The East Carolinian, January 10, 1995







SPORTS
Memphis Blues
OK, so we lost. But basketball is underway
in the new Williams Arena at Minges, and
attendance is skyrocketing. Turn to page
LIFESTYLE
TOMORROW
I SEE MONEY, FAME
Having a bad day? Find out if you
should just crawl back in bed. Check
out our horoscopes on page 8.
e
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 65
Circulation 12.000
Tuesday, January 10, 1995
Greenville, NC
16 pages
Vision obtained
SHARED VISIONS CAMPAIGN TOTALS BV SOURCE
Campaign
reached
goal full
year ahead
of schedule
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
Someone once said that Christ-
mas is the time for giving, which is
apparent in Chancellor Eakin's re-
cent announcement that the Shared
Visions campaign reached its goal a
full year ahead of schedule.
Eakin announced to the board of
trustees, members of the media and
guests at the Dec. 9 board meeting
that the total had reached $52.4 mil-
lion, with nearly 13 months still re-
maining on the original timetable.
"This is a magnificent achieve-
ment for East Carolina Eakin said.
"It is also a magnificent achieve-
ment for all out students, faculty,
staff, alumni and friends through-
out the state and nation
The campaign, which was pub-
licly announced in March 1993, will
continue through 1995. Target areas
to receive future contributions in-
clude endowments for the library
and the performing and visual arts,
as well as a cancer centerat the medi-
cal school and the expansion of
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
"We will not formally increase
thegoal forShared Visionscampaign.
Nonetheless, I anticipate that we will
raise an additional $12 to S15 million
by the end of this next year Eakin
said.
Eakinsaid that the support shown
in the campaign drive is evidence
that "this university is on the move
He remarked on the success of the
Model Clinical Teaching Program,
cited as a one of the best in the coun-
try. He added that the medical school
was chosen for multi-million dollar
grant to improve the preparation of
primary care physicians.
"The success of the Shared Vi-
sions campaign assures that our fu-
ture will be even more impressive
he said.
Eakin said as a result of the
campaign's success ECU will have
more merit scholarships and two
new endowed chairs in the School of
Education.
Of the Shared Visions contribu-
tions, nearly one-half ($24.5 million)
will go to student development, fac-
ulty enrichment and program en-
hancement. Another large portion
($18 million) will go toward campus
development, such as Ficklen Sta-
dium improvements and Minges
Coliseum renovations.
Since the original projections were
made, several families have made
considerable contributions to the
campaign, hence the changing of the
stadium name to Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium and newly renova ted arena
in Minges to be dedicated as the
Williams Arena in Minges Coliseum.
The final chunk ($7.5 million) of
the campaign contributions will go
towards annual support through
1997.
Board of Trustees Chair Craig
Souza said Eakin's total dedication
was the backbone for the successful
campaign. Souza recognized cam-
paign co-chairs Bob Ward and Henry
Williamson, Jr.
Ward said that ECU must con-
tinue to strive to succeed and to make
the goals higher and higher.
"It's the beginning of a time to
compete for what the private institu-
tions have known a long time�not
to live on tax dollars Ward said.
Campus Development $10,079,299 19 J�mAnnual . Support ' $48,147,425 fr 16



w, ��-

Program -m 19 m W Faculty, Enrichment�McxxMP t$8,856,267 H 17 i � J& ' 1 1 ' Student
$4,978,794 9 Combined Total- $52,440,096 (asDevelopment $10,331,215 20 Of 113094)
Third accident ends in death
In five days, three students have been struck by vehicles
Tambra Zion
Trustees pass
sticker increase
SGA pushes
for cheaper
alternatives
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
As many of us were winding
down the semester � taking
final exams, writing our lists to
Santa and packing up for an
extended and much needed va-
cation, members of ECU's Stu-
Ident Government Association
(SGA) were fighting for us, ac-
cording to SGA President Ian
Eastman-
Much to their chagrin, the
fight was worthless. Members
of the board of trustees voted to
increase parking stickers fees
by as much as $26, reaching a
total of $96 for commuter slick-
ers.
Eastman, who is also a board
member, asked that the vote be
postponed until alternate solu-
tions could be proposed. Trustee
Phil Dixon, a Greenville attor-
ney, supported the motion to
postpone the decision, but the
motion was denied in a 7-2 vote.
The increase was voted' nand
passed. Eastman, and Valeria
Lovelace voted against the in-
crease. One board member ab-
stained from voting. While
Eastman and SGA members plan
to continue to study the situa-
tion, administration says the
vote is final.
"It's a closed issue as far as
I'm concerned said Layton
Getsinger, vice chancellor for
business affairs. "I will be look-
ing at how we will be spending
the money and how it will be
allocated
Eastman said tha t he and Kent
Poff, an associate professor in
the School of Business, will con-
tinue to look at all possible sce-
narios to see how the increase
See INCREASE page 5
Assistant News Editor
Detlev Michelangelo Bunger,22,
an ECU student and son of ECU
English professor Robert Bunger,
died yesterday at approximately 3
p.m. after hislO-speed bicycle col-
lided with a Pitt County Boys' and
Girls' Club bus at the intersection of
Forrest Hill Circle and 10th Street,
reported Greenvillepolice.
Bunger was taken to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital where he was
pronounced dead on arrival, police
reported.
The bus, full of children peering
out the windows, blocked the inter-
section for more than an hour as
police worked to discover exactly
what happened. Several residents
in the neighborhood stood by dis-
cussing the accident which several
had seen.
According to police reports,
Bunger was traveling east on 10th
Street, stopped at thecomer of Forrest
Hills Circle and proceeded to cross
the intersection. At the same time,
the bus pulled out from the stop sign
at the intersection.
According to police reports, driver
Anita Pickett Prescott of Winterville
did not see Bunger, who was com-
pletely under the vehicle. At this
time, no charges have been filed
against Prescott.
"We as administrators are con-
cerned when this happens to any of
our children said Dr. Ronald Speier,
dean of students. "People need to be
Photo by TAMBRA ZION
A recent influx of accidents has ended in the death of an ECU student, Detlev Bunger yesterday afternoon.
Bunger's bike is seen here mangled under the Boys' and Girls' Club bus full of school children.
very careful when traveling down
roads close to campus � especially
10th Street where traffic goes so fast.
We've had a lot of incidents occurat
the bottom ofCollegeHill
This incident was not the first pe-
destrian - vehicle collision to occur
since the new year. Two students
were hit last Thursday.
John Hudsoa a graduate stu-
dent, was at the corner of First and
MeadeStreets whenhestepped off the
comer and collided with a car.
"I hit the hood�it really shook me
up Hudson said. "I look both ways
now Hudson didnot go to the hospi-
tal, but Marguerite Benjamin was
not so lucky. She was walking
toward thecashier'sofficeon cam-
pus when she was struck by a car.
"Ibruised tendons inmyknee
Benjamin said. "I thought I was
dead, then I thought I was para-
lyzed�until 1 got to the hospital
I
R&R?
Pirate basketball players
relax in Hawaii after
winning the Aloha
Classic. ECU defeated
Northern Arizona 78-56
in the championship
game. Chuckie
Robinson was named
the Aloha Classic MVP,
and Skipp Schaefbauer
also made the All-
Tournament team.
Photo Courtesy of GARRETT KILLIAN
Bikes continue to disappear
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
The good newsis there havebeen
no violent crimes committed on
campus so far this semester. The
bad news is somebody is snagging
many bikes.
Asof Nov. 8,52bikes were stolen
from the ECU campus, according to
Sgt. Fonville of the ECU Police.
"The most prevalent crime we
have right now involves bicycles
Fonville said. "That is the major
problem and 1 would venture to say
that it stems basically from the lack
of security � Prevention and technique
in mv opinion, go hand and hand
Fonville said many times people
will leave their bikes unsecured for
five or ten minutes and go inside a
building or classroom. They return
to find their bikes have been stolen.
Fonville recommends using U-
bolts which present a problem to
most theives attempting to tamper
with bikes, but he added that any
methtxl of security is betterthan none
at all.
During breaks, such as Christ-
mas, bike theft will be easier, with
fewer people around. Fonville
stressed a "priority on security"
over extended breaks.
"What we really would sug-
gest is that over the holidays, if
students can remove the bikes
from bike locks and if not take
them home put them in their
rooms for added security
Fonville said.
Public Safety has added sev-
eral blue lights on campus in-
cluding the walkway near Slay
dorm and the parking lot beside
the Carol Belk Building. Also, a
See BIKE page 5
-v-
�WWW "�
pmw J111





January 10, 1995
2The East Carolinian
Committee to study academic standards
Censorship causes controversy
An art exhibit at Indiana State University caused quite a stir
when a student complained about the obscenities she saw in a
public-funded gallery at the university. The exhibit received televi-
sion coverage when three paintings weft removed from the exhibit
against the artist's will. The paintings deal with women and will be
shown when space is available according to the exhibit's curator.
Graffiti out of control at NC State
NC State has had a tunnel of free expression since the 1960s, but
some artists have been taking their graffiti out of bounds recently.
Graffiti has been found on nearby buildings and walls causing
officials to examine the need for more student communication
concerning the tunnel of free expression.
Racial attacks under investigation
Students at the University of Missouri are experiencing racial
tensions following three incidents within one month. The first
assault occurred to an African American student, and a group of
African American students assaulted a white student two weeks
later According to university police, the third assault tould have
been prevented if security had acted more effectively after the first
two crime reports. Students are being asked to join together to stop
any future violence.
Racial issues spark campus reaction
African American students at Hofetta University in New York
protested racist treatment of an African American student by
university police. The officer was apparently in pursuit of a person
responsible for graffiti and accused an African American in a
blatantly racist manor. The officer has been suspended without
pay. The university is holding open forums on the campus to
promote communications between thetwo groups.
Student found in possession of ROtC rifles
Two ROTC rifles were recoveredfrom a student's car at Indiana
State University, a violation of the campas firearms policy. Officials
at the school state that the student is not in violation because the
weapons are used for school functions, bat the matter will be
discussed further.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
Academic requirements rest on
the heads of many students at ECU,
however, Chancellor Richard
Eakin appointed a committee this
fall to study, evaluate and improve
ECU's academic standards and the
graduation rate.
Over the course of years, there
has been a growing concern that
the standards for continuation
from one class to the next were not
sufficiently high, Eakin said. There
was a strong feeling from the fac-
ulty that the standards were so
low for continuance from one se-
mester to the next that students
had little incentive to do well.
"Out of the faculty senate came
a recommendation which I then
forwarded to the representative
from the board of trustees that we
should increase the standards for
progression from one semester to
the next Eakin said.
Eakin said that this year ECU
would not put the academic pen-
alties into effect so that students
will continue to operate through
the old standards, while at the same
time use the intervention strate-
gies to help them lift their perfor-
mance.
"The theory was to increase the
level of performance and students
will rise to meet it Eakin said.
"We are setting
new intervention
The theory was to
strategies which J
are ways to help increase the level of
students do better � �A
and to alert them performance and
when they are not students will HSe tO keep "P our re-
j �ii n ��- � font-inn rat fnr
"There are about a dozen mem-
bers on the committee that are help-
ing to collect information to help
these students Dixon said. "The
committee looks at course loads,
extracurricular activities and then
evaluates them.
We don't want
to lose students
for the wrong
reasons and we
are trying to
doing well
Trustee and
committee mem-
ber Phil Dixon said
the committee is ����mm
working to iden-
tify the student's problems early
so he or she will not get lost in the
system or be at risk of performing
poorly at ECU.
The committee is chaired by Dr.
Helen Grove, the Dean of Human
Environmental Sciences and
made up
with one
purpose
the intervention
to report
Eakin said
meet it.
Chancellor Eakin
tention rate for
graduation
Dixon said
that with good
attendance and
programming,
advisor help and student initia-
tive, students may have less diffi-
culty with academics.
According to the Academic
Regulation, Section 5, the student
will be placed on academic proba-
tion if his or her GPA is below a
1.75 for the first 31 attempted se-
mester hours or below a 2.00 fpr
32 semester hours or more. These
new standards are higher than
before where a student with 8-31
semester hours only needed to
maintain a 1.35 and a student wrjh
96 hours needed a 1.9 GPA to stay
clear of academic probation. The
new standard plan will not be
put in place until after this year
and after some study and evalu-
ation is completed, Eakin said.
"We should be able to see some
difference in this and determine
after the course of the year if the
intervention strategies have had
some good effect Eakin said.
"Then later on, we can determine
whether or not these higher aca-
demic standards should be put in
place for continuance at the uni-
versity. It is a trial year to see how
well we can improve students'
performance and their academ-
ics
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SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION EVENTS COMMITTEE
First place team member wifcireceive $25.00 each and a College Bowl t-shirt.
Second place team members will receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For more information, contact the Student Activities Office. 210 Mendenhall,
. . 328-47664711
AIR FORCE JOB BENEFITS
Compare the facts:
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Put your mind to it!
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Contact
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I �
January 10, 1995
The East Carolinian 3
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7. TREMENDOUS SELECTION OF INDOOR AND
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8. COMING FEBRUARY 4TH,
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Tambra Zion
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AT BELL'S FORK
Assistant News Editor
Eating disorders can affect ev-
ery aspect of a person's life.
Anorexia, bulimia and compul-
sive overeating diseases are com-
mon at ECU just as with any other
campus, but there is help.
Counseling Services offers in-
dividual and group counseling
for people seeking to fight the
battle against these lifelong dis-
eases. An Overeaters Anony-
mous (OA) group, which began
meeting December 5, is also avail-
able to anyone needing support.
'Melissa is one of the found-
ing members of Greenville's.
Overeaters Anonymous. Melissa
said she is in remission because
no one ever fully recovers from
an eating disorder.
"It OA saved my life Mel-
issa said. "Two years ago 1 woke
up and said T think 1 just want to
die today
I was in a sorority and remem-
ber having pig-out, throw-up
parties together OA made me
realize you don't have to con-
tinue the suicide process you
just find a new way of living
life
Elizabeth is also in recovery
and believes the 12-step program
OA offers also saved her life.
"It seems like you hit bottom
before you're ready to get help.
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NewmanCatholic
Student Center
wishes to announce a
CHANGE OF PLACE
in its Sunday Mass Schedule,
Beginning Sunday, Jan 8,1995
Both the 11:30 am and the
8:30 pm Mass wilttigneld at
iThejnan Catholic Student Center,
953 E:l6ui St. 2 houses from
the Fletcher Music Building)
For Further information, please contact
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
Looking back I wish I'd gone
three or four years earlier Eliza-
beth said. "Every time you get a
phone call or see someone seek-
ing help for an eating disorder
and you see how far down they
are, you realize how far you've
come
There is a difference between
the therapy offered through the
Counseling Center and the sup-
port given through OA.
OA is a self help group with
no individual leaders. Members
grow together through sharing
experiences and learning from
each other, Melissa said.
Counseling Center holds a
structured group with a thera-
pist. In some cases student's may
need more psychological therapy
that self help groups may not be
able to give, said Dr. Sarah Shep-
herd of ECU's Counseling Cen-
ter.
The Counseling Center's eat-
ing disorders group limits mem-
bership to around eight people,
students need to call the coun-
seling center and speak with Dr.
Shepherd before entering. A
new group is being formed for
the end of this month.
Overeaters Anonymous is
open to anyone and follows a
national 12-step program.
Membership often changes in
the Overeaters Anonymous
group but, "it only takes two
Melissa said.
Shepherd said she has seen
a lot of statistics as to how
many people suffer from
anorexia and bulimia, but be-
lieves around five percent
would be an accurate estima-
tion.
"Bulimia tends to be more
common, but anorexia is more
lethal � more deadly Shep-
herd said. "If folks don't eat,
they get sicker faster
Shepherd said the reasons
for the onset of these diseases
are still unclear. Cultural fac-
tors such as seeing super-trun
super models in the media ev-
eryday, relationship conflicts,
See EAT page 4
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Thursday, January 12
Friday, January 13
Saturday, January 14
All films start at 8:00 PM unless otherwise noted
and ore FREE to Students, Faculty, and Staff
(one guest allowed) with valid ECU ID.
East Carolina University's Student Union
Board of Directors is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1995 -1996 Term
Any full-time student with a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 can apply. Applications are available
at the Student Union Office - Room 236 - Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline to apply - January 13,1995
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The Student Union Visual Arts Committee will be
hosting the Second Annual Gubbio Exhibition
from January 6 -26. The reception will
be on January 14 from 7:00 - 9:00 PM.
The general public is encouraged to attend.
SEXUALLY
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Wednesday, February 22,1995
Wright Auditorium - 8:00 PM
For Ticket Information,
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or Locally at 328-4788
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Tell everyone about your Valentine
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Feb. 14 issue.
Only $3 for 25 words or less;
100 each for more than 25.
Pick up a Love Lines form at the newspaper
office, the Mendenhall information desk or
Student Stores. Speak out before our Feb. 11
deadline -
or forever hold your peace.
Love Linos





I
4 The East Carolinian
January 10, 1995
EAT
from p. 3
family issues and developmen-
tal issues may all be factors,
Shepherd said.
Although these diseases
were once thought to only af-
fect upper-class white women,
Shepherd said all races, cultures
and even men experience eat-
ing disorders.
"The group supports and
challenges each other Shep-
herd said. "One of the common
things I've seen is that they
people with eating disorders
have trouble getting their emo-
tional needs met. The goal is to
get them to ea t in a more heal thy
way
There are several variations
between anorexia and bulimia.
Binging could be counteracted
with vomiting, laxatives, ex-
treme exercise or other ways,
according to a pamphlet dis-
tributed by the Counseling Cen-
ter.
A pamphlet distributed by
OA stated that eating disorders
encompass all physical, emo-
tional and spiritual aspects of a
person's life.
Symptoms of anorexia in-
clude severe weight loss, perfec-
tionism, feeling easily cold or
chilled, stopped menstrual cycle,
becoming secretive, isolated,
rigid and reserved, Shepherd
said. Bulimic's will have up and
down weight loss and may en-
counter stress in their relation-
ships and other areas of life.
"They're going to find ways
to hide what they're doing re-
ally well Shepherd said.
"We've gotten boyfriends
roommates asking how they can
help
Elizabeth felt that no one was
available for her talk with, or
that no one could understand.
She said she felt alone, and the
OA program made her realize
that she was not.
"It's not about food Eliza-
beth said. "It's about other areas
of your life. I'm working on talk-
ing with my boyfriend instead
of getting mad at him and not
eating because of that
Shepherd said one of the most
important things to remember
when trying to help someone is
to not get into a battle for con-
trol. Using "I" statements (not
placing the blame on someone)
is also important.
Through continued practice of
Overeaters Anonymous' 12-step
program, Melissa believes she
has been able to cleanse herself
from all of the hate and guilt that
once surrounded her.
Admitting you are powerless
to food is the first step, giving
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control to a higher power and
continued awareness of harmful
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Overeaters Anonymous uses to
help members control eating dis-
orders.
Overeaters Anonymous meets
at 6:30 every Monday at Memo-
rial Baptist Church. Counseling
Services eating disorders group
can be located through Dr. Shep-
herd at 328-6661.
Last names have been omitted to
protect the privacy of the sources.
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January 10, 1995
DlltZ from p. 1
The East Carolinian 5
new blue light system lias been
added at the ECU Medical Center
thatcan be fully utilized toalert ECU
Police.
There are approximately 36 blue
lights across the ECU campus that
can be used to alert police that assis-
tance is needed in cases of emergen-
cies. Currently some lights are in the
process of being relocated or re-
placed due to damage.
Public Safety also hopes to stop
weapons from being brought onto
campus.
"We've had several incidents of
weapons on campus. There have not
been as many confiscated this semes-
ter as we had last semester Fonville
said
As defined by the North Carolina
Statute 14269.2, pertaining to posses-
sion of weapons on campus or other
educational property, states: "It shall
be unlawful for any person to pos-
sess or carry, whether openly or con-
cealed any gun, rifle, pistol, dyna-
mite, cartridge,bomb, grenade, mine,
powerful explosive as defined, slug
shot, lead key, switchblade knife,
blackjack, metallic knuckles or any
other weapons that cannot be used
solely for instruction or civil-sanc-
tioned ceremonial purposes in any
public or private school building or
bus, or any public or private school,
campus grounds, recreation areas,
athletic fields, other property owned,
used or operated by any board of
education school, college, or univer-
sity board of trustees for directors for
the administration of any public or
private educational institution
Another concern on campus is
reckless bicyclists. Most complaints
arise from individuals riding their
bikes on the sidewalk, Fonville said.
"The major problems that are en-
countered more are individuals that
do not adhere to the rules of the road,
riding bikes in the same manner as if
they were operating a vehicle
Fonville said.
Bicyclists are required to follow
the same rules and speed limits as
other vehicles. Bikes on campus are
required to be registered with Public
"Safety. All officers have the ability to
do on-site registration for unregis-
tered bikes.
"We ha ve a program ongoing now
byofficerswhoareregisteringbikes
Fonville said. "We do it free. They are
doing them on all patrols
Additionally, Fonville advised
students against drinking and
driving.
"I would pay close attention to
the operation of a motor vehicle in
as much as there is "Booze It &
Lose It" in full force, and that pro-
gram has taken a lot of people off
the road who are convinced they
simply will not drive without
drinking Fonville said. "Once
they are caught, they lose it their
license then
Sacked!
Murk Libiano and
others bring Illinois
quarterback Johnny-
Johnson down for a
loss. Libiano led the
Pirates in tackles this
year with 135. The
Pirates suffered a
devastating loss at
the Liberty Bowl.
Photo by GARRETT KILLIAN
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INCREASE
from p. 1
can be avoided or kept at a mini-
mum.
"If there is a fee increase it
should be a minimum of $5 � at
the most Eastman said. "We are
going to study every possible sce-
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nario. We are going to show the
administration how we can keep
the increase minimal
According to Getsinger,
Eastman may be wasting his time
since he considers the issue to be
final and Eastman's argument to
be erroneous.
"His (Eastman's) numbers just
don't make sense Getsinger said.
In May, the board voted to in-
crease student fees and less than a
year later another fee increase has
been passed. The parking sticker
fee increase will take effect July 1,
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1995 and will cover a two-year
period.
Commuters will not be the ,
only drivers affected by the in-
crease. Private lot stickers will'
rise from $210 to $288. Staff �
faculty sticker costs will rise as �
well. To curb the current park
ing problem, the Office of Busi- "
ness Affairs is purchasing an- '
other transit bus which will seat!
36 people. It is expected to be -
available for use within the next
week.
The fee increase will cover j
improvements to existing lots,
as well as construction of new
lots around Minges Coliseum
and Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
The goal of the parking and traf-
fic committee is to move park-
ing away from the core of cam-
pus to establish zone-style park-
ing.
"We can make the improve-
ments without raising fees
Eastman said.
Eastman said that other fee
increases will be discussed at
the March trustees' meeting, in-
cluding a $30 increase for the
Recreational Center, slated to
open next December. After find-
ing discrepancies in the sticker
increase, Eastman questions fu-
ture increases.
"The numbers don't match
up in the parking sticker in-
crease Eastman said. "How
can they expect us to believe
any other numbers
SGA formed two committees
yesterday to address the sticker
increase and to discuss future
fee increases. While Eastman is
the only student voice on the
board of trustees, any voice from
the students will help the fight.
"Let the trustees know I'm
not the only student concerned
about this he said. "It's a whole
student body issue
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Only those individuals who are committed
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the publication building to fill out an application
by January 16,1995.





� ��� li
v i tie cast Carolinian
I he bast Carolinian
Opinion
January 10, 199:
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion,Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson, Asst. Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Printed on
190
� recycled
paper
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Ashley Poplin, Typesetter
Jennifer Coleman, Typesetter
Darren Mygatt, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jeremy Lee, Asst. Layout Manager
Randall Rozzell, Creative Director
Darryl Marsh, Asst. Creative Director
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
ma�tv.iad editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited fo- decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
I
Break is over � time for work
The staff at The East Carolinian would
like to welcome everyone back to ECU's
hallowed halls of higher learning for the
spring semester. Much has occurred
locally and abroad over the fall hiatus. In
an effort to bring everyone up to date,
here is a recap of what has happened:
Our Pirates made a valiant effort to
capture another Bowl victory in
Memphis, but came up short with a 30-0
loss.
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum
was opened for the first time. The 11.4
million dollar state-of-the-art arena is one
of the first renovation projects to be
completed in ECU's effort to modernize.
Nationally, there was much news. The
abortion war continued to escalate with
John C. Salvi's suspected attack on a
Massachusetts abortion clinic and another
less deadly assault on a Virginia abortion
clinic. While in police custody, Salvi
concedes his innocence.
The Republican Party took charge in
the nation's capital with a vengeance.
Newt Gingrich's take-no-prisoners
attitude displayed by him and his
colleagues has Washington in an uproar.
Related to the Republican onslaught
is news person Connie Chung's interview
with Newt Gingrich's mother. Chung
was criticized for having employed
underhanded techniques to extract from
the elderly Mrs. Gingrich what her Newty
once called the First Lady: a bitch.
Internationally, the North Koreans shot
down an American helicopter that had
strayed over the DMZ. One pilot was killed
and the other was held captive over the
Christmas holiday. The Clinton
administration managed to retrieve the
remains of the dead pilot and the living
airman without further violence with the
stubborn North Koreans.
Keep up to date with your world by
reading The East Carolinian this Spring
and remember that as we embark on
another semester here at ECU, there are
plenty of entertainmenL options available
to students and faculty on campus:
Christenbury Gymnasium for exercise
nd athletics; Hendrix theater is offering
some excellent movie selections this spring
that include Clear and Present Danger and
Natural Bom Killers; and the Department
of Theatre Arts is sure to be offering some
excellent plays and recitals.
So don't just pickle your brain every
night with alcohol and illicit drugs! There
are plenty of other options available.
Work hard to earn those grades this
semester, have fun, but please � be safe!
Pirate fans proud in Memphis
Apparently, Elvis was not a
Pirate. Apparently, Elvis has a
serious dislike for Pirates. So
Memphis wasn't exactly the
victory trip it could have been, but
fan turnout was incredible, and
that's what I want to praise.
If the game had been played
by the fans, ECU most certainly
would have clobbered those Illini.
Memphis was literally painted
purple, from the gates of
Graceland to that willing Memphis
police officer who was so eager to
stream through the parade crowd
flying the Piratecolors. Everything
was purple, and that was an
exhilarating feeling.
Across Tennessee, car horns
blared as Pirate flags whipped in
the wind and ECUbumper stickers
seemed to multiply by the minute.
ECU showed the spirit to win the
Liberty Bowl, the team just slipped
a little. Those things happen. No
one should be embarrassed about
the Memphis shut-out, because the
point is we got there. That's more
than we can say for last year, or
the year before.
I have a problem, however,
with the jerks who insist on
constantly publishing negative
comments about Pirate head coach
Steve Logan.
One source in particular is the
locally-published Independent.
Referring to Logan as "LoGone"
is disrespectful and without logic,
and God forbid
"journalists" who
the two
write the
column ever have anything
positive to say. Not to mention the
fact that they refuse to print their
real names. Isn't that a bit
cowardly, boys?
Logan is the one who brought
the team to its winning season,
but he can't take full credit for the
wins � it was he team playing,
remember? Logan is also not
wholly responsible for the loss in
Memphis. Unless he was the one
missing passes, fumbling, etc
which obviously didn't happen.
We lost, it's over, and don't
complain unless you can get out
there and play yourself. To the
fans who went to Memphis and
cheered their hearts out, I
congratulate you. It was a rough
game, but we proved to Illinois
mat we (or the majority of us)
support our team through thick
and thin.
The wave of fan support
carried through to the firstdouble-
header in Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum last Friday night.
The arena began to fill during the
Lady Pirates' game, and
practically exploded at tip-off for
the men's game.
The arena is beautiful, and the
school spirit that night made the
whole building beam. I hope the
enthusiasm continues to build, as
Eddie Payne's team continues to
ftOOOOOO !
By Maureen Rich
improve.
I have only one complaint,
and that is about the people who
bought tickets, but then never
showed up, thus depriving
students of tickets at the door
where they had to be turned away.
If you buy a ticket, go to the
game, you fools! OK, I have
another complaint, too. WHY DO
PEOPLE LEAVE THE GAMES
EARLY? If there's one thing I can't
stand, it's when fans begin to
triclle and then pour out of their
seats when thereareeither only a
few minutes left or the score
differential is somewhat large.
My question is, are you there
to see just part of the game, or are
you there to support the team?
How do you people think it feels
to a seasoned winner like Anton
Gill, or a new guy like Othello
Meadows, when they're racing
furiously up and down the court,
and they look into the stands to
see people leaving? It jusf makes
no sense. Either support the team
through wins and losses, until the
final buzzer, or stay home and
channel surf.
In the past few weeks, ECU
faculty, staff, students, alumni,
family and friends have shown
the type of positive reinforcement
and spirit this university needs to
continue to be successful. Doesi ft
it make you proud? Please, let's
keep it up!
OH,PPE Down. it5
BE�N A GooO -jEAZ fb
TMe fAEDiATHe 'Dooj'r-
WAMT To 5BE T EWD.
mmmmmmsBmmtmm
A Review"? It
1QF I! I
mfl li
SIGNE
PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS
Philadelphia
USA
President Clinton still loathes the military
Although President Clinton
managed to retrieve our non-
navigating helicopter pilot, Bobby
Hall, from North Korea without
the assistance of former President
Carter, our current president's
image has not improved in my
eyes.
However, truth be known,
after the 1992 election, I actually
defended President Clinton while
arguing with some friends. I can
honestly admit that I have given
him a chance�of course he blew
it.
At the time of my premature
defense of our leftist president, I
was not informed of what Mr.
Clinton stood for and, more
importantly, what he does not
stand for. Perhaps the main reason
why I lost confidence in President
Clinton has to do with his utter
disregard for the military.
The point I want to make can
be seen in a picture that graced the
front pages of most newspapers
last year.
It showed high-ranking
Clinton administration officials,
clad in their golfing attire,
clambering on to a Presidential
helicopter and being saluted by
U.S. Marine Guards.
What was going through those
Marines' minds when they had to
salute those lily-livered, spineless,
golf-bag-toting, weenies? Those
Marines took an oath to protect
and defend their country in times
of peace and war, not to ferry
golfing enthusiasts around to
country clubs. If that incident did
not spell out the Clinton
administration's attitude towards
the military, I don't know what
does.
In an interview with NBC's
Tom Brokaw on board the USS
George Washington on June 5,
1994, President Clinton is quoted
as saying that he wished he had
the experience of military duty.
Continuing, Clinton stated I
think all the people who grew up
in my generation were hurt maybe
worse than any other generation
could have been by their
ambivalence over Vietnam
because we all loved the military
so much
The fact of the matter is that
when the call for service came
during the Vietnam War, our self-
proclaimed patriotic president did
his best to dodge the draft. In a
letter to the director of the
University of Arkansas ROTC
dated Dec. 3, 1969, William
Jefferson Clinton stated:
"I want to thank you, not just
for saving me from the draftthe
draft system itself is
illegitimateOne of my
roommates is a draft resisterHe
is one of the bravest, best men I
knowSo many fine people have
come to find themselves still loving
their country but loathing the
military
And people talk about Jesse
Helms being treasonous. So we
have a president who admittedly
ducked the draft, and a
commander-in-chief of our
military who says thatheesteemed
those who loathed the military, all
rolled up in one big mess.
One of the foremost reasons
for our nations continued strength
and survival thus far can be
attribi-ted to the sacrifices that
veterans have made while serving
our country. From the
Revolutionary War to The Gulf
War, many citizens have had the
guts to answer the call to arms to
defend our country and her
by Steven A. Hill
interests. Those Americans who
have died in combat or while
serving during peacetime, and
those who have sacrificed the best
years of their lives while in
uniform deserve to be respected,
not loathed.
Thankfully, President
Clinton and his ilk were not
around during the Second World
War. Something tells me that if
they were, we would all be eating
fish heads and rice along with an
awful lot of knockwurst and
sauerkraut.
Understandably not
everyone can, or desires, to serve
in the military. Those Americans
who do chose not to wear the
uniform of their country are not
un-American by any stretch. But
those cowards who openly
disavowal the military and shirk
the call the duty are not heroes,
they are scoundrels.
I realize that consistency is
the hobglobin of little minds, and
thatPresidentClinton'saforesaid
statements about the military are
over 20 years apart; however, the
present administration's anti-
military attitude cannot be
mistaken, thus leaving me to
believe mat the draft dodger is
still alive and well in President
Clinton's mind.
Recent popularity polls
indicate mat those Americans
who were misled by the sophist
who occupies the Oval Office will
not be fooled again.
Regretfully, we will all have
to endure President Clinton's
attempts to portray himself as a
more conservative public servant.
It is sure to be a sordid affair that
we will have to deal with until we
eject the draft dodger from office
in'96.
-Letters to the Editor-
To the Editor:
This is written in response to the letter by Larry
Freeman printed on December 1.1 do not wish to go
into an argument for or against what was said by
Senator Jesse Helms. That is a subject in which
people's opinions are primarily dependent on how
the statement is viewed, which in turn, I think, is
related to one's political affiliation. Whether the
statement was said in seriousness or not, I don't
know I wasn't there. 1 can only make weak
judgments based on what is reported. Like I said,
though, that's not the purpose of this letter.
Mr. Freeman's views are honest and should be
respected, whether I agree with him or not. That's
one of the advantages of living in this country.
While reading the letter, I came across something
mat at first made me laugh, but then it concerned
me greatly. The fourth paragraph opens with the
sentence, "Hey Jesse, you work for Bill Clinton you
idiot
Mr. Freeman, I'm sorry, but you are very wrong.
Senators do not work for the president. They are not
employees of the president. In case you didn't know,
the president does not hire members of Congress.
Representatives are elected by the people and are
supposed to work for us! That's partially how this
government is meant to run. Now, whether or not
he expressed the views the of North Carolinians is
a different matter.
I hate to have to give such a basic lesson in
government to any college student, but especially
to (and this is what concerns me) a political science
major who says that he is a juniorsomeone with
presumably about three years of course work in
political science under his belt! I'm not sure what
his problem is, and I don't doubt that ithas anything
to do with the instruction in the political science
department. From what I know, the department
has a very competent and talented faculty. I am
sure that mere are at least a few political science
professors who are embarrassed by the gross
misconception in that letter.
Mr. Freeman, I hope your knowledge of
govemmentis better than what was represented to
me in your letter. If not, I hope that you are on a six-
year plan, because you still have a long way to go.
Patrick Davis
Biology
Senior
To the Editor:
The December 6,1994, edition of TEC contained
a letter written by Tony Joyner. In his letter, Mr.
Joyner made statements that were conceited and
anti-tolerant sentiments. Mr. Joyner seems to think
that his "Republican" views are the only correct
views for a person to hold.
In his letter, Mr. Joyner stated "Mr. White I
hope you don't end up in hell, we will be praying for
you Before that remark Mr. Joyner had said "those
in favor of school prayer are not working to create
national religion, but instead allow children to pray
and worship God
These two statements contradict each other in
that while Mr. Joyner believes everybody should
have the right to worship God,he feels that anybody
who believes any different from him is wrong. Mr.
Joyner believes Mr. White is going to hell simply
because he disagrees with him.
In his letter, Mr. Joyner let us all know that he is
a "Christian Republican Mr. Joyner would like to
have us all believe that Christian and Republican
are synonymous. Mr. Joyner is wrong here because
the word "Christian" denotes a follower of Christ
while the word "Republican" signifies a political
affiliation. If Mr. Joyner had read the Constitution
carefully, he would have seen that it provides for a
separation of church and state.
Mr. Joyner, I suggest you take some sensitivity
seminars to help you deal with your prejudice and
conceit. And before you judge others, I suggest you
examine your own relationship with God.
Matthew A. Stuart
Political Science
Sophomore
iiily '�





(F
January 10, 1995
The East Carolinian 7
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
For Rent
1900 SQ. FT 3 bedroom, 2 full bath
house. Fenced in back yard near cam-
pus. 752-8079 night 524-5790 days.
Available 1-1-95 $750 month.
ROOMMATE NEEDED immedi-
ately. On campus, two rooms. $197
per a month and 12 utilities. Call:
758-6457
TAR RIVER ESTATES: Three male
roommates needed. Loczted on
river. $100 deposit, $169 rent, 14
utilities and phone. Call Kevin 758-
6701
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3Br
House at 206-A East 12th St. Rent
$450 month 2Br House at 206-B East
12th St. Rent $295 month. Also 2Br
apartment at 810 Cotanche Rent $325
month. Call 757-3191
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Live in a beautiful 3 bedroom, 2.5
bath townhouse j ust tour miles trom
ECU. The rent is $200.00 a month,
plus 13 utilities. On site benefits.
FREE tanning beds, Jacuzzi, sauna,
pool, 24-hour laundry, and weight
room. The deposit is $175.00. Avail-
able NOW. Call 321-8591. Bed fur-
nished.
risji
,nn , WESLEY COMMONS 3 bedroom
i u duplex: Room for rent, Available for
'� �' Spring Semester, 6 blocks from ECU,
i 7T WasherDryer. Big Screen T.V $220
vm? & 13 utilities mo. Call Dave 830-
4sj 4030.
"EL ROLANDO" Elegant, spacious
example fo Frank Lloyd Wright ar-
chitecture. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms,
large dining room, kitchen and liv-
ing room with fireplace. New refrig-
erator, washerdryer, fenced back-
yard, nice shrubbery. Convenient to
campus and hospital. $750.00mo.
deposit. 524-5790 day - 752-8079
night.
i�: i
i.i i i
i in w
iinv.
I ic
.
i .
3 13C
llh �
S III It
.caui
��.
at. ia
.ii
' eif I11
in w
�?� I
WHAT A DEAL Apt. available for
subleasing. Nd. a male or female to
share apt. with present occupant.
$205 plus 12 utilities. Great loca-
tion & may keep $50 of deposit
returm in August. Call 321-3863
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two
and one bedroom(s)' apartments at
Wesley Commons for rent Call 758-
1921. Free Cable.
ROOM AVAILABLE. Walking dis-
tance from campus. Private room;
share both and kitchen. Call Mike
Casey at 752-2879.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED -
nonsmoker, honest, available now,
rent 195.00, 13 utilitiess and De-
posit. Will have own room. Call 758-
6068.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED
Kings Row Apts. $190.00 rent 12
For Rent
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3 Bed-
room House Directly Across from
Campus, $240.00 13 utilities.
House has an alarm system and
washer and dryer. MALE or FE-
MALE. CALL 752-7251.
ROOMMATES NEEDED TO
� SHARE 3BR HOUSE ON GOLF
COURSE. Each Bedroom has own
bath. Only $250mo. utilities. Call
321-2379.
STUDIOUS AND SOCIAL FE-
MALE ROOMMATE to live in 3Br
2 Bath apt. in Tar River. 13 utilities
and phone, 208moonth. Call Tonya
752-5525
utilities. Basic Cable, pool and bus
"J service included. Prefer serious, quiet
grad. student Call 752-0845.
- ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY to share Tar River Apart-
ment. Own bedroom. Close to cam-
wm pis. Call Amy at 758-7542 for more
-ion ino.
r3"�l and 2 Bedrooms
' AZALEA CARDtNS
Clean and Quiet, one.badro�n v
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
�- ALSO- r. -aii
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS.
2899-2901 East 5th Slrtfcff
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry . ,J
;?� rFREE AUGUST REW v
. Special Student lwtf . �
also MOBILE HOM!RENTALS .
IT. or Tommy Williams
.�j 75$-7815475a-l�6 ivrA
For Sale
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Resi-
dency Status and Tuition is the bro-
chure by attorney Brad Lamb on the
in-state tuition residency application
process. For sale: student stores,
Wright Building.
FOR SALE: Health Club Member-
ship assume payments $29.00 per mo.
Work ask for Faye 752-0313 Home
753-5414
Services Offered
comversation, writing, and TOEFL.
Will edit papers also. Call Pam at
758-6952
Services Offered
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE Call
1-900-884-1400 ext 439 $2.95 min.
must be 18 or older.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS:
DV-1 Greencard Program, by US Im-
migration. Greencards provide US
permaneet resident status. Citizens
of almost all countries are allowed.
For info & forms New Era Legal Ser-
vices 20231 Stagg St. Canoga Park,
CA 91306 Tel: (818)772-7168; (818)998-
4425 Mon Sun 10am- 11pm.
FREE FINANCIAL AID! Over $6
Billion in private sector grants &
scholarships is now available, all stu-
dents are eligible regardless of grades,
income, or parent's income. Let us
help. Call Student Financial Services:
1-800-263-6495 ext. F536223
Become a CERTIFIED USSF SOC-
CER REFEREE. Earn Extra $$. Clinic
to be held on campus Jan. 20-22. Reg-
istration fee of $40.00. For further info.
Call Boyce Hudson 752-7914.
TUTORING- Improve your English!
Experienced teacher can tutor you in
5?
WE DELIVER!
758-2233
CS
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -
Earn up to $2,000 month working
on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour com-
panies. World travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
the Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal and
Full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For more in-
formation call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C53622.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
$1500 WEEKLY POSSIBLE mailing
our circulars! No experience required!
Begin now! For info call 202-298-8935.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT- Students needed! Fishing
industry. Earn up to $3,000- $6,000
per month. Room and board! Trans-
portation! Male or Female. No expe-
rience necessary. Call (206) 545-4155
ext A53621
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1,000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a licensed
agency. Must be 18, dependable and
have own phone and transportation.
Call Diamonds or Emerald City Es-
corts at 758-0896 or 757-3477
TELEMARKETING- Davenport Ex-
teriors Thermal Gard- $5 per hour
plus bonus. Easy work, flexible hours
start today. Call 355-0210
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM
seeks student groups and organiza-
tions to earn great money while par-
ticipating in on-campus promotions
for top companies this school year.
For info, call (800)592-2121 ext. 312
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY:
ECU Recreational Services is hiring
students interested in becoming In-
tramural Sport Officials. If interested,
attend the BASKETBALLOFFICIALS
MEETING January 11 at 9pm, in
Brewster B-102. The WATER POLO
OFFICIALS Meeting will be held
January 25 at 9pm in Brewster B-102.
For more details call David at 328-
6387.
AFTER-SCHOOL SITTER needed
M-F 2:30-5:30 for 4th & 5th gTader.
Must be non-smoker with reliable
transportation and good regerences.
�isai
Help Wanted
Requirements include picking up -
children from school & transporting
to special activities, helping w home-
work & providing snack. Call 321-
6296 andor 413-1781
EVENT STAFF f STAFF ONE, the
EVENT STAFF; Provider for Walnut
Creek Amp and N.C. ST Athlectics
and Concerts is Accepting Applica-
tions for Ushers and tickets Takers
for ECU Basketball and Concerts, Call
919-856-0800 Mon-Thur, 1pm - 5pm
for More Info.
"LAW FIRM has openings for mail
room messengerss, part-time 8:00am
to 1:00pm five days per week. Active
position involves errands, copies,
FAX and general office functions.
Apply in person 120 West Fire Tower
Road. Ward and Smith, PA
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Bring your outgoing personality and
reliable transportation and become
one of our personnal photographers.
Basic photography knowledge and
35mm SLR camera a plus, but not
essential. We train. Flexible FT hours-
$6.00 per hour. Call 1-800-722-7033
M-F 12-5pm
Experienced babysitter wanted to
care for two young children in my
home on Tuesdays from 8:45-5:00.
References required. Call 756-0941.
SZECHU AN G ARDEN - 909 S. Evans
St. Experienced waitstaff and cashier
needed. No phone calls please. Ap-
ply in person between 2:00 pm and
6:00pm.
A DEGREE IS GREAT, but a Degree
with practicial experience is better.
ONLINE INFORMATION SER-
VICES is currently taking applica-
tions for part-time telephone collec-
tors. If interested please apply at 1206
Charles Blvd. Greenville
WANTED BABYSITTER to help
share responsibility with aaother col-
lege student. This is for two boys ages
5 & 7. This semester need someone on
Tuesday & Thursday from 12 to 6.
Preferably a sophomore or junior.
Summer is taken care of this year.
Please call during the day at 756-8886
or after five at 756-0684. $5.00 a Hour.
HELP WANTED: Part-time worker
wanted for Tried & True Consign-
ment Shop. Furniture deliveries and
moving furniture. Approximately 10
hours a week. Call 752-2139. Com-
puter Assistant Delivery
RESEARCH HWMAlWi
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Announcements
SPFCTAL OLYMPICS
COACHES NEEDED
The Greenville - Pitt Co. Special
'?-Olympics will be conducting a
-��Track & Field Coaches Training
"�"School on Sat Feb. 4 from 9:00
J,iam-3:30 pm for all persons inter-
� 'ested in becoming a certified vol-
unteer track coach. We also need
coaches for the following sports:
equiestrain, bowling,
�powerlifting, volleyball, softball,
�ywimming, rollerskating, & gym-
nastics. NO EXPERIENCE IS
NECESSARY. For more informa-
tion, contact Connie or Dwain at
830-4541 or 830-4551.
NON CRFDTT EXCEL COURSE
The Decision Sciences Depart-
.�ment will offer a non-credit EX-
' CEL course at no cost. Classes are
;2-4 pm Fridays from January 13-
- February 10, 1995- Enrollment is
limited; preference will be given
l'M jo students that received transfer
credit for DSCI 2223 Introduc-
K-tion to Computers. To register
call (919)328-6893 or stop by the
?Decision Sciences office (GCB
"3410) by January 12. EXCEL is the
spreadsheet and graphics pack-
age used in business courses.
.WjLUBWE
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
IT'S ABOUT TIME� to begin the
application process for 1995 sum-
mer employment. In fact, mid-
January is the DEADLINE to ap-
ply for the much sought agyer
state government internship po-
sitions. Don't delay. Stop by the
Co-op office today for informa-
tion at 2300 General Classroom
Building or call 328-6979.
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
You are invited to come out to the
first rehearsal of the ECU Gospel
Choir 1995 at the Ledonia Wright
Culture Center (Behind Student
Health) 5-7om. Wednesday 1-11-
95. Come as you are and share
your talent with the ECU Gospel
Choir.
RESUME WRITING
WORKSHOP
A workshop on writing a profes-
sional resume for employment
will be held in the Career Services
Center, 701 E. Fifth St. on Wed.
Jan. 11 at 3:00pm. Seniors who
will soon enter the job market or
students seeking internships or
co-op experiences are invited to
attend. The program will include
information on the content, for-
. j iiii.j i.ouijmmjmiin. u.iiw: i I n
mat, and reproduction of the re-
sume.
CAREER SERVICES
ORIENTATION MEETING
Students who will graduate in
May or Summer 1995 are invited
to attend an Orientation to Career
Services program to get an over-
view of the programs and ser-
vices available to you to help you
in the job search. Dr. Jim
Westmoreland, Director and
Margie Swartout, Assistant Direc-
tor, will explain procedures for
establishing a credentials file, par-
ticipating in campus interviews
and registering with the Career
Services office. The meeting will
be held in the new Career Services
Center, 701 E. Fifth Street on Tue.
Jan. 10 at 3:00 pm, Thur. Jan 12 at
5:00 pm, and Wed. Jan 18 at 3:00
pm. No pre-registration is re-
quired.
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
Employment Opportunities are
available to students who are in-
terested in becoming PERSONAL
CARE ATTENDANTS to students
in wheelchairs, READERS, and
TUTORS. Past experience is de-
sired but not required. For an ap-
plication contact: Office for Dis-
ability Support Services, Brewster
A-116 or A-114, Telephone (919)
328-6799
COUNSELING CENTER
EATING DISORDER GROUP: A
counseling group for women with
anorexia and bulimia will be of-
fered on campus this semester.
The group will address self-es-
teem, stress management, rela-
tionships and problem-solving
skills. The group meets weekly
beginning in January and is facili-
tated by Susan Bower, MD, Stu-
dent Health and Sara Shepherd,
PhD, Counseling Center. Please
call 328-6661 or 328-6795 for more
information and to schedule an
appointment to talk with a facili-
tator before the group begins.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center wishes to announce a
CHANGE OF PLACE in its SUN-
DAY MASS SCHEDULE. Begin-
ning Sunday, January 8,1995, the
8:30 evening Mass will also be
held in the Newman Center, 953
E. 10th St 2 houses from the
Fletcher Music Bldg. The Center
will be closed from December 17
to January 2. For Further Informa-
tion, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth,
757-1991.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
THURS JAN 12�GRADUATE
RECITAL, Lori Schaberg,
violin(AJ Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00pm, free) FRI JAN 13�FAC-
ULTY RECITAL, Janette Fishell,
organist, FANTASIES AND FIRE-
WORKS (First Presbyterian
Church, Kinston, NC 8:00pm free)
SAT JAN 14�SENIOR RECITAL,
David Archer, horn (AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00pm free)
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Would you like to be a positive
role model, a big Friend for a child
in the community? Then be a part
of East Carolina Friends. We have
little friends ages 6-11 and start-
ing in January students in 9 th
grade. For more information call
Nikki 328-7655 and be sure to look
for announcements and flyers in
January.
PITT COUNTY ARTS COUN-
CIL ARTS DAY '95
The Pitt County Arts Council's
Arts Day '95 will be held on Satur-
day, January 28th at the Pitt Plaza
Mall. The Arts Council is invitin
any and all artists representing a
mediums to contact them abou
booth space to display and se
their wares! Grass Roots organi
zations are invited to contact th
Arts Council as well to reserv
booth space for display informa
tion. This year the Council invite
all Community performers to sub
mit audio and video tapes in oi
der to be considered for entertain
ment during the day as well. Th
Arts Council is also taking name
of volunteers who wish to donat
their time for set up and on-goin
activities during Arts Day as wel
Direct all submissions and inquii
ies to The Pitt County Arts Coun
cil ARTS DAY 95, PO Box 8191
Greenville, NC 27835 or call 757
1785 for booth application forms
For further information phon
Ilene Cox at 752-3247. Student
Welcome.
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. B.
sure to pick up your FREE videc
yearbook. Available at the Stu
dent Store, The East Carolinian
Jovner Library, Mendenhall am
the Media Board office in the Stu
dent Publications Building.
'�





8 The East Carolinian
January 10, 1995
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Movies in '94: Rewind the tape
A closer
ook at the
films of
1994
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
This is part one of a two-part
look at the films of 1994. Today,
our reviewer takes a shot at the
year overall. Thursday, zve will
offer his list of Top Ten movies of
last year.
The year in cinema passed
quietly enough. Only one film
seen by this critic rated a per-
fect "10 Quiz Show, com-
pared to three last year (The
Piano, Schindler's List, and Re-
mains of the Day). Quiz Shoxo
never even opened in
Greenville so that residents
were kept from seeing the one
truly remarkable achievement
in cinema this year. Many of
the films in my top ten only
rated an eight because the
competition proved paltry-
Very few films released in 1994
will have lasting significance
because they tried to cater to
public demand instead of adher-
ing to artistic integrity.
The year in film proved prof-
itable for the studios. The sum-
mer was one of the best in recent
memory with blockbuster films
like Speed, Forrest Gump, True
Lies, and The Lion King paving
the aisles with gold for the film
studios who released these mov-
ies. Much like a repeat of last
year though, when big holiday
films like Hoffa and Chaplin
gained neither critical nor pub-
lic acceptance, the Christmas
season proved to be a lump of
coal. The two big hits over the
holidays were two released for
Thanksgiving, Interview with the
Vampire and The Santa Clause.
Too many films succumbed
to the Forrest Gump mentality of
making mindless films that re-
fused to take a stand on any is-
sue. "Stupid is as stupid does"
accurately reflects the studio sys-
tem of late. More than ever the
presence of multiplex cinemas
can be felt. Small, independent
films suffer the same fate as the
last of the few independently
owned theaters: they lose
money- Crowding for room at
the nation's multiplexes are ba-
nal films designed to appeal to
everyone. The few gambles taken
by Hollywood directors this vear
looked pitiable, like Lawrence
Kasdan's big-budget failure
Wyatt Ear p.
Wyatt Earp, combined with A
Perfect World and The War, sig-
naled troubled times for the once
Hollywood darling Kevin
Costner. Arnold Schwarz-
enegger scored big with True Lies
but miscarried with Junior leav-
ing a hung jury for his future
success. Steven Segall stumbled
with his directing debut, On
Deadly Ground and Jean Claude
Van Damme is still debating
whether he will ever enter the
main stream due to the onlv
moderately successful Time Cop.
Tom Hanks is still in high gear
as is Tom Cruise. Women had
another troubled year. No meaty
female roles were written. The
top two films of the year, Quiz
Shozv and Pulp Fiction, had hardly
a female in them, and certainly
not in crucial roles. The Acad-
emy Awards will be heated for
the male categories but the Acad-
emy will be scrambling to find
female choices.
Despite the glum year several
highlights appeared, most nota-
blv in the establishment of two
See YEAR page 11
Photo Courtesy of Universal Pictures
This incredible treehouse set from The IVarwasn't the problem
making that film a flop for former box office champ Kevin Costner.
CD Reviews CD Reviews
CD Reviews
i
V

Kevin Salem
Soma City
4 out of 10 stars
Kevin Salem, a native of
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, be-
gan his musical career as a
member of the famed Boston
band, Dumptruck. After a three
year stay with that band he left
and relocated in New York to
be a major force in the local
music scene there. For a long
time he worked as a sideman
and producer for such bands as
Yo La Tango, Freedy Johnson,
Miracle Legion, The Pooh Sticks
and produced Madder Rose's
debut album.
During all this time Salem re-
mained focused on his own writ-
ing and recording efforts. In 1992
he recorded 11 of these songs,
but they were never released.
Gradually he built up his live
band into its present configura-
tion and began work on his de-
but release, Sowi City.
Soma City was recorded in five
days. This short length of time
made them rely on energy and
passion rather than technical
precision in making the album.
If a mistake sounded good, they
kept it.
Their sound is a mixture of
many guitar based alternative
bands. It's more akin to Lou Reed
and The Replacements. Critics
have deemed him roots rock, but
Salem is not really happy with
that label. "I feel rooted he
says. "But my roots are as much
in the Stooges and Wire as in
John Lennon
The CD has a live feel to it,
probably because of the lack of
production. It's not grunge,
metal or even alternative, even
though it's on a small label, Roa-
drunner Records. They are more
like straight forward rock and
roll, kind of like Matthew Sweet
but nowhere near as good. Soma
City is twelve rock songs with
ringing guitars and thunderous
drums, Salem's raspy Paul
Westerburg sounding voice fits
well with the instrument's
sound.
The opening tune, "Light-
house Keeper is filled with
See SALEM page 10
Blues Traveler
Four
10 out of 10 stars
Talk to me about John Pop-
per. The frontman of New York's
notoriously rowdy quartet Blues
Traveler "busts out of prison"
in your face with his fourth re-
lease aptly titled four. This one
is definitely worth listening to
over and over; it sounds better
each time. Four is different than
the rior Blues Traveler releases
in the sense that it is a cleaner,
more refined sound. But this re-
lease still embodies the fury and
energy that has become
svnonomous with the name
Blues Traveler. Popper put this
feeling into better perspective
when the harmonica virtuoso
stated, "Some people think be-
ing in a band is like having a
business, but I'd say it's like be-
ing pirates on a ship
"Once upon a midnight
drearie" opens the listener to
the introductory track, "Run-
around This tvpe of opening
song gives the listener the sense
that it is less like a CD release
and more like a story Popper
wants to tell. A definite asset to
this CD that manv others lack is
how easily it flows from fast
See BLUES page 10
Immortal plaid at Wright
Photo Courtesy of ECU Performing Arts
Forever Plaid tells the story of the Four Plaids, a singing
group that returns to Earth after being killed by a bus headed
for a Beatles show in 1964. The musical plays at Wright
Auditorium on January 13. For information call 328-4788.
What's Your
Sign?"
a bit defensive.
Aquariue (Jan. 20-Feb. 16)
Hug a Gemini today. Opportunities for financial
windfalls surround you� keep your eyes open. Avoid
eating blue food. Member of opposite sex tells you,
"I'veibeen watching you Trust your reactions.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
If at first you don't succeed�you may be trying to nail
Jello to a wall. Tryingo geJ)!pod from a stone. Trying
to make mountains from molehills. What you must do
is NOT TRY. See what treasures pile up in your lap.

Aries (Mar 21-April 19)
Everything you do today will be to the utmost of your
ability�from a DIVINE social gaffe to a SUBLIMELY
baked potato. You may be the PERFECT fool, but you
will make a STELLAR decision.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Getting out of bed was your first mistake Watch your
back. Delays will appear blocking your path to
progress. Do not believe anything good; it's a lie.
Avoid contacts with humans, if at all possible. If you
survive unscathed today, you have amazing fortitude.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
Today is your day to give constructive criticism. Then
DUCK! Watch other people's body language. You will
receive clues. If the recipient leaps at you and makes
a grab at your throat, your constructive criticism hasn't
gone over too well, and you'd do well to look
elsewhere for grateful advice-seekers.
Cancer (June 22-July 22)
Avoid numbers today ANY numbers. And try
something new today Instead of using money, why
not pay for your textbooks with fresh produce and
eggs? Get to the heart of matters. Avoid euphemisms, like. "I told you so.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Put music in your life. Recognize the absurd and ask
WHY? Since everything is absurd, you may find yourself
asking "why?" again and again. Do not do this in the
company of jumpy people or anyone who strikes you as

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
A social higher-up will tell you, "I suppose you're good
enough to spend time with. Let's hang out Hothead that
you are. you're inclined to tell them where to put the
comment. Bite your tongue. Be GRACEFUL. Tell them,
"OH, that would be faboo Actually showing up is
optional.
Libra (Sept. 23-0ct. 23)
Lucky numbers for you today are: 3. 4 and 6 Lucky
colors: gray and blue. Lucky monster: the yeti. Lucky
vegetable: the beet. Wear your lucky hat in a hard-hat
area. Don't tell anyone to smile. Avoid shellfish.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21)
The world owes you a drink. A reward A pat on the back
and a five-course dinner. The world is reluctant to give
you what you deserve, so you must turn i4 upside down
and SHAKE the loot out of its pockets.
Sagittarius (Nov. 21-Dec. 21)
Try not to make arrows in judgment Dent bow under
pressure. Aim high. Incidentally, today is a fine day to
tempt fate. Say out loud I don't see how things could
get any worse"
�icorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Travel is in your immediate future. You must start by
getting off the couch Revel in your wisdom Treat every
matter as a learning experience Avoid using expressions
A Diiop
IN THE
Bucket
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
"A Drop in the Bucket"
is just what it claims to be:
a very tiny drop in the great
screaming bucket of Ameri-
can media opinion. Take it
as iou will.
This one's gonna be
grouchy-
Christmas vacation has
never caused me anything
but trouble. Well, okay,
maybe "never" isn't quite ac-
curate; when I was a kid,
Christmas vacation was
okay. It was a break from
school, I watched all those
neat puppet animation
Christmas specials, and I got
all sorts of cool new toys.
But since I started college,
things have been different.
My freshman year, for ex-
ample, my grades came in on
December 23. Considering
mv study habits back then,
this was not good news.
Needless to say, my Christ-
mas spirit was dampened.
I get crappy gifts from
family members who live far
enough away that they only
see me at Christmas and thus
don't know me well enough
to get me anything more per-
sonal than blank video tapes.
Hint for future, people: send
money!
On top of this, my grand-
mother is slowly getting se-
nile, so my family spent
Christmas Day answering
the same question ten times
and reminding her which
relatives were dead. Our own
depressing futures laid out
before us, our Christmas
cheer became strained after a
while.
I also have chronic sinus
problems, and my father is a
chain smoker. So after four
months of breathing rela-
tively clean air, I'm thrown
into close quarters with a hu-
man smoke stack. I return
home to start the new year
with a nasty sinus infection
that lingers for weeks and
costs me a fortune in Kleenex.
This year I only stayed a
week, and as I write this the
Kleenex bill is in the double
digits.
Upon returning a couple
of days before New Year's, I
resolved to go home for
Christmas Day and Christ-
mas Day only next year.
Which reminds me of another
annoying social habit that
sticks in my craw: New Year's
Resolutions. Every year,
America makes promises to
itself that it almost immedi-
ately breaks.
How many January diet-
ers are hinging on massive
slabs of chocolate cake by
Groundhog day? How many
See BUCKET page 11
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t
January 10, 1995
The East Carolinian 9
NoTe5 From me Undcrground
John Woo's masterpiece The Killer features the finest in action direct from Hong Kong
Kevin Chaisson
Staff Writer
"Notes from the Underground"
is a semi-regular column dealing with
the strange, peculiar, and esoteric
crevices of entertainment.
A couple of years ago, I found
mvselt sitting in a movie theater,
waiting for the feature, when a
preview for the then-new Jean
Claude Van-Damme film Hard
Target came on. Looked good, ac-
tion scenes were pretty�but what
stuck with me was the tag line:
"From acclaimed action director
John Woo John Woo? Who the
hell is that? I remember thinking.
Now I am older and wiser, and
I realize that tag line wasn't just
GOLDEN CHINA
(ORIGINAL CHINATOWN EXPRESS)
some Madison Avenue creation
but. the God's honest truth. John
Woo is one of the best action direc
tors working today. 1 speak di-
rectly now to those of you who
saw Hard Target and said, "What's
the big deal? It's just another re-
hash of The Most Dangerous Came.
The action scenes were nice, but
nothing special Don'tjudgeWoo
by that tired Hollywoodized re-
tread. Look instead at the phe-
nomenal Hong Kong release, The
Killer, now widely available in the
U.S. on video.
Written and directed by Woo,
The Killer tells what, at tirst, seems
a rather routine story. Jeff, played
to cool perfection by Woo-regular
Chow Vim Fat, is the killer in the
title; a dangerous assassin, and the
best in the business. During a
nearly-botched job in a crimelord's
nightclub, Jell accidentally blinds
a torch singer, Jenny (Sally Yeh)
with a gunpowder discharge.
Racked with guilt and a growing
love for the girl, left wants to pull
off one last job and use the money
tor a cornea operation If the op-
eration isn't performed in time,
lennv will be blinded forever. Un-
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fortunately for Jeff, his employers
feel that it would be much cheaper
to let Jeff do the job for them and
have him killed. Throw in a ren-
egade cop (Danny Lee) hot on the
killer's trail, and the screen fairly
explodes with violent energy.
Sure, the story smacks of con-
ventionality, but Woo's script is
insanely multifaceted. Show me a
Schwartzenegger flick where the
lead and his friend debate the ex-
istence of Cod in the very first
scene (in a beautifully-surreal
Catholic mission, no less)! Show
me a Segall opus where the violent
acts committed have serious re-
percussions later, possibly ending
in death for the lead and his loved
ones. Woo's characters are still a
little cartoonv, but the situations
thevgetintoand the decisions they
have to make are far from that.
Some other things that break
Woo's storv from the humdrum,
seen-i t-a 11 action fare a re his choices
for leads and the beautifully ex-
ecuted action scenes. Chow Yun
Fat is hypnotic as the killer, sliding
viscously from cold-blooded killer,
to honorable friend, to lover. Dur-
ing the film's many over-the-top
violent, vet poetic, shoot-outs, Fat
is quite convincing as a seasoned
assassin.
A lot of the scenes are shot in
one take, showing without a
doubt that Fat must be one damn
good athlete, too. In the film's
opening shoot-out, Fat blasts up
the nightclub location with not
one, but two, automatics. When
out of ammo, he smashes a list
against a goon's poker table,
flipping the gu)s gun into the
air, catches it, and ices the guy!
Wow! Cop Danny Lee is no
slouch either, doing scary par-
allel-to-the-ground leaps be-
hind some cover, rev diver blaz-
ing. Both actors also play a W n-
derful, tension-filled standoff in
lennv's apartment that has to be
seen to be believed.
Hard Target? Bah! To see an
amazing display of what the ac-
tion genre should be like, ignore
that crappy Hollywood-sanc-
tioned example of Woo's work
and see The Killer. Take advan-
tage of the pristine, non-boot-
legged copies of this film and
other super-cool John Woo Hong
Kong action releases at your lo-
cal video store. I saw the boot-
legs, but now you can enjoy this
fine film without all of the lines
and muffled dubbing. Enjoy!
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1 OThe East Carolinian
January l(). 1995
SALEM
from p. 8
11-
I K
I
t �
heavy guitar riffs sounding
much like the Replacements in
tone and feel. It is a song about
looking for hope even though
none is ever found. The songs
are generally about the
struggles and passions of ev-
eryday life. In fact most of the
songs are about loss of some
type, which is usually dealing
with a relationship, but not al-
ways. Amnesia "Shot
Down "Forever Gone" and
"Falter" are other tracks in the
same vein.
"Shot Down" is one of the
few slower tunes on the release;
it is a rock ballad in the tradi-
tion of The Rolling Stones'
"Wild Horses" and "Daddy
You're a Fool to Cry Salem
even sounds like Jagger in this
song. Basically this is no frills
rock with a predictable struc-
ture.
This is a CD for those of you
that don't care for the more ex-
perimental sounds that modern
rock is producing now. This is
well-done, but nothing to crow
about. Kevin Salem's Soma City
is a good reiease by classic rock
standards; however if you are
looking for something different,
this is not one to pick up.
�Kris
Hoffler
BLUES
from p. 8
tempo songs to ballads and back
to the mind warping harmonica
solos that Blues Traveler is
known.
The primary ballad is the third
track, "Look Around On this
one, John Popper sets down his
harmonica and concentrates
more on expressing feelings of
depression associated with lost
love. On this track, Blues Trav-
eler delves deeper into acoustic
territory than on earlier releases
or any other song on four. It is
the slowest track, but one of the
most lyricaly powerful.
But Popper's not through with
us yet, not even close. The fourth
song, "Fallible" opens with a har-
monica jam that will knock the
taste out of your mouth. From
here, the CD flows u p to the sev-
enth song, "Crash Burn This
track is an upbeat dueling battle
of sorts; one in which each of the
four members of Blues Traveler
battle each other in dramatic so-
los. Of course, the harmonica
steals the show. This is probably
why Popper carries a dozen har-
monicas around his neck when
performing live. He rips so hard,
he warps harmonicas during the
live show.
"Hook the ninth song on
four, is the first one I heard. It
was played on WZMB before the
CD was even released. I know,
because I ran to four different
record stores in Greenville look-
ing for the CD before the song
even went off the air.
Overall, four is the best Blues
Traveler release I've heard aside
from Blues Traveler Live: Travel-
ers and Thieves, featuring Carlos
Santana. The only drawback is
that ten stars is the highest rat-
ing I can give this CD. Regard-
less of any specific musical in-
terests, this CD is one that will
appeal to everyone. The furious
energy of Blues Traveler com-
bined with moving acoustic bal-
lads certainly achieve the goal
promised by guitarist Chan
Kinchla, it helps everyone for-
get about the outside world
for a while. It just generates a
spark
- Brandon
Waddell
PIZZA
�1TPF
WINGS
Call For Daily Specials
758-2233
WILSON ACRES
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Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1995-1996 Term
Any full-time student with
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Applications are available at the Student Union Office
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Deadline To Apply: January 13,1995
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�1�BMP-� iiliJiUBItW





January 10. 1995
YEAR
from p. 8
BUCKET
from p. 8
first-rate directors, Robert
Redford (Quiz Show) and
Quentin Tarrentino (Pulp Fic-
tion). Redford has an Oscar al-
ready (for Ordinary People) but
despite his previous impressive
efforts, TheMilano Beanfield War
and A River Rums Through It,
only with Quiz Show does
Redford firmly establish him-
self as a supremely artistic di-
rector. Tarrentino erupted onto
the scene two years ago with
Reservoir Dogs and then wrote
True Romance and Natural Born
Killers. With his second directo-
rial effort. Pulp Fiction, he be-
comes a director to watch. The
ferocious style he uses combined
with his daring originality (while
Waiiuight Property Management
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still playing homage to the cin-
ematic past) portends that
Tarrantino will long be remem-
bered in cinema history.
And so 1944 is a distant
memory, but the films from the
year will live. For 1495 one can
only hope that more quality films
will appear in Greenville. Trav-
eling to Raleigh to watch films
can be a bit tiring. One of the
saddest commentaries of 1494 is
that even though very few qual-
ity films opened in Greenville,
the residents of this fair city still
did not miss all that much (ex-
cept, why was Quiz Show not
shown here?). But in the words
of Keanu Reeves in Speed (spo-
ken under slightly different cir-
cumstances): "What do you do?"
stf�r
210 E. 5th Street
atalog
nnection
abstaining smokers have toked
down a pack of Camels by Mar-
tin 1 uther King's birthday? How
many people make promises to
themselves they know they're not
going to keep? It must be some
sick national obsession with guilt.
We think we're improving our-
selves, but ultimately we simply
give ourselves something else to
feel bad about.
I'm not saving we shouldn't
try at all, but do we really have to
concentrate so much grief to-
gether at once? Couldn't we
spread it out a little? We could
have, I don't know, Fourth of July
Resolutions, or Columbus Day
resolutions, or even Flalloween
resolutions for those of us want-
ing to give our lives a sinister
bend. That way, the people who
broke their resolutions earlier in
the year aren't loo depressed to
offer support to those who fail to
improve themselves later. This
could work.
But no. We've got to have one
more thing to make the holidays
stink. However, the worst thing
to me, beyond the sinus hell and
the New Year's lies, is the Bibli-
cal-level sloth this vacation in-
spires in me. After three weeks
of basically doing nothing, I get
to like it. I haven't been to bed
before two in the morning since
before Christmas; I've never
filled so many hours with so
much nothing. Some insects have
lived and died through their
natural, life spans while I've sat
and collected dust.
In fact, I barely got this dis-
jointed and hornet-ill column
written by my deadline. I wasted
a whole weekend not writing it.
And what did I do? I watched
TV, hung out with friends, went(
for a walk Basically, I did noth-
ing. Now I'm done and I'm glad.
Time to hunt for that remote.
Another wasted evening sacri-
ficed to Christmas laziness.
The hast Carolinian
The
Price Is
Right
Our
classifieds
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12 The East Carolinian
Januar' 10, 1995
The East Carolinian
Sports
Pirates scalped by Illini 30-0
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina became the vic-
tim of one of the top-rated colle-
giate defenses, getting shut out
30-0 in the St. Jude Liberty Bowl
on national television. The Fight-
ing Illini were led by junior out-
side linebacker Simeon Rice,
whose 16 sacks led the nation,
and Butkus Award winner Dana
Howard. This linebacking unit
was rated No. 1 by the Sporting
News going in to the season.
After a few possessions, the
game began to turn ugly for the
Pirates. Tailback Jerris McPhail,
running up the right sideline af-
ter receiving a option pitch from
Marcus Crandell, fumbled the
ball after Rice stripped it from
him. The fumble was McPhail's
first of the season, but it did give
Illinois a little extra confidence
against the high-scoring Pirate
attack.
The ECU defense came right
back shutting down Illini run-
ning back Ty Douthard. Line-
backer Mark Libiano came clean
on a blitz putting heat on Illinois
quarterback Johnny Johnson,
who while falling down, flipped
the ball to wide receiver Jasper
Strong for a first down.
This was quite a momentum
breaker for the Pirate defense.
Six plays later Johnson found All-
Big Ten tight end Ken Dilger for
a touchdown. Dilger ran straight
down the throat of the Pirate sec-
ondary for the score. He was se-
lected Illinois' Offensive MVP
after seven passes for 60 yards.
Illinois jumped on the Pirates
again on their next possession
with a short pass to speedy Jas-
per Strong (3 catches for 96 yards,
1 TD) who cut up the sideline
and ran for a 73 yard touchdown,
one of the longest in Liberty Bowl
history. Strong was the recipient
of two great blocks do wnfield by
Dilger and wideout Jim Klein.
"I didn't think they would be
able to be as effective as they
were Pirate LB B.J. Crane said.
"They got the ball so much, and
Photo by Garrett Killian
Simeon Rice (97) and Dana Howard (40) both are preparing themselves to be drafted into the NFL ranks. Howard was the 1994
Butkus Award winner, given to the nation'spremier linebacker, while Rice led the Illini and Division l-A football with 16 sacks.
we were on the field for such a
long time that all those points were
bound to'happen
ECU put together it's best drive
of the day behind the strong run-
ning of McPhail, who ran for nine
yards on the first play of the drive.
Crandell went to WR Jason
Nichols twice, driving the Pirates
down to the Illini 19-vard line.
In the red zone, ECU head coach
Steve Logan normally goes to 6-
foot-6 receiver Larry Shannon,
who has made the fade route his
specialty this season. Instead,
Logan chose to go to Allen Will-
iams who has good size and ath-
letic ability, but not quite on the
same par as Shannon.
Williams and Illinois
cornerback Robert Crumpton
went up for the pass in the corner
of the end zone and Crumpton,
using good position and leverage
wrestled it away from Williams to
come up with the interception.
This play was the proverbial nail
in the coffin for the Pirates, who
wouldn't come close to scoring
again.
"Turnovers definitely killed
us Jason Nichols said. "We get
down inside the 20 and don't
score. I was very stunned to see us
get shut out. Normally, we click
but today we couldn't get any-
thing going
Crumpton, who had one
tumble recovery to go with his
shutout-preserving interception,
was selected the defensive MVP
for his effort.
Illinois put together a 11-play,
77-yard drive that ran 5:58 off the
clock as they controlled the ball
on the ground behind the efforts
of Robert Holcombe and Ty
Douthard, who did much of the
work. The Illini capped the drive
with a 21-yard Chris Richardson
field goal to extend their lead to
i '
ir-
w Mb- jtft tu�
�NgM
File photos
ODU's Petey Sessoms and JMU's Kent Culuko will both play
key roles in their teams' success in the CAA conference race.
Colonial hoops
race heats up
Brad Oltfham
Staff Writer
As thePiratehoopsters currently
find themselves atop the early Co-
lonial Athletic Association stand-
ings, much has happened to the
other teams in the conference
throughout their non-conference
games. Big men have fallen, little
men have come up big, while CAA
veterans and rookies are trying to
find the team chemistry required
to march to the NCAA tourney
with a CAA crown. Here's a look at
conference members and how they
have fared.
Old Dominion Monarchs
To nobody's surprise, it was the
Monarchs of Old Dominion who
looked to be the favorite to win the
CAA conference coming into this
season. Unfortunately, die loss of
center Odell Hodge to a knee in-
jury has put them at a disadvan-
tage for the season.
At the helm this season for ODU
is Jeff Capel, former head coach at
N.C. A&T and father of Dukejcoint
guard Jeff Capel.
The arsenal that was engaged by
former Monarch coach Oliver Purnell
will work nicely in conjunction with
the coaching style of Capel.
"I like to play pressure basketball
both offensively and defensively
hesaid. "We want to extend thefloor,
push theball up the floor and ta ke the
first available good shot
Of course, the biggest key in stop-
ping ODU going into this season was
to focus on Hodge, the MVP of the
CAA conference last season. He led
the conference in scoring (19.4 ppg)
and rebounds (9.0) in 1993.
With a big player like Hodge out
of the line-up for ODU, opponents
can now concentrate more on de-
fending the outside game of the Mon-
archs. Senior Petey Sessoms has been
a First Team All-CAA selection the
past two seasons. He hit 90 three-
pointers last season, averaging 16
points per game for ODU. As of
January 5, Sessoms was leading the
conference in scoring wi th 23.6 points
per game. Hewas named CAAplayer
of the week two weeks in a row at the
end of December.
Also in the staring lineup for the
Monarchs this year is senior forward
Mike Jones, currently averaging 17.5
points per game. Look for EJ. Sherod
and Duffy Samuels to handle the
guard duties. Atter sitting out most
of last season due to arthopscopic
surgerv on a ruptured disc, junior
Mario Mullen will be returning this
season tc help ODU. He could be
shifted into the staring position at
forward by conference time.
The talent and depth of this Old
Dominion squad probably exceeds
anv other program in the conference
this season, but the longer Hodge is
out of the lineup the worse off the
Monarchs are going to be. High ex-
pectations are being hurled at first-
year coach Capel, but he's using his
better judgement on how he is react-
ing to them.
"I know expectations are high for
us Capel said. "I know some polls
had us in the Top 25 at the beginning
of the season. We certainly have a
Top 25 sched ule, but it would be nice
to be there at the end of the season
Richmond Spiders
Last season's CAA Coach of the
Year Award was presented to first-
year Richmond Spider coach Bill
Dooley. The Spiders ended up at .500
last season with a 14-14 record. The
task of competing in the CAA this
season for Dooley will not be getting
any easier.
"To use just one word to describe,
our team this year, it would be obvi-
ously 'young Dooley said. "The
second word to use would be 'un-
proven We have just one starter
back in Kass Weaver, who is doing
an excellent job along with Derrick
Wall in trying to lead our younger
guys. It's a little bit of a bad combina-
tion this vear in that we have a young
team and a tough schedule,buthopc-
fullv we can use that to our benefit
and they will begainingexperience
Weaver will have his hands full
this year in carrying this Spider club.
A preseason First feam All-CAA
selection, Weaver is one of the best
go-to-guys in the conference. His
ability to play either guard or small
forward will be a vital ingredient in
the Spiders quest for wins this sea-
son. He is currently averaging 17.8
points per game.
Helping Weaver out this year will
be senior forward Wall, who will
either be starting at the power for-
ward or center position this year for
Richmond. Jason McKinney is a trans-
fer center from Siena, and could also
help out the Spiders this season.
James Madison
There's still celebration in the air
in Harrisonburg, Virginia these days
over "the shot Kent Culuko nailed
a three-pointer that put the Dukes in
the NCAA tournament last year for
the first time in ten seasons. Now
veteran head coach Lefty Driesell is
determined to put his JMU team back
in the tournament this year as well.
The Dukes aren't exactly setting the
court ablaze, starting the season at 4-
5.
"We're bigger than we have been
in the past Driesellsaid. "We've got
Kareem Robinson, James Coleman
and some other heavy guys, along
with good shooters in Culuko and
Darren McLinton. We got some vet-
erans coming back, and 1 think we'll
have a pretty good ball club
The big question for JMU this sea-
son is the eligibility status of senior
guard Dennis Leonard, who was
forced to sit out last semester for
academic reasons.
Returning to the starting lineup at
forward is 1994 Second Team All-
CAA selection Louis Rowe, second
in the conference in scoring this sea-
son in scoring, averaging 23.4 points
per game. He's shooting 60 percent
from the field, and is averaging 1.2
blocks a game. He was named CAA
See CAA page 13
1995
looks
p3TCHHSlICJ
for Buc
gprid&ers
Aaron Wilson
17-0.
Marcus Crandell (20-41, 179
yards, 4 INTs) had a long day at
the office, throwing his second
INT on ECU'S next possession
leading to a Jason Dulick touch-
down reception to run the score to
24-0.
A heavy pass rush by the Illini
linebackers gave him almost no
time to throw. Tackles Ron
Suddithand Charles Boothe made
a good effort on Rice holding him
to no sacks, but he did put con-
stant pressure on Crandell. Rice, a
See LIBERTY page 15
Williams
re-opens
Women lose,
men win first
home games
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Lady Pirates played the
first game ever in newly-renovated
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum.
Belinda Cagle became the answer to
a trivia question when she scored the
first basket in the new facility. De-
spite a outstanding effort, they fell
short losing to Western Carolina 78-
70.
Somenotableamenitiesaboutthe
new facility include live telecast from
two huge wide-screen televisions in
the upperdeck,modemscoreboards,
much improved lighting and an ex-
panded student section. A press row
was installed as well giving the gym-
nasium the feel of an ACC arena.
The loss dropped the Lady Pirate
record to 3-5 and runs their losing
streak to five games.
ECU trailed for much of the first
half as they suffered from a lot of
turnovers and poor shooting. With a
few minutes to go they put together
a 6-0 run to go into the half up 32-28.
They were led by sophomore
Tracey Kelley. The 6-footer from
Middletown, Md. scored 11 points
on three of six shooting in the first
half to lead all scorers.
Point guard Danielle
Charlesworth's quickness and floor
presence were also instrumental in
keeping the Lady Pirates in the game
See PIRATES page 14
Assistant Sports Editor
The outlook for the 1995
Pirates is a bright one. ThSrfc
werej usteight seniors listed
on, the. depth chart for ttr
Liberty Bowl, five of tjffc
starlets. 12 of the 22 starters
tnois were fresh-
sophomores, so
added experience-
hould be even more
next season.
Returning starters on of-
fense include tackles
Charles Boothe and Ron
Suddith, guard Jamie Gray-
and center Kevin Wiggins
These returning offensive
linemen allowed just 10
sacks this season. Suddith,
a 6-foot-3, 290-poynder,
was selected to two All-In-
dependent teams (1st Team
Football News and 2nd
team Associated Press) as
well as named All-Liberty
Bowl Alliance.
Quarterback Marcus
Crandell was selected to
horn B-Independent First
Teams and was named the
Liberty Bowl Alliance Co-
�ffensiveMVPalong with
teammate junior Smith.
Crandell passed for 2,687
yards and -21 touchdowns.
Wide receiver Mitchell
Galloi�y(Aa-ECAC return
specialist 2nd eam AiMn
depeAdentrocefver) ledtlve
Pirates with 566 receiving
He along with Jason
(42 catrhes), Larry
(6 rD's), A
(21 catches for
and tight end' Sean
son and Scott
Richards rnake up a very
strong returning core of re-
ceivers for Crandell tj
throw to. �
Backup tailback Jerris
McPhail should step easily
into Junior Smith's job at
tsfiBbajefe iW Clinton N.C.
native has the speed and,
motes to put-up big num
bersnextyear. He averaged
20 yards a ca tch in 1994a od
tod ECU'S longest offensive
play of the year, a "67 yard
touchdown against Central
fforida. He is currently
ranked as the No. 18 player
Available for the 1996 NHL
Di&ft by d�ait.�ep�rt and
L1SPN edtot' analyst. Mel.
fjper.
, .�'rteny. the '95,PV
jnsuTtfbe very strong
led by senior tinebacker
Libiano. Libi-mo. a 6-
ioct-3, 235-pounder from
liasron, Pa had 135 tackles
&ss6&sott and Was named
to both All-Independent
teams as well as being
named Ali-Tndcpendent
Defensive Player of the
�ear. :
He is joined by B.J.Crane,
Second on the team in tack-
le this yeir. and Morris
a 3rd team Au-
nt pick at LB and
foalOAraWe-mennonasa re-
Jem specialist who rounds
out what shonldbe a strong
:fc-backsng imtt;
Walter Scott, Lorertzo
West (3vd team AU-lnde-
fete&�PV�aniei Suss,
and femme Smith return
forthedefensiveime. Look
for Scott and Smith to put
"up"good humfcexs rushing
jpj passer next year.
The secondary returns all
four starters: Emmanuel
flBDwrtrftS TNT'S, AH- Lib-
See OUTLOOK page 14





January 10. 1995
The East Carolinian 13
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CAA
from p. 12
Player (f the Week for the week end-
ing January 2.
McLinton, who is averaging 4.3
assists per game, and junior forward
Kareem Robinson could see starting
roles for JMU early on in the year.
Winning the CAA last year, accom-
panied by a strong showing in the
NCAA tournament, (the Dukes lost
64-62 to eventual Final Four oppo-
nent Florida Gators), the Dukes will
be be one of the toughest teams to
beat in the conference.
American University
Look in the AU media guide and
all of a sudden it jumps out at you.
Like one of those 3-D images that
vou see at the mall. The Eagles of
American are putting this season in
the hands of a pair of former high
school teammates from a few miles
south of Washington, D.C. in
Chantilly, Virginia.
Tim Fudd and Darrvl Franklin
were high school teammates at
Chantilly High in during the 1990
and 1991 basketball seasons.
Franklin'ssenioryear, Fudd went off
to play basketball for coach Chris
Knoche and AU. A year later Franklin
followed. The two have set the goal
rtAWim7oWJ I ssistants
Orientation & The First Fear Experience � 203 .Frwin � 328-4173
KOW FIRING ORIENTATION ASSISTANTS fOR IUMMER 1995
For more information, call the Orientation Office or attend an
Information Session in Room 14 at the Mendenhall Student Center:
January 17 (Tuesday) 4 p.m.
January 23 (Monday) 4 p.m.
Applications available in Room 203 Erwin beginning January 11, 1995
Deadline for completed applications is January 31,1 995 at 5 p.m.
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I
of success at American by the logo
"by Fudd and Franklin means" and
seemed to have been catching on tor
AU as thev went into this season.
Unfortunately, the plan hit a snag
when the Eagles lost Fudd for the
season after he broke his kneecap. He
�vill redshirt this season and return
next year, but AU is struggling badly
without him.
"Tim established himself last year
as one of the more dominant players
in the league Knoche said. "I le's a
guy who scores well inside and out.
More than that though, Tim plays
very, very hard. Darrvl's more of a
cerebral, calmer tpe of player. His
level of play for as this year is critical.
If he passes the level of plav he had
last year, which 1 believe was very
good, then we are going to be one of
the more difficult teams to match up
against this vear
Other players to watch for the
Eagles this season willbeformer Duke
Blue Devil Christian Ast, who has
stepped up huge for AU after the loss
of Fudd averaging lq points a game.
Duane Cilliam, Nathan Smith md
Marko Knvokapic will all have to
pitch in to help the Eagles pull out of
their 0-11 start.
Things wore tough for AU last
season as well, as they ended up tied
for sixth place in the conference and
with an overall record of 8-19.
"YVearecomingoff aseasoaw here
we were not pleased with the re-
sults, Knoche said. "Yet we also had
three very big wins at the end season
overames Madison, Old Dominion
and William & Mary. That sort of
turned the season around as best as it
could be turned around
UNC Wilmington
For UNCW first-year coach Jerry
Wainwright. the path to winning has
already been paved by previous
Seahawkcoach Kevin Eastman, who
resigned after last season to coach
PAC-10 member Washington State.
"I'm very lucky in the fact that I
have an atypical position Wain-
wright said. "Kevin Eastman spent
Our Skiwear is User Friendly
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several years rebuilding this pro-
gram and did a wonderful job
doing it. He left a veteran team
with a lot of character and stabil-
ity. Our senior class is one of the
best classes I Ye seen in all aspects
of their lives since I've been in
coaching
The Seahawksarecertainly full
of experience this season, and it
shows w ith their impressive start.
Seniors Corev Stewart and Chris
Meighen will start at the forward
portions, while junior Darren
Moom will start at center. Senior
Canon Baker will likely start at
guard UNCW this season.
The Seahawks are a dark
horse candidate to win the CAA,
having all the tools necessary to
beat anybody in the conference.
William & Mary
Tilings can only get better for
first year William & Mary coach
Charlie Woolum this season. He
has all five starters back from the
Tribe's -23 season of 1993.
"The work ethic of this team is
very good Woolum said. "I'm
extremely pleased with David Cox
and his leadership. I know that
this is a very tough league, but I
have a very fine group of young
men who a re very anxious to play
and meet the challenge
Seniors Cox and Kurt Small,
who is averaging 16.3 points per
game, will handle the guard du-
ties this year for the Tribe. Junior
David Cully led the CAA in
blocked shots last season, and will
continue to be one of the best de-
fensive players in the conference
again this year. He is currently
leading the conference in re-
bounds with 9.7 per game. Juniors
Matt Verkey and Carl Parker
round out the starting five return-
ing to William & Mary this sea-
son.
So far, having all the starters
back for W&M hasn't helped
much, for they are currently 0-7.
All in all, the CAA race looks as
it could be one of the most exciting
in years. As the Pirates entered
conference play last night against
the Tribe, their success and the
continued rebuilding of Eddie
Payne's program moved one
notch closer to its goal, and w ith a
new arena that will be well dis-
played on national television, no
less, opponents and their fans will
get a chance to see these CAA
teams battle for the crown.
1
Tell everyone about your Valentine by putting a special
Love Lines personal ad in our special Feb. 14 issue.
Only $3 for 25 words or less; 10� each for more than 25
Pick up a Love Lines form at the newspaper office,
the Mendenhall information desk or the Student Stores.
Speak out before our Feb. 11 deadline -
or forever hold your peace.
ove
J






1 4The East Carolinian
PIRATES
January I0, 1995
from p. 12
in the first half. She had four steals
before the intermission. Her play on
defense and in running the ofrense
sparked the team after they had got
off to a sluggish start.
The Richmond transfer had eight
steals in the game and seven points.
In the second half Tracey Kelley
and Latesha Sutton played well fin-
ishing with 20 and 13 points for the
game, respectively.
However, Kelley got in foul
trouble late in the game, and that is
when WCU made their run. They
hit three pointer after three pointer
to put this game away.
"Western played hard and hit a
lotofkeyoutsideshotsinthisgame
Head coach Rosie Thompson said.
"We need to play hard for 40 min-
utes on both ends of the floor. That
is what it is going to take for us to
win
Danielle Charlesworth was the
main bright spot for the team, play-
ing an outstanding game on both
offense and defense. Her up-tempo
style is what the Lady Pirates need
to snap this losing streak.
"I tried to pick it up on defense to
change the momentum
Charlesworth said. "I think we like
to run but it slows us down as the
game wears on
"We have been working really
hardinpracticeTracey Kelley said.
"We just need to pull together and
win some games
The men played their home
opener following the women's
matchup and beat East Tennessee
State 80-76.
Before the tip off the stands were
rocking with the Pirate fans' antici-
pationof seeing their team inaction.
After ETS forward Phil Powe
scored onanalley-oopdunk toopen
the scoring, the Pirates took control
leading by as many as 10 points in
the first half.
Their fast-break style of play
worked for their advantage early in
the game as they continually beat
ETS down the floor. ECU head
coach substituted well by mixing
uphislineupfor favorable matchups
with the smaller Bucs.
Freshman point guard Tony
Parham dished assists off fo: several
inside baskets by big men Quickie
Robinson and Anton Gill.
ETS mounted a comeback though
behind the hot three-point shooting
of guards Andy Pennington and
Geoff Herman. The backcourt duo
combined for almost half of the Buc-
caneers' scoring in the first half.
After the half the Pirates began to
regain the momentum they started
the game with. A Skipp Schaefbauer
steal and dish to Robinson for an
emphatic dunk got the fans on their
feet.
Later on in the half, Parham
showed a lot of toughness and smarts
after being the victim of a block by
ETS' Leslie Brunn. Brunn was ejected
after being charged with a flagrant
personal foul on the play.
Parham converted on his free
throws to close the lead to 52-51 with
11:28 remaining in the ball game.
The lead swung back and forth
several times until two consecutive
dunks by Schaefbauer (18 points)
and Robinson (18 points) put the
Pirates up 67-62 with 3:27 to go.
Schaefbauer. went baseline and el-
evated for a ferocious slam that got
the arena rocking.
A late three pointerby ETS closed
the lead to 78-76 with 13.7seconds to
go. Shooting guard Skipp
Schaefbauer iced it with two free
throws to preserve the 80-76 victory.
"I love thisatmosphere Parham
said. "I don't think there is a better
atmosphere for basketball in the
country. Once we get things rolling,
it is going to be very hard for teams
to beat us here
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WINTER ADVENTURELAND
�j "The Outside is the Best Side" with a trip
m from the ECU Outdoor Program


Snowboarding in Virginia
Daes: January 27-29
Reg. Deadline:
Jan. 13 in 204 CG at 5:00 pm
Pre-Trip Meeting:
Jan. 23 at 6:00 pm at 117 CG
Cost: $115.00
Whether you are an absolute beginner or a seasoned
snowboarder, join ECU Recreational Outdoor Center for an
exciting weekend of winter fun. An experienced staff will teach
you the ins and outs of snowboarding in Massunutten, Virginia.
Price includes transportation, lodging, and rentals.
Date: February 5
Reg. Deadline:
Jan. 27 in CG 204 at 5:00 pm
Pre-Trip Meeting:
Jan. 30 at 6:00 pm in CG 117
Cost: $75.00 wo equipment
$50.00 with equipment
Skiing in Wintergreen
Take a break from studying for your classes and come with
Recreational Services to Wintergreen, Virginia and spend the
day on the slopes. If you are a beginner, intermediate, or an
advanced skier, Wintergreen is the place for you. So wax your
skis and sign up today, because for this trip space is iimited.
Price includes transportation and lunch on the road.
OUTLOOK
from p. 12
erty Bowl Alliance), Dwight Henry
(All-Independent Football News,
2nd team AP), Daren Hart (3rd
team All-Independent) and his
identical twin David, selected to
AP's honorable mention All-Inde-
pendent team.
Punter Matt Levine (All-Liberty
Bowl Alliance and 2nd team All-
Independent AP) had a 42.6 yard
punting average, and may take
over place kicking duties as well if
Chad Holcomb doesn't regain his
technique from his freshman sea-
son.
A tough schedule is the only
potential stumbling block for the
Pirates to have a successful 1995
season. They open at Tennessee
and then travel to Syracuse before
playing Central Michigan at home
and then square off in a rematch
with Illinois in Champaign. The
Pirates then play West Virginia at
home, then travel to Cincinnati and
have a home contest with Temple.
The schedule gets easier at the end
of the season with games at South-
ern Miss and Army before playing
two games in Dowdy-Ficklen
against Tulsa and Memphis to end
the year.
If the Pirates can improve in
the off-season by developing a
more physical ball-control of-
fense and gamble more on de-
fense, they should be a much
better football team. The key to
success is how well the new start-
ers will mesh with the returnees.
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It's TOURNAMENT TIME
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You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING CHESS
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at The University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN, the weekend of
February 24-26, 1995. All expenses paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Tuesday, January 24
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
U
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, February 1
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
a
i
ii
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Thursday, February 2
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
This trip sponsored by ECU Recreational Services. For more information call 328-6387
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Tuesday, February 7
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office, 328-4766, for more information.
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����
January 10. 1995
The East Carolinian 15
multi- A
media )
Lru
pieces got you
puzzled?
1 at your service
3140-D Mosley Drive Greenville, NC 27S5S hVhind Parker's on Greenville Blvd.
Phone 752-0832 Fax 757-27M BBS7pm-8am 752-WO
There will be a
sportswriters'
meeting Wed
Jan,12at2:00.If
ya wanna write
for us, drop by
for the meeting
and well chat
LIBERTY
from p. 12
junior, is projected to be the first
selection in this spring's NFL
draft by the Carolina Panthers if
he decides to leave school and
forego his final season of eligi-
bility. Rice totaled 10 tackles on
the day, including one for a loss
and a forced fumblt.
"I thought I did a decent job
of blocking him Boothe said.
"Simeon Rice made some plays
which is what great players do.
He is a legitimate NFL prospect.
I have to be able to block guys
like that if 1 want to be that kind
of player
Illinois quarterback Johnny
Johnson had one of his best days
ever. The Chicago native was
selected the MVP of the game
throwing for 250 yards and four
TD's on 18-30 passing. He had
plenty of time to throw as the
Pirate defensive line was unable
to get any pressure on him.
"I had time to throw all day
and the wide receivers did a re-
ally good job Johnson said.
"The offensive line did a great
job today. I barely even got
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Used books cost a lot less. And UBE has a lot more
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dirty
"We didn't run any of our
normal stunts ECU senior
defensive end Willie Brookins
said. "They have a big
otffensive line and the only
way to beat them is to use our
quickness and speed. Today,
was just a real frustrating way
to go out
Crandell's woes would
continue after the half as he
threw his first of two inter-
ceptions to Illini strong safety
Antwoine Patton. This pick
led to a easy touchdown by
Ty Douthard who was wide
open in the end zone after
Johnson scrambled around
for several seconds going
untouched by the Pirate de-
fensive line. This score made
it 30-0 and ensured no mi-
raculous comeback like the
Peach Bowl.
To their credit, ECU re-
fused to quit, tightening up
on defense for the rest of the
game and showing Pirate fans
a glimpse of seasons to come,
with freshman receiver Jason
Nichols (6 catches for 55
yards, ECU Offensive MVP)
and Jerris McPhail who ran
for 38 yards on only four car-
ries. McPhail showed a quick
burst of speed whenever he
touched the ball, taking a
swing pass 31 yards for a near
score and on a spinning nine-
yard run could have scored if
he could have kept his bal-
ance.
All-time leading rusher
Junior Smith's career did not
end quite the way he would
have wanted it to, rushing for
just 46 yards on 15 carries.
Smith did impress some NFL
scouts in attendance at the
Liberty Bowl who envision
him filling a 3rd down role,
catching the ball out of the
backfield and returning kicks.
The Fayetteville, N.C. senior
finished his career with 3,672
yards on 729 attempts, a 5.04
average.
"We never really got a
chance to get the running
game uncorked Steve Logan
said. "Usually when our run-
ning game unfolds is after
we've gotten some points on
the board and that never hap-
pened
Reserve defensive players
E.J. Gunthrope and Jermaine
Smith played hard in the 2nd
half, showing the kind of
heart the Pirates will need to
rebound from this loss and
go back to a bowl next sea-
son.
"The foundation for the fu-
ture was set today depart-
ing ECU fullback Damon Wil-
son said. "They will have
something to motivate them
in the off-season and to build
on. Next year's team should
be even better because we
only lose a few starters
That is about the only po-
tential positive that can be
taken from this game. How
the Pirates respond to this loss
and work in the off season
will determine how good this
team will be. Any thoughts of
complacency should be re-
moved from their heads when
they think about losing 30-0
on national television, espe-
cially since the Pirates have a
rematch with the Illini Sep-
tember 23rd in Champaign.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 10, 1995
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 10, 1995
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1048
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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