The East Carolinian, February 7, 1995






5
Februray 7,1995
Vol 69, No. 73
r
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pages
Pirate athletics left Hart-broken
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Dave Hart announced at a press conference Saturday that he was discussing details
regarding the athletic director position at Florida State University. Yesterday, he formally
announced that he has taken the job. A replacement search will begin late this week.
At a news conference yesterday
morning, Florida State University
(FSU) President Talbot "Sandy"
D'Alemberte announced that ECU
Athletic Director Dave Hart would
take over the same position at FSU,
effective March 15, 1995.
Details of Hart's contract were
not available, but it is rumored to be
a five-year deal worth just under
$200,000 per year.
"We had an outstanding pool
of candidates for this very important
position, but Dave Hart is clearly the
person who has the best athletic man-
agement, marketing, public relations
and fundraising skills to lead our ath-
letics program into the 21st century
D'Alemberte said at the press confer-
ence.
The announcement culminated
two weeks of speculation in which
Hart was rumored to be the heavy
favorite for the position, vacant since
former FSU athletic director Bob Goin
was fired for unethical practices last
October.
"The physical and program-
matic changes he has led are evident
and serve as a powerful testimonial
to his contributions to ECU said
"The physical and
programmatic
changes he has led
are evident and
serve as a powerful
testimonial to his
contributions to
ECU"
Richard Eakin
ECU Chancellor
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin. We
wish him continued success in his new
responsibilities at Florida State Uni-
No charges filed
in fatal accident
Bicycle safety
committee formed
last week to
inform students
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
cycle safety, we decided a task force
should be formed Gertz said.
SGA President Ian Eastman is
on the committee.
"We sat down and established
a charge, and everyone discussed the
needs that should be addressed
Eastman said.
He said the committee will
Anita Pickett Prescott, 51, of
Winterville will not be charged in the
Jan. 9 death of Detlev Bunger. an
ECU biology student, police said.
"The investigating officer met
with the district attorney and pre-
sented all of his evidence and all of
his facts and it was decided at that
time that no charges would be
brought against the bus driver said
CapL John Ennis of Greenville's po-
lice department.
Kirk Dominick, executive direc-
tor of Greenville' Boys' and Girls'
Club had no comment as to whether
Mrs. Prescott would continue to work
for the Boys' and Girls' Club saying
only, "We are concerned for the fam-
Bunger was traveling east on
10th Street when the bicycle he was
riding collided with a Boys' and Girls'
Club bus tui.ng right onto 10th
Street from the Forrest Hills Circle
intersection. The accident occured at
3 p.m.
Investigating officer R.A. Will-
iams made a statement that his in-
vestigation concluded Bunger was
traveling on the wrong side of the
road.
"In my opinion, she wasn't in
violation of any statutes Williams
said. "He was indicated on the report
as being in violation of traveling left
of center
Williams said the investigation
took a few weeks to complete all the
interviews and necessary procedures.
Prescott did not have to appear in
court.
A Bicycle Safety Committee
met for the first time in Mendenhall
last Thursday, said Pat Gertz, direc-
tor of traffic services.
"Because we had a lot of ques-
tions last November concerning bi-
See FATAL page 3
Bicycle Safety Tips
DOs and DONTs
� Ride with traffic, stay to the right
� Obey all traffic regulations
� Use proper hand signals
� Stop & look before entering street
� Walk bikes across streets
� Use headlights and rear reflectors
Suggested by Sgt. Al Fonville,
K Show off! Keep hands on bars
K Zig-zag, race or stunt ride in traffic
U Accept any passengers
K Carry large packages
Hitch rides on trucks or cars
Ride against traffic
ECU Public Safety
versity
In the recent past, Hart had
turned down the athletic director po-
sitions from Maryland and Pitt, citing
unfulfilled goals at ECU, most nota-
bly getting the Pirates into a football
conference - a goal still left
unreached.
"My vision for this program at
Florida State is to be a program that's
looked upon as highly successful and
comprehensive Hart told the Asso-
ciated Press.
Hart has been the athletics di-
rector at ECU since 1987, and has
more than doubled the Pirates' ath-
letic budget during his tenure. The
level of funding for ECU's women's
sports increased over 220 percent in
a three-year period under Hart and
three new women's sports were added.
"We are very appreciative of
how much the program has grown
under Mr. Hart's direction said Lady
Pirate basketball coach Rosie Thomp-
son. "They've played ball here with-
See HART page 9
Lama
to visit
campus
Students' dollars stack up illegally
aaa aaa tsaa
aaa aaa r�a
aa aaa rp
THE PYRAMID
$
$ � $
Vice-President Vice-President
Club members Club members
t�t�t�h tj ti ti fc
JJJjpJpJp p ip fy p
Pyramid scam
invades campus,
students warned
of legalities
Ben Duran
Staff Writer
New Members
New Members
1. New membership fee paid by the new members will be
handed up the pyramid to the president, who retires after maing
$800.
2. Each Vice President is then promoted to president of his own
pyramid, with two club members becoming president.
3. The four club members, under the vice president, then begin
to recruit two new members, each at a $100 membership fee.
4. If the new members are not recruited, then the pyramid is not
completed and the investors will receive no return on their
investment.
Information provided by U. Magazine
ECU has sprouted dozens of
pyramids re-
cently, but don't
go looking for
any giant tri-
angles on the
mall America's
latest get-rich-
quick scheme,
has hit Greenville
and it goes by the
name of The
Friends Network.
The rules
are simple
enough. As a new
member, you give
your $50 to the
president and
take your spot on the bottom row
of the pyramid. When eight people
have been recruited, and the presi-
dent gets eight payments of $50,
the pyramid splits in half. The eight
people who were on the bottom row
move up to the next level, and the
process repeats until you become
president and collect your checks.
"You've got people telling
people that it's a guaranteed $400,
but itfs not, you have to get other
people to join the pyramid or else
it will collapse under its own
weight says Amy, a senior.
"If you get people that are
willing to sell, it works, but if you
get people that don't realize that
you have to work for it, that it's not
a free lunch, it stops Amy said.
"Its all about money and
greed, people just want to make
money, they talk about friends, but
they're really
i screwing their
friends by doing
it Amy said.
Making
friends is a ma-
Rle photo
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
"It's just the
American dream,
just making money ���
without having to
do anything but
making new
friends
"Rob"
Network. One
junior named
Rob sums it up,
"It's just the
American dream,
just making
money without
having to do any-
thing but mak-
ing new friends.
"It's not a pyramid, its a
fractal, everybody has the chance
to get to the top, it's not just one
person at the top getting
everyone's money. It teaches you
about every aspect of business,
from marketing to sales and net-
See PYRAMID page 3
This week students and the
Greenville community can find out
more information on Eastern be-
liefs when The Venerable Bardor
Tulku Rinpoche of a Tibetan Bud-
dhist monastery in New York comes
and gives a public talk and semi-
nar.
"This gentleman is a Tibetan
Lama said Mary Atkeson, owner
of the Boktrader, located on the
corner of Dickinson Avenue and
10th Street. Lama means
teacher
Atkeson said "Rinpoche" also
means "teacher and "Tulku"
means "highly realized lama
Highly realized lamas are some-
times capable of remembering past
lives.
On Feb. 7, Rinpoche will give
an all day seminar on "The Bud-
dhist Practice of Chenrezig For
information on the place and time,
the phone number is 756-8315.
"The Chenrezig practice is a
practice trying to help you let off
See LAMA page 3
LWfeu
Ituide
8
The Gray Art Gallery could truly light up your day page
Are the media really screwed up?page 4
ECU gains 10 in-state recruitspage I c.
0?wua�
Tuesday
Snow, Snow
High 30
Low 20
Wednesday
Burrrrrr
High 34
Low 23
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from Joyner
-���
j





pr
Tuesday, February 7,1995
The East Carolinian
hatting
hancellor
On ECU basketball games and the new Williams Arena
So far, Chancellor Eakin hasn't missed a home game.
"I try to be the 1 supporter - fan - to show that I support their
efforts 1 think it's quite important for ECU administration to show sup-
port I'm so proud and so pleased with the new arena. It goes way beyond
my wildest dreams
On the stolen TV in Williams Arena
"It's extremely frustrating. Of course, it brings to our attention
the need to develop a higher level of security for the building. We may
have been operating on a higher level of trust than we should be, I'm sad
to say. We will be more vigilant because the new arena is something to be
treasured. I was so dismayed
On the rebuilding of the old Austin cupola
Some students have voiced concern that the site for the cupola
would interfere with Barefoot on the Mall, among activities.
"In recognition of SGA President Ian Eastman's observations,
the site was moved. Alumni Circle will eventually be gone, and the cupola
will be along where the sidewalk is now, away from the middle of the Mall
where Barefoot is held
On the 'dorm' versus 'residence hall' controversy
"I try mightily, but occasionally I slip. I belive in the fact that
there is a distinction
On the success of the Shared Visions campaign
"At the end of December we were at $54.3 million. December was
a good month for us we had an anonymous donation of $1 million. It
surprised me, frankly, that we didn't get more media coverage
Chancellor Eakin suggested that perhapd the coverage was lim-
ited because, while this campaign is extraordinary for ECU, other North
Carolina universities are used to even larger campaigns.
On the death of Detlev Bunger
"It was a tragic incident We all need to be very aware of safety
considerations whether we're walking, riding or driving. We have been for
a long time concerned with the crossing on 10th Street Our aim in life is
to make people cross at one of two crossings
On possible bike paths
"I want to do whatever we can do as a community to make it safe
for us. It must be dealt with by the community, and we must keep pedestri-
ans and bikes away from each other
Merchant seeks
pet supplies
BLT's, Pitt County
Humane Society
team up to collect
needed supplies
Correction Box
An article appearing last week entitled "Local vets offer
reduced spaying, neutering fees incorrectly listed the dates
of the services. The fees will be available the second and third
weeks of February. No dates have been set for September.
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
HHMnMMMaMMHHHHMHMHHi
For students who can not
have pets in their apartments or
dormitories, but who would like to
help with the pet problems in Pitt
County, there is an option. The Pitt
County Humane Society needs do-
nations of supplies to help feed and
board unwanted animals.
BLT's The Boutique is pitch-
ing in to help meet this need by of-
fering a ten percent discount on
anything in the store to customers
who bring in a donation for the Hu-
mane Society.
"We plan to run several of
these kinds of promotions over the
next year for different charities
said Denise Overman, owner of
BLT's. We're trying to give a little
back to the community
Overman said many custom-
ers are not even aware that the Hu-
mane Society is here in town.
"We're hoping that because
of this, more pets will be adopted,
too she said.
The donations BLT's and the
Pitt County Humane Society are
asking for are dog food, cat food,
flea spray, shampoos and toys. Any-
thing that will help with the care
and upkeep of the animals is
needed.
"We especially need puppy
food said Bobbie Parsons, presi-
dent of the Pitt County Humane
Society. "We get a lot of dog food,
but if we get a puppy in with mal-
nutrition, he has to have puppy
chow
The same is true for felines.
The Humane Society needs cat
food, but the need for kitten food
is more pressing. Other urgent
needs of the organization are
leashes, collars, kitty litter and
bermuda hay.
"Actually several local farm-
ers are donating bermuda hay al-
ready, but we need more Parsons
said.
The supplies go to help feed,
house and care for 35 dogs and
puppies and 25 cats and kittens.
Unfortunately, this is the maximum
number of animals the Humane
Society can house at one time.
"Once we're full, if a car pulls
up with a dog, we have to send him
to the citycounty shelter, where
See PET page 3
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
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Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Pet donations, such as pet food and litter can be dropped off
at BLT's located downtown. Puppy food is greatly needed.
East Carolina Playhouse
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February 9, 10, 11, 13 and 14, 1995 at 8:00 p.m.
February 12, 1995 at 2:00 p.m.
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East Carolina University
Main Campus
Call-328-6829
General Public: S 7.50
ECU Students:4.50
Children:4.50
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-





Tuesday, February 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
PYRAMID from page
working
The Friends Network is not
flawless, in fact it's illegal accord-
ing to State Statute 14-291.2,
which is comes under the heading:
Pyramid and Chain Schemes Pro-
hibited, according to Robert
Trivette, an assistant district attor-
ney in Dare County. But that has
not stopped many ECU students
from trying to make a few extra
dollars.
"College students don't really
have a lot of money to be throwing
away in it, but we just split the $50
box between two people, so it
wasn't that big of a gamble. But it
was weird because we were talking
to people we didn't even know
Amy said. "We were associating
with people that we might just have
seen before, but then we were talk-
ing to them like three times a day,
but we still didn't know them, I'm
just glad I didn't loose anything
Amy's pyramid collapsed just
after she became president and got
back her initial investment.
Rob declined to comment on
how much money he had made in
The Friends Network but did offer
this in response to questions re-
garding the pyramid's stability: "It
should never end because the world
is never going to run out of people,
the only way you don't make money
is if you're just lazy and sit around
and you don't recruit. If you sit
there and explain how it works to
people, they should have no qualms
about joining it
Several students, when given
an opportunity to join, decided
against doing so. Some said it was
too great of a financial risk, while
others feared the legal ramifica-
tions.
"Legal or illegal, it really
doesn't matter either way, we live
in a capitalist society where money
is of higher value than the law says
Shelle, a senior who declined to get
involved with The Friends Network,
but admitted " I was tempted
Last names have been omit-
ted to protect the privacy of the
sources.
Charting your rufure?
You'll find lote of options
in our classifieds.
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Jrlil from page 2
they dispose of them by the week.
Fifty animals a week are killed
there Parsons said.
The cause of the huge num-
bers of animals abandoned and de-
stroyed every week is partly due to
ECU students who are away from
home for the first time and miss-
ing their family dog or cat.
"Then once school is out,
they just leave them outside and
move away. Or their landlord finds
out and they put the pet out Par-
sons said.
Part of the problem is also
that everyone wants a puppy or a
kitten. The older pets do not get
adopted and the animals that are
adopted as puppies and kittens of-
ten are back at the Humane Soci-
ety by the time they are six months
old.
However, if ECU students are
a part of the problem, they are also
a part of the solution. The Pitt
County Humane Society has as
many as 10 ECU student volunteers
who come in on a regular basis and
give their time and energy to feed,
water and clean-up after the ani-
mals.
"We're lucky to have them
Parsons said. "And they are usually
the hardest on the other students
who come in looking to adopt a
puppy or kitten
These student volunteers and
people like Denise Overman, who
is conducting the Humane Society
promotion on her own initiative,
are making a start towards reduc-
ing the number of animals de-
stroyed in Pitt County every week.
c
a r e e r
orner
2
Registering For Career Services
It's Easier Than You Think
Now is an ideal time to get registered with Career Services.
Orientation sessions are listed in The East Carolinian
announcements.
Who's eligible to register with Career Services?
� Seniors (in their last academic year)
� Graduate Students (in their last academic year)
What are the perk of registering with Career Services?
� Monthly Job Guides that announce employer interview dates,
available positions and workshop dates.
� Credentials file that contains your resume, letters of reference and
student teaching report (if applicable). As requested, the credentials
are sent to employers.
� Publications that enhance your career search, including Job Choices
and Black Collegian.
� Job referrals that allows us to send your resume to interested
employers.
How can I register with Career Services?
�Call 328-6050 to learn about Orientation sessions.
Career Services is now located at 701 E. 5th Street.
FATAL from page 1
meet twice a month and has already
promoted action. The group is plan-
ning to post safety features on the
backs of Greenville signs and to pro-
pose a list of recommendations by
next April, Eastman said. The com-
mittee also addressed the need for
more bicycle racks and complimented
increased lighting around campus,
Eastman said. Specific locations for
safety measures were also discussed.
Several precautions can be
taken to avoid bicycle accidents, said
Sgt. Al Fonville of ECU's Public
Safety.
"The aspect of being informed;
that could offset a lot of the hazards
that are normally encountered wheh
riders do not adhere to the recom-
mended and legal aspect of riding a
bike on the street Fonville said. �
JLAjYLA. from page 1
your love and kindness and com-
passion towards other people
Atkeson said.
Buddhist chants are also used
during this practice.
On Feb. 8, he will give a pub-
lic talk on "How to Live With Lov-
ing Kindness in a Violent World"
at 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Uni-
versalist Church at 131 Oakmont
Drive.
Atkeson said most Buddhists
believe in non-violence and passiv-
ism when dealing with opposition.
Also, she said that when a lama
gives a public talk, it is on a secu-
lar, non-religious topic.
The talks are hosted by the
Karma Thegsum Choling (KTC)
Club of Greenville.
Atkeson said KTC's are estab-
lished all over the country by the
Karma Triyana Dharmachakra
(KTD) in New York.
Campus Interviews
February 21,1995
OLDE, America's Full Service Discount Broker,1 is
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If you possess excellent communication skills, general
market knowledge and the desire to excel, sign up for
an on-campus interview on February 21,1995 in the
Career Center.
If you are unable to arrange an interview call:
1 800 937-0606
or send resume to:
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"There is a Tibetan Buddhist
monastery established up in
Woodstock, New York Atkeson
said. "It's called Karma Triyana
Dharmachakra
Rinpoche is the second in
command at this monastery.
Other places that the KTD has
started KTC's are in South America,
Taiwan and Australia.
Atkeson said lamas usually
come to KTC's twice a year.
"We have, maybe twice a year,
lamas come give talks Atkeson
said. "He's going to give a talk here
in Greenville and one up in Raleigh
Rinpoche was born in 1950 in
Eastern Tibet. He and his family left
the country in 1959 when the com-
munist Chinese government leaders
killed or drove out the religious lead-
ers in Tibet ;
Atkeson said she is 95 percent
Buddhist and finds meditation ben-
eficial because it helps her concen-
trate and focus on her work. She
said she feels that anyone who goes
to the talk will get the Tibetan per-
ception on our world.
"They would get the point of
view of the Tibetan Buddhist toward
how we should relate to the world
Atkeson said. "How we should re-
late to violence. How it is possible
for us to relate with love and kind-
ness to this world we live in
��1 nic-n
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It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in

Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26, 1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the Mendenhall Information Desk
and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student
ii Activities Office, 328-4766, for more information.





Tuesday, February 7,1995
The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director

Our View
The East
Carolinian long
ago decided to
ignore the OJ.
controversy.
Well, we're
breaking our
silence to
chastise the
media. (Except,
obviously, us, of
course.) Can we
really believe
what you read
and see? Or do
we just want to
believe it so
badly?
What is wrong with the media today? Every time we open the
paper, turn on the TV or listen to the radio, we are bombarded by
some new development in the 0 J. Simpson trial.
It's not that the OJ. Simpson trial is unimportant, it's the fact
that the media is feeding upon this one event alone, and not paying
as much attention to other stories that are just as important
The last time we checked, the media's job is to tell the facts
without giving an opinion about what is going on. Now, every Larry,
Mo and Curly who has a job with the "illustrious" media can't seem
to get anything done without putting their own opinions into the
already-muddled pool of analysts.
Why is it that in the 0 J. case, CNN spent a whole evening record-
ing 0 J. and his friend driving down the highway at approximately 45
mph? Because we want to see such high drama and entertainment
There are also the people in the media who feel as if they have to
do everything they can just to get in on the action. This includes
scraping the bottom of the tank labeled "possible people who can tell
us about the real OJ and interviewing people who maybe knew
OJs ex-wife because they delivered flowers to her once, or they hap-
pened to run into 0 J. in a club once. These people are expected to
know everything about the accused, 0 J and the victim, Nicole, based
upon seeing them in person for a few hours out of the span of a
lifetime. These people have also been asked countless times whether
they think that 0 J. is guilty. And, sadly, we sit there and hang on to
their every word.
The media even go so far as to tell strategies from the defense
and the prosecution. This whole saga has turned into a parody of the
old TV show People's Court except Judge Wapnerhas been replaced I
by Judge Ito.
One other important issue the media constantly focus upon in
the Simpson case and other cases too, is the fact that when such a
tragedy happens, the media have forgotten the age-old premise that
in America a person is innocent until proven guilty.
Whatever happened to truth, justice and the American Way? Has
it been destroyed because the media have taken over our lives? It is
kind of sad that America is so dependent upon the media to provide
entertainment before news, because if we weren't would you be read-
ing this right now? What caught your eye first "media" or "0J-?"
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryi Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel.Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 coP.esevery T "�J�J
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editoria. Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters o the ed,tor, hm ted to
250 words which may be edited for decency or brevity.The East Carolinian reserves the right to edrt or reject letters for
publion AMetters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor.The East Caro.in.an, Pubhcatlons
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 278584353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
ify without hazing
I was surprised to see the article
in the Tuesday's paper (January 24,1995)
which talked about the suspension of
seven members of the Eta Nu chapter of
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity.
Although the article was very well
written, I feel that it should not have been
published since the incident happened
last semester. In my opinion it is best to
leave the past in the past
Newspapers are suppose to pub-
lish uptodate material, not material that
is at least three months old. I prefer to
read about the events that are happen-
ing this semester, not about the events
that has occured last semester.
A statement that was made by Mr.
Speier really got to me. How can Dean
Speier say that "the Alphas did a good
job of unifying their pledges?" Is hazing
the way to unify a group of individuals?
They are not animals who need to
be tamed in order to become unified. I
am surprised a statement like that would
leave the mouth of the Dean of Stu-
dents. A group of individuals do not need
to be hazed mentally nor physically in
order to be unified.
The negative publicity that was
Angela McCullers
Opinion Columnist
What's the real
meaning of
brother-and
sisterhood?
Hazing doesn't
quite define it .
generated by this incident is just the thing
that makes all black Greeklettered orga-
nizations look bad.
Greek organizations have a very
important purpose in our society. At
times there are a few members of some
organizations who do not stand up to
their responsibilities and work toward dis-
playing a positive image of themselves
or their organizations. This statement is
not directed to a specific organization,
but to all members, as individuals, in gen-
eral.
When black fraternities and sorori-
ties were established one of their primary
functions was to serve the community
on and off campus while promoting unity
among black students.
A few Greeks on the yard have a
poor disposition and a negative attitude,
but that goes for noivGreeks as well. ,
There are things that each minority stu-
dent can do to strengthen communica-
tion on campus.
It should not matter if an indi-
vidual is a "soror" or a "frat brother
The plan must be the same throughout
in order to see unified progress. It is easy
to be defeated whenever there is not a
unified front
Until we can come together as one,
love as one, stand up for each other as
one we will never know the real mean-
ing of brotherhood or sisterhood.
To every eye that reads these
words I would like to pose a question to
you: Do you know the real meaning of
brotherhood or sisterhood?
It is past time for us, as minority
students, to realize the meaning of the
words: I love you my brother or my sis-
ter.
deserves
Preaching lacks tolerance
Last week marked an event that
has become an annual occurrence here
at ECU. No, I'm not talking about the
dusting of snow Greenville received. I
am referring to the return of the Bible
thumping, judgment shouting finger
pointing Christian fundamentalists.
In the time I have been here, these
two guys have blessed ECU with their
presence every year like clockwork. The
majority of you probably know exactly
who I am talking about But for those of
you who don't I'll fiU you ��� Two men'
who's names I do not know, take it upon
themselves to venture onto the mall and
attempt to save each and every student
of this fine university from toe eternal
flames of Hell.
Armed only with cheap leisure
suits and an arsenal of unfounded judg
ments, they begin to spout at high vol-
umes, passages from the Bible. What
separates these guys from other evange-
lists is that they find no wrong in cast-
ing judgment on anyone who dresses,
walks, or believes differently from them-
selves. With only a glance they can fore-
cast your eternal fate. I personalty was
shocked to hear that Hell awaits me
merely because I wear an earring
An amazingly large number of stu-
dents stop to listen to these polyester
prophets. The majority are stopped by
curiosity or perhaps an opportunity for
free entertainment The remaining usu-
Calvin Arlington
Opinion Columnist
Free speech
accompanied
by deaf ears
invaded campus
once again.
ally fall into one of two categories. There
are those who blincuy agree with every-
thing these guys feel the need to scream,
and there are those who dare to chal-
lenge them with opposing views of reli-
gion. However, citing a differing view is
a big mistake when one is dealing with
fanatics. The opponents charge in with
ferocity and heart For that I must com
mend them But usually in the end their
points are ignored and they are driven
off by the religious madmen. Defeated,
not because they were wrong but be-
cause they lacked the vocal strength of
their rival
Don't get me wrong I'm no athe-
ist I feel these men have a right to come
onto our campus and share their beliefs.
However I do have a real problem with
anyone who exercises their right to free
speech, then not only turns a deaf ear
but belittles and insults those with dif-
ferent views. Sure it would be a nice
little world if we all walked around with
the same beliefs and opinions, but I don't
see that happening anytime soon. We
need to recognize that there are always
going to be those who do not agree with
us. Rather than deciding who is right
and wrong by seeing who can yell the
loudest we need to actually begin lis-
tening to one another. Who knows, we
might actually learn something
To these men who frequent our
campus annually I have something to
say. Continue to hold your beliefs
strongly and near to your heart Only in
the future be more tolerant of those who
question you. Wild accusations and
strong language may draw a crowd, but
a more patient approach is needed Your
motives are respectable but your presen-
tation leaves a lot to be desired.
I have no idea where these reli-
gious gypsies are now. Perhaps they are
roaring into the sunset with the Hell's
Angels they spoke so much about Or
maybe they are crouched behind the
bushes of an abortion clinic waiting to
share their views. Wherever they are,
Godspeed to them and I guess we'll see
them next year.
Burning the American flag is an
action I find utterly repulsive. Especially
disconcerting is when fellow Americans,
under the premise of free speech, torch
that symbol of American unity. As of
yet however, it is a heinous act that is
shielded by the First Amendment
In 1984 at the Republican Na-
tional Convention in Dallas, Texas, a
man publicly burned the American flag
while chanting "America, the red, white,
and blue, we spit on you The incident
incurred no violence and except for a
few spectators who testified that they
were offended, the event was peaceful.
The flag burner was subsequently
convicted because he broke a Texas
state law that prohibited flag burning
But later, an appeal to the Supreme
Court reversed his conviction.
Justice William Brennan's deci-
sion of the case asserted that there had
been no breach of the peace nor fight-
ing words exchanged at the incident
Brennan also stated that since the
state of Texas set aflame flags that had
become ragged, the sole reason for con-
viction was to restrict the message the
protester wished to convey. Conse-
quently, the constitutional right to free
speech protects advocacy of such mes-
sages, ergo, the flag burner was within
his rights.
Steven Hill
Opinion Columnist
Don't desecrate
the American
flag just to make
a point. Think
about what
you're doing.
Subsequent public uproar over
the 1989 Supreme Court decision com-
pelled Congress to pass the Flag Pro-
tection Act of 1989. The Act was quickly
tested and rejected by the Supreme
Court Justice Brennan: "Punishing des-
ecration of the flag dilutes the very free-
dom that makes this emblem so revered,
and worth revering"
The Supreme Court Justices were
not united in either of their decisions
- both the Texas case and the Flag Pro-
tection Act were decided by 54 mar-
gins. Dissenting Justices asserted that
flag burning has nothing to do with "dis-
agreeable conduct" The objecting Jus-
tices contended that the unique sym-
bolic value of the American flag should
allow it to be placed under exceptional
f
protection.
Since 1990, the flag burning con- .
troversy has been a dormant issue. How-
ever, room remains for further debate
over the issue. Supreme Court Justices
themselves have admitted that the laws
protecting are not necessarily incontest-
able and may change.
The flag burning issue is a sticky
issue that is worthy of thought A part
of me wants to protect our flag from
burning by resurrecting the old English
standard punishment for seditious libel.
It called for the offender to be
hanged, cut down while still alive, and
then emasculated, disemboweled, quar-
tered, and beheaded. Still another part
of me would like to subscribe to George
Hay's assertion that free speech, like
chastity, is absolute or it doesn't exist
at all.
Many methods are available for
Americans to voice their views and opin-
ions. One does not need to desecrate
the American flag to argue an issue.
While the arguments on both sides of
the issue are commendable, I must ad-
mit that I would not be averse to pro-
tecting our flag from unnecessary burn-
ing
Life is losing its vigor
� iLI11. � �. � -t A7Hu
4�H�
The world of Western Thought
is based on hierarchies. The U.S. gov-
ernment a flow chart and our edu-
cational system are all hierarchies.
We, as Americans, constantly
categorize items ushg this system.
How are we taught? The basics of
biology begin with kingdoms. English
begins with nouns, verbs and adjec-
tives. In math, we begin with whole
numbers. Each study simply expands.
We, as Americans, can classify
anything. We have categories for
music, books and paintings. There is
probably a classification for tooth-
picks in a factory somewhere.
We, as individuals, become clas-
sified by gender, race, weight and
height. And we, as students, have
been classified since the first day of
our education. Our educational sys-
tem is cluttered with categorized
measurements such as the SAT ACT,
ASVAB GRE LSAT, IQ and count-
less others. And, of course, we have
our beloved grading scale.
I now wish to return to a time
of enchanted dreams. A time when
Lewis N. Terrell
Opinion Columnist
Don't let socie
ruin your lives!
Break out of
those terrible,
constraining
classifications.
we acted and thrived on whatever our
minds could conjure. Our Picasso
souls created portraits on canvases
of newsprint with finger-paints.
We danced and sang as if na-
tive to some tropical island. Our
hearts pounded as we played out our
fantasies with friends we wished to
keep forever.
Our ambitions and dreams
were destined, as we ran through
neighborhoods of the past Why do
we now only dream at night? Why has
the same life lost the vigor and lust it
once possessed?
The answer is simple; we be-
came classified. And like the things
we classify and stereotype, it is diffi-
cult for those items to break free of
their given categories.
We, as individuals, accept our
classification and carry out our so-
ciological function. Our environment
and peers propel us down our path
of life as we run further and further
from our dreams. We have become
confined by our own 'abels.
Our concepts of reality are so
ingrained, we never attempt to dis-
cover their origin. The point is this,
the past will never change and the
future is nothing more than a deci-
sion made in the present
The past is carved in stone, the
future is as malleable as clay. Only
you can prevent the future of your
dreams. Society attempts to limit, but
the mind and spirit of individuals will
prevail.





?"
-
Tuesday, February 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
LIFe
4t e&tew
Art in the Dark
Knutson's phosphorescent paints light up Gray Gallery
Quentin Pickup
Staff Writer
The Wellington B. Gray Gallery
is hosting a retrospective exhibition of
paintings by internationally known
artist Anders Knutson. Knutson is a
native of Malmo, Sweden, but currently
resides in Brooklyn, New York.
At first sight Knutson's paintings
seem to be very gestural and organic
in their shape and form, but as dark-
ness falls the viewer realizes there is a
unique twist to these paintings.
Knutson has been experimenting and
using phosphorescent paints since the
late 70s and early '80s.
Color is reflected light, but
Knutson's paintings challenge this law
because his colors are also the source
of light Color is actually the source of
light within these paintings. Just as
light plays a part in the paintings so
does darkness. The viewer's perception
is focused on the paintings and their
elements since the viewer literally can't
see anything else. This creates a very
intimate relationship between the
viewer and the artwork. The lack of
depth and space, due to the darkness,
create a very liberating approach to art
These paintings challenge the
way a viewer experiences art, but the
paintings still must stand on their own
both in the darkness and uV light In
the light these paintings are not as im-
pressive or forceful as in the dark. The
lack of definition and contrast within
the paintings is bothersome. The paint-
ings appear very flat
Overall Knutson's paintings are
much more effective in the dark. Con-
trasts are intensified along with defi-
Bucket
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great screaming
bucket of American media opin-
ion. Take it as you will
Karl Marx once called reli-
gion the opiate of the masses. In
modern America, however, sports
seem to have taken religion's place
in that equation. America is too
diverse, with too marry faiths that
don't get along Sports is our na-
tional religion.
Just because we don't have
any holidays devoted to sports
doesn't make it any less true.
America worships the athlete. The
signs are everywhere. Sports bars
litter cities across the country,
modern churches where Ameri-
cans of all stripes gather to social-
ize and worship. Ghetto kids kill
each other over starter jackets em-
blazoned with team logos in some
kind of perverted holy war. You
can't walk 10 feet in this country
without seeing or hearing some
kind of sports reference. And then
there's the Super Bowl.
I think it's safe to talk about
this now. It's all over. The dust has
settled, the communion pretzels
and sacrificial beer cans have all
been carefully disposed of, and
even the most devout of the faith-
ful have stopped talking about it. I
don't think the gods of footbail will
cast their wrath down upon me.
If sports is a religion, Super
Bowl Sunday is its High Holy Day.
Since I can personally attest to the
fact that a large majority of the
student body was not on the
streets during the game last week,
let me tell you what it's like to avoid
America's favorite pagan ritual.
There I was, walking home
from work across an eerily-de-
serted campus. I was feeling very
much the infidel, insecure in the
knowledge that 1 was planning not
to participate in the great cer-
emony. Not a soul was in sight I
heard the revels of the faithful,
however, echoing from dorm TV
lounges in the distance, orgasmic
howls piercing the night air and
filling my soul with dread.
I made my way home
quickly, silently praying that they
wouldn't sic the hounds on me for
See BUCKET page 6
DSF Earth Corps
Life It's a
Wonderful
Occasion
Christina Pokrzewlnskl
Staff Writer
After a seemingly endless
search for music that doesn't suck,
DSF Earth Corps has answered my
prayers. Life It's a Wonderful Oc-
casion boasts one of the newest
trends in music, called Drivin'
Skankin' Funk, and it is indeed
pretty funky. Imagine bluesy guitars,
reggae drums and the slightest hint
of disco and you've got the latest
sound coming out of Chapel Hill.
The disc opens with "Rush
Hour which is basically an audio
documentary of a group of girls try-
ing to get ready to go out The voices
are a little annoying, but the back-
ground music is good. Overall, the
track is uniquely entertaining.
"Sweet Cheetah" is distinctly
disco, as it boasts of "faster cars and
mean guitars At a little over nine
minutes, it's the longest song on the
CD, but by far the best musically.
nition. The series of paintings on trees
are much more convincing and appear
almost human in form and shape while
viewed in the dark.
There are also some earlier
works of Knutson's that have a more
minimalist approach. The large paint-
ings dealing with a basic color evenly
applied over the canvas capture the
viewers thoughts and emotions mo-
mentarily.
Knutson's pencil drawings
"Europa Beech" and "Elm" are very
convincing in every aspect Their defi-
nition, value and contrast are very
strong throughout the entire work.
The next time you are walking
by Jenkins go in the gallery and take a
look around for a while. After check-
ing everything out ask them to dim
the lights and prepare yourself for a
visual treat
CD- Reviews
"I Spent the Day With a Rasta
Man" sounds slightly like Elvis
Costello guest starring on Hawaii
Fiv&O. With catch phrases like "rum
in your eye this song promises to
be favorite with the downtown crowd.
"Brick House" and "Now 1
See" are both mellow tunes, with ex-
tremely well-done blues guitar tntros.
"Now 1 See" even includes presiden-
tial favorite instruments like the saxo-
phone. At seven minutes, this one's
a bit long for a tune with such mean-
ingless lyrics, but the musical portion
of the song makes it at least listen-
able.
"Grassy Branch Road" has a
backwoods, Hee-Haw, banjos on pa-
rade feel Vocalist Phillip Price man-
ages to sound like the Monkee's
Mickey Dolenz on this one. If s a sffly
song that seems out of place on such
a mellow blues CD.
"Tonight" is a slow acoustic
ballad that employs the help of an
outstanding hom section. The lyrics
make an honest attempt at a serious
love song, but with hrics like "I geta
fever chilly cokt the hot again"
it's hard to take it seriously, much
less find any romantic value in it at
all.
"Tricky Travel" is unmistak-
able reggae, complete with hand
drums and smooth guitar. The lyrics
are good, giving the advice to take it
slowly day by day. Despite the fact
that Price is no Bob Marley, the song
grooves welL
"Everytime" is a song about
the conquest of a "super sexy girl
This track sounds vaguery alternative,
with steady drumbeats and lyrics that
can be likened to the Gin Blossoms.
DSF Earth Corps frontman
Phillip Price hails from Atlanta, Geor-
gia, and has pulled together an obvi-
ously skilled group of musicians. Life
It's a Wonderful Occasion is their
first attempt at an album, and they've
made a good start at creating their
own sound. This is one of the best
discs to be released in the last five
years, and it's an asset to anyone's
collection.
Photo by SWART WILLIAMS
Like the difference between night and day, Anders Knutson's phosphorescent
artwork, on display now at Gray Gallery, takes on an entirely new aspect m the dark.
ledtauMUtt IRectcetv
�����
gyros
A little bit of
Greece is found
in Greenville
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Okay kids, here it is, the latest
scoop in restaurant attractions the
Marathon Restaurant Marathon was the
first Greek specialty restaurant to open
in Greenville in 1979, and also the first
to start delivering items other than piz-
zas.
Despite all of these interesting
facts, I had never eaten there, but now
I'm glad that I did. There are many great
things to say about the restaurant and
the food is one of them.
The Marathon Restaurant offers,
of course, Greek food. I for one am not
very familiar with this cuisine, and there
are many others out there who aren't
either. So you can try Greek specialties
like souvlaki or the ever popular gyro
(pronounced e'ro or ge'ro). But if you
are not feeling adventurous, you can al-
ways have their chicken salad sand-
wiches, a tuna platter, cheeseburgers, a
mmmmz�
mmmmmm
Wayne's World Pizza (you would have
to see it for yourself), hot dogs, and even
egg rolls. This may seem strange, but not
everyone likes Greek food.
I ended up ordering the Chicken
Kabob Sandwich, which was decently
priced at $4.05. The marinated chicken
within it was quite a treat it was really
tender and juicy, and the oil
and vinegar dressing
added just the right
zing of flavor. Over-
all, the food rated
pretty high on my
scale. I like going
into a place that
makes the food while
you wait because you
know it hasn't been sitting
under heat lamps for the
last six hours.
The atmosphere in the Marathon
was very relaxed and calm. It wasn't very
crowded while I was there, but there were
many people coming in and out to pick
up their takeout orders. On those non-
busy nights, it's the perfect place to get
some work done. There were also a great
number of plants surrounding the en-
tire establishment which gave it a nice
homey touch. Just looking around, I
could tell, that the owner put in a lot of
time trying to give the place that certain
"umph" needed so badly here in
Greenville to make a business go. Maybe
that's why they serve beer also.
The service was also good. I went
up there to place my order, and the
people were really friendly. They prepared
my food quickly and brought it out to
me still sizzling from the grill. 1 also liked
the fret that you don't have to
worry about having a
waitress hovering over !
your shoulder every
five minutes. Not j
that I have anything ;
against waitresses, I '
used to be one: It's
just a nice change of
pace. I didn't feel like
had to worry about mak-
ing someone feel bad because
I didn't leave a big enough tip, and it
was a nice feeling to leave a place not
feeling guilty They do have a tip jar by
the register, and I made sure to leave my
contribution there.
Overall, my dining experience at '
the Marathon Restaurant was quite pleas-
ant In fact 1 really enjoyed myself. If you
ever get the chance to check it out you
won't be disappointed. The price, the
atmosphere and the food all were great
So out of 10 stars. 1 give the Marathon
an 8.5.
Rocket rises over campus
Messick Theatre
hosts Daniel's
dramatic take-off
Jennifer Coleman
Staff writer
"The Rise and Rise of Daniel
Rocket" is unlike any show performed
today. It's magical and mystical, and it
touches the heart in a way few plays
do.
The show is unique for many rea-
sons. The story begins when the char-
acters are 12 years old. Twenty years
later, act two begins, and we see the
children we came to love in act one as
adults with children of their own. "The
Rise and Rise of Daniel Rocket" also
has an amazing set that may be worth
the price of admission by itself.
But by far the most wonderful
thing about "The Rise and Rise of Daniel
Rocket" is the story itself. Daniel, played
by Ryan Holsoppie, is an exceptionally
bright young man with a special secret
He is constantly teased by his classmates
because he spends all of his time trying
to learn to fly. His best friend Richard
(Chris Tinkler) is the only one who be-
lieves him. Daniel is in love with Alice
(Alex Ewing), who tries to understand
Daniel even though she is in love with
Richard. The children are, appropriately
enough, studying stars and planets in
their sixth grade class. This fuels
Daniel's desire to fly, and all of the chil-
dren leam an important lesson about
friendship when Daniel's secret is re-
vealed.
"The Rise and Rise of Daniel
Rocket" is directed by Don Biehn, who
found this play a challenge, but not an
unwelcome one. Biehn, a member of
the theater faculty here at ECU, has
worked hard with the cast and crew to
create the mystical illusions necessary
to make this show a success. Set de-
signer Bob Alpers has done his usual
best to turn almost nothing into some-
thing beautiful and magical. The light-
ing for the show, designed by Ken
White, was perhaps one of the most
difficult things about the production,
but also one of the most successful.
The combination of set lights and de-
lightful acting will make this show
something to see.
"The Rise and Rise of Daniel
Rocket" opens Thursday, February 9
at 8:00 p.m. in ECU's Messick Theatre.
It will run through Thursday, Febru-
ary 14, with a matinee performance on
Sunday at 2:00 p.m. Tickets are $7.50
for the public and $4.50 for ECU stu-
dents with a valid ID.
Kerouac sends his love in long-lost letters
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)I
want to work in revelations, not just
spin silly tales for money
So wrote Jack Kerouac in a
1950 letter, one of 15 previously
unpublished letters collected in a
recent issue of The Missouri Re-
view, the literary magazine of the
University of Missouri-Columbia.
The release of the letters he
wrote between 1947 and 1968 has
Beat Generation scholars excited.
"Most of Kerouac's finest
writing comes in passages from let-
ters said Lee Bartlett, an English
professor at the University of New
Mexico and a specialist in poetry
after 1945.
The magazine worked nearly
three years to get permission from
the holder of the letters, Ed White,
a Denver architect and friend of
Kerouac until the author's death
in 1969 at age 47.
"They're written to the man
who in some ways was Kerouac's
best friend said Speer Morgan,
editor of the Review. "So his let-
ters, which cover this 20-year pe-
riod, are very revealing
In two, Kerouac thanks White
for being a "formative influence
Around 1950, Kerouac was strug-
gling with what would be published
seven years later as On the Road,
Morgan said.
The men were friends in New
York, and White, an architect in
training, often carried a pad to
sketch buildings. He advised
Kerouac to do the same - carry
notebooks and sketch out ideas as
they struck.
"It was one of those key mo-
ments in someone's life when some-
thing fit perfectly Morgan said.
"That fit Kerouac's talent perfectly,
which was finding the moment,
catching the moment.
"He began carrying around
notebooks and began the sponta-
neous prose style and in many
ways, it changed literature
The Beats became literary
legends. They started on the fringe,
and at first their books didn't sell.
But since 1966, nine years after
publication, On the Road has sold
about 2.5 million copies
To Kerouac and friends, the
Beat movement symbolized rejec-
tion of rigid intellectualism, an es-
See LETTER page 6






Tuesday, February 7, 1995
The East Cdiolinian
IBM trades ties
for tennis shoes
BUCKET from page 5
en. While dha enjoyed sex with dead anima
report that 11 Even i! it were true, no one would
ath want to be
irking thing b
p; Bowl seems unlikel
rrtainly. Rut of people who'd haw to be paid
. . it . mi A'ould make s ition so
Lfc 1 1 tllV from page 5
mowing th them this
mer
It's a tossup whether
will look am odder tl - I
polo si '
IBM's � - . I
the casual dress code kicks in
week.
p l li
. Why doe; tl course, I
:w powvr the Iran Contra s
At any rat
it's an exciting facts: America is ol
idal, too ov
w;
ssed with sports
azint surve
But dont
ireside
For y
sort mgs in H:
of Big Brother when ;
dress ,
mal en people whned I
well aware of its starched white-sh
correctnei
mer IBM executive Francis Weari
Rodgers in his i irs. called the plain
unwritten code . ctive as if it day.h
were engraved in steel - or if it had a when
loaded gun behind it
The changing
began in 1993. when Louis
jr. took IBM lirman.
Gerstnei n a
- GASP! blue shirt, a shade not fa-
vored by autocratic founder Tom
Watson.
But what �.
flip-flops. "Our
igh to know
is to be Athletes dominate the airwaves: when
Bow :� one they're not playini e, they're
the year. One selling us sho� � r or whati
i cl product pays them the mosl
i s tlive Why? Don't we have anythi
i the expectations, to worry about'
��' . It seems that, in the ahs,
anything real to believe in. ��
don'tI � turned to sports out of desperal
ggested that the While there's nothing wrong ��
e fixed. r. enjoying a good foot!
ght not deposit level of obsession America
rigl � pockets to reached with athletics is getting
their betting of hand. It's stupid, and I have a
� lity that the
. tlybethegro
fessional wres-
i n nd. It
clue, cape from conformity, a response
to alienation and the first breath
re won- oi the radical 60s
You really can fee! the arc
owl, ol his career, the fact that he was
� � put n really at his height when lie had the
easl k ceptance as a writer " Mor-
� � gai said.
reyawning "That period ol time in the
�niper Bore rout 1 was early '50s when he wrote eight
iiannel docu- hooks without having any of them
it human sexuality that accepted, carrying them around in
sex HI a a dufflebag. surviving, experiencing
.usand-fbld! So then life doing all kinds oi travel
MARK-DOWNS
On Winter Apparel
. To
pitalog
onnection
ft 90
Division ol UBt
210 E. 5th St.
758-8612
down to their blue jeans .
When it came time to join the
relaxed wardrobe brigade. IBM didn't
do so via a stafl n el
or an E-mail.
"We saw no need to formally
announce that dress would now he
informal Wilson said. "That would
be silly. We have about 800 people
here, and word travels fast through
the hallways
The hallways will he changing,
too. The company a d Friday
it will construct a higl adquar-

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I
Tuesday, February 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
American dumps ECU
Pirates lose third straight 79-65 against soaring Eagles
Photo by HAROLD WISE
"Vicious" Vic Hamilton (6-8, 200) has given ECU outstand-
ing playoff the bench this season as the "sixth man
Eric Bartels
Assistant Sports Editor
The Pirates, who could not re-
bound from a 13-point deficit on four
different occasions, saw the American
University Eagles soar to a 765 victory
in Williams Arena on Saturday afternoon.
" We got beat pretty soundly ECU
coach Eddie Payne said. "They took con-
trol early, and we weren't ready to play
The Pirates droDPed their third
straight CAA conference game, making
them 3-5 in the CAA (13-8), while the
Eagies have now won three straight (44
and 5-15 overall).
"We snot the ball well Ameri-
can coach Chris Knoche said, as he put
things into perspective. "We are a lot like
East Carolina we can play with every-
one in the conference
Junior guard Darryl Franklin and
senior center Christian Ast ran up the
scoreboard for over half of their team's
total points.
Ast from Heidelberg, Germany,
finished as the game's leading scorer and
rebour.der with 29 points and nine re-
bounds. He also took advantage of ECU's
weak defense in the first half, as he hit
50 percent from behind the three-point
line.
Franklin, last week's CAA player
of the week contributed 20 points and
six assists. He also shot 50 percent from
behind the arc.
"I told everyone on press day. ear-
lier in the season, that Darryl (Franklin)
would be a key to this team AU's
Knoche said.
The Pirates fell behind early but
captured the lead at 15:55 of the first
half after sophomore guard Skipp
See AU page 7
Fab freshmen coming in
ECU gains 10 in-
state football
recruits for 1995.
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy of ECU SID
Former ECU star Johnny Beck has moved on to Martinsville (Phillies). Last season, he
was 3-1 with a 4.05 ERA. For more on this year's team, check Thursday's TEC Sports.

Recreational Services
���r�r�
3TSTTTS1

East Carolina announced their
1995 recruiting class on Thursday, and
every indication points to this group
being head footbalicoach Steve Logan's
most complete clais. as far as filling po-
sitional needs.
"We signed&ome legitimate defen-
sive lineman that�re big. strong, fast and
aggressive Login said. "These kids will
help us match p better in the trenches
- size-wise. A Jot of mem will have a
chance to contribute next year. I don't
believe in redstSirting. The only question
1 ask of mysqf and my staff is 'Can he
help us win?j tne answer '5 V-tnen
we will play freshmen
The best defensive lineman of this
recruiting class is Washington D.C. de-
fensive tackle Npumi Masimini from
Woodrow Wilson HS.
Masimini (64, 275) was recruited
by Colorado. Illinois, Wisconsin and Syra-
cuse before deeding to play for ECU. He
was the Pigskin Club Defensive Player
of the Year after a senior season in which
he had 65 solo tackles. 13 sacks. 16 pass
deflections and six blocked punts. He was
rated sixth among the top 30 players in
the Mid-Atlantic area by Super Prep and
made L'SA Today s All-American Team.
Honorable-Mention.
"With that kid East Carolina has
the real deal, the whole package said
Rick Kimble, editor of Blue Chip Illus-
trated.
Other high profile D.C. area re-
cruits to sign on were Corey Russell, a
two-way lineman from Maryland's
Fairmont Heights H.S. and Brian
Johnson, a outside linebacker prospect
from H.D. Woodson H.S.
Russell (64,280) was a 2nd team
All-Metropolitan pick by the Washington
' Post who visited Rutgers and Pittsburgh
before decidingon ECU. He was featured
in both Super Prep and Mid-Atlantic
. Recruiting Service.
(RS) - The Department of Rec-
reational Services at ECU will serve
as the official host for the 1995 Schick
SuperHoops three-on-three Basketball
Atlantic Regional Tournament on Sat-
urday. Feb. 11, 1995.
The tourney will be conducted
at Christenbury Gym and Minges Coli-
seum with play expected to start at
approximately 10:30 a.m. Schick
SuperHoops. now in its 11th year, is
the largest collegiate extramural
sports program in the country, with
competition at over 800 institutions
leading to Regional Festivals at 22
sites.
The program is sponsored by
Schick. Starter and the National Bas-
ketball Association (NBA). Twenty
men's and nine women's teams par-
ticipated in the 1994 Regional, which
was hosted at ECU.
The Atlantic Coast region con-
sists of 42 institutions from North
Carolina and South Carolina that are
registered with the program and con-
duct local tournament on campus.
Winners in the men's and women's
divisions then qualify to advance to
the regional.
East Carolina University will be
represented by men's champion
Lambda Chi Alpha A consisting of
players Chad Reynolds, Bames Har-
ris, Davis Harris, and Steve Bartley.
'Too Tall To Play" captured the
women's division, and will be com-
posed of players Kim Pakowski,
Natalie Lew, Trish Maynard and
Lauren Boggs.
All participants will also be eli-
gible to compete in several prelimi-
nary events, such as Three Point
Shooting, Slam Dunk, Spot Shot, Free
Throw Shooting. Hot Shots and HO-
RSE, which will be conducted dur-
ing the Friday night and Saturday
morning before regular play com-
ECU's
SPORTS INFORMATION
DEPARTMENT
Photo courtesy of MIKE GRIZZARD
Greenville Rose's Troy Smith was ranked among the top 15
receivers in the nation, and chose ECU over Notre Dame.
Johnson (64.22i was the Defen-
sive Player of the Year for the Washing-
ton Metropolitan Area alter a 14-sack
senior performance that showed recruit-
ers his outstanding pass-rushing poten-
tial.
"It is always a priority for us to
add big kids to our defensive fh nt sewn
said Pirate defensive line coach and D.C.
area recruiter Cliff Yoshida. "These three
kids exhibit size, aggressiveness and
speed on film. We have to have those
qualities to be competitive up front"
ECU signed only three skill-ath
letes because they return all of their re-
ceivers, and secondary coach Chuck
Pagano's defensive hackfield returns ail
four starters. The Pirates did however,
sign Greenville Rose teammates Troy
Smith and Kevin Monroe.
Smith in his three seasons as a
receiver at Rose, caught 134 passes for
. ii )8 yards and 27 touchdowns. He was
rated among the Top 15 receivers na-
tionally by several publications and was
pursued heavily by Notre Dame. Texas
and South Carolina even after commit-
ting early on in the recruiting process to
ECU.
"Troy Smith had a chance to go
anywhere in the country Logan said.
"It means a lot for us to keep a good
Eastern North Carolina player like him
See RECRUIT page 9
(SID) - With 16 points, junior
forward Tomekia Biackmon led four
Lady Pirates scoring in double figures
as ECU defeated UNC-Wilmington 74-
64 in Colonial Athletic Association
women's basketball action on Sunday
in Trask Coliseum.
UNCW senior forward Hannah
Grady led all players with career highs
of 18 points and 16 rebounds, obtain-
ing her second double-double of the
season. Freshman forward Tara Spen-
cer racked up 17 points and six re-
bounds, and freshman guard Toni
Esposito tallied 13 points and a game-
high-tying six assists.
For ECU. junior guard Danielle
Charlesworth contributed 15 points, fol-
lowed by junior Darlene Boone with 14
and sophomore Shay Hayes with 11.
Boone also grabbed a team-high seven
rebounds.
UNC Wilmington slips to 2-17
overall and 1-6 in GVA play. East Caro-
lina improves its record to 5-12 overall
and 2-5 in the conference.
The Seahawk Women remain at
home for a pair of OVA contests next
weekend. UNCW hosts James Madison
on Friday. Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m then
faces Richmond on Sunday. Feb. 12, at
2 p.m.
The ECU Men's 4 x 400 relay
team found gold in the mountains of
West Virginia, taking first place at the
14th Annual Hardee's Classic here in
Morgantown on Saturday.
Juniors Keith Barker and Steve-
King as well as sophomores Brain
Johnson and Dwight Henry teamed up
once again posting a time of 3:18 2 to
hold off the squad from Central State
(3:19.0) to win their second relay event
in as many weeks.
In the sprinting events. Ken Laws
was the only ECU competitor to advance
to the final round, finishing sixth with a
time of 6.66 seconds. In the distance
events, freshman Brain Harrell finished
fourth in the 1,000 meters with a time
of 2:42.4. In the 3.000 meters, senior
Sean Connolly posted a time of 9:10.9
for a sixth place finish.
The Pirates competed in a total
of six events during the single�iay invi-
tational which drew competitors from
11 schools. Also competing were sev-
eral big name independents such as
James Jett a seven-time All-American
track star and current wide receiver for
the Los Angeles Raiders along with Lee
McCrea who currently holds the world
record in the 55 meters.
The event also marked a home-
coming for ECU Coach Bill Carson who
is a former WVU sprinter and assistant
coach.
The Lady Pirates made a consid-
erable mark at the Hardee's Invitational
on Saturday. February 4, winning first
place in three events.
ECU sophomore Lave Wilson
placed first in the triple jump with a jump
of 38 feet and 6.25 inches.
Lady Pirate Alexis Jacks won the
800m with a time of 2:19.7.
ECU's Dava Rhodes placed first
in the 3000m with a time of 10:33.3.
East Carolina's Cindy Szymanski
placed fourth in the 1000m with a time
of 3.00.0.
East Carolina will return to action
on Saturday. February 11 at the Virginia
Tech Invitational in Blacksburg, Va.
mences.
Three-on-three basketball is a
fast-paced, action-oriented game fea-
turing high scoring and wide-open
play. Traditionally, the caliber of ath-
lete who has participated has been
outstanding. At the 1994 Regional,
North Carolina State University (Men)
and East Carolina University (Women)
captured their respective divisions,
culminating an intense day of compe
tition in Oreenville.
The ECU Women's team was
composed of long-time program par
ticipants Katrina Evans, Candy Foust
and Angela Carroll. This team was
defeated by "Too Tall To Play" dur-
ing this fall's campus tournament. A
team from East Carolina also won the
men's division in both 1988 and
1992.
Spectators are invited and may
attend at no charge for and exciting
display of outstanding basketball.
Rookie
shines in
Pro Bowl
(AP) - Marshall Faulk. at 21 the
youngest player and the only rookie
in the 1995 Pro Bowl, probably will
appear in more of the NFL all-star
games over the course of his career.
And he'll probably never have
anoth. r game like his first one.
Breaking a record by O.J.
Simpson that was set one year before
Faulk was born, the Indianapolis
Colts' star ran for 180 yards on 13
carries - an astounding average of
14.8 yards per carry - Sunday as the
AFC overwhelmed the NFC 41-13 in
the Pro Bowl.
Earlier in the week. Faulk could
hardly believe he was on the same
practice field with the all-stars.
"These are guys that I've
watched on TV he said. "Now I get
the opportunity to play with them
He not only played with them,
he was the best of the NFL's best,
earning the Pro Bowl MVP award for
his record-breaking performance
against the NFC's finest defenders.
In addition to bettering
Simpson's long-standing Pro Bowl
rushing record of 112 yards, which
Simpson accomplished on 16 carries.
Faulk caught two passes for 27 yards.
And he first matched Liwrence
McCutcheon's 1976 record for long-
est Pro Bowl run with a 41-yarder
early in the final quarter, then rewrote
the mark with a 49-yard TD run in
See FAULK page 9
��pii !WH
� .





8
Tuesday, February 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
AU
from page 7
Schaefbauer hit a 17-foot jumper from
the left side.
However. American took the lead
t( r gi ii id after Ast knocked d wn a three-
pi �nter and Franklin laved in an easy
lay-up off a steal.
Schaefbauer (13 points. 8 rebounds)
a mid find success frm three-point range.
Schaefbauer shot l-of-7 from behind the
three-point line, while Basham hit onk-
33 percent
"This is the most disappointing
weren't ready to play.They had a big win
over James Madison, and they were
li ii ise.
Senior Chuckie Robinson finished
vis the Pirates' leading scorer with 14
points. Robinson also had the difficult
ECl 'sophomores Tim Basham or loss all year Schaefbauer said. "We task of defending Ast, who frequently
�� . ������� � ��'�,�!�?�������� f ����
RECRUIT
from page 7
here at ECU. He will get off to a fast
start, and I can see him catching the fade
route alongside Larry Shannon. With
those two athletes that can both jump
out of the gym. we should be in (J�id
shape at wide receiver
Monroe has 4.4 speed and stands
6-foot-1 and 176 pounds. He plays
cornerbacK and gives ECU defensive
coordinator Paul Jetle a bigger athlete
than the Pirates currently line up with
at defensive back.
Fi nrest Foster, a all-state selection
from Clemson. S.Cs Daniel H.S. had
eight interceptions this past season and
played in the Shrine Bowl. At 5-foot-lO,
.60-puunds, he can also play offense or
return kicks, and caught 36 passes for
6112 yards while holding a 9.2 punt re-
turn average and 38.1 kickoff average
this past year.
Damien Davis (6-3. 315) from
Greenville, SC's Berea HS may play very'
early on in his career as a Pirate, lining
up at offensive guard or tackle. Davis was
a Second-Team All-American in Blue Chip
after setting a school record for knock-
down blocks (89) this past season. He
started in the Shrine Bowl, and was re-
cruited heavily by Georgia. Clemson.
.Arkansas and North Carolina.
"He's big, aggressive and he runs
well offensive coordinator Todd berry
said. "You would have to think with
Damien's physical tools, that he could
help us next season
Other large players joining the
program that will be looked at on both
sides of the ball include North Carolina
linemen Dexter Shine (6-3 285), Norris
Mcleary (6-5 295), Matt Ellison (6-3 250).
Dwayr.e Ledford (6-5 250) and Mondell
Corbett (6-3 270).
Tight end DeMarcus Kelley a 6-
foot-4.250-pound athlete from Neptune,
NJs Trenton H.S. may try several posi-
tions at East Carolina hut will he given a
long look at tight end. Kelley caught 42
passes as a senior and made 143 tackles
on defense. The First-Team All-State se-
lection was among Super Pa'p and Blue
Chip's Top 100 players in the country,
and played in the prestigious New Jer-
sey All-Star Game. He was recruited by-
Wisconsin. Rutgers. Syracuse. Illinois and
Clemson.
ECU signed seven linebackmg
prospects including Bertie H.S. star
Travis Darden. The 6-foot-3, 227-pound
high school tailback spent this past sea-
son at Hargrave Military Academy, and
rushed for over 1,400 yards in high
school.
Orlando Peterson (6-1 235) chose
ECU after spending the past two sea-
sons at Hutchinson (KSl Junior College.
The former Ayden-Grifton player was a
Honorable-Mention JUCO All-American.
and turned down a full scholarship to
national champion Nebraska to return
to his home state. Freddie Claybrooks
(6-5 217) from Decatur. Ga. (HS).
Roderick Coleman (6-3.230) and Tomha
McMillan (64 225) may also contribute
early.
ECU did particularly well in-state
signing 10 players. This represents quite
a change from the past when the Pi
rates were repeatedly beaten by state
rival North Carolina. NC St. and Duke.
"We have always attempted to
work in-state Logan said. "The kids
want to play for a winner that plays a
nationally-competitive schedule with a
exciting style of play. All of that is there
for them here at ECU
The Pirates play Tennessee, Illi-
nois. West Virginia and Syracuse on the
road next season. This will be one of
their toughest schedule in years and
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buried the three-pointer at the top of the played ECU coach Payne said "We have and stay down, or we can get up and
key. two choices: We can gel knocked down fight back
AU's lead shortened to five after
senior Anton Gill ill points), and
Schaefbauer converted two straight
buckets down-low. 4944.
"We prepared a lot bettei than we
ammamommammaimmummmmmtmtt-
Logan's recruiting class seems to have
his ball club ready for the competition
"It really is a good group of kids
across the board said new recruiting
coordinator Ken Treadway. "It looks
very good on paper. We satisfied all of
our needs, upgrading i ur depth and size
on both sides of the ball while improv-
ing our team speed at receiver, defen-
sive hack and linebacker
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Tuesday, February 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
FAULlv from page 7
the closing minutes ot the game.
The AFC. which has taken its
licks in the Super Bowl over the past
11 years, completely dominated the
NFC on both sides of the ball in win-
ning the Pro Bowl for the third time
in five years and sixth time in the
last 12.
Seattle's Chris Warren also
went over Simpson's rushing mark
with 127 yards on 14 carries for the
AFC. which rolled up Pro Bowl
record of 400 yards rushing and 552
yards of total offense.
The AFC defense, with line-
backer Junior Seau of San Diego log-
ging seven tackles, gave up just 209
yards of offense to the NFC. only
41 yards rushing.
Warren had the rushing
HART
from page 1
record late in the game, but Faulk
capped hi6 afternoon when he reeled
off his 49-yard Tl) run off a fake punt
in the closing minutes ol the game
at Aloha Stadium.
"We were informed when I
was in the process ol al ' .
record Wan-en said. "They wanted
to get me the ball so I could hreak
it. Then they took me out and put
Marshall in and � e it.
"We were going back and
forth (with the record). 1 felt like
whoever got the ball last would have
the record. Marshall had a great
game
Said Faulk: "You have to
credit Bill Cowher and the coach
ing staff of the Pittsburgh Steelers
for implementing a good game plan
OFFICIAL BALLOT
"NAME THE
STUDENT SECTION
CONTEST
VOTE FOR ONLY ONE
l could understand,
rhey like to run the hall
The AFC players earned
$20,mid eai : iv and the
NFC players not10.000 ap;
Barry Switzer. whose Dallas
� ed the NFC said head
ing into the wee! that thi
was i'ii the playi un. He
was extn
hues durii , i s sit
n the bench with a mist-cooler
The NFC went ahead 10-0 in
the first quartei as San Francisco's
Steve Young drove the team to a
fit Id a; on its first posse
i 5 1 yard TD pass to
Minnesota s Cris Carter on the
NFC's next series.
But the first of two touch-
down receptions by Pittsburgh tight
end Eric Green, a 22-yarder from
Denver's John Elway, put the AFC
on the board early in the second
quarter. John Carney of San Diego
tied it 10-10 with a 22-yard field
goal, then Cleveland's Leroy Hoard
ran 4 yards for a TD just before half-
time to put the AFC ahead to stay
The AFC blew it open v. -
three touchdowns in the final quar
on an 11-yard run by Warrei
16-yard pass from the Los Angeles
Raiders' Jeff Hosteller to Green, and
Faulk's tackle-breaking 49-yard run
off a fake punt.
Young, the MVP of the 49ers'
19 26 Super Bowl win over San Di-
ego a week earlier, shared the NFC
quarterback duties with Troy
Aikman of Dallas and Warren Moon
of the Vikings. Young provided the
bulk of the offense, completing 8-
of-15 for 129 yards. Aikman was 2-
uf-9 and Moon was 3-of-H.
? THE DANGER ZONE
? THE GOLD MINE
? MINGES MANIACS
I I THE PIRA TES' DEN
WILLIAMS WACKOS
noTViOk a�-�cl 3iiaT7
0
u3"T"3arT7
o
1HA1 S WHY jOMENS OFFERS SI'ECIAI LY
I'RK I P i OILEGE FUNGS.
OTNSS299 219
MEN'S CGNT1NIN1M
� mm
�.� - : iRIA
lKGOLD
out any scholarships in the past. 1 have
no complaints about (the job he has
donel"
Furthermore, he initiated and
directed a $21 million expansion and
renovation of Minges Coliseum and
Ficklen Stadium, home to ECU'S bas-
ketball, volleyball and football teams.
ally, he was just like ei erj
other part of the coaching start Pirate
linebacker BJ. Crane said. "He was defi-
nitely for ECU. He wanted us to go
places. It's sad to see him go. He's a
pivotal part of the university.
Off the field. Hart has been rec-
ognized for the creation of a compre-
hensive Student Development Program
for all Pirate student-athletes. He has
also written marketing-related articles
in six different publications and is a regu-
larly featured speaker at the National
Association of Collegiate Directors of
Athletics (NACDA) yearly convention.
In addition. Hart established aca-
demic and class attendance guidelines
for ECL' student-athletes as well as a
student-athlete code of conduct and dis-
cipline policy.
Under Hart. ECU was selected
as one of five advisory schools to join
the NCAA's Life Skills Pilot Program,
which focuses on the total development
of student-athletes.
"i think that one of his greatest
accomplishments is his commitment to
the student-athletes said ECU assis-
tant athletic director for student de-
velopment Pam Overton. "He encour-
ages them to be students as well as
athletes, and to plan for careers after
college
Hart also serves as the vice chair
of the Division I-A Athletic Directors
Association's Missions and Values Com-
mittee, on the NCAA Council and on
their Special EventsPost-Season
Bowls Committee.
Hart came to ECU in April 1983
as the assistant director of athletics for
marketing, and served in that position
until he was named the associate di-
rector of athletics for external relations.
In February 1985. he became the ex-
ecutive director of the ECU Educa-
tional Foundation before being named
the athletic director in November of
1987.
According to Eakin, a nation-
wide search for a director of athletics
will begin as soon as possible. Henry
VanSant, associate athletic director for
administration for the last seven years
will serve as acting director until a new
director is employed. VanSant, by mu-
tual agreement, will not be a candidate
for the permanent position.
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
YOUR NAME:
Please CHECK your preferred choice and return to the ECU
Sports Marketing Office, 3rd floor of the Ward Sports
Medicine Building by 5:00 PM on Wednesday. February 8.
A C H 1 CjhPV
DATE: FEBRUARY 6,7,8,9 TIME: 10:00AM � 3:00 PM
PLACE: ECU STUDENT STORE
MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
SANDPIPER BEACON
BEACH RESORT
650 f EET OF GULF BEACH FRONTAGE
2 OUTDOOR POOLS � 1 INDOOR HEATfcD POOL
RESTAURANT � SUITES UP TO 10 PEOPLE
KITCHENS WITH MICROWAVES
TIKI BAR - BEACH PARTIES � ENTERTAINMENT � VOLLEYBALL
SAILBOATS jETSKIS � PARASAILS
DISCOUNTS TO AREA CLUBS. RESTAURANTS S. ATTRACTIONS
,�$91 PER PERSON PER WEEK
SANDPIPER BLACON BIACH fUSORT
1740J fRONT BLACH RD. PAN!AvA CITY BtACH. U 3413
INFORMATION 1-800-488-8828 -
n&�&
5u�YsrySop
foor
ZffencliHM&film&
Thursday, February 9
Friday, February 10
Saturday, February 11
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and
Staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
A. Douo Mc Huiry Film
LLEII PWIE
J0 PlHKETT
B0KEEM VVtJOOBINE
i Eddie Grin hi
Get yo
TRIG
Love is c ourjqr
GRAMERCY
THI Wa Mm P� I V U Im, l��i
,1V-J fc"
A , M
SOWETO STREET BEAT DANCE COMPANY PRESENTS
MAYIBUYE I AFRIKA
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 199S
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM - BtOQ PM
TICKETJ ARE FREE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
AN EVENING WITHMike Cross & Leo Kottke
8.00 PM � Monday, February 20, 1995 � Wright Auditorium
For ticket information, call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787) or 3284788.
Sponsored in part by WSFL 106.5 FM
SEXUALLY
SPEAKING
WITH
DR. RUTH
WESTHEIMER
Wednesday, February 22, 1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
Conlact the Central Ticket Office
1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787)
or Locally at 328-4788
Student Ticket Price - $3.00
Price at die Door-$10.00
('Papa's hot Delivery)
When you've got pizza on your mind-
get Papa on the phone. Papa John's
will deliver your favorite pizza - hot
and fresh. And, as always, we'll
include our special garlic sauce and
nepperoncinis, too - all at no extra
PIZZA
cost! And if you're really hungry, ask
about our cheesesticks and bread-
sticks! They make the perfect pizza
even better!
Perfect Pizza. Perfect Price. Everyday.
irfjoii
Deiiturina The rerj&d Pizza
1322 East 10th Street
Serving ECU Campus
& Eastern Greenville
757-7700
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S STUDENT UNION IS NOW
ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR MEMBERS AND COMMITTEE
CHAIRS OF THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEES FOR 1995 -1996:
We're More Than Barefoot!
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L.
One Small Pizza
with One Topping
and One Free Coke
Only $4.99 tax
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
,Jk
One Extra Large Pizza
order of Stix
2 Drinks
Only $11.98 tax
One Large Pizza
x with One Topping
Only $6.98 tax
pAPAJOHKc; PAPA JOHNs; pAPAJOHNs
I
.JL.
Miu( PrevMU i iuptn





10
Tuesday, February 7,1995
The East Carolinian
DM
For Rent
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR House at
206-A East 12th St Rent $450 month.
Also, 1BR Apartment at 810 Cotanche,
Rent $325 month Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two Bedroom
Apartments at Wesley Commons For Rent
Free Cable. Call 758-1921.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group to-
gether early. Two relatively new houses;
fully furnished; washer & dryer; dish-
washer; central AC; Available May 1
through August 31; sleeps 7 - $1500.00
per month; sleeps 8-9 - $2100.00 per
month (804) 850-1532
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! Male or
Female, own room 13 bills, $220.00
month, Please call 355-2803
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP.
167.50 month 12 util, 12 phone. 2Br
Apt Call 321-7522. Leave number mes-
sage or Call after 8:00 pm.
TO SHARE TWO BEDROOM DUPLEX
in College veiw. $175 12 utilities. Call
757-2763 Leave message
FREE FEBRUARY RENT and NO De-
posit Female roommate wanted or two
people to sublease a two bedroom apt
Total rent is $380.00. Basic cable, water,
pool and ECU bus service included. Kings
Row Apt. Call 752-0845 and leave mes-
sage.
ROOMMATES NEEDED to share house
in Nags Head, NC area. Please contact Ken
at 328-7202. ASAP Male or Female
APARTMENT FOR RENT - Wyndham
Court-2 bedroom, 1 bath, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer and dryer hook-up,
close to campus. Call Ali or Debra-830-
2270
NEED TO TAKE OVER LEASE, fur-
nished, pool, own room and bathroom. For
more information call Heidi 758-9480,
Kingston Place.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED. Private
room in Tar River apts. Rent $156 a
month plus 14 utilities. Call Tracy at 551-
7660. Please leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share Brick
House on N. Harding. 5 min walk to cam-
pus. $200mo 13 utilities. Want up-
perclassman and someone pretty cool
andor laid back. Big Screen TV and trust
fund are pluses. Call Brian at 757-3318.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: nice two room
apartment near campus, roomy and re-
laxed, on ECU bus route; rent $197 1
2 utilities. Call 752-1033(late afternoons-
early evenings)
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP: No de-
posit 12 of $360.00. H20 incl 12 of
utilities and cable. Call 321-0260
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 150.00split up
utilities. NEEDED ASAP. 5 minute walk
to campus. No pets. No smokers, Sociable,
Clean. For more info Call Woody. Leave
message 830-9536.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share 3 bed-
room house 1 block from campus & down-
town; $185mo 13 utilities. Call Jim
7524039.
FOR SALE: Oscar Schmidt 12-string gui-
tar. Mint cond. $200. Call 752-1373. Ask
for Bruce or leave message.
WOMEN SKIIS FOR SALE. Excellent
Condition. $300. Dial 756-6061. Leave
message.
FOR SALE: Men's 26 inch Ten Speed
Bicycle, $35.00. Call 756-7856 anytime.
1982 OLDSMOBILE OMEGA - Runs
Good. New Brakes, Needs paint and few
other repairs, nothing major -$700 nego-
tiable. Call 355-8043 weekdays. Ask for
Steve!
FOR SALE: Full-waveless King Size
Waterbed for $200 o.b.o. Recliner for $75,
chair for $35, couch for $60. Moving, must
sell immediately! Call 830-5201.
NEW MOM MUST SELL MAZDA RX-7,
white '88 5-speed, 50,000 miles, sunroof,
security system. Much loved, excellent
condition. 355-3727.
Having trouble finding where to drop off
Classifieds and Announcements?
Well, look no more!
Forms for Classifieds and Announcements can
be picked up in Mendenhall and dropped off
in the Student Pubs Building.
Joyner Library
We are
here
Student Pubs
Buildins
2nd floor
i
ft
IT
Help Wanted
JZ
Greek Personals
CARRIAGE HOUSE APARTMENTS
South Charles Street across from Athletic Club, close
to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2 Bedroom
Townhouses over 1000 sq. ft 1 12 baths, private patios,
dishwashers, all electric, water furnished, swimming pool,
volleyball court, cable TV available and on site laundry.
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further information.
m
Travel
SPRING BREAK! Bahamas Party Cruise
6 days $279! Includes 12 Meals & 6 Free
Parties! Great Beaches & Nightlife! A
HUGE Party! Cancun & Jamaica 7 Nights
Air & Hotel From $429. Spring Break
Travel 1-800-6786386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BREAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa Beach(Near Disney)-
27 Acre Deluxe Beach front Resort 7
Nights $159! Key West $229! Daytona
Beach Room with Kitchen From $129! 1-
80078-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8 Days
Oceanview Room with a Kitchen $129!
Walk to Best Bars! Includes Free Discount
Card Which Will Save You $100 on Food
Drinks! 1-800678-6386
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY beach
Florida, from $91 per person per week
Free Info 1-800488828
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring Break
- How about it in the Bahamas or Florida
Keys. Where the Party never ends. Spend
it on your own private yacht One week
only $385.00 per person. Including food
and much more. Organizers may go for
free! Easy Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-
7834001.
SPRING BREAK-Time to Book your week
at one of the Hot Spots Daytona$99
Panama$109 Padre$119 Cancun$399
and more Call Chris at ICP 1-800-828-
7015.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Book Now & Save. Jamaica $439, Cancun
Bahamas $399, Panama City $119,
Daytona $149, Organize Groups, Earn
Cash, & Travel Free. Endless Summer 1-
800-234-7007.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
HOOK NOW. AND SAVI
PANAMA CITY J1-9. OATONA $149
ORGANIZE GROUPS. EARN CASH. A TRAVEL FREE.
ENDLESS SUMMER!
1-800-234-7007
SPRING BREAK '95 !
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING Earn up
to $2,000month working on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies. World
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.). Seasonal and Full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more information call 1-206-634-0468 ext
C53623
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe, KS
66051. Immediate response.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000- $6,000 per month. Room and
board! Transportation! Male or Female.
No experience necessary. Call (206) 545-
4155 ext A53622
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY Clean,
High volume Adult Club needs YOU now.
Confidential employment Dairy pay Top
Commissions. Some to no experience. If
you've called before call again. Playmates
Massage Snow Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Brer
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own hours!
RUSH Self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home mail-
ing our circulars. Free details, Send SASE:
R&B Distributors, Box 20354, Greenville
NC 27858
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required. Begin
now. For info call 202-298-8952.
POOL MANAGERS (Aquatic Directors,
Head Guards, Assistant Head Guards). Sp
Sum 95. GreenvilePitt County,
Goldsboro, Kinston, Tarboro. Call Bob,
758-1088.
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Gain Career Experience and Save
$4,000.00. Please call 1-800-2514000 ext
1576. Leave Name. School Now Attend-
ing and Phone Number.
JOB AVAILABLE - Dependable person
who is good with children is needed to
work in our home doing daily household
duties and helping care for our three chil-
dren when 1 am not home. The children
are 3 yrs, 5yrs, and 6yrs. old. THE HOURS
ARE FLEXIBLE. Please Call ASAP. Must
have references. 756-3538
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS of
North Carolina this summer? For summer
employment and housing information call
Paul at 800-662-2122
PART TIME - FLEXABLE HOURS night
and weekends - Cleaning, Assembly &
mold waxing at local Boat Manufacturing
Plant Fill out application at North Ameri-
can Fiberglass - 758-9901
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a degree and
practical experience is better! We are ac-
cepting applications for part-time mort-
gage reporting processors. A professional
attitude and good telephone skills are re-
quired. Flexible hours. If interested, please
mail your resume to: ONLINE MORT-
GAGE SERVICES, PO BOX 8048,
Greenville, NC 27835. NO CALLS
PLEASE
PEOPLE WANTED TO WORK SUM-
MER IN MYRTLE BEACH, SC : Hiring
Lifeguards and Beach Concession Work-
ers. Earn good money while working on
the Beach $$ Salaiy plus bonuses $$ ?
FREE HOUSING To apply or for further
information, callfax Sun Beach Service
at 803-2724170
FULL-TIME SEASONAL EMPLOY-
MENT available as Customer Service
Representive. Will use data entry equip-
ment (CRT) to enter customer orders. Pre-
fer computer skills, or ability to type 30-
40 wpm. Pleasant phone voice and ability
to work with customers. Knowledge of
Marine & Water Sports Equipment is help-
ful. Days and hours are flexible. Applica-
tions will be taken from 9-1 lam and 2-
4pm, Monday through Thursday. Apply at
Corporate Center Office, 111 Red Banks
Road, Greenville, NC 27834.
BETA PHIS: CONGRATULATIONS
Michelle Matthews, Laura Bridges, Krista
Harris, Sarah Franc, Candance Kelley, Jen
Fouts. Love Alpha Xi Delta.
JANET STUBBS: Jr. Class Pres
Panhellenic Rush Chair. We're proud of
all your accomplishments and support you
100. Love Alpha Xi Delta.
SIGMA PI would like to congratulate our
new pledges. Thanks to all who came to
Rush.
SIGMA PI is looking forward in seeing
most Greek Women this semester.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI would like to WEL-
COME the new pledges. David Stroud,
Cale Banks, Patrick Dusenburg, Damian
Corbitt Rickey Buttram, and Fred Wilson.
The Brothers. (
DELTA ZETA- The Sisters would like to
welcome our new member class: Stephanie
Stillwell, Alexis Vernieri, Casey Smith, &
Jenne Shevilla.
DELTA ZETA: All the Sisters would like
to thank Brooke Batchelor for all of her
hard work in making our Spring Rush a
Success! Great Job Brooke
PT
Services Offered
FREE DELIVERY- Valentine Gifts- Prices
from $1.50 and up. Call 752-3783. Orders
must be placed before 21095.
TYPING Reasonable rates resumes,
term papers, thesis, other services. Call
Glenda: 752-9959 (days); 527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call 1-
900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min. must be
18 or older. Find that special someone!
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Billion
in private sector grants & scholarships is
now available. All students are eligible
regardless of grades, income, or parent's
income. Let us help. Call Student Finan-
cial Services: 1-800-263-6495 ext F53623
TUTORING - IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH!
Experienced teacher can tutor you in con-
versation, writing and TOEFL. Will edit
papers also. Call Pam at 758-6952.
NEED TYPING? Campus secretary offers
speedy service, familiar with all formats,
low rates. Work saved on Mac disks. Call
Cindy after 5pm or leave Message 355-
3611
CREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP! Mobile
Music Production is the premier Disc
Jockey service for your cocktail, social, and
formal needs. The most variety and expe-
rience of any Disc Jockey service in the
area. Specializing in ECU Greeks. Spring
dates booking fast Call early, 7584644 ask
for Lee.
DO YOU WANT TO IMPROVE your GPA
or exam scores? We have the edge you
need to succeed! STUDENT SUPPLE-
MENTS offers study guides based on the
notes of the "A" students in your classes.
Give us a call at 752-HELP
RESEARCH MRMATON!
Largest Library gl information in U.S. -
all subjects
Ofdef Caljioq ToflMy wi:n Visa IMC or COD
�� BOp-351-0222
Or rusti $2 00 w Research Information
r.?:2idarwAye-JL2aC �J.oi ARpe!�CA9qo?�.
Lost and Found 1
Lost $18 in the student store last Friday
Money needed to pay electricity bill! If
found please call Carla at 757-2821.
tueiyg vouBSgir & $avi
. Jamaica
0,V " I Bahamas
SpedaEGroup Rates & Free Travel I
jiSun Splash Tours y
7 1-800-426-7710 "jH
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
i;hsVi'h-t
STEAMBOAT
VAILBEAVER CREEK
pw paeon xnmm on resin� km outs; lbkth of swr
l-SOO-StrNCIISE
toll rvmt MfoManoN & kscbvmioNS
BAHAMAS
Spring Break Party
CRUISE
$279!
6 DAYS-12 MEALS'ALL TAXES
1-800-678-6386
ITS BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS!
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of March
to the first of May. Salary rates start at
$4.25 per hour. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt County
Memorial is seeking qualified individuals
to teach aerobic classes through its Em-
ployee Recreation and Wellness Depart-
ment Persons will contract to teach on a
part-time basis. Interested candidates
should contact Ms. Scottie Gaskins be-
tween 8am4:30pm at (919)816-5958. Pitt
County Memorial Hospital
NEED EXTRAFOR SPRING BREAK?
Earn the quick cash you need by stuffing
envelopes. It's easy-immediate response!
Send $1 with SASE to Carolina Enter-
prises, Inc P.O. Box 3251, Greenville. NC
27836-1251
SEASONAL PACKAGING & SHIPPING
OPENINGS available. Personnel needed
to fill customer orders and prepare pack-
ages for shipment Students seeking Full
Time work for Spring and Summer are
encouraged to apply. Days, Mon-Fri; Hours
8am-6pm. Applications will be taken 9-
11am & 24pm MonThur. Apply at the
corporate Center Offices, 111 Red Banks
Rd Greenville, NC 27834.
VALENTINE HELP NEEDED In store &
delivery, apply in person immediately
Cynthia's Flowers 10th St 757-1892
NEED A JOB? HABS personnel services
offer professional resumes just for you.
Also typing, interview skills, and applica-
tion preparation. Call 752-3716 for ap-
pointment!
.A,
w Personals
"MEE-MEE-MEE-MEE-BEEP-BEEP-
BEEP-BEEP WRL - Happy 23rd Birth-
day. We Love You Love, Your Little
Nurse, Sunshine, and Randolph.
RED HEAD WITH CLEFT CHIN. Lost
my Citibank Photocard at intramural boc-
cie. Easily recognizable. Bears name Linda
Walker. Sentimental Value. Reward: year's
supply of Sunblock.
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Displayed Classifieds
$5.50 per column inch
Displayed advertisements may be canceled
before 10 a.m. the day prior to publication.
However, no refunds will be given.
?All ads must be pre-paid
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
For more information, call
ECU-6366.
r
-�





sr
11
Tuesday, February 7,1995
The East Carolinian
ANNOU
AUDITIONS FOB VOLUNTEER
READERS
Auditions for Volunteer Readers are sched-
uled because of increased programming
planned by the RADIO READING SER-
VICE OF EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
(RRSENC). If you have some extra time, a
good speaking voice, clear enunciation,
and the ability to read aloud fluently and
expressively, you are invited to audition.
The RRSENC broadcsasts The Daily Re-
flector news, information, and a variety
of topics to the visually impaired mem-
bers of our comm unity, and will soom add
magazine excerpts, stories, interviews, etc
Broadcasts from the Brody Medical Build-
ing of Eas Carolina Campus are heard on
special radio receivers, and on Cable acess
Channel 36. You need not prepare for the
audition. You will be given something to
read aloud. The audition wil be held in
Auditorium Room 209 of the Robert
Humber Building at Greenville Commu-
nity College, Memorial Blvd Route 11,
on SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1995.
12:00 noon to 2:00pm. For more informa-
tion call Robert Lancet at 7584683, or
7563259.
CLUB HISPANICO
VAMOS A REUNIRNOS! We are going to
have a meeting!) When: Wednesday, Feb
8 at 3:30pm. Place: GC 3016 (L ounge of
Dept of Foreign Languages). Purpose:
Discuss this semester's activities. For more
information call: Ramon Serrano, Pres.
(931-8542) Karina Collentine, Adv. (328-
4129)
UNIVEBSTIY STUDENT
MARSHALS
Any student interested in serving as a uni-
versity marshal for the 1995 Spring com-
mencement may obtain an application
from Room A-12 Minges. Student must be
classified as a junior by the end of Fall
semester 1994 and have at least a 3.0 aca-
demic average to be eligible. Return com-
pleted application to Carol-Ann Tucker, Ad-
visor, A-12 Minges by Friday, February 17,
1995. For more information call 3284661.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will hold its next meet-
ing on February 7 at 5:00 pm in MSC Gr eat
Room 1 and 2. All members both new and
old are asked to attend and reminded to
return raffle ticket money.
MASSAGE CLINIC
Treat your Valentine to a massage! Mas
sage Clinic given by Physical Therapy stu-
dents, will be held Thursday Feb. 16 from
6-9pm at the ECU Back & Limb Clinic
Buy tickets from PT students or at Back
& Limb Clinic - $2.00 for 10 min. ($2.50
at the door)
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION OF
WOMEN
The Greenville Chapter of The National
Organization of Women will meet Wednes-
day, February 8, 1995 at the Szechuan
Cardent Restaurant at 5:30pm. Black His-
tory Month will be observed.
UNIVERSITY FOLK AND COUNTRY
DANCE CLUB
February meeting and contra dance will
be held Friday, Feb 10, 7:30-10:30pm in
the Ledonia Wright Bldg.(behind Student
Health). Live old-time music by Elderberry
Jam. Come alone or br ing a friend. FREE!
BUILDING ft MAINTAINING
FRIENDSHIPS
Learn how to develop trust, communica-
tion skills, and acceptance of self and oth-
ers. Emphasis will be placed upon dev el-
oping and maintaining friendships on-cam-
pus and beyoud. Wednesday, February 8,
2pm-3:30pm. Counseling Cent er. Call 328-
6661.
H-O-R-S-E COMPETITION
Come play in this year's basketball H-O-R-
S-E Competition at 4pm on Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 7 in Christenbury Gym. For addi-
tional information call Recreational Ser-
vices at 328387.
WHAT PERSONALITY "TYPE ARE
YOU?
Examining "personality" is one way of un-
derstanding yourself and your interactions
with others. Lear n one method of person-
ality assessment the Myers-Briggs Type
Indicator, and how it may be useful in your
life. Thursday, February 9,3:30pm-5:00pm.
Counseling Center. Call 328661 to reg-
ister.
BASKETBALL SHOOTING
TRIATHLON
Come play in this year's Basketball Shoot-
ing Triathlon at 8:30pm on Wednesday
February 15 in Christenbury Gym. Also,
don't forget the Racquetball Singles en-
try deadline at 5pm on Th ursday, Febru-
ary 23 in Christenbury 204. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328387
ASSEKTTVENESS TRAINING
This three-session workshop will teach you
why it is important to be assertive and
what makes assertive behavior difficult
This program will deepen your awareness
of yourself and others and teach you the
communication know-how that goes with
becoming more assertive. Wednesdays.
2pm-3:30pm. Beginning February 15.
Counseling Center. Call 328661 to reg-
ister.
BACKPACKING TRIP
Sign up now for the backpacking trip to
Mr. Rogers, Virginia on February 17-19.
If you are interested you will need to reg-
ister in 204 Christenbury Gym before
Friday, February 10. The next adventure
program is a Climbing II trip to Roxboro,
NC Saturday, February 25. Interested par-
ties will need to register by February 17
in 204 Christenbury Gym. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328387
ADULT CHILDREN OF
ALCOHOLICS WORKSHOP
Learn how growing up in a dysfunctional
family affected you then and the impact it
plays on your life now. This three-session
workshop will include information about
alcoholism, family rules and roles, and sug-
gest goals for future recovery. Wednesdays,
2:00pm-3:30pm, beginning 215. Counsel-
ing Center. Call 328661 to register.
FREE AEROBICS CLASS
There will be a free aerobics class, healthy
snacks, and prizes during the Friday Fit-
ness Fling on Friday, February 17 at 4pm
in 108 Christenbury Gym. For additional
information call Recreational Services at
328387.
CHOOSING A MAJOR � A CAREER
Learn how personality affects career
choice. Take five assessment instruments.
Learn how to research career areas that
may be right for you. This five-session
workshop is just what you need. $15.00
Classes begin: 214, 217. Counseling
Center. Call 328661 for more informa-
tion.
YOUTH HOSTELS
Traveling over Spring Break, or during
the summer? Purchase a youth hostel card
now! It is good for a year and for $25, it
can save you many times its cost You will
receive a map and a U.S. directory of hos-
tel locations. The card is also good for in-
ternational travel so come by International
Programs soon for your card! The office
is located on 9th St behind McDonald's
and is open M-F from 8:00-5:00, or call
328769 for information.
LISTENING TO YOUR BODY
Stress effects you phsically as well as emo-
tionally. Discover how the use of biofeed-
back is used to pinpoint your stressors
and aid in relaxation. 216, 3:30pm-
5:00pm. Counseling Cent er. Call 328661
to register.
PSICHI
PSI CHI - National Honor Society in Psy-
chology invites all who are interested and
who have maintained an overall GPA of
3.0 and have completed 9 hours in psy-
chology to attend our interest meeting on
Wed. Feb. 8 at 5:00 in the Psi Chi Library
on the third floor of Rawl.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Academic Motivation-Overcoming Procras-
tination: 213, 3:30pm-5:00pm. Schedul-
ing & Time Management: 217, lprp-2pm.
Note Taking & Study Strategies: 215,
llam-noon. Exam Preparation: 214,2pm-
3pm. Exam Strategies: 213, 9am-10am.
Counseling Center. Call 328661 to reg-
ister.
THE 25TH ANNUAL SPEECH,
LANGUAGE AND HEARING
SYMPOSIUM
The Symposium will be held February 9th
and 10th at the Ramada Inn, Greenville.
The symposium is planned and sponsor ed
by students with support from the East
Carolina University Department of Com-
munication Sciences and Disorders and
the Eastern Area Health Education Cen-
ter. All proceeds go to support student
scholarships. Speakers will include Dr.
William Haynes of Auburn University, Mr.
David Mills of the North Carolina Depart-
ment of Public Instruction, and Dr. Louis
Rossetti of the University of Wisconsin,
Oshkosh. For more information, contact
the ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic at
(919) 3284405.
NC FOLK ARTS ft ARTIST SERIES
1995
Down Home Down East Connie Mason
performs traditional ballads and songs re-
flecting the personal lives and regional
history of coastal North Carolinians.at Per-
colator Coffeehouse on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 8 at 7:30 pm For more informa-
tion about other programs in the series
call the ECU Folklore Archive at 328389
or 328726.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
"For planning purposes, a survey is being
taken of the number of students who
would definitely have majored in Religious
Studies if such a major had been offered.
If such a major is ever offered, it will be
several years from now, so this data is
being collected purely for planning pur-
poses. If you would have majored in Reli-
gious Studies if such a major had been
offered during your years here, call 328-
6121 and leave your name and a message
for Calvin Mercer or drop your name in
campus mail to Calvin Mercer, Brewster
A440
Two essential
for a perfect
date:
A date and this.
CYPRESS GROUP NEWS
Group Meeting 7:30pm, Monda y February;
13, 1995 First Presbyterian Church, 14th;
& Elm Streets, Greenville NC. What Hap
pens When Loggers and Tree Huggers Get;
Together: or. Strange Bedfellows on the;
Roanoke. Merrill Lynch, NC Nature Con- �
servancy, to speak. For more information �
Contact 757-3895.
ECU CLUB
Proudly presents THAT'S AMORE, The '�
1995 International Wine Gala. Saturday.
February 11, 1995, Rock Springs Eques
trian Center, Highway 43 North
Greenville, 5:50pm. Come enjoy a medley
of elegant wimes in a romantic setting.
Celebrity service will be led by Chancel-
lor Richard Eaking, our Master of Ceremo-
nies will be Mark Rosenberg of Rosenberg
and Associates Advertising, Inc. Win a trip
for two to any USAir North America des-
tination, including Canada, Mexico, and
the Caribbean, courtesy of USAir. And
don't miss the silent auction of outstand-
ing items. Tickets are $25 per person.
Proceeds from the Wine Gala will be used
to endow a single parent scholarship at
East Carolina University. For further in-
formation contact Lauren Whetstone 321-
4726 or Edna Hodges 816-3748. Black Tie
Optional.
BRYAN ADRIAN SUMMER
BASKETBALL CAMP
Registration is now open for the 17th An-
nual Bryan Adrian Summer Basketball
camp. Boys and Girls ages 5 through 18
are eligible. Included on the 1995 Sum-
mer Camp Staff are: Jerry
Stackhouse(UNC), Rasheed Wallace(UNC),
Randolph Childress(Wake Forest), George
Lynch(NBA), Donald Williams(UNC), Drew
Barry(Ga. Tech), Jeff McInnis(UNC), Chr is
Corchiani(NBA), Pat Sullivan(UNC), Der-
rick Phelps(NBA), Junior Burrough(UVA),
and Jason Williford(UVA). There are sev-
eral locations including Charlotte, NC:
Greensboro, NC; Banner Elk, NC; Hickory,
NC; Mount Olive, NC; Elkin, NC; Gastonia,
NC; Spartanburg, SC; Greenville, SC; At-
lanta, GA; Chattanooga, TN; Lynchburg,
VA; and Elkins, WV. For a brochure call
(704) 372-3236.
TREASURE CHESTS AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure to
pick up your FREE video yearbook. Avail-
able at the Student Store, The East Caro-
linian, Joyner Library, Mendenhall and the
Media Board office in the Student Publi-
cations Building.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
BEHIND BLOCKBUSTER VIDEO
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
321-GUMB(4862)
Gumby's now
delivers for lunch.
Call for Fast,
FREE Delivery
Call 321-GUMB
(4862)
VISA
VPLUS
Xtk everYere
-you vwa"t to be
D VIM U.S.A. Inc 1W
If you have 15 - 96 credits and a 3.0 G.PA. or better,
then you meet the initial requirements
for membership to the
Gamma Beta Phi
National Honor Society.
There will be an informational meeting on
Tuesday, February 7 at 4:30 pm in
Mendenhall Great Rooms 1&2
The regular meeting for
old members will be at 5:00.
Any questions?
Call Rob
at 757-2658
or Lisa
at 328-7938
����MM
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Bad Valentine Idea 12
Broadway Karaoke
I love you a
and a peck
You bet yer pretty
IDOOO!

���.�c.
Poor ECU Man. He wants to impress ECU Woman.
His heart's in the right place,
but his voice
v
if
I
Hey, just put a Love Line in The East Carolinian
and don't run the risk of hitting the wrong note.
Let ECU know how you feel about your guy or doll.
Otherwise, you may have to sing for your supper.
Name:
Tpve Lines Form
� A Messages will appear in the Feb. 14 issue of The East Carolinian
Messages will appear in the Feb. 14 issue of The East Carolinian
Phone Number:
Yeesh!
Oh, well. At least he's not as bad
as N.C. State Man.
Address
Message:
One
word
per
box.
$3 for 25 words or fewer; IOC each for more than 25
Names of sender and addressee will appear in bold with no charge; only first names will be printed
Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Sender will be notified in such an instance.
Bring form and payment to East Carolinian office (2nd floor, Student Pubs Building).
Deadline for entries is Friday, Feb. 10 at 4:00.
Lyrics � 1994 Frank Music Corp. ASCAP
;
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1W�" !�!�11 !�
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 7, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 07, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1056
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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