The East Carolinian, January 24, 1995






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January 24,1995
Vol 69, No. 69 �
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, N C
12 pases
Students suspended
Improper conduct
results in seven
fraternity
suspensions
Laura Jackman
Staff writer
Seven members of the Alpha
Phi Alpha fraternity were suspended
from school in December by the Of-
fice of the Dean of Students for in-
volvement in an activity in which
ECU student Brennon Bohol was in-
jured. Five men were suspended for
a semester and two men were sus-
pended for a year.
On Oct. 26, Bohol was injured
when all nine members of the pledge
class were bound, causing bruises
to his ribs.
Although neither the ECU or
Greenville police became involved
and no one was arrested, the ECU
administration became involved be-
cause "students accused of hazing
will appear before the Student
Honor Board said Dean of Stu-
dents Ronald Speier.
However, the process did not
get that far.
"There were over 500 cases
requiring judicial attention for vari-
ous campus violations in total last
semester and the system allows for
some to settle through other com-
mittees, which is what happened in
our case said Rodney White, Al-
pha Phi Alpha area director and
adviser. "All men involved were held
accountable
Although
most men in the
fraternity will
not speak about
the incident, in-
cluding Presi-
dent Demetrius
Carter (who said
he "instructed
the members of
my fraternity
not to speak
about whatever mamm-
happened"). two
men spoke publicly last December
with Shanai Harris of WITN and
then, along with a few other Alpha
members, to The East Carolinian.
Alpha Phi Alpha member
Leondus Farrow said Bohol claimed
"his ribs were bruised and that his
doctor ordered him to stay in bed a
"All I know is
that I was a
pledge and
few weeks, but within two days he
was at the football (Homecoming)
game and a step show
"The young man who got in-
jured said that his parents wanted
him to press criminal charges
against us. but he didn't because he
said he told them it was an acci-
dent Farrow said. "The point is, we
didn't bruise his ribs. Nobody beat
him or bruised
him. We don't
know how he
got his ribs
bruised, we
think the
pledges fell on
him.
When
asked why
seven students
were sus-
pended despite
the fact that
the incident is
being termed an accident. White
said: "There were different levels
and circumstances involved White
said.
Farrow, who was suspended
See SUSPEND page 3
It's
snowing!
r
now I'm not.
- Andree Taylor
Greenville
experienced its
first snow of the
year yesterday.
Students tended
to stay indoors to
avoid the wet and
wooly weather.
Much to many
students' dismay,
classes were not
cancelled and the
flakes stopped
falling by early
evening.
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
TV stolen from William's Arena
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Photo by TAMBRA ZION
Athletic Video Director Tom Doyle inspects the empty case that held a 19-inch color Zenith
television. The TV was stolen from William's arena sometime last weekend, and police
have no leads in the case. The television was valued at $500 and will probably be replaced
ECU lost more than a basket- .
ball game after the Jan. 14 dedica-
tion of the newly renovated
William's arena. A 19-inch color Ze-
nith television was stolen from an
u p;r concourse on the north side,
sometime between 8 p.m. Saturday
night and 9 a.m. Monday morning,
police reports stated.
"Certainly we weren't expect-
ing it said Henry VanSant, asso-
ciate athletic director. "We regret
that this sort of thing would hap-
pen, and we regret that our secu-
rity - and I'm not talking about
public safety, I'm talking about se-
curity of the building - was not
adequate to keep that kind of thing
from happening
VanSant said plans are under-
way to tighten security in the
arena.
"We're certainly doing what
we can to make sure the building
can be secured VanSant said.
Around 28 television moni-
tors enhance the new arena. The
stolen television was valued at $500
and will more than likely be re-
placed, said Tom Doyle, director of
athletic video.
"I think its a shame that we
open a brand new arena and every-
thing goes as well as it did, every-
thing runs the right way, and then
See TV page 3
Board delays
vote on clause
Board of
Governors
continues to
postpone vote on
sexual orientation
Ben Duran
Staff Writer
The UNC system's board of gov-
ernors (BOG) continue to delay voting
on an amendment to their code which
would protect gays and lesbians from
discrimination throughout the 16 state-
supported campuses.
The BOC planned to vote on the
measure in November, but the vote was
cancelled without explanation. The
amendment has not been brought to a
vote in the two subsequent meetings
of the BOG and has not been re-sched-
uled.
The proposed amendment which
was passed by the BOG's Non-Discrimi-
nation Committee in October, also ex-
tends protection from discrimination
based on age and or handicaps, as well
as sexual orientation.
The amendment has come un-
der fire from former Governor Jim Mar-
tin, said A Keith Dyer, president of the
Association of Student Governments
and a member of the board of gover-
nors. Dyer, an ECU undergraduate, is
the only student who serves on the
BOG. In a Jan. 12 article of UNC's Daily
Tar Heel Martin said he was seeking
clarification of the term sexual orien-
tation Martin did not return TEC's
phone calls.
"Any allusions to bestiality or
necrophilia really dodge what this leg-
islation is about" Dyer said. "This
amendment to the code sends the right
message - no one should be discrimi-
nated against because of their sexual
preference, there does not seem to be
any argument for the opposition to
stand on
ECU is one of 11 schools within
the UNC system which already has a
non-discrimination policy which in-
cludes coverage regarding sexual ori-
entation.
"We've had a non-discrimination
policy since I got here in '81. Last spring
we revised our policy to include sexual
orientation said ECU's equal employ-
ment officer. Dr. Mary Anne Rose.
While the measure has come
under fire from the former governor,
some BOG members are optimistic
about the amendment's chances.
"I expect this amendment to the
- -i i A S - r'
See VOTE page 2
nave mu iccius in uie iasc. i ne icicvioiuh wao vqiuuu uijuuui.u"i"k,v"� � �� �
NC culture studied in award-winning journal
. . . t il. ii �. c �t -�a ��� macsa7inp than a journal. Drimari
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
For students and others inter-
ested in learning more about North
Carolina, the North Carolina Literary
Review (NCLR) provides readers with
insight into the literature, history and
culture of North Carolina.
"What we are trying to do is look
at historical and contemporary culture
and literature in a broad context pre-
sented in a way that serious readers,
and not necessarily academic special-
ists, will enjoy reading and learning
about the regions and culture (of North
Carolina) said Alex Albright, editor
of NCLR.
NCLR was begun by Dr. Keats
Sparrow, dean of the College of Arts
and Sciences in 1992. The magazine
comes out about every 10 months with
the next issue scheduled to come out
in March. It is put out by the ECU
English department and the North
Carolina Literary and Historical Asso-
ciation. The magazine recently received
praise from the Council for Editors of
Learned Journals. NCLR was awarded
the Best New Journal Award.
"That was a real nice award
Albright said. "It was good for the uni-
versity and the department. It speaks
well, I think, of what we have been try-
ing to do
Albright said NCLR does not
normally accept unsolicited material
from writers.
"We are not really looking for
open submissions, we publish thematic
sections Albright said. "We are inter-
ested in proposals or queries from any-
body, but our staff is too small to
handle a lot of unsolicited manuscripts.
"We have published graduate,
undergraduate students from here
(ECU) as well as professional writers
from all over the world
Albright feels the NCLR helps
to promote the eastern part of North
Carolina by informing readers about
its past and present.
"I like a magazine that is read
and appreciated and helps people real-
ize particularly how important the east-
ern part of the state is to the rest of
the state and region Albright said.
Albright said the design of the
magazine makes it different from schol-
arly journals.
"I think the way we are able to
bring design, the way we mix design
with content, that makes it a real
unique publication, much more like a
magazine than a journal, primarily
because of excellent design by the
School of Art, which has won 14 de-
sign awards
Albright also credited success of
the magazine to associate editors John
Patterson and Bertie Fearing along
with student interns and graduate as-
sistants.
The NCLR due in March will
See NCLR page 3
LIFfc;
IvtAide
Restaurant reviewedpage
First a TV, next our entire reputation?page
Pirate swimmers win.
Tuesday
Partly Cloudy
Wednesday
Clearing
r? to teacA 0C&





$
Tuesday, January 24,1995
The East Carolinian
Briefs
��-TSBBMB
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Kennedy matriarch dies
(AP) - Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, the matriarch whose faith and
quiet strength saw one of America's most prominent families through
three generations of political triumphs and personal tragedies, died Sun-
day. She was 104 years old.
Mrs. Kennedy was the daughter of a congressman, wife of an am-
bassador and mother of a president.
Her husband, Joseph P. Kennedy, amassed a fortune in banking,
real estate, liquor, films and Wall Street and was a U.S. ambassador to
Britain. He died in 1969. Her father. John F. "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald, was
a congressman and Boston mayor.
Four of her nine children were killed, two in plane crashes and two
by assassins.
Her eldest son, Joseph Jr died when his plane exploded on a forld
War II mission. Her second son, John, was elected president in 1960 but
was killed by an assassin in 1963. Her third son, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy,
was killed by an assassin as he campaigned br president in 1968.
Mrs. Kennedy's only surviving son, Edward, has been a senator from
Massachusetts since 1962.
Her daughter Kathleen died in a plane crash in 1948 and her daugh-
ters Rosemary, Patricia, J a and Eunice survive her. Jean Kennedy Smith
is the U.S. ambassador to Ireland.
Earthquake casualties climb
(AP) - Powerful aftershocks rocked buildings and shattered glass in
Kobe Monday, and last week's deadly earthquake sent new shock waves
through Japan's political and financial establishment
The death toll from Tuesday's quake climbed k. 5.060, with 102
people still listed as missing, national police said. More than 26,284 people
were injured and 300,000 left homeless in Japan's deadliest quake in more
than 7u years.
Winter storms sweep through country
(AP) - A new Pacific storm snarled Southern California traffic Mon-
day with mudslides and water, and snow caused scattered school closings
yesterday across parts of the South.
Ohio had snowdrifts as high as eight feet after a stormy weekend.
A winter storm warning was in effect for Southern California through
Tuesday with up to eight inches of rain possible in the mountains, along
with two feet of snow above 2.000 feet, the National Weather Service
said.
A mudslide today blocked part of the Pacific Coast Highway in
Santa Monica, and on Sunday a rock slide killed two tourists on the
beach in La Jolla. Police today reported scores of stalled cars and spinouts.
In northern California, nearly three inches of rain fell in 24 hours
in the Sacramento Valley, and heavy snow was possible in the Sierra
Nevada.
In the Southeast, six counties in northern Georgia closed schools
this morning because of snow.
Barefoot space
shared by cupola
Jeffrey Lee
Staff Writer
Mention the Bell Tower and
North Carolina State comes to mind,
the Old Well and it's Carolina. Men-
tion the Cupola and nothing comes
to mind. Facilities Planners are hop-
ing for a little more name recognition
as plans for the Cupola, a symbol of
East Carolina's past and future, swing
into high gear.
The Old Austin Cupola sat atop
the Herbert Austin building that, in
1908, was the first major academic fa-
cility on campus. The Cupola stood
24 feet above the apex of the Austin
building and, for years, was the high-
est point in Greenville.
"This particular cupola replaces
symbolically the cupola that was on
the old Austin building which was a
symbol of the university for years and
years said Richard Brown, Vice-Chan-
cellor of Business Affairs. "Its a re-
production of one and a half to two
times larger than the original
After tossing around the idea
of placing the Cupola by the new rec-
reation center and other sights, offi-
cials, including SGA President Ian
Eastman, decided on the Mall. "This
will be a place where a string quartet
could perform, a small band or place
to just gather and talk Brown said.
Six months from the start of
construction, the project is expected
to take six months to complete. The
Cupola will stand 30-35 feet tall and
will be visible from all buildings on
campus as well as Fifth Street provid-
ing the community and visitors an
instantly recognizable landmark.
Facilities Planners have also
taken steps to spoil the hopes of
would be vandals once the project is
complete.
"Lighting and material selec-
tion will be the focus in deterring
vandalism said Facilities Planner
Bruce Frye. The Cupola will have a
masonry exterior that will allow for
the removal of spray paint and will be
very well lit at all times.
ECU students that fear con-
certs and Barefoot on the Mall will
be affected by this new structure can
relax.
"I believe the Cupola will add
to the Mall, it will give another for-
mal permanent location, things can
occur around it, in it, but it's far
enough off the center of the Mall that
it will not interfere with the band
shell Brown said.
The $223,900 project was en-
tirely funded by private donations
from two families, trustee Bill Furr
and family from Denver, N.C. and the
Lewis Weil family from Goldsboro,
N.C.
Coming soon
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
The Office ofhe Facilities Planned said the new recreational
center is currently on schedule for completion in December.
Construction employees have worked through heat and
cold to erect one of the university's largest buildings yet.
iT
VOTE from
P.i
code will pass despite the apparent con-
cern expressed by some of the Republi-
can board members Dyer said.
The amendment has become an
important issue with 16 of the 32 mem-
bers of the BOG coming up for re-elec-
tion this year. The BOG is appointed by
the state legislature, which has recently
come under Republican control.
Copies of ECU's Affirmative Ac-
tion Plan, which contains our non-dis-
crimination policy, are available in Joyner
Library, Health Sciences Library, the
Office of Equal Opportunity Programs,
Human Resources Department and in
the office of each vice chancellor.
I
104 West 5th St.
Coffee � Tea � Pastries
757-1070
Sun-Thurs 7am-12am Fri-Sat 7am-lam
ADVBmSED rra� POLICY- Eacn of these advertised items & required to Be readily available for sale in
each Kroger Store except as specifically noted m this ad if we do run out of an advertised item, we will
offer you your choice of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same savings or a rainchexk
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Thursday, January 26
Friday, January 27
Saturday, January 28
Sneak Preview
Wednesday, January 25,1995
Before Sunrise
Starring Ethan Hawke
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All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted and are FRfi to Students, Faculty, and Staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
JIMMY UmM(SPIRITEllkOUSTC)
FEBRUARY 1 -1:30 - 3:00 PM at Wri(JW�0�flop
Minority Within Minority - Lets Talk About Bloxton House
Tuesday, January 24, 1995 at 7:00 PM
AN EVENING WITH Mike Cross & Leo Kottke
8:00 PM � Monday, February 20, 1995
For more information, call 1-800-ECU-ARTS 028-2787) or 3284733-
SEXUALLY
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Wednesday, February 22,1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
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1-800-BCU-ARTS (328-2787)
or Locally at 328-4788
Sponsored by the
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Friday, January 27,1995
1:00-8:00 PM
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We're More Than Barefoot!
For More Information, Call the
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.





Tuesday, January 24,1995
The East Carolinian
Some advertising takes as long to
work as this tret Joes to qtow,
But not our classifieds.
You'll get immediate results from
advertising in our classifieds.
PATIENTS WANTED FOR
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If You Suffer From Asthma, You May Be Eligible To
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Medication. Age 18-70, Male Or Female, With Mild
To Moderate Asthma, Non-Smoker, Have Not Taken
Any Steroids Within 3 Months, And Have Not Had Any
Respitory Tract Infection In Last 4 Weeks. If
Interested Call East Carolina University Asthma And
Allergy Clinic At 919-816-3426 Or 919-816-3389.
Benefits: Possible That Asthma May Respond
Favorably To Treatment; Reimbursment; Study
Medication; Tests, Examination Free Of Charge.
Dr. W. James Met.ger Conducting Study. Cathy
Critchfield, R.N Study Coordinator.
NCLR from p. 1
focus on Black Mountain College, a
radical university located in the moun
tains of North Carolina that closed its
doors in 1956.
Subscriptions to Aft 7.A' are S i 7
for two issues and can he ordered by
writing to NCLR, English department.
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
278584353. It is also available at the
student store. University Book Ex-
change. Michael's and Quicksilver.
p.l
TV
- i
from p. 1
something like this has to happen, leads have been exhausted and the
That kind of takes the polish off case has been closed,
for us who have to work here ev "Unless and until something
eryday Doyle said. Maybe, with develops, there would need to be
the help of the ECU police depart- some lead that would cause us to
ment, we'll get the person who did
it-
Police fingerprinted the case
that the television was stolen from
Monday afternoon, police reports
stated. According to the reports, all
reopen it - as it stands now. it's
the case is closed Sgt. A!
Fonville of ECU public safety said.
"At the time, serial numbers were
not available, but they have been
acquired
Officials are hoping to pre
vent any more thefts from happen-
ing in the future.
"We hope that's not going to
be a normal thing, we're investigat-
ing it right now. getting serial num-
bers together we hope that it
won't happen again Van San t said.
"We're going to do something to
secure the units and make sure
doors are locked
SUSPEND fron,
for a semester, was punished tor. ac-
cording to him, "being there" when
the incident occurred, while another
member Derrek Batson, was sus-
pended for a year for "allegedly
knowing what was going on and not
saving anything
Although there is no official
definition for hazing, it is against
the law and The ECU Clue Book
states the penalties for it. In policy
II. under the code of conduct, it
states that anyone "endangering,
injuring or threatening the person
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or property of another" and "par-
ticipating in hazing or harassing
East Carolina students" is subject
to appropriate disciplinary action.
Disciplinary action can be initiated
by campus police, students, staff or
administrative personnel.
The Eta Nu chapter of the Al-
pha Phi Alpha fraternity here at
ECU did not induct a pledge class
last semester and is now suspended
until further notice. (ne member of
the nine man pledge class. Andree
Taylor, said that "all I know is that
I was a pledge and now I'm not"
Carter said he believes the in-
cident was "blown out of proportion
and we the Alphas) were treated un-
fairly
But according to Dean Speier,
the Student Life office and the
Panhellenic office (the advising
board for ECU sororities), received
two phone calls describing incidents
within the fraternity. Upon receiv-
ing that information. Speier's of-
fice began its investigation.
"The information received was
corroborated and substantiated and
supported the violations as listed
under the student Code of Con-
duct Speier said. "The Alphas did
a good job of unifying their pledges,
because they all stood together
throughout the investigation
Earrow said he is not trying
to make the incident into a racial
one. but, "I think often white fra-
ternities are slapped on the wrist,
called boys being boys he said.
Farrow said he does not un-
derstand why seven men could be
punished unless they were being
used as an example. "Dean Speier
told us lie had the power to give us
our punishment, but I think he was
trying to make a point to the mi-
nority students. You never hear of
a white guy going to an alcohol
detox because white fraternities are
swept under the rug
"That statement is inaccu-
AFTER 9 P.M. DINE IN ONLY
ALL ABC PERMITS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE PH. 757-1666
If you have 15 - 96 credits and a 3.0
G.P.A. or better, then you meet the initial
requirements for membership to the
Gamma Beta Phi
National Honor Society
There will be an informational meeting on
Tuesday, January 24 at 4:30pm in the
SpeightAuditorium of the Jenkins Art
Building. The regular meeting for
old members will be at 5:00.
Any questions?
Call Rob
at 757-2658
or Lisa
at 328-7938
Careers Require Experience.
Experience Leads to Success.
Don't Wait Until You Graduate to
Learn from Experience.
Attend
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ioln us for
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UCCESS
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February 1,1995
Ms. Kathy Barger
7:30 am,
February 7,1995
Call 328-4796 to RSVP
FREE BREAKFAST
If you could choose anyone to have
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who would you choose?
How about the superintendent of schools,
the president oi the Ronald McDonald
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learn their success stories and leadership
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Call 328-4796 by noon, the day before each
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Registration includes a wake up call,
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rate Speier said. "The law regulat-
ing hazing is very specific. If a mem-
ber of the administration knows that
(hazingl is taking place then they
are required to act upon it and no-
tify the proper authorities or they
are fired. There can be no 'sweep-
ing. "
"On TV, Mr. Batson referred
to fraternities as simply black and
white, alleging discrimination which
is totally against the law and na
tional fraternity policies said In
terfraternity Council (1FC) President
Justin Conrad. "My concern with
this issue is that, publicly, Mr.
Batson tried to turn this incident
into a racial incident that just did
not exist
IFC governs 17 fraternities at
ECU, of which the Alphas chose not
to be members. Instead, they are a
part of the National Panhellenic
Council which historically recog-
nizes and governs African-American
fraternities and sororities.
As far as Batson is concerned,
"the community is suffering" from
the suspension of the members and
the fraternity as a whole. "Alphas
are very busy in the Greenville com-
munity as well as nationally Batson
said. "Our programs will be missed
One of the programs Batson
is referring to was the absence of
the 12th annual Martin Luther King
Jr. Memorial. Every year prior to
this, the Alphas have supported and
run the program, which used to be
considered the largest student-run
African-American program on cam-
pus.
Batson also stressed the univer-
sity will lose a lot of student leaders
with the suspension. "You need a 2.5
GPA to get into my fraternity, higher
than most other fraternities, and you
are based on you leadership , schol-
arship and service. The intake
progress is very rigorous
"And the community will miss
us because we feed the hungry and
clothe the naked. A lot of people are
going to be missing out Batson said.
Batson is not sure of his plans for the
future but one thing is certain to him,
"Alpha is is the heart, never to depart"
"I've washed my hands of Alpha
Phi Alpha but I'm not turning my back
on my fraternity Farrow said. "I
don't have any hard feelings against
Dean Speier because I recognize his
position but 1 don't think the suspen-
sion was called for.
"I was only a semester away
from graduating but right now my
only priority is my son
White said "the Eta Nu chap-
ter was the first black fraternity on a
mostly white campus in North Caro-
lina and that this is its first brush with
the law
"Alpha is not gone forever be-
cause we'll be back and more active
than ever Batson said.
"The issue is dead on campus
White said. "Alpha does not believe
in hazing and does not condone the
activities that occurred with the Eta
Nus We are disappointed and sorry
about what happened to the brothers
and the victim.
.
IRTOtRVED
Monday 23 - Friday 27
9:00 am - 4:00pm
ECU Student Stores Deposit $25.00
"Officially Licensed East Carolina Ring Dealer" WSSSSSM
Student Stores
0: I t-f-T IfW I
OX � , " Special Payment Ptarts Available
IRTCIRVED
CCi-i ri-r svv lW





w
Tuesday, January 94,1995
The East Carolinian
Our View
The recent
dissapearance
of a 19-inch
color
television
from
Williams
Arena lends
credibility to
the
suggestion
that ECU
students are,
and always
will be,
irresponsible
and
incorrigible
troublemakers.
It was too good to be true.
ECU spends $11.4 million to renovate Minges Coli-
seum, signals the change by renaming the joint, and
not three weeks goes by before someone breaks in and
rips something off.
One of the 27 brand-new Zenith 19-inch televisions
that encompasses the upper level of Williams arena was
stolen sometime after the James Madison dedication
game and before 9 a.m. on Jan. 16, the day of the Pi-
rates' next game.
This fact will indeed only lend credibility to the no-
tion, according to our friends in the Triangle (the Wolves,
Dookies and UNC Baby-Blues), that we East Carolin-
ians are criminally-minded troublemakers.
Maybe so, but we sure are crafty little devils.
Although our in-state rivals are adept at participat-
ing in celebratory park bench bonfires and interscho-
lastic downtown rumbles (all in good fun, of course),
one or more of our very own Greenvillites has found a
way to climb up and free a cable-ready gem from its
lofty perch above the Williams Arena lobby, escaping
unmolested to the nearest pawn shop or back to his or
her home.
Or maybe it was a collegiate Triangle spy working
undercover in purple and gold?
Nah. The safety and efficiency of this act obviously
borrowed from knowledge and skills learned by taking
good notes and.paying close attention in that hard-to-
find physicsengineeringHow To Be a Criminal block
course here at ECU. At least we can say that our school
prepares us for the real world.
It seems, looking back, that there could have been
some kind of a top-notch security system The Club
latched on the back of each TV set?) installed as part of
the renovation. At least they could have put serial num-
bers on them.
Seriously, what we are trying to say is that the re-
percussions of this rather, well, stupid act is topping
the list of any ECU information heading toward the Tri-
angle, and will only further damage our already-tainted
reputation in the area.
The opening of Williams Arena on Jan. 6 took ECU,
especially the basketball programs, to another level in
the collegiate world. However, we as a school need to
open our eyes and recognize that we will never be looked
at as scholastically and athletically on par with UNC,
N.C. State or Duke if we keep shooting ourselves in the
foot with actions such as this.
More sex education needed
Last week I watched a talk show
on teenage pregnancy. One of the
guests, Sherry, really shocked me. She
has given birth to a child every year
since she was 14 year? old. At the age
of 19 she was the mother of four kids
and was pregnant with another.
One out of every ten girls in the
United States today gives birth to a
baby before reaching the age of 18.
More than 500,000 of these teenag-
ers struggle just to finish high school.
Teen mothers without a high
I school education are twice as likely
to live in households receiving Aids
; to Families with Dependent Children
! (AFDC), compared to women with a
� high school education.
With little education and a large
demand for money, these young moth-
ers resort to the welfare system for
I economic support However, welfare
I is not a chosen means of support for
a few teenagers. If a job is offered they
� will accept
Having a baby out of wedlock
as a teenager is the surest road to
long-term welfare dependency. About
C 50 percent of all teenage mothers are
- on welfare within one year of the birth
- of their first child, and 77 percent are
J on welfare within five years, accord-
ing to the Congressional Budget of-
fice.
The public costs of these births,
including welfare, medical care and
Angela McCullers
Opinion Columnist
Half of all teen
moms on welfare
food stamps has been estimated at $30
billion in 1994. The cost may go up
this year.
Teenage mothers complete less
formal education than young girls
without children. On average, only 5
percent of teen mothers receive col-
lege degrees, compared to 47 percent
of those who have children at the age
of 25 or older.
One Center for Population
Research study found that at least 23
percent of teen mothers admitted to
intentionally becoming pregnant.
Most of these are unprepared for fie
experience of motherhood. A very few
number of teenagers have an adequate
idea of what it means to be a parent.
When 23 percent of these children
want children we have a serious cri-
sis facing our nation.
One-third of the daughters of
teenage mothers will go on to become
teen mothers themselves.
Many people think that sex edu-
cation in the school systems will solve
the dilemma of teenage pregnancy. I,
on the other hand, do not think so. I
believe that the schools cannot fight
this battle alone and win.
It is time for parents to step in
and take on their responsibilities.
There are some things that need to
be taught at home, not in the school
system. All parents should be respon-
sible for educating their children
about sex, values and morals. The best
education starts in the home.
Although most local school dis-
tricts are free to offer sex education,
a majority of students get no sex edu-
cation in their schools.
The high school that I gradu-
ated from (Smithfield-Selma High) did
not offer sex education classes at all.
We had wood design classes, home
economic classes and auto repair
classes, but not one single sex educa-
tion class.
Nonschool programs seem
more likely than school-based ones to
cover the more controversial topics
that are of most interest to teens, such
as contraception, sexual decision mak-
ing, values, feelings and premarital
sex.
Sex education is also offered
through religious organizations,
youth agencies, family planning clin-
ics, medical schools and other orga-
nizations.
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lasstter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assistant News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson, Assistant Sports Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Assistant Layout Manager
Randall Roziell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Ass't Creative Director
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Paul D. Wright, Media Adviser
Janet Respess, Media Accountant
Deborah Daniel,Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925,The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The lead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board.The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to
250 words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. All letters must be signed. Letters should be addressed to Opinion Editor,The East Carolinian, Publications
Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For information, call (919) 328-6366.
(that capkiciousT
IWHIMSICAU -HOUft'
V BUG.
Americans: Politically ignorant
The American political system
is broken. People are angry with their
elected officials for not being respon-
sive. Voters say they want change in
their government
The answer is deeper than many
of the answer pundits give us. They
talk about term limits. They give us
complicated solutions like campaign
finance reform. They tell us the prob-
lem is the two major parties have be-
come stagnant. May the answer be
much simpler than we would like to
admit? The problem may not be the
politicians as much as it is us. Michael
Kinsley tells us voters in favor of term
limits are saying, "Stop me before I
vote again
Kinsley may have struck a glanc-
ing blow at the root cause of our po-
litical problems: the voters. We can-
not expect elected officials to answer
to an ill- informed and apathetic elec-
torate.
Nearly half of the adults in a
1994 poll did not even know the name
of their U.S. representative. Sixty-
seven percent of voters polled in a
1992 survey said television advertis-
ing was their primary source of infor-
mation on who to vote for. These
must be the same people who
Thomas W. Blue
Opinion Columnist
Who is your
representative?
wouldn't know what was funny if it
weren't for laugh tracks on network
television.
We live in a democratic society
where only half of the population
votes. Elected officials will not be
responsive unless we demand that
they be held accountable.
The Student Government Asso-
ciation (SGA) is a classic example of
this problem. Many students say the
SGA is not responsive to our needs,
yet anyone can join the organization
and try to change things. There are
even vacant positions because no one
cares enough to apply. This student
legislature spends over $150,000 of our
student fees.
It is unreasonable to expect SGA
to look out for our needs - if we are
unwilling to do it ourselves.
The same point can be illustrated
in local politics. Students often com-
plain about the Greenville City Coun-
cil. They say ordinances like the one
prohibiting more than three unrelated
adults from living in the same dwell-
ing are unfair.
However, there was not a crowd
of students to represent that view when
the Greenville board of adjustment dis-
cussed the enforcement of the ordi-
nance on January 19. Why should city
government respond to students' needs
if we don't bother to voice our con-
cerns? We cannot expect our politi-
cians, locally or nationally, to respond
to us unless we demand that they do.
The ordinance outlawing more
than three unrelated adults from liv-
ing in the same house may be enforced
in the near future. The legislature may
cut funding for higher education in
North Carolina. Congress may not deal
with many of the problems we want it
to.
However, people should not com-
plain about these or any other prob-
lems unless they are willing to get in-
volved or at least informed about gov-
ernment Changing our political sys-
tem is an individual responsibility. We
just can't afford to leave it up to the
politicians.
m
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
This reply concerns Patrick
Davis' letter in the Jan. 10th edition.
I thank you for commenting, but I
will stand behind my statement. Yes.
I did comment "Hey Jesse Helms,
you work for Bill Clinton and in
the literal sense, that is incorrect, but
there are many aspects of authority
a President enjoys over a Senator.
Don't insult my intelligence, Mr.
Davis.
The executive and legislative
branches are a "team" of sorts, work-
ing together to reform the country.
Senator Jesse Helms is definitely a
member of this unit, and I would con-
tend in this regard he works for the
Chief Executive Officer. The Presi-
dent spearheads the movement to
improve the country. His role is pri-
mary in the public eye, and with his
executive privileges (and his power
to veto legislation) he has leverage
over members of Congress. How
picky can we get, Mr. Davis? No, look-
ing at it technically, Sen. Jesse Helms
doesn't work for Clinton, but come
on Mr. Davis. I could write a weak
letter insulting someone else's aca-
demic integrity were they to make a
minor snafu such as this, but what
would the point be? Believe me. I
don't need any "basic lessons" other
than but what is offered by our fine
faculty. Perhaps I rushed through the
letter in my anger over Mr. Helms'
idiotic remark. What I need to leam
is how to deal with nit picky people
who can't understand creative writ-
ing. It is Helms, not I, who has a
"long way to go
Larry Freeman
Political Science
Junior
The East Carolinian welcomes all Letters to the Editor.
However, all letters, in order to be considered for publication,
must be typed, under 250 words, and contain your name,
class rank, major and a working daytime phone number.
Send,these to: Letters to the Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C. 27858-4353.
ji
i �
mmt-Hmm�





� m
Tuesday, January 24,1995
The Cast Carolinian
f Help Wanted I )� Travel
nfe For Rent
M For Sale
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR
House at 206-A East 12th St Rent
.$450 month. 2BR House at 206-B
East 12th St Rent $295 month. Also,
2BR Apartment at 810 Cotanche,
Rent $325 month Call 757-3191.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example of Frank Lloyd Wright archi-
tecture. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large dining room, kitchen and living
room with fireplace. New refrigerator,
washerdryer, fenced backyard, nice
shrubbery. Convenient to campus and
hospital. $750.00mo.deposit 524-
5790 day - 752-8079 night
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two and
one Bedrooms(s) Apartments at
Wesley Commons For Rent. Free
Cable. Call 758-1921.
STUDIOUS AND SOCIAL female
roommate to live in 3BR, 2Bath apt
in Tar River. 13 utilities and phone,
$208month. Call Tonya 752-5525.
APARTMENT FOR RENT Spacious
2 Bedroom 1 Bath stove, Frig. - 2 Bed-
room 2 Bam, stove, Frig Dishwasher,
Garbage Dispol, Washer, Dryer, Wa-
ter, Sewer, Basic Cable included 2
Blocks from Campus. Dogwood Hol-
low Apts. Call 752-8900
ROONMATE(S) NEEDED Male
Female(s) to live w two SWF's in 2
bedroom Tar River Apt If 2 room-
mates found 128.71month 14
utilities. If 1 roommate found 171
month 13 utilities. Please call 752-
.8428.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a 3-bedroom newly renovated
house. Close to campus and down-
town. Non-smoking uppeiclassman or
jgrad student preferred. Give us a call.
.Chris or Claudia 758-5024.
APARTMENTS FOR RENT: Up-
stairs 2BR, 1 bath apartment on Wash-
ington Street Great Condition & af-
fordable. $295.00 per month. 2BR, 1
12 bath duplex near campus. Fire-
place spaicous kitchen an living room.
$475.00 per month. Available now.
-Call Pro Management 756-1234.
HOUSES FOR RENT NEAR CAM-
PUS: 3BR, 1 bath house locatd on
�13th Street New carpet vinyl, freshly
-painted. $550.00 pre month. 3BR, 1
bath house located on Glen Arthur.
Central heat & air, large yard, excel-
lent condition. $585.00 per month.
2BR, 1 bath house on 12th Street
Gas heat $465.00 per month. 3BR, 1
Bath house on Washington Street.
Gas heat $450.00 per month. All
Available Now. Call Pro Management
of Greenville, 756-1234.
TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT: 3BR,
2 12 bath located at Brookhill.
$600.00 per month includes pool.
3BR. 2 12 bath located near Athletic
Club. Private patio, cable included.
$625.00. 2 & 3BR available at Wild-
wood Villas. Great Student location.
Some have finished basments. Prices
start at $525.00. Available now. Call
Pro Management 756-1234.
NAGS HEAD, NC - Get your group
together early. Two relatively new
houses; fully furnished; washer &
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; Avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
7 - $1500.00 per month; sleeps 8-9 -
$2100.00 per month (804) 850-1532
NOW LEASING MERIDIAN PARK
APARTMENTS: Luxurious new 2
bedroom units located minutes from
the hospital. Spacious units include
;gas fireplaces, all major appliances,
! gas heat 1200 S.F. of living space, and
Imuch more. Prices start at $585.00.
! Available Feb. 1. Call 321-1948. Pro-
'fessionalry managed by Pro Manage-
ment of Greenville.

t
i
i
i
CANNONDALE 55cm RED ROAD
BIKE - Shimano 600 - Time Pedals -
Mavic Tubular Rims - Turbo Ti Saddle
$450. Call Jeff at 752-1247.
IBM COMPATIBLE COMPUTER,
color monitor, color capable printer,
and MORE. Perfect or computer illit-
erate! $400 or best offer. Call Mary
758-3426
TREK 7000 ALUMINUM excellent
condition $500 or best offer Call Tom
at 752-9356
RAY BAN SUNGLASSES only 1
month old. Black steel wrap-arounds
with case $80 obo. Call 830-1853
RALEIGH 531 series 12 speed
roadbike for sale with excellent
acessories - Look pedals, Aero bars,
and cyclemeter. Excellent condition.
Asking $350.00 obo.
Call David 328-7188
HAWAIIAN ISLAND CREATIONS
SURFBOARD and Wetsuit! It's 6 ft
and has excellent manuverability. Will
sacrifice both for a mere 200 bucks.
Call 756-3901.
SEGA GENSIS18 Games and equip-
ment 300 neg. Call 328-8215
1985 FORD BRONCO II, XLS 4 w
d, air conditioning, power steering and
brakes. Newer tires and brakes. Please
call 758-8521
FOR SALE: Super Single Waterbed
with bookshelf, headboard, and 12
drawers. Excellent condition. New
comforter and waterbed sheets in-
cluded. Must sell immediately!
$150.00 Call 757-3704
fj Services Offered
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Librtry otinformation in U.S. -
allsubjects
Ar0er Ciljlog Today wn Viy ' K or C00
800-351-0222
OM310I 477-8220
Or. rusf! S? 00 to Research Information
Zicar-o e . .2QSiJ.QlAr.ge'es C4MC2L
ORDERING
H0TUNE
ff Help Wanted
CAMPUS REP
WANTED
The nation's leader m college marketing
is seeking an energetic, entrepreneurial
student lor the position of campus rep.
No sales involved. Place advertising on
bulletin boards for companies such as
American Express and Microsoft.
Great part-time job earnings. Choose
your own hours; 4-8 hours per week
required. Call:
Campus Rep Program
American Passage Media Corp.
215 W. Harrison, Seattle, WA 98119
(800) 487-2434 Ext 4444
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6 Bil-
lion in private sector grants & schol-
arships is now available. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, in-
come, or parent's income. Let us help.
Call Student Financial Services: 1-800-
263-6495 ext. F53623
TUTORING - IMPROVE TOUR EN-
GLISH! Experienced teacher can tu-
tor you in conversation, writing and
TOEFL. Will edit papers also. Call
Pam at 758-6952.
GREEKS! DON'T FORGET MMP!
Mobile Music Production is the pre-
mier Disc Jockey service for your cock-
tail, social, and formal needs. The most
variety and experience of any Disc
Jockey service in the area. Specializ-
ing in ECU Greeks. Spring dates book-
ing fast Call early, 7584644 ask for
Lee.
PIANO LESSONS OFFERED Stop
making excuses and call Kevin today
for affordable piano lessons for begin-
ning or intermediate pianists. 758-
2479
FRENCH TUTORING I am a
French exchange student, and can tu-
tor you in conversation or writing.
Don't hesitate to call me at 328-8159
and ask for Benjamin.
,���,�,�,�
PLAYERS CLUB
Students Needed!
n i 'tir It.win Knu

�BaS
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
Earn up to $2,000month working
on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour compa-
nies. World travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the
Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal and Full-
time employment available. No expe-
rience necessary. For more informa-
tion call 1-206-634-0468 ext. C53623
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students
needed! Fishing industry. Earn up to
$3,000- $6,000 per month. Room
and board! Transportation! Male or
Female. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 5454155 ext A53622
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1,000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a licensed agency.
Must be 18, dependable and have own
phone and transportation. Call Dia-
monds or Emerald City Escorts at
758-0896 or 757-3477
TELEMARKETING- Davenport Exte-
riors Thermal Gard- $5 per hour plus
bonus. Easy work, flexible hours start
today. Call 355-0210
PANAMA CITY BEACH, SPRING
BREAK 1995! 7 nights deluxe party
package $149.00 P.P. Campus Reps.
Wanted. Earn FREE Trips. Call Gator
Rock (800) 410-2867.
BASEBALL UMPIRES NEEDED
Anyone interested in umpiring youth
baseball games (ages 9-18) for the
Spring and Summer should contact
the Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department Athletic Office Immedi-
ately! 15-20 Umpires needed. Pay $15-
$20 per game. For more information
please call the Athletic Office at 830-
4550 after 2pm.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DE-
VELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF
ATHLETICS, is now accepting appli-
cations for tutors. A minimum 2.5 GPA
is required. Please call 3284550 for
more information.
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Clean, High volume Adult Club needs
YOU now. Confidential employment
Daily pay Top Commissions. Some to
no experience. If you've called before
call again. Playmates Massage Snow
Hill, N.C. 919-747-7686
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, We'll pay you to!
Make your A's pay by calling Student
Supplements today. We'll pay you cash
for going to class! Give us a call at
752-HELP
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! Spaiefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH Self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
MEN are accepting applications for
part-time sales positions Work with
the fashions you love to wear: Junior
Sportswear, Accessories, and
Youngmen's appaarel. Flexible sched-
uling optionssalaryclothing dis-
count. All retail positions include
weekends. Applications accepted Mon-
day and Thurday, l-3pm, Biody s. The
Plaza.
SITTING OUT THIS SEMESTER or
have plenty of free time during the
day? Brady's is accepting applications
for Receiving Room Associates. Verify
incoming freightprice merchandise.
Some lifting required. Excellent hours.
Applications accepted Monday and
Thursday, l-3pm, Brady's, The Plaza.
ECU ROPESCHALLENGE course
facilitators needed. Flexible schedules,
excellent pay. Interested persons call
328-6064.
WANTED: Photographers to free
lance for the School of Business. We
need photos for 3 to 6 events during
the semester. Call Professional Pro-
grams at 328-6377.
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. EARN
$1000's WEEKLY working at home
mailing our circulars. Free details,
Send SASE: R&B Distributors, Box
20354, Greenville NC 27858
WANTED MATH MAJOR OF GRAD
STUDENT to come to my home
(close to campus) every Mon. & Wed.
night to tutor me through Math 1065.
$20 per week. Call 752-5705 and leave
message.
WANTED: ORIGINAL ARTWORK
for T-Shirt Design. Call Les @ 752-
6953 between 8-5
$1750 weekly possible mailing our
circulars. No experience required.
Begin now. For info call 202-298952.
POOL MANAGERS (Aquatic Direc-
tors, Head Guards, Assistant Head
Guards). SpSum 95. GteenvilePitt
County, Goldsboro, Kinston, Tarboro.
Call Bob, 758-1088.
SUMMER POSITION AVAILABLE:
gain career experience and save
$4000.00 . Please call 18002514000
ext. 1576. Leave name, school now
attending and phone number
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt
County Memorial is seeking qualified
individuals to teach aerobic class
through its Employee Recreation and
Wellness Department. Persons will
contract to teach on a part-time ba-
sis. Interested candidates should con-
tact Ms. Scottie Gaskins between 8am-
4:30pm at (919)816-5958. Pitt'County
Memorial Hospital
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call Toll
Free 1-800467-5566. Ext 5920
SUMMER JOBS, Earn 3 hours col-
lege credit; Save $4-500. Call 1-800-
251400 Ext 1576
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8
Days Oceanview Room with a Kitchen
$129! Walk to Best Bars! Includes
Free Discount Card Which Will Save
You $100 on FoodDrinks! 1-800-678-
6386
SPRING BREAK PANAMA CITY
beach Florida, from $91 per person
per week Free Info 1-800488-8828
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Book Now & Save. Jamaica $439,
CancunBahamas $399, Panama City
$119, Daytona $149, Organize
Groups, Earn Cash, & Travel Free.
Endless Summer 1-800-234-7007.
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring
Break - How about it in the Bahamas
or Florida Keys. Where the Party
never ends. Spend it on your own pri-
vate yacht One week only $385.00 per
person. Including food and much
more. Organizers may go for free! Easy
Sailing Yacht Charters 1-800-783-
4001.
� Travel
AS SEE LAST APRIL ON THS NEWS"4fl HOI IIS"
BOTVC YOtlESWLF & $VCl
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
csEsa
STEAMBOAT
VAILBEAVER CREEK
' PER PERSON W KWWC ON DESTllATlON MM DATfS LENGTH Of STAY
1-800-SUNCHASE
TOLL mi INroCWATION & FCSEFVATIONS
SPRING BREAK '95!
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
Jamaica
� Lost and found
FOUND: 10 speed Bike at 5th St-
and Eastern. January 20 between 11
and 12. Call 757-1415
V
Bahamas
Special Group Rates & Free Travel!
Sun Splash Tours y
1-800-426-7710 A
Personals
HELP! Need ride to and from Cherry
Point Will Split gas. Call Sooz at 756-
9819. Leave message.
Greek Personals
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA wants to Con-
gratulate all of the fraternities on
another reat rush.
CONGRATULATIONS Chandra Mar-
tin on your Pi Kappa Alpha pin! Love
your SIGMA SISTERS.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW ALPHA XI DELTA OFFIC-
ERS: PresAmanda Beasley, VP-Jen
Byerly, Rec. SecKristen Gale, Cor.
Sec-Kelly Fountain. TreasKrista
Britton, Quill-Alison Rouse. Member-
ship-Amy Williams. Soical-Suan
WhitfieldJodi Strickland, Pledge Ed
Mandy Parris, Philanthropy-Michelle
Barnes, Alumni-Kati Craig, Chaplain-
Amy Dodson, Fiancial Kim
Poots,Historian-Jen EUithorpe, House-
man-Debbie Allison, Heritage-Christa
Maiers, Scrapbook-Rene Hood,
Scholorship-Renee Reese, Asst Treas
Heather Atkinson, Marshall-Amry
Peek, Panhellenic-Holiy Black, Comm.
SerMarcie Shelton
CONGRATULATIONS RHO
PLEDGE CLASS! Rebecca Weeks,
Rachel Jones, Vanessa Farmer,
Rosalyn Bekerman, Gina Herring,
Toni Daleo, Karen Jurgens, Meadow
Hensley, Brandi Foster, Jennifer
Hudson, Catherine Niles, Amanda Obi,
Amy Bergner, Shannon Jordan, Debra
Bard, Cathryn Singletary, and Sabina
Sehgal. Welcome to the Zeta Tau Al-
pha Sisterhood! Love, your sisters!
CONGRATULATIONS to all fraterni-
ties on a successful rush. Good luck
with your new pledges. Pi Delta.
SIG TAU- Thanks for inviting us last
Thurs. We all had a great time. Can't
wait to see you all again! Love Pi Delta
sisters.
TO ALL ECU FEMALES: Come
learn about sorority life. Rush Pi Delta
Jan. 30-Feb. 2. Look for more info on
Thurs. Any Questions? Call 758-9902
or 752-8724 (Nicole).
THE SISTERS OF DELTA ZETA
hope all fraternaties had a successful
Spring Rush.
CONGRATULATIONS NEW DELTA
ZETA SISTERS Sue Clarke, Amy
Dawkins, Stephanie Heckert, Ginger
Hollingsworth, Amy Johnson, Jenny
Lanka, Lisa Mazzoni, Faith Noyes,
Stacey Rodemer, Amanda Smith, Jes-
sica Theobald, & Julie Webb. Love
your sisters!
CONGRATULATIONS CHERYL
BYERS on becoming President of
Order of Omega. Good Luck! Love the
sisters of Delta Zeta.
SPRING BREAK! Bahamas Party
Cruise 6 days $279! Includes 12 Meals
& 6 Free Parties! Great Beaches &
Nightlife! A HUGE Party! Cancun &
Jamaica 7 Nights Air & Hotel From
$429. Spring Break Travel 1-800-678-
6386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BREAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa Beach(Near
Disney)-27 Acre Deluxe Beach front
Resort 7 Nights $159! Key West $229!
Daytona Beach Room with Kitchen
From $129! 1-800-678-6386
BAHAMAS
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CRUISE
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8 DAYS-12 MEALS-ALL TAXES
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IT'S BETTER IN THE BAHAMAS I
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� �gp
Tuesday, January 24,1995
ANNOU
The East Carolinian
SPECIAL OLYMPICS COACHES
NEEDED
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special Olym-
pics will be conducting a Track &
Field Coaches Training School on
Sat, Feb 4 from 9:O0am - 3:30pm for
all persons interested in becoming a
certified volunteer track coach. We
also need coaches for the following
Sports: equestrian, bowling,
powerlifting. vol!eyball. softball. swim-
ming, rollerskating & gymnastics. NO
EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY. For
more information, contact Connie or
Dwain at 830-4541 or 830-4551.
FLETCHER HALL RESIDENTS
Come join us in the Fletcher Hall
lobby on January 25.1995 9:00pm for
DOWNTOWN FLETCHER Every resi-
dent is permitted one guest and ev-
eryone must bring a picture ID to be
admitted. There will be music, bever-
ages, and snacks for all to enjoy. Take
part in the fun of DOWNTOWN
FLETCHER!
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will hold its first
meeting of the Spring Semester on
January 24th at 5:00pm in the Speight
Auditorium of Jenkens Art Building.
There will be important information
presented involving business for the
upcoming semester. The meeting will
last approximately 45 minutes and all
members are strongly encouraged to
attend.
PHI SIGMA PI NATIONAL
HONOR FRATERNITY
If you have between 32-96 credit
hours and at least a 3.3 g.p.a you are
invited to attend Phi Sigma Pi's
Smoker Jan. 24. 1994 in MSC 244.
Transfer hours also count
STUDENT LEADERSHIP
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
Student Leader Meeting, Wednesday,
January 25, 1995 5-6pm, 221
MSCLearn of leadership skills
workshopsLeam how to earn $100
free room through OA
positionsDiscover how the
SACCURAH conference hosted by
RHAbenefits your group Refresh-
ments provided.Call 328-4796 for
more info!
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Do you have 2 hours a week to share
with a child ages 5-11 or an adoles-
cent in 9th grade? If so become a part
of East Carolina Friends. Our inter-
est meetings are Jan 31 - Feb 2(only
attend one) 5:00 in Mendenhal (Room
TBA). All Guys and Girls welcome.
NATURAL LIFE CLUB
The Natural Life Club is hosting a
"Mystery Trip" on February 4th 'leav-
ing from the front of Christenbury at
4:30pm. You won't know where you
are going, but we promise you will
have a great time. Space is limited 50
reserve a spot with S2 before Febru-
ary 2nd in Christenbury 204.
STRESS MANAGEMENT-
RELAXATION TRAINING
This five-session workshop will ex-
plore the causes of stress and the ef-
fects it can have on you. Experience
various relaxation techniques in or-
der to cope with stress more effec-
tively. Mondays. 2:00pm-3:30pm, be-
ginning 1 30. Counseling Center. Call
328-6661 to register.
AFRICAN-AMERICAN SUPPORT
GROUP
Many students who are African-
american find that functioning in a
prejudicial world is stressful. This
group offers a chance to share con-
cerns and identify ways of managing
conflicts which arise. Tuesday,
3:30pm-5:00pm. Counseling Center.
Call 328-6661 to register.
COPING WITH LOSS SUPPORT
GROUP
This group is designed for those who
have experienced the loss or death of
a significant person. The focus is on
understanding feelings, reactions to
loss, how to move toward recovery,
taking care of needs, and developing
a positive outlook. Wednesday.
4:00pm-5:00pm. Counseling Center.
Call 328-6661 to register.
ACADEMIC SURVIVAL SKILLS
Scheduling & Time Management: 1
23. 9am-10am: 1, 31. 2pm-3pm. Note
Taking & Study Strategies: 1 30.
9am-10am. Counseling Center. Call
328-6661 to register.
SEXUAL ABUSE SURVIVORS
WORKSHOP
This three-session workshop for fe-
male survivors will focus on psycho-
logical and emotional issues associ-
ated with childhood incest andor
sexual abuse. Family behaviors, rules,
and individual roles will be identified:
with particular attention to how these
affect current personality styles and
relationships. Wednesdays, 3:30pm-
5:00pm. Beginning 21. Counseling
Center. Call 328-6661 to register.
H20 POLO OFFICIALS
MEETING
Recreational Services will be holding
a H20 Polo Officials Meeting on
Wednesday, Jan.25 at 9pm in Brewster
Building B Rm.102. Meeting is man-
datory for employment. Call 328-6387
for more details.
PIRATE DOUBLE DARE
Recreational Services will host the 3rd
Annual Double Dare Gef Nasty Com-
petition Thursday, January 26 at
6:15pm in Christenbury Gym. Regis-
ter your 4 person team today in 204
Christenbury Gym. Great prizes, it's
free, and fun! Sign up now. It only
lasts an hour. Call Rec Services at 328-
6387 for details.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
Career Services office will hold ori-
entation meetings for seniors and
graduate students graduating in May
Summer 1995 on Jan 26 at 2:00pm.
The program will include an overview
of services available to help prospec-
tive graruates find employment, as
well as procedures for registering with
Career Services. Students will also
receive instructions on establishing a
credentials file and how to participate
in employment interviews on campus.
Interested students are asked to meet
at the new Career Services Center.
701 E. 5th St.
INTERVIEW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate students com-
pleting their degree in May or the
Summer are invited to attend an in-
terview skills workshop Tue Jan 24
at 2:00pm. Sponsored by Career Ser-
vices, the workshop will be held at the
new address of Career Services, 701
E. 5th St. No pre-registration is re-
quired.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
"For planning purposes, a survey is
being taken of the number of students
who would definitely have majored in
Religious Studies if such a major had
been offered. If such a major is ever
offered, it will be several years from
now, so this data is being collected
purely for planning purposes. If you
would have majored in Religious Stud-
ies if such a major had been offered
during your years here, call 328-6121
and leave your name and a message
for Calvin Mercer or drop your name
in campus mail to Calvin Mercer,
Brewster A404
LISTENING TO YOUR BODY
Stress effects you phsically as well as
emotionally. Discover how the use of
biofeedback is used to pinpoint your
stressors and sid in relaxation. 130,
3:30pm-5:00pm. Counseling Center.
Call 328-6661 to register.
EAST CAROLINA CLASSIC
ROCK SOCIETY
Any students who have an interest in
forming a Classic Rock Music Soci-
ety " on campus please call Rob at 756-
4916. you don't have to play an in-
strument or be a musician to take
part.
STUDENT EXCHANGE-STUDY
ABROAD
England. Netherlands. New England.
California, these are a few places some
of your peers will be this fall because
they have applied for exchange! There
is still time to consider a student ex-
change or study abroad experience for
next fall or spring but time is running
short! If you are interested in study
sites which are available, visit
Mendenhall Lobby, Jan. 24, between
11:00 -1:00 to pick up brochures and
information on study abroad and na-
tional exchanges or stop in the Inter-
national Programs office on 9th
Street. Pay ECU tuition and study at
another location! Do it soon while
sites are still available!
ECU LACROSSE
Anyone interested in playing LaCrosse
this Spring, please contact Brian Trail
at 758-1348. Please leave your name
and number.
TRI-BETA
Tri-Beta is sponsoring a bloodmobile
through the American Red Cross on
Friday, January 27th at Mendenhall
from 12 noon to 6:00 p.m. Our goal is
to collect 175 pints of blood. Due to
low donations and inventories, it is
imperative that we meet this goal.
EAST CAROLINA
SOCIOLOGICAL SOCIETY
ECUSS: Attention Sociology majors
and minors: The ECU Sociological
Society would like to invite you to
attend our next meeting. It will be
held on Jan 25 in Brewster D, room
305 at 2:00pm.
Sales
happen in
our
classifieds
as quickly
multiply.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION (AMA)
Start your semester fresh by coming
ti i AMA meeting on January 2ti at ) I
pm in GC. Our speaker is going to be
Docor Wheatley and he will be talk
ing about how to market yourself
Pizza and refreshments will be served
plus you will have an opportunity to
win a free T-shirt.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services office will hold
orientation meetings for seniors and
graduate students graduating in May
Summer 1995 on the following dates:
Jan.26 at 2:00 p.m and Wed. Feb. 1
at 4:00 p.m. The program will include
an overview of services available to
help prospective graduates find em-
ployment, as well as procedures for
registering with Career Services. Stu-
dents will also receive instructions on
establishing a credentials file and how
to participate in employment inter-
views on campus. Interesrested stu-
dents are asked to meet at the new
Career Services Center. 701 E. Fifth
Street.
JOB SEARCH NETWORKING
WORKSHOP
Career Services announces a work-
shop designed to help prospective
graduates find employment. Network-
ing and other strategies will be dis-
cussed and handouts will be available.
The program will be held in The Ca-
reer Services Building. 701 E. Fifth
St. on Wed. Jan. 25. at 4:00 p.m.
INTERVIEW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduate students com-
tingl - degree in May or the sum-
mer are invited to attend an interview
skills workshop on Moo. Jan. 30 at
4:00. Sponsored by Career Services.
the workshops will be held at the new
address of Career Services. 701 E
Fifth Strvet. No pre registration is
required
ECL SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TIES Jan. 24- Graduate Recital,
jenny M. Parker, accompanying (AJ.
Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 p.m free).
THL'RS Jan. 26-Junior Recital.
Helen Pridgen-Gomez. voice, and Wil-
liam Tynch. saxophone (A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. 7:00 p.m free). FRL. Jan.
27-Guest Recital. Wilma Jensen, or-
ganist (First Presbyterian Church.
Kinston. NC. 8:00 p.mfree). SAT
Jan.28-Choral Materclass presented
by Wilma Jensen, guest organist (A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall, 10 a.rr - 12p.m
free). Scholarship Benefit Gala of the
Friends of the School of Music, (For
further information, call 328-6851).
Mon Jan. 30-ECU Composer Show-
case, Carroll V. Dashiell, Jr string
brass: Brad Foley, saxophone: Mark
Ford. Dercussion: John B. O'Brien,
piano: Bitton Theurer, trumpet: Chris-
topher Ulffers, bassoon; and Nathan
Williams, clarinet (AJ. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 p.m free). For additional
information, call ECU-6851 or the 24-
hour hotline at ECU-4370.
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure
to pick up your FREE video yearbook.
Available at the Student Store. The
East Carolinian. Joyner Library.
Mendenhall and the Media Board of-
fice in the Student Publications Build-
ing.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pittman Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:00-4:00
r0jfi enTat T oTOI s s i s t a n t s
Orientation & The First Fear Experience � 203 �rwin � 328-4 17?
KOW FIRING ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS fOR JUMMER 1995
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in Room 14 at the Mendenhall Student Center:
January 17 (Tuesday) 4 p.m.
January 23 (Monday) 4 p.m.
Applications available in Room 203 Erwin beginning January 11, 1995
Deadline for completed applications is January 31,1 995 at 5 p.m.
UlEV I E W75
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FRIDAY 27
Purple School Bus
SATURDAY
EVERYTHING
Special guest Spider Monkey





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Tuesday, January 24,1995
The East Carolinian
LIFE
Technicolor Gr ammer
Children's singer
doesn't act
his age
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
"I want to remind children and
their parents that the world is a won-
derful place to live
This quote, attributed to Red
Grammer himself, was music to my
ears when I discovered it in the press
material for his upcoming concert.
The problem is, it seems to be a sen-
timent most people grow out of.
Not so with Red Grammer. He
still believes in the beauty of the
world around him. However, not
only does Red see it and believe in
it, he also adds to this natural
11
� It
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great screaming
bucket of American media opin-
ion. Take it as you will.
Ah, January! A chill is in the
air, North Carolina begins to hold
its breath for the slightest hint of
snow, and the fecal stench of award
shows fills the air.
I don't know about anybody
else, but these things have a bad
tendency to make my blood pres-
sure go up. Every year I let my cu-
riosity get the better of me and
tune in, at least for a few fateful
minutes. Inevitably, something stu-
pid happens (remember that disas-
trous Jethro Tull win for best
Heavy Metal album a few years
back?), I curse loudly and quickly
shut off the TV. The nominations
alone are often enough to set me
off. How long will it be before
somebody realizes that the music
of Kenny G is not good jazz? It's
not just TV awards either; maga-
zines make some bonehead picks
themselves.
For example, I recently sub-
jected myself to checking out Roll-
ing Stone's special awards issue.
In their Readers' Choice awards,
Nine Inch Nails competes with
Aerosmith and Soundgarden for
Best Heavy Metal Band. Excuse
me? I haven't listened to metal in
a long time, but I really don't think
any of those bands qualify. And to
make matters worse, Soundgarden
won the category! I guess recycling
Black Sabbath riffs pays off in the
long run.
Of course, the real problem
is that they're comparing apples
and oranges. How do you judge
whether Nine Inch Nails' heavy in-
dustrial rage is better than
Aerosmith's last-of-the-dinosaurs
sex-rock slickness, or that
Soundgarden's retro-acid
meanderings are the best of the
three? To be fair, Rolling Stone's
Critics' Choice list was a bit more
on-target, with Helmet, Pantera
and Metallica up for the metal
crown. But I don't recall Metallica
actually releasing anything in
1994, so I'm not sure why they
were even considered.
On a brighter note, the
Goiden Globes were this past week-
end, and their choices are always
at least entertaining. Less politi-
See BUCKET page 9
beauty through music.
Red Grammer began his career
as a pop-rock musician in the '70s.
His entire musical outlook changed
in 1981 when he was chosen to re-
place Glenn Yarborough in the fa-
mous folk group The Limelighters.
He stayed with The Limelighters
until 1990, when he and his wife
Kathy decided to concentrate fully
on children's music.
He could not have made a bet-
ter decision. While performing with
The Limelighters made him famous,
entertaining children has made him
happy. And he has made children
and their parents across the coun-
try happy in return.
In addition to performing his
songs in live concerts and on tele-
vision, Red Grammer has released
three albums: Can You Sound Just
Like Me?, Teaching Peace and
Down the Do-Re-Mi.
These albums have quickly
become favorites with children and
parents alike. He has made several
appearances on the children's show
Eureka's Castle and has his own
concert special on the Disney Chan-
nel. And now he's coming to ECU.
There are many reasons to
see this show. But the most impor-
tant is the message that Red
Grammer conveys. He not only be-
lieves that people can remember,
but he also helps them do it
through his music.
Give in to your "inner child
Red Grammer will be performing at
2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 28. Tick-
ets are $5 for ECU students, $6 for
ECU faculty and staff and $8 for
the public.
Feel free to clap and laugh.
Enjoy yourself. And, when no one
is looking, sing along. But when the
show is over, don't forget what you
heard. Carry it with you and watch
the world change.
Catching
another buzz
Mr Review
Kits Hoffler
StaffWriter
Editor's note: This Miy ran fa
last Thursday's TEC with some print-
ing errors. Today we present it again
in Us correct form,
Ifs not going to get better
around here all at once; it comes in
small pieces. The ftrcolator Coffee-
house is one of those pieces. Lo-
cated right next to the Park The-
ater; it offers a great view of
fifth Street and some of
the best coffee
around It's not
lost the coffee that
makes it great,
however; the at-
mosphere h
stimulating and it
may just help to
put some culture iato
this 20 bar town.
The culture aspect comes
in the form of live acoustic musk ev-
ery Friday and Saturday night and
poetry readings (featured artist and
open mike) every Thursday. The Per-
colator also provi&is a space for art
shows: Any artist with enough mate-
rial can display their works without
charge for two weeks. So we have live
musfei poetry and ait all in the same
place. This is something Greenville has
needed for a long tin.
In talking with the two people
that make the place vvork (Greg and
Bradley), I got thorotighly educated
in the good and bad of making coffee.
They get their beans from an indepen-
dent supplier in Durham and make
sure there is very little time between
roasting, grinding and brewing of the
coffee to ensure optimum flavor. Cof
fee beans that sit around lose flavor
and that is the highest of crimes in
the coffee business. Their flavored
coffees are flavored after they are
made, which is the only proper-way to
do it The baked goods are supplied by
The Uppercrust Bakery just down the
street Everything in the place comes
to you fresh and pretty darn tasty.
Then there is what may argu-
ably be die best aspect of the place,
the price. The most expensive
drink in the house is a
Cafe Mocha at 2 dol-
lars. In fact there are
only two items that
cost over 2 dollars
and they are baked
goods. These prices
are especially good
for the perpetually
broke college crowd
On the inside
it is spacious with a
vast variety of seating that
can be shifted around for caffeine-
inspired group conversations. There
are also the intimate window seats
that are great for watching the world
go by. The Percolator's long business
hours (7 am. to midnight during the
week and 7-1 on weekends) can ac-
cotomoaate just about anyone but the
heartiest of night owls.
This reviewer may sound a little
over entriused, but I for one have been
waiting for something like this for a
long time. Kudos to The Percolator
Coffeehouse, we now have an alter-
native to the bar scene besides televi-
sion.
Photo Courtesy ofECU Performing ARTS
Red Grammer, world famous children's musician, will be performing at Wright Auditorium
Saturday at 2 p.m. This show is part of the East Carolina University Family Fare Series.
Robbins fails IQ test
New comedy
leaves a hollow
impression
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The comedies of the '30s and
'40s look so flawless on screen. You
watch a film like His Girl Friday or
Bringing Up Baby or Happened
One Xight and you start to beiieve
that making those films was easy. The
witty, urbane dialogue and the breezy
style seem effortless. Cary Grant.
Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable and
Jimmy Stewart all seemed perfect in
their roles, like they stepped out of
life onto the screen. You might think
that recapturing that style would re-
quire little effort on the part of film-
makers, but you would be making a
hugeomistake.
The most recent evidence of
how difficult comedy can be comes in
the form of IQ. which stars Tim
Robbins, Meg Ryan and Walter
Matthau. Though IQ causes no real
harm, the film leaves the viewer feel-
ing somehow betrayed at having in-
vested time in such a hollow film.
IQ tells the romantic tale of Ed
(Robbins). a garage mechanic who
meets Catherine Boyd (Ryan) one day
at work and instantly feels an attrac-
tion. When Ed visits Catherine's
house to return a watch she left at
the garage he discovers that
Catherine's uncle is Albert Einstein
(Matthau). Set in 1955 in Princeton,
NJ, IQ weaves a tangled web of play-
ful deceit and love while clouding the
barrier between fact and fiction.
When Ed meets Einstein they
talk about Catherine and how Ed has
fallen for her. Because Einstein does
not want Catherine to marry the
stuffy, uptight psychology professor
to whom she is engaged, he agrees to
help Ed woo Catherine. Unfortunately,
Catherine will only become interested
in men with intellect. Thus Einstein's
challenge is to make Ed seem smart,
even though Ed had trouble finish-
ing high school. The ploy used by
Einstein is to make Ed the author of
a cold fusion paper that promises to
put the Americans in front of the So-
viets in the space race. The deception
eventually unravels, as the plot is wont
to do in a film of this sort, leaving Ed
and Einstein with a lot of explaining
to do.
One of the big problems with
IQ is the jarring mix of fact and fic-
tion. The space race in'the tyaus was
deadly serious to Americans at the
time, but in IQ the competition is
played for laughs. Also milked for
laughs is the idea of plagiarism. The
comedy is never broad enough to ob-
viate a discussion of the serious is-
sues, nor incisive enough to disarm
the seriousness. Instead, an odd mix
of truth and fantasy meld into an un-
comfortably tart concoction.
The stars all try their best.
Robbins is winning as the common
man. Yet the actor never makes a full
character out of Ed. Instead, Robbins
seems content to have him remain
pleasantly amorphous with no real
conviction other than winning
Catherine's heart. Meg Ryan shines
radiantly upon the screen, but her
character is also one-sided. The film
only modestly accentuates her intelli-
gence but plays up her clumsiness and
uncertainty. Matthau makes a great
Einstein but how much the fictional-
ized Einstein resembles the real one
is in doubt. Einstein's three scientific
friends make an odd combination who
evoke the biggest laughs in the film.
One scene in particular, involv-
ing all four scientists left me with a
huge smile. Ed agrees to allow test-
ing to determine his IQ in front of an
auditorium filled with people. The
questions are flashed on a giant
screen and Ed must answer 50 of them
in 18 minutes. Einstein and friends
arrange themselves in a row and each
coughs, or otherwise signals, when his
position (A,B,C,D or E) corresponds
to the right answer. If the answer is E
none of them do anything or else they
try to make Catherine, who sits next
to them, speak out. Though the scene
made me laugh at the time, in retro-
spect 1 have to wonder why no one in
See IQ page 9
CD. Reviews
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
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�������
They took Bloodline as a
name for some very good reasons.
Initially they gained a reputation
on the fact of who their fathers
were. The drummer (Erin Davis) is
the son of the late jazz artist Miles
Davis, the rhythm guitarist (Waylon
Krieger) is the son of The Doors
guitarist Robbie Krieger and the
vocalistbass player. Berry Oakley
Jr is the son of the original bass-
ist for the Allman Brothers. The
Offspring would have been a bet-
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
�llllll�ll�ll�IIIIHIIIf
See BLOODLINE page 9
The Shadowcaste
Set in Motion
� if if if � �� if
Can you believe that more
than 200 bands are active in Geor-
gia? I can't help but wonder if The
Shadowcaste is just another one of
those bands trying to capture the
"Athens sound" that has made
bands like REM and the B-52's so
successful. Well, they seem to be
doing a pretty good job and show
great potential on their debut al-
bum. Set in Motion.
This 11 song CD is filled
with songs that range from being
happy go lucky to melancholy and
bluesy. The first song on the album
happens to be the same as its title.
"Set in Motion" is a very upbeat
song that is filled with the power-
ful vocals of singer Lori Thurman.
In this song she shows her amaz-
ing ability to move from vocals as
smooth as silk one minute to the
scratchy heartfelt abilities of Stevie
Nicks in another.
There is also a very big folk
edge with acoustic tracks on every
song. "Giving Myself Away" has
beautiful acoustic backup by Rob
Haywood (rhythm guitarist and vo-
calist) with Lori's voice covering
the lead electric guitar by David
See SHADOW page 8





8
Tuesday, January 24,1995
The East Carolinian
Tattooed shadow fromP7
will
contested
GARY, Ind. (AP) - Maria
Rodriguez was so fearful of one day
being put on life support, she had a
living will tattooed on her stomach.
The 40-year-old nurse said she
has seen enough patients and their
families suffer when lives are pro-
longed.
"I would never want my famib'
to suffer seeing me in a vegetative
state, to have them mortgage their
homes and go broke paying for my
care she said Wednesday.
The red and black tattoo fea-
tures a red heart slashed with the
universal "no" sign and the words
"No Code The will reads: "Pain and
comfort only. Organ donor It ends
with her initials, "MR
Rodriguez said the 'No Code'
instructs hospital and ambulance
workers not to resuscitate her or keep
her alive by artificial means.
"When my name gets called, I
don't want anything holding me up
she said.
The will, however, may not be
legally binding.
Indiana's living will statute re-
quires the will to be dated and signed
by the person writing it and two wit-
nesses. Although her will doesn't meet
those requirements. Rodriguez said
she hopes it is respected.
"I don't expect people to agree
with me she said. "But this is my
body, my life and my belief. And I hope
they respect that"
Rodriguez got the tattoo last
month after suffering chest pains she
attributed to a June miscarriage, job
stress and Christmas. Her doctor said
it was nerves.
Convincing her husband of 24
years, Gilbert Rodriguez, 50, was
tough, she said.
"I never want to let her go he
said. "But I understand
Mulkey like syrup does pancakes.
The drum beats provided by Dusty
Edinger, who also sings on the al-
bum, are simple yet strong and en-
ergetic. For some reason this song
makes me think of some of Natalie
Merchant's past stuff, and it is a
very enjoyable ballad indeed.
The fourth song, "Common
Ground catches you completely by
surprise because Lori has been re-
placed by one of the two male vo-
calists in the band, but for the life
of me I couldn't figure out which
one it was.
They never really gave him
any credit. With him singing, the
band has much more of a Dave
Mathews feel to them. The fact that
they incorporate a male singer in
their band makes them much more
respectable to me because they
don't focus just on Thurman as
their main talent. This song has
many well-written harmonies in it,
but after four minutes, I started to
get bored.
My favorite song on the al-
bum is "Resolution It is another
really well written ballad that has
a slow beat with Lori singing her
heart out about how "He doesn't
know what makes me laugh He
doesn't know what songs I write
You don't know what I've gone
through And you don't know how
hard I've tried
As you can see, she is talking
about how her lover just doesn't
know her at all, and that's why she
IF YOU WANT TO MAKE IT
m THE REAL WORLD,
SPEND A SEMESTER
TN OURS.
Walt Disney World Co. representatives will be on campus to
present an information session for Undergraduate Students on
the WALT DISNEY WORLD SummerFall '95 College Program.
WHEN: MONDAY, JAN. 30 at 7:00PM
WHERE: 1028 GENERAL CLASSROOM BUILDING
Attendance at this presentation is required to
interview for the SummerFall 95 College Program.
Interviews will be held Tuesday. January 31
The following majors are encouraged to attend:
Business. Communication. RecreationLeisure
Studies and TheatreDrama.
Lifeguards are needed to work at our many
W ater Parks and Resorts Students with
ANY major arc eligible to apply. You
need to hold lifeguard certification OR
be a strong swimmer and we'll provide
the training needed for an exciting
experience this summer or fall'
For more information contact:
Cooperative Education
j$ (�W��p
Wforld Co.
KTyere students spend a semester getting
ready firr the rest atheir iitvs.
Ik kjlt IJisno (
cqiul upptnunii onplu
;��'

aihd tell,
Tell everyone about your Valentine
by putting a special
Love Lines personal ad in our special
Feb. 14 issue.
Only $3 for 25 words or less;
100 each for more than 25.
Pick up a Love Lines form at the newspaper
office, the Mendenhall information desk or
Student Stores. Speak out before our Feb. 11
deadline -
or forever hold your peace.
IMWHMMMV
hurts so bad. The lyrics created by
The Shadowcaste are very insight-
ful and mature. In other words,
they make you think.
The Shadowcaste has five
members whose influences range
from Led Zeppelin to Stevie Nicks.
They have all known from the be-
ginning what they wanted: success.
In fact, they changed their name
in 1992. after being known as The
Barflys. and used that name to start
their own record label, Barfly
Records.
Set in Motion was produced
by John Keane who has worked
with such acts as the Indigo Girls.
Michael Stipe has heaped great
kudos upon them, and they have
toured with acts such as Toad the
Wet Sprocket and The Dave
Matthews Band, so maybe they are
all that they claim.
So, if you like bands that
aren't big on repetition, but are
hooked on solidity and variety. The
Shadowcaste's album may be the
one for you.
Also, if you're like me and like
to hear good bands before they hit;
the mainstream, impress your
friends by buying this album. They
even do a cover of Humble Pie's'
"Fool for a Prettv Face
Wainright Property Management
756-6209 1
109-B. E. Arlington Blvd. Greenville
Many Locations Near Campus!
Cannon Court � Cedar Court �
English Village � Park Village �
South Square � Summer Field �
Shiloh Drive
MANY APARTMENTS AVAILABLE FOR RENT TODAY!
Iu4hse44, Owl fCCeit nw v�ik
GcfHC bVH'hZcu'h, fwb tkAe kO O
atalog
" nnectiori
Division of UBE
210 E. 5th Street
758-8612
Mon. - Sat. 10-6
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING CHESS SPADES
Toumament winners will be awarded trophies and the opponunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN. the weekend of
February 24-26, 1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Toumament
Tuesday, January 24
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center �
�fr
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, February 1
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
II
�l
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
jjove Lines
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center. Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is S2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Inlomiation Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office. 328-4766. for more information.
WHIHP�I !���!
ff"��"





Tuesday, January 94,1995
The East Carolinian
Aon
&ome GLxperience the time of
pour life with us at
Alpha �micron lSi1
�$anuarp 24 cSC 2$ 9:3�J �-S Pm-
Soj Johnston OS.
rfor more information or a ride
call us anytime 7 S7'�79
BLOODLINE from P. i
ter name, but that has been taken.
Not every member of the
band has a famous father. Lou
Segreti supplies a melodic founda-
tion with his keyboard skills and
then there is the guitar prodigy
Smokin' Joe Bonamassa filling in
the lead for the group. Smokin' Joe
is the youngest of the group at the
ripe old age of 17. He has been play-
ing guitar since the age of five and
has been jamming with some of
New York's local blues bands since
the age of 10. There is quite a range
of influences and personalities that
go into the makeup of this band.
The music they produce is a
fusion of many different styles, but
it's most prominently Southern
rock in the Allman Brothers tradi-
tion. The blues, British pop and
funk can also be heard in their mix-
ture. The roots rock genre is still
going strong, and these guys add
Patients Wanted for
Asthma Research Study
Jfjvm iqfir fit0
m
W. James Metzger, M.D.
Clinical Investigator
ECU School of Medicine
Department of Allergy 3E-129
Greenville, NC 27858-4354
If you:
� are 12 years of age or older
� are male or female
� have mild to moderate asthma
� are a non-smoker
� have persistent nighttime asthma symptoms
� are not pregnant & practicing an acceptable method of birth control
� are not a lactating female
Benefits to Patient:
� Asthma medication, tests, examination, medical care free of charge
� Reimbursement
� Possible that patient's asthma may respond favorably to treatment
Location of Research:
ECU School of Medicine
Department of Allergy
Module D
If interested, please contact:
Cathy Critchfleld, RN
Study Coordinator (816-3426)
ADVANCE SCREENING
fee jnlie delpy
WRe
Can the greatest romance of your life
last only one night?
i
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Wednesday, January 25
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Pick Up Free Passes at the
Mendenhall Info Desk &
ECU Student Store
Presented By
The Student Union
Films Committee
ounes, g J �! LJ 19 U �
KNOW THE CODE" always the lowest price for a collect call. KtoK
'C� �ll '1T(�ST�tE t
in their own special stylings to a
genre that is often emulated and
rot innovated. The Associated
Press, Boston Globe and Guitar
World have all praised Bloodline as
being a new band adding new life
to an old style of rock.
Bloodline has just finished
their first untitled full length album
on EMI records. It is a 12-track re-
lease with sounds that range from
heavy Southern rock to soft and
twangy acoustic blues. The open-
ing track "Stone Cold Hearted" is
a jam sounding much like Stevie
Ray Vaughn's "Crossfire The
rhythm is driving and the solos are
technical and flashy. The rest of the
tracks follow in this format. The
band lays down some very tight
rhythms that are danceable and
funky, and Smokin' Joe adds in
much solo improvisation that seems
way tof good to be the sounds of a
17-year-old.
"The Storm the one instru-
mental track on the CD, really
shows the talent contained in this
band. They alternate from jazzy to
ballistic funk, and Smokin' Joe is
definitely in the Joe Satriani mode
with his solos. "Bad Girls" is a blues
tune complete with slide guitars
and a sound reminiscent of Bo
Diddly.
With a few exceptions most
of the songs on this CD are upbeat
and supported by driving funk
rhythms. In the song structure and
overall sound they are an Allman
Brothers for the '90s, Southern
rock with a hard edge. The hard
edge is accentuated by the flashy
leads of Smokin' Joe, whose talent
is undeniable. Davis' drumming is
surprisingly far from jazz most of
the time; he is a rock drummer
without a doubt. For such a young
band they have produced some very
impressive sounds, yet I think they
could use some more experience,
not musically, but in life. I am con-
vinced that the human condition is
a great force for the shaping of an
artist, and anything with a major
blues influence needs to be driven
by the trials and tribulations of liv-
ing. For example, there is no doubt
that Robert Johnson and Jimi
Hendrix had lived what they were
playing.
Bloodline are some very
young bloods, they are overloaded
with talent, but even the best steel
must be tempered in the fire to
reach its potential. I'm sure they
will be around for awhile, their first
album is good but not great. Just
give them some time. Bloodline will
be playing The Attic on Tuesday
night where you can judge their
talent for yourself.
IQ
from p. 7
that auditorium could figure out
what was happening. Suspension of
disbelief is necessary in a film, but
IQ stretches those limits to the break-
ing point and then keeps tugging.
The plot becomes unnecessar-
ily complex. Charles Duming plays
a character whose function is never
fully explained. In one scene
Durning's character tells Catherine
to get close to the record player in
an oddly sexual way. The inclusion
of Dwight Eisenhower into the plot
served no purpose. The president's
presence does nothing to further the
plot or to help define the charac-
ters. The script for IQ needed some
intelligence.
The directing falters too,
which is unusual for Fred Schepisi,
whose Roxanne is one of Steve
Martin's best films. Schepisi twice
employs a slow-motion shot of a
motorcycle in mid-air for no appar-
ent reason. The flow of the film gets
interrupted by shots like this, and
the seamless comedy starts to show
signs of wear. The best comedies of
the '40s did not need camera tricks
but instead relied on the timing of
their stars.
A poor script, ill-advised direc-
tion and stars that cannot compen-
sate for the lack of the first two
doom IQ. I find the situation ironic:
A film titled IQ treats its audience
as if it has no brains.
On a scale of one to ten, IQ
rates a four.
BUCKET from p. 7
always at least entertaining. Less
political and genre-biased than the
Oscars and Emmys, the Golden
Globes usually represent a clearer
picture of the year in television and
movies. I was pleased to see Mar-
tin Landau win Best Supporting
Actor for his role as Bela Lugosi in
Ed Wood, for instance.
But the big surprise for me
was X-Files winning Best TV
Drama. Up against stiff competition
from such shows as ER, Picket
Fences and NYPD Blue, the Fox
Network's weird mysterysuspense
show didn't seem to stand a chance.
At first I thought it might have been
a political decision, giving TV's big-
gest cult show the award just to
create controversy. But X-Files does
things with, cameras that are un-
heard of in network television (that
is to say, it moves them around
rather than just settling for a hand-
! .
ful of standard shots) and its act-
ing and scripts can stand respect-
ably beside anything on the screen.
So I must applaud the
Golden Globes for having the guts
to recognize quality wherever it
lurks. But that doesn't mean any-
body else out there has a clue. The
Oscars, Emmys and Grammys are
still to come, and while they may
surprise me, I'm not holding my
breath.
RUSH
Spring Rush held in the Mendenhall
Social Room
January 24th, 25th, 26th
7pm-9pm
For more information or a ride,
call 758-2386
Come hear about our new house
. . �� ii
T





mi i� il r
��� ' � ���� -
10
Tuesday, January 24,1995
The Bast Carolinian
Pirates 2-2 in CAA play
Bench racks up
points as Pirates
slow down GMU
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina ran its overall
record to 11-5 (2-2 in conference play)
after soundly defeating George Mason
84-70, Saturday at the Patriot Center.
The Pirates controlled this game from
the outset with a balanced scoring at-
tack, led by Tim Basham's career-high
23 points. All five starters scored in
double figures for ECU.
Basham has been on a tear the
last two games, scoring 20 against Rich-
mond. This game was a homecoming
for him; Basham grew up in Roanoke.
Va. before playing his last year of high
school in Maryland.
"I just came out and got a couple
shots Basham said. "I was just feeling
it I was getting better looks against the
zone
This game was also a homecom-
ing for ECU freshman point guard Tony
Parham, who grew up in Washington
D.C. Parham scored 10 points in front
of a large group of family and friends.
"It was a special night for me,
coming back home Parham said. "You
don't want to go back to your univer-
sity with a loss from your hometown. I
was just hoping to go in there and not
turn the ball over
Going into this game, the high-
scoring Patriots were expected to run
away with the win using head coach
Paul Westhead's up-tempo strategy to
their advantage. This was not the case.
George Mason struggled to get good
shots against the larger and taller Pi-
rates, shooting a dismal 15 percent from
behind the three-point arc.
"It was good. Sometimes we don't
jump on teams like we are supposed
to Basham said. "This time we jumped
on them and stuck to it"
"I thought our team did a good
job and played the kind of game we
wanted to Pirate head coach Eddie
Payne said. "We established a flow, and
kept them from getting into their flow.
I think, in terms of the overall game, it
was big. We had some big performances
- first time we had six guys in double
figures
Big men Chuckie Robinson and
Anton Gill also played well, each scor-
ing 11 points while controlling the paint
defensively. Shooting guard Skipp
Schaefbauer bounced back from a 1-of-
6 shooting night against Richmond by
going 7-12 from the field en route to 15
points.
Mason fell to 5-10 for the year
and has yet to win in conference despite
averaging nearly 100 points per game.
"It's easier to make shots when
you've won your last two, three, four or
five games Westhead said. "You have
to win a game first to get things going.
It was just a flat game, but I also think
East Carolina did a fine job. They ex-
ecute well. It's a tribute to Coach
Payne
On Wednesday. ECU took a 69-
67 win in Williams Arena over the Uni-
versity of Richmond Spiders. Point
guard Tony Parham converted with 25
seconds to go to give the Pirates their
first conference win of the season.
"1 knew those shots were good
when they left my hand Parham said.
The Pirates were led by a career-
high 20 points by small forward Tim
Basham. including six three-pointers.
"I just came in and stepped up
my game Basham said. 'They were
sagging down on Anton Gill) and
Chuckie Robinson, so I hit my outside
shot to free them up
Basham scored several of his
points on assists from Parham, who had
a careeer-high eight assists.
Leading 67-65 with a minute to
go, UR's Adam Ward missed a uncon-
tested layup, killing their momentum.
After getting the rebound, the Pirates
worked the ball inside to Chuckie
Robinson, who tied the score and set-
ting the stage for Parham's game win-
ning shots.
Defensively in the second half, the
Pirates turned up the intensity by bot-
tling up Kass Weaver, who scored most
of his 24 points in the first half.
The win was ECU'S first over
Richmond since January 10,1987. ECU
had lost 16 of their last 18 meetings
with the Spiders, and holds an all-time
record of 2345 after the game.
See MASON page 12
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Chuckie Robinson is making his mark on the opposition and fans in the CAA. The senior
ranks third in the nation in field goal percentage and is averaging 16.7 points per game.
Swimmers win Lady hoopsters split in conference
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
George Mason's Lady Patriots
used a 51-38 rebounding edge in
posting a 64-54 victory over ECU.
Junior guard Keri Chaconas led the
way with 19 points for Mason, who
improved to 4-10 (2-2 in the CAA).
Tomeika "Fruky" Blackmon scored
all of her team-high 16 points in the
second half for ECU (4-9 overall. 1-
3 in the CAA).
The Lady Pirates led 29-28 at
the half, but could not contain
Chaconas, who also had five assists.
The last time the Lady Pirates had
the lead was at the 16:15 mark of
the second half, when Blackmon hit
a eight-foot jumper. Coach Jim Lewis
of George Mason switched defenses
against ECU.
"We always try to get our play-
ers input, and our players said 'we
need to play man-to-man GMU
coach Lewis said. "Their guards
(Charlesworth and Alpress) lit us up
when we went to the zone. We did a
good job in our man-to-man
Another key to GMU's victory
was the play of their guards.
"Chaconas is an all-star
Lewis said. "She can do a lot of
things on the floor. I was also proud
of our freshman Krista Jay. She had
not practiced in 10 days due to an
injury. She's a dynamite player
Jay had eight points for the
Lady Patriots. Cricket Pearson con-
tributed eight points and 10 re-
bounds off the bench. aV did sopho-
more Gretchen Lacey. Coach Lewis
was also very impressed with the
play of ECU's Blackmon.
"I am so glad to see her back
from injury he said. "She gave us
a lot of problems. ECU is a very
young, high-octane team. They can
definitely give some people prob-
lems.
On Friday night. Danielle
Charlesworth's three-point basket
with two-tenths of a second left gave
the ECU Lady Pirates a 87-85 over-
time win over American University.
The win was the Lady Pirates first
in CAA conference play.
The victory broke a 16-game
CAA losing streak for Coach Rosie
Thompson and ECU. Sophmore
Shay Hayes sent the game into over-
time with two free throws, while
Tomekia "Fruky" Blackmon scored
nine of her 12 points for the Lady
Pirates in the overtime period.
Blackmon led the Pirates with
26 points and eight rebounds, and
junior Danielle Charlesworth con-
tributed 23 points. Justine Allpress
and Tracey Kelley each had 13
points for ECU. The Lady Pirates
shot 48 percent from the floor, while
the Lady Eagles shot just 35 per-
cent.
Danielle Charlesworth
The Lady Pirates will try to
get back on the winnning track to-
morrow night as they travel to Char-
lotte to face the UNC-Charlotte Lady
49ers.
Women win ninth-
straight meet, men
move to 6-3
Eric Bartels
Staff Writer
For the biggest crowd of the
1995 season in Minges Aquatic Cen-
ter, the University of Richmond Spi-
ders succumbed to the powerful
East Carolina swim team, as the Pi-
rates held a festive Parents' Week-
end.
Saturday marked the ninth
straight victory for the Lady Pirate
swimmers, as they tied the record
for the longest winning streak in
ECU women's swimming history.
The men's team guaranteed
themselves of a sixth-straight win-
ning season as they improved to 2-
2 in the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion and 6-3 overall.
"We swam awesome ECU
swim coach Rick Kobe said. "We are
ready for the CAA Championships
Sandra Ossann
The Lady Pirates upped their
record to 9-0 on the season (4-0 in
the CAA) as they had an easy time
with a young Richmond team.
Leading off the meet for the
women's team, who crushed the
Spiders 140-83, was the 400 Med-
ley Relay team of Amanda Atkinson,
Kim Field, Melissa Phillips and
Beth Humphrey, who dominated
their opponents.
Lady Pirate swimmers fin-
ished first in eight of the thirteen
events. As always, talented junior
Hilary Stokes led the meet with two
victories, claiming the 50 Free and
the 100 Free. Also, freshman
Sandra Ossmann added two victo-
ries to the Pirate point total when
she took the 1000 Free, and beat
out teammate Rachel Atkinson for
the 500 Free.
A surprising victory came
from Beth Humphrey as she nar-
rowly beat out teammate Jackie
Schmieder by three-tenths of a sec-
ond in the 200 Free. Melissa
See SWIM page 12

Pirate Prayers
Recreational Services
action warming up
Photo Com fesy of ECU SID
"Please bring back my nice TV Prayers and hard work
have ied the men's hoops team to a great start this year.
Angela Baumann
Recreational Services
Recreational Services plans
on warming up the upcoming
months with a number of events.
Between the fitness classes. Natu-
ral Life Events, and intramural ac-
tivities, one should find the winter-
time pounds easy to shed.
To get a jump on the action,
participants are urged to pre-regis-
ter for one of the many fitness
classes offered. The sign up for the
second twelve-week aerobic session
is from Feb. 23 to Mar. 2. To ease
decision making, a filmed demon-
stration will be on hand during reg-
istration to outline the many styles
available. There will also be a free
Fitness Fling aerobics class, where
food and refreshments will be on
hand, in Christenbury Gym 108 at
4 p.m. on February 17.
For students, the cost of
aerobics classes is only $10 per ses-
sion or $5 for five classes. Faculty
and staff prices are $20 per session
or $10 for five classes. Weight
Training Workshop registration will
run during the week of Jan. 24th
to the 30th. Free weight training
workshops will be held Jan. 31 and
Feb. 7th at 9 p.m. in Christenbury
and Garrett weight rooms, respec-
tively.
Recreational Services offers a
couple of starter programs that
both instruct and assess physical
fitness. Fitness Instruction and
Training (F.I.T.) is a personal car-
diovascular and strength training
program that will detail how to uti-
lize equipment, technique, and
strength training principles to build
an individualized program. Assis-
tants will follow up with you to
progress and answer questions.
Arm yourself with the strat-
egy with which to pursue the
healthiest lifestyle through the Fit-
ness Fizzicles program. Current fit-
See SERVICE page 12





11
Tuesday, January 24,1995
The last Carolinian
Basketball in the bloodlines of Pirate two-guard
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
Being the son of a Division I
college basketball coach can either
help or hinder an athlete.
"It doesn't make me feel any
different Pirate guard Jerod
Cohen said. "The team does not
treat me any different. The coach-
ing staff doesn't make me feel any
different
The 6-foot-2 inch freshman
guard from Coral Springs, Fla. is
in his second year with the Pirates,
and is the only walk-on on the
squad. Cohen was redshirted for
the 1993-94 season, a season in
which he saw valuable practice time
Investment
Strateg
Dr. Joseph Ki
List fall, over 150
people took
control of their
financial
futures. Merc's
what they had to
say about our
program
"This program gave me
the courage to be more
financially agresslve
Great class! "
"Dr. Kiely was thorough,
concise, knowledgeable
and entertaining
answered questions
without evasionwas not
defensive
content was
excellent
in the backcourt.
"It was really good getting
practice time last season Cohen
said. "Practicing against the likes
of Skipp Schaefbauer), Lester
Lyons) and Kareem Richardson
really helped me improve my game.
Sometimes it got tough sitting the
bench the whole year
Cohen worked hard in the off-
season to help improve his game.
"Basically the whole summer
1 was in Greenville. 1 lifted weights,
had individual workouts and gained
a needed J5 pounds. It's really im-
portant for me to add strength and
needed bulk
Cohen was introduced to bas-
ketball at a young age. His father
Michael played at Seton Hall and
has coached at Syracuse and
Wichita State. Although Jerod en-
joyed his father being a coach, it
was difficult at times.
"Sometimes it was tough, es-
pecially during the season said
Cohen. "When the team wasn't do-
ing well, seeing people down my fa-
ther and the team was hard.
Cohen played two seasons of
basketball at Wichita East High
School in Wichita, Kansas, then
transferred and earned two letters
at Stoneman Douglas High School
in Parkland, Fla. for coach Cott
Cromwell.
As a senior at Doi'glas, Cohen
averaged 12.5 points per game and
shot 40 percent from the three-point
line, and was named All-Broward
County and won his teams Best De-
fender Award, leading his team in
steals.
After high school, Cohen was
courted by numerous Division II and
III schools, but he always knew that
he wanted to play Division I hoops.
"I always knew that I wanted
to go to a bigger school, and ECU
seemed to be the perfect fit said
Cohen. "I liked the campus a lot, but
most importantly was Coach Payne
and his faith in me. I am a walk-on
now, but 1 am working hard to gain
a scholarship
Jerod sees his role on this
year's team as helping to add depth
at the two-guard position.
"It will probably between me
and Othello Meadows, a freshman
Phase One
(Ages 25-50)
Starts Tuesday,
January 24, 1995
7:00p.m -9:00p.m.
OR
Phase Two
(Ages 50 & over)
Starts Tuesday,
March 14, 1995
7:00p.m. -9:00p.m.
Cost of the course is $69 and
enrollment is limited. This is the
only unbitrn investment course
taught in this area Take control
of your financial future.
Even if ihe course nils up. wo inwto
everyone to atlend
llio first night - Free ot charge
"lo register, call:
328-6377
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This unborn baby is only 11 weeks old. She has a
beating heart, measurable brain waves
and ten tiny fingers and toes.
She also has almost a one-in-three chance of being killed
before she's born.
Every day, over 4,000 unborn babies are killed by
abortion in America. Some of these unborn children
are already old enough to survive outside their
mother's womb. Right now, in America, abortion
is legal for any reason�even late in pregnancy.
National Right to Life is working to protect unborn
babies threatened by abortion, as well as other
innocent human beings threatened by infanticide and
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heip themselves?
�notional
RIGHT TO LIFE
committee, inc.
Yes! I want to help National Right to Life help
innocent people threatened by abortion,
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fully tax deductible.)
Name:
Address:
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Enclosed is my donation for:
? $25 $50 $100
Make checks payable and return to:
NRI. Educational Trust Fund
4I9Sevcnth St N.W Ste. 500
Washington, IX 20004
(202)626-8800
Other
from Nebraska he said. "I'm hop-
ing for a gradual increase in min-
utes, and I hope to improve my game
in every way possible
Jerod said his personal goal
for the 94-95 campaign is to accom-
plish all expectations set by himself,
Jerod Cohen
coaches and teammates.
"Honestly, I expect to win ev-
ery game he said. "I never like los-
ing. Giving the public and the uni-
versity pride in the basketball pro-
gram at ECU is something I look for-
ward too
HEY YOU! We need a new
Assistant Sports Editor at
The East Carolinian If
interested, drop by the
office (2nd floor, Student
Pubs. Bldg.) fill out an
application and talk to
Dave by Monday
afternoon.
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�21
5 t

;pr
�r
1"
Tuesday, January 24,1995
The East Carolinian
SERVICE from p. 10
ness levels are determined after an
hour-long assessment. Results will
prove a safe guide in figuring the
right training regiment at
Christenbury's facilities. Call 328-
6387 to make an appointment.
A valuable incentive program
is also being offered. "Resolution
Solution" will motivate participants
to continue with an exercise pro-
gram with the help of rewards over
the course of four weeks. "It's an
excellent way to get beginners
started on a program, and keeps
people interested as they set their
own goals. "Resolution Solution"
ought to help everyone stick to
their New Year's promise of a solid
and consistent fitness agenda. Drop
by Christenbury 104 for details and
to make appointments.
Along with the many physi-
cal events, a number of social
events are offered for good clean
fun. Natural Life events, such as
last semester's Cliffhanger at the
Tower and King and Queen of the
Hall, offer pure social entertain-
ment. The purpose is to provide an
alternative to the downtown scene.
Pirate Double Dare is the
next Natural Life special event,
where you can answer a trivial pur-
suit question, dare the opposing
team to answer it and master an
array of dirty and nasty physical
challenges. Be sure to wear your
old clothes as you may get dirty
during the physical challenges. Pre-
registe; your team of four before
January 24, in Christenbury 204.
The actual event is on January 26,
at 6:15 p.m. in Christenbury Gym.
For more details call Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
The Natural Life Club is
newly formed student organization
that will be offering a Mystery Trip.
You won't know where you are go-
ing for this excursion but you're
guaranteed a good time. On Feb. 4
the bus will leave at 4:30 p.m. and
return at midnight. If you are in-
terested in attending, sign up now
with $2 per person in Christenbury
204. This club will be getting to-
gether and creating their own so-
cial activities to have. For more in-
formation call Angela at Recre-
ational Services 328-6387.
Upcoming Intramural Sports
Programs include water polo, bowl-
ing, and a basketball H-O-R-S-E
competition. Come to the water
polo registration meeting on Tues-
day, Jan. 24 at 5:00p.m. in BK 103.
The Bowling Registration meeting
is on Tuesday, Jan. 31 at 5 p.m. in
BIO 103. Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 4 p.m.
there will be a Basketball H-O-R-S-
E Competition in Christenbury
Gym. All you will need to do is at-
tend one of these meetings to get
involved. For more information call
328-6387.
MASON from p. 10
Off the bench, Damond
VanWeerhuizen and Vic Hamilton
sparked the Pirates when they appeared
sluggish. VanWeerhuizen hit a three-
pointer at a key juncture in the ball
game, and Hamilton's dunk and celebra-
tion got the fans into the ball game.
He drew a technical from referee
Vic Paparo for his actions, much to the
dissapointment of Hamilton's cheering
section who hold up signs reading "Vi-
cious Vic's Corner" whenever he scores
a basket
"I thought our bench did a nice
job Payne said. "VanWeerhuizen, that's
the best he's played in some time. Vic
didn't play a lot of minutes and his line
was not significant but he sparked us
again. Othello played well and Von
Bryant was more aggressive than he has
been
The Pirates next play at home
against Coastal Carolina on Thursday
night at 7 p.m.
CHAR-GRILL
HOME OF THE HAMBURGER
STEAK SANDWICH
Simply the Best Burgers
PHONE-IN
SWIM from p. 10
Phillips gave a great performance
in the 200 Fly, and sophomore
Lesley Hawley captured the 200
Back for the ECU.
The Lady Pirate diving team
was not as fortunate, failing to cap-
ture victory in either the one meter
or the three meter dives. Sopho-
more Beth Hanna placed second in
the one-meter dive, while the three-
meter became an exhibition.
As the Pirate men also ripped
through a young and less-talented
Spiders team, they evened their
record and looked to this coming
weeks' meets.
The 400 Medley Relay team
of sophomores Brian Wall, Alan
Pritchett, Erik Griffin and Jay Noles
produced the first of the Pirates'
points.
Junior McGee Moody and
freshman Andy Wright finished
strong as the Pirates swept the Spi-
ders, 139-91. Moody was challenged
by teammate James Baker in the 50
Free, but held on to win it and the
100 Free. Wright added to the Pi-
rate thrashing contributing victo-
ries in the 1000 Free and the 500
Free.
Other top finishers were se-
nior John Donovan, who collected
the 200 Free, freshman Jim
Broughal, who captured the 200
IM, sophomor Ryan Barlowe add-
ing a victory in the 200 Fly and
sophomore Chris Bembenek top-
ping off the swimmers with a 200
Back win.
Pirate divers struggled to
overtake the Spiders behind senior
Scott Kupec and freshman Stephen
Barnes, as Richmond diver Jay
Carroll stole both the one-meter
and three-meter dives. Barnes had
the better finish as he took second
in the one-meter, while the three-
meter dive became an exhibition.
On Tuesday, the Pirates will
travel to Chapel Hill in a non-con-
ference meet with the Tarheels.
Kobe and the Pirates will re-
turn on Saturday, January 28 to
host the final meet of the season
before the CAA Championships.
Coming to Greenville will b"e the
UNC-Wilmington Seahawks, look-
ing to revenge last season's loss to
ECU.
Try our phone in Express service. Just call ahead with your
order and we'll have it waiting lor you when you come in.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 24, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 24, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1052
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58518
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