The East Carolinian, January 26, 1995







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January 26,1995
Vol 69, No. 70
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
16 pases
ECU SATs:
Middle of road
SGA continues to work
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
�MnMn
When compared with other uni-
versities in the lfcampus UNC system,
EClFs entering freshmen SAT scores
rank 8th, said Dr. Thomas E. Fbwell,
director of the office of undergradu-
ate admissions.
Powell said the average scores
were 874 in 1990,889 in 1991,900 in
1992,920 in 1993 and 913 in 1994.
"The reason that we had a drop
between 1993 and 1994 of seen points
was because UNC General Administra-
tion restricted the number of out-of-
state students that we could take in
our class this year Powell said. His-
torically, out-of-state student SAT
scores run approximately 70 to 80
points higher than the in-state SAT
scores.
"So, when you take a fair
amount - and this year it was about
75 outof-state students - out of the
freshman class, the loss of 75 higher
SATs causes a drop
In 1992. when ECU reached
900, it was the first time the univer-
sity had been at that level since 1973.
Powell said mat other consider-
ations are more important than SAT
scores for a student to get into ECU.
"The class rank and the aca-
demic average in high school and fee
?ufaject matter requirements are much
more important Powell said. "There's
a regression formula that weights the
verbal and the math from the SAT, the
class rank and high school grade point
average. It weights them based on his-
torical information from previous fresh-
men classes, and how they performed
at the end of their freshmen year
The GPA and class rank is
weighted ten times more than the SAT
scores in the admissions process.
At North Carolina State Univer-
sity, Ruth Craven, a research associate
for university planning and analyses,
said the entering freshmen scores were
1053 in 1990.1050 in 1991, 1069 in
1992,1071 in 1993 and 1055 in 1994.
Craven said SAT scores are
somewhat important to admission to
NCSU, but the university also looks at
other student qualities.
"Ifs part cf our admission in-
dex Craven said. "High school rank
is considered, a good GPA and SAT
score.
James C. Walters, director of un-
dergraduate admissions at UNC-Chapel
Hill, said UNC's entering freshmen
scores were 1112 in 1990, 1120 in
1991,1122 in 1992.1126 in 1993 and
1128 in 1994.
Walters said SAT scores were
not as important to the university as
the student's high school record.
"In our case, the SAT scores are
secondary Walters said.
Walters said 60 percent of the
weight is placed on high school record
such as the GPA, class rank, strength
of the high school and the student's
course schedule. Then 20 percent on
SAT or ACT scores and 20 percent on
out-of-class activity and leadership.
Extra-curricular activity is not
considered in the ECU admissions pro-
cess.
ECU usually competes for stu-
dents and is compared most often with
UNC- Charlotte, UNC-Greensboro and
UNC-Wilmington. These schools aie
ranked in the middle of the UNC sys-
tem.
At UNC-W, Yvonne G. Smith, di-
rector of university planning, said the
entering freshman class scores were
926 in 1990,913 in 1991,936 in 1992,
935 in 1993 and 966 in 1994.
"We have had a very similar pro-
file with Wilmington, but in the last
couple of years, WUmington has re-
stricted growth, let in smaller classes
and has escalated their profile dramati-
cally Powell said. "So, they've gone
up a lot"
Though NCSU also keeps
records of the SAT scores from stu-
dents entering its Schools of Business
(called College of Management) and
Engineering, neither ECU or UNC
keep track of the SAT scores of stu-
dents entering their schools for busi-
ness or education.
"N.C. State admits students into
the School of Engineering Powell
said. "I have been a director at a school
that had a School of Engineering and
you have different admission standards
- more math requirements and higher
SAT requirements on the math side of
the formula. So, ifs easy foi them to
distinguish who's getting in.
"We don't have that situation
here. Our freshmen class for the most
part is admitted to the General Col-
lege, then students declare majors a
year or three semesters or four semes-
ters after they have been in school
Powell said SAT scores do not
necessarily show whether or not a stu-
dent will succeed on the college level.
"The SAT gets an awful lot of
See RANK page 3
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Student Government As-
sociation (SGA) continued the Spring
semester with business as usual, de-
spite some confusion in calling the
role during last Monday's meeting.
Three new members were in-
ducted, and Ronda Sortino was ap-
pointed to the position of attorney
general for SGA. Monday's snowy
weather, joined with ineligible mem-
bers and graduated students de-
creased attendance in Monday's meet-
ing, but the agenda continued as
usual. A quorum (counting of the
number of members present) was
taken to determine whether enough
members were present to continue the
meeting. One half of the student sen-
ate body, plus one, is required to pro-
ceed with business. Henry Bray, chair
of the Rules and Judiciary' Commit-
tee suggested that students exceed-
ing more than one absence be re-
moved from the role.
Committee reports and an-
nouncements were made, and over
$1,000 in appropriations were given.
Seven new club and group constitu-
tions were submitted for approval.
In a later interview. SGA Presi-
dent Ian Eastman
discussed future
plans for distrib-
uting a memoran-
dum to various
campus groups
concerning appro-
priations.
"There are
a lot of groups
"People in the past
have said that
student government
doesn't do anything,
but there's a lot of
work
55
that don't realize
that they can seek behind-the-scenes
funding
Eastman said.
"We've got
$65,000 left over
now, which is a lot
of money com-
so if these groups need money, lets
give them the money they need
Michael Carnes. SGA secretary,
welcomed a new president to the Stu-
dent Union board of directors, and an-
nounced upcoming sneak previews for
Hendrix Theatre. Sheila Boswell, SGA
vice president,
asked student sena-
tors for ideas for
this year's video
yearbook in her re-
port on the media
board. Lucy
Goodwin, chair of
the Screenings and
Appointments
Committee encour-
aged students to
join Omicron Delta
Kappa, a national
- Ian Eastman
SGA president
pared to last year. My views are it's
not my money, it's everybody's money.
leadership honor
fraternity.
Eastman an-
nounced the need
for representatives on a new board to
review weapons policies and proce-
dures on campus and promised to con-
tinue to fight the student fee increases
set to begin in June during the Jan. 9
SGA meeting. During Monday's meet-
ing. Eastman shared a letter concern-
ing the lighting situation progress
written by George Harrell, assistant
vice chancellor for facilities.
SGA members are involved with
a lot more than weekly meetings ad-
dresses.
SGA has a direct involvement
with more than 11 campus groups and
committees ranging from the transit
board to the Fee Review Committee.
"Its a part of the job Eastman
said. "People don't realize we do any-
thing up here
Eastman said that the board of
trustees is the most important com-
mittee SGA holds a vote on.
"Any kind of fees, it all comes
up to that point the board of trust-
ees Eastman said. "That's where the
final O.K yeah or nay on any fee or
See SGA page 4
Signs mark
new district
People
on the
STREET
HBmWw
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Local street signs recently
got a new look since the area
has been named the college
view historical district. Some
homes have also been
adorned with the signs dis-
playing the district logo.
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Signs of history are officially begin-
ning to mark Greenville's college view his-
toric district, causing joy for some and trouble
for others.
"The posting of the signs to note the
historic district we're very' proud to have
that happen Greenville Mayor Nancy
Jenkins said. "We now feel as if we have
tangible proof that the district is going to
be, and we're very pleased Greenville is go-
ing to have such a district We think the
value in declaring that a historic district is
going to be enhanced with time, it will be-
come more significant over the years
The district runs from First to Fifth
Streets, and west of Elm to Cotanche Streets
Some blocks within the district are excluded
because they were built at a later time than
most of the neighborhood, said Archie Smith
chairman of the Historic Preservation Com-
mission, and ECU sociology pmfessor.
"The district is A group of build-
ings - a community denoting that these
structures are of significant historical value
Smith said. "It was created through the ef-
forts of a number of people including the
preservation commission, and was desig-
nated as a historic district with approval of
the city council" Smith said
See SIGN page 3
Coffy Hines
sophomore
"Five years, because
sat out a semester
Rugby
anyone?
After a seven-year haitus, ECU
women are once again trying to
establish a Women's Rugby
team. Yesterday, an information
booth was set up in front of The
Student Stores. Interested
female students can contact
Meagan Johnson at 830-2162
or Linda McCormick at
758-9978.
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Anthony Barnett
junior
"Five years, because I
transferred here from
Delaware State
Justin Crist
junior
"Two years from now.
All together it will take
me four and a half
years
Pam Austin
graduate student
"It took me four and a
half years to complete
my undergraduate
degree. It will take two
years to finish graduate
school. I have one year
left
tlFfee
ynaide
Study on the five year planpage
01
tAcvt&oUief,
GenerationX, get over it.
�page
tiwi&cUu
Hopkins returns to face Piratespage
8
13
0?&iee&4�
Thursday
Sunny
High 52
Low 27
Weekend
Partly cloudy
High 51
Low 31
Phone 328 - 6366 Fax 328 - 6558
The East Carolinian
Student Publication Bldg. 2nd floor
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from Joyner





Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
CRUVUTSENE
January 17
Obtaining property by false pretense - A student reported that
he was aprroached by an unknown male while walking south of
Mendenhall. 1 he subject stated he had run out of gas and asked to
borrow S20. The subject gave a false name and telephone number: he
left the student a small flashlight for collateral, but never returned. The
suspect was a non-student and banned from campus.
January 18
Automobile accident � Two student were involved in an automo-
bile accident on college hill drive. No one was injured, but damage is
estimated at $7,000 on both cars.
January 19
Crimes against nature - A staff member reported that he had
observed a male perform fellatio on another male in the locker room in
Memorial Gymnasium.
Breaking and entering � A resident of Jones Hall reported the
breaking and entering of his room and the larceny of a compact disc case
containing 70 compact discs. The room was not locked.
Larceny � A non-student reported the larceny of her purse from
the telephone booth at Parking and Traffic Services. The victim left the
purse at the telephone booth, returned three hours later and found it
missing.
January 20
Tampering with university property � A non-student was banned
from campus for hitting signs north of Flanagan and Joyner Library' and
pulling up a handicap sign at the entrance of Joyner.
January 21
Fight in progress � Several officers responded to a fight-in-progress
call west of Aycock Hall. Upon arrival, the people involved had left the
area. Anonymous calls were received with information that one person
was on the second floor of Jones Hall and that he was injured. The
person could not be located after a search.
January 23
Assault on a female � A student reported being assaulted by her
estranged husband in the General Classroom Building. Contact was made
with the offender in the Charles Ficklen Lot He was arrested and banned
from campus.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU
police reports.
Good grades get mixed reviews
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
Making a straight-A average
may seem virtually impossible for
many students, but last semester over
500 ECU students did just that. As a
result, these 556 students, were
named to the Chancellor's List.
The Registrar's Office said the
Chancellor's List recognizes students
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who made a 4.(1 average baseJ on 12
credit hours of courses and no
incompleted courses. Joy Holster, of-
fice manager of the ECU News Bu-
reau. 4.522 students comprised the
Chancellor's List, the Dean's List and
the Honor Roll
There were 95 out of loo
counties that were represented on
these lists, 39 states and Id foreign
countries Holster said. "The
Registrar's Office prepares the
Chancellor's List and sends it to the
News Bureau so we can send the
names to the various student's home-
town newspapers
Thomas Powell, director ot Ad-
missions said various scholarships
and awards are given to these top stu-
dents by the schools of their major,
such as the School of Business and
School of Medicine.
When asked if a straight-A av-
erage really makes a difference in the
hiring an job placement process, sev-
eral prominent companies in
Greenville had mixed responses.
Dan Eckerd. of the personnel
services office at Procter and Gamble
said he looks for a combination of
things when he interviews a person.
"Grades are important, but
there are four separate tests we give
nglit off. written, mathematical, pro-
cess and mechanical Eckerd said.
"The mechanical test is sometimes
one that females fail: however, if the
interview process goes well, we feel
we can work with a female who has
trouble in this field
Eckerd said people can do well
in grades and on tests, but the inter-
view itself plays a major role in the
person's overall appearance.
Wanda Barker, office manager
at Mel. iwhorn and Associates, said
Mr McLawhorn looks for a person
who has good grades, hut also has
good English and grammar skills.
"Good grades make a real dif-
ference with Mr. Mdawhom Barker
said. "Thai is one of the things he is
See GRADE page 4
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The sisters of Pi Delta invite you
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Mon Jan. 30 Mendenhall 5:30pm
Tues Jan. 31 Mendenhall Room 244 9:00am
For more information eall anytime at
758-9902 or 752-8724





!
Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian-
SIGN
from page 1
Last week a ceremony dedicated the
first street sign to mark the district Smith
said'These logos will appear on all the sheet
signs that are in the historic district" Smith
said
Tliat's a bad sign for some students
living in the area.
"When our lease runs up - our rent
goes up. so we're moving Matt Toth. a jun-
ior said "Sewn months after we moved in,
they expanded the historical district to in-
clude us. I think its ridculous that our rent
will be going up because we're in the histori-
cal district Nothing has changed except that
we have been put in the historical district -
its just a name
The city is encouraging homeowners
to impiove the appearance of homes in the
area. Future rei lovations or repairs will have
to be reviewed by the historic preservation
committee.
"There's a set of construction modi-
fication guidelines that deal with the exte-
rior of the buildings. If you own property in
the district or if vou upgrade, modify or re-
habilitate property, it must be in conform-
ance with the guidelines established by the
preservation commission and the city coun-
cil Smith said
Certain construction materials, and
regulated fence sizes are a few examples
Smith gave of the regulations.
"It's an asset to the city of Greenville
because it preserves a part of unique his-
tory Smith said "The housing section was
built about the same time as the teacher's
college, and your preserving those houses
that were from that period of construction
Houses are protected by the grand
father clause, but any future modifications
to the exterior of historic district homes must
first be approved.
Ti d jl A AAA JT AJA A
cpeasant s Caje
f Coming to Peasant's Every Wednesday .
I Night In February
Keller Williams
Thursday:
vmvws&v w yiifrw 1 smog�
AND A DRINK SPECIAL YOU WONT BELIEVE
IT'SMOE
IWO CURLY OR LARRYSORRY
Saturday
IvAIN Jv from page 1
publicity because it tends to be the
thing that UNC General Administra-
tion is always publishing to compare
schools Powell said. "Admissions di-
rectors all over the country will tell
you it is the least of the predictors
for success in college.
"High SATs do not necessarily
predict success. Low SATs do not at
all pedict failure. Class rank and aca-
demic average in high school are
much more important predictors
Over the last two years, enter-
ing freshmen have had the average
high school GPAs of 2.93 and 2.94.
"You might as well say, we're
bringing in students with 3.0 aver-
ages out of high school now Powell
said.
However, the university plans
to try to raise its SAT scores.
"We are always striving to im-
prove the SAT profile within reason
Powell said. "Being particularly in
the region of eastern North Carolina,
and East Carolina having a regional
service mission, we want to admit stu-
dents that are going to be success-
ful, but we a's' wart to keep in rind
"So, while balancing a lot of to build the very strongest class we
variables, we're always going to strive can possibly have
r
r
A
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Accident Friday, September 2nd.
Approximately 11:30 a.m.
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CALL Van Harrington 756-3551
THE STUDENT UNION POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE PRESENTS
AN EVENING WITH
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Mike Cross &
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JiuiKMf fiif Dinino
Let's Do Lunch!
If you're doing lunch, do it right at Sweetheart's. Every class day,
Sweetheart's features a tempting menu of salads and sandwiches for
every taste. From our freshly baked breads, to our signature sweets,
to our superior service, we go out of our way to make your lunch
something special.
Join us on Wednesdays for our Mid-Week Gala Buffet! It's a
sumptuous smorgasborg- an all-you-can-eat feast that includes
carved meats, hot entrees, fresh vegetables, and a special
soup-of-the-day!
Upcoming Mid-Week Gala Buffet Menus:
Wednesday, February 1
Succulent Roast Pork
Curry Roasted Chicken Quarters
Roasted Broccoli & Cauliflower
Herb Buttered Orzo
Wednesday, February 8
Roast BeefAu Jus
Southern Fried Chicken
Creamy Potatoes Au Gratin
Fresh Green Beans
Open to all students, faculty, staff, and guests of East Carolina
University every day classes are held Monday-Friday
11:30AM-2:00PM. Declining balance, cash and checks accepted.
Parking is alway available for all guests in the lot adjacent to Todd
Dining Hall accessible from 14th Street.
8:00 PM
Monday, February 20, 1995
Tickets are on sale at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University.
We accept MasterCard and Visa. For more information,
call 1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787) or 328-4788 (TDD - 328-4736),
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ECU STUDENT UNION HOTLINE 328-6004
A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL
BUY ONE ENTREE OR BUFFET AT REGULAR PRICE,
GET ONE FREE!
Juncinf flit Dime
Located on College Hill in Todd Dining Hall's private dining room.
Free entree must be of equal or lessor value. Offer expires 22895.
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Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
GRADE.
from page 2
3vfiV from page 1
� n in the uni
:our
. anu tasiman
nts with bility oi t ling the
� en if meetings with the execut
d student s
� id( nts � aged to join i tt es.
� � People in the past have said
. iund that student government doesn't do
. said 1 anything, but there's a lot of behind-
ght ' i scenes v i i; itdoesi I seem like
le who want I - real issues who
to d I're - busy with commil
tee work and just the basic process
Eastman said "We met with the
ittee comptroller and the cashier, it's go-
le a list ol 20 items ot what we ing to happen next spring - I'm so
wanted to look inl I excited about it
could d Eastman believes that i en
in is proud of the light student will be able to benefit from
plishments across campus a tuition payment plan,
and' m in his eye when dis- Eastman is also investigating
extended library hours and changing
. . ! want to tlie.studeMt fee increase.
"Through the helpol professor
mentAss tion can Kent Poff in the accounting depart-
tude - a way to ment, we sat down and crunched
ying tuition those numbers during exams
s. e
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Eastman said. "These numbers for
a fee increase, they just dun ; add
up, we realized that they can du ev-
erything they plan on doing without
a fee increase we did it every alter-
native way, and we can show them
alternative ways of doing things with-
out raising fees
Eastman plans to present his
findings to the hoard of trustees tor
further review.
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All films start ot 8:00 PM unless
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Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
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For More Information,
Call the Student Union Hotline
at 328-6004. o�r
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CASH PRIZES FOR TRIVIA GAMES $1.50
PITCHERS AND $2.00 TEAS All JVJTE
DOWNTOWN, GREENVILLE 758-4591





?-
Thursday, January 26,1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
So, you're on
the five-year
plan, and you
can't figure out
why. For that
matter, your
parents are in-
sisting you fig-
ure out why
before they
send off an-
other check.
We see several
obstacles, but it
certainly isn't
the good 'ol
downtown
nightlife
Why do so many of us find it so hard to leave Greenville
behind? It could be the nightlife, we suppose, or the fine
athletic facilities, or maybe even some perverse fascina-
tion with severe parking problems. Whatever the case, the
great majority of ECU students are taking five or more
years to graduate. And we're not alone.
Nationwide, only 31 percent of college students are
graduating in four years. We here at ECU lag significantly
behind at a mere 16.5 percent. That doesn't do much to
debunk our "party school" image. Maybe that's why legis-
lation is underway to charge students more for each year
after the fourth. So we ask again, why are so many of us
on the five-year plan?
Many reasons are cited for the delay, like the need to
work to pay ever-higher tuition, switching majors, and the
unavailability of classes. Students need better advisers.
More sections of key classes need to be made available.
Better information about possible majors needs to be given
to incoming freshmen to help them make more informed
choices earlier in their college careers.
But most of that is a pipe dream. Despite an increased
enrollment (more people are going to college today than at
any other point in American history) and higher tuition,
colleges and universities don't have the money to make
the needed changes. Most can't spare enough money from
their budgets to hire the new instructors needed to teach
additional classes. Advisers are professors who have to
worry about the "publish or perish" mentality too much
to concentrate on advising. And, of course, hiring people
just to advise seems to be beyond the budget, too.
The problem is not going away. To get out of college in
four years, students must be driven, single-minded, pushy
enough to bully their way into special classes that meet
their needs, or independently wealthy.
One thing is clear, however. With the problems the uni-
versity system faces, we don't need to be pushed out of
school earlier by threatened tuition hikes. That would only
put those who are already working to pay off school in a
worse position. It would also force even more people into
an already-overburdened work force. Maybe the five-year
plan isn't such a bad idea after all.
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
tmXSUSSSUMmmm
Printed or.
100
recycled
paper
� - '�
Stephanie B. LassHer, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion ti the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor.The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
One waitress speaks out
I think that people are essen-
tially good until they sit down to
eat at a restaurant. And then suddenly
thev turn into spoiled, sullen, demand-
ing children. What is it about going
out to eat that makes usually polite
and gracious human beings think that
it is okay to be rude, dismissive and,
let's face it, stingy?
Many college students wait
tables to help with their expenses
because of the flexible hours and the
ideally good money. Unfortunately,
the ideal is not always a reality. Mini-
mum wage for a server is $2,125 per
hour; half the standard minimum
wage. The government allows this on
the assumption that, with tips, serv-
ers will make well over the standard
minimum wage. Those of you who do
not believe in tipping well, or at all,
know that this is not necessarily true.
Unfortunately, ECU students
and faculty are some of the worst of-
fenders when it comes to behaving
badly and tipping worse. (Please not
that I said 'some' and not 'all because
there are, of course, exceptions.)
I realize this is all hard to un-
derstand if you have never worked in
a restaurant, so let me give you a typi-
cal lunch shift scenario: I walk up to
a table where two men and two
women who have that ECU-faculty
look about them are seated. 1 expect
the best and prepare for the worst
I am smiling, notepad in hand,
ready to greet my guests and take
their drink orders, but they are talk-
ing and talking and talking. Mean-
while, my cheekbones are getting stiff
from smiling. I decide to give them a
few moments to finish their conver-
sation, but the second I step back one
Andi Powell Phillips
Opinion columnist
I have a fantasy
about these
people I only
have to pay what
I think the class is
worth
of the men says, without looking up,
"Do you think we could get some
drinks here?"
Okay, so they are preoccupied
with their work. I will be as unobtru-
sive as possible. Before I can fade into
the background though, I have to fond
out what they want for lunch. Three
of them order quickly and distractedly,
never looking up, and then comes the
fourth. "I'll have the soup and it bet-
ter be hot because I will send it back
she says. "And I want the house salad
but leave off the carrots and onions
and add extra tomatoes and cucum-
bers. And I want Ranch and French
dressing on the side She fixes a cold,
hostile stare on me and says, "Did you
get that?" Oh, well. At least one of
them acknowledged my existence.
During the meal I am sent to
get, one at a time, a plate of lemons,
some extra napkins, more dressing, an
extra glass of ice, two kinds of steak
sauce and refill packets of Sweet-n-
Low. Finally, I distribute four separate
checks and get four $20 bills. 1 spend
10 minutes making change, and then
I am ignored when I wish the group a
good day.
After they leave, 1 go to clean
off the table for the next guests. Un-
derneath a soiled napkin I find my.
reward for an hour's hard work: a
dollar bill, two quartern, a dime and
four pennies.
I have a fantasy about these
people. I have them all as professors
one semester, but rather than paying
tuition ahead of time, I get to pay it!
afterward. And I only have to pay what
I think the class is worth. They all
did a good job, I learned a lot but I
just don't feel like paying full tuition.
So I leave them a little less than half
1 love that one.
So my point is this; try being
as nice inside a restaurant as you are
outside. Look around and see that the
people bringing you food are people.
Maybe she is a friend of one of your:
friends, or the sister of one of your
sorority sisters. Or maybe he is even
the friend of your son. Ask for any-
thing you want - that is what we are
there for - but do not invent things
for us to fetch just to make yourself
feel more powerful.
And please tip according to the
service you receive. It is customary to
tip 15 percent of the total bill, before
taxes, for good service. If you get bad
service, by all means leave a bad tip
or tell a manager. But if you get good
service, tip appropriately.
Now please excuse me while I
imagine that all the rude, condescend
ing college kids who are living off their
parents have to cut the family lawn
with dull fingernail clippers while-
wearing last year's fashions to earn"
their allowances.
Forget Gen X, say 'hf! The case of the century?
Students today are in a predica- mmmmmmminn mnmamammmpi ter our lives around? Is that going to mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
ment for which they must blame them- Ren Duran solve the problems brought on by our fc-fc-SSSSS Amm��w Htek-n. � . - �I for the o
Students today are in a predica
ment for which they must blame them-
selves. This generation, to which some
refer to as Generation X, is at a cross-
roads that is exemplified in the college
experience.
People are figuring things out
for themselves, learning about the his-
tory of our world and making choices
that will affect their lives. What I see is
a bunch of people more concerned with
what they don't believe in, rather than
looking for and fighting for ideals and
beliefs that they find sacred.
There has been a lot of talk
about our generation. Those hippies
who sold out and are now symbols of
the status quo like to call us whiners
and complainers. We've all heard the
accusations, and come to think of it,
they have a good point
Yes, we all know that past indi-
viduals and institutions have left the
abominable scars and legacies of ha-
tred and global mismanagement but
what are you going to do about it? If
you are like most people, the answer is
nothing.
But why have things gotten to
this point' Aren't there any concrete
en Duran
Opinion Columnist
Get over
yourselves and
start seeing
everyone else
causes and ideologies that this genera-
tion can embrace and call their own?
The answers must be found within our-
selves.
Few people will deny that the
environmental movement and the highly
participational recycling programs we
have implemented in our society are
doing a good job as reducing the
amount of waste that is dumped into
the ground.
The generation that is currently
teething cannot comprehend a world
without recycled paper and post-con-
sumer plastics. But is that good
enough? Do we want to be more effi-
cient consumers? Is that a goal to cen-
ter our lives around? Is that going to
solve the problems brought on by our
system?
Don't misunderstand me, treat-
ing the Earth well is wonderful. But who
can characterize our existence in this
reality of the winter of 1995 as harmo-
nious on any level?
Many people may say that I am
just complaining like all the others of
my generation, but I have some news
for them. There are concrete ideals and
philosophies that we as a generation and
a world can embrace and think of as a
supreme truth.
Look inside yourself, what is re-
ally good about you? When you do good
things, does it make you feel good?
When you hate, does it make your heart
heavy? Does it make you feel nervous
when you realize that you are a unique
human being? It shouldn't
We are all wonderful let's stop
hiding it. Let's make this place
Greenville a real community. Let's talk
in the streets, the coffee houses, dorms,
on campus and in the classroom. Let's
talk to each other, and I promise you
harmony will begin to reign. Just in time
for spring.
EL
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
This article is in response to
your article in Tuesday's (January 24)
edition of the East Carolinian,
"Student's sic Suspended As in
most articles about Greek life, this was
another negative portrayal of how bad
"Greeks" are. Whenever the word
pledge is brought up, people's natu-
ral thoughts are hazing. Being in a
fraternity myself, activities that
pledges engage in are often misinter-
preted by those who don't understand
the system.
The important thing to remem-
ber is that this is not 1950 when
pledges were required to do all of
these inhumane acts in order to show
his desire to be in a fraternity. Over
time, these acts have all but ceased
in our current system. It's time that
the misconceptions about fraternities
be cleared up. No fraternity under the
Inter-Fraternity Council hazes its
pledges. You are required to achieve
certain goals before you are granted
membership but physical pain and
forceful drinking are not part of these
goals. Joining a fraternity is the expe-
rience of a lifetime. The friends you
make in a fraternity will be with you
forever. The old saying, "Fraternity is
a word that means you buy your
friends is simply not true. Of course
you pay dues, but most clubs that have
a budget also require dues. Just be-
cause you pay tuition to ECU doesn't
mean you bought the friends you
made here does it?
Remember the old saying,
"Don't always believe what you here
sic or read See for yourself, you
have nothing to lose.
Sam Lanier
President. Lambda Chi Alpha
Treasu.er, Inter-Fraternity
Council
It was like switching from Shasta
to Beaujoulais. When "The Young and
the Restless" went off Tuesday, instead
of "The Bold and the Beautiful" fol-
lowed the opening arguments of the
OJ. Simpson trial. And not only was
the change from fictional histrionics
to factual courtroom drama oddly
seamless but mesmerizing; turning the
channel was no good and turning the
TV off wasunthinkable. For four
hours, the two prosecutors tore into
Orenthal James with displays, dia-
grams, photos and computer gadgets
galore, hammering their argument as
to why he is accused of murder. Watch-
ing Marcia Clark and Christopher
Darden explicate the history of
Simpson's second marriage and the
death of Nicole Brown was certainly
an education.
With the trial's beginning, an
assumption of seriousness and effort
lower over the proceedings could be
felt Now that the evidence has been
entered and the argument takes a more
organized and mature tone, the full
ramifications of the trial became clear.
The prosecution will be relentless be-
cause, ironically, they have more to lose
than OJ.
The California district attorney's
office has been hammered in highly-
publicized trials in the Nineties. First
the state couldn't convince a jury that
four police officers used excessive force
in apprehending Rodney King. Then
the state failed to secure the Menendez
brothers, conviction even after they
confessed to murdering their parents.
Two obvious cases blown even with
seemingly insurmountable evidence on
the side of the prosecution. Again, with
this trial, there is a virtual trail of blood
from the murder scene to OJs bed-
room. But when the videotape of
King's beating couldn't be relied upon,
how much confidence can be instilled
by something as "airtight" as DNA
tests? The state has the burden of proof
Gregory Dickens
Opinion columnist
as always, but how much more of a
burden is the ability of the defense to
pick apart such physical evidence?
And, speaking of evidence, if O J.
is found not guilty, then how can any-
one use year-old evidence to find the
real killer? And how can the police and
prosecution face the slings and arrows
of accusations of incompetence for tar-
geting Simpson if he is determined to
not be the killer.
How could a criminal be found
and tried after he's had so long to ei-
ther leave the area or cover his tracks.
And just how much can O J. get from
the state of California if he files a defa-
mation of character lawsuit which he
may have to do just to pay the legal
bills? By the by, just what life can he
claim if he's found not guilty? He 's
ruined as an individual with no hope
of putting any of this behind him.
But there exist other possible
consequences if the prosecution fails.
In this country, with such doubt in a
legal system that contends more with
restitution than justice, the conviction
of Simpson would serve to reclaim the
oft-ridiculed quote, and justice for
all Especially in California, where
money stretches over an amazingly
wide range of social and economic con-
ditions, for OJ. to appear to buy his
freedom by hiring a crack legal team
to find loopholes would underscore the
pessimism that the law will blink in the
presence of money or status. With the
absence of a death penalty in Califor-
nia, he'll be sharing cell space and head-
lines with Charles Manson well into his
twilight years.
He's going to be an example
both of the sincerity of the law to pros-
ecute criminals but to punish them as
well. Not even Judge Ito can escape
that. He'll be pressured to giving
Simpson the most allowed for the of
fense-which is life, although the possK
bility of parole exists (Manson goes
before the board every year).
With the publicity this case has;
given domestic violence, can Simpson;
who got off so easy for his earlier ar"
rests fro assaulting Brown, be allowed
to get away with murder, as many feel
he might? What would that do the
publicity of domestic violence? And
would more people in such relation-
ships be tempted to kill their abuse
or the abused because OJ. could get
out from under the charge?
But also Simpson's conviction
due to such strong evidence would si-
lence those who wish to believe he's
being targeted because he's black,
which is bull. There's been a murder
and Simpson is a suspect because he
had threatened the deceased often and
had been arrested for it And if he didn't
kill them, the coincidence of blood and,
items found in his home is staggering:
He hasn't been an angel in the mar:
riage and he must be considered the
prime suspect when his ex-wife is killed.
Simpson may be not guilty, but he ain't
innocent
I don't want to think a man may
be jailed or treated so for a crime he
didn't commit and that plays into why
I believe the prosecution must win. 1
want to think that a man who has gone
through all this deserves it But also
there is all that evidence against him.
If he walks, who can we say is obvi-
ously guilty anymore? How can we
convict people on less evidence, which
is being done every day?
And in a society where the
guilty do get out of punishment on
technicalities and lack of prison space,
I don't want to feel less confident of
leaving my home knowing that as this
trial underscores, more and more, it's
getting harder to know who the bad
guys and the good guys are.
-fa
I �� �'�"





Thursday, January 26,1995 The East Carolinian
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ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR
House at 206 A East 12th St. Rent
$450 month. 2BR House at 206-B
East 12th St Rent $295 month. Also,
2BR Apartment at 810 Cotanche,
Rent $325 month Call 757-3191.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example of Frank Lloyd Wright archi-
tecture. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large dining room, kitchen and living
room with fireplace. New refrigerator,
washerdryer, fenced backyard, nice
shrubbery. Convenient to campus and
hospital. $750.00mo. deposit. 524-
5790 day - 752-8079 night
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two and
one Bedrooms(s) Apartments at
Wesley Commons For Rent. Free
Cable. Call 758-1921.
STUDIOUS AND SOCIAL female
roommate to live in 3BR, 2Bath apt
in Tar River. 13 utilities and phone,
$208month. Call Tonya 752-5525.
APARTMENT FOR RENT Spacious
2 Bedroom 1 Bath stove, Frig. - 2 Bed-
room 2 Bath, stove, Frig Dishwasher,
Garbage Dispol, Washer, Dryer, Wa-
ter, Sewer, Basic Cable included 2
Blocks from Campus. Dogwood Hol-
low Apts. Call 752-8900
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a 3-bedroom newly renovated
house. Close to campus and down-
town. Non-smoking upperclassman or
grad student preferred. Give us a call.
Chris or Claudia 758-5024.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group
together early. Two relatively new
houses; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; Avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
7 - $1500.00 per month: sleeps 8-9 -
$2100.00 per month (804) 850-1532
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed im-
mediately to share two bedroom
apartment on 10th street. Rent $195,
12 utilities and phone. Looking for
someone dependable, but likes to have
fun. Call 830-2055 for more informa-
tion.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom apartment dose to campus.
Rent $170 a month plus 12 utilities.
Call 757-1496 and leave message.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: 2Br
Duples, close to campus good size
bedroom, fully furnished, free cable.
190 util. Move in Feb. 1st 752-9392
ROOMMATE NEEDED share 2-Br,
$192mo, water mcl. Call 757-1317
34 mile from campus. Reedy Branch
Apts.
NeeJCASHnT
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For Sale
IBM COMPATIBLE COMPUTER
color monitor, color capable printer.
and MORE. Perfect for computer illit-
erate! $400 or best offer. Call Mary
758-3426
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM excellent
condition $500 or best offer Call Tom
at 752-9356
RALEIGH 531 series 12 speed
roadbike for sale with excellent
acessories - Look pedals, Aero bars,
and cyclemeter. Excellent condition.
Asking $350.00 obo.
Call David 328-7188
HAWAIIAN ISLAND CREATIONS
SURFBOARD and Wetsuit! It's 6 ft
and has excellent manuverability. Will
sacrifice both for a mere 200 bucks.
Call 756-3901.
1985 FORD BRONCO II, XLS 4 w
d, air conditioning, power steering and
brakes. Newer tires and brakes. Please
call 758-8521
FOR SALE: Super Single Waterbed
with bookshelf, headboard, and 12
drawers. Excellent condition. New
comforter and waterbed sheets in-
cluded. Must sell immediately!
.$150.00 Call 757-3704
IBM GAMES, 5 14 drive with extra
software. Call Kevin 830-8970
LOFT FOR SALE. Call 757-1496 and
leave message.
SAXOPHONE (Bundy). Good Condi-
tion. Few scratches. Must Sell.
$400.00neg. Call BJ. at 758-5906.
(Leave message)
WOMEN SKIIS FOR SALE. Excel
lent Condition. $300. Dial 756-6061.
Leave message.
FOR SALE: Ladies ski equipment
Boots, Ski's, and poles. Excellent
cond. Tuned & ready for slopes! $225
OBO - 757-3695 Lve. message.
FOR SALE: Men's 26 inch Ten Speed
Bicycle, $35.00. Call 756-7856 any-
time.
SNOW BOARD "91" BURTON M-6
$150, and Serengeti Mt Shasta Mnt
Bike 150 or obi. Call Ken 752-6848
Leave message.
f4 Services Offered
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of information in U.S. - I
all subjects
Prde' Cawioj ToOy v. si ri MC or COD
800-351-0222
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Bil-
lion in private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, in
come, or parent's income. Let us help.
Call Student Financial Services: 1-800-
263-6495 ext. F53623
TUTORING - IMPROVE YOUR EN-
GLISH! Experienced teacher can tu-
tor you in conversation, writing and
TOEFL. Will edit papers also. Call
Pam at 758-6952.
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP!
Mobile Music Production is the pre-
mier Disc Jockey service for your cock-
tail, social, and formal needs. The most
variety and experience of any Disc
Jockey service in the area. Specializ-
ing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates book-
ing fast Call early, 758-4644 ask for
Lee.
PIANO LESSONS OFFERED Stop
making excuses and call Kevin today
for affordable piano lessons for begin-
ning or intermediate pianists. 758-
2479
FRENCH TUTORING - I am a
French exchange student and can tu-
tor you in conversation or writing.
Don't hesitate to call me at 328-8159
and ask for Benjamin.
t Help Wanted
EARN $500 or more weekly stuffing
envelopes a,t home. Send long SASE
to: Country Living Shoppers, Dept.
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ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, We'll pay you to!
Make your A's pay by calling Student
Supplements today. We'll pay you cash
for going to class! Give us a call at
752-HELP
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! Spaiefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH Self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
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Youngmen's appaarel. Flexible sched-
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weekends. Applications accepted Mon-
day and Thurday, l-3pm, Btody's. The
Plaza.
SITTING OUT THIS SEMESTER or
have plenty of free time during the
day? Brady's is accepting applications
for Receiving Room Associates. Verify
incoming freightprice merchandise.
Some lifting required. Excellent hours.
Applications accepted Monday and
Thursday. l-3pm. Brady's, The Plaza.
ECU ROPESCHALLENGE course
facilitators needed. Flexible schedules,
excellent pay. Interested persons call
328-6064.
WANTED: Photographers to free
lance for the School of Business. We
need photos for 3 to 6 events during
the semester. Call Professional Pro-
grams at 328-6377.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home
mailing our circulars. Free details,
Send SASE: R&B Distributors, Box
20354, Greenville NC 27858
WANTED MATH MAJOR OR GRAD
STUDENT to come to my home
(close to campus) every Mon. & Wed.
night to tutor me through Math 1065.
$20 per week. Call 752-5705 and leave
message.
WANTED: ORIGINAL ARTWORK
for T-Shirt Design. Call Les @ 752-
6953 between 8-5
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$129! Walk to Best Bars! Includes
Free Discount Card Which Will Save
You $100 on Food'Drinks! 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
beach Florida, from $91 per person
per week Free Info 1-800-488-8828
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring
Break - Hovv about it in the Bahamas
or Florida Keys. Where the Party
never ends. Spend it on your own pri-
vate yacht. One week only $385.00 per
person. Including ford and muih
more. Organizers may go for free! Easy
Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-783-
4001.
CAMPUS REP
. WANTED
The nation's leader in college marketing
is seeking an energetic, entrepreneurial
student tor the position ot campus rep.
No sales involved. Place advertising on
bulletin boards lor companies such as
American Express and Microsoft.
Great part-time job earnings. Choose
your own hours; 4-6 hours per week
required. Call:
Campus Rep Program
American Passage Media Corp.
215 W. Harrison, Seattle. WA 98119
(800)487-2434 Ext 4444
��
Personals


AS SEE IAST APRIL ON CBS NEWS "41 HiUHV
BREAK
DRIVE VotiBSEir & $AVE
HELP! Need ride to and from Cherry
Point Will Split gas. Call Sooz at 756-
9819. Leave message.
4i Greek Personals
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA wants to Con-
gratulate all of the fraternities on
another great rush.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
Delta Chi Associate Members.
CINDY BELL - Thank you for such
an Awesome job with Founders Day!
It was greatly appreciated. Love, your
Gamma Sig Sisters.
LYNDA MCCORMICK Way to go
with the good job with rush! Thank
You! Love, your Gamma Sig Sisters.
ZETA TAU ALPHA - You all had it
going on in your PJ's Saturday. We
had a lot of fun. Delta Chi
ALPHA PHI: Thanks for all of your
help during rush. Delta Chi
KAPPA SIG: Thanks so much for the
social Saturday night. We'll have to
do it again sometime! Love, Delta Zeta

o3i
-822E
Or. rush SC C3 !0 Research Intormation
?lflano ve 2Q� A jjApje'es CA9CB25.
I
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
CASH
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
Student SwAr Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000- $6,000 per month. Room
and board! Transportation! Male or
Female. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 545-4155 ext A53622
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1,000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a licensed agency.
Must be 18, dependable and hae own
phone and transportation. Call Dia-
monds or Emerald City Escorts at
758-0896 or 757-3477
TELEMARKETING-Davenport Exte-
riors Thermal Card- $5 per hour plus
bonus. Easy work, flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210
BASEBALL UMPIRES NEEDED
Anyone interested in umpiring youth
baseball games (ages 9-18) for the
Spring and Summer should contact
the Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department Athletic Office Immedi-
ately! 15-20 Umpires needed. Pay $15-
$20 per game. For more information
please call the Athletic Office at 830-
4550 after 2pm.
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Clean, High volume Adult Club needs
YOU now. Confidential employment
Daily pay Top Commissions. Some to
no experience. If you've called before
call again. Playmates Massage Snow
Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call Toll
Free 1-800-467-5566. Ext. 5920
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required.
Begin now. For info call 202-298-8952.
POOL MANAGERS (Aquatic Direc-
tors, Head Guards, Assistant Head
Guards). SpSum 95. GteenvilePitt
County, Goldsboro, Kinston, Tarboro.
Call Bob, 758-1088.
WEBBSmSESSS
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
�iU'l'Mil
STEAMBOAT
PfH f�WN KPtHD'HC ON PfSltNAT'ON ' BWM OATB ' IfKGTH Of SHY
1-800-SiJNClUS
SUMMER POSITION AVAILABLE:
gain career experience and save
$4000.00 . Please call 18002514000
ext. 1576. Leave name, school now-
attending and phone number.
SUMMER JOBS, Earn 3 hows col-
lege credit Save $4-5000. Call 1-800-
251-400 Ext. 1576
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time
youth soccer coaches for the spring
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm with
some night and weekend coaching.
This program will run from the first
of March to the first of May. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
WANTED: part-time sales and stock
person needed. Heavy lifting required.
Apply at the Youth Shop Boutique.
Arlington Village.
BAHAMAS
Spring Break Party
CRUISE
$279!
0 DAYS-12 MEALS-ALL TAXES
1-800-678-8380
IT'S BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS!
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
U M K N W ANI SAVI
JAMAICA Mil CANCUWBAHAMAS tltt
PANAMA CITY tilt. D�I ON tltt
OROANZE GROUPS, EARN CASH. A TRAVEL FREE.
ENDLESS SUMMERI
1-800-234-7007
On-C'ampus Contact;
Angel @ 328-9961
Stephanie @ 758-8479
Cancun
Jamaica
Florida
from (JJODx
from 4J
from $1Z
TRAVEL
SIRVICM
120N uanSt iPnca NYunw
Id � i KXbiR4AdO
1-07-27;f.9M, fen l.i"7-72.3
Rate Bra p�' pa'aon qu�d occupant fc tn"ipc"i'w wt Mif� i
M0 t43�J�piTu'ir taiai to- Ja.ma.ea and Cancun Sat w peF�
combat 1aTTW and condition
ELISSA EARL. Congratulations on
your Sigma Phi Epsilon Lavalier! Love
your Sigma Sisters.
GO SIGMA BASKETBALL
ALPHA PHI we had a great time
Saturday night. Hope you had as
much fun as we did; "Oh What a
Night Thanks Sigma Alpha Epsilon
ALPHA PHI would like to thank all
old exec, on a job well done and
congrats to the new exec: PresNan
Patterson, VP-Katy McNiff, Tres
Kristin Shiavone, Frat Ed-Pam Miller,
Rush Kathy Molnar, House Mgr-Olivia
Plymale. Chapter Prom-Tristan Lee,
Social Chair-Jessica Gibson, Pan. del-
Wendi Hill, Scholarship-Stacey
Klatsky. Phil-Kim Hile, Rec. Sec-Jen-
nifer Hemink. Corr. Sec-Amanda Baer,
Adm. Asst-Melissa Godwin,
lntramurals-Jonni Wainwright. Activ
Michelle Whitehurst
PI KAPPA PHI: Alpha Phi would like
to thank the brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
for the "firery" social. Hope we can
do it again soon. Love, the sisters of
Alpha Phi!
THETA CHI: Theta Chi Bidnight, Oh
what a sight! The dare that we popped
really did us right! From switching
clothes to a kiss on the cheek, you
guys really know how to end up a
week. Congrats on your new pledge
class! Hope to see you soon! Love the
Sisters of Alpha Phi.
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON: With
Flannel Boxers and silk Lingerie Al-
pha Phi and Sigma Alpha Epsilon
were definitely ready to play. With 80's
music blaring the night was not bland,
because Betsy Finally learned how to
take a stand. Can't wait to rock on
again. Love. Alpha Phi
ALPHA PHI Congrats. Monica on
your engagement and to Julies and
Sherrill on your lavaliers. Love the
Sisters of Alpha Phi
m
Secretary Recptlonist
to work 9-1 or 1-5 M-F.
Student ActivitiesMarketing,
rm 210 MSC. Must have
wordperfect skills, IBMMAC
call 328-4711
sprinG Break 95
America's 1 Spring Break Company!
Cancun, Bahamas, or Florida!
110 Lowest Price Guarantee! Organize 15 friends and
TRAVEL FREE! Call for our finalized 1995 Party Schedules
(800) 95-BREAK
�IMHIiail I HJMPLIP
�t i��ii.j
UWI8 jP�





m i�
,� Greek Personals continued from page 6
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: Last Friday
night we had a blast I guess that
stuff in the trash can was a little more
potent than we all thought The Sis-
ters of Delta Zeta.
DELTA CHI - Thanks for the PJ in
our PJ's! Congrats to Jen and Lora
on the best jammies. It was a blast
guys - let's do it again. By the way,
what's the name of the game? Love,
Zeta.
TO THE PLEDGES OF ALPHA XI
DELTA: your doing a great job! We're
proud of you. Not too much longer!
Love the Sisters.
S1G EP - Thanks for the great bid
party Sat. nite. What was really in the
punch?! Love the Sisters and pledges
of Alpha Xi Delta
PIKA - Had a blast at your bid party.
Good Luck with you new pledges.
Can;t wait to do it again soon! Love
Alpha Xi Delta
ATTENTION ALL GIRLS INTER-
ESTED IN SORORITY LIFE: Phi
Delta Social Sorority invites you to
Spring Rush Jan. 30, at Mendenhall
at 5:30 p.m. and Jan.31, at Mendenhall
Room 244 at 9:00 p.m. For more in-
formation call us anytime at 758-9902
or 752-8724.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
Zeta Pledge class of Pi Lambda Phi:
Brian Aulabaugh. Robert Bean, Eric
Berisford, Michael Fritts. and Rex
Ryan Lawrence
THANK YOU Alph Delta Pi Sisters
and Mamma Lee for the use of your
house during rush. Hope to get to-
gether soon. Pi Lambda Phi
The ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee Presents
ILLUMINA'95
January 31 - February 23, 1995
Mendenhall Gallery
Call for Entries
Friday, January 27, 1995
1:00-8:00 PM
Mendenhall" 242
$3.00 Fee Per Entry - Limit 3'Entries Per Person
Categories: Painting, Sculpture, Drawing, Ceramics,
Textiles, Commercial Art, Foundations, Printmaking, Metals
Cash Prizes Totaling $1,050 to be Awarded
Reception
Thursday, February 16, 1995
7:00-9:00 PM
Mendenhall Gallery
Registration Packets Available at
Mendenhall information Desk and Gray Gallery
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
V Q
Thursday, January 26, 1995 The East Carolinian
ANNO
SPECIAL OLYMPICS COACHES
NEEDED
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics will be conducting a Track
& Field Coaches Training School on
Sat Feb. 4 from 9 am - 3:30pm for all
persons interested in becoming a cer-
tified volunteer track coach. We also
need coaches for the following
Sports: equestrian, bowling,
powerlifting, volleyball, softball,
swimming, rollerskating & gymnas-
tics. NO EXPERIENCE IS NECES-
SARY. For more information, contact
Connie or Dwain at 830-4541 or 830-
4551.
SOCIAL WORKCRIMINAL
JUSTICE
Nov. 1994 - Jan 1995 Qualified Ap-
plicants: Qualified Applicants for the
S.W. and C.J. majors are reminded to
attend an Admissions Group meet-
ing in Rawl 130 on Wednesday, Feb-
ruary 1, 1995 at 5:00pm Qualified
applicants must attend the meeting.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Do you have 2 hours a week to shar e
with a child ages 5-11 or an adoles-
cent in 9th grade? If so become a part
of East Carolina Friends. Our inter-
est meetings are Jan 31 - Feb 2(only
attend one) 5 in Mendenhal (Room
TBA). All Guys and Girls welcome.
NATURAL LIFE CLUB
The Natural Life Club is hosting a
"Mystery Trip" on February 4th
leaving from the front of
Christenbury at 4:30pm. You won't
know where you are going, but we
promise you will have a great time.
Space is limited 50 reserve a spot
with $2 before February 2nd in
Christenbury 204.
I SEXUAL ABUSE SURVIVORS
WORKSHOP
This three-session workshop for fe-
male survivors will focus on psycho-
logical and emotional issues associ-
ated with childhood incest andor
sexual abuse. Family be. aviors,
rules, and individual roles will be
identified; with particular attention
to how these affect current person-
ality styles and relationships.
Wednesdays, 3:30pm-5 pm. Begin-
ning 21. Counseling Center. Call
328-6661 to register.
LISTENING TO YOUR BODY
Stress effects you phsically as well
as emotionally. Discover how the
use of biofeedback is used to pin-
point your stressors and sid in re-
laxation. 1 30,3:30pm-5 pm. Coun-
seling Center. Call 328-6661 to reg-
ister.
PIRATE DOUBLE DARE
Recreational Services will host the
3rd Annual Double Dare Gef Nasty
Competition Thursday, January 26 at
6:15pm in Christenbury Gym. Reg-
ister your 4 person team today in 204
Christenbury Gym. Great prizes, it's
free, and fun! Sign up now. It only
lasts an hour. Call Rec Services at 328-
6387 for details.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
"For planning purposes, a survey is
being taken of the number of stu-
dents who would definitely have
majored in Religious Studies if such
a major had been offered. If such a
major is ever offered, it will be sev-
eral years from now, so this data is
being collected purely for planning
purposes. If you would have major ed
in Religious Studies if such a major
had been offered during your years
here, call 328-6121 and leave your
name and a message for Calvin Mer -
cer or drop your name in campus
mail to Calvin Mercer, Brewster
A404
ECU LACROSSE
Anyone interested in playing
LaCrosse this Spring, please contact
Brian Trail at 758-1348. Please leave
your name and number.
TRI-BETA
Tri-Beta is sponsoring a bloodmobile
through the American Red Cross on
Friday, January 27th at Mendenhall
from 12 noon to 6 p.m. Our goal is
to collect 175 pints of blood. Due to
low donations and inventories, it is
imperative that we meet this goal.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION (AMA)
Start your semester fresh by coming
to AMA meeting on January 26 at
3:30 pm in GC. Our speaker is going
to be Docor Wheatley and he will be
talking about how to market your-
self. Pizza and refreshments will be
served plus you will have an oppor -
tunity to win a free T-shirt.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services office will hold
orientation meetings for seniors and
graduate students graduating in
MaySummer 1995 on the following
dates: Jan.26at2 p.m and Wed. Feb.
1 at 4 p.m. The progTam will include
an overview of services available to
help prospective graduates find em-
ployment, as well as procedures for
registering with Career Services. Stu-
dents will also receive instructions on
establishing a credentials file and
how to participate in employment in-
terviews on campus. Inter esrested
students are asked to meet at the new
Career Services Center, 701 E. Fifth
Street.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
THURS Jan. 26�Junior Reel, Helen
Pridgen-Gomez, voice, and William
Tynch, saxophone (A.J. Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7 p.m free). FRI Jan.
27�Guest Recital, Wilma Jensen, or- ,
ganist (First Presbyterian Church,
Kinston, NC, 8 p.mfree). SAT
Jan.28�Choral Materclass presented
by Wilma Jensen, guest organist (A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 10 a.m. - 12p.m I
free). Scholarship Benefit Gala of
the Friends of the School of Music,
(For further information, call 328-
6851). Mon Jan. 30�ECU Com-
poser Showcase, Carroll V. Dashiell,
Jr string brass; Brad Foley, saxo-
phone; Mark Ford, percussion; John
B. O'Brien, piano; Bitton Theurer,
trumpet; Christopher Ulffers, bas-
soon; and Nathan Williams, clarinet '
(A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 p.m
tree). For additional information, call
ECU-6851 or the 24-hour hotline at
ECU-4370. ;
WOMEN'S STUDIES ALLIANCE
Women's Studies Alliance advocates
political, social and economic
equality for women and men. Come
join us on Wednesday, February 1 at '
4 pm GCB 2004. For more '
information, ask for Christine at 328-
6268 or 830-2062.
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
CLUB
Attention All Education Majors:
There will be an Elementary Ed. Club
meeting on February 1st at 4:30 in
Speight 129. We will be taking orders
for T-shirts and will also have a
speaker from the Co-op office. She
will give out infromarion for wonder -
ful summer employment opportuni-
ties for Education Majors. Don't miss
it!
LEARNED OPTIMISM-BEATING
THE COLLEGE BLUES
This ten-session workshop will teach
you strategies for overcoming the
mild depression experienced by
many college students. Mondays,
3:30pm-5 pm. Counseling Center.
Call 328-66&1 for information.
ANGER MANAGEMENT
SUPPORT GROUP
This five-session workshop will
teach you how to deal with anger in
a healthy, non-violent way. Learn
skills to improve your interpersonal
relationships. Thursdays, 2 pm-
3:30pm, beginning 22 Counseling
Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
INTERVIEW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate students com-
pleting their degree in May or the
summer are invited to attend an in-
terview skills workshop on Mon. Jan.
30 at 4 . Sponsored by Career Ser-
vices, the workshops will be held at
he new address of Career Services,
701 E. Fifth Street. No pre-registra-
tion is required.
YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT1
The Student Food Service Advisory
committee will hold its first meeting
of the semester on Thursday January
26 at 4 pm in Mendenhall Student
Center Room 248. All students are in-
vited to come and share their ideas
and concerns with Campus Dining
Services Management and find out
what the future of dining on campus
will be like. Refreshments will e pr o-
vided.
TONIGHT!
Sports �
Pad
Sports Pad
EVERY THURSDAY
BLOCK PARTY
FREE COVER TILL 9PM
New Drink Specials!
Splash & Sharkys

Sports Bar
Mon Night! Splash Open Mic. Night
Live acoustic performances
Hosted by Travis Proctor. The Stage is Yours!
Sound system provided
Sharky's
Splash
Thurs.
Scott Mueller
Fri.
Victor Hudson
Sat.
Victor Hudson

j





BY GREGORY DICKENS
'CAust JHATS one
THING I DON'T SF�.
THE BLOOD OF THE LAMB
BY CHAISSON AND BRETT if pjSS Coufo f
BY PAUL HAGWOOD
SPARE TIME 04�tfcitS
BY ANDY FARKAS MOPPETS
BY DAVID HISLE
tfwacsnnul "
II Jlljli "JUTO'lu II-1IL JIII "ilL" u�





Thursday, January 26,1995
The East Carolinian
LIFE a
Plan on a long stay
Jubilee Singers
More and more
college students
are opting for the
five-year plan
Brandon Waddell
Staff Writer
Remember standing in line
for three or four hours outside of
Spilman to pay fees a couple of
weeks ago? How about the time
spent figuring out the perfect
schedule - maybe one night class,
but none starting before 11 a.m. -
only to find out that all those sec-
tions are closed out and you're
stuck with all morning classes any-
way? Or having to skip one or two
classes so you could meet with your
advisor to have him sign your reg-
istration form? If you're like most
ECU students, one thing has
crossed your mind: If this keeps up,
I'll never graduate in four years.
This is the situation for most
of the undergraduate student body.
Case in point: Last week, while
walking from downtown, I looked
into the window at UBE and saw a
T-shirt for sale that read, "East
Carolina University- Five or Six of
the Best Years of Your Life Some
might call that profiting from some-
one else's misery, but in many cases
it's all too true. �
According to statistics pro-
vided by ECU's Planning and Insti-
tutional Research, 16.5 percent of
freshmen (with no other college
hours) who entered ECU in 1990
graduated in 1994. But after f've
years, the graduation rate jumps to
41.1 percent. Applicable 1991-92 '
graduates cited 14 reasons for the
hold up; among those, 23.4 percent
changed majors, 15.9 percent had
to work while enrolled and 9.1 per-
cent repeated courses.
With the rising costs of a col-
lege education, working while en-
rolled in school full time is a major
concern for students today. The
U.S. Department of Education re-
ported that 66 percent of the 14
million students enrolled in college
during the fall of 1992 were taking
more than 12 semester hours. Of
that 66 percent, 60 percent were
also working full time.
Paul B. Kennedy, a 1994
graduate in Hospitality Manage-
ment stated several reasons for his
extended stay at ECU. These in-
cluded a change of major, difficulty
getting classes to improve his GPA
and poor academic advising. These
follow the norm for most ECU stu-
dents.
Another person in Greenville
who has been on an extended visit
to ECU is Troy Plavec. Troy gradu-
ated from high school in June of
1988 and has been here since the
fall of that year. However, with hu-
mility Troy confessed, "I needed to
mature and grow up. When I first
started going to school here, no one
downtown enforced the drinking
age. I'm not going to blame it on
downtown, but I was 18 years old
and faced with the choice between
staying home and studying or go-
ing downtown, drinking and meet-
ing women; I chose the latter
Another interviewed student,
who asked to remain anonymous,
blamed her academic struggles on
lack of advising. She stated, "I
couldn't even find my new advisor,
so just for kicks I signed my own
name to my registration form. Not
only did the registrar miss it, she
gave me all the classes I wrote on
the form including one with special
permission
The plain, simple truth is
graduating from college in four
years is becoming a rarer and rarer
occurrence. Legislators not only in
North Carolina, but also in Califor-
nia and Washington are consider-
ing legislation that would charge
students extra who take more than
four years to graduate.
On the other side of the coin,
one California state university has
a money back guarantee. Incoming
freshmen can choose to enter into
a program that guarantees a degree
in four years or your money back.
At California State University-
Dominguez Hills, the program in-
cludes priority registration for ev-
ery semester and on-campus hous-
ing for those who want to stay on
campus. If the student maintains
satisfactory progress, the university
guarantees four-year graduation or
their money back.
Speculation abounds as to
why students are not graduating in
four years. But the majority of stu-
dents who have taken more than
four years to graduate either
change majors, work while in
school andor repeat courses. At-
tempts are being made to change
this pattern, but they're making
little headway. Soon the five-year
plan may become the norm.
Photo Courtesy of ECU PERFORMING AR TS
The Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers have become famous world-wide, focussing attention
on Afro-American folk music. They will bring their performance of spirituals, gospel, jazz
and contemporary rhythm and blues to Wright Auditorium on Feb. 10. Ticket information
is available through the Central Ticket Office at 328-4788.
ECU helps kids
get Arts Smart
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
waaaawai
The children of Pitt County
have found a fairy godmother. And
although "Bibbity Bobbity Boo
isn't in her vocabulary, the results
are the same - magic.
This fairy godmother isn't
one person, but rather a group of
people who believe that all children
deserve the opportunity to experi-
ence the performing arts in person.
The group, under the direction of
Carol Woodruff, has created the
ECU Arts Smart performing arts se-
ries to make sure that the children
of Pitt County do have the oppor-
tunity.
The Arts Smart series is
unique in a number of ways. Most
importantly, the Arts Smart series
holds two very special perfor-
mances of each show, in addition
to one show open to the public.
These two special performances are
held on Fridays at 9 a.m. and 11
a.m. and are open to Pitt County
schools. Tickets are available to the
schools at a reduced rate and ECU
even helps pay transportation ex-
penses.
Another thing that makes the
ECU Arts Smart series special is
See ARTS page 12
Store owners discuss Quicksilvermemories
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
"When people think of
Greenville they think 'bar town
but there is more to this town than
just bars said Tom Ives owner of
Quicksilver records. Tom and his
wife Rebecca both own and oper-
ate the downtown record store.
They first came to Greenville from
Jacksonville into 1981, and Rebecca
attended the ECU School of Art.
Upon arrival, Tom realized that
there were not any stores selling
used CDs in Greenville, so he de-
cided to open one up. Ever since,
Quicksilver has been one of
Greenville's most notable retail
stores.
Tom and Rebecca show their
love for their jobs in their enthusi-
asm about the store and its features.
Quicksilver sells new and used CDs
along with records, stickers, posters
and lots of reading material.
Rebecca, who used to run
Eponymous Books, was disap-
pointed when she had to close down
due to lack of business. "Eponymous
sold alternative and rare literature
that was not sold anywhere else
around here. Since everyone claims
to be alternative, 1 figured the store
would do wonderfully; however, it
seems that reading into the lifestyle
and the views of others was too
much trouble. They would rather
just wear the clothes and have the
'look Since the book store closed
down, it has temporarily moved into
the back of Quicksilver Yet when
the last of the stock is sold, they
are not planning to reorder any more
literature. Rebecca hopes that in the
future she might reopen Eponymous
because of her love for the books.
In November, Tom and
Rebecca opened another Quicksilver
store in Jacksonville, because there
were no stores there that sold used
compact discs. Although the store
is doing great, they regret that they
are not spending enough time with
the store in Greenville. Right now
they are trying to get the other store
settled before they start to concen-
trate on new ideas. This summer
Quicksilver is going to try to re-
model and renovate. By next fall,
everything will be back to speed.
Tom has been in Greenville
for many years, and he knows a lot
about this town. "I see Greenville
as two separate entities. One is the
students who live here, and the
other is the people who live in the
community. The people of the com-
munity don't want to come down-
town because they feel they are not
allowed to. What I want to see is
more intermingling between the
community and the university.
Since this town has a reputation of
a bar town everyone only comes
downtown at night, but there is
more to do during the day, and I
would like to see more people com-
ing out and using their downtown
area
This is a college town, and be-
cause of this, there are a lot of dif-
ferent people that grace Greenville
with their presence. Playing on that
idea, Tom and Rebecca hope to
open a few minds and let the ones
with little experience have the op-
portunity to learn and live life for
themselves.
Join the natural nightlife Igf c-P-Reviews
Natural life I �
;�A
Smoking a pack of cigarettes a day if you're a woman may
take 800 days off your life, 2,250 if you're a man. S$��B
-VEGETARIAN TIMES -��
This message has been brought to you by Recreational Services and Housing Services.
�NATURAL"
RECREATIONAL
What could be
more natural than
a natural life?
Angela Bauman
ECU Recreational Services
Recreational Services, in co-
operation with ECU Housing Ser-
vices and Campus Dining Services,
has created a program that many
students at East Carolina have been
actively attending without realizing
the true meaning of the theme that
surrounds each event. Last year,
the Natural Life pilot program be-
gan with a special event offered by
Recreational Services each month.
Natural Life was selected as the
name for this series of unusually
fun activities because of the pur-
pose of each event - to provide non-
alcoholic social events on tradi-
tional "party nights" for ECU stu-
dents - a natural alternative. Pro-
gram coordinators were ecstatic
with the student response. From
pool parties with "dive-in" movies
to western cook-outs and Super
Bowl parties, the Natural Life pro-
gram has found a home at ECU.
This year's student response
has been even greater. The series
started out with Cliffhanger at the
Tower. This event was highlighted
by free climbing on ECU's Climb-
ing Tower, a free cookout and the
viewing of the movie Cliffhanger
on the Tower after dark. Although
very cool temperatures hindered
movie attendance, the tower was
packed with students new to the
climbing scene. Next, event coordi-
nators expanded last year's bingo
party with a Jimmy Buffett theme.
Jimmy Buffett Bingo was a huge
success as over 100 participants
played 18 games of chance for
prizes donated by area businesses.
As with each Natural Life event.
Campus Dining provided free food
for participants. As a sideline to the
fun, each player was asked to bring
a canned good for the Greenville
Homeless Shelter.
See LIFE page 11
Various Artists
Hodge! Podgel
And Barrage! From
Japan
��������
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
This disc is utterly insane. Fea-
turing punk, ska, surf guitar and
rockabilly. Hodge! Podge! And Bar-
rage! From Japan is a compilation
of Japanese and American bands
from a fast-growing musical sub-cul-
ture. High energy is the order of the
day here; it crackles through every
track and then spills over to the
cover.
That cover itself features a
manic racial stereotype that might
be deemed offensive if the disk were
released by an American record com-
pany. But coming from the Japanese
label 12 Records, it seems more
playful than anything else. Actually,
appearances turn out to be deceiv-
ing when our clean-cut little cartoon
here brings his guitar down in a
shower of debris on the back cover,
revealing a weapon-ready chain dan-
gling from his back pocket.
Which brings us back to the
music, an equally deceiving mix. On
the surface, this is just a collection
of neat little tunes. In reality, how-
ever, Hodge! Podge! And Barrage!
From Japan is a hideaway for more
anger and frustration than Green
Day could ever hope to imitate on a
hundred albums. If anybody's won-
dering where the spirit of punk
went, here it is.
So, of course, the album opens
with a ska tune. Santiago Tamura's
"Ultra Man Ska" gets the album off
to a bouncy start. It's the theme to
Japanese kidvid classic Ultra Man
See HODGE page 10
Coming soon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, Jan. 26
Yellowman
and Big Fish Ensemble
at the Attic
(reggae)
Natural Born Killers
at Hendrix Theatre
(actionsatire)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Russian National Orchestra
at Wright Auditorium
(classical)
Friday, Jan. 27
Purple School Bus
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Natural Born Killers
at Hendrix Theatre
(actionsatire)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Red Crammer
at Wright Auditorium
(children's music)
9 a.m. & 11 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 28
Everything
and Spider Monkey
at the Attic
Natural Born Killers
at Hendrix Theatre
(actionsatire)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Red Crammer
at Wright Auditorium
(children's music)
2 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan. 31
Chew On This:
The NFL: Yesterday & Today
presented by Willi Scott
at the Underground, Mendenhall
Wednesday, Feb. 1
Comedy Zone:
Jeff Schilling
and Willie Randolph
at the Attic
SEND US INFO!
Do you have an upcoming eent
that you'd like listed in our
Coming Attractions column? If so,
please send us information (a
schedule would be nice) at:
Coming Attractions
East Carolina University
Student Publications Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
f.





W"
10
Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
HODGE from page 9
at Mach one. If memory serves,
Tamura didn't have to twist the
original theme very much to give it
a ska beat. Of course it's been a good
10 or 15 years since I last saw an
episode of Ultra Man. so 1 could be
way off base.
Later on, we're treated to a
similar reworking, courtesy of
American band Man or Astro-Man?
with "Everybody's Favorite Mar-
tian Here our evil surf guitar mas-
terminds put a surf twist on the
theme to the Bill Bixby Ray
Walston TV classic My Favorite
Martian. A typically enjoyable romp
from the Astroman boys, it's not
very close to the original but still a
lot of fun.
Next up is "On the Trail a
high-energy little punk rockabilly,
or punkabilly, tune by American
band the Makers. With a sound remi-
niscent of early Cramps (except not
quite so weird and tortured), the
Makers seem typical of the modern
punkabilly movement, both in Japan
and America. While the Cramps are
a good vein to mine, let's hope this
new generation of angry young
goofballs doesn't get as hide-bound
as their mentors (or am I the only-
one who's noticed that the last three
Cramps albums have sounded ex-
actly alike?).
The mixture of Japanese and
American bands on Hodge! Podge!
And Barrage! From Japan seems
to be a sort of marketing ploy. While
the American bands featured here
have only limited followings, they're
big in the American punkabilly ,
surf scene. There aren't any big
names like the Cramps or Dick Dale
(whose "Misirlou" graced the open-
ing credits of Quentin Tarantino's
recent blockbuster film Pulp Fic-
tion), but the guys who are here
have tremendous street cred.
Many of the Japanese groups.
on the other hand, seem to be low-
on the totem pole. Santiago
Tamura's two tracks were recorded
(according to the liner notes) in his
house. The production credits are
even more specific when it comes
to Jap Kat's weird and moody
"Pigmen" and "Spider Stomp they
were recorded in the "bathroom of
Jap Kat's house
It would be impossible in the
space allotted to mention even-
track or every band on Hodge!
Podge! And Barrage! There are 24
tracks here by 16 different bands: a
few groups do stand out, however.
The Titans, a Japanese punkabilly
group, crank out some great grunt-
ing jams on "She Would Back to
Cave" and the riotous "Speedqueen
Mama American duo Fireworks
offer the noisy rockabilly numbers
�Gimme Another Shot" and the de-
pressing "Endless Sleep
Japanese trio Jackie & the
in in mm in �����I mi �T
Cedrics. whose bass player Rockin'
Jelly Bean did the disc's cover art,
prove that cool surf guitar doesn't
have to come from America on
"Boss" and "Latinia And finally,
Americans Roy Loney & the Long
Shots finish Hodge! Podge! And
Barrage! off with the riotously
funny rockabilly romp "Teeny
Weenie Man
Now that MTV has "discov-
ered" and tamed alternative music,
and each new Buzz Clip gets more
sanitized than the last, fans of the
true underground are forced to turn
elsewhere for their fix of the weird.
This energetic and highly danceable
music is a big chunk of that under-
ground; though it lacks political or
social content, it's great for venting
frustrations and just generally get-
ting your rocks off. So search out
Hodge! Podge! And Barrage! From
Japan It'll be well-worth your ef-
fort.
IF YOU WANT TO MAKE IT
EV THE REAL WORLD,
SPEND A SEMESTER
IN OURS.
Walt Disney World Co. representatives will be on campus to
present an information session lor Undergraduate Students on
the WALT DISNEY wom.D SummerI all '95 College Program.
WHEN: MONDAY, JAN. 30 at 7:00PM
WHERE: 1028 GENERAL CLASSROOM BUILDING
Attendance at this presentation is required to
interview for the SummerFall '95 College Program.
Interviews will be held Tuesday, January 31.
The following majors are encouraged to attend:
Business, Communication, RecreationLeisure
Studies and TheatreDrama.
Lifeguards are needed to work at our many
' Water Parks and Resorts. Students with
ANY major are eligible to apply. You
need to hold lifeguard certification OR
be a strong swimmer and we'll provide
the training needed for an exciting
experience this summer or fall!
For more information contact:
Cooperative Education
Co.
GET INVOLVED
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S STUDENT UNION IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR MEMBERS OF THE FOLLOWING COMMITTEES FOR 1995 -1996:
VJDEV
O
UJ
� MARKETING
� VISUAL ARTS
� LECTURE
CULTURAL AWARENESS
� POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT
�FILMS
� SPECIAL EVENTS
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL THE STUDENT UNION HOTLINE AT 328-6004,
OR COME BY ROOM 236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER.
Urf�ep World
V7xtc students spi'nd ti setm-ster netting
rwulyfnr f�e rest oftlx'ir liivs.
An cqiul opportunity employer
"Simply the Best Burgers
HOME OF THE HAMBURGER
STEAK SANDWICH
Try our phone in Express service. Just call ahead with your
order and we'll have it waiting for you when you come in.
315 E. 10th St.
830-0304
Hamburger Steak Sandwich � Grilled Chicken Breast I 14 lb Hamburger Steak j
Jr French Fries & Medium � Sandwich, French Fries & ! Sandwich Jr French Fries &
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Limit one per coupon
Expires 4-2-95
Limit one per coupon
Expires 4-2-95
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee Presents
BATTLE OF THE I MM�
To be held on Thursday, April 6,1995, at 7:00 PM on the Mall
Grand Prize: Opening Band at Barefoot on the Mall (Thursday, April 20,1995)
Second Prize: $100 in Cash
� Deadline for demo tapes is Friday, February 17,1995. gk
- � Five Bands will be chosen to perform at the Battle of the Bands.j
�PA will be provided by the Popular Entertainment Committee. 'kJP
� Five finalists will be notified the week of February 27. yr
� Winners will be determined by judges.
To audition for the Battle of the Bands, please submit a demo tape containing
three songs, a Press-KitBio, and the Entry Form below to the Student Union
Office, Room 236, on the second floor of Mendenhall Student Center or Mail to:
Popular Entertainment Committee
c�m0
236 Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858
For More information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004
Battle of the Bands Entry Form
Name of BandContact Person
Address:
Phone Numbers:





11
Thursday, January 26,1995
The East Carolinian
Variety of
Goodies!
505 N. Berkely Blvd.
Goldsboro
778-3897
�Breakfast
�Lunch
�Dinner
�Catering
�Party
Platters
Bagels, Donuts, Muffins,
Cookies, Oven roasted
turkey, roast beef, ham,
and much, much more!
141 SW Greenville
Blvd.
355-8028
Picasso 9s
Bakery & Deli
Winter Student Special: Thru 331 Any student or faculty with valid ID ge! $1 off any sandwich Limit one per customer. Not valid with any other specials.
FREE
�i m
Donuts or Bagels
Buy a 12 dozen & get
a 12 dozen FREE.
Nch valid with any rtbei (fltt
FREE
Cream Cheese.
Buy any Bagel & get
order of Plain Cream
Cheese FREE.
Not Valid wfth any ixhcr oRei
�i f
11
FREE
�i m
Breakfast
Bagel or Biscuit
l I Buy ariyCouran Ham. Sausage or
Bacon Bagel or Biscuit and
I �
I i
get a second one of equal or
lesser value FREE
No valid . Hi my other after
SAVE
f tvinro VMW5 I txpmrs MM9 i I 'tltlllMIl
Sandwich, Fries &
Small Bev.
$3.89
Not valid with any olhci oflei.
fcxpiie�VH� j
Patients Wanted for
Asthma Research Study
If you:
tr m r &nW0m
� are 12 years of age or older
� are male or female
� have mild to moderate asthma
� are a non-smoker
� have persistent nighttime asthma symptoms
� are not pregnant & practicing an acceptable method of birth control
� are not a lactating female
W. James Metzger, M.D.
Clinical Investigator
ECU School of Medicine
Department of Allergy 3E-129
Greenville, NC 27858-4354
Benefits t6 Patient:
� Asthma medication, tests, examination, medical care free of charge
� Reimbursement
� Possible that patient's asthma may respond favorably to treatment
Location of Research:
ECU School of Medicine
Department of Allergy
Module D
If interested, please contact:
Cathy Critchfield, RN
Study Coordinator (816-3426)
And wow cm, goIamzI teAiimwnAal cm,
the, eeetw&M&iA, o �ad� Qaimlm2i

Sv
aBi
s
( Warning:
Individual results may vary.
Not valid with any other offer.
Use only as directed.)
ure, on Valentine's Day, you could rely on the old
standbys�chocolate, flowers, dinner, miniature golf.
But with Love Lines, she (or he) won't be the only one
who knows how you feel.
F
or only $3 for 25 words or less and 100 each for
more than 25 words, you can share the love with
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p
LIFE from page 9
Spring Natural Life events
will continue the same "alternative
amusement" theme with three pro-
grams. Pirate Double Dare will be
held at 6:15 p.m. on January 26 in
Christenbury Gymnasium. This
campus version of Double Dare
pairs teams of four in trivia ques-
tions for points. Teams may require
opponents to take the physical chal-
lenge where players undoubtedly
GET NASTY from water, slime and
whipped cream in all sorts of bi-
zarre games. The event closes with
a wild obstacle course for the top
four team score winners. Teams are
encouraged to register now in 204
Christenbury Gym.
The Natural Life program will
also promote two events offered by
the Major Events Committee and
Residence Hall Association. The an-
nual Mardi Gras celebration takes
place from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Feb-
ruary 24 in Mendenhall Student
Center. This year's event will fea-
ture a cabaretburlesque show, a
casino, bingo, King & Queen con-
test, Blizzard of Bucks, dance,
karaoke and roving performers
throughout the night. Highlighted
by a free cajun dinner, Mardi Gras
promises to bring the spirit of
N'awlins to ECU.
Natural Life and the Resi-
dence Hall Association are cur-
rently planning Hall Olympics, an
annual celebration during RHA
Week in March. To cap off the
spring Natural Life series, event
coordinators are planning an April
Fiesta Night at-the bottom of Col-
lege Hill. Mexican food will be
served while an exciting afternoon
of unique games and entertainment
are in the works. Just when the se-
mester comes to a close, Natural
Life Jello Wrestling will make a
comeback during Barefoot on the
Mall. Be sure to register your tag
team early for this unforgettable
addition to the biggest spring bash
this side of Raleigh.
As a result of such positive
student support, Recreational Ser-
vices is going to form a Natural Life
Club. This will be made up of stu-
dents who would like to get to-
gether a couple times a month on
a Friday night and participate in
Natural Life Activities. Such Natu-
ral Life Activities may include Limo
Scavenger Hunts and Mystery
Trips.
The first activity will be a
Mystery Trip at 4:30 p.m. on Feb-
ruary 4. Where we'll go you'll never
know. If you are interested in the
Mystery Trip you will need to reg-
ister prior to February 2 in 204
Christenbury Gym. For more infor-
mation on the Natural Life event
series or how to get involved with
the Natural Life Club, call 328-
6387.
to
GET YOUR PURPLE
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'95:
ENTRANCE OF
ALLIED HEALTH BUILDING
JAN. 30
9 - 2PM
WATCH FOR SENIOR SWEETS V
COMING SOON
SEXUALLY
SPEAKING
WITH
DR. RUTH
WESTHEIMER
!
ick up a Love Lines form at the newspaper office, the
Mendenhall information desk or Student Stores.
Deadline is Feb. 11. Love Lines will appear in the
Feb. 14 issue of The East Carolinian.
jjove Lines
Wednesday, February 22,1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
Contact the Central Ticket Office
1-800-EttJ-ARTS (328-2787)
or Locally at 328-4788
Sponsored By the Student Union Lecture Committee
r





i
12
Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
ARTS
. - TWHW�BMBMBBJ!
from page 9
the performers it attracts. The sea-
son opened last fall with a perfor-
mance of "Aladdin and the Magic
Lamp" by the American Family The-
ater. Then, in December. Fred
Garho and Daielma Santos pre
sented their "Inflatable Comedy
Theatre Next up are the inspira-
tional songs of Red Crammer, fol-
lowed by "The Incredible Merlin
Magic Show" in February. The sea-
son will conclude with
Theatreworks. USA's performance
of the children's classic "Curious
George" in April. Each of these art-
ists give a performance that is fun
for all ages.
Working in conjunction with
the Arts Smart group are the ECU
theater education majors. ECU is
one of only two universities in
North Carolina to offer the theater
education major. While it is a rela-
tively new program to ECU, it is
growing fast thanks to the help of
Patch Clark and her dedicated
group of students.
Dedicated is not a term used
lightly, either. These students give
up precious free time and sleep to
gather at Wright Auditorium by
8:15 a.m. for the Friday perfor-
mances. They assist with unloading
the buses and help keep the chil-
dren occupied until it is time to be
seated. Keeping kids busy is no
small task, as any parent will tell
you. but it's one the theater educa-
tion students enjoy. The students
teach the children games they de-
vised in the creative dramatics and
theater classes. For example, at the
"Aladdin" show the children were
led on an imaginary magic carpet
ride and played charades with
wishes. At the "Inflatable Comedy
Theatre" the children went on a
moon walk and imagined what it
would be like to be inflatable.
The Arts Smart series is prov-
ing to be a success. Audiences have
been full at both performances so
far, and similar crowds are expected
to complete the season. Dr. Charles
R. Coble has personally endorsed
the program. "Exposure to appro-
priate arts experiences in early
childhood can significantly broaden
the minds and imaginations of
young children while assisting in
the development of listening,
watching and processing skills. The
qualities of this program are un-
questionable, and I encourage ad-
ministrators and educators to in-
volve their students in ECU Arts
Smart said Dr. Coble, dean of the
school of education at ECU.
And while education is an im-
portant goal of the Arts Smart se-
ries, another equally important goal
is for everyone involved to have fun.
To further that goal, the Saturday
performances are held at 2 p.m. fol-
lowing each Friday performance
and are open to the public. The next
show will be the music of Red
Crammer on January 28. Call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788
for ticket information.
Jooking
for a room,
y : mate?
Find one in
our classifieds.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pitt man Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:0-4:00
dowatowai qmNviue
fi ike Led cutlet t 4fvCXe &U)whM .
We're worth a trip downtown!
Ladies' and Men's Clothing at 40 OFF Catalog Prices Everyday!
Super Winter Merchandise Markdowns
r atalog
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758-8612
MonSat. 10-6
Careers Tvequire Leadership .Experience.
Jljxperience Leads to Success.
Don't Wait Until You Graduate to
Learn from Experience.
Learn Leadership from Successful, Experienced Leaders
UCCESS @ SUNRISE
Breakfast with:
Dr. Howard Sosnel Ms. Kathy Barger I Mr. Eddie Payne
Superintendent,
Pitt County
Schools
February 1,1995
President,
Ronald McDonald
House Board of
Directors
February 7,1995
Coach,
ECU Men's
Basketball Team
March 28,1995
I
Join these local community leaders for breakfast,
from 7:30 am - 8:30 am, and learn their
success stories and leadership philosophies.
Registration includes a wake-up call, free ride from your residence
to MSC, and a continental breakfast.
Call 328-4796 by noon, the day before each breakfast, to attend.
For More Information,
Contact the Student Leadership Development Programs (ttuv,
109 Mendenhall Student Center, 328 4796
WE
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13
Thursday, January 26, 1995
77?e East Carolinian
TDNIGHT
I
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
ECU'S men's basketball team
(12-5) will take on one of their own
tonight, when they face off against
Coastal Carolina (5-10) and former
Pirate assistant coach Mike
Hopkins in Williams Arena.
Hopkins vacated Greenville af-
ter the 1993-4 season, when he was
9 � offered the head coaching
job of the Fighting Chanti-
cleers. Coastal is currently
competing in their first sea-
son of a four-year probation
for violation of NCAA
rules and regulations.
Coastal, in its first
15 games this season, has
been outscored by their
opponents by an average
of 82-75. and their offense
drops off even further (to
68 ppg) when they hit the
road.
"Coastal Carolina is quick Pi-
rate head coach Eddie Payne said.
"Their big guys run the floor well,
their post players are athletic and
their style of play is very similar to
ours
Coastal brings an 0-10 road
record to Greenville, but Coach
Hopkins would like nothing more
than to shed that particular mon-
key from his back tonight against
his former colleagues and players.
Three starters, led by Okla-
homa transfer Keke Hicks, returned
from last year's 15-11 squad for CCU
and Hopkins. Hicks, a 6-foot-l guard,
has averaged 25.4 points per game
for Coastal this season, but is barely
shooting 40 percent.
Sophomore forward Maurice
Ingram (14.5 ppg, 56 fg) has
stepped up big in his second season
as a Chanticleer. He is the team's
leading rebounder, pulling down 8.4
boards per contest.
Nine players on the CCU ros-
ter have registered double-figures
for minutes played, which means
Hopkins will always have fresh legs
on the floor against the Pirates.
The problem is that, barring
any major surprises, most of them
don't look to score. Hicks and
Ingram provide 54 percent of the
Coastal offense, and if ECU shuts
that duo down, it could get ugly in
Williams Arena.
In short, CCU has been
outscored, out-rebounded and out-
shot by their opponents this season,
a characteristic that should continue
tonight against the Pirates.
Hopkins has just two players
on his roster taller than 6-foot-5,
and will have to find a way to keep
the Pirates off the boards and out
of the paint so that the game
doesn't get away from him early in
the first half.
Vicious
Vic
Junior college
transfer forward Vic
Hamilton (33) has
his own cheering
section � "Vicious
Vic's Corner" � in
Williams Arena. He
recently received a
technical foul for
his enthusiasm
after one of his
patented follow-up
slam dunks, much
to the dismay of his
support group.
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Former ECU star TE
shines with Seahawks
Coach "Hop" returns to ECU
Hopkins head
coach at CCU
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
When Mike Hopkins left ECU
last spring for Conway, S.C. to take
the head coaching job at Coastal
Carolina University, he knew two
things: One, the program that he
was taking over was in shambles
after being placed on probation and
two, that he would have to make a
return trip to Greenville to face his
former team this season.
That time has finally arrived.
Tonight Coach Hopkins
brings his Coastal CarolinyChan-
ticleers into hostile Williams Arena
for a non-conference bout with the
Pirates.
"I'm not trying to put any
more importance on this game than
any other game we have this sea-
son said Hopkins. "My team needs
a win, and I'm just trying my best
to get them ready for a tough ECU
squad
Hopkins, who was on Coach
Eddie Payne's inaugural coaching
staff here at ECU. said that he is
excited about coming back to
Greenville to face his former team
but stresses the fact that the Pi-
rates are the opponent.
"It's good to see that ECU is
doing well, but I have a job here to
get Coastal Carolina back to where
it used to be Hopkins said.
Payne was glad to see his
former assistant get a chance at a
head coaching job, but agrees with
Hopkins in the fact that both teams
are trying to get a win.
"Once the game starts, we
will both be concentrating on the
game Payne said. "I'm very
happy for him. He is doing an ex-
cellent job. Coastal Carolina has all
the qualities of a well-coached
team
Hopkins took over a pro-
gram that had been placed on pro-
bation by the NCAA under former
coach Russ Bergman but says that
he is dealing with it well.
See HOPKINS page 16
Men's track team
opens '95 season
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Carlester Crumpler Jr a Walter Camp All-American tight end
at ECU in 1993, now plays for the NFL's Seattle Seahawks.
Former ECU star
started four games
with Seahawks
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
1993 Walter Camp 1st team All-
American TE Carlester Crumpler, Jr. is
making the transition to the professional
ranks after enjoying a successful career
at ECU. The former ECU star played his
first NFL season with the Seattle
Seahawks after being drafted in the sev-
enth round of last year's draft
"The transition wasn't all that
easy Crumpler said. "I was about 3,000
miles away from home. It was a good
experience for me, because I had to learn
how to be on my own and make good
decisions after spending all of my life in
Greenville
Playing time was sparse for the 6-
foot-6. 250-pounder upon first arriving
in Seattle because of the presence of
former All-Pro tight end Ferrell Edmunds.
Crumpler was inactive for the first seven
games of the season, but made his first
career catch during Seattle's Week eight
overtime matchup against Cincinnati and
his first career start two games later
against Denver.
On the season, Crumpler started
four games and had two catches for 19
yards (9.5 average).
"It was frustrating early in the year
because I wasn't playing Crumpler said.
"I got a game ball for blocking in the
Houston game, and that was probably
the highlight of my first season, along
with my catch against the Bengals
This game saw two ex-teammates
go head to head for the first time after
playing together at ECU. Jeff Blake, who
finished fifth in the 1991 Heisman vot
ing after ECU'S Peach Bowl season, is
the Bengals' starting quarterback.
"It was good to finally see Jeff get
a chance to show what he could do
Crumpler said. "Jeff stands at the top, if
not above, the majority of the quarter-
backs in this league. I wanted him to do
well, but I was still hollering at my team-
mates to light him up every chance they
got"
Tight ends at ECU are well-pre-
pared for the professional ranks;
Crumpler is the second Pirate
tight end to be drafted in the 90's. Luke
Fisher, who preceded Crumpler and
scored the game-winning touchdown in
the Peach Bowl, was drafted by the Min-
nesota Vikings in the 7th round in 1992.
"I think playing tight end at ECU
gives you a chance to develop as a blocker
See CRUMP page 15
Brett Piggott
Communication Arts
"What's the Super Bowl?
I thought they were on
strike
Rich Kunz
Art Major
"Sure they do, I would
like to see them win since
they never have
(SID) - The ECU men's track
Squad opened their 1995 indoor
season at the University of Florida
Invitational in Gainsville, Fla. on
Sunday.
Pirate Head Coach Bill
Carson, still trying to find an iden-
tity for this year's squad, explained
that he wanted to use the first meet
as a practice run.
"We really didn't go down
there to compete said Carson.
"What we did is go down there and
try to experiment some
Carson did receive some qual-
ity production from his 4r400 re-
lay squad, who finished tied for
fifth place with Georgia Tech, post-
ing a time of
3:15.70. This
team, which last
year won the
1C4A Champion-
ship, featured re-
turning sopho-
more CAA Cham-
pion Dwight
Henry and
sophomore
Brain Johnson,
as well as new-
comer junior col-
lege transfers
ever

junior Chris Pressely was not far j
behind at 6.75, followed by senior
Greg Floyd's 6.98.
Carson also took three cross-
country standout runners to sunny
Florida to compete in the distance
events. In the 3000-meter, senior
All-State performer Sean Connolly
placed 27th in a field of 46 with a
time of 9:01.54, and ireshman star
Mike Marini finished 32nd at
9:05.39. In the 800-meter, freshman
Brian Harrell placed 38th with a
time of 2:02.97.
The Pirates should be more
competitive this weekend at the
U.S. Air Force Academy Invita-
tional, where Carson hopes to fi-
nalize slart
ng positions
after the
"practice
run" in
Florida.
The
men's track
squad enters
the 1995 sea-
son looking
to rebound af-
ter an injury-
riddled '94
campaign.
"With the addition
of Barker and King,
we could have one
of our finest teams
Bill Carson
Jake Stephenson
Post Graduate Studies
"I thinkthatthe 49ers will
win but I don't care be-
cause I don't have a T.V
Keith Barker and Steve King.
The "B" Team, composed of
sophomores Lewis Harris, Artee'
Franklin, Derrick Floyd and Chris
McKinney finished the 4x400 with
a time of 3:24.20, placing them
15th in the event.
East Carolina entered three
sprinters in the 55-meter dash, the
largest event of the day, with 72
participants. Sophomore Ken Laws
led the way for the Pirate sprint-
ers with a time of 6.68 seconds,
placing him 42nd overall. Walk-on
However unlikely it may seem, head
coach Bill Carson started the sea-
son with only one senior and less
than a handful of sprinters with any
Division I experience.
Fortunately for Carson, his
squad is loaded with experienced
sophomores and promising JUCO
transfers. In his mind, this year's
team may be one of his very best.
"With the addition of Barker
and King, we could have one of our
See TRACK page 16
J�





14
Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
McNair
improves
stock as
All-Star
(AP) - Steve McNair thinks
his stock improved last week.
"Hopefully, I moved up in the
draft. I hope to go in the top five
picks McNair said after finishing
his week at the Senior Bowl, the
only all-star game invitation he ac-
cepted.
McNair had modest numbers
in Saturday's game, but what was
really important was the progress
he made during the week of prac-
tice before the game. He proved he
could adjust from the shotgun he
ran at Division I-AA Alcorn State
to the pro-style offense.
ESPN draft analyst Mel Kiper
said McNair is a "solid No. 1" in
rating the top quarterbacks avail-
able for April draft. He lists Chad
May of Kansas State and Kerry
Collins of Penn State, the North
QBs at the Senior Bowl, second and
third, respectively, ahead of BYU
junior John Walsh.
"Collins, in a lot of NFL
scouts' mind, is a finished product
as good as he is going to get
Kiper said from the Senior Bowl.
"McNair, with a little bit of season-
ing, could be tremendous
McNair had 87 total yards in
two quarters Saturday. That's mi-
nuscule compared with the 572 a
game he had at Division I-AA
Alcorn State this season, but it
didn't discourage McNair.
"I think I had good practices
all week. The game didn't hurt me
at all said McNair, the NCAA ca-
reer leader with 16,823 total yards.
"One week they wanted to see
me go in and do the things it takes
to learn the offense, to take con-
trol. That's what 1 did
McNair played the second and
fourth quarters for the South, com-
pleting 8-of-19 passes for 88 yards
with one of six interceptions
thrown by the four quarterbacks.
His only official carry was a one-
yard loss after falling on a fumbled
snap.
He sidestepped defensive
pressure on several plays and com-
pleted some crisp short passes. He
made a few mistakes, including
throwing into double coverage and
overthrowing a receiver, but was up
to par with the other all-star quar-
terbacks.
Those who played with him
Saturday, and practiced with him
during the week, think McNair is
ready for the pros.
"I think he proved he could
play on any level, and I think he's
going to prove that on the next
level running back Kevin Stewart
of Tennessee said.
"He proved to everybody that
he could play in the big time
Said Auburn wide receiver
Frank Sanders: "Handling the pro-
style offense, I think he did a good
job. I think he answered all the
questions in the week of practice
we had
It's not a question of if McNair
HEY STUDENTS!
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STUDENT SECTION"
IN
WILLIAMS ARENA AT MINGES COLISEUM
THIS IS YOUR CHANCE to choose a name for the
spirited and loud atmosphere you are creating in support of
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Coliseum!
ENTRY FORMS and information will be available at
tonight's ECU vs. Coastal Carolina Basketball Game.
THE WINNING "NAME" WILL BE ANNOUNCED
AT HALF-TIME OF THE ECU VS. OLD DOMINION
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For additional information call ECU Athletics at 328-4530.
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�1-
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mmmm
15
Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
f Prices Good In The Following Location Only:
609 S.E. Greenville Blvd Greenville
m)
Vlip Out
Coupons!
fiinnJXxie-
STORE COUPON EC,
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Coupon good Wed Jan. 25 Thru Tues Jan. 31,1995 in our Greenville, N.C. store only! Limit one coupon per customer, please!
Marketplace
STORE COUPON EC
18-0z. Jar
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Coupon good Wed Jan. 25 Thru Tues Jan. 31,1995 in our Greenville, N.C. store only! Limit one coupon per customer, please!
97!
STORE COUrgNVALUr92cl "g STORE COUPON EC
I97 i
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Folgers
Flake Coffee
Coupon good Wed Jan. 25 Thru Tues Jan. 31,1995 in our Greenville, N.C. store only! Limit one coupon per customer, please!
Plus, More Savings On Items Like These.
W-D Brand
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I � Jan. 31. 1995 Limit on roll par cuatomar. plaaaa. COUPON MUST BE IN DROP BAG WITH FILM'

GOOD IN OUR GREENVILLE N.C. STORE ONLY1
Prices Gnnd Wed Jan. 25th Thm Tues Jan. 31 St! Prices Good In The Following Location Only?
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CRUMP from page 13
and a receiver Grumpier said. "Coach
Logan likes to distribute the ball evenly,
and that gave me good opportunities to
make some catches. I take a lot of pride
in my blocking and am just glad I could
help graduated ECU running back Jun-
ior Smith to his first two 1,000 yard
seasons
Last season, Smith broke Carlester
Crumpler, Srs all-time rushing record
this past season. Crumpler, Sr. currently
works in the athletic department in stu-
dent development and as a color com-
mentator for ECU football games on the
Pirate sports network after playing in
the NFL with the Buffalo Bills as OJ.
Simpson's backup.
"I am proud of Junior Crumpler
Jr. said. "That was a major accomplish-
ment because my dad's record had stood
for about 20 years. I found out in USA
Today that he broke the record
College football is a highly de-
manding sport because of the time de-
mands that goes with being a full-time
student and practicing and training sev-
eral hours a day. In the pro's, it gets no
easier with a similar time schedule as a
fulkime job. The only difference is a schol-
arship pays for tuition, room and board,
while a pro contract is extremely lucra-
tive and can ensure lifetime financial sta-
bility.
"Wednesdays and Thursdays are
the hardest workdays of the week
Crumpler said. "A typical Wednesday is
a lifting session at 7 a.m so I have to get
up at 6:30 because I live in Kirkland a
suburb of Seattle. After I lift 1 get in the
Jacuzzi to relax and go to my meetings
at 8:30. The first is special teams, then
position, before our offensive meeting.
We meet until 12:00, and we only get a
five-minute break every hour. After lunch,
we have practice from 1:30 to 3:30, then
you have to work on the kicking game.
Then you have free time to go to dinner
or go out and do whatever. It's like hav-
ing a 8-too job
One of the hardest things for
Crumpler to adjust to was being away
from family and friends.
"Not everything is going to go
your way, and sometimes it can get you
down Crumpler said. "My first month
in Seattle I had a $500 phone bill, and
after that I said I will deal with my prob-
lems on my own. It's also a long season
- much longer than college. We play 20
games: 4 pre-season and 16 regular sea-
son. It can wear on you for a while
This off season has been one of
change for the Seahawks .with head
coach Tom Flores being replaced by
University of Miami head coach Dennis
Erickson.
"I haven't had the chance to .visit
with Coach Erickson Crumpler said.
"We will probably meet him during mini-
camp and get introduced to his philoso-
phy then. I just hope the transition is as
successful as Jimmy Johnson's, when he
left Miami for the pro's. We need a new
attitude on this team to turn things
around, and hopefully the new staff will
bring that about and get the ball to the
jA "xTouch. o� Cass
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EC I STUDENT SPECIAL
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Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
l Call 756-6278
I1 5 miles west of Greenville on 264 All.
X Dickinson Ave.
(behind John's Convenient Man)
tight ends more
A common misconception by col-
lege athletes is that the main difference
is that the NFL is just like college, but
with bigger and faster athletes.
"The mental aspect of the game
is so much more important in the NFL
Crumpler said. "Everyone is big and
strong, so they're aren't so many mis-
matches in personnel. A lot of times 1
will line up to just kill somebody off the
line, and they will realize my intentions
and slip my block. You have to learn how
to use strategy and disguise what you
are going to do
Unlike many modern athletes,
Crumpler is aware of who played his
position before him. and he emulates and
respects some of the great players who
have lined up before him.
"There are about three tight ends
I idolize he said. "John Mackey, Kelien
Winslow and Ozzie Newsome. All three
have different playing styles, and I just
try to pattern one aspect of their respec-
tive games, not the whole package. I have
watched Pro-Bowl tight ends play, and
they all have different strengths and
weaknesses
Crumpler does feel he has a re-
sponsibility as a role-model and to give
back to the community, unlike Phoenix
Suns basketball player Charles Barkley.
"I guess you can understand
Barkley's point but the issue is giving
back he said "I enjoy helping those less
fortunate than me. In Seattle. I do a lot
of charity work I helped feed needy fami-
lies during Thanksgiving by donating
money. I go to hospitals to help cheer
up disturbed kids, and at Christmas, I
helped pass out gifts to kids in a home-
less shelter. That is no big deal, none of
this was on TV. I don't need that I was
just giving back and helping someone
out"
Tragedy struck the Seahawks this
year when a car accident involving run-
ning backs Chris Warren and Lamar
Smith, as well as defensive lineman Mike
Frier, left Frier a quadriplegic.
"It made you realize how fast
something can happen Crumpler said
"You see somebody, and then a few hours
later they can never walk again. He was
from Jacksonville, N.C, which is one of
our big rivals back in high school. He
was a couple of years older than me, and
we are pretty good friends. 1 just hope
and pray he gets better soon
One thing is for sure for Carlester
Crumpler, Jr. is the fact that he has
stepped out of his father's long shadow
and is making a name for himself, join-
ing Pirate teammates Jeff Blake, Robert
Jones and John Jett as a full-time start-
ers. NFL success does run in the blood-
lines after all.
(T
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING CHESS

Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26, 1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
V
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, February 1
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office. 328-4766. for more information.
Qf
wmmmmmmmmmmmm
�w-mmmw.m
s





-�
16
Thursday, January 26, 1995
The East Carolinian
��� ����.� $&m -K
TRACK from p.g�.3 HOPKINS
frontpage 13
MCNAIRfromp.14
finest teams ever, in terms of depth
in the relay events said Carson.
"We very may well break some
school records in the 4x200 and
4x400, and we potentially have sev-
eral individual NCAA qualifiers
Returning last season is a tal-
ented group of sophomores. Lead-
ing the group is Henry, the CAA's
400-meter record holder, who
Carson describes as the "best ath-
lete on the squad The Fort Lau-
derdale native has made his pres-
ence felt not only on the track but
also on the gridiron, where he is a
stand out at free safety for Steve
Logan's football team.
Returning alongside Henry
will be Johnson and Harris.
Johnson, slowed by a hamstring
injury most of last season, has come
back strong during his second year.
Carson feels that he could break 46
seconds in the 400-meter and that
he will be a strong contender at the
IC4A's. At last year's CAA Champi-
onships. Harris stole the show, win-
ning the 200 meters, placing sec-
ond in the 100 meter dash and was
a member of the 4x100 relay squad
that took first place. Together,
Henry, Johnson and Harris hope to
defend their IC4A 4x400 relay
championship.
Coach Carson will look to
McKinney, the returning CAA Cham-
pion, to add depth in the sprints as
well as contend for a triple or long
jump title at the IC4A's. Meanwhile,
both Franklin and Laws come back
from injury filled '94 campaigns.
Trainers feel that Franklin has fully
recovered from a painful achilles ten-
don injury, while question marks
still surround the strength of Laws'
hamstring, that sidelined him all of
last year.
Adding depth will be first year
players Ceene Bailey, Floyd and
Pressley.
If the Pirates can remain
healthy through the indoor season,
Coach Carson may very well find
himself in Knoxville, Tenn. at the
NCAA Championships after a one-
year absence.
"I have dealt with it pretty
well he said. "1 have a very good
staff. We lean on each other
Hopkins, a 1983 graduate of
Coastal Carolina was a star player
in his playing days. He ranks in sev-
eral of the Chanticleers career and
season statistical leader'? catego-
ries. So when Coastal came calling.
last spring, a dream had come true
for him, even though he knew it
would be rough at times.
"Anytime you come back
home, you want to do well
Hopkins said. "1 want to clean this will play in the NFL. It's where.
program up and establish my phi-
losophy as a coach
"I knew about the conditions
that I was was taking over, and it
made it even more of a challenge
for me he said.
McNair and his agent had din-
ner Friday with Bill Polian. general
manager of the expansion Carolina
Panthers, who have the first pick in
the draft. The Houston Oilers, who
have the third pick, have also ex-
pressed strong interest.
Kiper expects McNair to be
Houston's pick. He forecasts Carolina
taking junior defensive end Warren
Sapp of Miami before Jacksonville
picks Penn State junior running back
Ki-Jana Carter second.
rum
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 26, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1053
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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