy, just be-
cause everybody made me feel so
much at home
Allpress is an urban and re-
gional planning major - a relatively
unknown program.
I knew that with a degree in
geography there wasn't a great deal
of opportunity Allpress said. "I
spoke to some advisors to see what
sort of subject areas would be re-
lated to it. Through research. I
came up with urban and regional
planning. 1 applied to universities
in England, and I got offers from
places in England doing urban
studies and regional planning.
That's the main reason I'm in such
an obscure field
A further adjustment for
Allpress was the intensity of the
Lady Pirates' basketball program.
-Me playing basketball as
much as I've had to since I've been
here is so different from what I'm
used to Allpress said. "I'm used
to practicing maybe three nights a
week with my team. Here I've
never done strength and condition-
ing training until I came here the
whole thing with the weights, and
everything being so organized, it
was all new to me. I enjoyed the
experience. I liked that
As Allpress got used to the
Lady Pirates program, she became
more valuable to the team. During
her freshman year, she played in all
26 games, starting the last nine.
"Last year I really didn't have
any idea what to expect Allpress
said. "We played Alabama - they
were ranked in national polls. I
had no idea how a ranked team
plaved
By the end of the 1993-94
season, Allpress was averaging 6.8
points per game, and ranked sev-
enth in the CAA in three-point field
goals per game (1.2).
"This year. I've got an oppor-
tunity to get better, play better and
just make an impact Allpress said.
�1 want to be able to make plays in
the game to make the crowds go.
See LADY page 13

v-





i
11
Thursday February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
:1rWi �������'�v
BALL from page 10
several different positions
Overton said. "Even though he is
only a junior he should jgve us
outstanding leadership
At centerfield Jason DeHart
and Lance Tigyer are competing for
the starting position. DeHart, a
freshman from Pennsylvania, bat-
ted .475 and stole 20 bases last
year. Tigyer is a sophomore trans-
fer from Ball State University who
appeared in 36 games with 14
starts for the Cardinals. Coach
Overton regards DeHart as the
faster of the two, with Tigyer be-
ing the stronger of the two at the
plate.
The middle of the infield
should be a strong double-play
combo with Lamont Edvards start-
ing at second base and senior Chad
Puckett returning at shortstop.
Edwards was an All-State selection
at Clinton H.S earning all-confer-
ence honors in football, basketball
and baseball.
This past season he played in
40 games finishing with a .317 bat-
ting average. Edwards played for
the Arlington Senators in the Wash-
ington D.C. Summer League lead-
ing his team in batting average
(.360) and stolen bases (17).
"Lamont Edwards is a player
that has paid his dues Overton
said. "He was a backup player on a
outstanding 1993 squad. Last year
he proved he is a Division! hitter.
KMKMMNMHMHMBZMRnSMAMOflNMSXMHNHMNBM
This year 1 believe he will prove to
college baseball that he is an out-
standing prospect for the profes-
sional scouts
Puckett is an outstanding
glove man who has improved con-
siderably at the plate. He set career
highs in every offensive category
this past season. The senior from
West Mecklenburg High School in
Charlotte is expected to only get
better in his third year as a full-
time starter.
At the corners, ECU will start
true freshman Derek Lindsay at
third base and Randy Rigsby at
first. Lindsay is a power hitter from
Virginia Beach who hit .430 this
past year and drove in 25 runs. He
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is described by Coach Overton as a
sure fielder with a strong arm who
has only average speed.
Rigsby is an outstanding de-
fensive player from Goldsboro who
has been inconsistent at the plate
thus far in preseason workouts.
"Randy Rigsby. should he win
the starting job, is a very good de-
fensive player Overton said. "Kyle
BiUingsley has had a good pre-
season and is a little more of a of-
fensive threat but is not quite as
strong in the field as Randy. I may
platoon them at first
Bil'ingsley transferred a year
ago from Chaffey J.C. and played
in 46 games last season. He could
start at DH if he doesn't unseat
Rigsby for the starting position at
first. His younger brother Brent, a
pitcher, may see a lot of action this
year after redshirting this past sea-
son.
At catcher, the Pirates are led
by Travis Meyer, a junior transfer
who signed with Ohio State out of
high school. Meyer is described as
having the best arm in this program
since Philadelphia Phillies minor
league player Tommy Eason was
behind home plate. Meyer hit .387
with seven home runs this past sea-
son.
He is backed up strongly by
Tim Flaherty, a freshman from Mas-
sachusetts who hit .561 and gained
All-State honors a year ago.
The Pirate pitching staff does
return two seniors Billy Layton and
Jason Mills. Layton was 2-2 last year
with a 3.58 ERA and 31 strikeouts
a year ago, while Mills was 4-3 with
a 1.86 ERA and 43 strikeouts.
"They should be the strength
of the staff Overton said. "They
should be our best two pitchers, not
because they have the best arms,
but because they have the best con-
trol and vary their pitches the
best
Coach Overton signed several
talented pitchers who were selected
in last year's major league draft.
Patrick Dunham, a power pitcher
from Pontiac, Michigan, was se-
lected by the New York Yankees
along with Jason Elmore transfer
from Louisburg J.C.
They were drafted in the 24th
and 67th rounds, respectively. John
Payne, a four-year letterman at Ath-
ens Drive High School in Raleigh,
NC, was chosen in the 48th round
by the Florida Marlins after regis-
tering a 8-3 record last season. They
all- have superior arms but need
work on their consistency and con-
trol. With added experience, this
could potentially be Coach
Overtoil's best group ever.
Brent BiUingsley and transfer
Chad Newton from Brevard J.C. may
also compete for spots in the start-
ing rotation. Newton had a 8-1
record with eight saves and a 2.25
ERA breaking school and region
records for saves in a season.
Overton is ECU's all-time
winningest coach with 347 wins.
His .638 winning percentage is
among the top twenty of active
Division-I coaches. Under his lead-
ership this should not be a year of
rebuilding. With a 14-game stretch
before facing conference favorite
Old Dominion, the Pirates should
be able to get acclimated to play-
ing with several new teammates. If
this team is as good on the field as
it looks on paper, they should fin-
ish no lower than third in the con-
ference.
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!
12
Thursday, February 9, 1995
The East Carolinian
REC
from page 10
riding and much, much more. In ad-
dition to trips, workshops are also
offered.
Workshops include a Climbing
II Trip to Roxboro. North Carolina on
Feb. 25 and Climbing III Trip in
Linville Gorge March 31 to April 2. If
you are interested in these trips you
will need to pre-register in 204
Christenbury.
The third component of the
Adventure Program is the Climbing
Tower which is located behind Allied
Heath Belk Building. In February, the
tower is open from 3:00 p.m to 5:00
p.m. every Wednesday. Starting March
13. the hours of the Climbing Tower
are from 3:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon-
day through Thursday and 1:00 p.m.
to 5:00 p.m. on Sundays.
Workshops are offered for be-
ginning climbers and intermediate
climbers at a nominal fee. In addition,
a climbing workshop is required for
any of the climbers planning on tak-
ing trips during the Spring semester.
The fourth the final component
making up the Adventure Program is
the Ropes Challenge Course. The
course is located next to the Climb-
ing Tower and provides a way to build
self-esteem and develop group cohe-
ECU
frontpage 10
sion. The course is opened to East
Carolina University students, faculty
and staff, and community groups.
Due to growing demand, this is
a component that will be expanding
rapidly in the future.
The Adventure Program also
provides a resource center that has
books and videos with information
about a variety of outdoor opportu-
nities and activities. Recreational ser-
vices, once moved into the new recre-
ational facility hopes to get books,
magazines and additional resources
that Joyner Library does not offer or
carry on a regular basis. This will pro-
vide a place for students, faculty, and
instructors to come and get additional
information.
Every spring, the Adventure
Program offers a spring break trip.
This year the trip will be to Canaan
Valley located in Davis, West Virginia.
This resort has both downhill and
cross-country skiing courses. The trip
will be during the week of March 5-
10. The price is $224, which includes
transportation, lift tickets and lodg-
ing. The registration deadline is Feb.
20, and a pre-trip meeting will be held
March 30, in Christenbury room 204.
As you can see, the Adventure
Program offers opportunities to chal-
lenge yourself and just plain have fun.
Stop by recreation services in 204
Christenbury or call 328-6387 to find
out more about trips, workshops and
programs offered through the Adven-
ture Program and recreation services.
Crab some friends and join in the fun!
rates, averaging just over eight points
a game. This is the second time he
has defeated his summer league
teammate and friend Langley. who
scored 29 in the Patriots' losing
cause.
"It's always fun playing against
him Parham said. "It started back
in my junior year of high school, and
ever since it has been a friendly ri-
valry between us
ECU won this game before a
crowd of 4.611 people. The game was
televised on HTS, and the highlights
were shown on ESPN's Sportscenter.
"I feel great right now
Parham said. "That has always been
my dream to take and make the win-
ning shot. 1 couldn't ask for a better
way to end this game
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Friday, February 10
Saturday, February 11
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�t.
13
Thursday, February 9, 1995
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Delicatessen
Prestige 97 Fat Free
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CANNED GOODS
.Alaskan Snow Crab Clusters LB. 5.98
ave
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14.5 To 15.2-Oz. Can Del Monte
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French Style Green Beans run
Four1 Z-Roll Paks Kleenex
$ Double Roll
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2-Llr. Bll.
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Bouquet Of 1-Dozen
Madame Del Barde
v? Long Stem
4-Lb. Bag Harvest Fresh
Florida
Valencia
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15-Oz.Box
JW Kellogg's
-W-1 Apple Jacks
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Winn-Dixie Raleigh
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19
95
Kareem
reflects
on NBA
(AP) - There's precious little room
in the slammin jammin voofIn' NBA ;
of the '90s for the sky hook. Even the .
man who originated that graceful and
effective shot Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. sees ,
its time is past
"Dr. J and Michael Jordan really
ruined it for all of us big guys Abdul-
Jabbar said. "Nobody wants to see some- .
body playing with their backs to the bas-
ket a
"People would rather look like ;
Michael Jordan on the highlight film than '
be seen shooting the sky hook. It's just
an element of style �
The former Lakers star, who re-
turned to his hometown Tuesday to be '
honored as a Hall of Fame inductee, sees i
little similarity between the game he -
played for a record 20 seasons and the
role of today's centers like Orlando's �
Shaquille O'Neal. y
Television has changed the face "
of the game. Abdul-Jabbar said.
"Certainly style over substance is
important now he said. "They didn't. J
have 'play of the day' when I was play-
ing
What hasn't changed: a dominat- :
ing center is still considered a ticket to ��
the NBA Finals.
Abdul-Jabbar, the NBAs leading '�
scorer with 38387 regular season points,
led Milwaukee to one title and the Lak-
ers to five more. That came after a col-
lege career in which he won three NCAA Z
championships under UCLA coach John
Woodea
"1 was able to beat one-on-one
coverage every time and shoot high-per-
centage shots that created a lot of stress j
on the defense he said. "That gave ev- �:
erybody who played on the perimeter .
for the Lakers an extra step, and we were '
able to win consistently using that theory
of play.
"Nowadays, 1 don't see anybody f
that's in there able to score as consis- ,
tently as I did as far as shooting percent- fcj
age and getting good shots
Not even O'Neal, although Abdul-
Jabbar acknowledges that the muscular i
Magic center has developed his own '
dominating high-percentage game based i
on getting dunks off offensive rebounds. f
"I saw his rap video where he said .�
he don't need no hook, so I'm not gring
to offer him any advice Abdul-Jabbar
said. "It's too bad he doesn't have a shot
he can shoot against the double-team.
And free throws, I won't talk about free �:
throws
So who does Abdul-Jabbar like
among today's dominating centers? '
Dikembe Mutombo, a center known
more for his shot-blocking defense than
his scoring.
"He's a great athlete and a team
player Abdul-Jabbar said. "People talk ,
about Robinson and Shaquille, and they
deserve all the ink they get but there f"
are different reasons to appreciate things, v
and Dikembe really impressed me
Now his life is consumed mainlyrj'j
by parenting a 15-year-old daughter andV
14-yearold son, and he has a television
and movie production company. But he's X
more interested than ever in getting back,
to basketball.
"I'm not against becoming in
volved in the game he said. "It doesn't j
matter what level. It would depend on
the offer
I
t
LADY from page 10
'That was just amazing' - make the (
pass that's going to get the crowd �
on their feet, make the clutch three-
pointer. I just want to be able to, a
in crisis situations, be there to light i.
it up from the outside - to make
plays that are going to be remem-
bered. I don't want to be a player ,
that was an 'also-ran
"I was blessed with speed - I
was lucky that way Allpress said.
"I think I could utilize it a lot morel
to get more steals on defense. Right'
now, a lot of my offense is being
concentrated on. I'd like to also be
known as a defensive player
Allpress is also highly opti
mistic about the Lady Pirates �.
through the rest of the season. �
"A lot of teams have underes-
timated us Allpress said. "We've J
shown against conference opposi-3
tion that we can either beat them V
or stay with them. There's no team
out there that can really do to us
what they did to us last year. No '
body should underestimate us
i





!W
Thursday, February 9, 1995 The East Carolinian
Help Wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to S2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.). Seasonal and Full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C53623
ffiffl
For Rent
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR House at
206-A East 12th St. Rent $450 month.
Also, 1BR Apartment at 810 Cotanche,
Rent $325 month Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two Bedroom
Apartments at Wesley Commons For Rent
Free Cable. Call 758-1921.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished: washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC: Available May 1
through August 31: sleeps 7 - $1500.00
per month; sleeps 8-9 - $2100.00 per
month (804) 850-1532
FREE FEBRUARY RENT and NO De
posit Female roommate wanted or two
people to sublease a two bedroom apt
Total rent is $380.00. Basic cable, water,
pool and ECU bus service included. Kings
Row Apt Call 752-0845 and leave mes-
sage.
APARTMENT FOR RENT - Wyndham
Court-2 bedroom, 1 bath, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer and dryer hook-up.
close to campus. Call Ali or Debra-830-
2270
NEED TO TAKE OVER LEASE, fur
nished, pool, own room and bathroom. For
more information call Heidi 758-9480.
Kingston Place.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED. Private
room in Tar River apts. Rent $156 a
month plus 14 utilities. Call Tracy at 551-
7660. Please leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: nice two room
apartment near campus, roomy and re-
laxed, on ECU bus route; rent $1971
2 utilities. Call 752-1033(late afternoons-
early evenings)
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP: No de
posit 12 of $360.00, H20 incl 12 of
utilities and cable. Call 321-0260
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 150.00 split up
utilities. NEEDED ASAP. 5 minute walk
to campus. No pets, No smokers, Sociable.
Clean. For more info Call Woody. Leave
message 830-9536.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share 3 bed-
room house 1 block from campus & down-
town; $185mo 13 utilities. Call Jim
7524039.
ROOMMATE NEEDED, Male or Female
2 BR Townhouse close to Campus. 212.50
per mth. plus 12 util, phone & cable Call
758-6061 leave message
APT. AVAILABLE FOR SUBLEASING.
March until August 30th. Need male or
female to share a 2 bedroom apt with fe-
male. Smoker or Non-smoker. Location:
Oak Mont Square Rent 205 plus 12 utili-
ties. Willing to give $75 of deposit return
in August I need someone ASAP Please
Call 321-3863
NOW LEASING 2 Bedroom 1 and 2 bath
Apartments stove, frig, dishwasher,
washerdryer, water sewer basic cable
included. 2 Blocks from Campus. On Site
Manager Call 752-8900
Services Offered
MMBI�H
FREE DELIVERY- Valentine Gifts- Prices
from $1.50 and up. Call 752-3783. Or ders
must be placed before 21095.
TYPING Reasonable rates resumes,
term papers, thesis, other services. Call
Glenda: 752-9959 (days); 527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call 1
900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min. must be
18 or older. Find that special someone!
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53623
NEED TYPING? Campus seer etary offers
speedy service, familiar with all formats,
low rates. Work saved on Mac disks. Call
Cindy after 5pm or leave Message 355-
3611
RESEARCH INFORM AM
Largest Library o information in U.S. -
all subjects
0tJB Catalog Tody wn V:ri WC c CCC
Gem, 800-351-0222
uSSfSBr Of 1310)477-8226
Dr. rush S2 C3 to Research Information
ur. rush ic uu o imffinhhhiniauw
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mo-
bile Music Production is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and expe-
rience of any Disc Jockey service in the
area. Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring
dates booking fast Call early. 7584644
ask for Lee.
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE your GPA
or exam scores? We have the edge you
need to succeed! STUDENT SUPPLE-
MENTS offers study guides based on the
notes of the "A" students in your classes.
Give us a call at 752-HELP
MEET NEW PEOPLE AT ECU Listen to
their voice and reply only if you are inter-
ested 1-900-82 ,000 ext. 8318 Pr ocall Co.
(602)954-7420 $2.99min. & 18
PROFESSIONAL WORD PROCESSING
and Desktop Publishing. Rat es as low as
$1.75 per page. Over 10 years experience
and laser printing system guarantee re-
sults. Call Mark at 7564640 between
12:00 noon and 9:00 pm.
FRENCH TUTORING - I'm a French ex-
char.J" 'ldent. and can tutor you in con-
versation or writing. Don't hesitate to call
me at 328-8159 & ask for Benjamin.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075. Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000- $6,000 per month. Room and
board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206) 545-
4155 ext A53622
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY Clean,
High volume Adult Club needs YOU now.
Confidential employment Daily pay Top
Commissions. Some to no exper ience. If
you've called before call again. Playmates
Massage Snow Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own hours!
RUSH Self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home mail-
ing our circulars. Free details, Send SASE:
R&B Distributors, Box 20354. Greenville
NC 27858
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298-8952.
POOL MANAGERS (Aquatic Directors,
Head Guards, Assistant Head Guards). Sp
Sum 95. GreenvilePitt County,
Goldsboro, Kinston, Tarboro. Call Bob,
758-1088.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-2514000 ext.
1576. Leave Name, School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share Brick
House on N. Harding. 5 min walk to cam-
pus. $200mo 13 utilities. Want up-
perclassman and someone pretty cool
andor laid back. Big Screen TV and trust
fund are pluses. Call Brian at 757-3318.
SUBLEASE: 2 Bedroom duplex in Col-
lege View Apts. Immediately! 350.00 per
month plus deposit 757-2763
CARRIAGE HOUSE APARTMENTS
South Charles Street across from Athletic Club, close
to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2 Bedroom
Townhouses over 1000 sq. ft 1 12 baths, private patios,
dishwashers, all electric, water furnished, swimming pool,
volleyball court, cable TV available and on site laundry.
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further information.
SEGA GENSIS 18 Games and Equipment
Good Condition $200 Call 328-8215
SONY 10-DISC CHANGER $200 obo Call
752-9319
FOR SALE: Matching Tan Recliner
Couch, Loveseat and Recliner Chair, Com-
fortable. $250 or best offer. Call 7563509
'87 MAZDA 323 red, ac. 107k, Excel-
lent running condition, $1600 Must Sell
7528868
N�JCASHm
We Buy CDS,
Cassette, and Lp �
Well py up to $8 euL iot
CJJ
SPRING BREAK! Bahamas Party Cruise
6 days $279! Includes 12 Meals & 6 Free
Parties! Great Beaches & Nightlife! A
HUGE Party! Cancun & Jamaica 7 Nights
Air & Hotel From $429. Spring Break
Travel 1-800-678-6386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BREAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa Beach(Near Disney)-
27 Acre Deluxe Beach front Resort 7
Nights $159! Key West $229! Daytona
Beach Room with Kitchen From $129! 1-
800-6786386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8 Days
Oceanview Room with a Kitchen $129!
Walk to Best Bars! Includes Free Discount
Card Which Will Save You $100 on Food
Drinks! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY beach
Florida, from $91 per person per week
Free Info 1-800488-8828
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring Break
- How about it in the Bahamas or Florida
Keys. Where the Party never ends. Spend
it on your own private yacht. One week
only $385.00 per person. Including food
and much more. Organizers may go for
free! Easy Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-
7834001.
SPRING BREAK-Time to Book your
week at one of the Hot Spots Daytona
$99 Panama$109 Padre$119 Cancun
$399 and more Call Chris at ICP 1-800-
828-7015.
I SPRING BREAK '95 !
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
. Jamaica
Special Group Rates & Free Travel!
Sun Splash Tours j.
T 1-800-426-7710 Vj
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and pat ience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Dal y at
8304550.
NEED EXTRAF OR SPRING BREAK?
Earn the quick cash you need by stuffing
envelopes. It's easy-immediate response!
Send $1 with SASE to Carolina Enter-
prises, Inc P.O. Box 3251, Greenville, NC
27836-1251
JOB AVAILABLE - Dependable person
who is good with children is needed to
work in our home doing daily household
duties and helping care for our three chil-
dren when I am not home. The children
are 3 yrs. 5yrs, and 6yrs. old. THE HOURS
ARE FLEXIBLE. Please Call ASAP. Must
have references. 756-3538
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS of
North Carolina this summer? For summer
employment and housing information call
Paul at 800-662-2122
PART TIME - FLEXABLE HOURS night
and weekends - Cleaning, Assembly &
mold waxing at local Boat Man ufacturing
Plant. Fill out applicat ion at North Ameri-
can Fiberglass - 758-9901
NEED A JOB? HABS personnel services
offer professional resumes just for you.
Also typing, interview skills, and applica-
tion preparation. Call 752-3716 for ap-
pointment!
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK SUM-
MER IN MYRTLE BEACH, SC : Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession Work-
ers. Earn good money while working on
the Beach $$ Salary plus bonuses $$
FREE HOUSINC To apply or for further
information, callfax Sun Beach Service
at 803-2724170
FULLTIME SEASONAL EMPLOY
MENT available as Customer Service
Representive. Will use data entry equip-
ment (CRT) to enter customer orders. Pre-
fer computer skills, or ability to type 30-
40 wpm. Pleasant phone voice and ability
to work with customers. Knowledge of
Marine & Water Sports Equipment is help-
ful. Days and hours are flexible. Applica-
tions will be taken from 9-llam and 2-
4pm, Monday through Thursday. Apply at
Overton's Sports Center, Corporate Cen-
ter Office. Ill Red Banks Road.
Greenville, NC 27834.
M
Greek Personals
4 1
i.1 I �
nv.�tv �,
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
We Also Buy
gold
silver
Jewelry-
Also Broken
Gold Pieces
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC
We Also Buy:
Stereo's
T.V's.
VCR's
CD Player's
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
414 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1:30-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRTVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
l'1Ul
STEAMBOAT
VAILBEAVER CREEK
A
P
Z
You can get it
all in our
classifieds.
BAHAMAS
Spring Break Party
CRUISE
$279!
6 DAYS-12 MEALS-ALL TAX�S
1 -800-678-6386
ITS BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS!
CONGRATUALTIONS to Lucy Goodwin
for being elected Omicron Delta Kappa
President We're proud of you! Love, your
Chi Omega Sisters.
PI KAPPA ALPHA! Thanks for the awe-
some social Saturday night. We all had a
great time and really appreciate everything
you've done for us. Hope we do something
again soon! Love, Chi Omega.
KAPPA ALPHA! Just wanted to say
thanks for yet another "spontaneous so-
cial We had a blast and we want to con-
tinue the tradition! Love, Chi Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new sisters
of Chi Omega: Dana Blackwell. Courtney
Blakeslee, Leslie Burke, Stacee Diener,
Jessica Ennis. Ann-Marie Gehring, Mary
Marshall Harris, Cindy Ladas, Sara
Matyiko, Gayle Mohler. Debra Nagele, Jen
Nolan, Kelly O'Connell, Laura Partin,
Wannapa Pasookhush, Nikki Sears, Renee
Silber, Tera Stutzman, Dana Thiedeman,
Beth Thompson, and Brady Wood. We're
proud of you' Love, your Chi Omega Sis-
ters.
CHI OMEGA THANKS for a great pre
downtown md the trip back to the 80's!
Let's get together again soon. Pi Lambda
Phi.
PHI KAPPA TAU � Thanks for the food,
thanks for the beer, "1 never" had so much
fun with the people that were there. We
started early, we ended late, the "I never"
secrets sealed our fate. Thanks for the
Super Bowl party. We'll leave the light on
for you. Zeta
ALPHA PHI-VVater Polo and Basketball
teams are doing a great job. Keep it up.
Thanks to Gary. John and Scott for being
our coaches. Love the sisters of Alpha Phi.
ALPHA PHI-Congratulations Melissa C.
Vice Pres. of Order of Omega. Love Your
Alpha Phi Sisters.
ALPHA PHI-we had a great time at our
Pre-downtown! Hope we can get together
again sometime soon. Thanks. Sigma Tau
Gamma
GO SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA Basketball!
You girls are doing great! Love your sis-
ters.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA, get psyched for
the rest of sisterhood week. It's been a
blast so far and there is more to come so
get ready!
AOPi would like to congratulate the New
Members Mandi Boykin, Olivia McGlohon,
Elizabeth Neil, Saysha Raper, Julie Schutz,
Jenni Sisk, Magda Szymanowska We Love
Ya
PI KAPPA PHI: Thanks for a great time
at the Stoplight Social - Green Means Go!
Love AOPi
TKE BROTHERS THANKS for the awe
some Redneck Social - next time we'll
dress for the occasion Love AOPi Sisters
OUTSTANDING EDUCATION AWARD
goes to AOPi - Congratulations Girls'
Thanks Jill for doing a great job!
KAREN BASSETTI Congrats on receiv-
ing the Hera Award We're so lucky to have
you with us - Love AOPi
MAUREEN CONGRATULATIONS on
1995 Greek Woman Leadership Award as
well as Geek Hall of Fame, Panhellenic
President - Your sisters are very proud -
we know you'll do a great job - Alpha Love
AOPi
CONGRATS! to Karla Thompson on
Greek Hall of Fame Award, Beth McGhee:
Artemis Award, Allison McCullen: Out-
standing New Member Award We're Proud
of you all - AOPi
ZETA TAU ALPHA - Congrats on Most
Improved GPA! Also, congratulations to
Toni Daleo, Edy Cline. Aura Latham, Jill
Wagner and all other award receipients!
KAPPA SIGMA - Thanks for the Pref
Party. The upside down margaritas were
great but where was the mixer? Zeta
CHRIS, MIKE, BERT, AND J. � Thanks
so much for helping us with Bid Day din-
ner! We couldn't have done it without you.
Love, Zeta
RUGBY TEAM-Anything for money was
the game, the things we dared sure were
insane: dancing on tables, kissing and
more, dirty dancing till we all hit the floor.
We had a wonderful time. Love the Alpha
Phi's.
SEASONAL PACKAGING & SHIPPING
OPENINGS available. Personnel needed
to fill customer orders and prepare pack-
ages for shipment Students seeking Full
Time work for Spring and Summer are
encouraged to apply. Days, Mon-Fri; Hours
8am-6pm. Applications will be taken 9-
11am & 24pm MonThur. Apply at the
corporate Center Offices, 111 Red Banks
Rd Greenville, NC 27834.
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a degree and
practical experience is better! We are ac-
cepting applications for part-time mort-
gage reporting processors. A professional
attitude and good telephone skills are re-
quired. Flexible hours. If interested, please
mail your resume to: ONLINE MORT-
GAGE SERVICES, PO BOX 8048,
Greenville, NC 27835. NO CALLS
PLEASE
FUNDRAISER: Exclusively for fraterni-
ties, soroities, & student organizations.
Earn money without spending a dime. Jus t
3-5 days of your time. A little worka lot
of money Call for info. No obligation. 1-
800-932-0528, ext 65
STUDENTS AND FACULTY & STAFF
to serve on the New Student Recreation
Center Advisory Council. The Council will
govern the SRC, recommend policies, rec-
ommend costs and programming. For
more details, contact Jeannette Roth at
Recreational Services (328-6387)
DRIVER NEEDED to transport middle-
schoolers home from school daily. Must
be reliable, with dependable car and ref-
erences. Call 3554944 or 830-6964 ev e-
nings.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt County-
Memorial is seeking qualified individuals
to teach aerobic classes through its Em-
ployee Recreation and Wellness Depart-
ment. Persons will contract to teach on a
part-time basis. Interested candidates
should contact Ms. Scottie Caskins be-
tween 8am4:30pm at (919)816-5958. Pit t
County Memorial Hospital
HELP
WANTED!
Roadway Package System t
needs package handlers to
load vans and unload trailers
for the AM shift hours 3-8AM,
$6.00 hour, tuition assistance
available after 30 days.
Future career
management possible.
Applications can be filled out at
104 United Dr. 752-1803
Selling
that
clunker?
)o it in our
classifieds.
f
�-







- � v -
-�-
p
15
Thursday, February 9,1995 The East Carolinian
ANNO
AUDITIONS FOR VOLUNTEER
READERS
Auditions for Volunteer Readers are sched-
uled because of increased programming
planned bv the RADIO READING SER-
VICE OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
(RRSENC). If you have some extra time, a
good speaking voice, clear enunciation,
and the ability to read aloud fluently and
expressively, you are invited to audition.
The RRSENC broadcsasts The Daily Re-
flector news, information, and a variety
of topics to the visually impaired mem-
bers of our comm unity, and will soom add
magazine excerpts, stories, interviews, etc.
Broadcasts from the Brody Medical Build-
ing of Eas Carolina Campus are heard on
special radio receivers, and on Cable acess
Channel 36. You need not prepare for the
audition. You will be given something to
read aloud. The audition wil be held in
Auditorium Room 209 of the Robert
Humber Building at Greenville Commu-
nity College. Memorial Blvd Route 11,
on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1995,
12:00 noon to 2:00pm. For more informa-
tion call Robert Lancet at 7584683, or
756-8259.
UNIVERSTIY STUDENT
MARSHALS
Any student interested in serving as a
university marshal for the 1995 Spring
commencement may obtain an applicat ion
from Room A-12 Minges. Student must be
classified as a junior by the end of Fall
semester 1994 and have at least a 3.0 aca-
demic average to be eligible. Return com-
pleted applicat ion to Carol-Ann Tucker, Ad-
visor, A-12 Minges by Friday, February 17,
1995. For more information call 3284661.
PHI SIGMA PI
The Alpha Sigma Pledge class of the Tau
Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
Fraternity will be holding a free car wash
on Saturday February 11. Donations will
be accepted. All donations will go toward
the Dr. Thornton Scholarship.
ROADSIDE BEAUTIFICATION
Sponsored by the Environmental Health
Clib. Everyone Welcome, members encour-
aged to participate. All those interested
meet at 3:00pm Friday, February 10 at
Welcome Middle School.
MIDDLE GRADES ASSOCIATION
There will be a Middle Grades Meet ing on
Monday. February 13, 1995 at 3:30pm in
Speight Room 308.
MASSAGE CLINIC
Treat your Valentine to a massage! Mas-
sage Clinic, given by Physical Therapy stu-
dents, will be held Thursday Feb. 16 from
6-9pm at the ECU Back & Limb Clinic.
Buy tickets from PT students or at Back
& Limb Clinic - $2.00 for 10 min. ($2.50
at the door)
UNIVERSITY FOLK AND COUNTRY
DANCE CLUB
February meeting and contra dance will
be held Friday. Feb 10, 7:30-10:30pm in
the Ledonia Wright Bldg.(behind Student
Health). Live old-time music by Elderberry
Jam. Come alone or br ing a friend. FREE!
WHAT PERSONALITY "TYPE" ARE
YOU?
Examining "personality- is one way of
understanding yourself and your interac-
tions with others. Learn one method of
personality assessment, the Myers-Briggs
Type Indicator, and how it may be useful
in your life. Thursday, February 9,3:30pm-
5:00pm. Counseling Center. Call 328661
to register.
BASKETBALL SHOOTING
TRIATHLON
Come play in this year's Basketball Shoot-
ing Triathlon at 8:30pm on Wednesday
February 15 in Christenbury Gym. Also,
don't forget the Racquetball Singles en-
try deadline at 5pm on Thursday, Febru-
ary 23 in Christenbury 204. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328387
becoming more assertive. Wednesdays.
2pm-3:30pm. Beginning February 15.
Counseling Center. Call 328-6661 to reg-
ister.
BACKPACKING TRIP
Sign up now for the backpacking trip to
Mr. Rogers, Virginia on February 17-19.
If you are interested you will need to reg-
ister in 204 Christenbury Gym before
Friday. February 10. The next adventure
program is a Climbing II trip to Roxboro.
NC Saturday. February 25. Interested par-
ties will need to register by February 17
in 204 Christenbury Gym. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328387
ASSERTTVENESS TRAINING
This three-session workshop will teach you
why it is important to be assertive and
what makes assertive behavior difficult
This program will deepen your awareness
of yourself and others and teach you the
communication know-how that goes with
ADULT CHILDREN OF
ALCOHOLICS WORKSHOP
Learn how growing up in a dysfunctional
family affected you then and the impact it
plays on your life now. This three-session
workshop will include information about
alcoholism, family rules and roles, and
suggest goals for future recovery. Wednes-
days, 2:00pm-3:30pm, beginning 215.
Counseling Center. Call 328-6661 to reg-
ister.
FREE AEROBICS CLASS
There wilt be a free aerobics class, healthy
snacks, and prizes during the Friday Fit-
ness Fling on Friday, February 17 at 4pm
in 108 Christenbury Gym. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328387.
CHOOSING A MAJOR & A CAREER
Learn how personality affects career
choice. Take five assessment instruments.
Learn how to research career areas that
may be right for you. This five-session
workshop is just what you need. $15.00
Classes begin: 214, 217. Counseling
Center. Call 328661 for more informa-
tion.
YOUTH HOSTELS
Traveling over Spring Break, or during
the summer? Purchase a youth hostel card
now! It is good for a year and for $25, it
can save you many times its cost. You will
receive a map and a U.S. directory of hos-
tel locations. The card is also good for
international travel so come by Interna-
tional Programs soon for your card! The
office is located on 9th St. behind
McDonald's and is open M-F from 8:00-
5:00, or call 328769 for information.
LISTENING TO YOUR BODY
Stress effects you phsically as well as
emotionally. Discover how the use of bio-
feedback is used to pinpoint your stres-
sors and aid in relaxation. 216, 3:30pm-
5:00pm. Counseling Cent er. Call 328-6661
to register.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Academic Motivation-Overcoming Procras-
tination: 213, 3.30pm-5:00pm. Schedul-
ing & Time Management: 217. lpm-2pm.
Note Taking & Study Strategies: 215,
1 lam-noon. Exam Preparation: 214,2pm-
3pm. Exam Strategies: 213, 9am-10am.
Counseling Center. Call 328661 to reg-
ister.
CYPRESS GROUP NEWS
Group Meeting 7:30pm, Monday Febru-
ary 13, 1995 First Presbyterian Church,
14th & Elm Streets, Greenville NC. What
Happens When Loggers and Tree
Huggers Get Together: or. Strange Bed-
fellows on the Roanoke. Merrill Lynch,
NC Nature Conservancy, to speak. For
more information Contact 757-3895.
ECU CLUB
Proudly presents THAT'S AMORE. The
1995 International Wine Gala. Saturday
February 11, 1995, Rock Springs Eques-
trian Center. Highway 43 North
Creenville, 5:50pm. Come enjoy a medley
of elegant wimes in a romantic setting.
Celebrity service will be led by Chancel-
lor Richard Eaking, our Master of Ceremo-
nies will be Mark Rosenberg of Rosenberg
and Associates Advertising, Inc Win a trip
for two to any USAir North America des-
tination, including Canada, Mexico, and
the Caribbean, courtesy of USAir. And
don't miss the silent auction of outstand-
ing items. Tickets are $25 per person.
Proceeds from the Wine Gala will be used
to endow a single parent scholarship at
East Carolina University. For further in-
formation contact Lauren Whetstone 321-
4726 or Edna Hodges 816-3748. Black Tie
Optional.
fied format of the basic ECU Course Pro-
posal Form giving the proposed course
number and title (from the list on the back
of this sheet) and the course information
following the format of Part 11: "The Na-
ture of the Course" of the ECU Course
Proposal Form. All proposed seminars
should be intended to be approved as
Writing Intensive. And each proposal
should also indicate the Unit Head's ap-
proval. 2-Submit 15 copies of your course
proposal either to the Faculty Senate Of-
fice or to Doug McMillan as the Chair of
the Honors Program Committee by March
13, 1995. 3- If at all possible, plan to ap-
pear at the March 21, 1995, Honors Pro-
gram Committee meeting. Contact Doug
McMillan to schedule an approximate time:
Doug McMillan (English) Honors Pr ogram
Committee Chair. CG 2119. Ext. 6667 or
6041
HONORS SEMINAR PROPOSALS
FOR SPRING SEMESTER 1996
The Honors Program Committee will be
pleased to consider proposals for Spring
1996 Honors Seminars at its meeting on
Tuesday. March 21. 1995, beginning at
1:00 in Rawl Annex 142. (In contrast, pro-
posals for Honors sections of existing
courses should be arranged through your
Unit Head and the Director of the Hon-
ors Program, Dr. David Sanders.)l- To
propose a seminar, use your own modi-
ECNAO
ECNAO will meet February 20 in
Mendenhall at 7:00 in Room 14. We may
have a Valentine's Day Party. If you would
like more information please call Kim
Sampson 752-2319
TREASURE CHESTS AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure to
pick up your FREE video yearbook. Avail-
able at the Student Store, The East Caro-
linian, Joyner Library, Mendenhall and the
Media Board office in the Student Publi-
cations Building.
Having trouble finding where to drop off
Classifieds and Announcements?
Well, look no more!
Forms for Classifieds and Announcements
can be picked up in Mendenhall and
dropped of in the Student Pubs Building
ATTIC
The.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
752-7303
209 E. 5th Street
Greenville, NC
TONIGHT FEB. 9
Arolly gray
For Membersjr3 SUNFIIRE
�SLANDREGGAE MUSIC
.990 Membership .99c Hi Balls .99C 32oz. Draft
.kAjLy
FRIDAY FEB. 10
JtNATUWB
Saturday Feb. 11
- 5 Adm.
FULL STOP
- vvi WITH SPECIAL GUEST:
KNOCKED DOWN SMtLIN (1030)
WEDNESDAY FEB. 15
COMEDY ZONE CONCERT:
BOB NELSON
Special Guest PETER PITOFSKY g
v vAjLis
2 Shows
7 & 10
TTT
THURSDAY FEB. 16
Rock for Real Benefit for the Real Crisis Center
Featurine the Along.With
reu ig ModernTilgrams
AMATEURS afiis
-
A"
FRIDAY FEB. 17
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Announcements
Any organization may use
the Announcements
Section of The East
Carolinian to list activities
and events open to the
public two times free of
charge. Due to the limited
amount of space, The
East Carolinian cannot
guarantee the publication
of announcements.
$10ADVTIXONSALENOW!
Displayed Classifieds
$5.50 per column inch
Displayed advertisements
may be canceled before
10 a.m. the day prior to
publication. However, no
refunds will be given.
AH ads must be pre-paid
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
For more Informatjoncall ECU-6366.






�I�
pr
"� � r �
Bad Valentine Idea 12
Broadway Karaoke
Ilovejow a
� and a pecA;
You bet yer pretty
IDOOO!
Poor ECU Man. He wants to impress ECU Woman.
His heart's in the right place,
but his voice
Hey, just put a Love Line in The East Carolinian
and don't run the risk of hitting the wrong note.
Let ECU know how you feel about your guy or doll.
Otherwise, you may have to sing for your supper.
Name:
T pvr. Lines Forffl
J�4 Messages will appear in the Feb. 14 issue of The East Carolinian
Phone Number: ��
Address
Message:
One
word
per
box.
$3 for 25 words or fewer; IOC each for more than 25
Names of sender and addressee will appear in bold with no charge; only first names will be pnnted
Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Sender will be notified in such an instance.
Bring form and payment to East Carolinian office (2nd floor. Student Pubs Building).
Deadline for entries is Friday, Feb. 10 at 4:00.
Lyrics � 1994 Frank Music Corp. ASCAP
Yeesh!
Oh, well. At least he's not as bad
as N.C. State Man.
M





Title
The East Carolinian, February 9, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1057
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58523
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