The East Carolinian, January 12, 1995







Pirates clip Redbird wings
In neck-to-neck competition, the Pirates
defeated the Illinois State RedBirds last night
64-57. The Pirates record now stands at 8-4.
THURSDAY
( MSttiHut'l-M �
" Low 48 m
� �t&iWiiiMMi m
Low 45
WEEKEND
LIFESTYLE
The Top of the Heap
Our critic ranks the 10 best films of
1994. See page 9 for our top 10 list.
&
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 66
Circulation 12,000
Thurday, January 12, 1995
Greenville, NC
16 pages
Student remembered for ethics, morals
Tambra Zion
Photo courtesy of Robert Bunger
Detlev Bunger, the student killed in a bicycling accident
Monday, will be remembered as a lover of the environment.
Assistant News Editor
A scholarship fund has been
established in memorial of
Detlev Bunger, an exceptional
student and environmentalist
who was planning to enter
graduate school before his life
suddenly ended last Monday in
a collision on 10th Street.
A memorial service will be
held in the Howell Science Com-
plex auditorium at 5:30 p.m. on
Friday. Detlev's friends and
family filled the west wing of
Wilkerson funeral home on Fifth
Street Wednesday afternoon for
a visitation and viewing.
"It's just inconceivable that
he's gone' said Dr. Robert
Bunger, Detlev's father and ECU
anthropology professor since
1971. "I know that life will go on
somehow but it's very hard for
me to conceive a life without
him, he was part of our life for
22 years
Friends are asked to donate
to the Detlev Bunger memorial
scholarship fund, care of the
ECU Biology department in
ECU's Hovell Science Complex,
rather than give flowers.
"The last thing my stepson
would have wanted would have
been cutting down flowers to
remember him by Mrs. Li
Bunger, Detlev's stepmother,
said.
Dr. Bunger is hoping Detlev's
menu y and the scholarship will
be able to inspire a deserving
biology student to excel as his
son did.
Detlev was riding his bicycle
when struck by a Boy's and
Girl's Club bus around 3 p.m. at
the intersection of Forrest Hill
Circle and 10th Street.
Named after a 19th century
German poet, Detlev had high
aspirations.
"We saw our child as being a
creative person, his art projects
for design were excellent if I
had seen it done by anybody I
would have said they're excel-
lent composi tions�he did grea t
work said Dr. Bunger said. "He
had it in him to be a creative
artist but he wanted to be a sci-
entist.
To me he epitomized a so-
cially conscious scientist, and I
think he would have made a
wonderful contribution � he
was a rare creation. He believed
that through science he could
really, genuinely make the
world a better place to live Dr.
Bunger said.
Detlev excelled in biology
and made straight A's in
most classes.
"He's an excellent student,
he's at the top of all our stu-
dents said Dr. Charles
Bland, chair of the biology
department. "He was fre-
quently on the chancellor's
list and one of our favorite
around here
He was president of Stu-
dents for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals (SETA), a
member of GAIA, Beta Beta
Beta � a biology honor fra-
ternity and recipient of a
scholarship through U.B.E.
See STUDENT page 4
Multicultural
Pet owners encouraged to leash-up even ts planned
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Attention pet owners � do not
let Fido or Spot run wild through-
out campus, or the animal will be
impounded and owners will have
to pay to have it released.
Pitt County has a 24-hour leash
law that requires animals to be or
a leash anywhere other than oi
the owner's property. Owner
must also be in direct control o
their animals at all times.
The first time an animal is im
pounded there is a $20 pickup fe
and $5 for each night the anima
stays at the City Animal Shelter
The second time an animal is im-
pounded the owner will be
charged $30 and $5 for each night
the animal spends at the shelter.
If no one picks up the animal
after three days, animals with-
out rabies or dog licenses will
either be adopted or put to
sleep. If animals have tags, then
the animal shelter is required to
send a registered letter to the
owner and cannot do anything to
the dog until the owner responds
to the letter.
Tom Pohlman, environmental
health specialist with ECU Envi-
ronmental Health and Safety, feels
that there ate a large number of
unrestrained and unattended ani-
mals on campus and increased ob-
servance of leash laws needs to
occur.
"On the campus it is getting to
beaprettybigproblem Pohlman
said. "I have been out there today
and seen at least three different
Hnac on ramniis
each dog has
necessarily bitten someone, but the
potential is there.
"It is just one of those things we
need to try to get a control on
before it gets too out of hand
ECU Environmental Health and
Safety will work with the
Greenville Animal Shelter in try-
ing to warn people to make sure to
have there animals on leashes and
restrained.
Pohlman said that they are look-
ing out not only for the safety of
the public but for the animals as
well. He said that animals not re-
strained are the ones who get in
the road and get hit.
"Our role is
looking after
t h eover-
a 1 1
wel-
f a r e
and
health
and
well
being of
the cam-
pus and
its commu-
nity Pohlman said.
"My main concern is con-
trolling the diseases that
animals carry and so our role
is basically coordination and edu-
cation. We are not trying to ban
animals from campus, but we are
trying to make sure animals are
under the proper control
Pohlman feels that it is inap-
propriate for students to tie ani-
mals up to poles or trees while
they are in class, especially when
conditions are especially hot or cold.
He said that animals who are left
tied up in extreme conditions could
possibly be impounded and the
owner could possibly be charged
with cruelty to animals.
"We're not in the business of try-
ing to create hassles for people and
especially students, we're here to
protect them Pohlman said. "Ani-
mal control is not just controlling
animals, it is a proven disease-con-
trol and disease-prevention
method
On campus this year there have
been two reported cases of people
bitten by animals and three reported
cases of animals showing aggressive
behavior towards people.
No cases of rabies have been con-
firmed in Pitt County, but in counties
surrounding Pitt County various
cases of rabies have been reported.
"In countries that don't have the
control of animals that we have liter-
ally tens to hundreds to thousands of
times more people are dying of dis-
eases than we do, and I think that
speaks very highly of animal control
in this country Pohlman said.
Pohlman thanks all students who
See PET page 5
Candlelight
march
kicks off
celebration
Warren Sumner
Eppes purchase in voters' hands
Negotiations are over, final call up to voters
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
After almost eight years of ne-
gotiating with Pitt County, ECU
will finally acquire Eppes Middle
School once voters pass a school
bond referendum in March.
"We feel very positive about
it because this has been a pur-
chase that has been in negotia-
tion for probably eight years, nine
years said Richard Brown, vice
chancellor for business affairs.
"We're just happy to get it to the
point where the university will
be acquiring the property for cer-
tain in the foreseeable future
The Pitt County commission-
ers agreed to accept the
university's final offer before the
Dec. 10 deadline the university
set, which was the date of the
university board of trustees
meeting.
"The final agreed upon offer
was $6 million for the purchase
of the Eppes property, leasing the
property back to the school sys-
tem for six years at a $1 a year and
the transfer of title of Wahl-Coates
School from the university to
school system Brown said.
Brown said the university's of-
fer was more appealing to the
county after it was raised from the
initial $5 million offer.
"They felt the property was
worth more than the $5 million
that had been offered and that the
extension of the offer of $1 mil-
lion more plus the use of the
school for six years was the turn-
ing point Brown said. "It is a
very good deal for the taxpayers
of the county and a fair deal for
the university
However, the offer of accep-
tance is subject to the passage of
the $31.8 million Pitt County
school system bond referendum.
"The deal is contingent upon
the approval of the bond sell
Brown said. "It is completely con-
nected. The total bond package
recognizes $6 million of revenue
coming from the sell of the school
as part of the proceeds to do the
repairs and renovations of the
schools in Pitt County
"If the bond package does not
pass, then the school system is
not in the position to give up that
property so readily
Brown said it is up to Pitt
county voters to approve the ref-
erendum and in the process final-
ize the sale of Eppes to the uni-
versity.
"If the bond issue does not pass
then we are back pretty much to
square one on the purchase of
Eppes, and we would have lost
ground in the process Brown
said. "We can't come right out
and encourage people to vote one
way or the other, but they need to
understand the implications for
the university
"The passage of that bond is-
sue is important to the acquisi-
tion of that property for the uni-
versity
The university wants this prop-
erty, located on Elm Street, be-
cause it is adjacent to College Hill,
and plans to use the building in
the future to temporarily place
departments andor administra-
tive offices while their usual
buildings are being repaired.
Eppes is considered a long-term
investment.
"It would take probably two to
three years, in any case, for us to
get funding to do the studies and
the repairs and the renovations
that we would want to do on that
building anyway Brown said.
"We'll start that planning process
in advance
"In the meantime, we continue
to use some of the buildings that
are not part of the main structure,
an automobile repair shop and
several other small buildings that
we use for facilities operations.
So, we get some use out of it also
Staff Writer
The ECU Office of Minority
Affairs, along with the Cultural
Awareness Committee and the
Department of University Unions,
has a list of events planned to
mark the celebration of the birth-
day of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
From Jan. 16-18, a number of
multicultural events will take
place in remembrance of the slain
civil rights leader and in celebra-
tio. of his philosophy.
The theme of this year's cel-
ebration, "A Commitment to Hu-
man Rights and World Peace
will be reflected by the programs
sponsored free of charge at the
university. The program begins
on Monday night with a candle-
light march from Christenbury
GymtoMendenhall StudentCen-
ter and everyone is invited to par-
ticipate.
A performance of "My Chil-
dren! My Af-
ricawillbe pre-
sented at
Hendrix Theatre
the next night.
This stirring play
focuses on the
oppression and
eventual libera-
tion of the South
African people
and will begin at
8 p.m.
Dr. Crystal
Kuykendall, the
author of From Rage to Hope: Re-
claiming Black and Hispanic Stu-
dents, will hold a lecture in room
1028 of the General Classroom
Building at 12 p.m. on Jan. 18.
This motivational speaker will
speak about minority relations in
today's society, particularly as
they relate to the conditions in
education.
According to Dr. Mary Anne
Rose, Equal Employment Officer,
the scheduling of Dr.
Kuykendall's lecture at 12 p.m.
was implemented to encourage
student attendance.
"We put (Kuykendall) on at
noon so thatwecouldgetas many
students as possible to see her
It is very
important that
(the university
community)
recognizes that
Dr. King stood
for everyone's
civil rights
r
mmmmmmmmm.
.
Rose said. "We know thatonce
a student leaves the campus,
they are reluctant to return,
and we hope that the schedul-
ing will make it convenient
for students to attend. She is a
dynamite speaker, and we
hope that students will go lis-
ten to her
Rose said that the celebra-
tion is not merely devoted to
remembering King's life but
hopes that it will help to con-
vey the principles helived un-
der to the student community.
"With this, in a way, we're
looking
backward
she said.
"But we're
also looking
to the future.
We hope that
this will help
to highlight
the prin-
ciples of non-
violence and
unity that Dr.
King lived
by
This sentiment isechoed by
Dr. Brian Haynes, the director
of the Office of Minority Stu-
dent Affairs. Haynes said he
hopes that students of all
classes and ethnic back-
grounds will take advantage
of the celebration of King's
life and work.
"It is very important that
(the university community)
recognizes that Dr. King stood
for everyone'scivil rights he
said. "Of course, we think of
him in terms of his being an
African-American leader, but
people need to know that he
championed causes for every-
one
es





2 The East Carolinian
January 12. 1995
January 4
Assault on campus � An ECL officer reported an assault
inflicting serious injury occurred at the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity
house at 3 a.m. The victim was a student and the accused is a non-
student.
January 5
Pedestrianvehicle accident �While crossing the street at Wright
Circle, a student was struck bv another student. The pedestrian was
transported to Pitt Memorial Hospital with injuries to her leg.
Breaking and enteringlarceny �A Scott Hall resident reported
the breaking and entering of his room. Several compact discs were
taken from the room.
January 9
Larceny � A student reported the larcenv of his portable com-
pact disc player from an unlocked studio in the Jenkins Art Build-
ing.

Breaking and entering attempted larceny of motor vehicle �
Officers discovered a vehicle in the Third and Reade lot with the
dash lights on, the ignition switch damaged and a door lock was
damaged. The victim was notified and found nothing missing from
the vehicle.
Possession of stolen property � A resident of Jones Hall was
found in possession of a Department of Transportation stop sign in
his room. The student was issued a state citation and a campus
appearance ticket for possession of stolen property.
January 10
Weapon on campus � A non-student was arrested for being in
possession of a weapon (BB gun) on campus, no operator's license
and exceeding the speed limit. The incident occurred on College
Hill Drive.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from offical ECU police
reports.
Model teaching
program awarded
for dedication
It would be
great if the
whole state
would recognize
our program
� Dr. Bettv Beacham
Correction box
The Shared Visions graph in Monday's paper was mislabeled.
The figures represented the purpose of the campaign. Annual
support will receive $8,147,425 of the total contributions.
Also, Dr. Robert Bunger was improperly identified. He is an
associate professor in the Anthropology Department.
Marguerite Benjamin
Staff Writer
Once again ECL"s Model Clini-
cal Teaching Program is saluted for
its efforts to improve the teaching
profession.
The program,
now entering its
seventh vear, is
already among
the four special
programs se-
lected for the an-
nual American
Association of
State Colleges
and Universities
Award.
The Model
Clinical Teach-
ing Program
takes a special approach to the edu-
cation of perspective teachers
"Our trainingl method places
seniors majoring in education in in-
ternships which last a full vear in-
stead of the traditional 10 weeks
said Dr. Betty Beacham, the
program's director.
During the year of training, train-
ees alternate their campus studies
with teaching practice in an elemen-
tary school classnxm.
"It would be great if the whole
state would recognizeour program
Beacham said. "I think it could be a
model for our state and the nation
Several organizatioas m ust agree
with Beacham because the program
received three awards in 1994 alone,
the third award being the Christa
McAuliffe Award named for the
teacher killed in the Challenger di-
saster.
Chancellor Richard Eakin ac-
cepted the Christa McAuliffe Show-
case for Excellence Award on behalf
The Varsity Sport of the Mind
mum
CAMPUS CHAMPIONSHIP
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1995
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
PICK UP COLLEGE BOWL INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION
PACKET FROM THE INFORMATION DESK.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION EVENTS COMMITTEE
First place team member will receive $25.00 each and a College Bowl t-shirt.
Second place team members will receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For more information, contact the Student Activities Office. 210 Mendenhall,
328-47664711
tftT
u

Put your mind to it!
ot EC U's teacher training program
on Tuesday, o 22, in Boca Raton,
Fl.
The McAuliffe Award is reserved
for those programs which strive to
make a difference in the teaching
profession, as
Christa McAuliffe
herself strived to
do before her.un-
timely death.
Beacham said the
teaching program
operated with
Christa
McAuIiffe's per-
sonal motto, "I
teach, therefore I
touch the future "
"We are proud
to have received so
See TEACH page 5
y-ypyw����p
Come Join Us Every
Thursday Night
at 7pm
In trfe General Classroom Building
Room 1031
For more information calt
Eddie Hilliard 321-6262
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M





r
January 12, 1995
The East Carolinian 3
On-campus injuries cost school
Jeb Brrokshire
i Staff writer
I
J Last year, there were 300 re-
' ported work-related injuries on
'ECU's campus. These reported
cases were only the ones that re-
quired first aid.
" Most of the jobs on campus are
indoors so the injuries are usually
minor things likecut fingers,bruises
and strained backs said the De-

m

Meet singles of ALL TYPES!
Straight, English, Spanish and
Alternative Lifestyles.
1-900-820-9669 ext 297 24hrs
$2.00min 18 Ttone req'd
Avalon Comm (305)525-0800
partment of Environmental Health
and Safety's acting director, Phil
Lewis. "Most of the injuries occur
in the higher risk occupations such
as grounds keeping, housekeeping,
maintenance and moving service
These injuries cost ECU around
$350,000 a year. This figure is up
from $286,000 two years ago. The
university is responsible for all of
the expenses including medical and
the regular pay that the employee
would normally receive during the
time that he or she is out of work.
Last year, some of the most se-
vere injuries were a file cabinet tip-
ping over on an employee, an elec-
trician who fell from a ladder and a
lab research specialist who con-
tacted 20 percent nitric acid while
washing off glassware.
To help prevent the severity of
accidents, supervisors now have to
keep a log of "near miss" incidents.
sc,�i
&
Clothing for Man and Woman
OFF
entire stock of man's and
women's catalog clothing,
3 DAYS ONLY !
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
January 12th, 13th, & 14th, Only
All Safes Final
We Accept.
Cash
Check
Accept
QBB KB Bi
Hidden Closet, Inc.
University Center
(Nmxt to Harris Tmmlmr) 14th � CharUt BW
Greenville, N.C.
758-1550
Open Mon. - Fri.
Sat. 1 -6 p.m. �
� Oo.in7p.m.
Sun. 1-5 p.m.
r-
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING CHESS
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26,1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Tuesday, January 24
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
M
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, February 1
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office. 328-4766. for more information.
y
This report will help the supervi-
sors to take the appropriate mea-
sure to reduce the accidents in their
work place.
The Occupational Safety and
Health Act (OSHA) of 1970 now
requires supervisors to post a log of
all the injuries of the past year. The
OSHA 200 log is posted every Feb-
ruary. This log shows all of the
injuries and also helps the supervi-
sors to prevent the recurrence of
injuries. There are also accident in-
vestigations that help to identify
why the accident happened and
what could have been done to pre-
vent it from happening.
"The key to preventing injuries
is to inform the employees of haz-
ards in the work place, offer the
appropriate protective equipment
and enforce the rules regarding the
use of this safety equipment said
Lewis.
Whippets seen
as choice dru
(CPS) � You may have seen
those little metal pellets around
campus. You might have even
watched friends at concerts as they
inhaled gas from balloons or plastic
bags and then laughed their heads
off. They were sniffing nitrous ox-
ide � known as "hippie crack" at
some schools � which is becoming
an increasingly popular way for
students to get high.
It has become so pervasive be-
cause it is cheap � $1 gets you a
whippet pellet � and it is easy to
get. Nitrous oxide is also called
laughing gas, the same kind den-
tists use, and it is most commonly
used as a propellant for whipped
cream cans.
Nitrous oxide is especially
popular on college campuses be-
cause many students do it at
raves and at concerts, particu-
larly the Grateful Dead shows
and other outdoor festivals
where it is not unusual to see a
guy carting around a tank of the
gas and selling it for $5 a bal-
loon-full, said Kayla Kirkpatrick,
youth program coordinator for
the International Institute on In-
halant Abuse in Englewood,
Colo.
Whippets are sold by the case
at gourmet stores for use in cake
decorating and other food
See CRACK page 4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
IS CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR
NEWS WRITERS
Requirements:
� 2.0 GPA (or above)
� Some writing experience
� Responsibility
� Desire to find out the truth
� The ability to tell the truth
Wanna Cut
Through the
Red Tape and
Find Out What's
Really Going
On?
(and get paid for it)
Stop by the Student Pubs Bldg.
(across from the library)
and fill out an application, or ask
for Stephanie Lassiter.
Questions? Call 328-6366
SEXUALLY
SPEAKING
WITH
DR. RUTH
WESTHEIMER
Wednesday, February 22,1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
Contact the Central Ticket Office
1-800-ECU-ARTS (328-2787)
or Locally at 328-4788
Sponsored By the Student Union Lecture Committee
rf??
�mmmermmmm





January 12. 1995
4 The East Carolinian
CRACK
from p. 3
preparation, but they also can be
bought at head and pomo shops. A
few states, such as Ohio, have de-
creed that nitrous oxide can only be
sold for food and dental purposes,
but it is legal in all 50 states. The
Food and Drug Administration says
N20 is neither a dangerous drug or
food product.
"Students think thatbecause they
see whippets around all the time
and because the dentists uses it, it
must be okay Kirkpatrick said.
"But the difference is that dentists
are using nitrous oxide in a con-
trolled environment and they've
been trained to use it properly
The laughing gas dentists use,
Kirkpatrick said, is 80 percent oxy-
gen as opposed to the 100 percent
nitrous oxide inhaled in whippets
or gas-filled balloons.
People who sniff nitrous oxide
get an immediate rush that often
makes them laugh and fell dizzy
and euphoric. Because the gas has
replaced oxygen in the blood stream,
it also makes the sniffers' hands and
feet tingle and can cause them to
lose their balance. The high, which
produces a psychological addiction,
lasts only a few minutes and com-
pels users to inhale more and more
to reach new levels of euphoria.
Most people get hangover-like
headaches the next day, but pro-
longed users can damage their bone
marrow, reproductive systems and
brain. Sometimes it make; people
pass out; some even die.
The International Institute on In-
halant Abuse (HIA) reports 34 deaths
nationwide have been caused from
nitrous oxide or other fumes. But
Kirkpatrick emphasizes that there
are no accurate U.S. death statistics,
because inhalants often contribute
to death but may not be the actual
cause of it. Take, for example, the
case of the 21-year-old suburban
Chicago man who drowned in a
pool after doing whippets. Inhaling
the gas caused him to pass out and
fall off a raft he was floating on. The
coroner ruled his death was by
drowning.
In England, though, the IIIA esti-
mated that one-fifth of all first-time
sniffers died.
NIDA estimates that 300,000
people between the ages of 18 and
25 used inhalants in 1991, and that
as the trend has become more popu-
lar, it is also become more widely
accepted. Inhalants are considered
the fourth most popular drug in
America, behind alcohol, tobacco
and marijuana, according to recent
NIDA studies.
Nitrous oxide tends to be the gas
of choice on college campuses while
abuse of other inhalants, such as
gasoline, air fresheners and nail pol-
ish, is being seen more and more
among younger kids, some only in
grade school, NIDA's Sargent said.
r
STUDENTW�
RUSH
I A E
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
"Fastest Growing
Fraternity on Campus"
311 South Woodlawn Dr. 5
Next to AOn
Call 752-1147 or 758-0998
J
"He was a pretty remarkable
student said Dr. Vincent Bellis,
a biologv professor. "I think he
knew most of the biology faculty,
we all knew he had a bright fu-
ture we were very proud that
he was a member of our depart-
ment
Detlev worked as a proctor for
the self-paced philosophy 1110
for more than three years. He
planned to study marine envi-
ronmental ecology as a graduate
student but had not yet decided
on a school.
"Typically, he wanted to read
articles by the professors in the
graduate school before he chose
where to go said Dr. Greg Ross,
ECU philosophy professor who
had known Detlev for several
years. "He was the most diligent
and studious person I had ever
met � certain to succeed even in
things he did not care for
A native of Greenville, Detlev
enjoyed his studies, skateboard-
ing and riding his bicycle.
"He used to skateboard for a
couple of hours everyday, he was
deeply into it in high school and
the beginning of college Dr.
Bunger said. "He loved that bi-
cycle. The bicycle he was killed on
was his most prized possession
His ability to combine environ-
mental issues and his skating
punkness and slam dancing shows
the mark of a very remarkable per-
son, Ross said.
"When he was a kid, he had
some hard times, but he devel-
oped out of that without changing
his personality Ross said. He be-
lieves Detlev was able to touch
hundreds of lives just through the
philosophy students he helped.
Friends and colleagues said it
was hard to believe Detlev is gone.
"I ride a bike too, and I think
about the thousands of times I've
ridden the exact same track, it
hasn't hit me said Keith Coon,
friend and fellow colleague. "Un-
believably, almost annoyingly
dedicated to school a very dedi-
cated punk rocker too. I know he
was avid into skateboarding. He
was very different type of person,
very alternative
Coon was one of the last people
to see Detlev before the accident.
"And to the last minute he was
alive, he was being picked on and
returning the favor Coon said.
Coon said Detlev was a strong
environmentalist and a vegetarian
because Detlev thought eating
meat was cruel.
"Detlev didn't know the mean-
ing of the word hate, I could truly
say thathe was the kindest person
I've ever known Dr. Bunger said.
"He disliked injustice, and he saw
a lot of injustice in the world, but
he didn't hate.
He was about as broad-minded
and loving person as you could
find. He was dedicated to saving
the environment he believed the
way to do this was through science
and not through rabble-rousing or
rioting he believed the way to
save the environment was to get
out and prove what was going on
and to prove it scientifically Dr.
Bungersaid.
Detlev had ideas for the future.
"I didn't have a chance to know
him long enough said major Irv-
ing Hooper, president of GALA "He
came to us with a lot of ideas, and
he wasn't the type of person to take
credit for those ideas; he just wanted
to help other people be aware of
what's going on around the world
and how most people waste re-
sources and he wanted to help us
make people aware of what we're
doing
Detlev enjoyed science fiction,
Star Wars and Star Trek, Dr. Bunger
said. He said Detlev thought of sci-
ence fiction as a way of showing
people what the world could be like.
Expressions Magazine
is looking for a few talented men and women
for the following positions:
Associate Editor
Staff Writers (2)
Typesetter
Only those individuals who are committed
to providing quality work and meeting
deadlines need to apply If interested, please
come by Expressions office on the 2nd floor of
the publication building to fill out an application
by January 16,1995.
210 E. 5th Street
atalog
nnection

� ra9ff
Division of UBE
758-8612
FAMOUS CATALOG
DRESSES
Off Catalog Price
HEAVY WINTER
COATS
Off Catalog Price
CATALOG
BRAS
50
Off Catalog Price
SHOES
BLAZERS
Off Catalog Price
MEN'S
JEANS
$Q95
GENUINE LEATHER
BELTS
MonSat. 10-6
LADIES
SWEATERS
ic-iDc parity
Off Catalog Price
SALE
RACK
LADIES SILK
BLOUSES
Off Catalog Price
COMBAT
BOOTS
Regular '72.00
1995
75
Group
SKIRTS
Hewas trying tochange things
and make things better. He had great
ideals and it doesn't make sense
why it had to be someone who was
trying to make a difference said
Shannon Gay, a friend of Detlev's.
Hooper said Detlev was the type
of person who did things instead of
talking about them.
"Whenever I saw him outside of
the club he was very open and
warm to me and took the time to
stop and talk to me. Even when he
was studying for exams, he always
took the time Hooper said.
MEETING!
GOLDEN KEY
NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY
Agenda:
�Spring Semester Kick off
��Florida Regional Conference
� New Member Reception
�Campus Awareness
�Other Activities
FREE PIZZA & DRINKS!
THUR. JAN. 12TH 4:00PM GC 1012
January at the Hbo
ALL NEW EXPANDED DANCE FLOOR!
Tuesday: ALL NEW TRIVIA TUESDAY! The Elbo is now connected to the
national trivia network! Come in and win cash prizes for the Best scores!
Games begin hourly, so come in and win! Pitchers are only $2.50 and cups of
draft are 50c. Enjoy our $1.00 bottles of beer and house hi-balls!
Wednesday: CLASSIC NIGHT! The best in classic rock & dance for you to enjoy
on our new dance floor! 1c Coors light draft, $1.25 domestics & high balls
PLUS $2.00 16oz. drink specials!
1C Coors light draft. Admission $3.00 members $4.00 guests.
Thursday: LADIES' NIGHT! Ladies' in free ali night long, guys who are members
in for $1.00 $2.00 guests! 25c cups of draft and $1.00 bottle beer and house
hi-balls. $2.00 Sex on the beach & 50c jello shots & champagne cocktails.
Ladies' come in early and win cash prizes in our special ladies' trivia contest!
9-11pm.
FRIDAY: RUSH HOUR! $1.00 OFF ADMISSION FROM 8 TIL 10PLUS
LADIES $1.00 OFF GUEST ADMISSION ALL NITE! $1.25 BOTTLE BEERS &
HIBALLS $2.00 TEAS AND SEX ON THE BEACH FEATURING ALL NEW
10 CENT DRAFT!
SATURDAY: DANCE PARTY! $3.00 PITCHERS & 50c CUPS OF DRAFT ANY
BRAND ALL NITE! LADIES $1.00 OFF THE GUEST ADMISSION! FEATUR-
ING THE BEST IN 70s , 80S & 90S DANCE MUSIC ALL NIGHT LONG.






January 12, 1995
The East Carolinian 5
Hattisfeeter
MEANS LOW PRICES!
7E4CH
from p. 2
Harris Teeter Brand Salel
Celebrating the "Coming Out" of our New Labels
Harris Teeter
Sweet Peas,
Corn or
Green Beans
many honors, but the important
thing is, our program is making a
difference Beacham said.
ECU' Model Clinical Teaching
Program was named "an exemplary
teacher education program" last July
by the National Education
Association's National Center for
Innovation. The program also has
added to its credits recognition from
the Distinguished Programs in
Teacher Education Foundation.
Beacham believed than in order
to make a difference in the class-
room, there must be a collaboration
between avid book training and
from p. 1
quality first-hand experience in
teaching.
Evidently theprogram'sperspec-
tive, techniques and procedures
have been very successful, as only
four other universities received the
honor of the McAuliffe Award:
Southeast Missouri State University,
California State University, North-
ern Texas and East Texas State Uni-
versity.
ECU's teacher education
program's participants are as proud
of their accomplishments as Christa
McAuliffe was to make a difference
in the teaching profession.
walk their animals on leashes.
"They are the ones who care
about their animal Pohlman said.
Anyone who needs to report an
aggressive animal can contact ECU
Environmental Health and Safety
at 328-6166 or ECU Police at 328-
6150.
14.50-15.25 oz.
Harris Teeter
Heed
Bacon
A 'xXouch oi Cfiass
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Danceis llpm-lan
CASH PRIZE
�Ccotetunu need to all A reiser In KlviDoe.
Muu inive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
Have you got the
winter blues,
kids? Are you
just plain tired of
the same old
same old? Well,
hold on to your
mittens, kittens,
because TEC has
a brand new
game headed
your way. Don't
be a snoozer,
pick up next
Tuesdays
edition to see
our BRAND
NEW, and much
improved
surprise. And get
out your fountain
pens, because
you'll certainly
want to write in
and congratulate
us. And if you do
happen to miss
out, don't panic.
Were here to
stay, much like
the parking
problem, only
with a much
more positive
effect.
Harris Teeter
Grain
Bread 24 oz.
Harris Teeter Cranberry
Cocktail Juice
Pepsi Or Diet
Pepsi
Selected
Varieties
64 OZ.
Harris Teeter
Snack
Crackers
Harris Teeter
Orange Concentrate
2Ltr.
Harris Teeter 4 Pk.
Bath
Tissue157.50 n.
Harris Teeter
Peanut c�aZyn�yr
Butter 1
.79
f39
Juice
Prices Effective Through Jan. 17,1995
PRICES IN Tins AD EFFECTIVE UU.Nt 'AY. JANUARY 11. IHROUGH JANUARY 17. 1995 IN OUR GREENV I.E STORES ONLY Wi:
Tell everyone about your Valentine
by putting a special
Love Lines personal ad in our special
Feb. 14 issue.
Only $3 for 25 words or less;
100 each for more than 25.
Pick up a Love Lines form at the newspaper
office, the Mendenhall information desk or
Student Stores. Speak out before our Feb. 11
deadline -
or forever hold your peace.
T ove Lined!
J � m
DTP TTH TV '
�mi ii1"
-W





t 9
677?e East Carolinian
January 12. 1995
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
mm
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
immediately. On campus, two
rooms. $197 per a month and 12
utilities. Call: 758-6457
TAR RIVER ESTATES: Three male
roommates needed. Located on river.
$100 deposit, $169 rent, 14 utilities
and phone. Call Kevin 758-6701
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3Br
House at 206-A East 12th St. Rent
$450 month 2Br House at 206-B East
12th St. Rent $295 month. Also 2Br
apartment at 810 Cotanche Rent $325
month. Call 757-3191
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Live in a beautiful 3 bedroom, 2.5
bath townhouse just four miles from
ECU. The rent is $200.00 a month,
plus 13 utilities. On site benefits.
FREE tanning beds, Jacuzzi, sauna,
pool, 24-hour laundry, and weight
room The deposit is $175.00.
Available NOW. Call 321-8591. Bed
furnished.
WESLEY COMMONS 3 bedroom
duplex: Room for rent, Available for
Spring Semester, 6 blocks from ECU,
WasherDryer. Big Screen T.V $220
& 13 utilities mo. Call Dave 830-
4030.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example fo Frank Lloyd Wright
architecture. 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, large dining room,
kitchen and living room with
fireplace. New refrigerator, washer
dryer, fenced backyard, nice
shrubbery. Convenient to campus
and hospital. $750.00mo. deposit.
524-5790 day - 752-8079 night.
WHAT A DEAL Apt. available for
subleasing. Nd. a male or female to
share apt. with present occupant.
$205 plus 12 utilities. Great location
& may keep $50 of deposit returm in
August. Call 321-3863
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two
and one bedroom(s) apartments at
Wesley Commons for rent Call 758-
1921. Free Cable.
ROOM AVAILABLE. Walking
distance from campus. Private room;
share both and kitchen. Call Mike
Casey at 752-2879.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
nonsmoker, honest, available now,
rent 195.00,1 3 utilitiessand Deposit.
Will have own room. Call 758-6068.
Hl
Personals
Well, Mr. President - your
first conquer as Rex. How was
it? It's too bad that a night with
Barbara is more important to
you than our friendship. What
happened to "I know you are
that SPECIAL ONE, and to get
that TRUST I've waited very long
???" Whatever, BUDDY! Best
Friends?? We used to be. SO
LONG!
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED
Kings Row Apts. S190.00 rent 12
utilities. Basic Cable, pool and bus
service included. Prefer serious, quiet
grad. student Call 752-0845.
ROOMMATE NEEDED
, IMMEDIATELY to share Tar River
Apartment. Own bedroom. Close to
campus. Call Amy at 758-7542 for
more info.
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3
Bedroom House Directly Across
from Campus, $240.00 13 utilities.
House has an alarm system and
washer and dryer. MALE or
FEMALE. CALL 752-7251.
STUDIOUS AND SOCIAL
FEMALE ROOMMATE to live in
3Br 2 Bath apt. in Tar River. 13
utilities and phone, 208 moonth. Call
Tonya 752-5525
DUPLEX FOR RENT 2 Bedroom 1
12 bath 2 Blocks from Campus 2
Blocks from Downtown Large
Rooms, Closets, Balcony and Back
Deck $500 per month 1 year lease &
Deposit 752-6833
ROOMMATE NEEDED NOW One
person needed to share a 3 br. apt.
with den, dining room, living room,
2 12 bath, pantry, patio, and will
have your own bedroom. $163.00
mon plus 1 4 ut $100 deposit, cable
included. Located on 1st. St. in Tar
River. Call 757-2684.
For Sale
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Resi-
dency Status and Tuition is the bro-
chure by attorney Brad Lamb on hie
in-state tuition residency application
process. For sale: student stores,
Wright Building.
2ACOOUSTICRESPONSESPEAK-
ERS, New in box, Oak, 12" woofers,
frequency controls, circuit protectors,
3yr warranty. Sold for $600 each, take
$500 for both. 757-0345 leave mes-
sage Brad.
CANNONDALE 55cm RED ROAD
BIKE - Shimano 600 - Time pedals -
Mavic Tubular rims-Turbo Ti Saddle
$450. Call Jeff at 752-1247.
KING SIZE WATERBED, Excellent
Condition, New Mattress and heater
with drawers and mirror headboard.
$175 obo leave message 757-0345
Austin.
Greek Personals
ZETA TAU ALPHA - Congratu-
lations to the newly installed
Executive Council officers! Presi-
dent- Edy Cline, VP-I-Julie Pearl,
VP-II-Amy Williams, SecKrista
Roth, TreasLisa Hetrick, Hist
Audra Latham, Memb. Chair-
Alicia Nisbet, Pan. RepSusan
Goodell, Ritual Chair-Sheila
Services Offered
TYPING Reasonable rates" re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6
Billion in private sector grants &
scholarships is now available, all stu-
dents are eligible regardless of grades,
income, or parent's income. Let us
help. Call Student Financial Services:
1-800-263-6495 ext. F536223
Become a CERTIFIED USSF SOC-
CER REFEREE. Earn Extra $$. Clinic
to be held on campus Jan. 20-22. Reg-
istration fee of $40.00. For further info.
Call Boyce Hudson 752-7914.
TUTORING - Improve your English!
Experienced teacher can tutor you in
conversation, writing, and TOEFL.
Will edit papers also. Call Pam at
758-6952
Help Wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
Earn up to $2,000month working
on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour com-
panies. World travel (Hawaii,
Mexico, theCaribbean, etc.).Seasonal
and Full-timeemploymentavailable.
No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C53622.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
extra cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided. Send
SASE to Central Distributors Po Box
10075, Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate
response.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT- Students needed! Fishing
industry. Earn up to $3,000- $6,000
per month. Room and board! Trans-
portation! Male or Female. No expe-
rience necessary. Call (206) 545-4155
ext A53622
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1,000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a licensed
agency. Must be 18, dependable and
have own phone and transportation.
Call Diamonds or Emerald City Es
corts at 758-0896 or 757-3477.
TELEMARKETING- Davenport
Exteriors Thermal Gard- $5 per hour
plus bonus. Easy work, flexible hours
start todav. Call 355-0210
Greek Personals
Elliot, House MgrRondaSortino
and Program Council Members!
Meadow Hensley, Vanessa
Farmer, Taia Scott, Karen
Jurgens, Catherine Singletary,
Amy Bergner, Deana Cale, Sh-
annon Jordan, Amanda Obi,
Toni Daleo, Christy Hinton,
Sabina Sehgal, Hillary Krimm,
and Catherine Niles. Here's look-
ing forward to a great semester!
Greek Personals
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA wants
to wish everyone a great spring
semester and hopes your holi-
days were a blast! WELCOME
BACK!
MISSING: Go greek sign. It is
missed terribly. Reward offered.
Love the Sigma's.
A
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
AFTER-SCHOOL SITTER needed
M-F 2:30-5:30 for 4th & 5th grader.
Must be non-smoker with reliable
transportation and good references.
Requirements include picking up
children from school & transporting
to special activities, helping w
homework & providing snack. Call
321-6296 andor 413-1787
EVENT STAFF ; STAFF ONE, the
EVENTSTAFF; Provider for Walnut
Creek Amp and N.C. ST Athletics
and Concerts is Accepting Applica-
tions for Ushers and Ticket Takers
for ECU Basketball and Concerts, Call
919-856-0800 Mon-Thur, 1pm - 5pm
for More Info.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER
wanted to care for two young chil-
dren in my home on Tuesdays from
8:45-5:00. References required. Call
756-0941.
SZECHUAN GARDEN-909 S.Evans
St. Experienced wait staff and cash-
ier needed. No phone calls please.
Apply in person between 2:00 pm
and 6:00pm.
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a Degree
with practicial experience is better.
ONLINE INFORMATION SER-
VICES is currently taking applica-
tions for part-time telephone collec-
tors. If interested please applv at 1206
Charles Blvd. Greenville
WANTED BABYSITTER to help
share responsibility with another
college student. This is for two boys
ages 5 & 7. This semester need some-
one on Tuesday & Thursday from 12
to 6. Preferably a sophomore or jun-
HELP WANTED!
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
ALL POSITIONS. APPLY IN PERSON
2-4 M-F
PLEASE NO CALLS
1
"LAW FIRM has openings for mail
room messengers part-time 8:00am
to 1:00pm five days per week. Active
position involves errands, copies,
FAX and general office functions.
Apply in person 120 West Fire Tower
Road. Ward and Smith, P.A
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Bring your outgoing personality and
reliable transportation and become
one of our personnal photographers.
Basic photography knowledge and
35mm SLR.cajmera a plus, but not
essential. Wetrain. Flexible PThours-
$6.00 per hour. Call 1-800-722-7033
ior. Summer is taken care of this year.
Please call during the day at 756-8886
or after five at 756-0684. $5.00 a Hour.
HELP WANTED. Part-time worker
wanted for Tried & True Consign-
ment Shop. Furniture deliveries and
moving furniture. Approximately 10
hours a week. Call 752-2139. Com-
puter AssistantDelivery ii
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER
needed for 21 2 year old on Monday
and Friday mornings. No smoking,
Transportation and references re-
quired. 355-2088.
U�
Help Wanted
PANAMA CITY BEACH, SPRINC
BREAK 1995! 7 nights deluxe part;
package $149.00 P.P. Campus Reps'
Wanted. Earn Free Trips. Call Gatoi
Rock (800) 410-2867.
BASEBALL UMPIRES NEEDED!
Anyone interested in umpiring youth
baseball games (ages 9-18) tor the
Spring and Summer Should contact
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department Athletic Office Immedi-
ately! 15-20 Umpires needed Pay
$15-$20 per game. For more infor-
mation please call the Athletic Office
at 830-4550 after 2pm.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DE-
VELOPMENT, DEPARTMENTOF
ATHLETICS, is now accepting ap-
plications for tutors. A minimVim 2.5
GPA is required. Please call 3 $-4550
for more information. !

RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL to
care for children after schooh Tues-
day and Thursday, 2:30-5:30p,�n. Call
Travel
SPRING BREAK $5!
Guaranteed lowest prices to USA
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Special Group Rales & Free Tfevel!
v San Splash Tour& .
T 1-800-426-7710 z?
SPRING BREAK! Ba
Party Cruise 6 Days
Includes 12 Meals &
Parties! Great Beac
Nightlife! A HUGE
Cancun & Jamaica 7
Air & Hotel From
Spring Break Travel
678-6386
FLORIDA'S SPRING BfAK
HOTSPOTS! Cocoa Beach flfcear
Disney) - 27 Acre Deluxe
Beachfront Resort 7 Nights
$159! Key West $229! Daytona
Beach Room With Kitchen From
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SPRING BREAK! Panama
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Walk To Best Bars! Includes
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FoodDrinks! 1-800-678-
6386
Announcements
GAIA
ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION OR-
GANIZATIONwould like to ex-
press our deep sense of loss for one
of our own who exemplified the
goals of our organization. We will
truly miss Detlev Bunger.
GAIA
(ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION OR-
GANIZATION) Will meet Thurs-
day at 5pm. Everyone is welcome to
attend and participate. Please bring
ideas for an improved environment
or call 321-8699.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS COACHES
NEEDED
The Greenville - Pitt Co. Special
Olympics will be conducting a Track
& Field Coaches Training School on
Sat Feb. 4 from 9:00 am-3:30 pm for
all persons interested in becoming a
certified volunteer track coach. We
also need coaches for the following
sports: equiestrain, bowling,
powerlifting, volleyball, softball,
swimming, rollerskating, & gymnas-
tics. NO EXPERIENCE IS NECES-
SARY. For more information, con-
tact Connie or Dwain at 830-4541 or
830-4551.
NON CREDIT EXCEL COURSE
The Decision Sciences Department
will offer a non-credit EXCEL course
at no cost. Classes are 2-4 pm Fri-
days from January 13-February 10,
1995. Enrollment is limited; prefer-
ence will be given to students that
received transfer credit for DSCI
2223 Introduction to Computers.
Toregistercall(919)328-6893orstop
by the Decision Sciences office (GCB
3410) by January 12. EXCEL is the
spreadsheet and graphics package
used in business courses.
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
IT'S ABOUT TIME� to begin the
application process for 1995 summer
employment. In fact, mid-January is
the DEADLINE to apply for the much
sought agyer state government in-
ternship positions. Don't delay. Stop
by the Co-op office today for infor-
mation at 2300 General Classroom
Building or call 328-6979.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNI-
TIES
Employment Opportunities a re avail-
able to students who are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE AT-
TENDANTS to students in wheel-
chairs, READERS, and TUTORS. Past
experience is desired but not required.
For an application contact: Office for
Disability Su pport Services, Brewster
A-l 16 orA-114, Telephone (919) 328-
6799
COUNSELING CENTER
EATING DISORDER GROUP: A
counseling group for women with
anorexia and bulimia will be offered
on campus this semester. The group
will address self-esteern, stress man-
agement, relationships and problem-
solving skills. The group meets
weekly beginning in January and is
facilitated bv Susan Bower, MD, Stu-
dent Health and Sara Shepherd, PhD,
Counseling Center. Please call 328-
6661 or 328-6795 for more informa-
tion and to schedule an appointment
to talk with a facilitator before the
group begins.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
THURS JAN 12�GRADUATE RE-
CITAL, Lori Schaberg, violin(AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm, free)
FR1 JAN 13�FACULTY RECITAL,
Janette Fishell, organist, FANTASIES
AND FIREWORKS (First Presbyte-
rian Church, Kinston,
NC 8:00pm free) SAT JAN 14�SE-
NIOR RECITAL, David Archer, horn
(AJ Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm free)
SNOW BOARDING ADVEN-
TURE TRIP
Recreational Services is offering
Snowboarding is Virginia, a week-
end of winter fun. Registration dead-
line is Jan. 13th in 204 Christenbury
Gym at 5:0 pm. There will be a pre-
trip meeting on Jan. 23rd at 6:00 pm at
117 Christenbury Gym. The cost of
the trip is $115.00 per person, and it
will be held January 27 29. Costs in-
clude transportation, lodging, and
rentals. Call 328-6387 for more de-
tails.
PAPA IQHN'S BASKETBALL
INVITATIONAL
Papa John's Pizza and ECU Recre-
ational Services is hosting the first
annual Intramural Basketball Invita-
tional Tournament. Register by 5:00
pm January 12 in 204 Christe.ibury
Gymnassium. T-shirts, coupons, and
pizzas will be provided by Papa
John's Pizza. Call David at 328-6387
for more details.
5-ON-5 BASKETBALL MEETING
Recreational Services will be holding
a 5-on-5 Basketball Meeting on Tues-
day. Ian. 17 in Biology Building Room
103. Meeting is mandatory to regis-
ter team. Call 328-6387 for more de-
tails.
FITNESS DROP-IN CLASSES
Drop-In Fitness Classes offered
through Recreational Services begin
January 11 at 4:00pm in Garrett and
5:00pm in Christenbury Gym. Classes
will be held through the 19th begin-
ning at 3:30 pm. Regular registration
takes place January 9-20 in 204
Christenbury Gym. Call 328-6387 for
details.
FITNESS CLASS REGISTRATION
Register for Recrteational Services
Aerobic Fitness Classes January 9-20
in 204 Christenbury Gym. The cost is
$10 per student for 12 classes and $20
for faculty and staff. Over 12 differ-
ent classes are offered. Call 328-6387
for more details or pick up a class,
schedule in 204 Christenbury Gym.
TREASURE CHESTS AVAIL-
ABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure
to pick up your FREE video year-
book. Available at the Student Store,
The East Carolinian, Joyner Library,
Mendenhall and the Media Board
office in the Student Publications
Building.
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students$2.00
Non-students$3.00
Each Additional word$0.05
Deadlines:
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
For more
information call
328-6366

� ii wmw





J
January 12, 1995
The East Carolinian 7
I he Last Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tam bra Zion, test. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, test. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson, Asst. Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Ashley Poplin, Typesetter
Jennifer Coleman, Typesetter
Darren Mygatt, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Asst. Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, test. Creative Director
Charles Pede, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, 77m? East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
Bicyclists and pedestrians in danger


It finally happened. An ECU student's
life was tragically ended when his bike
and a bus collided. Every semester we
have several accidents that pit pedestrians
and bicyclists against trucks and
automobiles � a lopsided contest to say
the least.
On campus and in most of the older
parts of Greenville (downtown), there
are plenty of sidewalks for pedestrian
safety. But such niceties do not grace the
main arteries that lead to campus.
The newer parts of town, most notably
the areas surrounding the Plaza Mall, do
not have sidewalks or even clearly
marked bike paths. Everything is geared
towards the almighty auto. More needs
to be done to ensure pedestrian and
bicyclists' safety.
If you have ever traversed the distance
to the Belk building, by bike or foot, you
know exactly what we are referring to.
Sure there are some very nice signs on
Charles Blvd. that ostensibly warn drivers
to make room for bikers, but nothing
more.
If you mistakenly believe that the
signs afford adequate safety for bikers
and pedestrians, you obviously have not
enjoyed the harrowing experience.
Try crossing a street corner in
Greenville. The stop lights are there for the
automobiles, not the pedestrians�it's no-
man's-land for those who dare leave the
confines of the beloved auto.
Given the lack of adequate parking
spaces, many students and faculty have
been left with no recourse but to walk or
ride a bicycle to campus.
Besides the ineffective signs on Charles
Boulevard, have our community leaders
taken any measures to rectify this problem?
A total lack of planning has allowed
the situation to come to this point. We have
grown so dependent on the auto that those
in charge of planning, if there is anyone in
charge, must not have thought about thoge
who may, out of necessity or desire, walk
on and off campus or ride a bike.
The staff at TEC would like to challenge
ECU leaders to take more effective
measures to assist in pedestrian and
bicyclist's safety. If positive measures are
not taken quickly, it is only a matter of time
before someone else is injured or killed
because of the pedestrian planning deficit.
How many lives will have to be wasted
before the local leadership finds the money
to lay some paint down on the roads to
mark bikes paths and some cement for
sidewalks?
Scourge of the roads:Drunk drivers
by Angela McCullers
Drinking and driving is still a
.problem. During the holidays it
gets worse. The largest amount of
alcohol consumption occurs
during this time. Thousands of
-people die each year due to
' alcohol-related accidents.
Many of these people are
innocent victims. An intoxicated
individual with keys to an
automobile is an enemy to
everyone who are on the roads.
iheie ever this enemy goes,
struction, disability, grief, death
ggjd pain lurks with them. Alcohol
tfrtoo often an agent of misery and
tragedy.
Alcohol is one of the major
causes of highway deaths and
injuries accounting for about half
of all annual car accidents. Each
year, drunk drivers are involved
in crashes that take the lives of
20,000-25,000 people.
The shocking reality is that
there are more alcohol-related
traffic fatalities than there are
riiurders. Drunk drivers maim
more innocent victims than all
violentstreet criminals combined.
The lethal and often
devastating consequences of
rruxing drinking and driving
should make drunk driving
eligible for the inclusion in any list
of serious and violent crimes.
Society was reluctant to
acknowledge that a drunk driving
problem existed until the early
1980s. The public found it all too
easy to identify with the offenders
and to view them as decent law-
abiding citizens (rather than
criminals) caught up in
unfortunate circumstances which
they "had no control over What
about the real victims?
No one trunks about them.
They are the ones who had no
control over their tragic death. A
person who decides that they want
to drink and drive should accept
full responsibility for anything that
happens after they get in the
drivers seat of a car. The thousands
of people who die each year did
not have the opportunity to make
that fatal decision.
Many people do not realize
how serious this problem is until
someone close to them are killed
or maimed because of a drunk
driver.
Every time we get into our
cars we are t ng a chance of
getting killed because of a bad
decision on behalf of another
person� their decision to drink
and drive.
Lowering the blood alcohol
concentration last year to .08 was
a step in the right direction. While
new laws make it more difficult
for drunk drivers to avoid
conviction, they also harden
public attitudes and stiffen drunk
driving penalties But more still
has to be done to solve this
problem.
In the past, the state penal
codes emphasized releasing
convicted drunk drivers with a
warning, small fines, occasional
license suspensions, probation,
and treatment program
sentences.
Nationwide, as many as 70
to 80 percent of the drivers
whose licenses were suspended
simply continued to drive
without them or easily obtained
a new license in other states.
Letting drunk drivers off easy
does not change their behavior.
1 am glad that law makers
have realized that. My heart
goes out to all of the families
who have lost their loved ones
to the hands of drunk drivers.
More has to be done to stop this
problem. We, as young adults,
can have a helping hand in
stopping drunk driving.
But first we have to start
with ourselves before we can
go any farther. Please do not
drink and drive. The life you
take could be your own.
f
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Crime not deterred by 911
Murder and violent assault
continues to haunt America. Each
and every day we hear of, or see
on television, violence in one
form or another. Regretfully, the
crime rate will probably do
nothing but increase in the future.
Is there any relief from this
pestilence? Some Americans
mistakenly believe that there
exists some magical security
blanket in the 911 Emergency
system.
In the Dec. 25th issue of The
Daily Reflector, the-e was an
article entitled "Answering the
call: 911 operators a national
lifeline
The essay begins with an
editors note: "It seems a month
doesn't pass that without news
of a 911 call going tragically
wrong Indeed, while the 911
operators perform a noble and
necessary function, the 911
national lifeline is not a panacea.
Recently, it took over 40
minutes for Philadelphia police
to respond to a flood of 911 calls
that reported a gang of baseball
bat wielding youths attacking
people. Because of the Fluggish
response, one young man was
killed�the911 system isattimes
too slow to prevent a crime from
a occurring.
The 911 system has
undoubtedly saved many lives,
but Americans should not be
misled � nothing supersedes
self-reliance. The 911 hot line
should not be construed as the
citizens first line of defense in
potentially dangerous situations
involving criminals.
Of course, the ultimate form
of self-reliance when dealing
with violent criminals is a
firearm. Some Americans feel
uneasy about handling firearms
because they inaccurately
believe that the crime problem
is due to an overabundance of
guns on the streets.
That is untrue. The problem
is that the guns are in the wrong
persons' hands. Allow me to
flesh out my opinion with an
example:
Last year I recall watching
CNN as they played the 911
recording of a woman literally
calling for her life. It seems that
she called because her brother's
business associates, drug
dealers, had come to collect on a
debt.
Since the woman's brother
was broke and his debt was
outstanding, the druggies came
to abduct his adult sister. While
the 911 operator listened, the
intruders kidnapped the young
lady.
CNN played the recording
for a few days hoping to assist
the police in their search efforts.
When the police finally did
locate the woman, she was face
down in the gutter � dead.
I believe that her chances
for survival would have been
exponentially increased if she
owned and knew how to
properly handle a gun.
One MTV commercial
asserts that guns kill people.
Since guns are lifeless objects,
without human intervention,
guns could not possibly kill any
one. The problem with the
Beavis and Butthead logic is that
By Steven A. Hill
it does not consider the other side
of the argument. Guns work both
ways � they save lives as well as
take them away. While the press is
quick to report incidents where the
victims of violent crime have their
own unpreparedness and temerity
to blame, we often do not hear of
armed citizens defending
themselves:
Susan Kaleta's Californian
home had been subjected to several
robbery attempts. Wanting to
preclude any further
encroachments upon her property,
or her life, she installed a burglar
system that if activated would set
off a loud screeching noise. One
night she unmistakably heard
someone trying to break into her
home.
Susan immediately activated
the alarm system's alarm and was
in her room calling 911 when the
intruder tried to attack her.
With the phone in one hand
and a gun in the other, Susan �
with deadly accuracy � shot the
criminal twice as he attacked her.
Afterwards, the police reported
that the man had been responsible
for the previous break-ins.
It is indeed a pity that society
has stooped to such a degenerate
state. What is a law abiding citizen
to do? There is no easy answer;
however, total reliance on 911 and
the MTV Beavis and Butthead logic
is asinine.
If a criminal has the guts to
pull a gun on an individual and
threaten that person with death �
we should have enough intestinal
fortitude to promise the criminal
with a bullet between the eyes in
addition to a 911 phone call.
JOIN THE CHAOS!
If you are of sound and opinionated
mind, please come write for us! We are
looking for a student or a faculty member
to author a weekly opinion column,
much like what you see above. We want
strong arguments with strong
supporting evidence. A nice, crisp
sarcastic sense of humor works well, too.
Stop by our offices on the second floor of
the Publications Bldg. across from
Joyner library and fill out an application,
and ask for Maureen. '







NICK O'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
BY STEPHANIE SMITH
'SET a w�!
wevcr
rue ReAL I
11 9gEq �

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aiuiarv
1995
The East Carolinian 9
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Unsound make themselves heard
Shannon Gay
Staff Writer
Sitting in a far-too-cluttered
apartment, listening to Neurosis,
it's easv to understand the guys
from Unsound. I"hey are per-
plexed, diverse and intrinsic.
Each ot the tour members pro-
vide their own t pe ot organized
hv steria.
Unsound is a conglomeration
ot tour different -t les.
(dd Paddock supplies the heav
i dge h i ti one who rew up
loving metal and Hall and Oat
which must he the cause ot his
i th nature He's
simple to identify with and pos-
sessesaneasv manner He writes
the mam riffs tor the songs and
provides the technical work.
Singer and lyricist Mark
Snyder, however is a complex
stage.
leaver no
thim
and
I le s the
�t
w hose still waters run deep. He
sat almost silent throughout the
interview, vet when it comes time
to hit the
unsaid.
Drummer Brian Simpson had
much to sav; he wanted to maki it
clear the importance of creating
great music and the ef-
fect it has on the au-
dience as well as
himself. He
said lie pre-
ferred play-
ing his
d rums
heavv and
slow to allow'
creativity to
flow between
each hit ot the
drums
Basest c heec h believes thecom-
bination between Simpson and
himself provides the groove and
even the sou! to Unsound.
The band formed in late WL�2
and their first gig was Halloween
night at the now defunct bar New
Deli. Singer Mark Snyder officially
joined the band in April 1994 after
tilling in tor their singer who fre-
quently missed shows due to medi-
cal problems. 1 he guys sav hi
wasn't as dedicated .is the rest ot
the hand Thev believe the tour-
some the) h.n e now ; perl
they click 1 he e id� i i
in their song
Cheech feels when
they come together at
prai tic e to wi ite a
song it takes them a
long ti me V e re
portei tionists I at h
new s(ing must be
meaner than the last
Cheechsaid. Thev write
nigs ,i release, a way
tor them to vent angst nd
the traumas ot everyday lite.
Simpson said, "When we write it's
a way for us toe okeemotion,and
when other people appreciate or
understand that feeling, it's dou-
bly fulfilling He calls this the
double prong effect to relate to
music in his own wav and tor oth-
ers toconnec t with it as well. Lyri-
cist Snvder writes the songs
vagueh
o the listener;
pret vv hat the want from tin' mu-
sk For me, it's just a release, but
oui songs are psychological
Sn der said
ITie guv s believe their music
has made an impac t on the
Greenville music scene and that
thev e changed it and given it a
heaviei edge. "Before us there
wasn't aband with distort ion, now
it seems to be morecommon here
Paddock said. I hey feel their mu-
sic relates to people because it's
different and aggressive. An Un-
sound show is ;i great forum to
relinquish aggression. "We set
aside one song per show tor the
ladies tf mosh Paddock said.
These guvs are politically correct'
Unsound describes its sound as
a power groove that's heavy and
slow. "We're heavy but you can
he-bop to it Simpson said. In the
past thev have covered anything
from Rage Against The Machine
to Beastie Boys to Helmet to
Sepultura I he are trying to break
a wav from cover tunes and try to
concentrate more on their original
material
I nsound has an upcoming
-how tonight at the Brewery in
Raleigh, with the local band
Bloodstul opening up At the end
of February thev will be headlin-
ing at the Attic with Greenville's
own Sex, I ove And Money. Ihev
have also completed a three song
demo recorded at Audio Arts here
in Greenville. The demo will be
available at local music stores and
shows at the end of January.
W MB is currently playing a song
otf the demo titled "Raike" that
was the first song Snyder wrote
when he joined the band.
The Unsound guys are comical
and provide a lot of laughs, but
when it comes to their music, they
are very serious. The band has the
potential to become very big in the
future and as for their Greenville
status, it is a band to be reckoned
with.
And the
winner is
Meiman gives Cheap Advice
Con friends and neighbors! Live like a king!
The Top
Ten Films
of 1994
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
This is part two of a two-part
series on 144 in tilm. For our
critic'sv iewson certain very good
films not making it to Greenville,
see part one from Tuesday. To-
day, we otter the Top Ten films of
the year.
The top ten films of the year
provide an eclectic trip down
memory lane tor the year that was
1444 Bear in mind that several
films on other critics' ten best lists
never opened in Greenville. Chief
among the absentees are Quiz
Show, Hoop Dreams, I our Weddings
and a uneral, The Last Seduction,
and Id Wood. This last film will be
thankfullvon viewatMendenhall
starting tonight, and all concerned
film fans should show an out-
pouring of support so that the
tilm committee takes risks like this
to bring artistic films to campus
that were never shown in
c Jreenville before
The following list is in order
with the grade in parentheses be-
hind the title. Any tilm not open-
ing in Greenville is marked with
an asterisk ().
I Quiz Slmu (10)
A tilm for all time. Not only
does it handle the disillusionment
ot the American people with tele-
vision (which did not last long),
but it adroitly juggles the conflicts
ot several main characters. In just
over two hours, Robert Redtord
tells ,i marvelously intertwined
storv of greed, trust, misplaced
devotion, and deception. John
Turturro Ralph I mnes, and Paul
Scofteld all deliver superb perfor-
mances, but Redford's direction
holds the story together and even-
tually wraps its threads tightly to
weave a cohesive masterwork.
1 his is the best tilm of Redford's
career and easilv the best tilm of
the year.
2. Pulp I it tion (9)
: I . tion wasoneol the most
talked about films ot the year.
Director Quentin "arantino de-
puts thieves, hitmen, drug ,ic
di( tsand Mafia bosses with a fond-
ness usually reserved tor parents
and children. I he tilm uses dis-
jointed tune to tell its storv. hut
the jumps nev ei confusi thi
view er I he stars in J
all si iar h hn I ra muel !
pher W'a I ken (my favori te) a 111 u rn
in wildly wonderful portrayals of
Tarantino's misfits. Of all the films
on this list, this is the one I will
watch more times than any other
during the rest ot my life.
3. Four Weddings and a Funeral
This was the year of Hugh
Grant and this was the film that
outshone all others. Wickedly
funny from beginning toend, this
fi I m had one of the funn iest scenes
o! the year when a priest per-
forms his first wedding. Also hi-
larious was a wedding in which
the hero gets seated at a table with
a gaggle of his ex-girlfriends. This
one is already out on video and if
you have not seen it vet, do your-
self a favor and rent it.
4. Natural Bom Killers (9)
Though Quentin Tarantino
now distances himself from the
film, he retains credit for the origi-
nal storv. But no mistake can be
made that SBK is Oliver Stone's
movie. Never one to use nuance
or ambiguity, Stone surpasses
even his own bludgeoning style
of storv telling with this two-hour
montage of violent images. BK
was probablv the year's best ex-
aiapleof alove-it-or-leave-itfilm:
many viewers walked out.
Though the story was only mildly
original, the avant-garde style
makes NBK something that will
long be studied in film classes.
5. Heavenly Creatures (4)
A New Zealand film about two
adolescent friends who conspire
to kill one oi their mothers The
tale is told to allow the v lewer to
experience what might have been
occurring inside the girls' heads.
Figures in clay battle and occa-
sionally the clay figures enter the
girls' reality, as when thev see a
principal killed by one oi their
clay figures. The film is based on
fact but the artistic licensee used
by Peter Jackson solidities this
sordid tale and elevates it to a
marvelous artistic achievement.
6. The Hudsucker Proxy (8)
Probablv the least successful
oftheC oenbrothers'work, which
includes Raising Arizona and
SAiller's Crossing, this film still tops
most other filmmaker'sbest work.
I got towatch lhclludsucker Proxy
on the big screen in Pittsburgh
but not until seeing the film again
on video did I truly appreciate the
genius ot the brothers C oen I he
tilm crackles with imagination,
with the shots ot people tailing
from tall buildings being the most
extraordinary.
7 sV,(S)
An inc rediblerollercoasterride
i ! a mov le I his dim begins with
an elevator hanging in its shaft by
a thn ad readv to plummet thirtv
SeeTopTfi 11
Photo Courtesy of WARNER BOOKS
David Letterman's favorite genetic mutation. Calvert DeForest (better-known as Larry "Bud"
Meiman). poses for lots of funny pictures and hogs all the credit in his new book, Cheap Advice.
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
Who is this guy .nd where did
he pop up from Is lie just some
lucky guv thev found on the street
picking daisies1 Where he came
from nobody knows except the
man himself, Calvert DeForest.
DeForest, better known as Larry
"Bud" Meiman (or maybe the "1-
800-COLLECT" guv) has made
appearances for years on the 1 )avid
l.etterman Show as well as nu-
merous television commercials.
Playing on that tame, he figured
he could make an easy buck and
has w ritten Cheap Adint e: At tuide
To hoivost I uxury. A perfect gift
tor both the cheap and severely
gullible people of this country
When I sav gullible, I refer to
the half-wits who might actually
believe that this guv really has
written a book bv himself. It savs
that it was w ritten bv DeForest on
the cover, but a look inside reveals
sev eral other names listed as writ-
ers In ,i wav, 1 sort ot feel sorry for
thi- uuv I le- the cute little organ
grinder monkev you see on the
corner used as a plo to get money
from people, thev put costumes
on him, make him run around New
, ork making an ass out ot himself,
and prop him up tor a tew pic-
tures Then some people write a
book and use his face to sell it.
I he book itselt, putting aside a
few corny and out of date jokes, is
really not bad. Calvert covers just
about all aspects of living and re-
veals his secrets on how to live a
long happy lite as a con artist and
professional tightwad. From get-
ting rich quickly to cheap travel
tips, this book has it all Cleverly
laid out, Cheap Advice has a very
entertaining style to it. Fven though
the book may be less than stimu-
lating, you still kind of want to
read it anyway. It even includes a
"flip-it cartoon" of DeForest; when
you tlip the book's pages quickly,
he laughs at you (funny stuff)
Cheap Advice is not a practical
book for tips on how to save money.
It was meant to be a joke (or at least
I hope so). Mv favorite part of the
guide was Cal's Cheap Tips for
Saving Money. Tip number 1: Steal
everything, mooch off friends, and
panhandle between classes. No
kidding, it's just as simple as that
Although it may be funny, hardly
any of the stuff in this book can be
used in real lite. However it is very
See CHEAP page 11
COMING
AMCTIONS
Couins; toon for your
edification and amusement:
Thursday, fan. 12
Blue Miracle
at the Attic
td Wood
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy-drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Friday, fan. 13
Bad Luck
Everywhere
(superstition)
Sex Police
at the Attic
(rocky'jazzfunk)
All Tore Up
and After Forever
at O' Rock's
Forever Plaid
at Wright Auditorium
(doo-wop musical)
Ed Wood
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy-drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Saturday, Jan. 14
Priapism
and Centaur
at O'Rock's
(heavy metal)
Breakfast Club
at the Attic
(80s retro)
Ed Wood
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy-drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
Ray Maas
at Carolina East Mall
(Elvis illusionist)
11 a.m. 2p.m. 7 p.m.
Sunday, fan. 15
One Step Beyond
at the Attic
Wednesday, Jan. 18
Noon Day Tunes:
Lightnin' Wells
at Wright Soda Shop
(blues)
1:30 p.m.
Pinkard and Bowden
at the Attic
(musical comedy)
if

CD Reviews
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
m
Everclear
World of Noise
Three Sbrrs out of ten
Prioi to putting thisDintomy
stereo and mashing "play" 1 was
thinking to myself that at last, te
tiallv, the Seattle musk s. ene had
buried its ugly head "Progressh e
and alternative have become
household words ,js iir- notions
ia contemporai v ommen ial i
sic I henew Pearljam 11 �
was released earlier last mtmth into
shoppie. i rtss th
and the new rnusii 1 that
area had tmallv be
the fly swattei ot,
liation F.ntei Fvei �
man band from Portland,Oregon,
with their debut release World of
Noise 1 his band must have been
freeze dried or doing hard time
tor the last tew vears; this type of
music has a I readv been exploited
It it sounds like thev re trying to
ride a w av e ot the musical splash
Nirvana made sev eral years ago
- ex.u tlv how I see it.
I heir music sounds exactly as
�ie implies NOIS1 c lu k
i on the front cover
hi idea In covering
I ver� tear s musk is a
ire ot the energy ot lu ifk
I musu w ith hard Mink
rock. The CD starts off strong
with the opening track, "lour
Genius f lands, but the tempo
slows and the rest ot the songs
all start sounding the same It
on decide to pick up this disc
don't turn the volume up too
loud be. use all the amplifier
feedback w ill make y ou deaf
The release is a promising
first one tor the trio ot musi-
. tans, however it is hardlv
worth themoncv you d pa)
it A strong sound pre
rhv thm guitai and sen
See EVERCLEAR





1 0 The East Carolinian
CD Reviews
January 12, 1995
Jack Tempchin
After the Rain
Two out of ten stars
Jack Tempchin never has been a
household name, despite his long
list of credentials in the music in-
dustry. A three-decade veteran of
the business, Tempchin has written
aplethora of songs witha long list of
reputable artists, most notably a
little-known country-rock outfit
named "the Eagles Tempchin
helped pen some of the group's
earliest hits and garnered a reputa-
tion as a sought-after collaborator
and producer.
CD Reviews
However, during the 1980s
Tempchin began to wallow in the
mire of Eagle Glenn Frey's hit pa-
rade, helping the then-solo artist to
produce such cheddar offerings as
"The One That You Love" and
"Smuggler's Blues
With the release of After the Rain,
Tempchin had an opportunity to
thunder back into the teeth of the
music industry with material pub-
lished under his own name!
Unfortunately for Tempchin, he
got chewed up and spit out.
A lot of phrases and descriptions
could be used to draw a picture of
After the Rain, but put simply, it just
isn't very good. The song writing on
the album is simple, which isn't an
CD Reviews
inherently bad thing, but it results in
a cliche-a-thon which by the third
song had this listener fighting waves
of nausea.
The opening song, "Blue
Flame for example, is a wretched
excuse for a piece of music.
But it gets worse. Take this elo-
quentchorusfrom"Slow Dancing
the album's fifth trackAnd we're
slow dancing, swaying to the music
Slow dancing, just me and my girl
(Urp!) Slow dancing, swaying to
the music No one else on the whole
wide world (OhGod, I'mgonna lose
it!) In the whole wide world
Excuse me while I retch.
Perhaps the only redeeming song
on the album is the one entitled "I'm
CD Reviews
Daddy Now an emotional testa-
ment to the transfer of responsibility
that a man faces when he has a child.
This song is by no means a Grammy
candidate, but it isn't bad either.
Don't get me wrong, I love some
of Tempchin's early work; you would
be hard-pressed to find a bigger
Eagles fan than I am. And I was
initially excited to review this CD,
because it featured nearly all the cur-
rent Eagles lineup on background
vocals and the song writing of Glenn
Frey.
Instead of being the Westem-rock
gem I was hoping for, it serves as
evidence that oohs and aahs can't
make a record and iat without Don
Henley, Frey could consider a job at
CD Reviews
Frito-Lay.
In Tempchin's defense he liasbeen
quoted as saying that After tlie Rain
was merely an opportunity for a few
friends to get together and have fun
in the studio. If that is indeed thecase,
then there is nothing wrong with this
CD Reviews
CD at all.
But if taken in the context of
serious artists producing serious
work, it falls miserably short.
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Sumner
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-�
January 12. 1995
The East Carolinian 1
JANFEB
1995
ATTC
JANFEB
1995
TUESDAYS
70'S80'S
DANCE NIGHT
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from p. 9
(definitely not singing) vocals are
what World of Noise is all about.
The best of the twelve tracks on
the disc are certainly the opening
one, "Your Genius Hands and,
closer to the end, "Invisible But
you have to listen to the entire
thing to hear them. They should
have released a single with just
those two songs on it.
The sound is definitely Grunge
and the style is definitely played
out. If you have the money arid
want to buy a CD with if, I
wouldn't get this one.
- Brandon
Waddell
CHEAP
from p. 9
interesting to read some of the
ideas they did come up with on
how to work over someone, much
like the way Bugs Bunny used to
give Fudd the old switcheroo.
Calvert gives ideas on how to
turn a situation around so that
instead of owing money, the
money comes right back into your
pocket.
Calvert DeForest's Cheap Ad-
vice is just that, cheap. Although
it at times can be humorous, this
book falls short of being a classic.
It is filled with stupid pictures,
crappy jokes, and an old man
who makes a living being
laughed at. In a way, DeForest
is like a clown and perhaps he
isn't so poor after all. I mean,
let's face it. He did give me the
works; after all, I bought the
book. So I suppose I'm the real
sucker of this story.
TOP TEN
from p. 9
floors. Then it gets really exciting
as a bomb on a bus is set to explode
if the bus goes under 50 miles per
hour. Speed has made mega-stars
of Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bul-
lock and deservedly earned a large
portion of the summer's box-office
revenue. This one is also on video,
so rent it if you haven't. I guaran-
tee you'll like it.
8. Forrest Gump (8)
I grudgingly put Forrest Gump
on this list, not because I did not
enjoy the film (I certainly did), but
because of the embrace with which
America accepted this film into
their hearts. Tom Hanks gives a
marvelous performance (though I
hope he does not win an Oscar) as
the slow-witted but good-hearted
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Gump. The film presents the
cliches of the last thirty years
and views them through the
eyes of the main character. This
vantage point allows the viewer
to accept the Vietnam War,
Watergate and the sundry in-
sults visited upon misfits with
a calm acceptance of the way
things are. I worry that Forrest
Gump was popular for all the
wrong reasons but I still thor-
oughly enjoyed the film and
thus included it here.
9. Bitter Moon (8)
Probably my most contro-
versial choice for inclusion in
this list. One friend sneered
outright when I told him I liked
Bitter Moon. The story occurs
in flashback as told to an un-
suspecting young man (Hugh
Grant) by a bitter writer (the
masterfully overacting Peter
Coyote). The film is vintage
Roman Polanski, filled with
kinky sex and twisted emo-
tions. The film packs a wallop
but the theme is disagreeable.
10. Little Women (8)
I was among a small chorus
who loved the 1933 version of
Little Women so much that a
remake seemed appalling. I
was pleasantly surprised to
be proven misguided in my
fears. The new version is
splendid. The leads are all
superb, the scenery lovely,
and the story as poignant as
ever. The director, Gillian
Armstrong, brings a female
sensitivity and sensibility to
Louisa May Alcott's timeless
story. This film is a great treat
for the entire family.
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January 12. 1995
1 2 The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Sports
VCU whips ECU 69-43
Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
The Lady Pirate (3-6)
hoopsters ran into a small prob-
lem Tuesday night in Williams
Arena. Make that a big prob-
lem, of the "foreign nature The
Lady Rams (11-2) of Virginia
Commonwealth used their mas-
sive height advantage and Eu-
ropean stars to dominate ECU
69-43.
VCU center Svetlan "Spanky"
Pankratova collected 19 points,
8 rebounds and 4 blocked shots
for the Lady Rams, leading her
team on an early 19-2 run, from
which they never looked back.
The 6-foot-7 senior from St. Pe-
tersburg, Russia was dominant
in the paint and used her height
advantage to help put away the
Lady Pirates early.
6-foot-4 senior Niamh Darcy
added 17 points and 9 rebounds,
while freshman guard Gabrielle
Kylstedt scored 12 points, dished
out 12 assists and had eight re-
bounds for VCU. Darcy, who
hails from Ireland, and Kylstedt,
who calls Sweden home, made it
a rough night for the ECU Lady
Pirates as they also did for re-
porters trying to spell and pro-
nounce their names.
Tomekia "Fruky" Blackmon
led the Lady Pirates with 10 points
in 22 minutes of play in her first
game back from injury. Junior
point guard Danielle
Charlesworth scored seven points,
while freshman Jennifer Westfort
gave an impressive all-around
performance, adding six points.
"Our height advantage was
definitely the main difference in
tonights game Walvius said. "I
was really impressed with
Tomekia Blackmon and Danielle
Charlesworth. They are both go-
ing to be great players
Coach Walvius was also im-
pressed with the Lady Pirates as a
team.
"People better not overlook
them she said. "We have plyed
most of the teams in the Colonial,
and ECU can hold their own with
any of them
The Lady Rams shot 56 percent
from the floor, while ECU
struggled all night, shooting just
28 percent. VCU committed 16
turnovers to ECU's 26.
ECU starts their Colonial
Athletic Association champion-
ship run on Friday night, travel-
ing to Harrisonburg, VA to face
James Madison.
'Super Ho's" win
1st ECU Flag Football team to win
playoff game at nationals
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Danielle Charlesworth has played big in her second
year at ECU after transferring from U. of Richmond.
(RS) � The Super Ho's! men's
flag football team and four officials
from East Carolina University par-
ticipated in the National Invitational
Flag Football Championship in New
Orleans, Louisiana form December
28-31, 1994. The Super Ho's! quali-
fied for the playoff bracket for the
second consecutive year by winning
their pool with victories over the
University of South Alabama and
Lee College (TX). They also became
the first ECU team since 1987 to win
a playoff game by defeating the Uni-
versity of West Florida in the round
of 32. Members of the Super Ho's!
who participated included David
Campbell, Brandon Taylor, Doug
Talbert, Steve Marshburn, Daniel
Finn, Scott Harrelson, Kevin
Hollingsworth, Rodney Young,
Jerrod Jenkins, and Chris Pressley.
This marked the third time in the
past four years that the Super Ho's!
had qualified for this event. The
NIFFC featured a record-total of 203
teams participating in the Men's
Collegiate, Women's Collegiate, Co-
Rec Collegiate and Men's Open di-
visions. The University of South
Florida won the men's collegiate
while the University of Florida cap-
tured the women's collegiate and
Louisiana State University-Baton
Rouge won the co-rec collegiate.
Manzella's All-Stars won the sec-
ond Open championship.
One hundred ten officials from
46 schools were selected to work
the tourney either through their
performance on campus or in one
of a number of state and regional
tournaments throughout the na-
tion. Representing ECU were
Lynda McCormick (second year),
George Hollen (second year),
Kevin Hinnant, and Geouf Ander-
son. McCormick was honored be
her automatic invitation to return
to next year's tourney. This year
marks the first time since 1989 that
ECU has not had at least one All-
A.nerican official in the tourney.
Current official Brian Weingartz
was selected for this honor in 1992
but did not officiate at the Nation-
als this year. Congratulations to
the Super Ho's! and the ECU offi-
cials for their participation and
achievements.
Tribe scalps Pirate hoopsters 80-73
Baseball team finds new assistant coach in former player
Robinson
plays with
intensity
and desire
Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
Intensity. It's what drives se-
nior forward Chuckie Robinson
on the basketball court. It's what
makes him the most physical
player on this ECU basketball
team this season, and it's what
motivates his teammates around
him.
Last year, Robinson emerged
into one of the most popular play-
ers on the team at Minges Coli-
seum. With his fist pumping in
the air and his enthusiastic style
of play, he brought the crowd to
their feet numerous times last
season � and that was when he
was coming off of the bench ev-
ery game. This season, Robinson
has found a spot in the starting
lineup for Coach Payne, and the
thrills will only increase.
Robinson played two seasons
at Howard County College be-
fore entering ECU last year, and
Division I basketball wasn't ex-
actly what he expected it to be.
"I thought that JUCO and Di-
vision I were going to be similar,
but it was very different
Robinson said. "In Division I ball
you have to come out prepared to
play every game. It's a different
style
Robinson helped the Pirates
achieve their best record in 14
seasons, buthe and his teammates
weren't exactly thrilled with last
year's results.
"We're never satisfied he
said. "We always want to improve
each and every season. We want
more this year. Especially for me
and Anton (Gill) � we want to go
See ROBINSON page 13
(SID) � Kurt Small scored 15
points in- the second half as Will-
iam & Mary opened its CAA
schedule with an 80-73 over East
Carolina. Small finished with 23
points to lead four W & M players
in double figures. The win was the
second in a row for the Tribe after
starting the season 0-7.
After falling behind 48-41 early
in the second half, W & M came
back to tie the score at 54 and 59
before finally taking a 61-60 lead
on two Matt Verkev free throws
with 8:31 remaining. David Cox,
Shaka Arnold, and Verkey all
scored lay-ups in the next two
minutes to give the Tribe a 67-62
lead. W & M never relinquished
the lead and hit 8-of-l 1 free throws
in the final four minutes.
W & M, shooting only 63 from
the free throw line this season,
knocked down 19 of 23 (83) from
the charity stripe.
W & M led by as many as six
points in the first half before ECU
took a 38-37 halfHme lead. Tim
Basham had 13 of his 16 points,
including three treys, in the first
half for East Caolina.
Matt Verkey broke out of a scor-
ing slump with 14 points off the
bench for W & M. David cox added
14 points and four assists. Carl
Parker contributed 13 points,
seven boards, and three blocks.
Arnold had a strong performance
off the bench with a career-high
nine points and five rebounds, all
on the offensive end.
Anton Gill hd the Pirates with
21 points and 16 rebounds and
tied and William & Mary Hall
record with 26 field goal attempts.
Gill also holds the W & M Hall
record for points with 40, set last
year. Chuckie Robinson scored 16
for ECU and Skipp Schaefbauer
added 14 before fouling out.
"Verkev got back into his game
tonight said W&M head coach
Charlie Woolum. "If we shoot and
play as well as I think we can, we
can be a very representative team
"Physically we were not as ag-
gressive as we need to be on the
defensive end on and off the glass
said ECU coach Eddie Payne. "The
fundmental problem we had to-
night was that we did not have any
sustained defensive intensity
East Carolina (7-4,0-1) will face
Illinois State at home Wednesday
in non-conference action.
W&M (2-7, 1-0) returnes to the
floor Wednesday night at North
Carolina State.
Former ECU player, Charlie
Smith has been named assistant
baseball coach at East Carolina,
replacing Roger Williams, it was
announced Tuesday, by ECU head
baseball coach Gary Overton.
"Coach Smith brings a wealth
of experience to our program hav-
ing been in our system during his
tenure as a player and as a gradu-
ate assistant said Overton. "He is
and excellent addiditon to our pro-
gram
Smith comes to Greenville from
Havelock High School, where he
served as head baseball coach for
10 seasons. Under his guidance,
the Rams recorded a 127-92 record,
and seven winning seasons. Last
year, Havelock registered a 12-9
and a trip to the state play-offs.
Smith guided the Rams to the
Coastal 3A Conference Champi-
onship with a 19-6 mark in the
1990 season. He takes over for
Williams, who left ECU for a simi-
lar position at the University of
North Carolina in October.
"It has always been a dream of
mine to get back to the collegiate
level said Smith, who will as-
sume the duties of handling a
youthful pitching staff. "I'm
thrilled about being back at East
Carolina. I'm very fortunate to
have the opportunity to return to
my alma mater and coach at this
level
The 1983 graduate of East Caro-
lina lettered three-years in base-
ball under head coach Hal Baird,
as well as then assistant coach
Overton. Smith posted a 6-7 record
with a 3.66 ERA in his career as a
Pirate. In 1982 he garnered EC AC
Player-of-the-Week accolades for
pi tching a no-hitter against Atlan-
tic Christiam.
Smith earned a bachelor's of
science in physical education in
1983, and later earned a masters in
physical education in 1984. He is
married to the former Jody White.
The couple has two children. Jena
Delaine (7) and Charles Jr. (5).
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Senior Anton Gill, shown here against East Tennessee Sate,
has been a key member of Eddie Payne's ECU basketball team
Basham
Photo courtesy of ECU SID
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
Youth does not always equate
with inexperience, especially
when you look at the Pirate start-
ing small forward Tim Basham.
The 6-foot-5 sophomore from
Roanoke, Virginia represented
ECU well on last year's CAA All-
Rcokie team, having played in
every Pirate game during the 1993-
94 season. His average that year
as a freshman was 6.4 points and
3.3 rebounds, managing to sink at
least one three-point field goal in
22 games.
ECU head basketball coach
Eddie Payne knew that Basham
was special by the high school for
which Basham played his senior
season.
"Tim played in a very presti-
gious and successful program, St.
John's Prospect Hall Frederick,
Maryland Payne said. "Stu
Vedder is a very respected coach,
and thev'vehad a lot of good play-
ers: Curtis Staples, George Lynch
Tim's cousin, a former UNC star
who currently plays for the L.A.
Lakers, Randolph
Childressthey've had just a run
of excellent players over the
years
"If you go all
out in practice,
it'll carry over
into the game
- ECU forward
Tim Basham
Basham led the team in re-
bounds (9.4 average) to go with a
10.2-point scoring average and 58
percent shooting accuracy from
the floor That year, the Vikings
were 23-2, finishing eighth in the
final polls of USA TODAY and
ESPN's Scholastic Sports America.
"Tim was one of those guys
that didn't stand out in that pro-
gram Payne explained. "He w�
very solid, very fundamental, and
did things well, and did 'em right.
We were looking for � and con-
tinuing to look for � players who
came out of good programs that
knew something about winning.
Ones that knew how to do the
little things, the dirty work' that
needs to be done
"Coach Vedder's program is
similar to a college program, and
was much similar to coach Payne's
program, so I was able to catch on
to it real quick Basham added.
"He adapted, as did
Schaefbauer last year as a fresh-
man, better than most freshmen,
and it was a reflection of the pro-
grams they came out of Payne
aid. It's also a reflection that
physically, they were more ready
toplay;thatpartofthegamedidn't
overwhelm them, like it does a
lot of freshmen
During his freshman year at
ECU, Basham was not expect-
ing to play as much as he did.
"I thought I would just come
in and contribute,because I had
a senior (Curly Young) ahead
of me Basham said, "so I just
thought I would help the team
out in ways that they needed
it
By the end of his freshman
season, Basham had started in
four games, including the last
three of the season. In the four
games, he scored in double-
figures.
If you go all out in practice,
it'll carrv over into the game,
and Coach Payne really liked
that in mo Basham said.
That hustle earned Basham
the starting position at small
See PIRATE page 15





A
r
The hast Carolinianl3
Januan 12. 1995
Westhead's Pats off and running
Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
Westhead
position of
When Paul
stepped into thi
head basketball coach at George
Mason University, everybody
throughout theCAAconference
waited in anticipation to see
what was going to happen.
The high octane, run-and-
gun style of offense that
Vethead was famous for
enstilling in LA. with the Lak-
ers and at Loyola-Mary mount
wa welcomed with open arms
in Fairfax, Virginia, and it wasn't
long before "Paul-Ball" became
a part of CAA conference play.
The results however, revealed
to Westhead that his offense was
still tar from achieving success.
The Patriots ended up 10-17 on
the season, 5-9 in conference
play, and tied tor sixth place in
the conference.
One thing that Westhead did
do last year was put points on
the board. Mason ranked 10th in
the nation in scoring with 88.3
points per game. The Patriots
had five players who averaged
at least 11 points per game, in-
cluding guard Donald Ross, who
as a junior last season attempted
more three-pointers than any
other player in the CAA. Ross
averaged 17.1 points per game
last season, and was sixth in the
nation in three-pointers made
with 3.7 per game.
Another player that will have
to carry a majority of the weight
as tar as "Paul-Ball" goes is
sophomore point guard Curtis
McCants. He won the CAA
Rookie of the Year award last
season, averaging 14.6 points per
game, along with 124 assists. He
is currently averaging 16.9 points
per game tor the Patriots, along
with a 9.7 assists.
The forward positions will be
filled by junior Kenwan Alford
and senior Mark McGlone.
Alford, a n-foot-h junior from
Hopkins, S.C averaged 114
points per game last season,
along with seven rebounds.
McGlone will be looked upon to
pull in rebounds from the
"shoot em' up" guards on the
team.
Westhead will likely run a
three forward set-up this sea
son instead ot playing a true
center, which the Patriots lack
anyway. Six new (aces enter
the program this season, and t
many could see playing time '
See CAA page 14
ROBINSON from p 12
out in st le. We u ant a winning I ast season Robinson was sec-
season We want to win theCAA ond on the team ,n rebounds with
and then we want to go to the an average of 5.6 a game. More
NCAA tournament Lmportanuy.hedevetoped intothe
dAe dedWoM m Q7o�m
a�t w �� y.fi
powerhouse player that was
needed on the court for the Pirates
last year. Coming into this year,
the task of being the physical pres-
ence that he is will be Robinson's
biggest role on this team. It's a role
Robinson can deal with.
"1 feel pretty good with that
role, because that's just me
Robinson said. "1 like to have tun
out there and 1'ma physical player
They look to me to give them a lift
of emotion, and that's what I do
Not only does it bring his team-
mates a lift, but Robinson's emo-
tions frequently carried the home
crowds at ECU last year, another
weight that he is more than willing
to carry.
"The crowd Robinson said,
with a smile that stretched from
one end o his face to the other, "I
TmHUWNlYWHlCM.Hn'
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THE '50S AND 60S
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Expires 12195
love the crowd. I like to get them
into the game, and I just feed off
the crowd. It's what gets the team
excited, and that's what gets the
fans excited
His effect rubs off on his team-
mates not only when Robinson is
celebrating a thundering dunk or
a blocked shot, but also when his
younger teammates need a word
of encouragement from an older
teammate.
' I tell them that I'm never going
to let them down, and they believe
me he said. "I'm playing hard
and giving 110 percent, and it rubs
off on them. They play 110 percent
and have that extra confidence to
carrv them into a game
The taskof banging around with
the big bovs of the CAA will be no
small task for the likes of ECU
plavers such as Robinson and Gill.
With physical players such as
ODU's Odell Hodge and
American's Tim Fudd returning
this season, Robinson feels that he
and Gill are up tor the challenge.
"Anton is one of the better plav-
ers in the conference " he said. "We
compliment each other very well.
He can take vou inside or outside.
Plaving with him makes my level
go up a notch too
One player that Robinson looks
up to is Phoenix Suns' forward
Charles Barklev. The comparisons
of both players are obvious. A
blend of raw emotion and physical
play, spiced with the crowd pleas-
ing capabilities of an entertainer, j
the two plavers have a way of ,
being noticed on the floor. ,
"We show a lot of emotion
Robinson said "Hedoesn't like
to lose and 1 don't like to lose, so
we go m there and give 110
percent, and say whatever is on
our mind. We're not scared to ,
hold back c1
While Robinson looks up to (1
Barklev as a player, he doesn't
totallv agree with Barkley's ,
opinion of refusing to be a role
model to kids.
"I think I'm a role model he :
said. "I have a daughter and I J
want her to look up to me. I
believe it gins with the terri- ,
torv, because being an athlete ,
everybody looks upon vou to
be special and do the right .
tnings. Other people have to i
know, too, that we are human -
beings and we will make mis- .�
takes, so you got to look at it 6
both ways. Sometimes I agree
with Barklev. and sometimes I,j
don't
At 6-foot-S, it's no wonder;
that even body looks up to a:
guy like Robinson. But maybe-
it's not his overwhelming size
that draws people close to him.
From students to teammates
from kids and from generally
everybody that he is around
Chuckie Robinson is looked up ;
tobecauseof who he really is. A
leader both on and off the floor. �

PLAYERS CLUB
APARTMENTS
THE PLACE TO
PLAY AT ECU
The ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee Presents
ILLUMINA'95
January 31-February 23,1995
Mendenhall Gallery
Call for Entries
Friday, January 27,1995
1:00-8:00 PM
Mendenhall 242
$3.00 Fee Per Entry - Limit 3 Entries Per Person
' Categories: Painting, Sculpture, Drawing, Ceramics,
Textiles, Commercial Art, Foundations, Printmaking, Metals
Cash Prizes Totaling $1,050 to be Awarded
Reception
ThursdayFebruary 16,1995
7:00-9:00 PM
Mendenhall Gallery
Registration Packets Available at
Mendenhall Information Desk and Gray Gallery
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
Leasing Begins
Feb. 6.
Wailing List
Available.
321-7613
1526 Charles Blvd.
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A





January 12, 1995
1 4 The East Carolinian
CAA
from p. 13
soton'for coach Westhead.
"We did a decent job of im-
proving our team Westhead
said.
�And he literally traveled to
the end of the world to do so.
Bernard Wanjara hails from
Kisumu, Kenya, and is an ath-
letic 6-foot-8 player who can
play either forward or center.
He already has 11 blocked shots
on the season.
"He's going to be a real as-
set to us Westhead said.
Another new face arriving to
Fairfax this season is 6-foot-6
forward Pharoah Davis, from
Palmdale, CA.
"Someone said to me,
'Coach, there's a player in the
desert that you need to go see
and I said, 'Yes, what's his name
and they said 'Pharoah so I
went out and saw tlvs young
man play, and he's a nice player
Guard Nate Langley could
end up being one of the best
players in the conference, and is
currently leading the Patriots in
scoring, averaging 17 points per
game, along with 3.1 steals.
"We'll play our six new play-
ers as quickly as I can get them
in, but they will be up and run-
ning Westhead said.
Running. What a concept.
And so far, the Patriots love run-
ning at home, because they are
5-1 at the Patriot Center in
Fairfax. The road, however, has
not been as successful, as GMU
stands 0-5 in away games.
�i .
m

ECU Observes Dr. Martin Luther King, Jrs Birthday:
A Commitment to Human
Rights and World Peace
N Monday, January 16
7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 17
8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, January 18
12:00 noon
Candlelight March
Christenoury Gym to Mendenhall
Student Center
My Children! My Africa!
Hendrix Theatre
Dr. Crystal Kuykendall, Author
From Rage to Hope: Reclaiming
Black and Hispanic Students
1028 General Classroom Building
For imu'r intiirmaitiin. ptetot ctmtact thftffke '� Min
I i;(m- o Equal tpponsniq Program. I28-6BW
Studrru -V.i
128-6495,
Question
Knowledg
a NEW OEAL
J
0"
JENNIFER CONNELLY ICE CUBE
OMAR EPPS MICHAEL RAPAPDRT
KRISTY SWANSDN
HENCE FtSHBURNE
"SSMflf CLARK
nDWIGHT ALONZO
JOHN SINGLETON and PAUL HALL
WRIIIINANIi I
lEClHttd
:k un (Pin fjuuNfi i kAx! arj��r
� � kt g i COLUMBIAryi
Ry�yaraar. pj.cture.sLJJ
At Theat
TONIGHT!
EVERY THURSDAY
BLOCK PfiRTY
FREE COVER TILL 9PM
Fri & Sat: Welcome Back Students
New Drink Specials! Splash & Sharkys
Mon Night! Splash
Open Mic Night
Live acoustic performances
Hosted by Travis Proctor
The Stage is Yours!
Sound system provided
Splash
Thurs.
Scott Mueller
Fri.
Jack Bowen
Sat.
Jack Bowen
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.





January 12, 1995
The East Carolinian 15
aiiiright Property Management
I 756-6209 I
109-B. E. Arlington Blvd. Greenville
Many Locations Near Campus!
Cannon Court � Cedar Court �
English Village � Park Village �
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MANYAPARTMENTS AVAILABLE FOR RENT TODAY!
PIRATE from p. 12
forward this year, and he is al-
ready working toward goals for
this season.
"I want to improve my points
from last year, my field-goal per-
centage, and three-point percent-
age, and assists and all that
Basham said, "just improve my
whole game
H&'Trras
WE'RE gLOSFR THAN YOU THINKt
fm
When asked if he had any hid-
den talents which had not fully
appeared on the court yet, Basham
was quick to answer.
"I can show my shooting abil-
ity, my passing ability � some
people say I can't dunk, but I
canso maybe if I get a
breakaway and dunk, then I can
show everybody I can do it
Basham said.
Coach Payne also commented
on the differences in Basham's
game between his freshman and
sophomore years.
"His role and how he performs
on the court is very similar to
last year, but his role in terms of
the amount of minutes he plays
are greater � it's a more impor-
tant role Payne said. "This year,
he's in a position to start and play
a lot of minutes
"He played 36 minutes against
Western Carolina on Dec. 10
Payne continued. "I don't know
that he's always going to play
that many minutes, but we need
a real solid production outof him.
We need him to be very solid
defensively, we need him to be
able to take away penetration �
because a lot of the people he
plays against are probably a little
quicker, like a Louis Roland of
James Madison, for example
"He might match up with a
guy who's a little bigger and taller
than him .Corey Stewart at UNC-
Wilmington Payne said. "He's
a pivotal player in that regard in
our defensive scheme, particu-
larly man-to-man
"Offensively, our team has
evolved into more players simi-
lar to Tim, in terms of their quick-
ness and ability to do things off
the dribble. That's not his
strength, that's not necessarily
our strength as a team � our
strength is playing together, be-
ing good screeners, being able to
knock down the open shot, being
smart passers, making good
decisionsthings that Tim
demonstrated he did very well
last year Payne added.
Basham has another two
years of Pirate basketball after
this one, but already he's look-
ing forward with his post-
graduate plans.
"My main goal is the NBA,
or overseas basketball
leagues .anything that comes
up Basham said. "If that
doesn't work out, I'll have my
communications major to fall
back on. Hopefully, my first
personal goal will work out
In the mean time, Basham is
excited about this season as an
opportunity to continue the
unexpected growth he's expe-
rienced thus far.
"We've been waiting for the
season to start for the longest
time, waiting for the new Wil-
liams Arena to open, and
everybody's been excited
about that Basham said.
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All films start at 8:00 PM
unless otherwise noted
and are FREE to Students,
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with valid ECU ID.
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Thursday, January 12 � Friday, January 13 � Saturday, January 14
For More Information, Call the Student Union Hotline at 328-6004.
SPECIAL
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Don't leave room for someone to fill in their
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It discourages pickpockets. So does wearing
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 12, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 12, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1049
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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