The East Carolinian, February 2, 1995






naran
Former $tu
found dead
ent Air For
soaring o
Spring enrollment down
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
See AIR page 4
Frat rush turnout up
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
'
o u Id
kllv tl
Ivtetde
Thursday
Partly Cloudy
?oeea�t
High 55
Low 35
Weekend
Cloudy
r"

High 45
I ov,
Logan scores big in recruits
Phone 328 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The Fust Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd fl
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from 1�





1995
ihe East Carolinian
Mentor ship offered to minorities
Students given
chancr earn
one-on-one
Jeff Lee
Staff IVr,
when
arrants
January 2tt
ting am) entering motor vehicles - , th park
loor-unlocking tool, i
Assist rescue � An ' to Jenkins Art Building
� had fainted Wl
i iut a tooth. Stic vw
Assault on a female �
prayed the suspect with pepper spra
' ijured.
assaulted by a
i
ped
egi I. She kicked
id over her. The victim
January 27
Larceny
Larcetn
Damage to p
a lighter
lisher
January 150
A non student reported i his com-
ith of Jarvis Mali. The drive;
inknown.
I to put

inking
ith the

" said Ha1 Rogei
� Mangle East Hank and founder
I rban Minority Business Student
I ECU
:i-times just understai
w rid of work is like ver-
. ademic world either gets the
� cused, better focused or
' : in nation as to whether
even on the right
said.
� with banking
cials. This contact provides I
with the support and resi lurces tJ i.
wise would not have.
According to William L. Tun
branch manager of the Greenvill
ordinator of the Student
Program foi Bankers As-
sociatii in, the secondary goal of the pro-
gram is to help m
can-American students in the business
curriculum, whether it be finance, deci-
i ience or accounting.
What we noticed is that the mi-
dents' GPAs entering the
gh, and
vide a
one-oi. � oring.and �
Turner said.
Although not th
See PROGRAM page 3
Quiz bowl team
heads west
Reps to compete
in regional
tournament
Jeff Lee
Staff Writer
e bowl iast week and :s cur-
rently gearing up for regional com-
petition. �
The Tri-Beta team of Christie
Johnson. Jackie Patten. Alex Jun and
Brian Hall swept the campus com-
petition of the College Bowl on Jan.
18. They, along with one other mem-
ber chosen from the varsity squad,
are headed on an all-expenses-paid
trip to the University of Tennessee
in Knoxville for the regional corn-
See QUIZ page 4
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from offical ECU
reports.
MARK-DOWNS
On Winter Apparel
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If you have 15-96 credits and a 3.0 G.P.A. or better.
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There will be an informational meeting on
Tuesday, February 7 at 4:30 pm in
Mendenhall Great Rooms 1&2
The regular meeting for
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Any questions?
Call Rob
at 757-2658
or Lisa
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Thursday, Fe
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PROGRAM
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But net our classifieds.
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. fr
Thursday. February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
V U1Z from page 2
petition to be held Feb. 24-26.
"Ten people make up the var-
sity squad said Lynn Caverly. Uni-
versity Union's assistant director for
student activities.
"They will get together and
from them we will nominate a team
of five people to represent ECU at
the regional competition sponsored
by the Association of College Unions
International Caverly said.
The format for the campus
College Bowl was a 12-team, double-
elimination format. With participant
turnout for the bowl was up from
last year, organizers are hoping to
expand next year's format.
"We had a really good turn-
out from the residence halls this
year, and we are looking at expand-
ing the program next year and
maybe doing two round robin
leagues with the top two teams from
each league participating in a
double-elimination playoff, so the
teams can play more often because
that's what they really like to do
Caverly said.
ECU will get the chance to play,
plenty. The regional tournament in
Knoxville will showcase 20 teams
from colleges and universities from
N.C S.C Kentucky and Tennessee.
The winner of the regional tourna-
ment will then go to the national
competition to be held in April. Three
years ago the ECU College Bowl
Team finished third in the regionals
knocking off such powerhouses as
Duke. NC State, Carolina, the Uni-
versity of Kentucky and Vanderbilt.
"It would be nice if more stu-
dents came out to help us said Se-
nior History major Brian Hall, a mem-
ber of that third place team. "We have
the ability to compete with those
other schools.
"When we played Vanderbilt
that year, I overheard a guy say that
ECU would be an 'easy victory a lot
of people believe ECU is just a party
school, so it was very nice when we
beat Vanderbilt in the first round, it
was nice to sick it to them said
Hall.
Formerly known as the G.E.
College Bowl in the '60s, the bowl
was televised after the Saturday af-
ternoon college football games. In-
terest in the College Bowl declined
after G.E. dropped its sponsorship of
the event but has risen in the past
decade.
AIR
from page 1
ition. books and SlOO-a-month
spending money
Even those cadets not on
scholarship seem to think the
AFROTC is a good deal.
"Initially, the possibility of be-
ing under scholarship brought me
to the ROTC, but now it's a way to
make trends, find out about the Air
Force, and I may make a career of
it said AS 100 James Crouch, who
is in his second semester with the
corps.
Beyond training and classes,
there are trips, parties and formal
functions. For example, this semes-
ter there will be a military ball on
April 8. a field training mini camp
on March 31 through April 2. the
national awards ceremony on April
13 and a trip to Washington D.C.
March 9 through March 12.
While ir Washington D.C. ca-
dets will tour the White House and
the Pentagon. They will be staying
at Boiling Air Force Base and will
observe Air Force officers in their
daily work environments in order to
get a real sense of what the Air Force
is all about.
Students may wonder where
the money comes from to fund these
activities. At least in part, the money
comes from the cadets themselves
and from work they do on campus.
The remainder is funded by the
United States Air Force.
"To earn money for AFROTC
functions, instead of doing
carwashes or that knid of fundraiser,
we are the ushers at basketball
games and at the theatre in
Mendenhall Craves said.
Cadets sign up for the hours
they want to work, but if they fail
to show-up during that time, they
are fined $50.
The AFROTC gives students a
chance to see Air Force life from the deciding, but I like it more and more
inside before they make a every day I'm here, and I get closer
committment. and closer to deciding to join
"I am still in the process of Crouch said.
Order of Omega
Honor Fraternity
Meetings for Spring Semester '95:
February 2nd, S:O0 p.m MSC Social Room
February 9th, 5:00 p.m MSC Social Room
(new members to be initiated ONLY)
February 16th, 5:0O p.m MSC Social Room
(initiation of new members)
March 2nd, 5:00 p.m MSC Sodal Room

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Thursday, February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
�MA �� � � �� -�- . �����
IT'S
PICK AN
OPINION
TIME!
A. Hey!
Check it out!
Studying is
the latest
thing! And
difficult
classes! Yes,
they are so
cool.
B. And, like,
sometimes
you learn
something.
That is, if you,
like, study or
something.
C. Pass the
drop sheet,
pal. We're
outta here if
the word
'paper' is
even uttered.
If you're reading this, you're probably either a student, a
faculty member or a staff member at ECU. With this common
bond, The East Carolinian would like to hit a nerve with a lot
of you. LAZINESS! It's everywhere, and no one seems to be
able to stop it!
Granted, we acknowledge the hard-working individuals dili-
gently studying in the library (or trying to - what is that ruckus,
anyway?) each day, those who appear 15 minutes before class
to get in a little review time, and those who pull all-nighters
even though they've consistently kept up with all reading as-
signments, homework, etc. All two of you.
Today, however, we would like to address the 50 bazillion
others who have nightmares about ever carrying out such hor-
rible actions. Now, we're all procrastinators at some point. And
not all of us are that bad, but we're sick of the ones who are!
Take a challenging class, for example. There are so many
people at this school who would love that diploma, but want it
for free. As in, no tests - oral quizzes if necessary, please - a
one-and-a-half page final paper, and free snacks between lecture
issues. Frequently, we who actually are here to learn, must lis-
ten to "God, Dr. So-and-So is su-u-uch a tyrant! I mean, he actu-
ally made us WRITE A PAPER Or, "I know, Dr. Such-and-Such
is just irrational. I had to study a whole two hours for her test,
and I still flunked
Come on, people! And you know who you are! Hang your
heads, get a clue and grow up! Some of us want a challenge,
and find those classes that make us study like heck extremely
fascinating. Of course, there are exceptions. (Refer to previous
article on 'D' and 'F' classes.) We certainly don't want to have
to pass a test that Chancellor Eakin might even have problems
with, but the occasional "Sheesh. I must study all night or I will
certainly fail like no one has ever failed before" class can be
exciting.
Think about it. An excuse to order pizza at crazy hours. A
reason to call home and moan about your tireless efforts and
aching brains (This gets a great response, too. Parents have
been known to purchase new cars for sons and daughters who
call home and sound like they're studying endlessly. Plus the
call gives you a great reason to procrastinate.).
Then there are the people who start a hate organization
against any professor who has the nerve to bring some life into
a class. Like forcing class participation. Whoa. Tough one. Or
trying a new teaching tactic, foolishly under the impression
that "Change is good, change is good
All we're saying is that perhaps some people could stop
complaining and start listening. The hardest classes often turn
out to be the ones you quote from during late-night conversa-
tions that require some exhibition of intellect.
And calm down, all of you who want to write letters to TEC's
staff labeling us goody-two-shoes, etc. We're far from it, but we
are an ambitious group. In fact, our ambition allowed us this
consensus opinion. Those on the staff who disagreed can be
found somewhere in one of ECU's beautiful construction
swamps.
We like ordering pizza at ridiculous hours just like the next
guy. We actually excel at the process. But we don't insist that
the pizza be delivered during class, between lecture subjects.
Answer isn't term limits
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
v
m
Printed on
100
recycled
paper
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Eric Bartels, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Roziell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor,The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
Ladies deserve fans, too
Well here we are again fellow
Pirate fans. Smack dab in the
middle of another season of colle-
giate hoops. On any given weekend
we have the privilege of heading
over to Williams Arena and catch-
ing a glimpse of Skip Schaefbaur
sinking a three or Chuckie Robinson
slamming one home. No one can
argue the fact that the men are
amazing to watch, but I have a sur-
prise for all of you. We also have a
women's team that plays in Minges
Coliseum.
We, as a university, seem con-
tent to rally behind the men's team
in vast numbers while at the same
time hardly acknowledging that the
Lady Pirates exist. A perfect ex-
ample of this is the Perfect Pirate
Fan contest that is going on now.
This contest attempts to fill the
seats of the newly renovated Will-
iams Arena by promising students a
chance to win a spring break trip
for two to Panama City. The only
eligibility requirement is that you
attend select games at the new
arena, and present your I.D. at a spe-
cial table. Ahh! This is where it
gets interesting. In order to be a
"Perfect" Pirate Fan, you have to at-
tend twelve of the men's games but
are only asked to attend two of the
women's contests. The rules of this
contest insinuate that watching the
Calvin Arlington
Opinion Columnist
What's this?
You're only
perfect if you
support the men's
basketball team?
men battle it out on the hardwood
is much more crucial to obtaining
that "perfect" fan status than sup-
porting the ladies in their athletic
endeavors. Who's to blame for this
flagrantly biased promotion? At first
, visions of a polyester clad adminis-
trative chauvinist may come to mind.
However if one looks further, it is
we the fans that are to blame for
the inequality of the contest.
Over and over again we pile
into the coliseum and show our sup-
port for the men. On the other
hand, a relatively minuscule number
of fans come out and cheer on the
ladies. Excluding the double header
on January 6, the women's audience
has averaged only 296 fans. The
men however have commanded au-
diences in excess of 6000 through-
out the season thus far. These num-
bers clearly show that we as a stu-
dent body refuse to recognize the
Lady Pirates as the accomplished
athletes that they are.
No, you probably won't see a
female Buccaneer hanging from the
rim anytime soon. But that is be-
cause women's basketball is, in some
respects, a different game alto-
gether. Sure they don't have the
dunk, but they create in its absence
a more pure version of the game that
is rooted in the fundamentals of the
sport.
Why, you may ask, did I bother
to bring all this up? Because we as
a student body need to give these
ladies the recognition they so de-
serve. The women who make up our
Lady Pirates team have made the
same sacrifices as their male coun-
terparts. They practice long hours
and travel many miles in order to play
the game. These women have given
themselves to the game and to their
school. For that we owe them some
thanks. If we really want to be "per-
fect" Pirate fans, we should give the
women the same support as we do
the men. Our ladies should be able
to take to their home floor in front
of an ocean of screaming Purple and
Gold fans. Or have we the students
reserved that privilege only for the
guys? My hat is off to you ladies.
Race should not be issue
Many people seem to think term
limit will clean up our government
Some even want us to believe these
limits will make all of our
government's problems go away. How-
ever, nothing could be farther from
the truth.
The problem with our govern-
ment is the power money exerts in
our political system. Sure, term lim-
its may not be bad. They may even
make things marginally better - but
they are not the panacea their propo-
nents tout them to be.
Term limits do not attack the
fundamental problem in Washington
or Raleigh. My preacher used to say
that money is the root of all evil. I
believe he was right
Money and the influence of spe-
cial interests are the root jroblems in
Washington. The very nai ure of our
political system encourages politicians
to prostitute themselves for money
To give an example, let's say I
am running for Congress. It costs
money to get my message out to the
people. I couldn't expect people to
vote for me unless they know who I
am and where I'm coming from.
I would have to go spend large
sums of money for television, radio,
and newspaper ads. I would have to
spend massive amounts of money to
Thomas Blue
Opinion Columnist
Forget term
limits, let's keep
an eye on the
money that gets
passed around
get elected, particularly if I'm running
against a well known incumbent.
Henry Aldridge, the newly
elected state representative for Pitt
County, spent over $50,000 to be
elected to a job that only pays thir-
teen thousand. His opponent Charles
McLawhorn spent over thirty thou-
sand.
Politicians usually have to
spend large amounts of money to get
elected or reelected. Some of the
money comes from die-hard Republi-
can or Democratic contributors. How-
ever, a lot of the money comes from
those who, simply want to gain access
or influence.
One of the most powerful tools
lobbyists have is the ability to infuse
large amounts of cash into the politi-
cal campaigns of people who vote
their way. It is not good that politi-
cians can gain thousands of dollars
for their political war chests if they
vote the way a special interest with
money wants them to.
Traditionally, the largest edge
incumbents have, is the ability to build
a large campaign war chest If we want
to make the playing field level, we
must address campaign financing.
Most term limit options cur-
rently being discussed will allow leg-
islators in Raleigh or Washington to
run for at least twelve more years. In
other words, a state legislator could
run for reelection five times, and then
run for state senate and congress five
or six times apiece.
Term limits will not stop politi-
cians from cow-towing to those who
have the money to finance their next
campaign.
Michael Kinsley recently said
voters wanting term limits were sim-
ply saying, "Stop me before I vote
again
If we truly want to change our
political system, we should start with
campaign finance reform. Otherwise,
we may have new faces in government,
but the same old problems.
I wish 1 could say I had no prob-
lem with African-American History
Month, but doing so would be dishon-
est. It does indeed bother me.
I'm not offended by the idea of
recognizing the efforts of others. Far
from it Anytime nowadays that we can
acknowledge the beneficial works of
others instead of rummaging through
their affairs, scandals or shortcom-
ings, we should. Anytime we can
praise effort, persistence and hard
work, we must And anytimeNve can
underscore the importance and inspi-
ration of the examples of individuals
overcoming great obstacles and dis-
advantages and make a contribution
to society, we need to.
And that is what African-Ameri-
can History is for. However. I believe
it's wrong to emphasize the color of
one's skin in recognizing his or her
accomplishments, and that also is
what African-American History Month
is for.
In 1987, when Reverend Jesse
Jackson was campaigning to be the
Democratic candidate for President,
he spoke to the assembled students
of my high school in Spartanburg, S.C.
In a school in which drug abuse of all
kinds were prevalent and the country
was in the midst of "Just Say Noisms,
Jackson sought to inspire the students
to believe in themselves without the
habitual dependence of recreational
drugs (and, of course, trying to sway
Dixiecrat support through the chil-
dren of registered voters).
His message was one of recog-
nizing the potential of all people, in
all endeavors, in every level of our
society. It was a . ean to open-
mindedness and possibility, a message
even then I realized he was relying
on in order to successfully run for
President. But it came across as sin-
cere and, seven years later, I remem-
Gegory Dickens
General Manager
Black History
Month is
detrimental to
the cause of
united people
ber that speech and I remember how
I enthusiastic I felt afterward.
While I realize that events such
as African-American History Month is
designed to educate everyone and
encourage them to strive, by empha-
sizing one ethnic group, all other
groups are alienated. And while I don't
think the act of acknowledgment dis-
courages those who aren't being given
the spotlight, to say that the accom-
plishments of any people are made
more significant by their skn color is
tantamount to disavowing the efforts
of others because of the same crite-
rion.
The rationale for the February
celebrations, as I understand it is to
enlighten others as to the efforts of
people who began under great disad-
vantages in all areas of society only
to make significant contributions to
that same society. The common ele-
ment of those hailed during this
month is that they were under duress
because they were black. The reason
this is so emphasized is to demon-
strate that everyone deserves a chance
to prove themselves and that color
should no more be a deterrent than
the number of one's teeth. Moreover,
their common point is important to a
society in which "separate but equal"
was considered unconstitutional only
30 years ago. In other words, by show-
ing everybody what any body can do
when given a chance, hopefully eth-
nic prejudice, and bias in general, can
be eliminated. It is done to make
America stronger.
Again, anytime we can do that,
I'm all for it But I believe that em-
phasizing one group is detrimental to
the cause of a united people, and by ;
people I mean "country I contend
that it's important to show everyone
what anyone can do by showing what I
everyone who has achieved has done. �
Yes, Carver, DuBois and Little ;
were great people, but what of eery- �
one else who has overcome great.
odds? What of the scientists, writers, 1
inventors, and teachers of this coun- .
try who aren't mentioned and eel- -
ebrated because they aren't black? Or �
white? In a country suddenly popu- J
lated by hyphenated groups, we can- j
not deny diversity as was tried at
tempted before. Even if we wanted to
it just isn't possible where so many
different media present so many dif- J
ferent points of view and messages. J
In those messages lie the heart
of the oft-scoffed idea of our country !
as a "great melting pot" And to spot- �
light any group over another is to;
undermine those trying to get their J
message across. It was wrong to place
white over black, and it's wrong to!
place black over anyone else. That is
what we are supposed to have learned.
That everybody has a chance and a �
dream. That everybody wants to be;
free at last Let us revere those who.
seek it no matter what color they are
Or aren't
And let me be the first to sug- �
gest an "American History Month" so
everyone in this society has a stake'
in the lessons to be learned.
Tans ?s owr optmou pas
And we would like to know what you think of it. During the course of
the next several weeks, you will see new issues brought up from the minds
of some brand-new writers. We encourage anyone and everyone to write
in or just call with your comments. We are here for you, remember? But
we can't give you what you want unless you speak up!
f �
A





m. nil
NICK O'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
?��"
mmmmmmmam





Thursday, February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
I Dueling Critics
Legends of the Fall
splits our reviewers
Artwork courtesy Bongo Comics
Krusty swings into action! In a scene from his very own comic book series, The Simpsons'
Krusty the Clown attempts to stop his pet chimp, Mr. Teeny, from stealing his limousine.
The Simpsons rule TV
Caustic humor
wins praise for the
animated family
Thumbs down
BHMHHi
Thumbs up
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
One friend of mine has seen Legends of the Fall
twice already. She claims that she cannot remember the
last time she cried so hard at a film. After the show I
saw a group of girls ahead of me wiping their eyes and
talking about how sad the story was.
The emotional response of these viewers leaves
me puzzled because this film offers nothing more than
what can be seen on any daytime soap opera.
Legends of the Fall tells the sordid tale of a family
in conflict because of a woman. Three brothers, Alfred
(Aidan Quinn), Tristan (Brad Pitt) and Samuel (Henry
Thomas) Ludlow all wish to curry the favor of Susannah
(Julia Ormond), who comes to the Ludlow ranch in Mon-
tana as the fiancee of Samuel. Soon World War I breaks
out and the brothers enlist to aid the British in their
fight against Germany. Tristan returns from the war to
fall in love with Susannah, who never marries Samuel.
Later Tristan leaves the ranch for a sailing voyage, and
Susannah agrees to marry Alfred.
The patriarch of the family, Colonel Ludlow (An-
: thony Hopkins), remains at home while the brothers each
seek out a life for themselves. Colonel Ludlow had quit
the army when he saw how ignominiousry the military
treated the American Indian. The Colonel objects to his
boys going to war but can do little to stop them. He
objects to many of the decisions made by his sons but
seems powerless to change them. He is an ineffectual
father and a rather cold-hearted man.
Many subplots play out in the story, along with
the main theme of a woman splitting apart the family.
None of the subplots further the development of any of
the characters but serve only to add needless complex-
ity to an otherwise simplistic story.
The decision to set Legends of the Fall in the lovely
beauty of the Montana may have been only to give Tristan
a setting to develop his wild nature. The scenery serves
little more than a backdrop to the overwrought melo-
drama happening within the family. Unlike importance
of nature to A River Runs Through It (which also starred
Pitt), the characters in Legends of the Fall seem im-
mune to the majestic splendor of the place in which
they live.
The relationship of the Ludlow brothers occurs
only in soap operas and Harlequin romances. No real
bond gets developed. The film substitutes deep under-
standing with horse play between grown brothers. The
shallowness of the love between the brothers is mirrored
by the shallowness of the story.
The story itself seems designed for convenient his-
trionics. Why, for example, do none of the other broth-
ers ever interact with another female (save one shot of
Tristan with a woman assumed to be a prostitute)? Why
does Susannah opt to marry Alfred when abandoned by
Tristan? She must have had friends back on the East
coast and she had already admitted to not loving Alfred.
Why did Alfred even love her? The unanswered ques-
tions arise because of a shallow plot.
The acting in Legends of the Fall falls well short
of emotional. Anthony Hopkins gets wasted in his pater-
nal role. He occasionally shouts as a substitute for act-
ing. Aidan Quinn and Henry Thomas seem to have no
connection to their roles and consequently bring noth-
ing to them. Brad Pitt tries hard to bring the wild, un-
tamed nature of Tristan to life but succeeds only in preen-
ing for the camera in a glamorous role designed to make
women swoon. Pitt does a much more credible job of
playing a wayward brother who few people understand
in A River Runs Through It. Julia Ormond seems con-
tent to allow pained expressions and tears constitute
acting. She allows none of the conflicts troubling her
soul to gain expression. Her character becomes a pos-
session only, one that is desired by all three brothers.
The brothers could have been fighting over a beautiful
horse for as much emotion as Ormond invests in her
role.
The staging of Legends of the Fall also falls short
of acceptable. The World War I scenes are especially bad.
In a pivotal scene between Samuel and Tristan, German
officers pop up at random in the midst of a deserted
battlefield and then disappear again so that Tristan can
have plenty of room to vent his emotions. The town of
Helena, where Alfred eventually lives, looks like it was
slapped together for an old-time celebration in the com-
munity. Little realism exists in any set, giving even more
evidence that this film should have been a TV miniseries.
Usually a film's title can help deepen the under-
standing of the events within the film. Legends of the
Fall inadequately describes the motivation within the
story. None of the characters could be called legendary.
Brothers or Montana or some other appropriately
See DOWN page 8
Legends of the Fall is a story of love: between
men and women, between fathers and sons, between
brothers and between friends. It is also about the com-
plexity of that love and how it can turn joy into de-
spair in less than a heartbeat.
But most impo.tantly. Legends of the Fall is
about the rise, and yes, the fall of a family torn apart
by circumstances beyond their control.
The story centers around Tristan Ludlow (Brad
Pitt), one of three sons born to Colonel William Ludlow
(Anthony Hopkins) and his wife Isabel. Tristan, along
with his older brother Alfred (Aidan Quinn) and his
younger brother Samuel (Henry Thomas), live with
their father in Montana. The boys' mother returned
to the city while they were still children to escape the
harsh winters and the even harsher responsibilities
of being a wife and a mother.
Running away from responsibility is one of the
many themes in this complex film. The screenplay is
extremely active; however, it does not fall into the "too
much action, not enough plot" trap that many movies
do. It can perhaps be said that there is too much plot,
rather than a lack of twists and turns, that tosses the
Ludlow family into a sea of impossible choices. A few
people 1 spoke with found it difficult to follow and I
agree that a second viewing may be in order. How-
ever, many great movies, such as the acclaimed
Schindler's List and JFK. require concentration to be
completely understood. Rather than take away from
Legends of the Fall, this quality makes it a treat to
watch.
Legends of the Fall is wonderfully written, acted
and directed. The characters are real and alive, thanks
to both the dedication of the actors and to director
Edward Zwick. Brad Pitt portrays the wild Tristan with
clarity and true emotional expression. One of the more
moving scenes in the film, Samuel's death scene, was
handled exceptionally well by both Pitt and Thomas.
The extreme loss Tristan feels at his brother's death
was expressed without being overly melodramatic as
many actors tend to do.
Anthony Hopkins deserves much praise for his
portrayal of Colonel Ludlow. This role was especially
demanding, because the Colonel spends the latter half
of the movie partially paralyzed from a stroke. Hopkins
allows Ludlow's inner strength to remain even after
the stroke. His genuine concern and love for his sons
conflicts with his strict military training to provide
an interesting and moving emotional struggle as he
tries to raise his sons alone.
I found the performances of Quinn and Thomas
extremely interesting. They, along with Pitt, were ex-
tremely believable as brothers. I especially enjoyed the
scenes before the war when the brothers became re-
acquainted. The horseplay and frank conversations re-
minded me of my own family, and the joking was good-
natured and taken in stride. Julia Ormand, who por-
trayed Susannah, the woman who comes between the
brothers, was also very good in her role. I would have
liked to see her establish the relationship with Samuel
better, however. I could easily believe her love for
Tristan but had a somewhat harder time understand-
ing her relationship with Samuel.
There are a few unanswered questions raised in
Legends of the Fall. In the beginning of the film, the
sheriff comes to the Ludlow ranch in search of a man
named Tom Cullen. It is never explained who Cullen
was or why the sheriff wanted him. It is taken for
granted that this was included in the film to give Colo-
nel Ludlow a chance to show that he is no longer coop-
erative in any way towards the government or the mili-
tary. However, I believe this was already established
and the entrance of Cullen into the script simply left
me wondering. Also, I believe Tristan's departure for
war was slightly contrived; while both Alfred and Samuel
express avid political interests, Tristan never shows even
a passing interest in the war. He enlists to "take care of
Samuel which seems just a bit trite.
None of these minor problems takes away from
the overall beauty of the film. Despite its complexity, I
found it surprisingly easy to follow. I felt that the ma-
jority of the relationships were well-defined, although
I would have liked to see more of the relationship be-
tween Samuel and Susannah. I do applaud the writer
for not bowing to the traditional "happy ending" re-
quirement that runs rampant in too many of today's
movies. Writers who feel that everything must have a
storybook ending usually end up with an impossibly
overdone story. That is not the case with Legends of
the Fall, which, although sad. ends remarkably well.
Legends of the Fall is a wonderful film. Out of
10 stars, it rates a 9.
The Simpsons may well be the
best show in the history of Ameri-
can television. At the very least, it's
in the top 10.
I don't make this claim
lightly, or without a fairly intimate
knowledge of the 40 years of TV
that precede the show. Certainly,
The Simpsons doesn't have the
heart of a show like MASH or the
mind-bursting dramatic potential of
The Twilight Zone. But then, it's
not supposed to.
The Simpsons is that rarest
of all network TV animals, a social
satire. Chronicling the animated ad-
ventures of the Simpson family, the
show is the creation of Matt
Greening, whose comic strip "Life
in Hell" runs in alternative press
newspapers across the country. The
Simpsons trades in taking nasty
shots at such American institutions
as Christianity, the elderly and femi-
nism. There are no sacred cows
here, no matter which side of the
political fence they graze on.
Rest assured, this is not stan-
dard TV fare. Enslaved as it gener-
ally is to the moral interests of a
few rabid televangelists and a
gaggle of blue-haired old ladies
from Ann Arbor, Michigan, network
television seldom rises above the
level of that simpering vehicle for
the troll-doll-like Olson twins, Full
House. Thankfully, The Simpsons
is the rare exception.
Set in the fictional commu-
nity of Springfield (an ail-American
town if ever there was one), The
Simpsons puts all of the nation's
foibles on ugly display. The police
are donut-swilling incompetents.
The mayor is a corrupt parody of
Ted Kennedy. Beer is a drug used
to keep the populace docile. Repub-
licans are evil manipulators, inter-
ested only in making themselves
richer. Democrats are less evil but
totally incapable of governing. The
Simpsons themselves are the
nuclear family gone horribly wrong,
dysfunctional to the core.
As Homer Simpson himself
would say, "It's funny 'cause it's
true
It's that truthfulness (cynical
as it may be) that rubs some people
the wrong way. The Fox Network
reportedly gets over a hundred let-
ters and phone calls every week
complaining about the show. Much
to its credit, however, Fox mostly
ignores the complaints. The
Simpsons was one of the network's
first big hits, and the execs leave it
alone.
So the American public is
treated every week to another
manic outing. And manic it is. The
jokes come fast and hard on this
show; it's not unusual for me to
spend five full minutes laughing.
Most TV comedies can barely mus-
ter up enough humor to give me
even one giggle in that time, but
The Simpsons barrels along like a
rocket.
Even still, the humor never
works to the detriment of the story,
or even, most amazingly, the devel-
opment of the characters. This is a
show with a sense of history, and
we're occasionally given glimpses
into the past that round out even
the most stereotypical characters.
So we know, for example, that
Homer's alcoholic friend Barney
wouldn't be the drunken sod he is
See SIMPSONS page 8
Reviews
Big Chief
Platinum Jive
Christina Pokrzewinski
Staff Writer
Hey kids, do you like that
zany new rock and roll? Well, the
newest phase of rock and roll for
the '90s is here, and it's Platinum.
Platinum Jive that is, the 16-track
debut album of the retro-rock band
Big Chief.
The album has a little some-
thing for everyone with a mixture
of sounds ranging from teeny
bopper alternative to rap and back
a couple of decades to an almost
Led Zeppelin Pink Floyd sound.
Almost. Regardless of who Big
Chief's influences may be, the band
has meshed them all in a new sound
experience that is, without a doubt,
all their own.
The album starts off strong
with "Lion's Mouth" and "Takeover
Baby Both songs have a pseudo-
Red Hot Chili Peppers bassline and
throbbing drum beats. Barry
Henssler's grating voice detracts
somewhat from the intensity of the
music, but the lyrical content of the
songs overshadows his shortcom-
ings, g
"John's Scared" is also a great
song that utilizes the Floydian
space intro and bass sound com-
bined with impressively organized
guitar distortion that Henssler can
actually compete with.
"Armed Love" kicks a bit
harder than the earlier cuts with
surging guitars and a dangerous
bassline that is vaguely reminiscent
of Metallica before they hit their tal-
ent peak in the '80s.
Every real band in history has
had a "love sucks" song, and for
Big Chief "Armed Love" is that
song. "All Downhill From Here" is
the closest thing to standard rock
and roll on the album. The song has
a bluesy bassline and a pleasantly
steady beat, not to mention an ap-
pearance from the most cliched in-
strument from the '70s - the
dreaded Partridge Family tambou-
rine.
The song's lyrics are nearly
meaningful: "I knew the truth but
I misplaced it, I had a mind but I
slowly erased it" are common sen-
timents among many people these
days.
The best song on the album
as far as musical content is con-
cerned is "The Liquor Talkin a
mellow, easygoing drinking song
that is just, well, damn funny.
There are only three abso-
lutely terrible songs on the album.
"Map Of Your Failure" is a dron-
ing, repetitious track that neither
musically nor lyrically goes any-
where worth going. The song is dull
and tries to be cutting edge too hard
to be good.
"Bona Fide sung by a char-
acter who calls himself Schooly D,
is a gangsta rap wannabe tune, com-
plete with inane sexual references
and lame word choices common to
the anything-for-a-rhyme syndrome.
The song is hopelessly lost on an
otherwise listenable album.
The third dud on Platinum
Jive, "Philly Nocturne is not even
a song. It is 31 seconds of static,
guitar and acoustic bass, not to
mention a complete waste of noise.
With only three out of 16
songs that are weak. Platinum Jive
promises to be a favorite of the new
rockers and old rockers alike. Wait,
there is a bonus to Platinum Jive
- one of those sneaky hidden songs
at the end of the CD.
What is it about, you ask?
You'll just have to decipher that for
yourself.
mint!
Utracticns
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, Feb. 2
OpenMic
at the Percolator
Coffeehouse
(poetry)
Fighting Gravity
at the Attic
ska)
One Hot Foot
at Peasant's Cafe
The Lion King
at Hendrix Theatre
(Disney)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, Feb. 3
The Amateurs
at the Attic
White Buffalo
at Peasant's Cafe
The Lion King
at Hendrix Theatre
(Disney)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, Feb. 4
Unsound
at O'Rock's
(metal)
MiloZ
and One Step Beyond
at the Attic
Knocked Down Smilin'
at Peasant's Cafe
The Lion King
at Hendrix Theatre
(Disney)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Wednesday, Feb. 8
Connie Mason
at the Percolator
Coffeehouse
(traditional folk ballads)
Comedv Zone:
Billy Gardell
and Daryl Rhoades
at the Attic
� �iijiMNIMiMUHJg
-��� �� � �fc
S
mmmmm xL'i





8
Thursday, February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
DOWN from page 7 SIMPSONS from page 7
melodramaic one-word title would have
more suited the film.
Despite the sobbing overheard in
the theater, the only bodily action I found
difficult to control were my yawns. Leg-
ends of die Fall plods along for over two
hours with nothing to offer the viewer
but a family undone by sex. Hollywood
should save these films for network tele-
vision and stick to the complex, artistic
drama that belongs on the silver screen.
On a scale of one to 10, Legends
of the Fall rates a the.
today if Homer hadn't given him his
first beer when they should have
been studying for the SAT.
It's the background details
like this (making even a pathetic
figure like Barney more human)
that raises this show above even the
usual satire. Nobody is a cardboard
cut-out here, much as we might like
them to be.
Trying to explain the phenom-
enon that is The Simpsons in the
space provided here is an impossible
task. There's too much going on; the
satire is too deliciously vicious, to
do justice to it all. I watch it every
chance I get (and with daily repeats,
that's a lot of time in front of the
tube) and find myself discussing epi-
sodes with my friends weeks after
they first air. If this is addiction, so
be it. I can think of worse things to
adhere to.
On a scale of one to 10. The
Simpsons rates an enthusiastic 12.
What more can 1 say?
EBSEEIIEaKfiAX
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Sponsored By the Student Union Lecture Committee
j���





Thursday, February 2,1995 The East Carolinian
Pure Gold!
Monarchs top ECU 69-66
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Chuckle Robinson, shown against Coastal Carolina, has
played big in the paint for Coach Payne this season.
"Petey is our horse Old Domin-
ion head coach Jeff Capel said about
guard Petey Sessoms after Tuesday-
night's 69-66 victory over the Pirates.
"We're going to saddle him up and ride
him until he drops
Ride em' cowboy.
Sessoms scorched ECU (13-7,34
CAA) for 26 points, 19 in the second half,
as the Monarchs (12-8,7-0 CAA) slipped
by the Pirates 696 Tuesday night in
Norfolk to keep their conference record
perfect after seven games.
Sloppy passing marred ECU'S
game early on, but they steadily con-
verted on first-half shooting fouls to keep
the game from getting away from them.
The Pirates would find themselves off-
balance virtually all night as ODU con-
stantly played in and out of a full-court
press, leading to 19 Pirate turnovers.
"We got too many unforced turn-
overs Payne said. "You can't do that
against a good team and expect to win
By hitting free throws, ECU stayed
closely behind the Monarchs for most of
the first half until senior forward Chuckle
Robinson put back an errant Pirate shot
at the halftime buzzer to tie the score at
35.
"They did a good job defending
us on the perimeter Pirate point guard
Tony Parham said, "so we had to go in-
side to the big men
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Fans who visit Williams Arena to catch a Pirate or Lady Pirate hoops contest get an
additional bonus. The ECU Pure Gold Dancers perform at every homeame.
Football recruits sign on
See ODU page 10
Quality recruits
sign letters-of-intent
to play for ECU
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
Feb. 1st is the first day that high
school, junior college and prep school
football players can sign their letters of
intent verifying their college choices.
East Carolina did extremely well
this off-season recruiting bigger linemen
on both sides of the football while im-
proving their team speed at the skill po-
"Mr. Minnesota" stars for Pirates
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
In time, Skipp Schaefbauer, a
6-foot-4. 200-pound sophomore
guard from Elk River, Minn. (HS)
may become one of the best all-
around guards to play at ECU.
Minnesota's 1992-93 "Mr. Bas-
ketball" made the CAA All-Rookie
team last year after averaging 6.3
points, 1.8 rebounds, and 2.1 assists
per game. Unimpressive numbers at
first glance, but his playing time was
limited due to being behind All-CAA
guard Lester Lyons. He flashed ath-
letic ability that the Pirates have sel-
dom had to go with such a big
guard.
Schaefbauer has both the
highest vertical leap (36.5) and
bench press (295) on the squad. He
has the ability to rise over defend-
ers and dunk the basketball, while
raining jumpshots from NBA three-
point range.
This season, his first as a full-
time starter, has seen Schaefbauer
average 12.4 points per game, 3.7
rebounds and 4 assists while shoot-
ing 30 percent from behind the arc.
A big part of the Pirates' suc-
cess this season is Schaefbauer, who
could score more, but unselfishly
gives up the ball to open teammates.
�Taking Lester's place is not
easy Schaefbauer said. "Those are
some really big shoes to fill.
"The strong points of my game
is my shooting. I would like to put
the ball on the floor more and get
to the free throw line more
Schaefbauer has consistently
drawn fouls by beating opponents
with a strong cross-over dribble
when they overplay his jump shot.
"1 definitely use a lot of
dribble moves to get to the basket
Schaefbauer said. "Scouts from
other schools had me pegged as
strictly a catch-it-and shoot-it-type
Schaefbauer has a lot of play-
ers he has modeled his game after,
particularly Indiana Pacers guards'
Reggie Miller and Damon Bailey.
"Reggie Miller is my favorite
pro Schaefbauer said. "He has the
purest jumper in the NBA. Bailey
is similar to me in size and height.
He's a real good shooter and smart
player. He know's how to get to the
free throw line
Schaefbauer was the subject
of a lot of recruiting attention af-
ter a great senior season playing
at Elk River High School. He aver-
aged 23.5 points, five rebounds and
eight assists per game for the Elks,
leading them to a 26-2 record and
a third-place finish in the state tour-
nament.
"I visited Washington State,
Wyoming, UNC-Wilmington and
ECU Schaefbauer said. "It is kind
of a difficult process. I didn't know
anyone who had gone through it
before. I didn't realize it was such
a business, with schools banging
down the door one day and then
next week decide they like another
player more. I'm very happy with
the decision I made to attend ECU
Making the transition to col-
lege has been an easy one for
Schaefbauer due to the similar
coaching styles of his high school
coach and ECU head coach Eddie
Payne. Both are strict and disci-
plined coaches, according to the
Minnesota native, that let each
p'ayer know his particular role on
the team, while not yelling or
screaming at them.
In the classroom, the GTE
Cosida Academic-All American can-
didate has excelled as well.
Schaefbauer attributes his aca-
demic success to time management
and having the self-discipline to
study after long hours on the court.
"I have decided to go into
sports psychology for a masters
program Schaefbauer said. "Even-
tually, I will probably end up in
coaching. I can't see myself doing
anything not related to basketball.
1 would like to play in the NBA, and
I feel like that is a realistic goal if I
continue to improve and become a
Jeff Hornacek-type of player
As far as team goals,
Shaefbauer is shooting for nothing
less than first place in the Colonial
Athletic Association. Currently, the
Pirates are in fourth after losing
to Old Dominion on Tuesday night.
"I know we are going to play
a lot of tough teams Schaefbauer
said. "Old Dominion. JMU and
Wilmington are really good this
year so we are going to have to
come together as a team to beat
them. Our conference doesn't usu-
sitions.
"It really is a good group of kids
across the board said Ken Treadway,
ECU'S new recruiting coordinator. "On
paper, it looks very good. We satisfied
our needs as far as getting bigger play-
ers and good kids at the skill positions.
There are about three or four wide bod-
ies that have a chance to help us next
season. Also, we improved our team
speed significantly
The "big players" Treadway is re-
ferring to include Npumi Masimini, a 6-
foot-5, 280-pound All-American out of
Washington, D.Cs Woodrow Wilson HS.
Masimini had &5 tackles and 14 sacks,
and was recruited by Colorado, Illinois,
Wisconsin and Syracuse.
Another D.C. area recruit, Corey
Russell from Maryland's Fairmont
Heights H.S may contribute early in his
ECU career too. Russell was recruited
by Rutgers and the University of Pitts-
burgh. He stands 6-foot4, weighs 285
pounds and was selected to Lindy's ACC
players to watch as well as The Washing-
ton Post's All-Metropolitan Team Hon-
orable Mention.
In the past we have been a little
undersized on our defensive line, and it
is always a priority for us to get good,
big athletes said Cliff Yoshida ECU's
defensive line coach and Washington D.C.
recruiter "They have got to be able to
run - size is really important too, but
we have to have quickness and athletic
ability on our D-Line. I feel like these
guys have the physical tools to play early,
but it is just a question of how quickly
they mature and adjust to college foot-
ball
Offensive lineman Dameon D�is,
a 6-foot-3,310-pound tackleguard from
Greenville, SC's Berea H.S. chose ECU
over North Carolina. Clemson, Arkansas
and Georgia.
Local recruiting brought in skill
players Troy Smith and Kevin Monroe
from Greenville Rose H.S. Smith (6-3,
180) was recruited heavily by Notre
Dame. He may play immediately, giving
Steve Logan another big, athletic receiver
to go with Larry Shannon. He was rated
See ECU page 10
"Fruky" battles
back from injury
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
Photo by GARRETT KILLIAN
Sophomore Skipp Schaefbauer has averaged 12.4 points, 3.7
rebounds and 4 assists per game during the 1995 season. He
has shot better than 30 percent from three-point range.
ally get an at-large bid to the NCAA
tournament, so our post-season
tournament is what determines
who gets to go
The new gymnasium is an-
other big motivator for
Schaefbauer, who says the Pirates
are going to be very tough to beat
this year in Williams Arena.
Schaefbauer's NBA dreams
are not far-fetched. This past sum-
mer he played in a Pro-Am Summer
League in Minneapolis and helped
lead his team to the championship.
With an exciting style of play
that has a combination of ability
to drive to the basket and score
from long range. NBA scouts may
take notice soon of the young Pi-
rate shooting guard.
It sounds like a plot from a
TV series.
Junior forward Tomekia
"Fruky" Blackmon, a preseason
All-CAA pick, starts off last Novem-
ber in what should be her best sea-
son yet as a basketball player.
Within minutes of the opening tip-
off of the first exhibition game of
the season, she injures her left knee
(torn ACL-ligament) and must recu-
perate on the Pirate bench for at
least two months.
More than a drama, this was
real life - and it hurt in more ways
than one.
"Especially when we get our
first game against outside compe-
tition, and she plays four minutes
and gets nine points Lady Pirates
head coach Rosie Thompson said.
"We were getting our inside game
clicking - and all of a sudden, she's
out
Blackmon watched from the
bench as the Lady Pirates went on
to win that exhibition game against
Croatia, and the next two as they
captured the UMBC (University of
Maryland - Baltimore County) tour-
nament the following weekend.
Things went downhill after
that, as ECU met up with the UNC's
Lady Tarheels, a match which
launched an eight-game losing
streak for the Lady Pirates.
Blackmon rejoined the lineup
for the Virginia Commonwealth
game January 10th, and though she
was not 100 recuperated, she
managed to contribute ten points
and five rebounds.
"To get Fruky back into the
lineup, even with a third of an ACL
Tomekia "Fruky" Blackmon
- it doesn't seem to bother her a
bit Thompson said. "I told her.
�You have a lot of guts. You've got
to have at least three knee injuries,
and you're back out there again,
and this one's not even fixed yet
"I have a lot of trust in God,
and before every game, I say a
prayer Blackmon explained. "I s
a prayer to the Lord, and by the
time I go out on the floor, I don't
think about my leg at all
Blackmon s had to make
some adjustments in her game to
accommodate the new injury.
"1 was out for two months
Blackmon added. "My cardio-vascu-
lar system got down. 1 couldn't run
for a while, and I'm losing all my
conditioning. I'm picking it back up
with every practice and game,
though
Within two weeks of getting
back into the lineup, Blackmon
came up only one point shy of ty-
See FRUKY page 11





V
10
Thursday, February 2, 1995.
The Fast Carolinian
ODU from page 9
ODU opened the second half with
a 7-0 run that ate over three minutes of
the clock. Parham drove to the basket
and scored the Pirates' first points of the
halfwith just under 17 minutes remain-
ing, bringing the Pirates momentarily out
of their comatose state.
Sessoms and Pirate forward Tim
Basham traded quick threes before ECU
shooting guard Skipp Schaefbauer cut
the lead to 51-50 with two free throws at
the 10:46 mark.
A steal and Sessoms' second jam
of the night forced the Pirates to call a
time-out to regroup, down 58-52. ECU
came out of the break with a 6-0 run
and tied the game on a Robinson 15-
foot baseline jumper with just under five
minutes left in regulation.
"They hit some big shots down
the stretch Parham said. "Sessoms re-
ally carrid them in the second half
Through the remainder of the
game, ODU would attempt only one field
goal. However. ECU granted the Mon-
archs 14 shots from the charity stripe
over the last 4:23, of which they con-
verted on 11.
Down 67-60 with 49.5 seconds left
in the game, the Pirates got hot Parham
hit a spinning jumper for two, and ECU's
suddenly stifling defense caused Sessoms
to turn the bail over. A Robinson tip-in
cut the lead the three with 25.8 seconds
to go.
The Pirates went into a full-court
press of their own but had to foul Mon-
arch freshman Dennis Dunlap to stop the
clock. Dunlap missed both free
throws,but made gxxi on his next two
chances at the line with 7.7 seconds re-
maining, making the score 69-66.
Freshman Othello Meadow
missed a last chance three-pointer to send
ECU
from page 9
the game to OT as time ran out on the
Pirates at The Scope. Meadows and
Damon Van VVeerdhuizen were both in
the ECU backcourt as both Parham and
Schaefbauer fouled out in the last minute
of play.
"Both Skipp and Tony had fouled
out" Payne said. 0' popped open on
the play and drove down the court It
was kind of a scramble
The Pirates next hit the hardwood
on Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. in Will-
iams Arena, when they will square off
against the American Eagles.
I
among the Top 15 receivers nationally
and chose ECU because of the chance
to get the football in his hands accord-
ing to Rose coach, Lonnie Baker. Mon-
roe, a 6-foot-l 185-pound comerback
with 4.4 speed was at the top of ECU's
wish list for secondary' coach Chuck
Pagano's defensive backfield.
A complete list of Pirate recruits
will be available in Tuesday's paper.
Sports Information will release the com-
plete list tomorrow and head coach
Steve Logan will be available for com-
ments.
t , �
Ky
Campus Interviews
February 21,1995
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If you possess excellent communication skills, general
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If you are unable to arrange an interview call:
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or send resume to:
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It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
CHESS SPADES
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26, 1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the Mendenhall Iriformation Desk
and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student
Selected Varieties
Stokelv's
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1
11
Thursday, February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
mm
alegal.
Marjoriekiirtaitsnn
Paralegal, �m
Xandridge & li
Meredith lean
Program (.iiidun.
� A rewarding new career
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Weigh. 2W W
(919)829-8353
JDLTH
erred, ualinmil nr rlhnic origin, ojr. �r diuhilily
FlvlJICY from page 9
ing her career-scoring record as she
posted 26 points against American
on Jan. 20.
During her years at Greene
Central High School in Snow Hill.
N.C Blackmon lettered in basket-
ball, softball, and volleyball, and
was named to the all-conference
teams at different times in all three
sports.
Shunning all of her acco-
lades, the inevitable question
arises - "Fruky?"
"I've had it since I was little
Blackmon said of her unusual nick-
name. "My grandfather gave it to
me. I don't know where he got it
from
From Greene Central,
Blackmon had her choice of several
collegiate athletic programs, includ-
I ing Campbell University, Howard
University and South Carolina.
"I didn't want to go too far
from home Blzrckmon said.
During her first year as a
Lady Pirate. Blackmon was
redshirted as she recovered from a
hand injury.
"That was my learning year
Blackmon said. "1 learned a lot that
year. They had me playing against
Tonya Hargrove, '8892
"She was the one who in-
spired me Blackmon added. "1 like
her style of play: I look up to her.
The way she played and talked to
me, helped me out when 1 was
down
The following season,
Hargrove had graduated, but
Blackmon didn't have the position
all to herself just yet.
"Toni Thurman '8993 was
behind Tonya, and she started
Blackmon said, "but 1 was seeing
a lot of playing time behind her, and
1 did make the CAA All-Rookie
Team. 1 was averaging more points
per game than she was, but there
were a lot of seniors on the team
that year.
"I came off the bench and
played against girls like Nickie
Hilton of George Mason, and they
helped me out. Moves that they
would make on offense. I would
try to make. I tried to remember
those
"She's playing against bigger
people all the time Thompson
said. "Because of her strength, and
her quick 'first step it makes her
successful inside
By the time that Blackmon
reached her sophomore season of
GET INVOLVED
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S STUDENT UNION IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR MEMBERS OF THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEES FOR 1995 -1996:
"Come Feel the Rays of the
Tropics at the
HOTTEST SPOT IN TOWN
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FULL SERVICE NAIL & TANNING SALON
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL THE STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-6004,
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HEY STUDENTS
THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO
"NAME THE
STUDENT SECTION"
WILLIAMS ARENA AT MINGES COLISEUM
GREAT BIG-TIME ATMOSPHERES TAKE ON THEIR OWN PERSONALITIES depicted with names like
the "Electric Zoo " "The Jungle and "The Antlers This is your opportunity to choose a name for the spirited and
loud almosphere you are crefting in support of YOUR PIRATES in the new Williams Arena at Mmges Cohseum!
ENTRY FORMS and information will be available at: FEBRUARY 4, ECU VS AMERICAN GAME. Just
stop by the table in the lower level concourse behind Section 102 for entry information, or fill out the entry form
below.
BALLOTS TO VOTE for your favorite entry, from a group of finalists, will be available at the FEBRUARY
6, ECU VS GEORGE MASON regionally televised basketball game. Ballots should be turned in February 6 before
you leave the game.
THE WINNING "NAME" WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT HALF-TIME OF THE ECU VS OLD
DOMINION NATIONALLY TELEVISED GAME ON FEBRUARY 20. This game is the first nationally
televised game (ESPN2) for Pirate basketball to be played in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum. It will be an
exciting night to make a strong statement about ECU fan support for Pirate basketball.
PRIZES FOR THE WINNING ENTRY include specially designed t-shirts with the winning "name" and
a chance to play a five minute pick-up game with nine of your friends at half-time of the ECU vs UNC Charlotte
game in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum.
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Fani Facial Products, Dudley. Toni
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WEDNESDAYS
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10th St.
eligibility, she had already demon-
strated her abilities, and was ready
for a regular job with the Lady Pi-
rates.
One of the more memorable -�
moments came for her in the open- j
ing exhibition game of the 1993-94 ,
season.
"I went out and played hard, ,
and I saw that 1 couid play with the
big girls Blackmon said. "I think
I scored, like, twenty points that
game. It was my first real college
game
Coach Thompson encouraged ,
Blackmon as she 'came of age' last .
year.
"And then all of a sudden Th- �
ompson said. "It was. 'Okay Fruky,
this is your position. I think she re-
ally felt a little more comfortable u
having the weight of vying to start t.
on everybody else's shoulders
Blackmon went on to lead the
Lady Pirates last year in both scor-
ing (14.2) and rebounding (6.9), and
was named the team MVP and a
member of the second team AU-CAA.
She scored her career-high last sea-
son with 27 points against Appala-
chian State (3694).
So how does one improve on
a season like that?
"My assigned opponent is .
averaging 'so many' points a game
Blackmon said. "My goal for each
game is to not let her get her scor- f
ing average. I got to 'D' her up, I n
got to play good defense that game
Offensively, though, Blackmon
is a team player. (
"I'm not the type of person
that has to get the ball and score
'so many' points Blackmon said.
"If they come, they come. I like all
my teammates to play
While Blackmon certainly has
enough to keep her busy with bas-
ketball, she still looks ahead to
graduation.
"I want to go into child devel-
opment Blackmon explained. "I
like working with kids, mainly dis-
abled kids, handicapped kids. After
I finish college, I might go to get a
another degree in therapy
"I do a lot of work with Spe-
cial Olympics, and I work camps and
stuff Blackmon said. "I was around
them when I was growing up. My
high school softball coach was in-
volved in the Special Olympics as
the director, and we did a lot with
them
In closing her comments to
The East Carolinian. Blackmon
shared her sentiments about atten-
dance of women's basketball games.
"In high school at Greene
Central, a lot of people came to
watch the girls play, because we had
a winning record, and the guys
didn't have a winning .record
Blackmon recalledBut now, I see
how it is � now, all the people come
see the guys play
"I don't know what we'll have
to do to get people to come to our
games Blackmon said. "I hope
people will come and support us in
any way they can
"We've been trying to impress
upon the players that if they give
everything they've got, regardless of
what the score is, peopl: will come
out and watch Thompson said.
NOTE: In case of duplicate entry, the first entry received will be recognized for prizes.
For additional information call the Department of Athletics at 328-4530.
tf
NAME THE STUDENT SECTION"
NAME:
GROUP NAME (if any).
ADDRESS
. (W)
PHONE : (H)
I think the Student Section in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum should be called:
W&u buy QjualXfy Cltitfovhfr
at Retail Piee?
S0& W A
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onnection
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Division of UBE
MonSat.lQ-6 � Sunday 1-5
mmmamemmm
mm .in .mil yiiJlHft'K"
IMKMBinmft1)?")





!
12
Thursday, February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
A 1-BOO-COLLECT CALL WAS ALL IT TOOK FOR MARY TO FORGIVE DAN
FOR THAT WICKED CASE OF POISON IVY.
LLECT
Save The People You Call Up To 44.





13
Thursday, February 2, 1995 The East Carolinian
Help Wanted
nfe For Rent
W For Sate
ff Help Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEI
immediately. On campus, two rooms
$197 per a month and 12 utilities,
am an exchange student. Call : 75�
6457
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR
House at 206-A East 12th St. Rent
$450 month. Also, 1BR Apartment
at 810 Cotanche, Rent $325 month
Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example of Frank Lloyd Wright archi-
tecture. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large dining room, kitchen and living
room with fireplace. New refrigerator,
washerdryer, fenced backyard, nice
shrubbery. Convenient to campus and
: hospital. $750.00mo. deposit. 524-
, 5790 day - 752-8079 night.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two Bed-
� room Apartments at Wesley Commons
; For Rent Free Cable. Call 758-1921.
: NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group
I together early. Two relatively new
; houses; fully furnished; washer &
j dryer; dishwasher; central AC; Avail-
: able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
I 7 - $1500.00 per month; sleeps 8-9 -
$2100.00 per month (804) 850-1532
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: 2Br
Duplex close to campus good size
! bedroom, fully furnished, free cable.
! 190util. Move in Feb. 1st 752-9392
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! Male
;or Female, own room 13 bills,
: $220.00 month, Please call 355-2803
! ROOM FOR RENT: Newly renovated
I private room in home walking dis-
j tance from campus. $175.00m'onth
; and 13 utilities. Contact Mike Carey
; at home 752-2879 work 830-5577.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
I ASAP. 167.50 month 12 util, 12
phone. 2Br Apt Call 321-7522. Leave
; number message or Call after 8
I pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
2Br. apartment close to campus. On
ECU bus route. $175mo plus 12
utilities and phone. Non-smokers only
please! Please contact Patrick at 752-
9928.
TO SHARE TWO BEDROOM DU-
PLEX in College veiw. $175 12
utilities. Call 757-2763 Leave message
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house 1 block from campus
& downtown, wash, dryer, 13 utili-
ties $190 mo. Call Jim 7524039
FREE FEBRUARY RENT and NO
Deposit Female roommate wanted or
two people to sublease a two bedroom
apt Total rent is $380.00. Basic cable,
water, pool and ECU bus service in-
cluded. Kings Row Apt. Call 752-0845
and leave message.
ROOMMATES NEEDED to share
house in Nags Head, NC area. Please
contact Ken at 328-7202. ASAP Male
or Female
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Wyndham Court-2 bedroom, 1 bath,
refrigerator, dishwasher, washer and
dryer hook-up, close to campus. Call
Ali or Debra-830-2270
NEED TO TAKE OVER LEASE, fur-
nished, pool, own room and bathroom.
For more information call Heidi 758-
9480, Kingston Place.
For Sale
N�JCASHTTT
We Buy CDS,
CaMettes, ud Lp'�
Well pmy up to $5 euk for
ccr.
Student Swap Shop
OUR 2ND BIG SALE!
Featuring:
Coats, Jeans, Sweaters, etc,
All your favorite brands
TOMMY HILIFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
J. CREW
GUESS
LEVI
. ATI- SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
.414.1-IVANS ST. '
MRS: IHIKSIRI 10-1 2. 1:30-5. SAT FROM 10-1
('()V11. INTO "IHLdTY PARKING LOT
IN FRONT OF- WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN, I )RIV 111) BACK IXX)R.& RING BLXLR
RALEIGH 531 series 12 speed
roadbike for sale with excellent
acessories - Look pedals, Aero bars,
and cyclemeter. Excellent condition.
Asking $350.00 obo.
Call David 328-7188
WOMEN SKIIS FOR SALE. Excel-
lent Condition. $300. Dial 75&6061.
Leave message
FOR SALE: Men's 26 inch Ten Speed
Bicycle, $35.00. Call 756-7856 any-
time.
1982 OLDSMOBILE OMEGA- Runs
Good, New Brakes, Needs paint and
few other repairs, nothing major $700
negotiable, Call 355-8043 weekdays.
Ask for Steve!
FOR SALE: Fuli-waveless King Size
Waterbed for $200 o.b.o. Recliner for
$75, chair for $35, couch for $60. Mov-
ing, must sell immediately! Call 830-
5201.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
Earn up to $2,000nionth working
on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour compa-
nies. World travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the
Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal and Full-
time employment available. No expe-
rience necessary. For more informa-
tion call 1-206-634-0468 ext. C53623
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
SUMMER JOBS, Earn 3 hours col-
lege credit; Save $4000. Call 1-800-
251-4000 Ext. 1576 Leave Name.
School and Phone .
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time
youth soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching.
This program will run from the first
of March to the first of May. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt
County Memorial is seeking qualified
individuals to teach aerobic classes
through its Employee Recreation and
Wellness Department. Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time ba-
sis. Interested candidates should con-
tact Ms. Scottie Gaskins between 8am-
4:30pm at (919)816-5958. Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
NEED EXTRAFOR SPRING
BREAK? Earn the quick cash you
need by stuffing envelopes. It's easy-
immediate response! Send $1 with
SASE to Carolina Enterprises, Inc
P.O. Box 3251, Greenville, NC 27836-
1251.
JOB AVAILABLE - Dependable per-
son who is good with children is
needed to work in our home doing
daily household duties and helping
care for our three children when I am
not home. The children are 3 yrs, 5yrs,
and 6yrs. old. THE HOURS ARE
FLEXIBLE. Please Call ASAP. Must
have references. 756-3538
BRIDES CHOICE is seeking profes-
sional, affluent females to work Sat-
urdays and some weekdays beginning
immediately. Bridal or regular retail
sales experience helpful, but not re-
quired. Applicants should apply in
person at Bride's Choice, 426-C Ar-
lington Blvd.(near Kroger's). No
phone calls please.
SPRING BREAK! Bahamas Party
Cruise 6 days $279! Includes 12 Metis
& 6 Free Parties! Great Beaches &
Nightlife! A HUGE Party! Cancun &
Jamaica 7 Nights Air & Hotel From
$429. Spring Break Travel 1-800-678-
6386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BREAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa BeacMNear
Disney)-27 Acre Deluxe Beach front
Resort 7 Nights $159! Key West $229!
Daytona Beach Room with Kitchen
From $129! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8
Days Oceanview Room with a Kitchen
$129! Walk to Best Bars! Includes
Free Discount Card Which Will Save
You $100 on FoodDrinks! 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
beach Florida, from $91 per person
per week Free Info 1-800-488-8828.
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring
Break - How about it in the Bahamas
or Florida Keys. Where the Party
never ends. Spend it on your own pri-
vate yacht One week only $385.00 per
person. Including food and much
more. Organizers may go for free! Easy
Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-783-
4001.
SPRING BREAK-Time to Book your
week at one of the Hot Spots
Daytona$99 Panama$109 Padre
$119 Cancun$399 and more Call
Chris at ICP 1-800-828-7015.
Personals
HAPPY BIRTHDAY RHONDA! We
hope it's a great one. We love you girl!
Soniajennifer, Andra. & Ashley
� Greek Personals
BAHAMAS
Spring Break Party
CRUISE
$279!
6 DAYS-12 MEALS-ALL TAXES
1-800-678-6386
ITS BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS!
fd Services Offered
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000- $6,000 per month. Room
and board! Transportation! Male or
Female. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 5454155 ext A53622
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Clean, High volume Adult Club needs
YOU now. Confidential employment
Daily pay Top Commissions. Some to
no experience. If you've called before
call again. Playmates Massage Snow
Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
����
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older. Find that special
someone!
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Bil-
lion in private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, in-
come, or parent's income. Let us help.
Call Student Financial Services: 1-800-
263-6495 ext F53623
TUTORING - IMPROVE YOUR EN-
GLISH! Experienced teacher can tu-
tor you in conversation, writing and
TOEFL. Will edit papers also. Call
Pam at 758-6952.
FREE INFORMATION! GUIDE TO
HOME EMPLOYMENT! Send SASE
To: The Business Advisory, Box
1634C, Greenville, NC 27835. Imme-
diate response.
NEED TYPING? Campus secretary
offers speedy service, familiar with all
formats, low rates. Work saved on Mac
disks. Call Cindy after 5pm or leave
Message 355-3611.
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP!
Mobile Music Production is the pre-
mier Disc Jockey service for your cock-
tail, social, and formal needs. The most
vaiitty and experience of any Disc
Jockey service in the area. Specializ-
ing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates book-
ing fast Call early, 758-4644 ask for
Lee.
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH Self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
MEN are accepting applications for
part-time sales associates. Work with
the fashions you love to wear: Junior
Sportswear, Accessories, and Young
Men's Apparel Flexible scheduling
optionssalaryclothing discount. All
retail positions include weekends.
Applications accepted Monday and
Thurday, l-3pm, Brady s, 1 ne Plaza.
SITTING OUT THIS SEMESTER or
have plenty of free time during the
day? Brady's is accepting applications
for Receiving Room Associates. Verify
incoming freightprice merchandise.
Some lifting required. Excellent hours.
Applications accepted Monday and
Thursday, l-3pm, Brady's, The Plaza.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home
mailing our circulars. Free details.
Send SASE: R&B Distributors, Box
20354, Greenville NC 27858
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required.
Begin now. For info call 202-298-8952.
POOL MANAGERS (Aquatic Direc-
tors, Head Guards, Assistant Head
Guards). SpSum 95. GreenvilePitt
County, Goldsboro, Kinston, Tarboro.
Call Bob, 758-1088.
MATURE AND DEPENDABLE
BABYSITTER NEEDED for 11
month old in our home. Wednesday
8:30am-l:00pm Please Call 756-8262
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS
of North Carolina this summer? For
summer employment and housing in-
formation call Paul at 800-662-2122
PART TIME - FLEXABLE HOURS
night and weekends - Cleaning, Assem-
bly & mold waxing at local Boat
Manufacturing Plant Fill out applica-
tion at North American Fiberglass -
758-9901
VALENTINE HELP NEEDED in
store & delivery apply in person im-
mediately Cynthia's Flowers 10th St.
757-1892
NEED A JOB? HABS personnel ser-
vices offer professional resumes just
for you. Also typing, interview skills,
and application preparation. Call 752-
3716 for appointment!
SPRING BREAK '95!
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA will hold
Spring Rush Feb. 6-9 in Rawl 105 from
5:30-6:30. ESA is a service sorority
involved in the community and affili-
ated with St. Jude Children's Hospi-
tal. Please attend as many nights as
possible. We look forward to seeing
you there.
PHI KAPPA TAU My tie, my tie, Oh
where is my tie? Thanks for the box
of fun. Love Alpha Phi
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON -
Superbowl Sunday was all set. Hey
Steve, How did your pants get all wet?
We all crowded into Nicole's living
room, What a blast, lets do it again
soon. Uh! Uh! Uh! Halftime, was cool!
Love, the Alpha Phi's.
SIGMA TAU GAMMA - Had a won-
derful time at the pre-downtown. Hope
to do it again soon. Love the Alpha
Phi's
TKE: The anything for money social
was so much fun, dancing on the pool
table and drink-ng a ton. You gave me
a dollar, and this is for you: TKE's are
the greatest, but DZ's are too Love
the sisters of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: It was Saturday night
and you didn't know, there was a
suprise for you at the Elbo. We all
were there to give a big cheer we
danced, laughed, and drank lots of
beer. So happy Birthday to you,
Martha and Sue
SIGMA NU: The Superbowl bash was
tons of fun! Thanks for everything.
Love, Delta Zeta
PI DELTA, Thanks for the social last
Wednesday, Hope there isn't too many
Jailbirds walking around. Looking
Forward to getting together again.
The Bros of Delta Sig
Bahamas
Special Group Rates & Free Travel i
Sun
Splash Tours
1-800-426-7710
MtU I
Lost and Found
FOUND black male cat at Tar River
Apts. Cat has rabies tag on collar, if
yours call 752-6094.
Personals
BANTER! - I've really enjoyed the way
you've taught me how wrong I am for
being male and how right you are for
being female. I hope we can get
togother soon for eggs and beacon
and for my weekly Q-Tipless Ear-clean-
ing! Not that I'm propositioning you
or anything, as Brad Pitt's twin that
would be wrong! Yours truly,
DILEMMALESS
DELTA SIG, The brothers of Delta
Sig would like to congratulate its new
pledges on making a decision of a life-
time: Justin Crist Chip Cromartic,
Jason Graves, Gregg Harold, Jay
Hollingsworth, Steven Ryce, and Todd
Rademacker
.CONGRATULATIONS sisters of
jkOP'i for ranking second highest GPA
� guess you really were studying!
WAY TO GO AOPi BASKETBALL
TEAM, Hoop it up Girls! Alpha love!
SISTERS OF AOPi Curiosity rising?
Stay tuned, Love Seta Chi's
GREAT JOB to all of my AOPi sis-
ters, couldn't have done it without you
- Love Mac
YOUR AOPi sisters would like to say
thanks to Mac on a super rush - Love
ya mean it!
JILL, Great job on Founder's Day!
Love your AOPi Sisters!
Travel
u'men last .trillion nis mihs-ib iimus-
BREAK
REGISTRATION LINES
POST OFFICE LINES
DROPADD LINES
WORRY LINES
PICK-UP LINES

THANK GOODNESS FOR
HP4-
n �i.
�wJNiii ���iwn ii p�
SUMMER POSITIONS AVAIL-
ABLE: gain career experience and
save $4000.00. Please call 1-800-251-
4000 ext. 1576. Leave name, school
now attending and phone number.
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
W3ZESEM
STEAMBOAT
VAILBEAVER CREEK
KR flKCM KKTOMG OH MSTKATK IW� �'�' ItWIH W SUr
-BOO-SUNCHAS�
TOLL FKf IWroBWATIOM 8. HJBBVATIOM1
DEADLINE IS FEB. 10.
p.i f-i





14
Thursday, February 2, 1995
The East Carolinian
�;3 u
SPECIAL OLYMPICS COACHES
NEEDED
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special Olym-
pics will he conducting a Track &
Field Coaches Training School on Sat
Feb. 4 from 9:00am - 3:30pm for all
persons interested in becoming a cer-
tified volunteer track coach. We also
need coaches for the following Sports:
equestrian, bowling, powerlifting,
volleyball, softball, swimming,
rollerskating & gymnastics. NO EX-
PERIENCE IS NECESSARY. For more
information, contact Connie or Dwain
at 830-4541 or 830-4551.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will be holding
it's Bi-monthlv meeting on Feb 6 at
5:15pm in Rawl 206. Our guest
speaker will be Superior Court Judge
Russell Duke. We encourage all ma-
jors and new members to attend.
CLUB HISPANICO
VAMOS A RFUNIRNOS! (We are go-
ing to have a meeting!) When:
Wednesday, Feb 8 at 3:30pm. Place:
GC 3016 (Lounge of Dept. of Foreign
Languages). Purpose: Discuss this
semester's activities. For more infor-
, mation call: Ramon Serrano, Pres.
(931-8542) Karina Collentine, Adv.
(328-4129)
UNIVERSTIY STUDENT
MARSHALS
Any student interested in serving as
a university marshal for the 1995
Spring commencement may obtain an
application from Room A-12 Minges.
Student must be classified as a junior
by the end of Fall semester 1994 and
have at least a 3.0 academic average
to be eligible. Return completed ap-
plication to Carol-Ann Tucker, Advi-
sor, A-12 Minges by Friday, February
17, 1995. For more information call
328-4661.
EAST CAROLINA NATIVE
AMERICAN ORGANIZATION
ECNAO will be having their second
meeting tonight in Mendenhall rm 14
at 7pm. All members and interested
students (Native or not) are encour-
aged to attend. For more information
or questions call Kim Sampson at 72-
2319 or Nikki Fpps at 328-777S
ECNAO
ECNAO will meet Feb 20 in
Mendenhall at 7:00pm in Rm 14. We
may have a Valentine's Day Party. If
you would like more information
please call Kim Sampson 752-2319.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
CLUB MEETING
Club meeting Monday, Feb. b, 7:00pm
MSC Room 221. Speaker: Bovd
Overman, P.T. of Eastern Carolina
Physical Therapv Assoc. Subject:
"HEALTH REFORM" AND HOW IT
IS EXPECTED TO EFFECT PHYSI-
CAL THERAPY AS A HEALTH PRO-
FESSION.
ABLE
Allied Blacks For Leadership and
Equalitv presents the 2nd Annual Mr.
ABLE Pageant "Essence of a Black
Man" Interest meeting on Thursday
Feb 2, at 7:00pm in the lobby of
Fletcher Residence Hall. All interested
men are welcome. Contact Ms. Susan
Stewart at 328-7924 for additional in-
formation.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Scheduling & Time Management: 2
8, 1 lam-noon. Note Taking & Study-
Strategies: 27, 2pm-3pm. Exam
Preparation: 26, 9am-10an. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328-6661 to regis-
ter.
EC NATIVE AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION
ECNAO will hold a meeting on Feb.
2 at 7:00pm in Mendenhall Rm 14.
Please attend, call Kim Sampson for
more info. 752-2319
WOMENS LACROSSE CLUB
Anvone interested in playing on the
Womens I acrosse ream is welcome
join us on Wednesday, I eh l-t at
4:00pm. Practice will be held on the
Allied Health Fields Questions1all
Alana 752-7153.
STUDENT NORTH CAROLINA
ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS
SNCAE will hold its second meeting
on February 2 at 4:30 in Speight 308
Elections lor the offices of Vice-Presi
dent and Treasurer will be held. I here
will be a speaker on the hospital read
ing program and handouts on ideas
for your classroom
ECU CLUB WATER POLO
Every Monday and Wednesday Night
9 to 10:30 for more into call Boh 72-
29e.5 or Dave 757-8705
B-GLAD
B-GLAD (Bisexuals, (�ays, 1 esbiafts &
Allies for Diversity) will meet tonight
at 8pm in the Multi-Purpose Room
(1st floor) of Mendenhall Student
Center.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Interest meetings will be held Janu-
ary 31 & February 1, 5-6pm
Mendenhall basement NC, D.I Febr u-
ary 2, 4-5pm(Pleasc notice the.time
change) Mendenhall basement
8C,D,E. Come learn how a make 2
hours a week more rewarding' More
information Nikki 328-7655.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
"For planning purposes, a survey is
being taken of the number ot students
who would definitely have majored
in Religious Studies it such a major
had been offered. If such a major is
ever offered, it will be several years
from now, so this data is being col-
lected purely for planning purposes
If you would have majored in Reli-
gious Studies if such a major had been
offered during your years here, call
328-6121 and leave your name and a
message for Calvin Mercer or drop
your name in campus mail to Calvin
l� i, er, Brewstei 440
PSI CHI
PS1 (. III NationI I lonor Six ierj in
Psy hologj unites all V, ho are inter
ested .ni who have maintained .in
overall (.1' ot 3 0 and have om
pleted9 hours m psychology to attend
our interest meeting on Wed Feb 8
at 5:00 m tin' I'si C hi I ibrary on the
third floorol Raul.
KOBE OSAKA EARTHQUAKE
FUND
Ihosf who are interested in helping
the hundreds ol thousands ot people
in the earthquake area can send a do
nation to I xchange apan (I .nth
quake Fund, POBox I Ion, Ann rbor,
Ml 48106).Since time isol the essence,
we ask those of you considering send-
ing a contribution to send it as quickly
as possible Any amount would be
significant m afundraising ei tort such
as this. There are many exchange stu-
dents all oxer the world and to help
in an area ol need is to help ourselves
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
February 7 through February 13: All
Events Free and held at A. . Flecther
Recital Hall unless otherwise listed.
FR1 I I B 10 - l NIOR Rl CI1 M .
Scott Beckett, trumpet, 7:00pm; SUN
IIHP- r.l iFST RICIT Al Patricia
Hawkins Hiss, soprano, and Linda
Smith, piano, 4:00pm; GRADUA I E
REG I Al Gene I ambrough, percus
sion, 7:00pm; MON I IB 13-1 Ac
ULTY RECITAL, Christopher Ulffers
bassoon, and Elizabeth Norvell
Ulffers,piano,8:00pm. I or additional
information, call HCU-(-K51 or the 24-
hour hotline at l'CU-4370.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
HOLDS RUSH
Feb. 6-9 (Mon. -Thurs.) Epsilon Sigma
Alpha will hold their Spring Rush in
Rawl 105 from 5 30 - 6:30. Come and
find out about this growing sorority,
who is dedicated to helping others.
Mon. Into. Night, luesRefresh
ments, Wed. - Bowling, Thurs. Fiesta
I inner. Please attend as mans' nights
as possible. I ooking forward to see-
ing you there.
ATTENTION MIDDLE SCHOOL
EDUCATORS:
There will be an introductory meet-
ing for any middle grade education
majors on February 2, 1995 in Speight
308 at 5:00. All concentrations and
years invited to attend. Agenda in-
cludes orientation, next meeting
dates, and upcoming projects. Re-
availabl
prizes will he
( ali Allen 758-
! i
CREDIT CARDS: THE REALITY
OF DEBT
I ei j one is invited to the Feb, 2, EC!
Investment t lubmeeting in l .( B
al ipm l Ha speaker will be dis-
cussing the ins and outs of credit card
use Some ot the planned topics in-
clude: how to use credit, when1 to
find the lowest interest rates, and
V hat perks . aids offei
THE 25TH ANNUAL SPEECH,
LANGUAGE AND HEARING
SYMPOSIUM
I he Symposium will be held Febru-
ary 9th and 10th at the Ramada Inn,
Greenville. 1 he symposium is
planned and spi ;sored by students
with support from the East C arolina
University Department off. ommuni-
cation St iencesand Disorders and the
I astern Area Health Education Cen
ten All proceeds go to support student
scholarships. Speakers will include
Dr William Haynes of Auburn Uni-
versity, Ml I a id Mills of the North
I arolina Department of Public ln-
strtk tion, and I )r. I ouis Rossetti ot the
University ol Wisconsin, Oshkosh.
I or more information, contact the
II Speech and Hearing Clinic at
(919) 328 4405,
BRYAN ADRIAN SUMMER
BASKETBALL CAMP
Registration is now open for the 17th
Annual Bryan Adrian Summer Bas-
ketball camp. Boys and Girls ages 5
through IS are eligible. Included on
the 1945 Summer Camp Staff are:
Jerry Stackhouse(LNC), Rasheed
Wallace(LNC), Randolph
Childress(Wake Forest), George
Lynch(NBA), Donald
Williams(UNC), Drew BarryfGa.
I � �, hi. t-II h Innis(UNC), Chris
( on hiani(NBA), Pat Sullivan(UNC),
Derrick Phelps(NBA), Junior
Burrough(UVA), and Jason
Williford(UVA). There are several lo-
cations including Charlotte, NC;
Greensboro, NC; Banner Elk, NC;
I lickory, NC, Mount Olive, NC; Elkin,
C (.astonia, NC; Spartanburg, SC;
(Ireenville, SC; Atlanta, GA; Chatta-
nooga, TN; Lynchburg, VA, and
Elkins, W V For a brochure call (704)
372-3236.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will hold its next
meeting on February 7 at 5:00 pm in
MSC Great Room 1 and 2. All mem-
bers both new and old are asked to
attend and reminded to return raffle
ticket money
NC FOLK ARTS & ARTIST
SERIES 1995
Down Home Down East. Connie Ma-
son performs traditional ballads and
songs reflecting the personal lives and
regional history of coastal North
Carolinians.at Percolator Coffeehouse
on Wednesday, February 8at 7:30 pm
For more information about other
programs in the series call the ECU
Folklore Archive at 328-6389 or 328-
i.726.
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure
to pick up your FREE video yearbook.
Available at the Student Store, The
East Carolinian, Joyner Library,
Mendenhall and the Media Board of-
fice in the Student Publications Build-
ing.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
PLAYERS CLUB
A P A R T M E N T S
New Luxury 4 Bedroom Apartments
�Fully equipped fitnesB room � Exciting social events
Clubhouse with Pool Table and large screen.TV � Four bedroom floor plan
�Swimming Pool � Tennis Courts � Volleyball � Basketball
Special Hours.on February 6
7am - 7pm
321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd.
Across the street from Minges Coliseum
� � �
wpmm�i-fti ���
imm HBariH
��� - �





Title
The East Carolinian, February 2, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1055
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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