The East Carolinian, January 17, 1995






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January 17,1995
Vol 69, No. 67
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC
16 pages
Scholarship donations needed
More medical
school student
aid to be
provided through
donations
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
The ECU Medical Foundation,
the fund-raising organization for the
medical school, still needs money to
reach the goal of $1 million for its cur-
rent fund-raising drive.
About Sjnn.OOO has been do-
nated so far, said Dr. Robert Adams,
president of the medical foundation.
He said the drive will run through
March or April in connection with tax
season.
All of the money donated to the
medical foundation will go to provide
more scholarships for the medical
school. Currently, the medical school
has 27 scholarships and 300 students
� 65 percent of whom receive finan-
cial aid.
"We have very few scholarships
here at the School of Medicine, since
we are so new and haven't really pri-
oritized scholarship fund-raising in the
past Adams said. "We probably need
another 20 well-funded scholarships so
that we can compete with other medi-
cal schools in our regions for good stu-
dents.
"We are losing good students
because they are offered more money
to go to other schools
The medical foundation began
a mail campaign in December to so-
licit funds for the drive. Letters were
sent to previous donors and prospec-
tive donors, said Adams. The medical
0�L& Dayou think
THE
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TUAH1 WILLIAMS
Eric Merola
"With
proper
planning
and no
irmaience
to the
biker
Deborah
Cruz
"Yes, I do,
but I think it
could be
dangerous
to
pedestrians
if they cross
the path
Liz Kirk
"I think that
the money
could be
used for
better
things,
because of
what it
would cost
foundation also met face-to-face with
industrial and commercial groups and
management staffs and private foun-
dations.
Adams said the group has sev-
eral goals that they hope to achieve
with the fund-raising foundation.
"The overall success hinges on
whether we, as a school of medicine,
live up to our mission and that mis-
sion is one, to provide better health
care for our region of the state; two,
to provide for more minorities and
underrepresented minorities in medi-
cal education; and three, to provide
more general-practice, primary care
physicians to all of North Carolina
Adams said. "If we can have an effect
on any of those areas and meet our
mission then we will consider it a suc-
cess
Adams said the medical founda-
tion appreciates all donations that they
receive.
"We are very thankful for our
donors and the people all over East-
ern North Carolina who have come to
our aid in the past four years Adams
said.
Anne Ballance May and John E.
May, both alumni of the university, re-
cently established a charitable remain-
der trust fund that will benefit the
medical school.
The Mays transferred real estate
valued at approximately $119,000 into
the trust fund. The principal and any
undistributed income generated from
the trust fund will benefit the medical
foundation, after satisfying Mrs. May's
life income interest.
The Mays and their daughter,
Mary Jon Pabst, who is also an alum-
nus, are involved with numerous uni-
versity organizations. Mrs. May was
an accountant in the ECU Business
Affairs Office for 36 years until she
retired in July 1994.
Mr. May said the couple picked
the medical school because of how it
has benefited eastern North Carolina.
"It is one of the greatest things
to happen to eastern North Carolina
May said. "It is the catalyst that sparked
the growth of eastern North Carolina
Adams said the medical founda-
tion were very appreciative of the do-
nation by the Mays.
"It was a great gift said Mays.
"It just shows you what people can do
if they want to help. In the future, those
kinds of gifts will really help us
Donations to the medical foun-
dation can be made by calling 816-2238
or by writing to The Medical Founda-
tion of East Carolina University, 525
Moye Blvd Greenville, NC 27858.
California drcamin'
Photo by HAROLD WISE
The ECU Jazz Ensemble spent countless hours practicing
to perform at the Int. Assoc. of Jazz Educators 22nd Annual
Int. Conference in Anaheim, Ca. last week.
Olympians seek aid
Unusual
fundraising
planned for
Special Olympics
Andi Powell Phillips
Staff Writer
Activities start for
FratRush Week
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
Now that the Spring semester has
begun, ECU students have settled into
their routines and once again, the Inter-
fraternity Council (IFC) is ready to kick
off Rush Week.
Tonight is the first night for the
planned activities that will run until
Thursday, Jan. 19. From 8-11 p.m all 17
fraternities associated with IFC will open
their doors to any ECU male interested
in Greek life.
"Only 10 percent of students on
this campus are Greek said IFC Rush
Chair Neal Terrell, "and we'd like to in-
crease that number
In an effort to do just that, the
IFC held a Fraternity Forum on the mall
last week to introduce Greek life to stu-
dents and to answer any questions that
they might have about the system. It
was the first step in what IFC believes to
be public awareness without feeling any
pressure to make a decision.
"We had a good turnout and feel
that the forum served its purpose and
therefore believe it was successful said
IFC President Justin Conrad.
IFC is trying to change the image
of the Greek system by "dealing with the
barriers and misconceptions people
might have about Greek life Terrell said.
"People used to think that frater-
nity life had a negative effect on your
grades, but we've changed that and have
the numbers to prove it" Conrad said.
Last semester, the overall GPA for
undergraduate fraternity males was
2340, very close to the overall 2350 GPA
for all undergraduate ECU males, Conrad
said. IFC said its various time manage-
ment and leadership skills seminars held
last semester (which were mandatory for
all pledges to attend) are the reason for
the increase.
"We want to raise those numbers
yet again so we are looking to coordi-
nate another seminar with members of
our executive council faculty members
See RUSH page 5
If you don't know what to do
with those pesky, cluncky cars clut-
tering up your front yard, the North
Carolina Special Olympics (NCSO)
urges you to donate them.
NCSO is sponsoring an innova-
tive new fund-raiser called "Recycle
for Gold The organization is asking
the public to donate unwanted auto-
mobiles that will be resold, used for
spare parts or crushed for scrap metal.
"Regardless of the condition,
Special Olympics will receive $25 for
each recycled vehicle or half the funds
generated from selling parts or from
refurbishing the vehicle said Dave
Lenox, the NCSO executive director,
in a press release.
The funds from the recycled
cars will benefit the NCSO's sports
training program, which helps prepare
athletes for the 1995 Special Olym-
pics Summer World Games. Prospec-
tive participants should call 1-800-590-
1600, and a salvage operator will
schedule a pick-up time.
The 1995 Special Olympics
Summer World Games are being held
June 30 through July 9 at sites
throughout Connecticut The Games
are comprised of 19 sporting events
ranging from aquatics, to powerlifting,
volleyball and a sport called bocce.
"Bocce is a game taken from the
Italians that is similar to lawn bowl-
ing or horse shoes. It's more popular
with the older athletes said Keith L.
Fishburne, associate executive direc-
tor of the NCSO.
In addition to the "Recycle for
Gold" program, two more fundraising
campaigns will take place simulta-
neously this month to benefit the
Summer World Games.
"We also have a corporate cam-
paign to solicit support but these will
be the only fund-raisers directed at
the general public Fishburne said.
The Procter & Gamble company
is sponsoring the second campaign by
including millions of coupons for their
products in the Publisher's Clearing
House national winter mailing. Thirty-
three coupons for Procter & Gamble
products, ranging from Scope Mouthy
wash to Tide Clothes Detergent will
be distributed in the mailing so that
people can save money while benefit-
ing the Special Olympics. Ten cents
from every redeemed coupon will be
donated to the Special Olympics.
The NCSO expects to receive up
to $20,000 from this promotion. The
National Special Olympics stands to
receive up to $500,000.
A third way to contribute to the
NCSO, for those who do not have an
extra car lying around or who do not
need any kind of personal care or
household products, is to get out the
checkbook.
The NCSO has set goals of rais-
ing $85,000, to send 65 athletes and
20 coaches to the 1995 Summer
World Games in Connecticut
If you would like to help real-
ize this goal, call Lenox at 1-800-843-
6276 or send a donation directly to
the North Carolina World Games
Fund, P.O. Box 98209, Raleigh, N.C.
27624-8209.
Jump ball!
Tom Minges
(center) prepares
to ceremoniously
tip-off the
Williams-Arena
dedication game
Saturday. The
Pirates were
defeated 71-69 in
overtime by the
JMU Dukes.
Photo by HAROLD WISE
tiffed
The Four Plaids return page 0
Problems with racism page O
Quarterback leaves programpage I mL
Vvtectut
Tuesday
Patrly cloudy
High 75
Low 51
Wednesday
Partly cloudy
High 70
Low 49
13W t teaeA u&
Phone 328-6366 Fax 328-6558
The East Carolinian
ECU Publication Bldg.
Greenville, NC 27858
Student Pubs Building;across from Joyner
�IPIIIM II - �� -





I
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
The East Carolinian
Athletes suspended for reaching out
Three West Point football players who admitted groping the breasts
of female cadets during a pre-game ceremony have been suspended from
the team for the season. Eighteen female cadets told academy officials
that they were inappropriately touched while they ran past the football
players.
UNC students want a refund
Students at UNC Chapel Hill are demanding a partial refund of
their $28 student activity fees because the bowling alleys have been out
of service. The student bowling alley has been in operation since 1969
and has problems. The manager said he has had problems with the lanes
since he took his position in 1992. Currently only two lanes are working,
while six others are being overhauled for repairs.
Injectable birth control increasing on college campuses
College aged women are increasingly turning from birth control
pills and other traditional methods to a new drug which only needs to be
injected every three months. Officials at Indiana State University said
that demand for the Depo-Provera drug is increasing. The student health
center at Indiana State offers the drug. The drug was approved in 1992,
and used by more than 30 million women world-wide.
Beavis and Butthead studied at Harvard
The last morons one would expect to see in an ivy-league school
were the hot topic in a class at Harvard last week. The "Moral Dilemmas
of Management" class used the popular show, Beavis and Butthead, to
examine how business interests may be harmful to society. By viewing
exerts from the show and studying the cable industry in general, several
students commented that the case study was beneficial - huh, huh-huh.
What did they do with their bond money?
The college of engineering at NC State is currently constructing a
graduate research center. A five level parking deck is also under construc-
tion on campus. The $32 million projects are being funded by the bond
referendum which passed last November. The projects are expected to be
completed in the fall of '96. A golf course is also being planned. Deelop-
ers at the university plan to leave up to 50 percent of the land untouched
for environmental reasons.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from CPS and
other campus newspapers.
Depressed? Help is out there
Free counseling
available for
students
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Depression can affect anyone at
any time. The symptoms are well
known and vary: isolation, weight loss,
feelings of hopelessness, helplessness
or fatigue. If such feelings persist for
more than two weeks, depression has
set in and help should be sought
ECU offers counseling services
through the Counseling Center and
Mental Health Services located within
the Student Health Center. All ser-
vices are free-of-charge to students.
The Counseling Center offers
individual counseling and is sponsor-
ing a depression workshop
called, "Beating the College
Blues The program will
begin Feb. 6, said George
Gressman of the Counseling
Center. Between seven and
12 students will be admitted
to the workshop group.
"The workshop is
cognitively behavioral based
with activities based on
learning what makes people
depressed and going out and chang-
ing those behaviors
There are differences in the se-
verity of depression students can ex-
perience, and the causes of depression
are just as abundant
Gressman said people who are
severely depressed usually do not seek
help because they are unable to func-
tion.
"The difference is between the
severity of symptoms mild depres-
sion may occur if someone is feeling
unhappy or distressed, yet a wide
range of functioning remains intact"
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said Dr. Russ Federman, a psycholo-
gist with Mental Health. "With more
severe depression, it all begins to slide
downhill. To be successful in school
you must be fairly motivated, that may
diminish
Federman said college students
can be more at risk of depression.
"In some ways the university
environment is a 15 week time lim-
ited pressure cooker Federman said.
"School is a real conditional environ-
ment
Federman said he believes the
majority of college students do not
suffer from depression but can feel
depressed at times.
Major depression is most com-
monly diagnosed by Mental Health
said Dr. Steven Dauer, a psychologist
with Mental Health Services.
"For major depression the time
frame is two weeks, there would be a
severe decline in functioning Dauer
said
Dysthymia, a less acute
and less severe form of depres-
sion, will usually affect a per-
son for more than two years
to be diagnosed. Adjustment
disorder with depressive
mood is often caused by a
traumatic incident such as
breaking up with a boy-
friend or academic failure,
Dauer said. Depressive disor-
ders and bipolar depression (com-
monly referred to as manic depression)
are some other types of the illness. In
order to be clinically diagnosed, a
person must go through screening to
determine what type of illness they
suffer from.
"By far the majority of people
we see are for some form of depres-
sion or another Dauer said "We do
see a lot of other different kinds of
problems but depression is really the
common problem here
Mental Health Services differs
from the Counseling Center in treat-
ment.
"We tend to deal with more se-
vere problems that impact on the stu-
dents functioning the people we see
are not doing very well in several ar-
eas of their life Dr. Dauer said. "The
counseling center deals with what we
might think of as the normal levels of
adjustment and development and this
age range of people here on a college
campus things like loss and relation-
ship difficulties, stress management
and of course the academic support
services
According to Gressman, 850
students turned to the Counseling
Center for help for depression last
semester. Mental Health services
handles fewer patients, because there
are less staff resources available.
Students suffering from depres-
sion due to chemical disorders may
also need medication prescribed
through Mental Health Services.
Both genders suffer from de-
pression, but more women seek help,
Gressman said.
"It seems to be more culturally
acceptable for women to seek coun-
seling Gressman said. "Men are
taught to have to deal with it on their
own
Whether male or female, it is
important to get help.
"What's important is that
people be honest with themselves if
they are having those difficulties and
to try to deal with their reluctance to
get help Dauer said.
There is good news for those
who suffer from depression. Accord-
ing to literature distributed through
the Counseling Center, 80 percent of
those who obtain help for depression
are cured.
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I
The East Carolinian
Tuesday. January 17. 1995
Poet to discuss history of rap
Jeffrey Lee
Staff Writer
What could rap, poetry and
poetics have in common? Notre
Dame professor and author Dr. Pe-
ter Erskine will be glad to answer
that question when he visits ECU
to discuss Afro-American Poetics in
the U.S.
Dr. Peters is the 1995 Tag
Lecturer sponsored annually by the
English Department. The lecture is
slated for tomorrow at 4 p.m. in
GCB 1031. Dr. Erskine will be avail-
able for questions during a recep-
tion scheduled immediately follow-
ing the lecture.
Peters is the former director
of African-American Studies at Uni-
versity of California at Berkeley. His
areas of specialization include
Faulkner Studies. American Litera-
ture to 1930, African-American Lit-
erature. Eighteenth-Century British
Literature and Afro-Poetics.
"My emphasis is going to be
on giving a perspective on a book
that I am completing by the same
name. Afro-Ameri-
can Poetics in the
United States
Peters said. "What
1 do is try to start
with African back-
ground, talk about
the various types
of poetry that ex-
ist in Africa and
then 1 look at sev-
eral types of folk
tradition in the
U.S. that help to
maintain the links
to those old tradi-
tions
Dr. Peters'
work embraces all
areas of these folk
traditions such as
the jazz tradition
of poetry that, ac-
I also look at
rap music
because rap
music is from
rap poetry and
that comes from
a very, very long
tradition that
was launched
back in Africa.
� Dr.Peter Erskine
ECU CAMPUS
DELTA SIGMA PHI
EPSILON PHI CHAPTER
1993 -1994 Most Improved GPA
1993 - 1994 Most Improved Fraternity
Become a part of the Delta Sigma Phi tradition and experience at East Carolina University
To find out more stop by our house conveniently located at 510
East 10th St. during the rush sessions Tuesday, January 17-Thursday,
January 19, from 8:00 -11:00 PM. Friday night Invitation Bid Party.
If you need directions or a ride please call 757-1817 or 757-2885.
TJ
Delia
Sigma
Phi
10th Street
�n
Darryl's
cording to Pe-
ters, began to
evolve in the
1920s and came
to true fulfill-
ment in the
1960s and early
"70s and still
carries over to-
day.
'What I
do Peters said,
"is link up these
conterhporary
points that I am
working on in
the poetry and
look back to
trace the evolu-
tion.
"I also
look at'rap mu-
sic because rap
music is from rap poetry and that
comes from a very, very long tradi-
tion that was launched back in Af-
rica
According to Julie Fay, an as-
sociate professor of the English de-
partment, Peters is developing a
new. system of poetic measure spe-
cifically for African and African-
American poetry.
Fay added that the rhythm of
African and Afro-American poetry
is different from most other poetry
and is in need of its own poetic mea-
sure.
Ten years in the making, the
thrust of Dr. Peters' book and lec-
ture examines Afro-poetics in rela-
tion to African and African-Ameri-
can folk traditions.
Although no publishing or
release date has been set, Peters
hopes to secure a publisher in the
near future.
New art gallery
director named
Ben Duran
Staff Writer
ECU may have a new arena for
the exchange of ideas. No, there has
not been any secret construction
while students were asleep, but a
new director has been named for the
Wellington B. Gray Gallery. Gilbert
Leebrick has stepped in to fill the
vacancy left by Charles Lovell, who
resigned last June.
Leebrick, the former Director
of the Highlands Center for the Vi-
sual Arts in Highlands, NC and the
Appalachian Environmental Arts
Center brings over 25 years of ex-
perience and involvement with the
arts to his new position. He has a
serious interest in the environment
and draws a strong correlation be-
tween the arts and the natural
world. One of his recent works, for
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owntown
Greenville
which he received a NC Artist's
Grant, focused on Pre-Columbian
Native-American ceremonial sites.
Originally from a small farm
in upstate New York, Leebrick be-
gan his career in art as a painter.
He is a graduate of both Clemson
University and the University of
Hawaii, holding degrees in sculpture
and photography. The 17 years he
spent in Hawaii have given him an
appreciation for the coast, and he is
pleased to be living so close to it.
"Greenville is very enjoyable
says Leebrick. "It (Greenville) is
much different from the mountains
- it is a much more culturally stimu-
lating environment
As director of the Gallery,
Leebrick's duties include both ex-
hibition planning and fundraising,
as well as the hands on implemen-
tation of his vision for the gallery's
future. He sees the gallery as a
"teaching tool that can educate stu-
dents, as well as inform and stimu-
late the faculty and engage the com-
munity
"I have a certain sensibility
which is manifested in my gallery
agenda Leebrick said. "We need to
embrace art and not keep it tucked
away in museums, enjoying the aes-
thetic experience is what it is all
about. Art is synonymous with life
Leebrick is excited about the
events which are already scheduled
for the gallery, and hopes to put to-
gether some future exhibitions and
symposiums which focus on Native-
American art as well as the environ-
ment.
"The Beuys exhibit is a coup.
We are one of oniy four or five
schools to have the exhibition
Leebrick said.
The University of Michigan at
Ann Arbor and the University of Mi-
ami will also play host to the exhibi-
tion. Here at ECU, the exhibition be-
gins on May 27 and runs through
July 16.
However, students will not
have to wait until the summer for
cultural stimulation, because at this
moment the gallery is currently pre-
paring for a retrospective of the
work of Anders Knutsson and the
exhibition of a Yves Paquette instal-
lation. Both are set to run from Jan.
20 to March 3, with a lecture
planned for Jan. 19 at 7 p.m.
With the next two years of
events already scheduled, Leebrick
See ART page 5
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.�







Tuesday, January 17. 1995
The East Carolinian
Does Mickey want you?
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
Walt Disney World is looking
for singers and musicians to be a
part of the Disney Entertainment
Work Experience Program for the
upcoming summer session.
Larry Smith, audition coordi-
nator for Walt Disney World, said
students will audition to be per-
formers in one of the three catego-
ries: All American College March-
ing Band, All American College
Jazz Band or All American Jazz
Singers. Auditioners must be 18
years old to perform on the profes-
sional level and at least 16 to par-
ticipate in parade performances. All
entertainers will be covered under
the terms and conditions of the
Actor's Equity Association, a per-
formers' labor union, Smith said.
"Students will be divided up
into separate categories according
to their talents and auditions will
be held in these selective cities:
Anaheim, Ca. (Jan. 13-14), Orlando
(Jan. 28), Evanston, 111. (Feb. 4),
Bloomington, Ind. (Feb. 5), Boston
(Feb. 11), New York City (Feb. 12),
Dallas (Feb. 16), Austin.Tx. (Feb.
17), and Los Angeles (Feb. 18-19)
Smith said.
Walt Disney is seeking per
formers who have top abilities in
technical, lyrical, and improvisa-
tional skills in music. The Ameri-
can College Jazz Band is audition
ing for five saxophones, four trum-
pets, three trombones, one bass,
one guitar, one piano, one tuba and
one percussion. The All American
College Jazz Singers has openings
for two sopranos, two altos, one
tenor, and one bass. The All Ameri-
can Marching Band needs five saxo-
phones, four trumpets, four trom-
bones, two tubas, and three
percusssions. Sight reading is a
plus, Smith said.
"Students will perform four
hours a day and attend two hour
career workshops with professional
actors and singers Smith said.
"We are entering our 24th year of
this program and the program re-
alty helps students master top per-
forming ability as well as develop
skills for a profession in the enter-
tainment world
Disney is currently looking
for actors to participate in their
summer show, The Indiana Jones
Stunt Spectacular. Male
auditioners should have tumbling
and athletic abilities as well as com-
bat and training in high falls.
Women auditioners should be ath-
letic and have gymnastic and tum-
bling strength, Smith said. The po-
sitions that are available are Indi-
ana Jones, Marion Wavensworth,
stunt doubles, casting director and
more.
ECU student, Andrew Miller,
worked for Walt Disney World in
1993 under the Disney Co-op Man-
agement Program as a celebrity
food and beverage host.
Miller said he was inter-
viewed and chosen for the job that
only one out often people received.
Miller attended 10 Management
Seminars over his six month stay
at Disney and met many celebrities
while he was a part of the
"Hoopdee Doo Review" that per-
formed three shows a night.
Disney has one of the top five
benefits of any company, Miller
said. After you work for Disney you
are a CT (casting temporary) which
means you can come back to Disney
anytime as long as you work at least
one day every year.
"I decided to take a semester
off and work at Disney Miller said.
I worked at the number one dinner
show in the world and had a blast.
Working for Disney has good job
security and it looks great on a re-
sume. It was a good, fun job expe-
rience for me and I recommend it
to anyone
1993. The Walt Disney Company
(Left to right) Mary Hebbard, Holly Rodham, Louisa Michael
and Kathleen Snyder are ECU students who participated.
Flood
clean-up
begins
AP - Residents of western
North Carolina began cleaning up
Monday after weekend rains killed
three Boy Scouts, washed out roads
and inundated property along creeks
and riverbeds.
In Watauga County, about 10
families remained stranded in their
homes Monday because of high wa-
ters and washed-out roads, said county
emergency services spokeswoman
Lisa Shoun.
"They're fine, but we can't
reach them Shoun said. "They've got
power, they've got phones, but they're
stranded
More than 8 inches of rain fell
in Watauga County from Friday
evening, and some areas reported as
much as 11 inches. Grandfather Moun-
tain in Avery County had about 15
inches of rain, although exact mea-
surements were not possible because
of high winds, officials there said.
The downpours caused creeks
and streams to run riot over their
banks and brought lakes to flood
stages. By Monday, most of the rain
stopped, and emergency crews were
assessing the damage.
"It's just one of those things
where you have to let it do its thing
and then go in and clean up the
mess said Watauga County emer-
gency worker Steve Sudderth.
Thad Bryson, coordinator for
the North Carolina Emergency Man-
agement Division's regional office in
Asheville, said the standing water in
most counties had receded, and crews
mainly were cleaning up mud and
debris.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
Nation remembers civil leader
P - The nation remembered
Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday
; mid a feud between his family and
the National Park Service over who
preserve his memory and how.
At Ebenezer Baptist Church,
where King was pastor. Dexter Scott
King vowed to continue his lather's
work through economic opportunity,
calling for a SHi billion investment in
black community.
"My father had a dream. I too
have a dream the 3-year-old said in
; Martin Luther King Day address.
' My father delivered to his generation
political freedom. I would like to de-
liver to my generation economic free-
dom
More than 400 people packed
the church, next door to the Martin
Luther King Center for Nonviolent
Social Change and the crypt that
holds the body of the civil rights
leader, who would have been 66 on
Sunday.
The park service wants to build
a museum and visitors center near the
King Center. King's widow. Coretta
Scott King, and children want to cre-
ate their own interactive museum.
The dispute prompted the fam-
ily to halt park service tours of Kin, s
birthplace. The service now shepherds
tours past the home and presents a
slide show at its own facility about a
block away. The sides ate to meet Sat-
urday and discuss the disagreement.
The feud cropped up Monday
in Dexter King's church speech, and
in appearances on CNN and NBC by
King and Troy Lissimore. the park
service's superintendent of the King
Historic Site.
Lissimore said he thinks the
dispute could be worked out. But
King, now president of the King Cen-
ter, said the park service has falsely
accsed the family of trying to profit
from his father's memory.
"Myself and my family have
been accused of protecting our
legacy, the King legacy King said
during the service. "Yet we did not
wake up one morning and decide to
start a company called Martin Luther
King Jr. Inc
L'p to 700 marchers walked
through downtown Memphis. Tenn
stopping at the Lorraine Motel, now
the National Civil Rights Museum,
where King was assassinated by a
sniper on April 4. 1968.
Elsewhere:
- In Denver. President Clinton
addressed a crowd of more than
20.000 at a park as part of a daylong
celebration that featured a two-mile
parade. "Even as he marched all
across this land and took that vast
throng to Washington, D.C he knew
in the end that what was in the
hearts and minds of the average
RUSH from p. 1
American citizen was even more im-
portant Clinton said.
- In Boston, about 2,000
people attended a breakfast in Kings
honor, where 19-year-old Tito
Jackman said his generation has gone
astray. "We've gone off on tangents
instead of taking up the baton and
running the next leg said Jackman.
a student at the University of New
Hampshire.
- In New Hampshire, the only
state that has not fully adopted the
federal King holiday, about 25 teen-
agers staked out the sidewalk at the
Statehouse in Concord in a vigil
scheduled to last from midnight Sun-
day to midnight Monday.
"We feel he was an important
enough person in the civil rights
movement that he deserved to be rec-
ognized Eliot Lothrop said. The
state isn't giving him enough recog-
nition
FLOOD from p. 4
"In the mountains, when we to remain closed Tuesday,
have a heck of a lot of water, it rises Another area particularly
rapidly and goes away rapidly he
sa; 1. )
Exact figures on the damage
would not be available until Wednes-
day or Thursday. Bryson said.
Most roads from Yancey and
McDowell counties south were open
Monday, but in Watauga County, 25
state roads remained closed.
Some Watauga County roads
were completely under water or had
been washed away. On other roads,
the pavement was intact but the dirt
underneath it had washed away.
About 50 county residents had
been evacuated from their homes Sat-
urday, along with residents of a nurs-
ing home in Boone. and emergency
crews helped them move back in Mon-
day. Shouti sai 1.
However, about five families'
homes were too damaged for them to
return Monday, she said.
Watauga County schools were
hard hit by the flooding was Caldwell
County, where three Boy Scouts
drowned Saturday after being swept
from a foot bridge into the raging
waters of a creek.
In Collettsville, a portable wa-
ter tanker was set up at the city fire
department Sunday to provide clean
drinking water for area residents. Of-
ficials feared the flood waters may
have contaminated wells in the area,
said county fire marshal Dale Coffey.
The bad weather also caused
some scattered power outages and
problems with telephone service,
Coffey said.
Kelly Winkler, an engineer with
the state Department of Transporta-
tion, said crews were working Mon-
day to try and reopen Caldwell County
roads closed by high waters and
mudslides.
"We're going to be working late
until we get them opened he said.
COME CHECK OUT AMERICA'S
1ST FRATERNITY FOUNDED
AGAINST
RACISM!
tiao
iiao
JAN. 17 - 19
7 - 10 PM
AT THE ALPHA DELTA PI SORORITY
HOUSE. LOCATED ON 5TH STREET.
and our adviser. Dean Speier, to study
the effects of Creek life and its strengths
and weaknesses within the campus and
community Conrad said. "We are also
planning on training the executive level
of each fraternity on their leadership
skills in hopes to strengthen each indi-
vidual chapters
One event the IFC is working on
is organizing a Greek Fair where each
fraternity and sorority will have a differ-
ent game booth and all the money raised
will be donated to the booths' philan-
thropy.
"We're not just here for the stu-
dents but for the community as well
Terrell said.
Another idea for next Fall is a plan
to station several members from each
fraternity at various residence halls to
help on-campus students move into their
new rooms. ECU has 17 fraternities and
each holds something different for ev-
eryone.
For rides and further information,
call each house, or the IFC office at 328-
4706. WZMB will also provide informa-
tion all this week during its program-
ming.
J:
A PULSE-POUNDING
THRILL RIDE
THE
IVER
HENDRIX FILMS
Thursday, January 19
� Friday, January 20
Saturday, January 21
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Members of Phi Kappa Tau talk to potential pledges during a Fraternity Forum held last week
on the mall. Rush Week officially starts today. One in 10 students on campus is Greek.
ART from p. 3
�vTH
ai
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted and are FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff (one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
THE CULTURAL AWARENESS COMMITTEE PRESENTS
MY CHILDREN, MY AFRICA
TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1995
8XOO PM IN HENDRIX THEATRE
UGHTNIN' WELLS (BLUES MUSIC)
JANUARY 18 -1:30 - 3:00 PM at Wright Soda Shop
SEXUALLY
SPEAKING
WITH
DR. RUTH
WESTHEIMER
Wednesday, February 22,1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
Contact the Central Ticket Office
100-ECU-ARTS (328-2787)
or Locally at 328-4788
Sponsored by the
Student Union Lecture Committee
WT Biblical Archaeology
Prophecy Fullfillment
A slide show presentation
on the 1 atest ,deve 1 opmcuts.
Mendenhall Rm. 241
7:15 pmTues. & Wed.
January 17th & 18th
lh Apostolic Campus Ministry
Ik
hue
is focusing on the relationship between
the gallery and the people it serves.
"Everyone is welcome in the
gallery anytime to talk about their con-
cerns, what they are excited about and
interested in he said. "Everyone is
extremely friendly and I am looking
forward to a long relationship here,
working with students and faculty on
future exhibitions
"After an exhaustive national
search, we are delighted to have Mr.
Leebrick join our faculty. He has ex-
tensive administrative experience and
strong ties to the arts agencies in our
region. We look forward to a promis-
ing future for the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery said Michael Dorsey. dean of
the school of Art in a prepared press
release.
Leebrick is joined in the move
to Greenville by his wife Jacquelyn and
his daughters Meradith and Dawn, who
plans to attend the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill next year as a
freshman.
ILLUMINA 95
Call for Entries
Friday, January 27,1995
1:00-8:00 PM
Mendenhall 242
? ?????????
We're More Than Barefoot!
For More Information, Call trie
Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Due To Ike Natwie O Owi
Hu4vfve�4f Owi B��eit n4v Beit
Cche DwhtowsK, fiJ CJL&ck Cut Ike
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atalog
nnectiori
Division of UBE
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210 E. 5th Street





-JU. -
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith I.angley . Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Printed on
1000
recycled
p�per
Thomas Brobst. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson. Copy Editor
Jennifer Coleman. Typesetter
Darren Mygatt. Typesetter
Ashley Poplin. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Mike O'Shea, Cm idotum Manager
Celeste Wilson, Uixoul Manager
Jeremy Lee, Asst. Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, AM Creative Director
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Aaron Wilson, Asst, Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith. Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925 . The East Carolinian publishes 12.0()0 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Utters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
Say hello to the new East Carolinianl Today is our debut issue of a fresh, improved
layout. We've worked long and hard this year to bring you the timeliest and most accurate
information source, and today's paper is the result of great consideration and deliberation
to provide an up-to-date, visually pleasing product.
As managing editor for this newspaper, 1 know firsthand just how diligently our staff
works. The people here are devoted to serving you, our campus community. Let me speak
for the entire staff when I say that we truly listen to your criticisms.
Probably the most important thing for students, faculty, staff family and friends to
remember is that The East Carolinian (TEC) is completely student-run. We go to classes
and then we go to work, much like the rest of the campus. Our hours fluctuate, and it's
not always fun and games. Sometimes we're up here until as late as 6 a.m. (God help us
alland sometimes we're scrambling out the door at 8:30 p.m. That can be tough on
the ol' GPA, but we realize there are a lot of other students working much the same
schedules. , ,
The difference is that we're in the spotlight. And it gets rough when all we get back
are negative responses. Just like many of you out there, we work hard at what we do.
Sometimes we're going to make mistakes, and sometimes they're going to be big. (One
rule of thumb - just spell Eakin correctly!)
Most likely, however, we're going to make - as my grandmother says incessantly -
"learning mistakes That's OK, because that's what we're here to do: learn.
I encourage all our readers to help us out. Please call if we attribute a quote to your
pet parakeet instead of you. Please write when we fill this space here with an opinion that
you just don't agree with. But please call and write when we print a feature that makes
you laugh, a story that really personifies the ECU spirit, or a picture that says a million
words. i.T
We're here to inform you, the campus community. But we can t do it alone. Weicome
to the new TEC. Don't be a stranger. JjjQjjJuJLi. i�iok
Trt� SttAPSON JURORS EMERGE
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Racism: A dead-end street
Low standards cost money
$14 billion lost
to student loon
defaults
Chris Arlir.e
Staff Writer
I recall my first meeting with
my junior high school counselor Mrs.
Beverly. We were planning out my
course selections. The conversation,
however, eventually digressed to what
my future education plans were. One
of the first things she mentioned was
that college was not for everyone.
The reason I bring up this en-
counter is quite simple: Until recently.
I was not aware of how right she was.
Okay, I will admit that everyone
can stand to gain something from
higher education. However, a college
setting may not be for everyone to
seek it There are far too many stu-
dents who clearly do not belong. Yet
college and the Federal Government
continues to encourage it
Let's start with the final decid-
ing factor as to whether or not a stu-
dent is able to attend college or not
money, and can they afford or not The
U.S. Department of Education annu-
ally administers $6 billion in college
tuition grants and $15 billion in guar-
anteed loans. All as "entitlements"
with non specific academic require-
ments, only financial need.
Unfortunately, many recipients
of these grants are not ready for col-
lege, which raises the question of how
did they get there? If a college does
not require high school graduation for
enrollment, its students can get fed-
eral tuition grants and loans without
having a high school diploma or
equivalency degree.
This raises the question of how
are they going to be disciplined
enough to handle college if they could
not make it in high school? Unfortu-
nately, the truth of the matter is they
can't Many students can't hack it and
that ends up costing the government
money. "How much money?"
From 1988 to 1993, $14 billion
was lost to student loan defaults.
Those without a high school diploma
comprise over 50 percent of that num-
ber.
Remember the good old days
when you could actually fail classes.
Well, not anymore. Late in the 1960s
many students and professors started
viewing grades as artificial measure-
ments and irrelevant encumbrances in
the anything-goes culture.
In the early 1970s, Stanford
University allowed students to drop
classes right up until the final exam.
Wouldn't that be great? Wait, it gets
even better. They also abolished D's
and F's.
Recently Stanford has decided
to reincorporate the F's. Think they
are enforced? Less than 10 percent
even make anything less than a B the
whole time they are there.
The University of Virginia's Law
School has decided to smell a little of
the Colombian as well. They recently
initiated a B-mean policy. It says that
professors have to give their classes
an average of B grade. Does anyone
think that the students will sue?
These are days many students
are saying "I pay so much to go here,
you can't give me D's and F's. Ah, so
now grade inflation is an acceptable
form of consumer fraud.
The solution to these problems
are simple. A standardized minimum
test should be implemented in order
to qualify for grants and loans. Hey it
would be in line with the new Goals
2000 Educate America Act. It seems
to me that anything that would help
a government act actually work for
once and save billions of dollars would
be a good idea. If someone can't do
the wprk keep them out of the class-
room.
Solution number two.is even
simpler. Simply start handling our
appropriate grades. If I perform a test
at C quality then give me a C. Don't
inflate it to a door prize B. It is time
that ethics played a bigger role in
awarding merit than sympathy.
Racism issues
in Higher
Learning
Angela McCullers
Staff Writer
Racism on college campuses is
a growing national problem. John
Singleton brings this issue to the
public's attention in his new film
"Higher Learning In Singleton's
movie, the racist attitudes of some
of the students and police officers at
Columbus University, followed by
their racist behaviors, brought about
racial problems on their campus. Vio-
lence was used to solve their prob-
lem-which ultimately led to the
death of three students.
Racism is the name we attach
to the activities of people who be-
lieve that one race of people is "natu-
rally" superior to another.
In one scene, Malik Williams
(Omar Epps) confronts a skinhead
played by Michael Rappaport, about
his behavior. Malik feels that the
skinhead has been "walking around
campus calling him a nigger in his
head
Many of the students in the
movie did not profess their racist ide-
ologies and views openly. Racism is
more than attitudes or feelings. We
do not have to look into the hearts
of our peers to find racism. We can
look at their actions. Racism is a state
of mind, a set of values and a con-
stellation of behaviors that has been
passed down from generation to gen-
eration.
You do not have to confront a
person who you feel is racist in -or-
der to make them confess to their
personal racial bias. What will be
solved?
What will you accomplish by
doing that? The individual will con-
tinue to be a racist after you have
confronted him or her. Their atti-
tudes and beliefs are not going to
change solely because you have dis-
covered their true feeling about other
races. Without positive change there
can be no progress.
Racism is a dead-end street,
leading to frustration and hatred of
others. It is a cancerous phenomenon
that lurks in every cranny of Ameri-
can society. Many people have suf-
fered damage to their self-esteem due
to the ugly ramifications of racism.
Self-esteem is a must for sheer sur-
vival.
Do not wait until you are older
to feel the need to improve the rela-
tionship of the races. We, as young
adults, stand a better chance of ulti-
mately eliminating racism in our
country if we begin to do something
about it now. I am not saying that
racism will disappear overnight. That
is not going to happen. Racism may
not disappear in the next one hun-
dred years. r,
We must start with oui children
that we will some day have. We mtf$t
teach them that a person can not r)e
judged on their nationality or their
race, but on their personality and thejr
ability to get along with others.
ii
ii
ii
Letters to the
Editor
tv� v3RfcS,aNri �

s
To the Editor:
The tragic loss of one of our
most promising young biology stu-
dents underscores the need to pro-
vide an elevated cross-walk over the
10th street raceway. Daily, the health
and lives of students, faculty, and
staff are jeopardized as they negoti-
ate traffic in and around university
grounds. It is so obvious to every
pedestrian, another senseless acci-
dent is destine to occur along 10th
street in front of Brewster Building.
For a fraction of the funds spent on
sports arenas, bowling alleys, and
snack bars, the university cross-walk
could be designed that encourages
usership. On campus, pedestrians
should have the right-of-way. how-
ever, vehicles rarely yield to pedes-
trians. Proper signage and enforce-
ment could help to alleviate this prob-
lem. Certainly, past and present uni-
versity administrations have consid-
ered these options but for some rea-
son could not justify construction or
action. Please reconsider.
David Knowles
Instructor
Biology i
TheEastCarolinian welcomes all Letters to the Editor.
However, all letters, in order to be considered for publication,
must be typed, under 250 words, and contain your name,
class rank, major and a working daytime phone number.
Send these to: Letters to the Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 278584353.
��mil n �) i ��ii





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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
SSIF
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY! On Campus, two
rooms. $197 per month and 1 2 utili-
ties. Call 758-6457
TAR RIVER ESTATES: Three male
roommates needed. Located on river.
$100 deposit, $169 rent, 1 4 utilities
and phone. Call Keving 758-6701.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3BR
House at 206-A East 12th St. Rent
$450 month. 2BR House at 206-B East
12th St. Rent $295 month Also, 2BR
Apartment at 810 Cotanche, Rent $325
month Call 757-3191.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example of Frank Lloyd Wright ar-
chitecture. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large dining room, kitchen and living
room with fireplace. New refrigera-
tor, washerdryer, fenced backyard,
nice shrubbery. Convenient to cam-
pus and hospital. $750.00mo. de-
posit. 524-5790 day - 752-8079 night.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two and
one Bedrooms(s) Apartments at
Wesley Commons For Rent. Free
Cable. Call 758-1921.
ROOM AVAILABLE. Walking dis-
tance from campus. Private room;
share bath and kitchen. Call Mike
Carey at 752-2879.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Kings Row Apts $190.00 rent 12
utilities, Basic cable, pool and bus
service included. Prefer serious, quiet
grad student. Call 752-0845.
ROOMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY to share Tar River Apartment.
Own bedroom. Close to campus. Call
Amy at 758-7542 for more info.
STUDIOUS AND SOCIAL female
roommate to live in 3BR, 2Bath apt. in
Tar River. 13 utilities and phone,
$208 month. Call Tonya 752-5525.
DUPLEX FOR RENT: 2Bedroom, 1
12 bath 2 blocks from campus, 2
blocks from Downtown. Large
Rooms, Closets, Balcony and Back
Deck. $500 per month. 1 year lease
Deposit 752-6833
ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW One
person needed to share a 3BR apt.
with den, dining room, living room, 2
1 2 bath, pantry, patio, and will have
your own bedroom. $163.00mon
plus 14 ut $100 deposit, cable in-
cluded. Located on 1st St. in Tar River.
Call 757-2684.
APARTMENT FOR RENT Spacious
2 Bedroom 1 Bath stove. Frig. - 2
Bedroom 2 Bath, stove, Frig Dish-
washer, Garbage Dispol, Washer,
Dryer, Water, Sewer, Basic Cable in-
cluded 2 Blocks from Campus. Dog-
wood Hollow Apts. Call 752-8900
ROOMATE NEEDED, own room for
140 1 5 utilities. 3 blocks from cam-
pus. Call 830-2007
MALE, NONSMOKER, STUDENT
wanted to share house 1 mile from
ECU. Serious about school, clean and
neat. $175 a month. All amenities.
Call 758-5206
For Sale
FOR SALE: Black, leather chair $30,
Entertainment Center (small) $25,
Mauve carpet perfect for dorm or
apartment $35. All must be sold! Call
758-5361
1990 SUZUKI KATANA 600 very
fast bike, red black gold, new tires,
1 cargo net, Shoei helmet Great condi-
tion. $3,300 neg. Call 830-5583 leave
message Jamie
TREK 700 ALUMINUM excellent
condition $500 or best offer Call Tom
at 752-9356
I j KBElVflBEEll i vA i;r3Ei7f3iiET.a Ikt
o
Services Offered
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6
Billion in private sector grants &
scholarships is now available. All stu-
dents are eligible regardless of grades,
income, or parent's income. Let us
help. Call Student Financial Services:
1-800-263-6495 ext. F53623
TUTORING - IMPROVE YOUR
ENGLISH! Experienced teacher can
tutor you in conversation, writing and
TOEFL. Will edit papers also. Call
Pam at 758-6952.
El Help Wanted
HELP WANTED DRIVERS
Make your own Schedule
Paid $50 to $100 cash nightly
If interested please see
Eric 321-4862
CARRIAGE HOUSE APARTMENTS
South Charles Street across from Athletic Club, close
to the Plaza and ECU Bus Service, large 2 Bedroom
Townhouses over 1000 sq. ft 1 12 baths, private patios,
dishwashers, all electric, water furnished, swimming pool,
volleyball court, cable TV available and on site laundry.
Call Resident Manager at 756-3450
for further information.
For Sale
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Resi-
dency Status and Tuition is the bro-
chure by attorney Brad Lamb aa the
in-state tuition residency application
process. For sale: student stores,
Wright Building.
CANNONDALE 55cm RED ROAD
BIKE - Shimano 600 - Time Pedals -
Ma vie Tubular Rims - Turbo Ti Saddle
S450. Call Jeff at 752-1247.
IBM COMPATIBLE COMPUTER,
color monitor, color capable printer,
and MORE. Perfect for computer il-
literate! $400 or best offer. Call Mary
758-3426
FOR SALE: 3 Piece bedroom suit,
$275 If interested please contact Chris-
. tine. 752-6962 Must Sell!
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Stu-
dents needed! Fishing industry.
Earn up to $3,000- $6,000 per
month. Room and board! Trans-
portation! Male or Female. No ex-
perience necessary. Call (206) 545-
4155 ext A53622
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1,000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a licensed
agency. Must be 18, dependable
and have own phone and transpor-
tation. Call Diamonds or Emerald
City Escorts at 758-0896 or 757-3477
TELEMARKETING- Davenport
Exteriors Thermal Gard- $5 per
hour plus bonus. Easy work, flex-
ible hours start today. Call 355-
0210
EVENT STAFF - STAFF ONE, the
Event Staff Provider for Walnut
Creek Amp and NC State Athletics
and Concerts is accepting applica-
tions for ushers and ticket takers
for ECU Basketball and Concerts,
Call 919 856-0800 Mon-Thur, 1pm-
5pm for more info.
BECOME A CERTIFIED USSF SOC-
CER REFEREE. Earn Extra $$. Clinic
to be held on Campus Jan. 20-22. Reg-
istration fee of $40.00. For further info
call Boyce Hudson 752-7914.
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY:
ECU Recreational Services is hir-
ing students interested in becom-
ing Intramural Sport Officals. If
interested, attend the WATER
POLO OFFICIALS MEETING held
January 25 at 9pm in Brewster B-
102. For more details call David at
328-6387.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -
Earn up to $2,000month work-
ing on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour
companies. World travel (Hawaii,
Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.). Sea-
sonal and Full-time employment
available. Noexperience necessary.
For more information call 1-206-
634-0468 ext. C53623
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
extra cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided. Send
SASE to Central Distributors Po
Box 10075, Olathe, KS 66051. Im-
mediate response.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Bring your outgoing personality
and reliable transportation and
become one of our Professional
Photographers. Basic photography
knowledge and 35mm SLR camera
a plus, but not essential. We train.
Flexible PT h rs - $6.00 per hour.
Call 1-800-722-7033 M-F 12-5pm
SZECHUAN GARDEN - 909 S.
Evans St. Experienced wait staff
and cashier needed. No phone calls
please. Apply in person between
2:00pm and 6:00pm.
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a De-
gree with practical experience is
better. ONLINE INFORMATION
SERVICES is currently taking ap-
plications for part-time telephone
collectors. If interested please ap-
ply at 1206 Charles Blvd. Green-
ville
WANTED BABYSITTER to help
share responsibility with another
collegestudent. This is for two boys
ages 5 & 7. This semester need
someone on Tuesday and Thurs-
day from 12 to 6. Preferably a
Sopnomore or Junior. Summer is
taken care of this year. Please call
during the day at 756-8886 or after
Five at 756-0684. $5.00 a Hour.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER
needed for 2 1 2 year old on Mon-
day and Friday mornings. No
smoking, Transportation and ref-
erences required. 355-2088.
PANAMA CITY BEACH,
SPRING BREAK 1995! 7 nights
deluxe party package $149.00 P.P.
Campus Reps. Wanted. Earn FREE
Trips. Call Gator Rock (800) 410-
2867.
BASEBALL UMPIRES
NEEDED Anyone interested in
umpiring youth baseball games
(ages 9-18) for the Spring and Sum-
mer should contact the Greenville
Recreation and Parks Department
Athletic Office Immediately! 15-20
Umpires needed. Pay $15-$20 per
game. For more information please
call the Athletic Office at 830-4550
after 2pm.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DE-
VELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT
OF ATHLETICS, is now accepting
applications for tutors. A minimum
2.5GPA is required. Please call 328-
4550 for more information.
RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL to
care for children after school. Tues-
day and Thursday, 2:30 - 5:30pm.
Call 756-0417 before 9:00pm.
SEEKING DEPENDABLE, LOV-
ING SITTER to keep my children
part time. It interested, please call
JARMA at 355-1451
HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Clean, High volume Adult Club
needs YOU now. Confidential em-
ployment Daily pay Top Commis-
sions. Some to no experience. If
you've called before call again.
Playmates Massage Snow Hill, N.C.
919-747-7686
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BET-
TER GRADES? Well, We'll pay
you to! Make your A's pay by call-
ing Student Supplements today.
We'll pay you cash for going to
class! Give us a call at 752-HELP
EARN EXTRA MONEY at home,
stuffing envelopes part-time. Rush
SASE to ML Associates 7209 East
Harris Blvd 321 Charlotte, NC
28212
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! Sparefull-time. Set
own hours! RUSH Self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl)
1821 HillandaleRd. 1B-295 Durham
NC 27705
mm
BRODY'S AND BRODY'S FOR
MEN are accepting part-time sales
applications. Flexible scheduling
optionssalary clothingdiscount.
All retail positions include week-
ends. Applications accepted Mon-
day and Thurday, l-3pm, Brody's,
The Plaza
SITTING OUf THIS SEMESTER
or have plenty of free time during
the day? Brody's is accepting ap-
plications for Receiving Room As-
sociates. Verify incoming freight
price merchandise. Some lifting
required. Applications accepted
Monday and Thursday, l-3pm,
Brody's, The Plaza.
ECU ROPESCHALLENGE
course facilitators needed. Flexible
schedules, excellent pay. Interested
persons call 328-6064.
Travel
SPRING BREAK! Bahamas Party
Cruise 6 days $279! Includes 12 Meals
& 6 Free Parties! Great Beaches &
Nightlife! A HUGE Party! Cancun &
Jarfcaica 7 Nights Air & Hotel From
$429. Spring Break Travel 1-800-678-
6386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BREAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa Beach(Near
Disney)-27 Acre Deluxe Beach front
Resort 7 Nights $159! Key West $229!
Daytona Beach Room with Kitchen
From $129! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8
DaysOceanview Room with a Kitchen
$129! Walk to Best Bars! Includes Free
Discount Card Which Will Save You
$100on FoodDrinks! 1-800-678-6386
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Book Now & Save. Jamaica $439,
CancunBahamas $399, Panama City
$119, Day tona $149, Organize Groups,
Earn Cash, & Travel Free. Endless
Summer 1-800-234-7007
HELP! Need ride to and from Cherry
Point. Will Split gas. Call Sooz at 756-
9819. Leave message.
WANT TO GET WET AND WILD?
Then sign us for Innertube Water Polo
with Recreational Services. On almost
any night of the week you can find
Men, Women, and even Co-Rec teams
having a blast in the pool. The infor-
mational meeting is on Tuesday, Janu-
ary 24 at 5:00 pm in the Biology Build-
ing Rm 103. If you have any questions
contact Donna Allen at 328-6387.
SPRING BREAK '95!
Guaranteed lowest prices In USA
Jamaica
Bahamas
Special Group Rates & Free Travel!
. Sun Splash Tours j
T 1-800-426-7710 "v1
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
JAMAICA SAM, CWCUW1AHAMAI �.��
PANAMA CITY till. DATOMA (1 t
OMOAMZf WKur, tU)H CAAK. A THAVEL FHt
ENDLEit SUMMER!
1 800-234-7007
REAK
VtfVS YOUfiSCLF & $AV�!
M VI N NK.H1 1RIPS
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
PANAMA CITY BEACH
DAYTONA BEACH
iW:V
31
STEAMBOAT
VAILBEAVER CREEK
� PS MMB1KKH� 0 0BTAWKW MM 0�TtS; LBICTH W SWY
400-StfNCUASE
toa-l rm MroaMAvnoM & wi�ations
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PIAVKKS CIAJR
Skillut V-ci.od!

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Want to send that
special someone a
message?
Try our personals in
the classified section!
Only $2.00 for 25
words or less.
Greek Personals
RUSH SIGMA NU Come out this
week and meet the brothers of Sigma
Nu. Our house is conviently located
behind Miami Subs, one block from
campus Joyce My brothers.
for all you
i! AOPi
JENNY VEST, thank you
have done for us - we love you
AOPI would like to wish everyone
the best throughout the Spring se-
mester and good luck with your
classes.
THANK YOU Melinda for every-
thing you have done for us. Thank
You U.B.E. Love, AOPi
THE SISTERS OF AOPI would like
to wish the best of luck to all fraterni-
ties during RUSH.
CONGRATS to Kristen Sierocki on
your pinning to your Sig Pi Guy!
Tommy is a lucky Man, Love your
AOPi Sisters!
BEAUTIFUL AND BRAINS TOO
Congratulations to Sigma Pi for hav-
ing highest GPA in Fall 94!
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
brothers of Sigma Pi - Robert Colling,
Jeff Privott, and John Myers JBs For
Life
SIGMA PI would like to welcome
back all from break. And welcome all
to come out for RUSH in Spring 95
CONGRATULATIONS to Pi
Lambda Phi's new Executive Board!
President-Ryan Lawrence, VP-
Dwayne deSerres, TreasArno Riehs,
Sec-Chris Feathers, Pledge Marshall-
Mac McLawhorn. GOOD LUCK!
THE BROTHERS OF PI LAMDA
PHI would like to welcome all rush-
ees to come out to the Alpha Delta Pi
sorority house located on 5th street.
Tues. 17th-Thurs. 19th. GO GREEK!
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA, a na-
tional service sorority will be holding
Spring Rush,Jan.l7,18,19, from 7p.m.
to 9p.m in the Mendenhall Social
Room. Come and find out what "Ser-
vice in friendship" is all about. For
more info. Call 758-9978.
THE SISTERS OF AOTT would like
all of the interested girls to come learn
more about sorority life on January
24 and 25.9:30-10:45.805 Johnston St.
See You There! Any questions or if
you need a ride call us at 757-0769!
PHI SIGMA PI Welcome Back All
Tau Brothers. Hope the break went
well! We will have our first Dinner
meetingjan.25that6:00at the Golden
Corral.
CONGRATULATIONS to Nicole
Mosteiler for being voted Vice Presi-
dent of Order oi Omega and mem-
ber-at-large for Ponhellenic. We're
proud of you. Love, your Pi Delta
Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
sisters of Pi Delta: Jennifer Andrews,
Ami Brosure, Tammy Deweese,
Renee Hester, Karen Hoddinott,
Christy Ibrahim, Ashley Miller, Amy
Roberts, Kerri Smith, Metizza Wenzel,
Lynne Zengilowski. We love you!
Love, your sisters.
Announcement
SPECIAL OLYMPICS COACHE?
NEEDED ,
TheGreenville-Pitt Co. Special Olyn
pics will be conducting a Track .
Field CoachesTrainingSchool on Sal
Feb. 4 from 9:00am - 3:30pm for a
persons interested in becoming a ce
tified volunteer track coach. We als
need coaches for the following Sport
equestrian, bowling, powerliftin;
volleyball, softbal! swimminj
rollerskating & gymnastics. NO E
PERIENCE IS NECESSARY Formoi
information, contact Connie or Dwai
at 830-4541 or 830-4551.
DR. ERSK1NE PETERS
Afro-American Poetics in the US: 199
TAG Lecturer of the Dept. of Englis
Wednesday, January 18 4:00pm GC
1031. Reception Follows
E. C. NATIVE AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION
ECNAO meeting at 7:00pi
Mendenhall Room 14
PSI CHI NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY
All PSI CHI members need to attenc
Jan 18,95 Rawl 101 at 5:00pm. (Elec
tions)
B-GLAD
B-GLAD (Bisexuals, Gays, Lesbian
& Allies for Divesity) will hold it
first meeting of the semester on Thurs
day, January 19 at 8pm in the Multi
purpose Room (1st floor) o
Mendenhall Student Center.
A FREE FRIDAY FLING
Recreational Services is offering a fre
aerobics session Friday, January 20 a
4:00pm in Christenbury Gym roor
108. Free Food, Aerobics and refresh
ments will be offered. All faculty
staff and students are welcome witl
a valid identification card.
ATTENTION EDUCATION
MAIORS!
The opportunity to get involved ii
the only professional organizatioi
that can help you move from the stu
dent desk to the teacher's desk i
open to you. Come join SNCAE a
our first meeting of the spring semes
ter on January 19 in Speight Roor
308 at 4:30pm
BLOODMOBILE
Give another chance. Give Blood
Bloodmobile at Hayfield Farm
Ayden, NCSaturday,January21,199
10:00am-3:00pm. Donate Blood an.
receive a Free Riding Lesson!
ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB
Meeting on Thursday, Jan 19, in GC1
3007, at 5pm. Refreshments will b
provided.
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNI-
CATION SCIENCES AND
DISORDERS
(Formerly SLAP) will be providin;
the speech and hearing screening fo
students who are fulfilling require
ments for admission to Upper Divi
sion on January 23,24,and 25, 199
from 5:00-6:00pm each day. Thes
are the only screening dates durin;
the Spring Semester. The screenin;
will be conducted in the Bel
Annex(ECU Speech and Hearin;
Clinic located next to the Bel
Building(School of Allied Health Sci
ences), near the intersection of Charle
St. and the 264 PY-pass. NO AF
POINTMENT IS NEEDED
PLEASE DO NOT CALL THEIR OF
FICE FOR AN APPOINTMENT
WAITING ISOUTSIDE THE CLINK
WAITING ROOM. SIGN IN BEGIN?
AT4:50PM. Screenings are conductei
on a first come, first serve basis.
CHOOSING A MAIOR & A
CAREER
Learn how personality affects caree
choice. Take five assesment instru
ments. Learn how to research caree
areas that may be right for you. Thi:
five-session workshop is just wha
you need. $15.00 classes begin: 119
1 23,1 25,1 31. Counseling Center
Call 328-6661 for more information.
RUSH PHI KAPPA PSI
Scholars. Athletes K: Gentlemen who
want to join a group of best friends for
life. We will he at the AOPi house
Tue-ThuiS lliilht. located on Johnston
st. at I hi end of
Kiltmorc ae. (In front
Li of Fleming dorm)
Call for a ride
830-9536
ask for Woody
K






8
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
The East Carolinian
L

Step into the Alley
Owner makes
big impression
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
immmmmmmmmmmmmmmnmmmmmmmam
How many of you faithful read-
ers knew that CD Alley came to
Greenville because Sean McCrossin,
the owner, moved here to be closer to
the girl of his dreams? Even though
she's not around anymore. Sean him-
self decided to stay behind. Many of
you already know this man. Why else
would you be sporting the newest CD
Alley T-shirt design?
Sean brought his store to
Greenville about six years ago when
he moved here from Kill Devil Hills (a
small coastal town here in North Caro-
lina). As stated previously, he came
here to be with his girlfriend and also
because a record store was a risky
business venture in a tourist town.
Since the store opened, Sean
has had nothing but sweet success.
his business growing steadily from
day one. At first, however, he was
worried that the store wouldn't fly
because ol ail the competition. So
Sean lived off of the money he made
by bar-tending and invested all of the
profit made by CD Alley back into
the store.
This proved to be a very wise
business decision, because he has
now expanded the store to almost if
not more than twice the size that it
was and has increased his stock by
25percent
CD Alley now carries music
that caters to all musical fantasies,
ranging from punk to beach music
to classical. When asked why he
opened the store here in Greenville
he simply said. "For the love of mu-
sic, and to learn more about the mu-
sic world So. what's next for this
music lover?
A record company is on his
front burner as we read. Sit & Spin
Records will be one of the first record
companies coming out of Greenville
that will feature alternative music
and other musical styles. Sean's de-
sire to get good music to the people
and turning them on to new sounds
has already made his store success-
ful and he thinks it will be a good
formula for mixing up a record label.
He waiats to start off small by releas-
ing some 7-inch singles and maybe a
full length album if interest in the
band in uuestion is high. This strat-
egy is to get credibility and good sales
for him and to give the bands a great
opportunity to get some exposure
into the mainstream.
Sean's knowledge has turned
some of the greatest musical fuddy-
duddies in town on to some great
music. He also has this uncanny abil-
ity to find that certain record, tape
or CD that you've been looking for,
even if that means he has to special
order it for you. An easy- going man.
he is always friendly and helpful to
the customer and so are his employ-
ees. The world needs more people
with his knowledge and the creativ-
ity to make a record store like CD
Alley fly.
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Singing Plaid
The Four Plaids return from the
grave to give one last show
"A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a very
tiny drop in the great screaming
bucket of American media opinion.
Take it as you will.
Okay, so we all know that
Greenville's nightlife sucks. You
can go get drunk at this bar or
that bar. You can watch the same
stupid fights break out over the
same stupid crap, or the same
sleazy pick-up lines lead to the
same lame-ass drunken sexual li-
aisons between the same musky
sheets. You can be really lame and
participate in the above activities.
Or you can do all of the above to
the beat of any of the same three
rotating rosters of bands that mill
through the last three surviving
live-music clubs in town. Big fun.
And as an added attraction,
you can choke on the soup-thick
fog of a thousand cigarettes. And
while I'm on the subject. I'd like
to take a moment to make a note
to smokers. I have nothing against
your habit, honestly. I think smok-
ers should be able to light up any-
where that fire doesn't cause a se-
rious danger.
It's just that well, it's the
smell. Cigarettes stink. I mean,
they smell like they would cause
cancer, and that usually just pisses
me off. So couldn't you have the
decency to smoke something that
smells good, like a pipe? At least
then I might enjoy having my
lungs gunked up. Thanks.
Anyway, back to that sucky
Greenville nightlife. Sometimes it
seems like we have no choice but
to buy into the mass hallucination
that downtown is actually fun. So
we wade through the muck and
try to have a good time. That's
okay sometimes, but shouldn't
there be something else? 1 mean,
when you have to drink heavily to
even make a place seem bearable,
I think it's time for a change.
Thankfully, there are alter-
natives to the bar scene. We just
got a super-cool new coffee house
downtown, for instance. It's called
the Percolator, and it's sort of like
a bar. but there's less vomiting. It's
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
See BUCKET page 11
"Forever Plaid' is dedicated to
the 'good guys to the guys who
wheeled the projector carts for the
AV club; to the guys who saved their
allowances to give their parents a spe-
cial night for their anniversary; to the
guys who carried an extra handker-
chief: to the guys who never went
beyond first base, and if they did, they
didn't tell anyone
This dedication, hidden as it was
among the names of the "Forever
Plaid" staff in the program, was as
much a surprise as the show itself,
and no less amusing. The dedication,
with its deceptive simplicity, actually
reveals a great deal about the show. I
say the show was a surprise because,
quite honestly, I didn't know what to
expect from it at first. I was very skep-
tical. Was listening to four guys sing
songs thirty years older than I am
really the way I wanted to spend the
better part of Friday night'
Luckily, 1 didn't let my doubts
stop me from seeing the show From
My Children
My Africa!
The Mixed Company, a
professional acting
troupe, will perform "My
Children! My Africa a
play that focuses on the
events that led to the
outbreak of unrest in
South Africa in 1984. The
performance will begin
tonight at 8 p.m. at
Hendrix Theatre. Admis-
sion is free.
Photo Courtesy of Joanne Rile
Artists Management, Inc.
Jfdm 0Witf0&ld?
John Frusciante
Niandra Lades
and Usually Just
a T-Shirt

When John Frusciante was one
of the original Red Hot Chili Peppers,
he and his bass counterpart. Flea,
broke much new ground in the un-
derground music of the eighties. Then
came the nineties and alternative be-
came the mainstream, the Chili Pep-
pers' Blood, Sugar, Sex, Magic was a
smash hit and suddenly they were
touring the world. During their tour
of Japan. Frusciante decided he had
had enough. He left the band in the
height of their fame and moved back
to Los Angeles to live in happy ob-
scurity. The Chili Peppers got a new
guitar player and continued with busi-
ness as usual.
After leaving the band.
Frusciante began to experiment with
painting and music. The painting
failed but the music for the album
Xiandra Lades was recorded, of
which he was particularly proud. He
soon fell into a trance-like creative
state where he would stay up for days
painting and creating music. The fi-
nal result of all of this is his new al-
bum Xiandra Lades and Usually Just
A T-Shirt.
1 guess you could call this an
experimental album. It is full of
strangely distorted guitars, off the
wall licks and some very unconven-
tional studio tricks. The opening
track is a strange mixture of acous-
tic and distorted electric guitar: it
seems to be an almost random place-
ment of notes at times. Most of the
tracks repeat this formula: acoustic
guitar laying down the basic rhythm
and electric plucking out the part
usually filled by the lead guitar, but
I'm not really sure if you could call
this a lead. At times it seems to be
off-key improvisations or even just a
random choice of sounds; John Cage
comes to mind.
"Big Takeover" has a plucky
mandolin sound and strange avant
garde lyrics like "the world is full its
own emissions and another Nazi
tent Then there is "Curtains which
contains only a strange piano melody
and even stranger lyrics: "the world
is a sphere no larger than the balls
that you suck
Then there is "Running Away
Into You This one takes weirdness
to another level. The studio effects
are somewhere in the realm of drugs
or madness. The acoustic strumming
is back, but I haven't a clue where
most of the noise is coming from.
Some of the songs sound al-
most normal and at times his vocals
sound much like his old friend An-
thony Kiedas. But for the most part
this is a very strange album; maybe
this is a product of fame. Who
knows? Most of the songs are short,
lasting on an average of three min-
utes each and some are less than two
minutes. This is basically an experi-
mental album. If he didn't already
have a name for himself I doubt any
label would have picked this up;
strangely enough, this is on the big-
time record business American label.
There are 25 tracks on this re-
lease, a culmination of two years of
work. Despite the outright weirdness
of this release it is in some way ap-
pealing, almost refreshing. Guitar
World reviewed this CD and the re-
viewer decided that he had cracked.
This may be true, but you have got
to give the guy credit for pushing the
limits. If you are looking for the Chili
Pepper's trademark funk-metal
sound you will not find it here.
Frusciante uses neither funk nor
metal or anything that can be cat-
egorized. I recommend this if you are
looking for something completely
different, because as far as I know
this CD is one of a kind.
�Kris
HofSler
DINK
DINK

beginning to end. "Forever Plaid" was
a delight to watch. The play centers
around four guys who form a musical
group, and yet it's about a lot more.
To me. "Forever Plaid" was about the
passing of an era, about a decade in
which musical harmony was alive and
well in the form of groups such as
The Four Aces, The Four Freshmen,
and the mythical Four Plaids.
The plot is simple, and although
far fetched, does not take away from
the wonderful musical selections that
make the show a hit. As the show
opens, the audience learns that the
members of the Four Plaids were
killed in a car crash on their way to
pick up new plaid tuxedo jackets for
their first big show by a bus filled with
Catholic teens or. their way to see the
Beatles debut on the Ed Sullivan
Show. The teenagers were miracu-
lously unharmed, but the Plaids never
got to do their show.
Now. however, "through the
power of harmony and the expanding
holes in the ozone layer, in conjunc-
tion with the positions of the planets
Sec PLAID ptiye 10
"We are going to have open
sexual intercourse on every street
corner of America where thousands
and thousands can watch Wow. not
bad. I just might be able to get into
this stuff. To be completely honest
from the beginning, 1 was a bit
nervous about listening to a
band called Dink - I tend to be
more of a classic rock listener
with, of course, a few exceptions.
As the tape slid into the tape
deck, a mild form of fear set in.
The first words heard on Dink's
new self-titled album are atten-
tion grabbers, to say the very
least. And surprisingly enough,
the rest of the album is refreshingly
noticeable as well.
Dink, the "small, insignificant"
band based in Kent. Ohio, began their
climb into the music world at Kent
State back in 1990 by playing the
Kent-Cleveland-Akron club circuit and
releasing a self-titled five song EP
Like their Kent predecessors Nine
Inch Nails and Ministry. Dink takes
the alternative approach to music,
only they add a new retro-80s twist
They possess a sort of industrial
techno-early-80s-grunge-metal sort of
style which, combined with an intense
drum back beat and raging guitars,
form an incredible sound explosion
that forces people to sit up and listen.
Rob Lightbody and Jer Herring com-
bine their strong voices into an almost
Nine Inch Nails Henry Rollins in-your-
face sound that is uncommon with
most new alternative bands, but which
is an overdue and welcome change.
The boys play well together, as is made
�UK
obvious on nearly every track on the
album.
"3 Big Bags" and "Green Mind"
are musically two of the best songs
on the album. Jeff Finn fills the back-
drop of each song with a more con-
structed, slowed down Sex Pistols
thrash bass line. Combined with Jan
Eddy Van der Kail's throbbing drums
and Sean Carlin's wild guitar. Dink
has found a way to expa'ss their views
on urban decline (same old story as
most artists of today) without being
depressing or overly dramatic. "Run-
ning Red" also pulsates with an in-
tense bass line and pseudo-techno
rhythms that make Dink good driv-
ing music for road trips or great club
music. "Rocks" and "Dirt" are also
decent songs with many similarities
to "Bags "Mind" and "Red includ-
ing bass line, drums and a few of the
guitar riffs.
The album does have a few
downfalls, however. The
song "Angel" bears a fright-
ening resemblance to
Prince's lame theme song
from the Batman movie,
and "Get On It" sounds like
2 Live Crew's old pop hit
"It Takes Two Lyrically,
Dink tends to be a bit inane
- the song "In Her Head"
consists mostly of the re-
peated phrase "Mary Trery
hopes and fears - she drank lots and
lots of beers Not anything excep-
tional, but rather funny if nothing else.
Dink's first full length album
has surprised nearly everyone who
has heard it. If you have the chance
to check it out, go for it. Dink is on
the cutting edge of something new
and wild. Besides, how bad can open
sexual intercourse be?
�Christina
Pokrzewinski






���
I m
n �
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
Big shoes are filled by Little Women
Despite Winona Ryder, the fourth film version of Alcott's novel lives up to the 1933 original
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
I will be the first to admit that
one of my favorite Katherine
Hepburn films is the 1933 version
of Little Women, which was di-
rected by George Cukor. Hepburn
glows as Josephine March and the
rest of the cast is equally splendid.
The film is a cinematic masterpiece.
Thus when I heard that Little
Women was being filmed for a
fourth time I groaned audibly.
"Why thought I, "tinker with per-
fection?" The 1933 version per-
fectly told the story of the March
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sisters and their life in Concord,
Massachusetts. A new version
would have nothing to offer.
Much to my surprise, the new-
est filming of Louisa May Alcott's
timeless story provides a cinematic
treat. Though the newest film does
not beat the 1933 version, it does
boast a splendid cast with a lovely
setting, all told with a gentle, femi-
nine touch by Australian director
Gillian Armstrong (My Brilliant Ca-
reer).
Winona Ryder plays the cen-
tral character Jo, who Hepburn so
jauntily portrayed. Ryder will surely
get nominated for an Academy
Award, but she certainly lacks the
vivacity and charm of Hepburn. Per-
haps the comparison is unfair, but
Ryder wants to become a serious
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actress as judged by her roles in
The Age of Innocence, Reality
Bites and Dracula. If judged by the
same criteria as the best actresses
of cinema, both yesterday and to-
day, Ryder pales in comparison. Be-
cause Jo has a feminist sensibility
and a likely stubborn side, she is a
wonderfully complex character. But
Ryder brings nothing to the role
and seems to be acting with only a
half-hearted effort. I still have never
been able to see Ryder in a role, I
always see her as an actress trying
hard to play a role.
Aside from my criticisms of
Ryder, I loved every aspect of Little
Women. The other three sisters are
played by Trini Alvarado (Meg),
Claire Danes (Beth) and Kristin
Dunst (Amy) with Samantha Mathis
playing the older Amy. Dunst shows
signs of being a superb actress with
this role and her role in Interview
with the Vampire now to her credit.
Alvarado and Danes become Meg
and Beth and make the audience
really care about them. Perhaps the
role of Jo needed to be filled by a
lesser-known actress so that the
audience did not keep seeing the
celebrity Winona Ryder in the role.
Susan Sarandon does a magnificent
turn as Mrs. March. The feminist
stance of Mrs. March seems per-
fectly suited for Sarandon, yet
Sarandon never overplays the part
and instead allows the subtle nu-
ances of Mrs. March's personality
only slowly to surface.
Adding male support are
Christian Bale (Theodore
Lawrence) and Gabriel Byrne
(Friedreich). Lawrence woos Jo only
to be spurned and Friedrejch even-
tually captures Jo's heart as a
kindly tutor.
The real credit for this film
belongs to Armstrong. She seems
to know exactly how a family like
the Marches would have lived. The
clothes, the fires, the warm humor
shared within the family seem so
natural on the screen. The scenes
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in the snow are especially beauti-
ful. Armstrong and screenwriter
Robin Swicord allow the story of
Little Women to develop gradually
like a quilt being sewn together.
Eventually all the pieces of the
story come together to make a
beautiful pattern that will linger in
the mind of the viewers.
The story itself exerts such a
profound effect that the viewer may
very well want to revisit, or visit for
the first time, the novel of the same
name. The tender story of love
within the March family resonates
for the ears of all ages and of any
time period. Looking at the strong
female characters one may assume
that Alcott was ahead of her time
in her thinking. When Jo turns
down one suitor, the audience ini-
tially balks at her choice but then
slowly realizes that Jo acts from a
position of strength. She does not
want to marry simply for the sake
of having a husband. The difference
between the sisters becomes appar-
ent, but Jo does not judge her sis-
ters badly because of their differ-
ences but instead embraces those
differences. Near the end of the
film, Friedreich tells Jo that the
book she has written has given him
a window to her soul. Likewise, the
film provides a window into the
soul of Alcott and, one may assume,
Armstrong.
Little Women is a film to be
embraced. I cannot say rush to see
the film because it demands no
rushing. Rather take the time to
spend some quality time with the
March sisters. Rarely does a cin-
ematic story get told with such
genuine poignance. Little Women
is not little accomplishment.
On a scale of one to ten, Little
Women rates an eight.
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Thursday, January 19: Subs
Friday, January 20:
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�I �
10
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
The East Carolinian
Camels, reindeer and bulls highlight Europe '95
Selcuk, a historic Turkish
town near the ancient city of
Ephesus, is the setting for one of
Europe's most unusual spectacles
- the Camel Wrestling Festival,
which starts today.
Area villagers enter only their
best beasts. Thousands of specta-
tors come to cheer as male camels,
docile except during the rutting
season, vie for a she-camel kept
within sniffing range. Between
bouts, souvenirs, handicrafts and
Turkish delicacies such as kebabs,
pide and raki are sold in tented
stalls.
Winners of each camel fight
move to the next round until there
are two finalists. When all of the
kicking, biting, spitting - and no
harm - is done, the dominant camel
is treated like a king. So is his
owner, who celebrates by donating
cash prizes to his village to help
pay for education and for care of
the poor and elderly.
The Camel Wrestling Festival
kicks off a year-long calendar of
events among the 26 member na-
tions of the European Travel Com-
mission. Though it's too late to see
the camels, you may want to sched-
ule your travels to coincide with
one or more of the highlights.
On the animal theme, rein-
deer racing is featured at Sweden's
Jokkmokk Sami Market, celebrating
its 390th year on Feb. 2-5. Thou-
sands of Sami, reindeer herders in
Northern Scandinavia, gather at
Jokkmokk, a town on the Arctic
Circle, to sell traditional crafts, in-
cluding baskets, weavings, clothes
made from reindeer skin, pewter
jewelry, and knives with handles
made of etched reindeer horn. Sami
delicacies - dried reindeer meat,
fresh fish and special breads - are
served.
Better known is the annual
Running of the Bulls during
Spain's San Fermin Festival, this
year July 6-14. Thousands of men
and women risk their lives trying
to outrun a herd of charging bulls
ultimately corralled for fights in the
Pamplona bullring.
Sweden highlights other
forms of competition at the World
Championships in Athletics, this
year Aug. 4-13 in Goteborg. More
than 2,700 athletes from 200 coun-
tries compete, making only the
Summer Olympics and World Soc-
cer Championships bigger. Street
shows and performances at the
city's new opera house are also fea-
tured.
The arts are in focus in Lux-
embourg, designated European
City of Culture for 1995. Events
throughout the year include classi-
cal music, ballets and operas, jazz
and rock concerts, theater and pan-
tomime
Similarly, Great Britain's year-
long Festival of Arts and Culture
features 500 separate music, drama.
dance and film festivals, plus exhib-
its, architectural and garden tours
scheduled in London, Birmingham.
Manchester, Cardiff and other cit-
ies.
Monaco's Printemps Des Arts
de Monte-Carlo (Spring Arts Festi-
val), celebrating the 25th year since
its founding by Princess Grace, pre-
sents leading music and ballet en-
sembles, plus special dramatic and
cabaret performances from April
15-May 17. It includes Ballets de
Monte-Carlo, Stuttgart Chamber
Orchestra and a production of Eu-
gene Ionesco's "The Chairs
Poland's Chopin Interna-
tional Piano Competition, once ev-
ry five years, is set for Oct. 1-21
in Warsaw. On Oct. 17. celebrations
at Holy Cross Church will mark the
146th anniversary of the
composer's death. Additionally, the
Polish National Tourist Office will
help you follow a Chopin trail
throughout the country, stopping
at Duszniki-Zdroj, a resort near the
Sudety Mountains, among other
places.
For flower-lovers, Belgium
presents the Ghent Floralies, also
once in five years. From April 22-
May 1, a profusion of plants, flow-
ers and shrubs is presented by
world growers to an international
jury and the public. During the
same period, Greenhouses of the
Royal Palace at Laeken, a Brussels
suburb, are open to the public. Visi-
tors may stroll along nearly a mile
of paths through landscaped gar-
dens.
For history buffs. Belgium
marks the 180th anniversary of the
Battle of Waterloo and the defeat
of Napoleon by British and allied
forces. The June 17-18 event in-
cludes re-enactments of the battle
and historic processions.
The 1000th anniversary of
Norway's christening will be cel-
ebrated June 2-5 at Mosterhamn, a
historic hamlet on the small island
of Bomlo near Bergen. Special ser-
vices, concerts and historic plays
are planned at Moster Church,
Norway's 1.000-year-old church.
Additional commemorative con-
certs, ballets and exhibitions will
be presented throughout Norway in
July and August.
On March 6-12, Denmark
See EUROPE page 11
PLAID from p. 8
and all that astro-technical stuff the
Plaids have returned to earth to ful-
fill their dream.
And fulfill it they do. The Plaids
J perform a musical revue that would
make any music fan long for the days
; of poodle skirts, soda shops and bar-
bershop quartets. Among my favorite
�numbers were "Moments to Remem-
ber Chain Gang" and two selections
out of the "Plaids Go Calypso" seg-
j ment, "Day-O" and "Kingston Market
"Moments to Remember "Day-
!0" and "Kingston Market" were all
� sung by Jinx, played by Gilles
Chiasson. Chiasson has an extremely
versatile and powerful voice. It's no
wonder that out of 22 songs, he sings
the lead in seven.
While Chiasson definitely had
the best voice of the four, no one had
l better stage presence than Neil
"Nash, who portrayed Frankie. His
"character's excellence was not surpris-
ing considering his impressive resume,
which consists of roles in "Cyrano de
Bergerac "A Midsummer Night's
Dream and "The Gift of the Magi
The other cast members, Mark
Martino (Smudge) and Stephen
Wallem (Sparky), were fun to watch,
although not quite as spectacular as
Chiasson and Nash. Wallem does a
respectable job as the stereotypical
"dumb jock For example, at one
point in the show Frankie tells
Smudge that Sparky is busy writing
the words to "Perfidia" on his hand.
While this was a good idea as far as
character development goes. I felt that
his surreptitious glances at his hand
were far too obvious to be considered
successful. As for Martino s perfor-
mance, he unfortunately wasn't fea-
tured enough for me to form a solid
opinion about either his voice or his
acting ability. I did enjoy his rendi-
tion of "16 Tons but it was almost
run over by Frankie's 'Chain Gang
and I wasn't given time to concentrate
EXPERIENCE
THE
la:
on it.
My favorite parts of the show
occurred in the second half, and credit
for their success should go equally to
the cast as well as the writerdirec-
tor Stuart Ross. The first was a sing-
along to the song "Mathilda" with
Christmas lights and glowing bananas
for that perfect calypso setting. The
second was the Plaids' rendition of
The Ed Sullivan Show - "in three
minutes and eleven seconds During
that three minutes the Plaids become
jugglers, trained seals, vikings, flame
eaters, accordion players and puppe-
teers, all to the tune of "Lady of
Spain Both scenes had the audience
rolling in the aisles and added that
much more to an already good per-
formance.
"Forever Plaid" was a great
show. It was fun to watch and to lis-
ten to. The actors gave energetic and
enjoyable, if not perfect, performances.
The set and costume designs were
appealing. Out of 10 stars, "Forever
Plaid" rates a seven.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 17. 1995
11
Some advertising takes as long to
work as this tree does to jrim
But not our classifieds.
You'll get immediate results from
advertising in our classifieds.
BUCKET from p. 8
EUROPE from p. 10
SUB STHT!0H
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, North Carolina
(919)752-2183
"Sandwich Shop"
316 W. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, North Carolina
(919)756-7171
$2.99 T)iiUf.JLuHc4iSfuclAU
Monday Small Ham & Cheese, Bag of Chips, & 15oz.
Soft Drink
Tuesday Small Turkey & Chcase, Bag of Chips, & 15oz.
Soft Drink
Wednesday Small Ham, Bologna & Cheese, Bag of Chips, &
15oz. Soft Drink
Thursday Small Ham, Salami, Pepperoni & Cheese, Bag of
Chips, � 15oz. Soft Drink
Friday Small Ham, Turkey & Cheese, Bag of Chips, &
15oz. Soft Drink
TuesdisGoBeNTt99tSdbs6-10pm
a more laid-back atmosphere, where
you can pretend to be a beat poet
for an evening, or just relax and feel
really cool while you nurse a big-ass
cup of coffee.
And then, of course, there's al-
ways Wal-Mart. Those of us with cars
can spice up our lives with a trip into
the wondrous land of Wal-Mart late-
night. If you've never experienced
this spectacle, it's time you did. Staff
is low, customers are few, and chaos
reigns! I've seen toy gunfights in the
feminine hygiene section and guys
test-riding bikes around the store.
And there's all sorts of fun
games you can play, like "Security
Hunt where you act suspiciously
and lead Wal-Mart rent-a-cops on a
wild goose chase. My favorite Wal-
Mart game, however, is "Bait the
Psycho Here's how you play: find a
scary loner and follow him around
until he snaps (just hope he doesn't
lose it in Hardware)!
Or, of course, you could just
sit around somebody's front yard and
throw hammers at fresh melons.
But even with these swell dis-
tractions, we still need more variety
here in the Emerald City. Late night
putt-putt golf might do well, for ex-
ample (hey. bowling caught on, so
why not?). But what would really be
cool would be a Midnight
Moviehouse. the kind of place that
shows old cult movies on weekends.
The Rocky Horror Picture Show
would probably be huge here, for
example, but the possibilities are
endless. There's 60 or 70 years of
movies out there that could draw an
audience.
I know I would pay to see Alien
or Bladerunner on the big screen.
Alfred Hitchcock films like Psycho
would also be good, as well as stutt
like Reservoir Dogs, the first movie
from Pulp Fiction writerdirector
Quenton Tarantino. That film was an
independent release, and never made
it to a lot of cities. But now that
Tarantino is a big name, Dogs could
be a nice money-maker. And what
about 3-D movies? There are a ton of
movie buffs in Greenville, and an old
theatre like the Park downtown
could make some money off this.
At any rate. I think it's past
time that we had something more to
do than get drunk around here. Sure,
it's fun. but even (especially?) alco-
hol gets old after a while. Or am I
just getting jaded?
looks to the future as host of the
World Summit for Social Develop
ment. As follow-up to the 1992
Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil, leaders from 184 nations
will meet in Copenhagen to discuss
social, economic, environmental, re-
ligious,and ethnic issues in the
post-Cold War era. Concurrent ex-
hibitions and events are expected
to attract some 10.000 visitors.
For a free booklet. 'Planning
Your Trip to Europe which lists
events in 26 European nations,
write to: European Planner, P.O.
Box 1754, New York, N.Y. 10185.
Telephone (800) 816-7530.
Natural life I �
�Ar
A Purdue University study found those who began exercising
increased their ability to make complex decisions 70. fj.
-USA Today '1
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iftlTfffTJWHSisSiS IA NT S
203 JERWIN � 328-4173
Orientation & The First Fear Experience
K)W WRING ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS fOR JTlMMER 1995
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in Room 14 at the Mendenhall Student Center:
January 17 (Tuesday) 4 p.m.
January 23 (Monday) 4 p.m.
Applications available in Room 203 Erwin beginning January 11,1995
Deadline for completed applications is January 31, 1995 at 5 p.m.
JjlREU I EW'?5
SPORTS
ADVENTURE
Sun!
For more details
regarding any of these
programs offered by
ECU Recreational
Services, call 328-6387,
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
I
January's AjWAfllt
5-on-5 Basketball Registration Meeting
MM &ffi5&� in playing Intramural basketball
S"Sn2fsS?an!arr'�" classes are $10 far students and $20 far facultystaff. Register
in 204 Christenbury Gym. You can't beat the price!
Water Polo Registration Meeting
WmenTwame'ns�$& in playing Intramural Water Wo. Get We. n Wild!
"
gooey, and nasty!
L Introduction to WildemessHJving
5Kn�Ka tri&Sn1 itS January 20 in 204 Christenbury Gym.
Bowling Registration Meeting
ffiiKSS in this spring bawling .eague.
Wintergreen, VA Ski Trip
Leaving February 5. Register by January 27 in 204 Christenbury Gymnasium. Get away w.th us far the
dayTl The cost is $75 wo equipment and $50 with equipment.
Equipment Check-Out Center
weekends after 12:00 p.m.
K5!l!IK a valid ECU ID. Lockers can be reserved in .15 Christenbury
Gymnasium.
F.I.T. Program: Fitness, instruction, &Training
This program offers you one-on-one instruction that will assist you withi a
cardiovascular or strength training program tailor made for you. Call 328-6387 or
stop by 104 Christenbury Gym to set up an appointment.
Racquetball Reservations
Reservations are required for the courts in Minges Coliseum. Call 328-6911 to sign up
beginning at 1000a.m.
c&,)





f i m �
nar in ��
�.
12
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
The East Carolinian
ECU falls in overtime
JMU spoils
dedication party
71-69
Eric Bartels
Staff Writer
It was more a sense of frustra-
tion and confusion than anything else
for the record breaking crowd of 7,611
on hand in Williams Arena for the
dedication as they watched the East
Carolina Pirates come up short to the
James Madison University Dukes in
overtime, 71-69.
"It was a tremendous effort
with an unjust ending ECU coach
Eddie Payne said. "We came back-
we had to fight and claw our way back,
but we played well
After a Kent Culuko missed
shot in the lane over ECU guard Skipp
Schaefbauer, Culuko hustled for his
miss and dropped-in the game win-
ner with :00.6 left ECU called a time-
out to set up a designed inbounds
play.
Pirate forward Chuckie
Robinson took the inbounds pass
from forward Tim Basham at the top
of key, and put up the game tying shot
with less than :00.3, forcing a second
overtime.
However, the mid-court official
denied that the shot was good, get-
ting a big sigh of relief from JMU's
coach. "Lefty" Driesell and the Dukes,
while FJi:c ! tii insisted on kick-
ing tc score ubie.
Ur.eseB's response to his teams'
victory was rather nonchalant
"It was a good game. We let
them back in it, but won it in the end
Driesell said. "These are great games
(in the CAA), but it all comes down to
the CAA tournament
A dismal first half that saw the
Pirates perimeter shooting gather a
weak 34 percent from the field while
the Dukes were reluctant to miss (55
percent), ended with the Pirates trail-
ing by four in the second half, as fresh-
man Tony Parham (14 points) scored
the first five points, as the Pirates ral-
lied behind his shooting, and the in-
side game of Chuckie Robinson (18
points). At one
point, ECU overcame a twelve point
deficit on the shooting of senior for-
ward Anton Gill (15 points), and the
bench' play of Vic Hamilton who
added four points.
As the Pirate fans became more
intense, the second half intensified.
Both teams would look to their pre-
mier players to hit important baskets.
Senior guard Kent Culuko hit
a three-pointer with 9:26 left in the
game, but would be answered by a Tim
Basham three of his own to cut the
lead to one.
Sophomore guard Skipp
Schaefbauer nailed a baseline three
point basket to even the game at 57-
57 with 6:24 left
The Pirates would trail late,
until forward Anton Gill hit a clutch
three point shot with :26 remaining.
"I'm a Senior, and I am sup-
posed to make shots like that Gill
said, who responded to his game ty-
ing shot.
The regulation ended dead-
locked as JMU's uuard Darren
McLinion attempted a three point
shot from the top of the key with time
running down.
The power and quickness of
senior forward Louis Rowe, CAA's
leading scorer, was not a factor due
to the tremendous defensive effort by
Tim Basham, who heid the JMU player
to 14 points.
It looked as it ECU would hang
on to the lead in overtime as Louis
Rowe, last weeks' CAA player of the
week, committed his fifth personal
foul with 4:14 remaining. However,
Rowe's replacement, Ryan Culicerto
sank an important three pointer from
the right side with 1:24 on the clock.
"Rowe is our go-to guy in close games,
and he is a big force JMU coach
Driesell said.
The older and more mature JMU
team took advantage of ECU's youth
and mistakes and capitalized with
control late in the overtime period.
With a combination of misses
from both Tim Basham from the three
point line and Chuckie Robinson un-
derneath with three JMU players all
over him, JMU grabbed the loose ball
and called a time-out.
Driesell looked to get the ball
in the hands of his star guard, Culuko,
the games leading scorer and best
three point shooter (50 percent), as
time ran down. Under :07 remaining
Culuko followed his miss with the
game winning tip.
"Any lose in the conference is
tough Schaefbauer said. "The play-
ers decide the games this is college
basketball at its best"
On the season, the Pirates
dropped their second straight in the
conference 0-2,(8-5) and will look to
revenge an early season lose against
Campbell as they piay host Monday
evening.
"We have to continue to work
hard in practice, and take one game
at a time senior forward Anton Giil
said.
ECU'S Fab
Freshman
Washington D.Cs Tony
Parham has stepped in
nicelytofillthepointguard
position for Eddie Payne's
1994-5 Pirate hoopsters.
Parham (6-1, 180) has
averaged 8.1 points, 2.9
rebounds and 2.9 assists
per game for the Pirates,
who were 8-5 going into
last night's game against
the Campbell University
Camels.
Photo by HAROLD WISE
Swimmers make splash
Women sweep Duke and American, men split meets
Eric Bartels
Staff Writer
For the Pirate swim teams,
1994 ended on a good note with a
two-team thrashing of Duke Univer-
sity. However, the season wasn't
complete, and a tough conference
schedule resumed on Saturday
against American.
On Saturday January 14. the
ECU swimmers hosted the Ameri-
can University in a dual meet that
saw the Lady Pirates dominate a
small women's team, while the men
were overpowered by an older
E4les' team.
The Piuie charge was led by
juniors' Hilary Xokes and Jackie
Schmiedcr. who rolled to an impres-
sive 8-0 (3-0 in CAA). Stokes was
very impressive at home, with first
Hilary Stokes
place finishes i ;Iie 50 and 100-
Free. Schmieder cont.ieutec io the
Pirates thwarting by taking the
200-Free. She also participated in
the victory of the 300-Free Relay
Jim Broughal
Photos Courts of ECU SID
team of S.indra Ossniann. Rachel
Atkinson, ana Beta Humphrey.
Other Lady Pirates with
Sec SWIM page 15
Women's track looks promising
(SID)-On Saturday, ECU's
women's track team opened their
indoor season with a second-place
finish at the Virginia Tech Quad
Meet. The Lady Pirates placed sec-
ond behind Appalachian State, who
outsccored ECU 120.5-115.5.
ECU freshman Michelle
Clayton won the shot put with a
personal-best 40'8.75 and placed
second in the weight throw with a
school-record 44'8.25
Lady Pirate Carla Powell
placed first in the 55m with a time
of 7.22. an ECAC qualifying time.
The ECU women's track team
entered the '95 season with 33
members, 22 of which are return-
ing from the '94 season. The Lady
Pirates finished second behind
George Mason in the CAA Champi-
onships last season and are expect-
ing another exceptional season. In
years 1990-1993, the team finished
fourth in the CAA, so 1994 served
as jump ahead for the Lady Pirates.
Among returning players for
ECU is All-American Dava Rhodes.
She placed eighth in the 10,000m
at the NCAA Championship last sea-
son. According to Head Coach
Charles "Choo" Justice, ECU plans
to attack with the depth in every
event. In quest for the title, the
Lady Pirates will attempt to unseed
some of the returning champions.
"ECU features the most all-
around team in the CAA with qual-
ity athletes in every event group
said Coach Justice.
Throws: The Lady Pirates
feature four versatile throwers who
hold the ability to earn big points
for ECU. Juniors Zina Briley,
Darlene Vick, and Kim Pakow.ski
are joined by freshman Michelle
Clayton. Briley, fourth in the CAA
in '94, and Clayton, are mainstays
in the shot-put. Pakowski, third in
the CAA last season, and Vick, third
in the CAA in '93, are discus pow-
ers. Clayton, Pakowski, and Briley
will take aim at breaking school
record with the hammer. Vick will
also throw the javelin.
Jumps: Sophomore Lave Wil-
son led ECU's jumpers last season
by qualifying for the ECACs in the
long and triple jump events, and
she currently holds the school out-
door triple jump record. Junior
Michelle Bullock, holder of the
ECU indoor triple jump record and
ECAC qualifier, returns to chal-
lenge Wilson to a friendly rivalry.
Sophomore Amanda Johnson takes
aim on the ECU outdoor long jump
record as she already holds the in-
door record. Johnson was second
in the CAA in the long jump and
qualified for the ECACs. Freshman
Saundra Teel joins former high
school rival Jennifer Murdoch to
bolster ECU's high jumping.
Sprints: Junior Carla Powell
returns with two second place fin-
ishes (100m, 200m) from the CAA
meet last season, and she qualified
for the ECACs two consecutive
years. Sophomore Amanda Johnson
(third in the CAA 100m) ran right
behind Powell. Junior Shantell
Carter is expected to excel in the
200m. Returnees Keisha Johnson
and Erica Green will face strong
competition from freshman Kim-
berly Rinkerman.
Hurdles: Hurdles are an area
See TRACK page 15
Hester leaves
ECU program
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
Chris Hester, a former starter at
quarterback for the Pirates has decided
to leave the ECU football program and
will take a semester off from school and
work tor a construction company in At-
lanta, Ga.
"I just felt I needed a break
Hester said. "1 was burned out on both
football and school. Football might not
ever be there for me again, but its not
the most important thing in my life
Hester visited East Tennessee
State, a highly competitive Division I-AA
school in Johnson City, Tennessee shortly
after the Liberty Bowl.
"I thought taking a visit there
would pep me up and get me excited
about football again, but it didn't" Hester
said. "They offered me a full scholarship
but I just wasn't interested in playing for
See HESTER page 15
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Rhodes leads the Lady Pirate track team. Flanked by
cellent support, ECU should have a good Reason in '95.
Upcoming ECU Sports
Saturday, December 3
Men's Basketball vs. Georgia Tech
at Atlanta, Ga 1 p.m.
Women's Basketball at UMBC Tournament
(UMBC, ECU, Columbia and Delaware
State) at Baltimore, Md.
Sunday, December 4
W. Basketball at UMBC Tournament
at Baltimore, Md.
Tuesday, December 6
Men's Basketball vs. Campbell
at Fayetteville, N.C 7:30 p.m.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Chris Hester filled in for Marcus Crandell in 1993 until
injuries halted his season as well. He saw no action in '94.
t






r
The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
13
Meadows handles pressure
Scott Batchelor
Staff Writer
When New Jersey Nets star
Kenny Anderson handles the ball,
everybody notices. The defense col-
lapses and the former Georgia Tech
standout blows by everybody for an
easy lay-up.
0 Othello Meadows dreams
of the day he will draw that much
attention when he has the ball.
Meadows is in his first season
with the Pirates. He has been used
primarily as a back-up to sopho-
more Skipp Schaefbauer, but hopes
to continue getting playing time as
the season progresses.
"I have been playing 15 to 20
minutes a game Meadows said. "I
am happy that 1 have had the op-
portunity to play
Meadows is one of nine un-
tfelhn Key
Rational Hiene octety
INFORMATION BOOTH
Wed. 118-Fri. 120
8:00am - 3:00pm
. Lobby-StudentStores
derclassmen on this year's edition
of the Pirates and sees good things
for the future of ECU basketball.
"I think we can be as good as
we want to be Meadows said. "All
we have to do is apply practice to
the game. If we stick to the game
plan, we will be okay
The 6-foot-3 freshman came
to ECU with his own game plan,
one where scholastics played an im-
portant role.
"One of the most important
factors in my decision to come to
ECU was that ECU has a good edu-
cation department Meadows said.
"I also wanted a chance to get away
from home and experience some
things. So far, on the whole, I am
pretty pleased with ECU
ECU fans and coaches are cer-
tainly glad he opted for Eddie
Payne's program. Meadows was
named "Mr. Basketball" in Ne-
braska, while putting up some im-
pressive numbers at his alma mater
Creighton Prep. Meadows netted
17.4 points per game while snatch-
ing 3.7 rebounds and dishing 2.8
assists per contest.
� � � � � ����
r
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING CHESS
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in KnoxviUe, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26,1995. All expenses paid bv the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Tuesday, January 24
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center � �
P
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
i!
li
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee lor each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Biliiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 328-4766, for more information.
v
Owners reignite
baseball talks
Othello Meadows
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Meadows was named All-
Plains Region by Basketball
Times, and MVP of the Nebraska
State Tournament. He added
Metro Conference Player of the
Year honors to his resume before
travelling east to become a Pirate.
The Omaha, Nebraska native
is adjusting to the methodical, con-
servative ball-control offense of
fourth-year coach Eddie Payne.
"My senior year in high
school, we ran an 'up tempo' style
of offense Meadows said. "It
wasn't a run-and-gun but it was
much more fast-paced than here at
ECU. We set more picks and pass
a lot more than I am used to
Meadows knows he can be a
contributor at ECU, although he
plays in a reserve role now. He
wants to put up big numbers in
Greenville, just like he did in
Omaha.
"I am going to keep doing
the things I am doing Meadows
said. "I am going to keep working
hard in practice, and keep my pri-
orities straight. I feel like I get
better every single day I practice
A typical Pirate practice runs
two to three hours with an empha-
sis on offense or defense, depend-
ing on the opponent. The netters
also go through shooting drills,
passing drills, and free throw drills.
As the season progresses and
Meadows gains more game experi-
ence, he says he wants to create
opportunities for his teammates to
score.
"I want to get to the point
where defenses cannot play off of
me, and I can either shoot a
jumper or pass it off for an assist
Meadows said.
When Williams Arena
opened its doors to fans on Jan. 6,
many Pirate fans saw Othello
Meadows play for the first time.
Meadows has a promising future
ahead of him. and with three more
years of eligibility, Pirate oppo-
nents better be prepared for a few
years of seeing number zero fly
right by.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, February 1
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(AP) - In an effort to restart
the baseball strike talks, the owners'
negotiating team will meet Thursday
in Washington with special mediator
WJ. Usery.
A management official, speak-
ing on the condition he not be identi-
fied, confirmed the meeting Sunday.
The official said events of no great
significance were expected.
"It's just a meeting to look ev-
eryone in the eye and say, 'You've got
to get this settled for the good of the
country " the management official
said.
Owners broke off talks Dec. 22
and implemented their salary cap pro-
posal the following day. The sides
haven't met since.
Boston Red Sox chief executive
officer John Harrington, chairman of
management's negotiating committee,
has spent the past two weeks helping
formulate the rules for replacement
players that owners intend to hire for
spring training and the regular sea-
son. Baseball's ruling executive coun-
cil approved the rules Friday.
Union head Donald Fehr has
spent the past 10 days conducting
regional meetings with players. Fehr
will hold his seventh meeting Mon-
day at Caracas, Venezuela. The final
meeting of the tour is Wednesday at
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.
Usery was appointed by the
Clinton Administration Oct. 14 and
led the sides through five rounds of
bargaining in the following two
months. While he did cajole owners
into making two tax proposals, the
players' association said both plans
eventually would act like salary caps,
which owners didn't deny.
"We weren't the ones who cut
off talks Fehr said Saturday. "If they
have something to say to us, I'm sure
we'll hear from them
"Prime Time"
goes Bowl-ing
(AP) - Deion didn't invent atti-
tude, he just perfected it Then he im-
ported it to the West Coast and an or-
ganization in desperate need of some-
thing different
Once renowned for their cool and
their professionalism, the San Francisco
49ers had been unsettled and upset in
the NFC championship game twice in
succession by a brash Dallas team that
didn't respect its elders or their tradi-
tions.
Enter Deion, carrying enough at-
titude to inflate an organization all by
himself.
"This team was a great team, they
would have made the playoffs without
me. I was brought here for this ore
game. And here Sanders paused tor
dramatic effect, "we prevailed
Not just prevail, but prevail with
style. Deion taught the 49ers how to
strut He taught the Mormon quarter-
back to frolic and dance. He gave the
white-haired professor the thrill of his
coaching lifetime. And make no mistake
- this WAS part of the job description
- he pointed the organization back to
the Super Bowl.
In the aftermath of San
Francisco's 38-28 win over Dallas, proof
that Sanders' singular ideas about fash-
ion and his petulant peacock-like per-
sonality have influenced his newest
teammates - some might say infected
them - was everywhere.
As one celebration continued,
Steve Young, the former Brtgham
Young quarterback and descendant of
Brigham himself, was already looking
ahead to the real team party.
"Even for a Mormon guy Young
said, "I swear it's going to be fun
And talk about guys acting nutty.
Young looked at coach George Seifert
even less of a party animal than him-
self.
"Even George is loose Young
marveled, "and that's something
Of course, it wasn't only in the
locker room that Deion and the gospel
of don't-mess-with-me held sway over the
49ers.
It was the reason a fight broke
out an hour before the game when a
handful of 49ers happened on some
Cowboys stretching in the north end
zone. strrposecJy THE'R enJ wrte. An!
it wfci the i eu; n just miiIlI �. :ar tin
game, when the championship trophy
was presented to the 49ers in the south
end zone and a handful of them, doin'
the Deion. turned their just-embroidered
matching championship caps back-
wards.
And in between?
Let us count the ways Dallas lost
its cool.
There was the uncharacteristi-
cally high number of penalties (nine for
98 yards) called on the Cowboys. There
was the finger-pointing and waving,
dancing and raving taking place on
49ers sideline, much of it inspired by
the guys in the 'do rags - the scarlet
bandanas favored by Sanders as protec-
tion against helmet head, and now cop-
ied by almost a half-dozen teammates.
See DEION page 14
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
RUSH
. AXA
Lambda Chi Alpha
Lambda Chi has leadership: SGA President, Graduate School President,
SGA Secretary, Inter-Fraternity Council Treasurer,
Inter-Fraternity Sports Chair.
Lambda Chi excels in athletics: 5 on 5 b-ball champs, flag football champs,
soccer champs, and water polo champs.
Lambda Chi has: socials with every sorority, and the largest party room in
the greek system with a minumum of two band parties a semester.
What is Lambda Chi missing.
You
RUSH DATES: January 17th, 18th, and 19th.
500 Elizabeth Street
Phone: 758-8435
Directions: Follow 5th street through downtown (away from campus), cross the train tracks,
house sits up on a hill directly in from of you. CALL! for rides.
1
�-Lij.i.1wmmmm





.
14
Tuesday. January 17, 1995
The East Carolinian
49ers enter Super
Bowl big favorites
(AP) - They come from the muck
and mud of northern California, seek-
ing the unprecedented. They are the resi-
dent NFL powerhouse, these San Fran-
cisco 49ers, and they look unstoppable.
Their opponent comes from the
sun and surf of southern California.
About the only thing likely to make the
San Diego Chargers comfortable at the
Super Bowl is the sun and surf of Mi-
ami.
Don't expect the 49ers to be very
hospitable. Las Vegas certainly doesn't
When the 49ers attempt to be-
come the first team to win five Super
Bowls on Jan. 29 at Joe Robbie Stadium,
they will enter as perhaps the biggest
favorite in the 29-year history of the big
game.
"The Super Bowl, in my opinion,
will be anticlimactic said 49ers presi-
dent Carmen Policy, whose team already
has been installed as a 19-point favorite
in some betting parlors. "It would be a
tragedy if we lose, but that's how big I
feel this win is
The 49ers' 38-28 victory over Dal-
las for the NFC championship Sunday
showed all the potency San Francisco
is blessed with. It displayed a certain
toughness the Niners lacked in losing
to the Cowboys the last two years. And
it exhibited the big play capabilities the
offense and defense have.
Michael Roxborough said the
spread hasn't been so big since the Bal-
timore Colts opened as 17-point favor-
ites over the New York Jets in Super
Bowl III. The Jets won the game 16-7.
"It's not that the Chargers are the
weakest team that has ever been in the
Super Bowl said Roxborough, the
oddsmaker who sets point spreads for
75 percent of Nevada's legal sports
books. "It's that the performance by the
49ers was totally devastating. We had
to set a line big enough so that the
sports books would get some money bet
on the Chargers
Why would anyone bet on a team
whose conference has lost 10 straight
Super Bowls: a team that is making its
Super Bowl debut; and a team that lost
to San Francisco 38-15 in December?
That was the last time the Charg-
ers lost however. And they have beaten
two pretty fair opponents. Miami and
Pittsburgh (17-13 in the AFC title game,
on the road, no less) to get this far.
"The San Diego Chargers are on
the move safety Stanley Richard pro-
claimed.
"This team will be ieady to play
added linebacker David Griggs. "it feels
great"
For the first time, both Super
Bowl teams play in the same state. For
the, uh, 100th time, or 1.000th. the NFC
team is considered awesome.
Nearly all the stars suit up for the
49ers: Steve Young. Jerry Rice, Deion
Sanders, Ricky Watters. Ken Norton -
shall we go on? The only Charger with
much renown is All-Pro linebacker Jun-
ior Seau, and he could be run ragged
by all of San Francisco's firepower.
"Nobody is going to come out and
walk through us. We're a professional
team, and you don't get to this level by-
being a pansy Chargers running back
Natrone Means said.
But the 49ers did just that on
Dec. 11. Young was 25-for-32 for 304
yards and two touchdowns, and Rice
caught 12 passes for 144 yards, joining
James Lofton and Steve Largent as the
only receivers with more than 13.000
career yards.
That victory was nice. But it
didn't compare to the NFC title win. And
it certainly wouldn't compare to what
the 49ers are expected to do in two
weeks.
"This is it it's the ultimate high
San Francisco safety Tim McDonald
said. "Just to get over this Dallas thing.
They (the 49ers) brought in a lot of play-
ers to make sure we would do that"
Now, they must do a little bit
more.
HESTER from p. I.
them. I didn't feel the same sense � i team
that we haw here at ECU. It seemed like
their program lacks a lot of discipline.
Coach McKnight, their quarterback
coach, is a great guy. but I don't feel like
playing football right now. at East Ten-
nessee State or ECU
The quarterback from Loganviile.
Ga. would have been immediately eligible
under new NCAA transfer rules that let
a player compete right away and not sit
out. if he transfers down a level. Fast
Carolina is a Division l-A school, so any
player who transfers from here to a I-AA
school can play with out losing a year of
eligibility.
Chris came to our first team
meeting .and we were very excited about
him joining our program McKnight
said. " He left that next morning and went
home to Georgia. He said he was not
sure if he was going to return to East
Carolina or sit out the semester. He has
a great reputation as a pretty good foot-
ball player. We wish him a lot of success,
but Chris is definitely not going to be a
part of our football program
The option to return to ECU was
open for Hester and remain on scholar-
ship even after taking the visit
"Everyone said, 'just stay at ECU
and finish your education Hestw said.
"They djn't understand if you aren't
motivated to play, it is really hard to feel
right about being on a full ride. I just felt
like I was wasting my time. Even though
I was eligible to come back, my grades
aren't all that good
ECU head coach Steve Logan
was supportive of Hester regardless of
what he decided to do.
"I talked with Coach Logan for
about three hours Hester said. "We
talked about life - not just football,
judgements. He was more concerned
about Chris the person, not the foot-
ball player. He said that he would help
me to go to another school if that is
what I wanted, or I could come back to
ECU. He asked me if I wanted to go
with him to talk to a preacher, and i
agreed. I felt like 1 needed some spiri-
tual guidance right then. I wasn't at
peace with myself. I didn't feel like I was
living the way God would want me to
live
"I wouldn't say I'm saved but I
feel a lot better he said. "I asked God
to come in to my life and it feeb great.
Coach Logan is a good man who cares
about his players. People don't realize
it because they only see him as a loot-
hall coach, hut he can be your best friend
when you need help
Playing time was a defirvte fac-
tor in Hester's decision to leave as well.
After playing in five games (3 starts) in
place of injured starter Marcus Crandell
in 1993. Hester saw no game action this
season.
"Practicing hard all week and not
getting to play is kind of like working a
job and not getting paid Hester said.
"1 telt iike I did a good job when I was
out there
Hester completed 47 of 87
passes (54 percent) and threw for 444
yards in '93. His top statistical perfor-
mance came against UCF, the same
game in which Crandell broke his ankle.
He was voted the R.W. Moore "King of
the Gridiron Award after completing
17 of 23 passes for 216 yards and a
touchdown to beat the Knights.
The most impressive thing about
Hester's abilities, beside being an accu-
rate passer, were his toughness and lead-
ership qualities. Hester took several vi-
cious shots before and after the whistle
from the University of Washington de-
fense in the Pirates 35-0 loss to the Hus-
kies.
"I thought he was going to take
off his pads and have a big "S' on his
chest Ail-American UW defensive line-
man and current Los Angeles Ram
D'Marco Farr said. "We hit him as hard
as we could, and he just kept getting
up for more
"I feel proud of what I accom-
plished, but just playing a little wasn't
enough for me Hester said. "I wanted
to start Every guy who is a competitor
should want to start Marcus Crandell
is a great quarterback and I'm real proud
of him. 1 wish the best for him and the
program. Coach Logan has that team
realizing how to win. Hopefully, they
will continue to win
" I still have the desire to play,
but for now I'm going to work and come
back to school and finish up later. I am
going to miss ECU and all the people
there, but this was something i had to
do for my best interests. Football is not
the most important thing in my life
DEION from p. 13
Then there was the first San Fran
cisco interception by Eric Davis, a Deion
understudy. Even as Davis was making
way toward the end zone. Sanders came
back across the field to help Dallas
passer Troy Aikman to his feet Though
the TV cameras did not catch what
Deion said, the Cowboys quarterback
clearly could be seen mouthing back.
"Get away trom me
It set the tone for the rest of
Aikman's day.
"I was saying keep yur head up
Deion recalled, denying he had added
insult to injury. But a moment later.
Sanders recalled. "I just wanted him to
throw me one
"One in this case, meant an in-
terception, and Aikman eventually-
obliged. But even that didn't get Sand-
ers off his back.
Afterward, someone reminded
Sanders that he had penalized himself by
signing with San Francisco for less money
than any of the i ither teams that pursued
him offered. But Deion always said the
first condition of employment was play-
ing for a contender.
"This proves to me that it's all right
to dream again he said.
That's not to say the commercial
possibilities nave escaped him completely.
An incentive clause in Sanders' incentive-
laden contract guarantees him $750,000
for reaching the Super Bowl. A moment
later, perhaps brightening at that very
thought Deion looked straight at the cam-
era.
"It must be the money he said.
It was a plug lor his new rap video,
not the reason he came to San Francisco.
But like the strut it wasn't a bad throw-in.
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The East Carolinian
Tuesday, January 17, 1995
15
w
We will have
writers
meetings
every
Thursday at
4:30. Don't be
late! Thanks!
TRACK from p. 12
where the Lady Pirates show great
depth. Junior Jennifer Kalanick re-
turns with school record in the high
hurdles. She finished 3rd in the
CAA last season and competed in
the ECAC's in the 55HH as a fresh-
man. Freshman Saundra Teel and
redshirt freshman Jenny Ayres will
challenge Kalanick.
Middle Distance: Senior
Marvina Hamilton returns to lead
the half-milers. Juniors Alexis Jacks
and Megan McGruder, sophomores
Sunshine Sandridge and Elizabeth
Juras, and freshman Kelly Spraker
will also run the half mile.
McGruder, sophomore Cindy
Szymanski, and freshman standout
Emily Linnemeier will compete in
both the half mile and the 1500m.
Long Distance: AU-American
Dava Rhodes rewrote the record
book as a freshman. This year she
faces the challenge of trying to top
last years performances and again
should lead ECU to the national
level. Twin sister Tara Rhodes looks
to join Dava in the bid to return to
the NCAAs and both have an excel-
lent chance. Stacy Green returns
healthy to run the 1500m and
3000m after missing the last two
track seasons due to injury. Mel-
issa Bonelli and Melanie House are
also expected to contribute in vari-
ous distance events.
Relays
4x100: Juniors Carla Powell
and Shantell Carter, and Sopho-
more Amanda Johnson return off
the team that earned All-East hon-
ors last season. Look for the fresh-
man Saundra Teel to step into the
anchor position this season. These
runners will also compete in the
4x200m.
4x400: Several runners will
try for spots on this relay team.
Quarter milers Keisha Johnson,
Erica Green, and Kim Rinkerman
will battle for spots along with in-
termediate hurdlers Bader and
Kalanick. Half milers Hamilton and
Jacks are veterans of this relay and
are also possibilities.
4x800: Szymanski,
Hamilton, Jacks, and McGruder all
return this year from a team that
qualified for the ECAC Champion-
ships and set the school record in
the 4x800m. This season, action
from Linnemeier, S. Green, Spraker,
Sandridge, and Juras is expected in
this relay. These runners may
shuffle into and out of the lineups
to give ECU their best 4x800m and
Distance Medley lineups yet
The Lady Pirates will return
to action on Sunday, Jan. 22 at the
University of Florida Invitational in
Gainesville, Fl.
SWIM from p. 12
Come Join Us Every
Thursday Night
at 7pm
In the General Classroom Building
Room 1031
For more information call
Eddie Milliard 321-6262
Meet singles of ALL TYPES
in your area!
Straight, English, Spanish and
Alternative Lifestyles.
1-900-820-9669 ext 297 24hrs
$2.00mlo 18 Tlon req'd
Avaloo Comm (30S)525-OB00
strong finishes were Elizabeth
Bradner, who won the 200-Back,
and Allison Lipp, who won the
1000-Free. Leading off the meet
were the 400-Medley Relay team
consisting of Amanda Atkinson,
Kim Field, Melissa Phillips, and
Hilary Stokes. The women finished
with a 135-77 victory.
"Everyone swam fast times -
American has a lot of depth and
strength ECU swim coach Rick
Kobe said. "Our women were able
to out-swim AU, but our men were
unable to come up with a victory
In the men's competition, the
only bright spot came when Jim
Broughal captured the 100 Free.
Other Pirates with strong perfor-
mances were Andy Wright and
McGee Moody both nabbing second
place in the 1000 Free and the 50
Free. However, the determination
was not enough for the younger
ECU team as they fell 141-97.
In a dual meet before the
Christmas break, ECU hosted Duke.
As the Lady Pirate team came
through with another opponent
thrashing, the men were somewhat
challenged by a weaker Duke team.
After a Pirate swimmer was dis-
qualified for an early start on the
last event (400-Free relay), the Pi-
rate swimmers took the victory by
a single point
The Ladies cruised (147-92)
and looked towards the Christmas
holiday as a chance to relax and pre-
pare for an obviously-grueling
month of CAA swimming.
Leading the ECU charge was
the 400-Medley Relay team of fresh-
men Amanda Atkinson and Kim
Fields, sophomore Michelle Phillips
and junior Hilary Stokes. Follow-
ing the opening race, Pirate junior
DISCOVER THE ADVENTURE
BECOME A RESIDENT ADVISOR
FOR THE 1995-1996 ACADEMIC YEAR
INFORMATION MEETINGS
Mandatory for all candidates. Applications are distributed at these meetings only.
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Monday
January 16
January 17
January 18
January 19
January 23
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.
Tyler Hall Lobby
Fletcher Hall Lobby
Belk Hall Lobby
221 Mendenhall
Greene Hall Lobby
frf UNIVERSITY
U U HOUSING
H SERVICES
sensation Jackie Schmieder nar-
rowly beat out teammate Allison
Lipp for the 1000-Free victory.
Sophomore Bizzy Browne would
win the next race as she nudged out
teammate Kim Field for first place
in the 200-IM. Once
again, Michelle Phillips would con-
tribute to the Pirate point total by
easily taking the 200-Fly. Also,
freshmen Amanda Atkinson and
Sandra Ossmann would round out
the top qualifiers for the Lady Pi-
rates in both the 200-Back and 500-
Free.
Contributing to the Lady Pi-
rate onslaught and improving their
performances were freshmen Stacie
Haymes, who garnered the first
place finish in the 3M dive, and Lisa
McCoy, who took first in the 1M
dive.
The most chaotic moment of
the meet came in the last event The
400-Free Relay, where the team of
Adam Ciarla, Jim Broughal, John
Donovan and McGee Moody could
have captured the victory were dis-
qualified for a quick start However,
the men held on after mounting a
more than ten-point lead at one
point during the competition.
The men jumped out to an
early lead with a win by the 400-
Medley Relay team. Juniors McGee
Moody and Adam Ciarla, sopho-
more Chris Bembenek and fresh-
man Patrick Kesler comprised the
winning combination. Freshman
Andy Wright followed the Pirate
victory with an easy win in the
1000-Free. Keeping pace with the
first place finishers, senior John
Donovan cruised past a Duke swim-
mer and landed first place in the
200 IM.
The 'youth factor' was an ad-
vantage to Coach Kobe and the
men. Freshmen Jim Broughal and
Andy Wright swam well, as both
were victorious in the 100-Free and
the 500-Free. Sophomore Chris
Bembenek rounded out the Pirate
leaders as he completed the 200-
Back more than fifty seconds be-
fore the first Duke swimmer.
The Pirate diving team did �
"hot fair as well, and finished sec-
ond in both the 3M and the IM
dives with Scott Kupec and
Stephen Barnes.
"It was an exciting meet be-
cause it came down to the last
event and fortunately, we were able
to win the meet said Pirate swim
coach Rick Kobe.
The Pirate swim team was
busy over the holidays as they trav-
eled to West Palm Beach, Florida
for their annual Christmas training
trip. Pirate swimmers averaged five
hours a day in the pool and over
90,000 meters in the eight day trip.
The Pirates met North East Mis-
souri State University in an exhibi-
tion scrimmage on January 3 in
order to maintain their competitive
edge.
"Our main goal of the trip is
to focus on the upcoming CAA Con-
ference Championships Kobe said.
Kobe and the Pirate swim-
mers will look to the Richmond Spi-
ders on Saturday, January 21 at
Minges Aquatic Center to regroup
and make gains on the CAA.
Sports
Pact
Sports Pad
4?
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LADIES NIGH
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s
' t





m ��
��
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL'S
Spring Rush 1995
Jan. 17-19 8-11:00 p.m.
GO GREEK!
E5S5
AIO
The Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity was nationally founded in December
or" 1845 at Yale University. Alpha Sig has been a strong growing
chapter on the campus of ECU for many years. They give annualrv
to the American IjjjicAssooationandenjayavery active intramural,
academic, and social life. Ifyou are interested in rushing a fraternity
go by and visit Alpha Sigma Phi. 422 West 5th St 757-0866
becoming a part of a brotherhood of men whose friendship will last a
lifetime. Being a Lambda Chi means knowing that there will always be
someone who cares about you, someone who will be anxious to help
you over those rough spots in life. The Lambda Chis invite you to
become a part of their association. Come by and look us over, we think
you will be glad you did! 500 ElizabethW 5th St. 757-3232
OK�
IIAO
Pi Lambda Phi is the first fraternity to take the Non Sectarian
Multiracial appraoch to greek life. Our brotherhood is literally a
diverse group of men trying to acbeive similiar goals and our diversity
goes beyond the normal bounds of typical fraternities. Our brothers are
a mix of different race and creeds, all excelling in community service
and commitment to the university. We look forward to seeing all the
rushees and welcoming them to the greek system. Go Greek!
ADPi House 1407 E 5th St 752-8456
Phi Kappa Psi is one of tbe oldest fraternities in the country and the first
one with tbe idea of national expansion. Here at ECU we pride ourselves
on being a smaller, more close knit brotherhood than some of tbe larger
ones. We are very active in athletics and scholarship. If you want to join a '
fraternity made up of lifetime friendships as well as diverse relationships
than come see phi psi. If you came to college to do more than just drimk
alcohol and skip classes come see phi psi and get the most out of your
college life. AOPi House 805 Johnston st 830-9536
opportunities during the college years, the fraternity experience
continues throughout one's life. Sig Ep provides an environment
whereabrorher develops and lcarmrnaityimportant social skills such
as sportsmanship, scholarship, and cornmunicarion among many
oure.Wcpridccur$chraonbcingcrKoftrKbcst
Carolina as well as in the nation. Sigma Phi Epsilon has been named
ECU's most outstanding fraternity two out of three years. On a
national level the North Carolina Kappa Chapter has been recognized
as one of the best all-around Sig Ep chapters in the nation. Sig Ep
is looking for balanced men who excel not only in academics, but in
athletics, leadership, and social skills as well. We extend an invitation
toallintcn3tcd,qualifiedmenwithadcsiretobecomcapartofSigma
Phi Epsilon. 505 East 5th St. 830-4324
in
DKT
AX
Delta Chi was founded at ECU to break away from the "norm m
fratcmitv life. We believe in strong Brotherhood, while maintaining
each Brother's distinct personality. Delta Chi has outstanding
friendship athleticism, leadership, scholarship, and most of all good
times. Wc arc looking for men that want to make the most of college
life. If you would like to build a tradition rather than become part
of one Delta Chi is for you. We look forward to meetingyou at rush,
and remember, If vou can find a better fraternity, join them!
' Alpha Phi House 10th St. 758-5284
Your college vears are a prime opportunity to challenge yourself. This
means making the most of the classes, people, and situations you
encounter. Fraternities encourage this; Phi Kappa Tau is comprised of
a solid brotherhood involved in a wide range of campus activities. We
are also verv strong on a national level, with over 100 chapters across
the country and about $50,000 in academic scholarships awarded
annually through our headquarters. The advantages of fraternity
memberships do not end upon graduation. Phi Kappa Tau graduates
have the opportunity to get together at the house every year at alumni
Events, such as Homecoming. So go ahead and challenge yourself, get
knotted with a fraternity. 409 ElizabethW 5th St. 752-0469
The Eta Kappa chapter of Sigma Pi was the second fastest chapter in
Sigma Pi Intcmauonal history. Sigma Pi is the up-and-coming
fraternity on campus. Sigma Pi is known for its diversity among
members vet has a ery strong brotherhood. Sigma Pi is very
competitive with each and every fraternity on campus and with your
help will becomr an even more dominant part ot the Greek system
at East Carolina. If vou want to go Greek, experience a great
brotherhood, meet lots of people, and have a good time then go
Sigma Pi. 508 E 10th St 752-1955
rrr
AXO
iika
Delta Sigma Phi was chartered at East Carolina in April of 1971, and
has continually given what it could to better the ECU Greek system.
Delta Sig is based on three simple, but loyal principles: Leadership,
Scholarship, and Brotherhood. Brotherhood is a phenomenon that
can be felt and witnessed much better than it can be explained. It is
a deep friendship with men who can always be depended upon to
help when there is a need, and to be there to share the experience
of self growth in the incrediblv complex world of college life.
510 e7 10th St. 757-1817
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded on March 1, 1968 at the
University ofVirgjnia. Pika'at ECU is a fratcmitv that takes great pride
in their involvement onthecampusand around the community. Pika
was rechartcrcd at ECU six years ago and has flourished to be one ot
the greatest suppottcrsofmcGrMksv-stcm.Ifv-ou'iethinkingofgoing
Greek this year check out Pi KaPDa Atoha it mav be one of the best
decisions of vou college life. Ill House 803 E. 5th St 752-4181
Sigma Tau Gamma has a long and proud heritage ofofferingyoung
men the opportunity to broaden their lives through fraternal
brotherhood. With over 100chaptersacrossuSeccHmrry,SigrnaTau
Gamma is recognized nationally and has its home office in
Warrensburg, MO. Our national office works closely with our
chapter here at East Carolina which maximizes our bonds to one
another and the community. Come sec what makes Sigma Tau
Gamma fraternity the most uruque and diversified on campus. Sigma
Tau Gamma - taking tradition to tomorrow. 1210 Dickinson
Ave 757-0127
TKE
nKO
KA
The Kappa Alpha Order was chartered on September 26,1958 at
East Carolina University. At KA there is a deep tradition in
preserving the quality of Southern gentlemen. Kappa Alpha's
athletic program is known for its consistent rate of success. Our
brotherhood would like to extend an invitation to all interested men
to attend rush at our house. We arc looking forward to meetingyou
during rush. 500 E. 11th St 757-3826
Pi Kappa Phi was chartered at East Carolina in 1963. Since the
beginning wc have proven to be a strong force in the development of
fincvoung men to serve our campus. We offer a vancty of activitiesto
excel in ranging form a string athletic program to community service
and projects for the handicapped. We arc known to have a very strong
social program and hold many major events throughout the year. Wc
have a very strong alumni association that helps in our endeavors. Our
scholarship pro-am helps to develop our �" ��
remember, when you're in a rush to the only wayGO PI KAPP.
830 Hooker Rd 756-2149
Tau Kaooa Epsilon, founded in 1899, has become the largest
teXM with around.365 chapters in the US. and
Canada TKE calls itself "the fraternity for life" and over 100,000
members worldwide arc proving it through their interest in the
fratcmitv that continues long after graduation. TKE participates in
If you like what you hear, come on down to the bottom of the ruu
to the TKE house and find out ifTKE is for you. 951 E 10th St
752-9144
OX
KE
IN
Kappa Sigma was founded on the East Carolina Campus on
November 20, 1966. Since then the fraternity has stnved to
represent the Greek system of ECU well. Located on Tenth Street
directly across from campus, the fraternity offers a convenient spot
for its member to gather between classes, as well as being in easy
walking distance from the residence halls. The basis of the Kappa Sig
fraternity is its brotherhood and through that brotherhood wc will
continue to grow and prosper long into the future. 700 E. 10th St
757-1005
AXA
At East Carolina, Sigma Nu is a combination of nch tradition and new
membership. First chartered in 1959, the Eta Beta chapter of Sigma
Nu is among the oldest of all Fraternities at ECU. Fraternity life at
Sigma Nu offers many things for all its members: an active social lite,
strong support for athletics, community service, and academics.
Nationallv,SigmaNuisamongthcbcstinalleategoncs.Withovcr230
chapters and 130 thousand brothers, it is the third largest fraternity
internationally. Itscomprehensive EducationalFoundanon LEA)
provides many scholarships and offers many great- leadership
development programs. Wc encourage you to Rush Sigma Nu and
above all, GO GREEK! j E. nth St 758-7450
Thcta Chi was first chartered at East Carolina on March 15,1958.
We arc an established Fraternity with over 50 active brothers who
pride themselves on the concept of unity and closeness within the
brotherhood. Thcta Chi strives among the top in athlencs and
scholastics and is a catalyst for indrvicTual accomplishment. Wc
challenge you to be a part of our continued success and extend an
imitarioVto rush Thcta Chi. Our new house�OWO�JWEast
1 IthSt (758-6969).BcapartoftheGreekleaderofrhe90 s.ROLL
CHI! 312 E 11th St 758-6969
Lambda Chi Alpha is a fraternity ofhoncst friendship. Wc have over
210 fraternity chapters nationally. Being a Lambda Chi means
ME
At Sigma Phi Epsilon we believe that as well as providing numerous
L





Title
The East Carolinian, January 17, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 17, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1050
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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