The East Carolinian, January 31, 1995






TUES
January 31,1995 ;
Vol69,No. 71
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
House of Payne King legacy lives on
needs a name
Daughter of slain
civil rights activist
to visit campus
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
ECU starts its celebration of
African-American History Month on
Wednesday, Feb. 1 at 8:00 p.m. at
Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center with Yolanda King,
daughter of the late Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr.
"She's coming here to kick off
African-American History Month
here on
said Dr.
Haynes,
minor-
affairs.
years,
partici-
civil and
:ampus,
Brian
director of
ity student
s;Over the
King has
pated in
human-
rights demonstrations and has spo-
ken to numerous religious, educa-
tional, civic, and human-rights
groups.
Haynes said King will give her
audience more of an entertaining
Yolanda King
presentation than a lecture.
"Yolanda King has moie of a
presentation format than a lecture
format Haynes said. "She reads po-
etry. She recites verses from her
father's cpeeches. She does some
drama. She's more along the lines
of a Maya Angelou in the sense that
she will not just come in and give a
canned lecture. She's more of a per-
former
King uses her talents in hopes
to change society for the better.
King was quoted by Marco
Productions, Inc. as saying, "While
it is imperative to actively challenge
Botanist to visit
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Students will have the opportunity to name the student section in the newly renovated
Williams Arena. Deadline forentries is half-time at Saturday's game. Prizes will be awarded.
Stephanie Lassiter
NewsEditor
With enthusiasm and excitement
flooding the floors of Williams Arena
at Minges Coliseum, one thing still re-
mains missing - a name for the stu-
dent section. But that should change
within the next several weeks when stu-
dents will have the opportunity to give
their section its ;ery own name.
Any football fan who has ever
attended at football game at Williams-
Bryce Stadium, home of the Univer-
sity of South Carolina Gamecocks,
knows how intimidating an athletic
facility can become.
With the proper dosage of fan
support and atmosphere, the home
team can have an advantage before the
game ever begins. ECU's athletic de-
partment is hoping to create such a
feeling at Williams Arena.
"The atmosphere will be created
by the fans said Lee Workman, assis-
tant athletic director for ticket sales
and promotions. "We want to make
sure we have a good home court ad-
vantage
Dr. James A Hallock. dean of the
School of Medicine and vice chancel-
lor for health sciences, originally pro-
posed the idea to Athletic Director
Dave Hart during a basketball game
several weeks ago. Hart and other ath-
letic department officials kicked the
idea around and quickly created the
"Name the Student Section" contest.
During last Thursday's game against
Coastal Carolina, fliers were handed
out describing the contest.
Workman said the students were
already handing in entry forms by the
end of that game. The contest will con-
tinue through this Saturday's game
against American University. Entry
forms will be accepted up until half-
time of the game.
"We want something that will
exemplify class and enthusiasm, but
we want it to be fun Workman said.
The athletics office will narrow
the entries and create a ballot from
which students will choose the final
winner. Any duplications of entries will
be eliminated; only the first entry will
be used.
The winner of the contest will
receive 20 specially designed T-shirts
with the new name of the student sec-
tion, as well as the opportunity to play
a pick-up basketball game with nine
friends during the halftime of the ECU
vs. UNC Charlotte game.
"We want to generate a lot of
excitement during the nationally tele-
vised game Workman said. "This is
our first chance to do that nationally
for basketball
Entry forms will be passed out
once again during this Saturday's
game. The forms can be turned in at
the In?ide Ticket Office window located
on the lower concourse behind Section
102 or at the Sports Marketing Office,
third floor. Ward Sports Medicine
Building.
The winner will be announced
during ECU'S first nationally televised
basketball game on Feb. 20.
As always, student tickets are
available at the Athletic Ticket Office
the working day before the game.
the forces that deny human be-
ings their right to a decent life-
one must also stimulate and al-
ter the hearts and minds of both
the privileged as well as those
who have been too long denied.
Within the arts lies this power
Her presentation is spon-
sored by the office of minority
affairs and is free totstudents and
the public. �
Other events include the
Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers on
Feb. 10 at 8:00 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
"They are world re-
nowned Haynes said. "They
sing African-American spirituals,
calypso, and gospel. They are a
great group. I think the campus
community needs to come out
See VISIT page 3
PC
invades
campus
Minority speaker
serves as scientist
and role model
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
This week the ECU minority
presence initiative program will
present two lectures from guest lec-
turer, Dr. Lafayette Frederick, Pro-
fessor Emeritus, from Howard Uni-
versity in Washington, D.C.
"Dr. Frederick is an outstand-
ing scientist and individual said
Dr. Charles Bland, chairperson of
the biology department. "He will
serve as a role model to all stu-
dents
On Feb. 1 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Great Room, Section 1,
Frederick will present his first lec-
ture on "Fungal-Host Interactions
in the Development of Dutch Elm
Disease
"It's mainly tailored to those
in the sciences said Dr. Brian
Haynes, director of minority affairs.
The 70-year-old Frederick
will again speak on Feb. 2 at 4:00
p.m. in the Mendenhall Great Room
on "Reflections on a Career in Sci-
ence
Bland said he thought
Frederick could not only be a role
model for African-American stu-
dents and other students in the sci-
ences but also to people over 65.
Frederick still teaches classes and
works in his own laboratory.
Frederick plans to meet with
high school, undergraduate and
graduate students from 9:00 to
12:00 on Feb. 3 in the Howell Sci-
ence Complex in room BN 109 to
speak with them and answer ques-
tions.
Bland said Frederick's years
of experience will make him inter-
esting to students because of his
great insight into science.
"He can tell us what science
was like in the early days Bland
said. "I think his perspective on sci-
ence will be of interest to all stu-
See MODEL page 3
Maureen Rich
Managing Editor
Students pick up
tab for Williams
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
ECU students are picking up a
large portion of the check for the
renovations done to Williams Arena
at Minges Coliseum.
The total renovations of Will-
iams Arena cost ECU $11.4 million.
The state gave the university $2.5
million in state appropriations that
does not have to be paid back. The
other $8.9 million was paid for by a
revenue bond.
Daniel Bishop, comptroller for
the university, said a bond is used as
a long term financing instrument.
The bond used to finance Williams
Arena will take the university 15
years to pay back.
"A bond is a revenue instru-
ment that is sold for a long period of
time to retire a major debt of con-
struction produced generally at a
reduced interest rate Bishop said.
"It's called a revenue bond, and they
have to be secured by pledged rev-
enue
Students were the source of
pledged revenue for the bond. Each
student pays $70 annually in student
fees towards the repayment of the
$8.9 million revenue bond.
The process for renovating the
See TAB page 3
Ouch!
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Is a dorm by any other name still
a dorm? ECU's Residence Hall Asso-
ciation (RHA) is convinced it is not.
For several years the RHA has urged
students, faculty and staff to stop say-
ing 'dorm' and start saying residence
hall and even recently fined Chancel-
lor Eakin for using the forbidden word.
"The use of the word 'dorm' is
no longer an acceptable term for on-
campus housing said Michelle Reece,
RHA president, in a Jan. 10 memo to
The East Carolinian. Residence
Halls' or 'Halls' for short has a more
positive meaning behind it The differ-
ence between the meanings of the two
words is related to community
According to some memories,
the RHA waged this battle to convert
vocabulary use as many as 30 years
ago in an attempt to improve the resi-
dence hall image. But students inter-
viewed aren't interested in correct or
incorrect terms, and they already have
an image implanted in their minds.
"I think it's stupid said
Stephanie Fritz, who has lived in resi-
dence halls for two years. "I use
'dorm
Fritz said she doesn't like living
in the "dorms and sees the commu-
nity theme as a hindrance. "There's no
privacy she said. "Fteople are always
coming in your room, so it's pretty hard
to study and the bathrooms are
pretty gross
Not everyone was as direct
"I never really thought about it
said freshman Tony Parham. "I call it
a dorm, my cousins always called it a
dorm I see it as a community already,
so I don't think it matters what you
call it"
In a phone interview, Reece ex-
plained that often the word 'dorm'
brings negative connotations, espe-
cially when people connect it with an
institution, or a military base.
"I guess it's just more or less try-
ing to change stereotypes that have
been formed Reece said. "The 'd'
word has always been a pet peeve of
ECU student Bryan Burns flexes up for the punch of the needle. Yesterday, students like
Burns donated blood for the monthly Bloodmobile, which is located in Mendenhall.
See PC page 3
xmtfU
ItuitU
Noon Day Tunes are coming soonpage
OPINIQJIeWct
Tuesday
Partly Cloudy
Has PC gone too far at ECU?page
TEC goes up close & personal with Gill, Parhampage





� i
mm
-2
Tuesday, January 31,1995
The East Carolinian
Kennedy clan responsible for Special Olympics
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
As applications for volunteers
for the Pitt County Special Olympics
riour in each year, some students may
wonder what makes this philan-
thropy so popular. It is evident that
the Special Olympics is continuing
to grow as shown by the percentage
of help coming from ECU.
"In the Spring we do roller-
skating, bowling, gymnastics, swim-
ming and track and field, and 98
percent of the volunteer coaches
come from ECU said Connie
Sappenfield. coordinator. Greenville
Pitt County Special Olympics.
Sappenfield is the former sec-
retary to Eunice Kennedy Shriver.
the founder of Special Olympics In-
ternational. Shriver may be the least-
recognized of the Kennedy clan, but
she has made extraordinary contri-
butions for the improvement of the
lives of people with mental retarda-
tion.
Shriver is the fifth of the
Kennedy children including John F.
Kennedy, Robert Kennedy and Ted
Kennedy born to Joseph and Rose
Fitzgerald Kennedy. The oldest
Kennedy child. Rosemary, had a pro-
found influence on Shriver's work.
"Joseph Kennedy, while his
wife Rose was out of the country, had
an experimental lobotomy performed
on Rosemary. She had been mildly
retarded but high functioning until
then, but came out of it severely im-
paired Sappenfield said.
Rosemary was able to benefit
from the creation of the Special
Olympics as well as other advances
made by the Joseph P. Kennedy Foun-
dation under the direction of Eunice
Kennedy Shriver.
The foundation, which was
named for the eldest Kennedy son
who died in World War II. established
the President's Committee on Men-
tal Retardation in 1961. .Additionally,
it created fitness standards and tests
for people with mental retardation
and brought about a change in the
Civil service regulations in 1964 to
allow the employment of individuals
with mental retardation based on
ability rather than test scores.
According to information from
Michael Janes of the Special Olym-
pics International Media Relations,
the Special Olympics was formed in
1968 after Shriver conducted a day
camp for mentally retarded adults
and children. She realized during
this day camp that the participants
were much more capable of playing
and enjoying sports than most ex-
perts believed.
"Shriver knew that people
with mental retardation were never
going to shine in the classroom, so
she wanted to find someplace where
they could excel Sappenfield said.
Twenty-seven years later, the
Special Olympics has accredited pro-
grams in more than 130 countries
with more being developed. The im-
pact of the organization on the par-
ticipants and volunteers alike is illus-
trated by the level of involvement here
at ECU.
While the ECU Student Volun-
teer Program offers many volunteer-
ing options, the Special Olympics has
the highest number of student volun-
teers each semester.
"It's because the Games require
so many people at one time, on one
particular day. That event is one that
allows people to see themselves mak-
ing a difference said Judy Baker, di-
rector of ECU's volunteer program.
As the volunteer season for
Special Olympics approaches, many
students may wonder why they should
jump on the bandwagon.
"We are offering experiences
that give students a way to get in-
volved Baker said.
Local vets offer reduced spayingneutering fees
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Sue Garris, manager of the Greenhouse on campus, recently
became a new parent to several stray cats. Cats like YrYo,
shown here, often wind up in the pound where they are later
destroyed.
Despite Bob Barker's pleas to
"The Price is Right" audiences to
have their pets spayed or neutered,
the pet population continues to
grow and animal shelters continue
to be overrun.
As a result of the continuing
abundance of unwanted pets, the
North Carolina Veterinary Medicine
Association (NCVMA) has organized
a state-wide program, SpayNeuter
Improves Pets (SNIP), designed to
encourage pet owners to have their
pets spayed or neutered.
Participating veterinarians
will offer their spaying and neuter-
ing fees at 80 percent of the origi-
nal cost. The 20 percent reduction
will provide pet owners with sub-
stantial cutbacks. Dr. Mark T. Hayes
of the Tenth Street Animal Hospi-
tal said a typical cat neutering costs
$40, but the reduction will cut that
cost to $32.
"I think SNIP is going to of-
fer an opportunity to have the op-
eration done when otherwise they
(the owner) may not be able to have
it done Hayes said.

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Spaying refers to the removal
of the female's ovaries and uterus.
Neutering is the removal of the
male's testis. According to a press
release from the Pitt County Hu-
mane Society. Inc the majority of
animals go through these operations
without complications. Normally,
the male animal is permitted to go
home the day of the operation, but
females are hospitalized overnight.
The reduced fees will be avail-
able the first two weeks of Febru-
ary and the first two weeks of Sep-
tember. Hayes said the months of
February and September were most
likely chosen because of the animals'
natural life cycles. Animals go into
heat in the spring months; therefore,
February is an ideal time to prepare.
Any puppies born in the spring are
prepared for spaying and neutering
in the fall months, therefore Septem-
ber is also a model month.
Bobbie Parsons, president of
the Pitt County Humane Society
and operator of the Humane Soci-
eties Shelter, said the pet popula-
tion problem is extremely bad in Pitt
County.
"It is a very sad situation in
Pitt County she said. "There're just
more animals than there are homes.
There just are no permanent
homes
Last year, the CityCouncil
Animal Shelter destroyed 1.992 dogs
and 1,505 cats which averages 75
animals per week. Not only does spay-
ing and neutering help control the
animal population, it also improves
the animals overall health. The op-
eration makes the animals cleaner,
more affectionate towards their own-
ers, less likely to wander away and it
also reduces the animals' chances of
getting cancer of the reproductive
system.
Although spaying and neuter-
ing will keep your pets cleaner and
generally healthier, decreasing the
animal population is the most criti-
cal at this point.
'The shelter is having to kill
the animal because there's no home
for it Parsons said.
The Pitt County Humane So-
ciety, Inc. said that one unspayed fe-
male dog and her descendants can
produce 4.372 puppies in just seven
generations. One unspayed cat and
her offspring can produce 80 million
kittens in just ten years.
For those people who do not
already have pets, but are consider-
ing becoming pet owners. Parsons
encourages them to get their pets
from the Humane Society's shelter.
While the actual animal is free, the
shelter asks the person receiving a
pet to donate $50. This cost includes
a portion of the animal's medical ex-
penses. The remainder of the medi-
cal fees are covered by additional do-
nations made to the shelter. The $50
fee includes spaying or neutering,
heart worm testing (for dogs), leu-
kemia testing and shots (for cats) and
any other shots necessary. Parson's
said these medical expenses gener-
ally cost $100; therefore, the owner
is not only receiving a pet, but get-
ting medical services as well.
The animal shelter is located
on Arlington Blvd. extension (its
name changes to County Road 1725
after the Fire Tower Road intersec-
tion). Their number is 8304387.
Area veterinarians participat-
ing in the reduced spaying and neu-
tering program are Drs. Michael
House and J.P Barwick, Animal Hos-
pital of Pitt County; Dr. Arthur
McMillan, Animal Care Veterinary
Hospital; Drs. Linda Kuhn and Mary
Anne Leslie, East Carolina Veterinary
Service; Mark Hayes, Tenth Street
Animal Hospital; and A.G. Thompson,
Greenville Veterinary Hospital.
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�mmrtimmmm
Tuesday, January 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
Ml Cv from page 1
mine We're trying to erase the nega-
tive impressions and make on-cam-
pus living a more positive experi-
ence
Reece referred to a dictionary,
where 'dorm' is defined, among
things, as being a part of an institu-
tion.
The American Heritage Dictio-
nary defines dormitory as "a room
providing sleeping quarters for a num-
ber of persons, a building for hous-
ing a number of persons, as at a school
or resort, a residential community
whose inhabitants commute to a
nearby metropolis for employment
and recreation
Reece said the nationwide resi-
dence hall organizations strictly en-
force the rule against using the 'd'
word. A fine of 25 cents is imposed
on any offenders, which at ECU in-
cluded Chancellor Eakin.
"We fined the Chancellor last
year Reece said, "and he dutifully
paid it"
TAB
"1 don't know how much I owed
by the time I finished there Eakin
said with a smile.
Some students reported the
practice of fining is alive and well in
ECU residence halls.
"That sort of got blown out of
proportion Reece said. "We don't
necessarily fine students - it's now
more or less a joke
Reece said in hall meetings the
rule may be enforced, but not ran-
domly in the halls. "It's up to each
hall she said. "I don't gp and say you
have to fine a person Reece said
what money is collected is used for
an end-of-year party for those who
worked hard all year in the residence
halls.
But has political correctness
truly slammed into our campus?
"OK, let's spend our time do-
ing something completely worthless
said senior Meredith Bell, a veteran
of on-campus living who now lives off-
campus. "That's crazy. 'Dorm' is all
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it ever was to me, and that's all it will
ever be to me
The RHA insists there is a
strong difference between the two
terms, however.
"Dorms are places where stu-
dents just eat and sleep Reece said
in her memo. "University Housing of-
fers students an opportunity to live
in a community-like setting where
they can build lasting relationships
throughout their college experience
One student's answering ma-
chine greeting told its own story of
life in a residence hall.
"I'm either sleeping, studying,
eating or just out the recording said.
"So leave a message
Vice Chancellor for Student Life
Al Matthews said he believes the RHA
is on the right track to improving stu-
dents' images of campus housing.
"I think it's a good issue
Matthews said. "By insisting that
people recognize that the two are dif-
ferent that's certainly going to be ben-
eficial to students, and especially to
the students that live in the residence
halls. I'm very supportive of the RHA's
endeavors and goals to try and make
living on campus a better experience
from page 1
coliseum and obtaining the bond
went through various stages. Initially
the idea for renovation came from
the athletic department. The ap-
proval for obtaining the bond went
through the chancellor's staff, the
board of trustees, the board of gov-
ernors and finally was approved by
the state legislature.
The $1 million donation given
by the Williams family (for whom the
arena is named) did not go towards
the renovation of Minges. The Will-
iams' donation was given to the Pi-
rate Club and will go towards schol-
arships and additional funding for
athletics, according to Bishop.
The upkeep of Minges Coli-
seum costs the university $100,000
annually. Minges' upkeep costs each
student six dollars each year.
Students don't seem to mind
paying the extra money for the
arena and see it as a bonus for the
university.
"I think if we're going to pay
$90 a year for parking fees, we can
justify paying $70 a year for a bet-
ter basketball arena said Richard
Boustead, junior, marketing major.
"I don't think that is such a
high price to pay - you can seat
more people now, and it looks bet-
ter said Jessica Theobold, sopho-
more, nutrition major.
Other students were not as en-
thusiastic about Williams Arena and
the $70 fee.
"I could see them putting it
in a lot of other places, but it doesn't
really bother me said Matthew
Holder, sophomore, sociology major.
Fees for paying off the bond
for Williams Arena will not increase
anymore Bishop said.
MODEL from page 1
dents
Haynes said the university has
the minority presence initiative to
make the campus aware of the ex-
istence of minority scholars in the
U.S.
"The minority presence initia-
tive is a program administered from
our affirmative action office
Haynes said. "It is an attempt to
bring minority scholars to campus
to expose the campus to minority
scholars, and hopefully, to increase
the number of minority scholars on
campus
Bland said the Minority Pres-
ence Initiative brings minority schol-
ars, to lecture on campus to allow
African-American students to have
a representative on campus and is
used to attract minority high school
students to ECU.
Frederick earned his
bachelor's degree at Tuskegee Insti-
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and hear this particular group
Another event will be the
Soweto Street Beat on Feb. 15 at
8:00 p.m. at Wright Auditorium.
"The Soweto Street Beat
dance company is a world renown
dance group out of the South Afri-
can township of Soweto Haynes
said. "They were the first dance
group to be formed out of that
South African township. So, that's
a piece of history right there
Students and the public can
get tickets to both events at the
Mendenhall Student Center Central
Ticket Office. The Jubilee Singers
tickets are $7.00 for students and
$15.00 for the public and at the
door. The Soweto Street Beat event
is free, but tickets are required.
An event sponsored by a stu-
dent organization on campus, the
Allied Blacks for Leadership and
Equality (A.B.L.E.), is scheduled to
have a Mr. A.B.L.E. pageant on Feb.
17 at 7:00 p.m. in Speight Audito-
rium.
"The theme of the program is
Essence of a Black Man and that is
sort of in response to some of the
negative publicity we've been seeing
and hearing in the media in reference
to African-American males Haynes
said.
Ticket information will be
posted on flyers across campus.
Also, during the month, Afri-
can-American storyteller, Binnie Tate
Wilken will perform on Feb. 13 in the
Mendenhall Student Center Social
Room at 7:00 p.m. On Feb. 9-11 the
movie "Jason's Lyric" will be shown
5UBSTflTI0�J
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, North Carolina
(919)752-2183
"Sandwich Shop"
316 W. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, North Carolina
(919)756-7171
Real Meal Deal �
Large Pizza
Two Toppings
Two Cokes
Breadstix
,$8
Expires 2-14-65
$2.99 VeUUf SfaeOoU
Monday Small Ham & Cheese, Bag of Chips, & 15oz.
Soft Drink
Tuesday Small Turkey & Cheese, Bag of Chips, & 15oz.
Soft Drink
Wednesday Small Ham, Bologna & Cheese, Bag of Chips, &
15oz. Soft Drink
Thursday Small Ham, Salami, Pepperoni & Cheese, Bag of
Chips, & 15oz. Soft Drink
Friday Smali Ham, Turkey & Cheese, Bag of Chips, &
15oz. Soft Drink
Tuescfcy is Gofege Nght
$1.99Rfcha5 &. 99tSite 12pm
ECU Celebrates Black History Month
SUN.
MON.
TUE.
WED.
February 1995
12
Jones & Jury
Panel discussion on
Interracial Relationships
7:00 p.m.
Jones Hall Basement
African
American
13
19
Storyteller
Binnie Tate Wilkin
7:00 p.m. FREE
Social Room
Mendenhall
Student Center
Sponsored by Office
of Minority Affairs
FREE FREE FREE FREE FREE i
YOLANDA KING
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Sponsored by Office of Minority Affairs
20
THUR.
14
21
SOWETO is
STREET BEAT
8:00 pm. Wright Auditorium
Free with ticket available from
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
Sponsored by Student Union Cultural
Awareness Committee and Office of Minority
Affairs
FRi.
SAT.
10
11
SEXUALLY 22
SPEAKING With Dr. Ruth
8:00 p.m.Wright Auditorium
Student tickets $3.00 in advance from
the Central Ticket Office. All tickets
at the door will be $7.00.
Albert McNeil
Jubilee Singers
8:00 p.m. Wright Auditorium
Tickets available from the
Central Ticket Office - 328-4788
JASON'S LYRIC 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre Admission free
with valid ECU ID card. One guest allowed per ID.
16
23
MR. A.B.L.E.
Jenkins Fine Arts Building
Speight Auditorium
7:00 p.m.
Allied Blacks for Leadership & Equality
18
24
ECU Gospel Choir 25
Anniversary Performance
6:00 p.m. Wright Auditorium.
Admission charged at the door.
tute. He was one of the first African-
American students to earn a master's
degree in botany at the University of
Rhode Island, and he earned his doc-
torate degree at Washington State
University. He is nationally known for
his research program in the .plant sci-
ences. In 1993, he received the Na
tional Science Foundation Lifetime
Achievement Award, and in 1994, he
received the Botanical Society of
America Merit Award.
in Hendrix Theatre.
Haynes also said the residence
halls will sponsor a number of pro-
grams including a panel discussion
on interracial relationships in Jones
Hall. Other halls are planning to have
banner and bulletin board contests.
"So, there are a number of pro-
grams going on that I would encour-
age all students, whether black, white
or others to get involved in some of
these African-American History
Month programs Haynes said.
The national theme for African-
American History Month is "Reflec-
tion on 1895: Douglas, DuBois and
Washington.
Haynes said the national theme
has been developed by the Center for
Afro-American Studies since the start
of Negro History Week in 1925. The
week was started by Carter G.
Woodson, the father of black history.
In the late 1960's and early 1970's
the week became Black History
Month.
"This is the 70th year that we
first celebrated Negro History Week
and now African-American History
Month Haynes said.
Though ECU'S programming is
not directly following the national
theme. Haynes said that the univer-
sity is following an agenda that meets
the needs of the students. �
"Our programs, though not tai-
lored towards those three outstand-
ing African-Americans, are tailored
towards mainly students here on cam-
pus, mainly toward some of the issues
that we see students facing on a pre-
dominately white campus and just
along the theme of getting the word
out about the richness of African-
American culture and history Haynes
said. "So, we didn't necessarily follow
the national theme, but we've got
some in- house goals and objectives
that we'd like to accomplish through
our programming
0VJ Op
104 West 5th St.
Coffee � Tea � Pastries
757-1070
Sun-Thurs 7am-12am Fri-Sat 7am-1 am
HEY STUDENTS!
"NHME THE
STUDENT SECTION"
IN
WILLIAMS ARENA AT MINGES COLISEUM
THIS IS YOUR CHANCE to choose a name for the
spirited and loud atmosphere you are creating in support of
YOUR PIRATES in the new Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum!
ENTRY FORMS and information will be available at
tonight's ECU vs. Coastal Carolina Basketball Game.
THE WINNING "NAME" WILL BE ANNOUNCED
AT HALF-TIME OF THE ECU VS. OLD DOMINION
NATIONALLY TELEVISED GAME ON FEB. 20.
For additional information call ECU Athletics at 328-4530.
� H� .���vr-�w





gar
Tuesday, January 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
What do you
call those
ominous
buildings on
campus or up on
College Hill? If
you call them
dorms, get out
your wallet! The
RHA is spending
its time trying to
force people to
say 'residence
hall' instead of
'dorm The East
Carolinian says,
DORM, DORM,
DORM!
Political correctness has once again gone way too far.
ECU's Residence Hall Association (RHA) feels so strongly
against using the word 'dorm' to refer to the student liv-
ing facilities that it will fine anyone including our Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin 25 cents for each time that they use
the word.
Their skewed reasoning is stated below by our RHA
president Michelle Reece.
"The use of the word 'dorm is no longer an accept-
able term for on-campus housing Reece said. "Residence
Halls' or 'Halls' for short has a more positive meaning
behind it
The East Carolinian doesn't mean to step on anyone's
toes, but give us a break. 'Dorm' or 'dormitories' is the
way students have described where they lay their head
down to sleep for over a century.
The RHA claims that 'dorm' is a negative term that
reinforces stereotypes about institutional living, and the
use of 'residence hall' is so much different.
That claim doesn't make any sense at all. You can
draw a similar analogy to describe Kleenex and facial tis-
sue. Kleenex is a famous name brand for facial tissue but
the word has become so synonymous with the product
thai most people just say Kleenex to refer to it.
The same thing is happening when you play seman-
tics with 'dorm' and 'residence hall
Doesn't the RHA have anything better to do than com-
plain in memos to protest how their facility is referred to?
We would think so. Instead of complaining about what
student living facilities are called and wasting paper on
memos, why doesn't the RHA continue to work to im-
prove them.
The only way to get respect is to earn it. You don't ask
someone to respect you or what you are doing, you need
t prove that you deserve respect. RHA has made some
great strides recently, but they can not rest on their lau-
rels. Further improvement and earmarking of student
funds is necessary for student living to get better, not
just changing the name. A rose by any other name is still
a rose, etc.
Have you ever heard a student say to another student
"Let's go hang out at my residence hall?" Everyone calls
it a 'dorm and it is silly to be forced by some arbitrary
rule to call it anything different.
The RHA's purpose is to serve the students and make
their stay at ECU a safe and enjoyable one.
The students we polled on this 'issue' agree that they
say 'dorm not 'residence hall This school is here to
educate and serve the students who spend a lot of money
on tuition to go here. Those who choose to live in on-
campus housing should have the choice to call it what
they like, not be forced to use their silly, politically cor-
rect terminology. Fix what's broken, people! Don't fix what
ain't broke!
Letters to the Editor
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Primed on
100
recycled
paper
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words which may be edited for decency or brevity.The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor.The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
I want my right to choose
One of the hottest topics in our
country today is the issue of a
woman's right to choose an abortion.
Abortion on demand has been guar-
anteed since January of 1973. The
whole idea of a woman having a choice
places the emphasis on the right of
the mother to decide whether or not
she wants to have a baby. The gov-
erning principle is that no woman
should be forced to have a baby
against her will.
The Supreme Court based its
decision on this assumption, referring
to the unborn as "a potential human
life The court also explicitly recog-
nized that "if this right of human
personhood is established, the
appellant's case, of course, collapses,
for the fetus' right to life is then guar-
anteed specifically by the 14th
amendment Therefore, the right to
choose is based upon the supposition
that the unborn is not fully human.
But it would seem that if the
trial were held today, such a decision
would not be so obvious. Genetic
evidence asserts that from the very
moment of ronception the fertilized
ovum is lOCHpercent human. No new
information is added from the point
of conception until death. All physi-
cal characteristics for life are con-
tained in that genetic code present at
conception. Even the sex of the per-
son is determined at the moment of
conception. (A fetus is never an it, it
is always he or she). The only thing
added after conception is food, water
and oxygen (things that are necessary
for all human life).
Before the United States Con-
gress during hearings in 1981, Dr.
Micheline M. Mathew-Roth of Harvard
University declared that "in biology
and in medicine, it is an accepted fact
that the life of any individual organ-
ism reproducing by sexual reproduc-
tion begins at conception, or fertili-
zation The famous French geneti-
cist Jerome LeJeune testified that to
Shane Deike
Opinion Columnist
Abortion is a
strong issue, but
choice ends
where rights are
violated.
accept the fact that after fertilization
has taken place a new human has
come into being is no longer a matter
of taste or opinion He goes on to
add. ' The human nature of the hu-
man being from conception to old age
is not a metaphysical contention, it is
plain experimental evidence
Modern fetology has brought
even more light to this issue in the
past 22 years since the decision was
handed down. By the second month
of pregnancy the fetus (let's say a girl)
has a brain wave and her nose, eyes,
ears and toes appear. She has a heart-
beat and circulates her own blood (of
her own type). All her bodily systems
are present and functioning and she
even has her own distinct fingerprint.
All of this at two months.
Of course, life is not the issue
most often being debated. The prob-
lem with the entire abortion issue is
that it has come more to focus on the
supposed rights of the mothers and
not on the life of the unborn. If we
discuss the issue of life, then clearly
the mother has no right to take it from
the child, just as a member of society
has no right to take the life of another
member of society based solely on
convenience or personal choice. The
right to privacy argument only works
if the embryo is not fully human. Pri-
vacy rights are not absolute. No one
would argue that we have the right
to engage in child abuse or rape as
long as it was private. And certainly
we have no right to kill privately.
Abortion is essentially discrimi-
nation based upon the circumstances
of the fetus. Discrimination against �
anyone s life based upon ciicumstan- :
tial matters such as size, age, location,
gender, race, or functional ability is
morally wrong. Yet these (minus race,
gender) are the grounds for which the
abortionists consider the unborn child
to be nonhuman. On the same
grounds we could discriminate against
pygmies because the are too small, or
minorities because of where they live,
or premature babies because they are
young, or the deaf because they can-
not hear, or the blind because they
cannot see. These are the actions that
bring serious lawsuits in our day and
age, and yet as a nation we categori-
cally go beyond simple discrimination
to complete legalization of the termi-
nation of individuals who have no
ability to speak for themselves. Un-
fortunately, the unborn do not have
the ability to take the stand in their
own defense.
I may not agree fully with ev-
eryone who is pro-life, but we can-
not continue to go along with the
perception that an abortion is an
arbitrary choice of personal prefer-
ence. It involves terminating life. I
assure you I believe in everyone's
right to choose - that is of course
until it violates the rights of some-
one else. And if abortion is just con-
sidered a choice for women as a
woman's issue, we must never forget
that approximately 50 percent of
those aborted are women - women
who never had a chance to make a
choice.
References:
� Supreme Court Decision
Doe v. Dalton 11173
� Expert testimony from
United States Congressional hear-
ings April 23, 1981
Got an opinion? Lay it on!
To the Editor,
I am writing in reaction to the article written by Wendy Rountree in the January 19 edition of The East
Carolinian.
The article stated that 55 of Math 1065 students made a D or F. I am assuming that these students do not
have a learning disability in math. Therefore, it is very discouraging to people like me who have a documented LD in
math to know that ECU requires that we take Math 1065 even in light of our apparent disability. I personally don't
think it is fair.
I am capable of getting a degree just like everyone else here. However, this ridiculous policy may make that an
impossibility. If Math 1065 was one of the most failed classes how can I or ECU even begin to think that I could pass
it? I feel that ECU needs to review and change it's sic practices so that people like me can get a degree.
Natalie Nicole Lewis
Junior
Community Service HESC
To the Editor,
WAKE UP AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS at ECU and look around. We are the minority here and we need
to band together and support oneanother sic. It is easy to see hundreds of students at a party or social gathering,
but difficult to get African-American students to go to other events that are beneficial to us as minorities such as the
recent Kwanzaa ceremony. When a negative event arises such as with the ECU police last year, or the unfortunate
event with the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity everyone seems to become interested and boisterous about race relations
at ECU. Guess what, things happen everyday where your brothers and sisters need support. It should not come down
to a negative event to unify everyone. My fellow Greek collegues (sic) can we put personal differences behind us and
support one another. I am the president of the Phi Beta Sigma chapter here on campus and during ojr Founders
week we had a Greek Lock-in planned to try to strengthen a bond among the Greeks - we invited ALL Greeks no
matter what their status - 3 sororities were represented and no fraternitys sic. This really upset me, where is the
Unity? We as Greeks should be able to come together and be leaders on this campus not cause friction with one
another. African-Americans look in the mirror and realize that you are one of a few on this campus and we need to
band together and live together in peace or we will lose out on alot sic.
Lamont Burns
Junior
Communications
Dear Readers.
Hello and welcome to the Opin-
ion page of The East Carolinian.
You may have noticed that this sec-
tion of the paper has perhaps been
unappealing, lifeless and down-right
mundane in the recent past.
Well, not anymore.
My name is Frank Hurley and
I will be one of the new authors of
the "new and improved" Opinion
page. It 1s our intention to raise
topics to you twice a week - create
thought-provoking issues that will
hopefully capture your interest in a
positive way, or just yank on your
chain. Strike a nerve. Make your
eager tempers flair in opposition.
For that is what this column is all
about. And we challenge you to write
back! Good and bad.
We would like to lay a few
:r.
Frank Hurley
Opinion Columnist
Tired of the old
Opinion page?
Weep no more,
I'm here to spice
things up!
simple, humanistic rules first.
When you feel the uncontrol-
lable urge to respond to an article,
try to refrain from using naughty
words. Also, avoid any life threaten-
ing comments - for we will not be
able to print your work if you do so.
Be creative. Write from your gut, and
most important, be sure to cross your
Ts and dot your Isbut certainly, by
no means, mind your Ps and Qs).
In closing I would like to say
that beyond this one column, in this
one paper, on this one campus, there
is a whole world out there full of an-
guish, war, pain, confusion, hatred
and sadness. There is also glory,
success, achievement, advancement,
hope and happiness. And I ada-
mantly believe that our generation
has something very powerful to say
about it. We would like to use this
tiny space in this tiny paper as an
open forum to discuss it.
So stay tuned, sharpen your
pencils and remember: An opinion
is something every human being is
entitled to.
Until next time





Il�I
Imwii "l 1
Tuesday, January 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
Linklater's Sun sets
on Hawke and Delpy
Wovce IRevcecv
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The newest film by Richard
Linklater, the director of Slacker
and Dazed and Confused, is called
Before Sunrise and was screened
last Wednesday at Hendrix Theatre.
The new film stars Ethan Hawke and
Julie Delpy as strangers who become
lovers in the course of 14 hours
spent together in Vienna.
Before Sunrise begins on a
Eurail train headed for Paris. Celine
(Delpy), a college student returning
home following a visit with a rela-
tive in Budapest, leaves her seat on
the train to escape the bickering of
a couple next to her. She sits down
across the aisle from Jesse (Hawke),
an American on his way to the
Vienna airport to head back to the
United States.
Jesse eventually gets the nerve
to ask Celine back to the dining car
where the two make an instant con-
nection. During their conversation
each person learns of the other's
reasons for being on the train and
learns that neither has plans for that
night. In a bold move Jesse asks
Celine if she would like to spend his
last night in Europe together in
Vienna.
Jesse explains that since he
has little money he cannot afford a
hotel room, but instead plans to
spend the evening wandering
around the city. His plane leaves at
9:30 a.m he explains, at which point
Celine can continue her trip home
to Paris. Celine agrees to accompany
Jesse and a romantic, poignant ex-
perience follows for both youths.
The couple walks and takes
mass transit all over the city of
Vienna while slowly exploring each
other's souls. The city only serves
as a backdrop to the conversations
of Jesse and Celine. Unlike the Rob-
ert Downey, Jr. and Melissa Tomei
film Only You, which looked like a
travel film as photographed by ex-
pert cinematographer Sven Nyvikst,
Before Sunrise uses Vienna only as
a backdrop to the conversations of
the couple. The story could have
taken place in almost any city in
America, and therefore Vienna does
not become the third character in
this tale as the cities do in Only You.
Thus, without the personality
of the city, Before Sunrise relies al-
most completely on the interactions
between the two main characters.
Though Linklater, who also co-wrote
the script with Kim Krizan, claims
that the audience really gets to know
the characters in Before Sunrise, he
overestimates his writing ability. The
dialogue lacks the crispness or the
momentum to effect a true under-
standing of the characters. Despite
the obvious attempts to explore the
depths of the characters' emotions,
the audience never understands why
Jesse and Celine find each other at-
Photo Courtesy of Castle Rock Enter tainment
Here we see Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy walk and talk on the streets Venice in;a ty-
pically lethargic scene from Slacker director Richard Linklater's new film. Before Sunnse.
Enjoy tunes in
the afternoon
Brandon Waddell
Staff Writer
See SUN page 7
Secret club revealed
Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Club 757 is probably the best-
kept secret on campus. Located in
Mendenhall, Club 757 has been
hosting comedy acts for a little over
two and a half years, but nobody
seems to know it exists.
Comedians are featured on
one Tuesday each month, and usu-
ally last an hour and a half to two
hours.
The name Club 757 was cho-
sen because the acts usually start
at around 7:57p.m. Each of the per-
formances is free to students, who
are allowed to bring one guest.
Jay Marshall is one of the
club's biggest promoters. "We try
to offer a coffee house atmosphere.
It's a good chance for students to
come out and see a comedy routine.
It's a good opportunity for students
to unwind and take a break from
the books in a casual atmosphere
Marshall said.
Unfortunatley the acts
haven't gotten an incredibly large
See CLUB page 7
Are you wandering aimlessly
around campus on Wednesday after-
noons or looking for some acoustical
entertainment to sit down and enjoy
over lunch? The Popular Entertain-
ment Committee and Dining Services
knew you were.
For the rest of this semester, on
Wednesdays from 1:30 p.m. to 3 pm,
ECU Dining Services is sponsoring
Noon Day Tunes at the Wright Place
soda shop. The program was originally
planned to be presented at
Mendenhall. but because of construc-
tion on campus, the location has per-
manently been changed to Wright.
According to J. Marshall, assistant di-
rector of student life, "The goal of
Noon Day Tunes is to provide quality
on-campus entertainment to students
when they are on campus. 60 percent
of ECU'S student body are commut-
ers. Once they leave campus for the
day, they don't come back. Therefore,
commuter students are the primary
target audience for Noon Day Tunes
The majority of students are'on cam-
pus at this time of day, and this way it
should attract the largest audience. J.
Marshall has successfully run similar
programs at South Arkansas and
Vanderbi't and with any luck ECU will
be next on the list
The Noon Day Tunes produc-
tion started last Wednesday and will
run weekly until April 12. Through-
out the semester, featured acts will
include talented students as well as
local musicians performing mostly
original music and some cover tunes.
Tomorrow's featured all-acous-
tical performers are Jim Swinson and
Lightning Wells. The show promises
to be a spirited, acoustical and smooth
performance. For information on up-
coming events, students are encour-
aged to call the Student Union Hotline
at 328-6004.
Love, sex and violence stalk February
photos
shredded
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP)
- With the flip of a switch, the
Smithsonian Institution has con-
cealed the naked truth about
generations of Yaie University
alumni.
Under the watchful eye of
a Yale representative,
Smithsonian officials shredded
nude photographs taken decades
ago of Yale students as part of
research into a since-discredited
scientific theory.
More than 100 pounds of
photos and negatives were emp-
tied into a shredder Friday at a
museum office in Suitland, Md.
Yale lawyers wanted the photos
destroyed to protect the privacy
of its graduates, many of whom
have since gone on to become
leaders in culture and politics.
"We are delighted that the
privacy of the individuals in
those photographs will be forever
protected said Yale spokesman
Gary Fryer.
Posing for the photos was
required of students at many Ivy
League colleges and other pres-
tigious schools, including
Wellesley, Mount Hooke, Vassar
and Swarthmore.
Among the people who
would have been subject to the
ritual were President Bush,
Hillary Rodham Clinton and
Diane Sawyer. It couldn't be con-
firmed whether their photos
were in the collection.
Heather Zophy
Student Health Service
February is packed with many
love-filled events. Of course, there is
Valentine's Day on the 14th. There is
also National Condom Week, which
is celebrated by many universities and
communities during the week of
Valentine's Day. Cupid will definitely
get his money's worth this year at
ECU. Our campus has planned many
sexuality related programs and activi-
ties for students during the month of
February.
First of all, it is important to
realize ECU is not condoning or en-
couraging sex in any way; however, it
is essential that students be educated
about prevention and protection
against pregnancy and sexually trans-
mitted diseases. Also, it is equally im-
portant for students to be made aware
of sexual assault prevention strategies.
Communication plays a key role in
addressing all of these issues.
During the week of Valentine's
Day, the ECU Peer Health Educators
will be giving away Condom Valen-
tines. This activity pro-
vides interested stu
dents with a
Valentine's
Day card
and a latex
condom.
Aside
from ab-
stinence,
condoms
are the
best protec-
tion against
sexually trans-
mitted diseases
(STDs). To be effec-
tive, condoms must pass
the following standards: condoms
must be made of latex. They must con-
tain spermicide (Nonoxynol-9). They
must be in date (always check the ex-
piration date). The condom package
needs to be checked to be sure it has
not been tampered with - holes, tears,
etc. Condoms must be stored in a dry,
cool environment and
American-made or
Japanese-made
condoms are
F best, be-
cause they
are all in-
dividually
tested
prior to
packag-
ing. Even
after these
standards are
met, condoms
will not be effec-
tive unless they are
put on, taken off and
used correctly. Remember that only
water-based lubricants should be used
with condoms.
Another event that will be tak
ing place during February is the sneak
preview of the film A Reason to Be-
lieve. This story focuses on a group
of college friends whose loyalties are
challenged when one friend makes a
sexual advance on another. The film
will be presented at Hendrix Theatre
on Tuesday night. February 21, from
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. There will also be a
panel of ECU personnel to discuss
these related issues on campus.
To close out ECU'S sexual ren-
dezvous, Sexually Speaking with Dr.
Ruth Westheimer will be presented at
Wright Auditorium on Wednesday,
February 22 at 8 p.m. Dr. Ruth can
answer all your questions - where sex
is concerned. February is going to be
a fun-filled month. Just make sure that
if Cupid does hit you with one of his
love-filled arrows, that you play it safe
- abstain or protect yourself. For more
information pertaining to contracep-
tion, STDs, safe sex. etc contact the
Health Educator at the ECU Student
Health Center at 328-6794.
CD. Reviews
�����x'JM
Mm
!�� �

See PHOTOS page 7
Various Artists
Skynyrd Frynds
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
Lynyrd Skynyrd - the name
is almost synonymous with the be-
ginning of Southern rock. An en-
tire generation has been influenced
by the songs of this legendary
group, and from that generation
have come some of the greatest of
today's country superstars.
Some of these stars, among
them Alabama, Hank Williams, Jr
The Mavericks and Terry McBride
and the Ride, have joined together
to produce an album of Skynyrd fa-
vorites.
My favorite song on the al-
bum is "Tuesday's Gone master-
fully redone by Hank Williams. Jr.
I was surprised that this song af-
fected me since I don't really like
Hank Jr. However, he lost none of
the original spirit and somehow
added a touch here and there that
made the song, already a favorite
of mine, even better. The ballad,
which is one of Skynyrd's best, is a
treat that country fans have en-
joyed for ages and the new version
is not a disappointment.
I also loved Alabama's version
of "Sweet Home Alabama Their
use of a church organ for the open-
ing chords of the song added a rev-
erent touch to a song that helped
shape today's country rock. It is the
longest track on the disc, totaling
almost seven minutes of pure coun-
try. Not a second of the music is
Bucket
Meredith Langiey
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great scream-
ing bucket of American media
opinion. Take it as you will.
What is it about January
and ending relationships? Since
I've been back from Christmas va-
cation over half of my friends
have seen their love lives break
apart, including me. Is there
something in the air that makes
young lovers yearn for the taste
of freedom again, or is it just the
winter blues?
These answers are left up
to the ones with the strength to
break off the relationship and let
the chips fall where they may.
The old saying "breaking
up is hard to do" definitely has
some merit. All the things that
you share with the person you
have been dating are hard to let
go of, especially the company.
The other thing you have to let
go of is the past.
But, just because someone
has dumped you doesn't mean
that your life has come to an end.
There are plenty of other fish in
the sea, just waiting for the bait.
Being 20 years old and feeling
like you're married is no way to
live your college years. The more
I think about it, I'm kind of glad
that I've been dumped. 1 now un-
derstand the freedom that I pos-
sess and that the past is a beau-
tiful thing to remember, but not
to live in.
One word of very impor-
tant advice I can give to the poor,
heart-broken individuals out
there is that even though you
may be hurting, the person who
broke up with you is probably
hurting too. I didn't realize that
at first, and I think I've made
things pretty hard on my now ex-
boyfriend. I'm sure it's not easy
for someone to feel good about
breaking someone else's heart.
And if it is, why did you go out
with them in the first place?
For those of you who have
recently let go of your significant
other, don't say that you want to
be their friend unless you abso-
lutely mean it. If you want to have
absolutely nothing to do with
them, tell them so that they won't
be filled with some false hope
that you can still hang out. 1
know that things like this can be
very difficult, especially if you
have been going out for a long
time. I know it's going to be dif-
ficult for my ex-boyfriend and I
to be friends, but it uxuild be nice.
I have a feeling that things will
work out that way if we can both
See FRYNDS page 7
See BUCKET page 7





I
Tuesday, January 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
c-Dj FDA stalls on vaccine
Reviews
Laundry
Blacktongue
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Have you noticed the many
bands that try to sound like ma-
chines? Industrial bands make no
bones about it. They are trying to
sound like a machine: an evil, twit-
tering, self-destructive machine.
Laundry is sort of like that, but they
add a few other elements to give
their music an original twist. You
can hear influences from a wide
range of sources in their music, jazz,
'70s progressive rock. Primus and
Metallica come to mind. Their mu-
sic is sort of a collection of styles,
and it all comes together on their
new re'ease, titled Blacktongue.
The diversity of the band mem-
bers helps to give them their unique
sound. The bass player, Ian Varriale.
is a main ingredient in their strange
sound. He plays this 10 string con-
traption called a Chapman Stick
(sort of a cross between a paino and
a bass), which creates some very
strange and Primus-like sounds. A
- founding but defecting member of
' Counting Crows, Tobias Hawkins III,
supplies the wailing and half-spoken
-vocals. His vocal stylings are so dif-
' ferent it is really puzzling as to how
he would have handled the pep styl-
ing of Counting Crows. Tim "Herb"
Alexander (of Primus) supplies the
pile-driving drums, and Tom Butler
ties it all together with his surreal-
istic guitar noises.
Their sound alternates be-
tween a driving Claypool funk and
a monotonous machine-like rhythm.
The guitar cracks and screams in an
antirock style; it is a layering of dif-
ferent sounds rather than the struc-
tured refrainchorus style you ex-
pect from most music. The opening
track is a good example of this
sound. "Windshield" is funky but
disjointed, strangely melodic, yet
antibeat and nonlyrically-oriented.
Every song on this release follows
in the same manner.
The title track is a little more
conventional. "Blaclviounge" opens
�with a Metallica-like metal riff but
-soon returns to Laundry's dis-
jointed, off-center sound. The lyrics
take a back seat to the noise of the
band, but they are weird enough to
make you take notice.
"Blacktongue" is a sick little song
about a picnic with two surreal lov-
ers. "She whispers desire, he quiv-
ers Silver gun in the basket, an-
other Car chase in the casket Well
ilone Blacktongue
The lyrics of "Monarch Man"
kind of explain the feel of this band
Iforgive the analogy). The song
opens, "Released from the castle of
the mentally ill, to a broken down
shack on a lonely hill Their sound
could be classified as mentally ill in
comparison to anything conven-
tional sounding; and the lonely hill
is where they stand now because
they have created something highly
original.
If you are into Primus and just
generally weird stuff, this is defi-
nitely one to pick up. These guys
have succeeded in creating some-
ihir g really different. Their sound
pusnes the envelope that much fur-
ther into the realm of antimusic (if
there is such a thing). But maybe
that's the point, even antimusic is
music. It is really refreshing to have
artists that understand the concept
of being a pioneer. All hail the
psycho edge!
Chickenpox cure
held up in testing
BETHESDA. Md. (AP) -
Merck & Co. is preparing to study
tens of thousands of children who
will get its long-awaited chickenpox
vaccine to prove how long it protects
and whether people will need
booster shots.
The studies, already being set
up in Durham, N.C and California,
were revealed Friday by the Food
and Drug Administration and signal
the vaccine is in the final stages of
government review.
But the FDA cautioned that
it cannot reach a final decision on
the Varivax vaccine until Merck
answers final questions about
how it plans to ensure the qual-
ity and safety of the shots.
Parents have assailed the
FDA for holding up the Varivax vac-
cine, which had been expected on
the market last year. And one of the
agency's outside advisers warned
regulators Friday that doctors are
getting frustrated, too.
"The longer we go on, the
more adversely people view the se-
crecy shrouding the whole issue
said Dr. Patricia Ferrieri of the Uni-
versity of Minnesota.
But the FDA's Dr. Philip
Krause told an advisory committee
hearing that the agency was putting
Merck's data under fast review - as
soon as the company sends in the
final answers. Merck responded that
the data are almost complete, and
that it expects to begin selling the
vaccine before summer.
Chickenpox afflicts about 4
million Americans a year,
mostly children.
Typically,
it's a nuisance disease, keeping
bump-covered students out of school
and their parents out of work for
about a week.
But chickenpox can be deadly
in infants, adults and people with
immune problems. It kills up to 90
people a year and hospitalizes 9,000.
Last January, the FDA advi-
sory committee concluded that
Varivax is safe and effective in the
short term. But it asked how long
its immunity lasted.
On Friday, the FDA said
Varivax was at least 50 percent to
70 percent effective at keeping chil-
dren from getting any chickenpox
lesions, and that the few break-
through cases suffered were much
milder than typical chickenpox.
Merck, however, said the
FDA's numbers came from 1987
studies, while the vaccine it plans
to sell is at least twice as potent.
Trials of that vaccine indicate it is
70 percent to 80 percent effective,
said Merck's Dr. Jo White.
To prove how long immu-
nity lasts. Merck plans to study
vaccinated children from a
Durham day-care center for 10
years, and tens of thousands of
patients at a California health
maintenance organization.
Those studies should check
whether immunity wanes
with age so that people
would be in danger of se-
vere chickenpox when
thev reach adulthood.
the FDA panel said. "We do need
careful monitoring to make sure we
are controlling it, not delaying it
said Dr. Thomas Fleming of the
University of Washington.
But the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention noted that
less chickenpox virus should circu-
late once children start getting
shots, putting everyone at less dan-
ger. It just set up centers in Los
Angeles. Houston and Philadelphia
to start the nation's first chickenpox
surveillance to see if that proves
true.
IP2
Fact: In the US, motor vehicles account
for 60 percent of ozone emissions, 80
percent of carbon monoxide emissions
and 63 percent of petroleum consump-
tion.
Tip: Use radial tires and maintain proper
tire pressure. Radial tires increase fuel
efficiency by 4 percent. Improperly in-
flated tires can reduce fuel efficiency by
up to 10 percent.

t
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JIMMY LANDRY- Spirited Acoustic
Wednesday, February 1 � 1:30 - 3:00 PM � Wright Soda Shop
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All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
SOWETO STREET BEAT DANCE COMPANY PRESENTS
MAYIBUYE I APRIKA
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY IS, 1995
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM - 8tOO PM
TICKETS ARE FREE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
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or Locally at 528-4788
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THE STUDENT UNION IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICAT0
We're More Than Barefoot!
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
S OF fV





Tuesday, January 31,1995
The East Carolinian

w
FRYNDS from page 5
wasted, either. Alabama has main-
tained the integrity of the song
that has long been known as a fa-
vorite among Skynyrd fans.
Although I had never before
heard the song "One More Time
it quickly became a favorite.
Charlie Daniels, who chose the
song because it was one of
Skynyrd's lesser known hits, has a
voice that makes you sit up and
take notice. The song has a very
strong chorus that remained in my
mind long after the music had
ended. Daniels is an artist I intend
to pay much more attention to in
the future.
Most of the songs on this al-
bum were a delight to listen to. How-
ever. 1 detested Wynonna's version
of "Free Bird The song, considered
a classic, should never have been al-
$
2?
I
lowed to leave the studio in such a
horrible rendition. 1 am almost em-
barrassed by Wynonna's destruction
of the basic mood of the song. I have
always seen "Free Bird" as a song
about freedom, but Wynonna
sounds as if she is trapped. As the
only woman represented on the disc.
I had hoped she would make a bet-
ter showing. Unfortunately, the song
drags on. and I found it difficult to
listen to the entire thing without
tearing my hair out.
On the whole, though, 1 en-
joyed SkynyrdFrynds. It is well put
together, and most of the artists do
a great job with the monumental
task of recording some of Skynyrd's
best songs. However, the producers
should be slapped for including
Wynonna Judd in with this group
of otherwise respectable artists.
CjJLUI) from page 5
amount of crowd support. "We've
had some really good acts. But I'd
like to see a lot more student turn-
out Marshall said.
"The comedians we have
aren't really big names. But people
don't understand that they might
be someday.
"Two and a half years ago we
had Carrot Top when he was virtu-
ally a no name, and now he's the
biggest college comedian in the
country. Actually, we're trying to
get Carrot Top to come back
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INFORMATION 1-800-4&8-8828
Club 757 brings in a lot of lo-
cal acts. "We try to bring in come-
dians from around local areas. It's
kind of hard for us to bring in re-
ally established comedians like
Jerry Seinfeld. But we do bring in
very respectable acts Marshall
said.
This semester's acts include
Leon Lilly on Febuary 7. Leroy
Seabrooks on March 21 and Randy
Howard on April 4.
Club 757 is located in
Mendenhall Room 244.
PHOTOS from page 5
The photos were taken begin-
ning in the early 1900s as part of
physical education classes. Later,
from the 1940s to the 1960s, a re-
searcher named W.H. Sheldon took
photographs as part of his studies.
He believed there was a relationship
between body shape and intelli-
gence.
Sheldon died in 1977. and his
research has since been dismissed by
most scientists. But many students
were not aware of the research and
believed the photos were only being
used for physical education classes.
The pnotos were never dis-
played at the Smithsonian and had
been available only to students and
researchers. Last week, the
Smithsonian cut off all public access
to the pictures.
Donald L. Ortner, director of
the Smithsonian Natural History Mu-
seum, said it probably would destroy
all the photographs if the universi-
ties asked. He said any historic or
scientific value of the pictures
"would be minimal
BuCjjKJhl from page 5
be mature about this whole mess and
actually make an effort to be friends.
If you really love someone, you
will let them go. That was what my
mother always told me. and that's
what I really believe. You can't ex-
pect to hold on to someone who isn't
going to be happy with you. I know
that this comment might sting some
individuals, but look at it this way:
How would you like to be stuck in a
relationship that you felt wasn't go-
ing anywhere just because you were
afraid of hurting their feelings? See.
now that the tables have been turned,
you wouldn't want to be a caged bird
either. And remember, they could al-
ways return sompday. but don't count
on it.
Revenge is not necessarily
sweet either. Going out and slashing
your ex-lover's tires is not only ille-
gal, but immature as well. Just be-
cause your heart may be broken, it
doesn't give you permission to ren-
der them transportationally disabled.
Also, it is not going to make them
wake up and realize that they still
love you because you cut up all of
their clothes and left them by the
front door. If anything, it will only
make them lose more respect for you
because you really aren't acting very
mature about the situation. That's
how I felt about one of my ex-boy-
friends from high school, who prob-
ably keyed my sister's new car be-
cause she told me that he was trying
to date someone else behind my back.
So. not only is revenge stupid, it
:
shows that you need mental help as
well.
Everyone needs time to grow
up. and like I said earlier, not every-
one is ready for marriage while they
are in college. Groveling at their feet
and begging for them to take you
back is one of those things that
makes you look like you are weak and
not mature enough to even have a
relationship in the first place. If they
want to move on with their life, it
just isn't right to try to hold them
back. I hope that my ex-boyfriend has
a very happy and successful life and
that we can someday look back at
the past and be proud of the deci-
sions we have made. I even hope that
he'll someday find a nice girl to settle
down with that will make him happy.
It really sucks when you lose your
best friend and your boyfriend when
you break off a relationship. It might
only take one person to dump an-
other, but it takes two to try to make
a friendship work out
I guess that breaking up is just
another one of those things that hap-
pens that you know isn't going to kill
you, even though it hurts like Hell
right now. To all of you who are suf-
fering from the January blues called
being dumped, buck up buttercups,
things can only get better from here.
Spring and romance are on the way.
and even though you may think love
isn't worth having anymore, remem-
ber how good it feels to actually fall
in love, and remember how hard it is
to let it go.
, ,��- . �'� V, �. ' � 'V�MM�
jUJN from page 5
tractive.
Celine claims at one point that
Jesse could not understand just how-
much she needed "a night like this
The audience cannot understand ei-
ther and though the statement may
have been designed to add a myste-
riousness to Celine, it serves only
to obscure the motivations of her
character. So much of Before Sun-
rise deals with inane issues that the
audience never connects with the
characters. .
The film most closely related
to Before Sunrise is My Dinner
With Andre, in which Wallace
Shawn and Andre Gregory discuss
a whole host of issues during din-
ner. The latter film is told in real
time and has only minimal intru-
sions by the restaurant staff to ham-
per the flow of conversation. Per-
haps to compensate for the lack of
depth of the conversation in Before
Sunrise. Linklater chose to neither
tell his tale in real time nor set the
story against a simple background.
Linklater films snippets of conver-
sations throughout the 14 hours
spent in Vienna by the young couple
but never allows them to explore any
issues fully. As soon as the hint of
uncomfortable topics arise,
Linklater switches scenes. This ef-
fect keeps the audience at a distance
and makes them feel more like tour-
ists in the lives of Celine and Jesse
than residents. Linklater also uses
Vienna as a convenient excuse to
stretch the story without adding any
depth to his characters.
The ending of the film was de-
signed to stir debate, but much like
the ending of Basic Instinct, the
story preceding the ambiguous con-
clusion leaves the viewer feeling apa-
thetic. Hence most viewers will not
debate the ending, because the film
remains too shallow to warrant ex-
ploration.
Before Sunrise deserves
credit for attempting to tell an emo-
tional tale of fleeting love, but the
obvious flaws doom it throughout.
On a scale of one to ten. Be-
fore Sunrise rates a five.
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i�
8
Tuesday, January 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
ECU falls to Seahawks
Anton Gill
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
�� hum i� ��� ���nirrnimrTi-mn�i
When UNC-Wilmington and
ECU get together on the basketball
court, it's usually a war. Saturday
night it wasn't any different
A sold-out, hostile Trask Coli-
seum crowd of 6,100 watched the
Seahawks take advantage of ECU
missed free throws over the final five
minutes and claim a 65-57 Colonial
Athletic Association victory over the
Pirates.
It was the Pirates 11th loss in
the last 12 tries at Wilmington. The
win improved the Seahawks to 10-8
overall and 4-2 in the CAA, tying them
with William and Mary. The lo� left
ECU 13-6 overall and 3-3 in th; CAA,
good enough for fourth place.
UNC-Wilmington, which led 33-
31 at halftime, used a size advantage
and bench scoring to help them all
evening. Corey Stewart led the way
for the Seahawks with 14 points, in-
cluding a 3-pointer and a steal for a
dunk late in the game, completing a
7-2 run late in the game to give the
Seahawks a 5248 lead.
"1 had heard them calling the
play before, and 1 just anticipated the
pass to Basham he said. "I stepped
in front of it, and I was all by myself
UNC-W led 4946 with just un-
der 5:00 remaining in the game, when
Tim Basham missed two free throws
that would have brought the Pirates
ECU'S
U
INFORMATION
gEPABTKENT frfc
(SID) - Old Dominion's
Clarisse Machanguana led six
Lady Monarchs in double figures,
as ODU defeated East Carolina
92-67 in woman's basketball ac-
tion Sunday afternoon.
Machanguana netted a
game-high 23 points as the Lady
Monarchs continued their domi-
nation of East Carolina in win-
ning their 11th consecutive game
against the Lady Pirates. Esther
Benjamin added 13 as ODU
raised their mark to 17-3 overall
(6-0 in the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation). ECU dropped to 4-11
overall (1-4 in CAA action).
After seeing the Lady Pi-
rates jump out to a 94 lead, ODU
answered with a 21-2 run to build
their lead to 25-11. They would
stretch the lead to 55-28 head-
ing into the half.
It appeared for a while the
Lady Monarchs would top the
century mark, holding a 75-47
lead with 11 minutes remaining.
However, the Lady Pirates' de-
fense would stiffen and begin to
control the rebounds. ECU
outscored the Lady Monarchs in
the second half 39-37. The much
taller ODU squad, which held a
commanding 14 rebound edge
with around five minutes remain-
ing, would win the rebounding
war 53-51.
Tomekia Blackmon led
ECU with 18 points and 10 re-
bounds, while Justine Allpress
added 17 points and a career-
high 11 boards.
The Lady Pirates will travel
to Williamsburg, Va. to tangle
with William & Mary, this
Wednesday evening.
After last weekend's "test
run" in Florida, ECU Men's Track
Coach Bill Carson was ready to
showcase his pride and joy, the
Pirates' one-mile relay team.
After a 3:15.70 fifth place
performance at the U. of Florida
Invitational, the tandem of Brian
Johnson, Steve King, Keith
Barker, and Dwight Henry blew
past the competition, posting a
time of 3:13.40 to place first at
the Rocky Mountain cup U.S. Air
Force Invitational in Colorado
Springs on Saturday.
"I'm very satisfied with our
performance said Carson.
"That's the fastest mile (relay)
we've run in a long time, plus the
competition this weekend was
much better than expected
Saturday's success was a
marked improvement over a slow
start on Friday night.
"On Friday night, we were
hurt by a long, hard flight as well
as the altitude Carson said.
"That's the highest altitude we've
ever run at, and it showed. The
kids were not ready for that, and
we were getting beat pretty bad
at first
However, the Pirates settled
in and performed rather well on
opening night as Artee' Franklin
ran a 22:56 in the 200-meters.
Steve King also stood out as he
qualified for the finals before be-
ing pulled by Carson to preserve
him for the mile relay.
"Steve drew the outside
lane in the finals and we thought
it would be best to save him for
the mile said Carson.
Ken Laws placed 11th in the
55-meter dash with a time of 6:55
despite aggravating a hamstring.
Carson also sent three run-
ners to the Delaware Indoor Invi-
tational as Chris Pressley took
2nd in the 55-meters while Bryan
Harrell tied for 5th in the 1,000
meters and Sean Connolly fin-
ished 4th in the 5,000 meters.
The sprinters will return to
action next week at the Hardee's
Invitational in Morgantown, West
Virginia.
The ECU women's track
team took first place in the Dela-
ware Quad Meet on Friday. The
Lady Pirates outscored second-
place finisher Mount St. Mary's
158-133.
East Carolina freshman
Saundra Teel placed first in the
high jump with an ECU indoor
record-breaking jump of 5'03.75
Lady Pirate junior Zina
Briley placed third in the shot put
with a throw of 39'0.75 her per-
sonal best.
ECU sprinters Amanda
Johnson and Shantell Carter both
set new personal bests, sweeeping
first and second places in the 55-
meter dash with times of 7.31 and
7.34, respectively.
"The girls proved consistent
all around, and I saw many signs
of progress from our first meet
two weeks ago Justice said.
East Carolina will return to
action on Saturday, February 4 at
the Hardee's Invitational in
Morgantown, W.V.
within one. Chris Meighn, UNCW's
leading scorer, followed the errant free
throws, registering his only points of
the night, a three pointer from the
top of the key to give the Seahawks a
5248 lead.
Stewart put the nail in the cof-
fin after Basham missed another pair
of free throws with a three pointer of
his own with just over a minute left,
making the score 57-51.
UNC-W head coach Jerry Wain-
wright was very pleased with his two
seniors Meighen and Stewart.
"They both stepped up he
said. "Things had not been going well
for Corey or Chris, but they were here
for this team when we needed them.
Their experience showed
ECU was led by Anton Gill, who
led all scorers with 20 points. Skipp
Schaefbauer and Tim Basham each
had 12, while freshman guard Tony
Parham contributed 10. ECU's season-
See UNC page 9
Turn
two,
infield!
Football is longgone,
basketball is past the
midway point, and the
"boys of summer" are
preparing to hit the
diamond. No past-
their-prime replace-
ment players grovel-
ling about their pay-
checks here, but
Coach Overton does
have a rather young
roster to shuffle dur-
ing the 1995 season.
File Photo
Pirate swimmers split with UNC-W
Eric Bartels
Staff Writer
It can be defined as a 'Super"
weekend. Besides the 49ers display of
fireworks in Miami, the Pirates hosted
an intense meet with CAA rivals UNC-
Wilmington.
The tenacity of a strong, young
Lady Pirate swim team was able to
fend-off the Seahawks 127-116. How-
ever, the men were challenged late in
the meet and conceded the victory to
UNC-W as they fell 125-112.
In a meet that showcased many
of ECU'S star freshman swimmers, two
freshman records were eclipsed. Sandra
Ossmann broke the 1000-freestyle
record, while Kim Field broke the 200-
individual medley record.
"The women are 10-1 - their
best record ever swim coach Rick
Kobe said. "Our men swam great in a
losing effort"
The Lady Pirate team secured
their fourth undefeated season in the
CAA as they moved to 5-0 (10-1) on
the season. The men secured their
twelfth winning season last week
against Richmond. In the conference,
the men finished 2-3 (6-5).
ECU's 400-medley relay team,
consisting of Elizabeth Bradner, Kim
Field, Hilary Stokes and Melissa
Phillips gathered the first victory for
the women as they beat the Seahawks
by more than three seconds. Follow-
ing up the relay victory, Sandra
Ossmann went on to set the freshman
record in the 1000-freestyle when she
beat teammate Allison Lipp by ten sec-
onds.
Hilary Stokes impressed her
home crowd, finishing her junior year
solidly, possibly giving her best perfor-
mance at the Minges Aquatic Center
this year. Once again, Stokes grabbed
the 50-freesty!e and the 100-freestyle
from Seahawk swimmer Fathom
Houtz.
Two sophomore swimmers
added victories for the Pirates. Bizzy
Browne captured the 200-individual
medley by beating Karla Zick of UNC-
W. Melissa Phillips cruised past Christy
Wunderlich of UNC-W and the rest of
the 200-butterfly contenders.
Junior Jackie Schmieder helped
the ECU cause gathering the 500-
freestyle from Karla Zick of UNC-W
In Lady Pirate diving competi-
tion. Beth Hanna had a solid perfor-
mance but could only come up with
fourth place in the three-meter and
one-meter dives behind Seahawk
divers.
Intense was the only way to de-
scribe the action in the men's compe-
tition. ECU had the lead going into the
200-backstroke but gave up the lead
and couldn't recover over the last four
events.
Jumping out to an earty lead be-
hind the consistent strong swimming
of Chris Bembenek, Patrick Kesler, Jim
Broughal and McGee Moody, the Pi-
rates won the 400-medley relay. Fol-
lowing the 400, freshman Andy Wright
captured the 1000-freestyle over
Seahawk Matt Shelby and was the only
top finisher for the Pirates in individual
competition.
Other Pirates with great perfor-
mances came from Moody, who added
points in the 100-freestyle, Wright was
the top finisher for ECU in the 500-
freestyle behind UNC-W swimmer Matt
Allen. Broughal finished solidly in the
See SWIM page 9
Parham runs the
point as freshman
Tony Parham
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
For ECU point guard Tony
Parham, making the move from a big-
city high school star to running the
floor for head coach Eddie Payne's
Pirates in Greenville has been a little
less notorious than his early days on
the court.
"When I was about eight or
nine he said. "Well, you know how
at the half you change sides? I took
the ball and went and scored on the
other wrong side
The times, they are a changin
In his first season, Parham has
led the Pirates to a 13-6 (3-3 in CAA)
record, and has quickly made his ath-
letic presence known to CAA fans and
coaches alike.
"I've been playing point guard
my whole life Parham said. "My
passing is the best part of my game.
I know how to run a team, I know
where to give people the ball and how
to get it to them
Roughly halfway through the
1994-5 season, Parham has averaged
8.6 points, 2.9 rebounds and 3.1 as-
sists per game for the purple and
gold. He has recorded double figures
in scoring in 44 percent of ECU's
games this season, and has con-
stantly played above and beyond his
collegiate hoops experience.
"Tony's a total package Payne
said. "He's got a lot of weapons. He
can pull up and shoot or take it to
the bucket, and has proven to be a
better defender than we had origi-
nally thought
Parham won two letters at
Archbishop Carroll High School in
Washington D.C earning numerous
media and conference accolades for
his performances as a Lion. During
his senior season, he shredded op
posing defenses with ease, racking
up 22 points and five assists per con-
test.
"When I was younger, I used
to play football, but I never grew
any Parham said with a smile.
"Weight plays a factor in that
By focusing solely on basket-
ball, it was much easier for Parham
to fine-tune his hoops skills.
"My role model growing up was
Magic Johnson he said. "I always
See PARHAM page 9
1995 Rec Hoops
150 basketball
teams compete in
intramural games
David Gaskins
Recreational Services
The intramural sports basket-
ball season has kicked off ECU's ver-
sion of "March Madness" in Janu-
ary as approximately 150 teams will
vie for championships in a number
of divisions.
Among the fraternities,
"Lambda Chi Alpha A with the
deadeye shooting of Davis and
Barnes Harris appear set to step for-
ward in the Fraternity Gold division.
However, the men of "Kappa Alpha
,A" with Jason Warren and Will and
Jackson Temple will prove to be wor-
thy challengers. "Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon A" is also expected to be a
strong as well as "Theta Chi A
In Men's Gold, several top
teams are expected to challenge de-
fending champion "Total Package
The "Deadly Venoms led by speed-
sters Derrick Harris, Chris Pressley,
Anthony Barnett and big men
Derek McCreight and Rafael
McBroom are extremely talented.
"Life in the CBA" features the high-
flying Maurice Moody, while the
long-range shooting of Orlando
Whitaker fuels 'The Final Chapter
In Men's Purple, defending
champions "Second String" return
led by Donnie Peaks and Robert
Rawls. However, Vu Donie once
again predicts that his team
"Trifecta State will be a tops, and
even guarantees a trip to the finals.
Other top teams are expected
to include the "CAC All-Stars
Corey Kings "Instant Grits Jay
Flowe's "Unrefuted and "BOWB
with speedy Stephen FJippin. In
Men's Blue, BJ. Tucker looks to
build another intramural dynasty
with "Intimate Net Apparel the
men of "Faded Glory" who seek to
bring back some of the years past
The Sorority division, re-
cently dominated by the ladies of
"Alpha Phi may be set for transi-
tion as this unit lost several key
players to graduation "Delta Zeta"
returns all-around star Claire
Norman, who was injured for most
of last season.
"NuthuY But Net" has gone
to all come s of the campus to re-
cruit a women's powerhouse, in-
cluding inside players Kim
PakowsM, Natalie Lew and outside
threats in Angle Carroll and
Katrina Evans. However, Tara
Venn's "ECUWBAL, and "IMFF
with Shauna Carter and Donna
Allen look to provide competition.
While the regular 5-on-5 bas-
ketball season has garnered a ma-
jor share of the attention of intra-
mural players, there are a few other
exciting basketball opportunities
for the roundball enthusiast On
Tuesday, Feb. 7th at 4 p.m. in
Christenbury Gym, Recreational
Services will sponsor a Basketball
H-O-R-S-E contest
This version of the old back-
yardgame will match the shooting
and trick shot artistry of competi-
SeeRECpage9
nj .�ii i ���� �i i





J"
Tuesday, January 31, 1995
The East Carolinian
1VCV from page 8
tors in a "Can you top this?" con-
test to determine the champions in
Men's and Women's divisions. Sign-
up for the event will be from 3:30 -
4 p.m. on the day of the event with
a valid picture identification. All
participants must be currently en-
rolled students or facultystaff of
ECU.
The Basketball Shooting
Triathlon involves a triad of shoot-
ing accuracy contests designed to
determine the top marksmen
among the ECU intramural partici-
pants. This activity consists of a
Three Point Shootout, Free Throw
Contest, and Hot Shots. Partici-
pants may compete in one, two or
all three of the events. Champions
for men and women will be crowned
in each event, as well.as an overall
combined titlelist.
The event will be held on
Wednesday, Feb. 15 from 8:30 to
11 p.m. and on Thursday, Feb. 16
from 4 to 6 p.m. Registration will
be conducted on-site with a valid
ECU or comparable picture identi-
fication beginning 30 minutes prior
to the event on each day. Partici-
pants may only compete in each
event one time.
For further information on
these, or any other Intramural
Sports programs, please contact
David Gaskins or Kari Duncan at
the Department of Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
49ers win yawner in Miami
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32
(AP) - The futile effort of safeties
Darren Carrington and Stanley Richard
underscored what the San Diego Charg-
ers were up against
They couldn't stop the San Fran-
cisco 49ers. and barely slowed them
down.
Steve Young picked on Carrington
and Richard down the middle for two
touchdown passes in the first five min-
utes of Sunday's Super Bowl. With the
49ers' superiority thus established, they
went on to win 49-26.
Game MVP Young threw a Super
Bowl-record sLx touchdown passes, and
the first two were the longest, covering
44 yards to Jerry Rice and 51 yards to
Ricky Watters.
"Any time someone scores that
fast it makes you freeze for a second
Richard said, "because you don't expect
to give up big plays like that"
"The plays we were running were
designed to break their zone 49ers full-
back William Floyd said. "They left the
middle open a lot"
Once divided, the Chargers' de-
fense fell. The two early scores were the
longest plays for a San Francisco offense
that rolled up 449 yards, including 304
before halftime.
All week long, Young had pub-
licly preached the need to remain patient
against a secondary that plays soft cov-
erage. But when the game began. Young
turned greedy. He spotted a new scheme
designed by San Diego defensive coordi-
nator Bill Amsparger.
"I knew Amsparger would find
some wrinkles Young said. "He put a
new defense on Jerry on the first touch-
down. It had to be a dagger in their heart
that Jerry ran right through a defense
he had never seen
The touchdown 84 seconds into
the game was the fastest in Super Bowl
history.
"After that first touchdown, we
said. It's a rout Floyd said. "And that's
the way it turned out"
Rice cut over the middle on first
down, simply ran between the two safe-
ties, caught a perfect throw from Young
at the 10-yard line and cruised across
the goal line.
Richard confessed to blowing the
coverage.
"Young did a lot of looking off,
and the field was so wide open that it
was hard for the middle safety to cover
everyone Richard said. "The ball was
thrown down the middle, and there was
no one there
Moments later, following a punt
the 49ers again had a first down at
midfield. While Young faked a handoff,
running back Watters circled out of the
backfield, over the middle and into the
open.
Watters caught Young's pass at
the 30 and refused to be stopped.
Carrington and then Richard missed tack-
les as Watters charged on to the end zone
for the first of his three scores.
"Critical errors Amsparger said.
"You can't spot a team that good two
touchdowns
The 49ers always map out the first
15 plays of a game in advance. Some-
times they'll stray from the plan, but not
on Sunday.
"We went with the first 15 Young
said. "And after the first 15, it was 14-0
"We came out very explosive said
Rice, who finished with three touch-
downs. "We went into the game feeling
we had to score every time we got our
hands on the ball
PARHAM from page 8
tried to be like him. I never had the
speed, and he never had the speed,
but he always found a way to get the
job done
East Carolina, both on and off
the court, seemed like the ideal place
for Parham to fit in and be success-
ful.
When I visited ECU back in
November of 1993), 1 thought it was
a good environment Parham said.
"1 always wanted to get away from
the city to play in a college town
One of the main drawing points
of East Carolina and Eddie Payne's
program for Parham was the newly-
renovated Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum.
"They told me all of the things
that they were going to do to it. so
that really played a factor in my de-
cision Parham said.
Parham's opportunity to start
got a major boost when former ECU
point guard Kareem Richardson
transferred to Evansville unexpect-
edly.
"I felt excited Parham said.
"1 knew I had a chance to set in and
contribute. When I came here, 1 fig-
ured that Kareem would get the ma-
jority of the playing time. It was kind
of a bonus
Although success has come
with relative ease, Parham and his
coach know that he is young and
needs to improve his game a bit.
"His development maturity as
a player and his strength are his main
weaknesses Payne said. "Those
should improve as he gains more ex-
perience - he doesn't have a big ego
Off court, Parham is working
towards a communication degree, and
aspires to work in radio or television
sports broadcasting.
"Of course I'd like to play ball,
but if that and sportscasting don't
work out, I'll think of physical educa-
tion he said. "I'd like to become a
coach somewhere along the line
The Pirates' schedule takes
them to Norfolk, Va. tonight to tangle
with the Old Dominion Monarchs.
Parham is looking forward to the op-
portunity to play against one of the
better teams in the conference.
"It's a big game for us coming
off of the Wilmington loss he said.
"If I don't turn the ball over and we
can stay focused and play as a team,
we should have a good game
Whatever the future holds for
him, Parham is sure to find the same
degree of success that he has found
in Greenville, both on and off the
court
"He has surpassed all expecta-
tions Payne said. "Tony's a good
person. He's got a good heart, steady
demeanor and a solid perspective on
things
SWIM from page 8 UNC from page 8
200-freestyle slightly behind Allen.
Bembenek completed the 200-back-
stroke four-tenths of a second behind
Seahawk Burak Erdem.
The finale for the men left the
Seahawks with an 18-point lead. The
Pirate men needed to finish strong in
the 400-freestyle relay, even though
the points necessary to win did not
exceed the point margin.
A very close race became a Pi-
rate victory as Jim Broughal held onto
a lead that Moody set up for him,
James Baker, and John Donovan.
The Pirates garnered a victory
and a second place finish in the div-
ing competitions. Senior Scott Kupec
assisted the team with a victory in the
one-meter dive, while he achieved sec-
ond inhe three-meter dive behind the
Seahawks Rich Hanser.
Although two weeks away, the
Colonial Athletic Association Cham-
pionships will be held in Wilmington
on February 15-18.
Careers lvequire Leadership iixperience.
.experience Leads to Success.
Don't Wait Until You Graduate to
Learn from Experience.
Learn Leadership from Successful, Experienced Leaders
leading scorer Chuckie Robinson was
held to a season-low 2 points.
The Pirates shot a dismal 37
percent from the floor while UNCW
shot 47 percent.
ECU will try to get back on the
winning track tonight as they travel
to Norfolk, Virginia to face the league-
leading Old Dominion Mo rchs.
On Thursday, ECU controlled
Coastal Carolina's Chanticleers from
the outset and defeated them 85-62.
The closest former ECU assistant
coach Mike Hopkins' team would
come was eight points after a 14-2 run
early in the second half.
Chuckie Robinson (21 points)
and Anton Gill took control of the
paint, scoring at will on the smaller
Coastal Carolina squad. Shooting
guard Skipp Schaefbauer dished in-
stead of shooting, hitting teammates
with crisp passes to finish with a
mlegal.
Marjorie Knrtaiison
Paralegal. Womfr
Sandridge & i
Meredith legal.
Program (iradua
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Meredith College
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Knleigb. J-M- ��
wuai&SESm
W&&
ITH
i�m0sttints
't-tl. ntilintiat or fthnk origin, flflf. or disahihtx
game-high six assists.
"It was kind of funny seeing
Coach Hopkins on the other bench ;
Gill saidI'm just glad he didn't come
back here and pick up a win
The Pirates did have a scare at .
one point in the second half when
freshman point guard Tony Parham
went down hard on his wrist diving
for a loose ball. He was forced to leave
the game, but did return several min-
utes later appearing unhurt finishing
with 10 points on 4-of-5 shooting from
the field.
Schaefbauer, who always draws
the opponent's top gun, shut down
CCU's Keke Hicks, limiting him to
eight points on 3-18 shooting (2-10
from 3-point range). Hicks normally
averages 25.4 points per game.
"He's a good player
Schaefbauer said. "He can usualV
shoot from anywhere, but tonight we
did a good job on not letting him get
the shots he usually likes to take
ECU shot down any hopes of
Hopkins getting a win when little used
big men Don Douglas and fon Bryant
sparked the ballclub by hitting the
boards and following up their
teammate's misses to score. Douglass
finished with four points and four re-
bounds in only five minutes of action,
and Bryant scored eight points in 16
minutes.
"Our bench did give us a boost
tonight ECU head coach Eddie
Payne said. "It's unusual for those to
guys to play so much, but they are
going to have to contribute on a regu-
lar basis to help us win down the
stretch
Breakfast with:
Dr. Howard Sosnel Ms. Kathy Barger I Mr. Eddie Payne
Superintendent, I President, Coach,
! Pitt County
Schools
February 1.1 �95
Ronald McDonald
House Board of
Directors .
February 7, 1995
FCl! Men's
Basketball Team
March 28, 1995
Join these local community leaders for breakfast,
from 7:30 am - 8:30 am, and learn their
success stories and leadership philosophies.
Registration includes a wake-up call, free ride from your residence
to MSC, and a continental breakfast.
Call 328-4796 by noon, the day before each breakfast, to attend.
For More Information,
Contact the Student Leadership Development Programs Office,
109 Mendenhall Student Center, 328-4796

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10
Tuesday, January 31,1995
The East Carolinian
ff Help Wanted Travel
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
immediately. On campus, two rooms.
$197 per a month and 12 utilities. I
am an exchange student Call : 758-
6457
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR
House at 206-A East 12th St Rent
$450 month. Also, IBR Apartment
at 810 Cotanche. Rent $325 month
Call 757-3191. Pets OK.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example of Frank Lloyd Wright ar-
chitecture. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large dining room, kitchen and living
room with fireplace. New refrigera-
tor, washerdryer, fenced backyard,
nice shrubbery. Convenient to cam-
pus and hospital. $750.00mo. de-
posit 524-5790 day - 752-8079 night
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two Bed-
room Apartments at Wesley Com-
mons For Rent. Free Cable. Call 758-
1921.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group
together early. Two relatively new
houses; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; Avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
7 - $1500.00 per month; sleeps 8-9 -
$2100.00 per month (804) 850-1532
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed im-
mediately to share two bedroom
apartment on 10th street Rent $195,
12 utilities and phone. Looking for
someone dependable, but likes to
have fun. Call 830-2055 for more in-
formation.

ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom apartment close to campus.
Rent $170 a month plus 12 utilities.
Call 757-1496 and leave message.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: 2Br
Duplex, close to campus good size
bedroom, fully furnished, free cable.
190 util. Move in Feb. 1st 752-
9392
ROOMMATE NEEDED share 2-Br,
$192mo, water incl. Call 757-1317
34 mile from campus. Reedy Branch
Apts.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! Male
or Female, own room 13 bills,
$220.00 month, Please call 355-2803
ROOM FOR RENT: Newly reno-
vated private room in home walking
distance from campus. $175.00
month and 13 utilities. Contact Mike
Carey at home 752-2879 work 830-
5577.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED 2
Bedroom partly furnished Apt Close
to campus. Cat lover 12 rent e;ectric
? cable Deposit required. Linda 758-
1393
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP. 167.50 month 12 util, 12
phone. 2Br Apt Call 321-7522. Leave
number message or Call after 8:00
pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
2Br. apartment close to campus. On
ECU bus route. $175mo plus 12
utilities and phone. Non-smokers only
please! Please contact Patrick at 752-
9928.
TO SHARE TWO BEDROOM DU-
PLEX in College veiw. $175 12
utilities. Call 757-2763 Leave message
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house 1 block from campus
& downtown, wash, dryer, 13 utili-
ties $190 mo. Call Jim 752-4039
W For Sale
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM excellent
Condition $500 or best offer Call Tom
at 752-9356
RALEIGH 531 series 12 speed
roadbike for sale with excellent
acessories - Look pedals, Aero bars,
and cyclemeter. Excellent condition.
Asking $350.00 obo.
Call David 328-7188
W For Sale
IBM GAMES, 5 14 drive with extra
software. Call Kevin 830-8970
WOMEN SKIIS FOR SALE. Excellent
Condition. $300. Dial 756-6061. Leave
message.
FOR SALE: Men's 26 inch Ten Speed
Bicycle, $35.00. Call 756-7856 any-
time.
FOR SALE: Oscar Schmidt 12-string
guitar. Mintcond. $200. Call 752-1373.
Ask for Bruce or leave message.
CONVERTIBLE, 1989 MUSTANG
LX w 5.0 At. AC.CC. power every-
thing, one female owner, 74,000
miles.Call Nicole 758-5833
Services Offered
tried & true
Sofas- $40 & up
Chairs - $10 & up
Tried & True Consignment Shop
942 - Dickenson Ave. 752-2139
T-F 10-5 Sat 10-2
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Bil-
lion in private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, in-
come, or parent's income. Let us help.
Call Student Financial Services: 1-800-
263-6495 ext F53623
TUTORING - IMPROVE YOUR EN-
GLISH! Experienced teacher can tu-
tor you in conversation, writing and
TOEFL. Will edit papers also. Call Pam
at 758-6952.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: DV-
1 Greencard Program, by U.S. Immi-
gration. Greencards provide U.S. per-
manent resident status. Citizens of al-
most all countries are allowed. For info
& forms: New Era Legal Services
20231 Stagg St Canoga Park, CA
91306 Tel: (818)772-7168;(818)998-
4425 Monday-Sunday: 10a.m. -11p.m.
FREE INFORMATION! GUIDE TO
HOME EMPLOYMENT! Send SASE
To: The Business Advisory, Box
1634C, Greenville, NC 27835. Imme-
diate response.
NEED TYPING? Campus secretary
offers speedy service, familiar with all
formats, low rates. Work saved on Mac
disks. Call Cindy after 5pm or leave
Message 355-3611.
RESEARCH INFORMATJONj
Largest Library of information in U.S. -
all subjects
Orde' Catalog Tody wS Viv' MC or COD
800-351-0222
0'1310: 477-8226
Of. rusfi S2 00 to Research Informition
�.�:2!Mno�ve i22L 6WiAae'esCA90C2JL
Help Wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
Earn up to $2,000month working
on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour compa-
nies. World travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the
Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal and Full-
time employment available. No expe-
rience necessary. For more informa-
tion call 1-206-634-0468 ext C53623
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000- $6,000per month. Room
and board! Transportation! Male or
Female. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 5454155 ext A53622
TELEMARKETING- Davenport Exte-
riors Thermal Card- $5 per hour plus
bonus. Easy work, flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210
ff Help Wanted
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Clean, High volume Adult Club needs
YOU now. Confidential employment
Daily pay Top Commissions. Some to
no experience. If you've called before
call again. Playmates Massage Snow
Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, We'll pay you to!
Make your A's pay by calling Student
Supplements today. We'll pay you cash
for going to class! Give us a call at
752-HELP
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH Self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
MEN are accepting applications for
part-time sales associates. Work with
the fashions you love to wear: Junior
Sportswear, Accessories, and
Youngmen's apparel. Flexible sched-
uling optionssalaryclothing dis-
count All retail positions include
weekends. Applications accepted Mon-
day and Thurday, l-3pm, Brady's, The
Plaza.
SITTING OUT THIS SEMESTER or
have plenty of free time during the
day? Brady's is accepting applications
for Receiving Room Associates. Verify
incoming freightprice merchandise.
Some lifting required. Excellent hours.
Applications accepted Monday and
Thursday, l-3pm, Brady's, The Plaza.
ECU ROPESCHALLENGE course
facilitators needed. Flexible schedules,
excellent pay. Interested persons call
32&6064.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home
mailing our circulars. Free details,
Send SASE: R&B Distributors, Box
20354, Greenville NC 27858
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required.
Begin now. For info call 202-298-8952.
POOL MANAGERS (Aquatic Direc-
tors, Head Guards, Assistant Head
Guards). SpSum 95. GreenvilePitt
County, Goldsboro, Kinston, Tarboro.
Call Bob, 758-1088.
SUMMER POSITION AVAILABLE:
gain career experience and save
$4000.00. Please call 1-800-251-4000
ext 1576. Leave name, school now
attending and phone number.
SUMMER JOBS, Earn 3 hours col-
lege credit; Save $4000. Call 1-800-
251-4000 Ext. 1576 Leave Name,
School and Phone .
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time
youth soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching.
This program will run from the first
of March to the first of May. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 8304550.
PERSONNEL NEEDED for front
desk and night Auditor positions for
Hotel in Greenville. Hospitality and
Accounting Majors are preferred but
not required. Please Fax Resume to
919-934-5533
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt
County Memorial is seeking qualified
individuals to teach aerobic classes
through its Employee Recreation and
Wellness Department. Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time ba-
sis. Interested candidates should con-
tact Ms. Scottie Gaskins between 8am-
4:30pm at (919)816-5958. Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
NEED EXTRAFOR SPRING
BREAK? Earn the quick cash you
need by stuffing envelopes. It's easy-
immediate response! Send $1 with
SASE to Carolina Enterprises, Inc
P.O. Box 3251, Greenville, NC 27836-
1251
JOB AVAILABLE - Dependable per-
son who is good with children is
needed to work in our home doing
daily household duties and helping
care for our three children when I am
not home. The children are 3 yrs, 5yrs,
and 6yrs. old. THE HOURS ARE
FLEXIBLE. Please Call ASAP. Must
have references. 756-3538
BRIDES CHOICE is seeking profes-
sional, affluent females to work Sat-
urdays and some weekdays beginning
immediately. Bridal or regular retail
sales experience helpful, but not re-
quired. Applicants should apply in
person at Bride's Choice, 426-C Ar-
lington Blvd.(near Kroger's). No
phone calls please.
MATURE AND DEPENDABLE
BABYSITTER NEEDED for 11
month old in our home. Wednesday
8:30am-1.00pm Please Call 756-8262
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
beach Florida, from $91 per person
per week Free Info 1-800488-8828
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring
Break - How about it in the Bahamas
or Florida Keys. Where the Party
never ends. Spend it on your own pri-
vate yacht One week only $385.00 per
person. Including food and much
more. Organizers may go for free! Easy
Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-783-
4001.
SPRING BREAK '95!
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
c Jamaica
yc t�
Bahamas
Special Group Rates & Free Travel!

Sun Splash Tours
1-800-426-7710
-f
Travel
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Book Now & Save.Jamaica $439,
CancunBahamas $399. Panama City
$119, Daytona $149, Organize
Groups, Earn Cash, & Travel Free.
Endless Summer 1-800-234-7007.
SPRING BREAK! Bahamas Party
Cruise 6 days $279! Includes 12 Meals
& 6 Free Parties! Great Beaches &
Nightlife! A HUGE Party! Cancun &
Jamaica 7 Nights Air & Hotel From
$429. Spring Break Travel 1-800-678-
6386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BREAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa Beach(Near
Disney)-27 Acre Deluxe Beach front
Resort 7 Nights $159! Key West $229!
Daytona Beach Room with Kitchen
From $129! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8
Days Oceanview Room with a Kitchen
$129! Walk to Best Bars! Includes
Free Discount Card Which Will Save
You $100 on FoodDrinks! 1-800-678-
6386
BAHAMAS
Spring Break Party
CRUISE
$279!
6 DAYS-12 MEALS-ALL TAXES
1-800-673-6386
ITS BETTER IN THE BAHAMASI
" Lost and Found
FOUND black male cat at Tar River
Apts. Cat has rabies tag on collar, if
yours call 752-6094
4f Greek Personals
ATTENTION ALL GIRLS INTER-
ESTED IN SORORITY LIFE: Phi
Delta Social Sorority invites you to
Spring Rush Jan. 30, at Mendenhall
at 5:30 p.m. and Jan.31, at Mendenhall
Room 244 at 9:00 p.m. For more in-
formation call us anytime at 758-9902
or 752-8724.
4 Greek Personals
CHI OMEGA would like to congratu-
late all the fraternities on a success-
ful rush and for having great new
pledges. Keep it up!
PHI KAPPA TAU: Thanks for the
great time at our social last week. We
loved meeting your awesome new
pledges and we hope to do something
again soon! Love, Chi Omega.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA, will hold
Spring Rush Feb. 6-9 in Rawl 105 from
5:30-6:30. ESA is a service sorority
involved in the community and affili-
ated with St. Jude Children's Hospi-
tal. Please attend as many nights as
possible. We look forward to seeing
you there.
PI DELTA would like to invite all ECU
females looking for fun. excitement.
and friendship to rush this week. Tues-
Mendenhall in Rm 244. 9 pm. Weds-
dinner with the sisters. For more info,
call 758-9902.
DELTA SIG- Thanks for the great
jailhouse social last Weds. There's no
one else we'd rather be handcuffed
to! Can't wait to get together again
soon. Love, Pi Delta.
GOOD LUCK to all our girls playing
basketball and waterpolo. Love you
Alpha Delta Pi Sisters.
RONDA SORTINO - Congratulations
on being appointed Attorney General
for SGA! We are so proud of you!
ZLAM, your siters.
THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA NU
would like to thank Greg Rocchio,
Ethan Hazelrigs, and Dave Matthews
on a great job with rush. 12 Pledges,
not bad fellas, Congrats The Broth-
ers.
DELTA ZETA, THANK for a great
Superbowl party. We've got to get
together again soon, Thanks the
brothers of Sigma Nu
PI DELTA - last Thursday night was
great! We are looking forward to
"Heaven and HellSigma Tau
Gamma
SIGMA TAU GAMMA would like to
congratulate our new associate
Kristopher Ketham. Good Luck!
DELTA ZETA - last Friday night was
a blast! Can't wait to get together
again! - Sigma Tau Gamma
REGISTRATION LINES
POST OFFICE LINES
DROPADD LINES
WORRY LINES
PICK-UP LINES
THANK GOODNESS FOR
LOVE LINEcS
DEADLINE IS FEB. 10.





II l�lll�
,�
11
Tuesday, January 31,1995
The East Carolinian
W
SPECIAL OLYMPICS COACHES
NEEDED
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special Olym-
pics will be conducting a Track &
Field Coaches Training School on
Sat. Feb. 4 from 9:00am - 3:30pm for
all persons interested in becoming a
certified volunteer track coach. We
also need coaches for the following
Sports: equestrian, bowling,
powerlifting, volleyball. Softball, swim-
ming, rollerskating & gymnastics. NO
EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. For
more information, contact Connie or
Dwain at 8304541 or 8304551.
ABLE
Allied Blacks For Leadership and
Equality presents the 2nd Annual Mr.
ABLE Pageant "Essence of a Black
Man" Interest meeting on Thursday
Feb 2, at 7:00pm in the lobby of
Fletcher Residence Hall. All interested
men are welcome. Contact Ms. Susan
Stewart at 328-7924 for additional in-
formation.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Scheduling & Time Management: 2
8, 1 lam-noon. Note Taking & Study
Strategies: 27. 2pm-3pm. Exam
Preparation: 26,9am-10am. Counsel-
ing Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
EC NATIVE AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION
ECNAO will hold a meeting on Feb. 2
at 7:00pm in Mendenhall Rm 14.
Please attend, call Kim Sampson for
more info. 752-2319
WOMENS LACROSSE CLUB
Anyone interested in playing on the
Womens Lacrosse Team is welcome
to join us on Wednesday, Feb. 1st at
4:00pm. Practice will be held on the
Allied Health Fields. Questions? Call
Alana 752-7153.
STUDENT NORTH CAROLINA
ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATORS
SNCAE will hold its second meeting
on February 2 at 4:30 in Speight 308.
Elections for the offices of Vice-Presi-
dent and Treasurer will be held. There
will be a speaker on the hospital read-
ing program and handouts on ideas
for your classroom.
ECU CLUB WATER POLO
Every Monday and Wednesday Night
9 to 10:30 for more info call Bob 752-
2965 or Dave 757-8705
BGLAD
B-GLAD (Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbians &
Allies for Diversity) will meet Thurs-
day, February 2 at 8pm in the Multi-
purpose Room (1st floor) of
Mendenhall Student Center.
SOCIAL WORKCRIMINAL
JUSTICE
Nov. 1994 - Jan 1995 Qualified Appli-
cants: Qualified Applicants for the
S.W. and C.J. majors are reminded to
attend an Admissions Group meeting
in Rawl 130 on Wednesday, February
1,1995 at 5:00pm Qualified applicatns
must attend the meeting.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Interest meetings will be held Janu-
ary 31 & February 1. 5-6pm
Mendenhall basement 8C.D.E. Febru-
ary 2, 4-5pm(Pleare notice the time
change) Mendenhall basement
8C,D,E. Come leam how a make 2
hours a week more rewarding! More
information Nikki 328-7655.
WOMEN'S STUDIES ALLIANCE
Women's Studies Alliance advocates
political, social and economic equal-
ity for women and men. Come join us
on Wednesday. February 1 at 4:00 pm
GCB 2004. For more information, ask
for Christine at 328-6268 or 830-2062.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
CLUB
Attention All Education Majors:
There will be an Elementary Ed. Club
meeting on February 1st at 4:30 in
Speight 129. We will be taking orders
for T-shirts and will also have a
speaker from the Co-op office. She will
give out infromation for wonderful
summer employment opportunities
for Education Majors. Don't miss it!
LEARNED OPTIMISM-BEATING
THE COLLEGE BLUES
This ten-session workshop will teach
you strategies for overcoming the mild
depression experienced by many col-
lege students. Mondays, 3:30pm-
5:00pm. Counseling Center. Call 328-
6661 for information.
ANGER MANAGEMENT
SUPPORT GROUP
This five-session workshop will teach
you how to deal with anger in a
healthy, non-violent way. Learn skills
to improve your interpersonal rela-
tionships. Thursdays, 2:00pm-3:30pm,
beginning 22 Counseling Center.
Call 328-6661 to register.
NATURAL LIFE CLUB
The Natural Life Club is hosting a
"Mystery Trip" on February 4th leav-
ing from the front of Christenbury at
4:30pm. You won't know where you
are going, but we promise you will
have a great time. Space is limited 50
reserve a spot with S2 before Febru-
ary 2nd in Christenbury 204.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
"For planning purposes, a survey is
being taken of the number of students
who would definitely have majored in
Religious Studies if such a major had
been offered. If such a major Is ever
offered, it will be several years from
now, so this data is being collected
purely for planning purposes. If you
would have majored in Religious Stud-
ies if such a major had been offered
during your years here, call 328-6121
and leave your name and a message
for Calvin Mercer or drop your name
in campus mail to Calvin Mercer,
Brewster A440
ECU LACROSSE
Anyone interested in playing LaCrosse
this Spring, please contact Brian Trail
at 758-1348. Please leave your name
and number.
PSI CHI
PS1 CHI - National Honor Society in
Psychology invites all who are inter-
ested and who have maintained an
overall GPA of 3.0 and have completed
9 hours in psychology to attend our
interest meeting on Wed. Feb. 8 at
5:00 in the Psi Chi Library on the
third floor of Rawl.
Flecther Recital Hall unless otherwise
listed. TUES JAN 31-GRADUATE
REHTAL, Jenny Parker, accompany-
ing, 7:00pm. WED FEB 1-GRADU-
ATE RECITAL. Mechele Marie
Roelofs. flute. 7:00pm. THURS FEB
2-SENIOR RECITAL, Crystal Gray,
violin. 7:00pm. FRI FEB 3- SYM-
PHONIC WIND ENSEMBLE, Scott
Carter. Conductor and JAZZ EN-
SEMELE A, Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr.
Director(Wright Auditorium, 8:00pm)
FEB 4-EASTERN DISTRICT HIGH
SCHOOL AND JUNIOR HIGH HON-
ORS BAND CONCERT(Wright Audi-
torium, 7:00pm). SUN FEB 5-SE-
NIOR RECITAL, Gerri Reese, clarinet,
7:00pm MON FEB 6-FACULTY RE-
CITAL, Mary Burroughs, hom; and
Randy Love, fortepiano guest from
Duke University 8:00pm. For addi-
tional information, call ECU-6851 or
the 24-hour hotline at ECU4370.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
HOLDS RUSH
Feb. 6-9 (Mon. -Thurs.) Epsilon Sigma
Alpha will hold their Spring Rush in
Rawl 105 from 5:30 - 6:30. Come and
find out about this growing sorority,
who is dedicated to helping others.
MonInfo. Night, TuesRefreshments,
Wed. - Bowling. ThursFiesta Dinner.
Please attend as many nights as pos-
sible. Looking forward to seeing you
there.
KOBEOSAKA EARTHQUAKE
FUND
Those who are interested in helping
the hundreds of thousands of people
in the earthquake area can send a
donation to: Exchange Japan (Earth-
quake Fund, PO Box 1166, Ann Ar-
bor. MI 48106).Since time is of the
essence, we ask those of you consid-
ering sending a contribution to send
it as quickly as possible. Any amount
would be significant in a fundraising
effort such as this. There are many
exchange students all over the world
and to help in an area of need is to
help ourselves.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Week of January 31 thru February 6:
All Events Free and held at A. J.
ATTENTION MIDDLE SCHOOL
EDUCATORS:
There will be an introductory meet-
ing for any middle grade education
majors on February 2,1995 in Speight
308 at 5:00. All concentrations and
years invited to attend. Agenda in-
cludes orientation, next meeting
dates, and upcoming projects. Refresh-
ments and Door prizes will be avail-
able. Questions? Call Allen 758-9769
or Tara 830-2248.
STUDENT EXCHANGE-STUDY
ABROAD
There is still time to consider a stu-
dent exchange or study abroad expe-
rience for next fall or spring but time
is running short! If you are interested
in study sites which are available, vist
GCB lobby, Feb. 1, between 9:00-2:00 I
to pick up brochures and information
on study abroad and national ex-
changes or stop in the International
Programs office on 9th Street Pay
ECU tuition and study at another lo-
cation! Do it soon while sites are still
availab'e!
CREDIT CARDSs THE REALITY
OF DEBT
Everyone is invited to the Feb. 2, ECU
Investment Clubmeeting in GCB
3007, at 5pm. Our speaker will be dis-
cussing the ins and outs of credit card
use. Some of the planned topics in-
clude: how to use credit, where to
find the lowest interest rates, and what
perks cards offer.
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure
to pick up your FREE video yearbook.
Available at the Student Store, The
East Carolinian, Joyner Library,
Mendenhall and the Media Board of-
fice in the Student Publications Build-
ing.
Looking for a
roommate?
Find one in our
classifieds.
GOLDEN KEY
&
National Honor Society
DEADLINE!
Attention New Member
invites, your membership
application must be mailed
this week (postmarked by
Feb. 5th)
For more information or to
have questions answered stop
by the information booth in
the lobby of Student Stores
on Wednesday or Thursday
11a.m. - 2p.m.
Meeting Dates:
Every 2nd and 4th Thursday 4:00p.m. GC
1012 (For more information contact
Harold Wise at 830-5160)
Variety of
Goodies!
505 N. Berkely Blvd.
Goldsboro
778-3897
�BreakfastBagels. Donuts, Muffins
�LunchCookies. Oven roasted
�Dinnerturkey, roast beef, ham.
�Cateringand much, much more!
�Party141 SW Greenville
PlattersBlvd.
355-8028
Picasso s
Bakery ?& Deli
W.n.e- Student Speoal Thru 331 Any studem or (acuity wtlh val.d I D get S1 oft any sandw.cn Lirrnt one per customer Not MM with any other speoals.
FREE
Donuts or Bagels
Buy a 12 dozen & gel
a 12 dozen FREE.
'i r
I I
I I
FREE
Cream Cheese
Buy any Bagel & gel
order of Plain Cream
Cheese FREE.
m ri
�i i
i i
FREE
�p rp
�i r
SAVE
i
Breakfast J Sandwich, Fries &
Bagel or Biscuit
I I ltu anyCoumij Ham. Sausage or
Won Bagel or Biscuit and
get a second one of equal or
iesscr value KRKF. i
I
Small Bev.
$3.89
F4� hU ��i in, oom earn � � � J � � �fc��rt�5
tipue. Wl93 .i' � � � � � � � mmmm ��� � � � mi
t
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
TABLE TENNIS CHESS spades
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26, 1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
V
SSL
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, February 1
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
�� Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available ai toe Mendenhall Information Desk
and in tin- Billiards and Bow ling Centers located on toe ground ftoord MendenhaB Student Center. Call the Student
Activities Oilu more liilomialioo.
7 C �
J





PlcuwUncf, 01 dJwutmcj, wuti lxw&
?
You'd be on solid ground if you placed
a Love Line in the Feb. 14 issue
of The East Carolinian.
With a distribution of 12,000, nearly two-thirds of
ECU would know for whom
you fall head over heels.
� � � �
We'll even make it
4fteasier for you.

�Simply cut out th
� 1



?ra








Title
The East Carolinian, January 31, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 31, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1054
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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