The East Carolinian, December 8, 1994






SPORTS
McPhail Goes To School
Jems McPhail, a junior running hack on the ECU football
team visited with some students from Wahl-Coates
Elementary Shcool yesterday. See page 12.
THURSDAY
LIFESTYLE
Fahoo-Foray Lahoo-Loray!
FRIDAY
Have a wonderful Grinchy time exploring
Whoville, ECU style, in our Lifestyle
section. See page 9.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 64
Circulation 12.(KK)
Thursday. December 8, 1994
Greenville, NC
14 pages
Parking stickers to possibly go up �
SGA continues to rally to postpone Board of Trustees vote from tomorrow until January
J r �;�.��wk,mMv,llbc and expanding the freshmen lots over the next seven years b
again
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
For students who have nought
$70 parking stickers, onlv to be
forced to park off-campus due to
lack of spaces, there is bad news �
the stickers may soon rise to $.
On the proposed agenda for
tomorrow's Board of Trustees
meeting is the vote to increase stu-
dent fees Members of SGA are
presently working to have the vote
postponed until January to allow
time to research the increase and
offer alternative measures
"We are actively pursuing a
postponement of the decision un-
til January said Ian Eastman,
SGA president. "We are trying to
get some answers out to the stu-
dent body
Eastman said he and his cabi-
net would like to alleviate all in-
creases, but realize that is next to
impossible. Therefore, they are
stri.ing to see that students are
informed prior to any tee increase
1 ast summer, the Board voted on
student fee increases while stu-
dents were away on summer va-
cation.
"Students are paying for these
projects without really being in-
formed said Dale Emery, SGA
Speaker
Emery was referring to projet ts
including the paving of the fresh-
men parking lot (at Allied Health).
paving the Reade Street lots and
constructing lots around Minges
Coliseum and Uowdy-HcklenSta
dium.
One might wonder why the
administration would vote to pave
lots rather than increasing the size
of the lots when the parking situ
ation is in such disarray Accord-
ing to associate vice chancellor for
business af fai rs, 1 .av ton C ietsinger,
the decision was made in an effort
to improve existing lots.
"The master plan calls for us to
move parking off the core ot cam-
pus he said. "There are no lots
that have the capacity of being
increased
(.etsinger said the lots at Reade
Street are in poor condition and
need maintenance to improve the
safety and the appearance Cam-
eras are expected to be installed in
the lots tor security reasons In the
next two to three years, parking
will become zoned, meaning stick-
ers will be sold on a priority basis
For instance, core parking will be
sold at the maximum price Pe-
rimeter parking, such as that at
Minges, will be sold at one-halt
the maximum price I ampus resi
dents who are juniors and seniors
will have priority to the i t av resi
dents' parking
"We are positioning ourselves
financially Getsinger said refer-
ring to establishing funds to move
to the zone-stvle parking.
According to Emery, students
will not be the onlv ones facing
increases in tees StaffFaculty
parking stickers will also rise. Pri-
vate lot stickers that now cost $210
will rise to$2K8. Percentage-wise,
stafffaculty will suffer more,
Emery said.
The total bill tor the paving of
the lots at Reade Street, paving
and expanding the freshmen lots
at Allied Health and constructing
lots around the athletic fields will
total over $2 million. According to
the Parking and Traffic Revenue
and 1 xpense Projections, the pav-
ing of the lot at Allied Health,
which totals $518,900, will be paid
tor in cash. The remainder ot the
bill will be paid for out ot a 5-year
loan.
The projections also show that
in the previous academic school
year, me office of Parking andTraf-
fic accumulated $34b,62h in fines
If that total were divided by the
approximate number of students,
18,000, that would total $20 per
student in fines to Parking and
Traffic. The projections show that
number decreasing this year by
$16,000, but increasing steadily
ovei the next seven years by
$ OIK) per year.
SGA, likeTEC .found these
numbers to be confusing and
contradictory and are request-
ing additional time to go over
the stat sties and determine if
an increase in student fees can
be avoided The Board will
determine tomorrow if they
will grant a delay in the vote.
If this particular fee increase
is passed, a two or three mora-
torium will be passed that
states that no student fee can
be increased for that desig-
nated period ot time. In 1991,
a freeze was put on parking fix1
increases, but that time period
expired this year
See FEE page 5
jr - �s.
Photo by HARLOD WISE
Photo by HARC LO WISE
Upper left, these children prepare for Santa by
participating in the Christmas parade. Above, What
happened to good ol' St. Nick? Below left, Greenville
welcomes visitors to the Emerald City with a festive
holiday banner. Below, the House of Lights in Winterville
attracts multitudes of visitors, as well as thousands of
dollars in contributions for Greenville's homeless.
Photo by HARtOD WISE
Photo b STUAHT WILLIAMS





I
� �
Wt
2 The East Carolinian
Decembers, 1994
.
2,000 to graduate Saturday
December 1
Jones Hall� Officers responded to an activated fire alarm at
Jones Hall. A coordinator turned over a device that had activated the
alarm. The device was a lighter with a number of fire crackers taped
around it. A resident advisor found the device in a hole in the wall
on the fourth floor. No damage occurred to the building and no
injuries were reported.
Umstead construction site � The construction foreman at the
Umstead construction site reported a former employee came to the
site intoxicated and refused to leave. The subject responded to
officers' requests for him to leave.
Clement Hall � An anonymous caller reported an assault on a
female in Clement Hall. Upon arrival, officers found it to be an affray
between two students. Each student was banned from the other
student's residence hall.
IDecember 2
Third and Reade Streets parking lot� A student reported the
breaking and entering of his vehicle parked in the lot. The door had
been forced open and stereo speakers were taken. The student also
reported that two verticle slits had been cut into the vinyl door.
North of Joyner Library � A student reported a subject had
approached her and asked her for her jacket. The subject followed
her until she began running, at which point he turned and ran away.
December 4
Fletcher Hall�Officers responded to Fletcher Hall after Dino's
Pizza complained that a person at that residence hall had refused to
accept or pay for a pizza that had been ordered from that residence.
After speaking with officers, the student did agree to accept and pay
for the pizza.
December 6
White Hall�A resident reported the attempted suicide of a male
who called her on the phone and threatened suicide. The caller
stated his first name and said he was calling from Aycock Hall. She
then heard a gunshot and gurgling sounds of the male asking her to
call 911. Officers evacuated Aycock Hall and searched for all resi-
dents of the name he had given. Police could not locate the injured
subject and no one in the hall reported hearing a gunshot.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU police
reports.
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
More than 2,000 senior, gradu-
ate students and their families will
gather in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
at 9 a.m. on Dec. 10 for fall gradu-
ation, weather permitting.
Commencement exercises will
begin with a band from the ECU
School of Music at 9:15. The aca-
demic procession will follow at
9:45.
Fiction writer, poet and English
professor Dr. Peter L. Makuck has
been chosen to address the gradu-
ating class. Makuck has taught at
ECU since 1976, he came here af-
ter teaching in France as a
Fullbright Exchange professor. He
has published short story and
poetry collections and edits Tar
River Poetry, and is the director of
ECU's Poetry Forum. He is look-
ing forward to speaking at gradu-
ation.
Makvxck received his under-
graduate degree with a class of 48
people and never dreamed he
would eventually be speaking to
a crowd of 2,000.
"Its definitely an honor, I knew
it was an honor when I was invited
but I kind of winced a little bit � I
wasn't sure what I was going to
say or if I had anything to say
Makuck said.
After some thought and writ-
ing, Makuck has decided to talk
about language.
"How important it is in terms of
your success as a citizen, never
mind your success in business or
your personal success, to be able to
precisely say what you mean and
understand other people Makuck
said.
He believes politicians and ad-
vertises go to great measures to get
the average person to hear their
messages.
"You need to know the words
meaning, and you need to listen
carefully to the spin that's put on
these words in order to be a good
citizen in order to be able to read
the political and social realities of
our times Makuck said.
Makuckwasawarded theChar-
ity Randall Citation from the In-
ternational Poetry Forum in 1993
and was the 19488 winner of the
Zoe Kincaid Brock Memorial
Award, the highest honor given
by the North Carolina P etry Soci-
ety.
Because of renovations to
Minges Coliseum, no provisions
have been made for indoor cer-
emony.
In case of rain, graduation will
be delayed until 1:15 p.m. the same
day. Other options include hav-
ing the ceremony at 1:15 p.m.
on Sunday or canceling until
next May and holding a larger
ceremony for both graduating
classes.
Degree candidates should as-
semble under the north stands
and enter the stadium through
Gate 4A. Students are asked not
to don their robes until they
enter the stadium to help re-
duce the risk of alcohol con-
sumption within the stadium.
ECU has provided a hotline
for students and parents want-
ing current information con-
cerning the commencement ex-
ercises. The hotline number is
.128-4884 and it will provide in-
formation on delays or a pos-
sible cancellation. Area televi-
sion and radio stations will an-
nounce any delays.
SGA finds secretary, ends semester
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Laura Jackman also contributed
to this story.
Penn Crawford is the new Stu-
dent Government Association
(SGA) secretary. He won the po-
sition by default because his op-
ponent, Maureen McKenna
failed to turn in her expense re-
ports, according to the SGA of-
fice.
SGA concluded the semester
Monday night by passing a pro-
posal for a dead week, citing the
need for an AM radio station
and announcing support for a
voter outreach drive.
Robert Lewis addressed the
assembly, stressing the benefits
an AM radio station could bring
ECU. He believes the radio sta-
tion would provide students and
visitors with important informa
tion concerning school events,
directions and university ser-
vices.
SGA is planning to implement
a voter outreach drive by plac-
ing voter registration forms at
class registration points, and
ensuring that these forms be de-
livered to the North Carolina
Board of Elections.
The proposal for a dead week
was passed. This means profes-
sors would not be allowed to
give students tests for a full week
before exams begin.
As the semester closes, execu-
tive committee President Ian
Eastman, Vice-President Sheila
Boswell, Secretary Michael
iongratulation
and
Good Luck
East Carolina
University
Pirates
Jl Jimmy Dean Foods

Carnes have all been absent once.
Michael Carnes explained
Eastman and Boswell's absences
on Nov. 28 were caused by a
make-up exam and an unavoid-
able meeting.
Throughout the semester,
SGA has recognized more than
twenty clubs and group consti-
tutions, appropriated almost
$17,000 to various student orga-
nizations and admitted enough
students to almost double the
original assembly's size. Several
bills were also introduced in-
cluding one stating the need for
more bicycle racks.
The executive council has
been responsible for the illumi-
nation of many previously dark
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areas across campus.
"At the beginning of the
semester, the chancellor, two
members of his staff and per-
spective members of the Stu-
dent Government Association
took a walk through cam-
pus identifying danger areas,
and if you look around the
library, there are new lights
along the walkway where
there weren't any before
Eastman said.
Executive council members
also took measures to stop the
office of business affairs from
taking over the transit system.
And what about those cam-
paign promises?
Eastman said he anticipates
the implementation of a pay-
ment plan beginning next fall.
He said he needs to hold an
additional meeting with the
comptroller concerning the is-
sue. Twenty-four hour study
halls were mentioned during
the semester. Eastman said the
library did not seem like a
favorable place and he would
investigate the possibility of
using Mendenhall as an ex-
tended study facility.
"We're the executive coun-
cil going to work on that for
next spring. The library is
staying open extra hours as it
is. Now we're going to sit back
and see how many students
are still in the library later on
at night and see if we really
need this Eastman said.
Overall, Eastman said h�. is
satisfied with the semester's
events.
"Yes, but there are a few
individual goals of mine and
of the executive staff tha t we'd
to see get moving a little
icker Eastman said.
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Saturda
Sunday:
lH-ViB 85c Molson Night
Congrats to all Graduates
(It's about Time)
From the Staff:
To all our High friends in low places.
Thanks for a good year!
-��





Decembers. 1994
The East Carolinian3
Greenville to celebrate season at Commons
Jennifer Davis
Staff Writer
The Christmas season is ap-
proaching once again, lifting our
spirits and warming our hearts
with the love and joy of the holi-
days. On Saturday, Dec. 10, visi-
tors and residents of the
Greenville community can
awaken their holiday spirit at the
fourth annual Festival of Lights.
"The festival, sponsored by the
citv of Greenville, will begin at 4
p.m. starting with the Jaycees
Holiday Parade said Carol
Whiteford from the Greenville
Recreation and Parks Depart-
ment. The parade will start at
Minges Coliseum and end up on
First Street at the Town Com-
mons.
Virgil Clark, who is in charge
of putting units in the parade,
said that it will feature a variety
of floats and numerous acts of
entertainment.
"There will be several horses,
(about 20), three or four bands,
six floats, and a few clowns
Clark said.
The floats will consist of the
ECU cheerleaders and PeeDee the
pirate, a Santa Claus float spon-
sored by Richard L. Cannon, At-
torney at Law, and the Greenville
Jaycees and three other floats
sponsored by uptown Greenville,
Every Child's Next Step (a
children's clothing store) and
Jefferson-Pilot Life Insurance.
Just after the parade, the Po-
lice Band will play four songs
from approximately 4 to 4.45 p.m.
A Tree Lighting Ceremony-
will follow at the Greenville
Town Commons. The event will
feature Greenville Mayor Nancy
Jenkins lighting the offi( iil Festi-
val of Lights Tree.
The Greenville Area Chapter
of the Barbershop Harmony So-
ciety will provide holiday music
that can be enjoyed by all who
attend. Not only can the audi-
ence enjoy the music, but they
can also participate in a group
sing-along of Christmas carols
For the children and the young
at heart, Sandra Jones will add
to the celebration by reading
the classic, memorable Story
of "The Night Before Christ-
mas
And what would a Christ-
mas festival be without the
presence ol Santa Clause? He
will be making a special ap-
pearance so that children of
all ages can sit on his lap and
whisper their Christmas
wishes in his ear.
Vivarin not always right answer
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Pulling all-nighters, downing
massive amounts of caffeine and
stressing under the pressure of
final exams are what a lot of stu-
dents plan to do next week.
"When 1 really get stressed out
for exams and I know I have a real
major exam the next day, I'll go to
the store and buv some Vivarin
and take a couple of them, so I can
be able to stay up the whole night
said Kim Curtis, a junior elemen-
tary education major.
Heather O. Zophy, health edu-
cation coordinator at strdent
health services, said students
should be careful when using caf-
feine products such as Vivarin and
No-Doz when they want to stay
alert.
"If you are going to use the prod-
12PMCEDINNER
ucts that are on the market now
like Vivarin, No-Doz and the pep
pills, it is recommended to follow
directions and use them as the di-
rections indicate Zophy said.
Students who are currently us-
ing certain types of medication may
have extreme reactions to the caf-
feine products.
"Some drugs decrease the me-
tabolism of caffeine like the birth
control pill or oral contraceptives,
tagamet, and certain antibiotics
would decrease the metabolism of
the caffeine Zophy said. "So, the
person might get too much stimu-
lation. They would get even more
of an effect
Students who smoke may get a
lesser reaction from the caffeine
products than students who do
not smoke.
"Smoking increases the metabo-
lism of caffeine products Zophy
said. "A smoker compared to a
nonsmoker, taking a No-Doz, the
person who is a nonsmoker will
feel the effect of the No-Doz more
See EXAM page 4
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YAV!
IT'S OUER
Thank you to all the editors
and asst. editors (and, of
course, Celeste!) who
worked so hard to get these
papers out before 3 a.m.
every week. Just don't
leave me in the Spring.
Thanks also to Jon, Leslie,
my faithful copy editors, our
great staff illustrator and our
support team � Dr.Mr.Oh
Great One Wright, Deborah
and Gregory.
Merry Christmas, Happy
Hannukah, Happy Holidays
to all! �Maureen, the
- stressed one.
&
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4 The East Carolinian
December 8. 1994
TcxMjtsT
GRANDMA'S LATKES
3 Large Potatoes
1 Small Onion
2 Beaten Eggs
2 Tablespoons Flour
1 Teaspoon Salt
Pinch of Pepper
12 Cup Vegetable Oil
Wash the potatoes very well, but
don't peel the. Grate them coarsely '
into a bowl. Grate in the onion.
Add the beaten eggs, flour, salt
and pepper. Let the mixture sit for
10 minutes to thicken. Pour off
excess liquid. Heat the vegetable
oil for one minute in a frying pan,
then drop tablespoons of the
mixtuie into the pan. When the
pancakes are brown around the
edges, turn and fry them until the
other sides are crispy. Drain them
on paper towels and eat them
with sour cream and applesauce.
?recipe from Grandma's Latkes by
Malka Drucker
Meet us in Memphis
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Plenty of Liberty Bowl tickets, as well as hotel rooms remain available. Get your tickets, rooms and T-shirts now.
Call 1-800-DIAL-ECU for tickets. Rooms are available in Memphis. There is no excuse; Be there!
EXAM
From p.3
person
who is the
than the
smoker
Zophy said students can use
alternative caffeine products like
soft drinks, coffee, tea and cer-
tain types of chocolate.
"This is my first final's week
said Rachel Baker, a freshman
health education major. "I guess
what I want to do is to stay up late
and have a caffeine drink
Caffeine products like Vivarin
have about 100 to 200 milligrams
of caffeine, while the alternatives
like coffee and tea have 30 to 100
milligrams per cup. Caffeine, in
general, stimulates the central
nervous system and makes the
heart beat faster, creates a sense
of excitement and keeps people
alert.
Zophy said large amounts of
caffeine from caffeine products
or natural sources can cause
health problems.
"If caffeine is used in large
quantities, it can activate an ul-
cer Zophy said. "If apersonhad
some type of ulcer and had it
treated a long time ago, it could
activate the ulcer again
"It can increase high levels of
blood glucose, which could be
very hazardous to diabetics
Other negative effects can be
insomnia, restlessness, stomach
pains, vomiting, headaches and
ringing in the ears.
With the added pressures dur-
ing this time of year, Zophy said
the health service center has an
increased number of student pa-
tients do not watch their health
and do not get enough sleep.
"I usually don't go to sleep
because I feel like if I go to sleep,
I'll just forget what I'm study-
ing Curtis said. So, I feel better
to keep on going and just study. I
usually cram, so if I have a lot in
�a row, I'll stay up late, and after I
take my exam, I take a nap and
then I'll stay up late again the
next night
Zophy said students should eat
a balanced diet and exercise.
Stress is also something students
will be dealing with during finals
week.
"I feel that the exams do cause a
lot of stress because so much of
your future is riding on your final
performance in those classes said
Michael Rhys Scott, a freshman
commercial arts major.
"When I'm sitting mere study-
ing, I get real stressed Curtis said.
"I tend to smoke more than when
I'm not stressed out studying from
all these exams
Dr. Russ Federman, director of
mental health services, said stress
can cause changes in heart rate,
muscle tension and blood pres-
sure.
"(These are things that happen
when one's autonomic nervous
system is aroused as a result of
distressing thoughts Federman
said. "If we don't perceive any-
thing to be threatening, present or
future, we would not get stress
Federman said stress can come
from a student's state of mind, like
whether or not a student believes,
he or she, will past a final exam.
"If you feel confidently that
things are going to happen in a
successful way, you may feel the
pressure of the work demands, but
that's not going to make you
afraid Federman said. "It's just
going to have you feel like you are
working hard and that's not bad
"But, if you are working hard, if
you are feeling the impact of work-
ing hard, which is normal, but
you're fearing anticipated failure
and saying 'Oh, my God, I'm go-
ing to blow it that changes the
whole complexion of the situa-
tion
Federman said students should
not take exams lightly, but to also
remember that it is not the end of
their academic career to not do
well on an exam because classes
can be taken over.
Federman said during exams,
students cannot prevent stress be-
cause everyone deals with it on a
daily basis. However, he said stu-
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dents can do things to manage
stress levels and by remaining
healthy.
"One thing that I think students
usually forget about is during times
of peak stress, you have to main-
tain healthy lifestyle habits
Federman said. "So, the main thing
is the maintenance of a healthy
diet, the maintain of adequatesleep
and the maintenance of regular
exercise. It's like you think of your
body as a machine, and if you know
what a machine needs to function
optimally under peak demand, it's
got to have some basic essentials.
Too often when students get into
cramming, they just kind of forget
that stuff
Also, scheduling periods of
study and relaxation can lessen
stress.
"1 think when under peak aca-
demic loads, students need to cre-
ate very clearly defined work
schedules, including clearly de-
fined play schedules Federman
said. "Say to yourself, 'Okay, I'm
going to study from 7:00 to 10:30,
and then I'm going to take an hour
break and then I'm going to study
four more hours
Planning how long to make a
studying period or what activities
to do during breaks is up to the
individual.
Federman said that if students
find their stress to be too much to
handle, they should seek help from
student health services, the coun-
seling center or resident advisors.
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Ryder s standard rental requirements Coupon expires Sept IS. 1995
10
Off
Local
Moves
Eastern Limousine Service
1314 East 10th Street
752-9888 or 752-9907
Greenville, NC 27858
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
BULLET
Mifh?club - 'rTouck oi CfiaM
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-Ian j(�
CASH PRIZE
�Contestants need in call & register in advance.
Must arrive h 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces '
$2.(X) OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
i l'j�"�� -I 5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ave.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
NAME BRAND
FASH
JUST
YOU
fe & COLLEGE STUDENTS
m and FACULTY
RACK ROOM
SHOES
GREENVILLE BUYER'S MARKET
Memorial Drive355-2519
DISCOUNT
with
Current College ID
(Some brands I'Xfluded
TIME IS MONEY
MIKEY MONEYS
S1 BONUS CREDIT FOR $20 IN TEXTBOOKS SOLD TO OUR BOOKSTORI T
�&k CREDIT TOWARD
JSIS& 3&�& purchase of any ?
�ks��,SZZ?uT 5r MERCHANDISE t
rviDiHG I INCLUDING T1XTBOOKS! ?
?????????????�???????????????????????
-5 locations on campus
-Receive $1 Bonus credit back for a sell back
value of $20
-Can be used with other coupons

Si
Student Stores
Store Hours M-Thurs- 8-8
Friday- 8-5
Sat 11-5

mt





December 8. 1994
The East Carolinian 5
safe- �-
;Ss5iai-i
�&
9jk
TIRED OF TURKEY &
PIG S-IN-THE-BL ANKET?
TRY SOMETHING NEW
CHRISTMAS COOKIE PIZZA
HEAT oven to 350�
BEAT in large bowl with spoon or on medium speed until smooth:
12 cup packed brown sugar
12 (1 stick) margarine or butter, softened
14 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
!egg
STIR in:
114 cups all-purpose flour
12 teaspoon baking soda
1 4 teaspoon salt
SPREAD dough in ungreased 12-inch pizza pan or shape into 12-inch circle on cookie sheet.
BAKE about 15 minutes or until golden brown; cool.
PREPARE Chocolate Pizza Sauce (below). Spread over crust.
SPRINKLE with and press lightly:
12 cup pecan halves
12 red and green candy-coated chocolate candies
14 cup shredded coconut, toasted, if desired
DRIZZLE with:
2 ounces vanilla-flavored candy coating, melted
LET STAND until set. Heat 1 package (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips, 2 tablespoons margarine
or butter and 3 tablespoons milk over low heat, stirring occassionally, just until chocolate is melted;
remove from heat. Stir in 1 cup powered sugar. Beat with wire whisk until smooth and glossy. (If
, is not glossy, stir in few drops hot water.)
Ii using self-rising flour, omit baking soda and salt.
Recipe provided by The Daily News, Washington ,N.C.
'&xmri
r&g&H
NewmanC atholic
Student Center
wishes to announce a
CHANGE OF PLACE
in its Sunday Mass Schedule.
Beginning Sunday, Jan 8,1995
Both the 11:30 am and the
8:30 pm Mass will be held at
Job market
looking good
�'
The Newman Catholic Student Center
(953 E. 10th St.
2 houses from the Fletcher Music Building)
For Further information, please contact
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
(AP) � Attention, college se-
niors: You have the best shot in
years at landing a job right out of
school.
Hiring is projected to go up 5.9
percent over last year, according
to a survey released today by the
Collegiate Employment Research
Institute at Michigan State Uni-
versity.
"New graduates should get
better replies from employers than
they have been receiving for the
last three or four years said
Patrick Scheetz, the institute's di-
rector. The increase represents a
"modest recovery from a very se-
vere erosion of the job market
he said.
New college grads can expect
to take home annual paychecks
ranging from $20,821 for telecom-
munications job to $40,689 for
chemical engineers, according to
the survey of 545 businesses, in-
dustries and government agen-
cies.
Pay was higher in all parts of
the country and in all occupations
� ranging from a 1.3 percent hike
to $23,856 for hotel restaurant
managers, to a ju mp of 2.6 percent
to $35,302 for electrica 1 engineers.
Hiring of new graduates had
declined more than 30 percent in
the four years prior to last year's
increase of 1.1 percent, Scheetz
said.
COUPON
TWO DAYS ONLY!
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, DEC. 9 AND 10
One coupon per customer per visit. Cannot be used on sale merchandise.
CHATTING
WITH THE
CHANCELLOR
TEC will be meeting with Chancellor Eakin on a monthly basis to act
as a liaison between the student body and the Chancellor's office. After
each meeting, a box will follow written either by a TEC editor or by the
Chancellor.
On Shared Visions
A monumental statement will be released at tomorrow's Board
of Trustees meeeting dealing with the Shared Visions campaign
which is scheduled to continue through next December. The goal
of the campaign is to raise $50 million for Capital Improvement
projects including the Joyner Library expansion, payment for
Todd Dining Hall, renovations to Slay and Umstead residence
halls and campus beautification projects.
On property acquistions
Eakin said that during a recent city council meeting, the Pitt
County Public School Board asked to put a Public School Bond
Referendum on the voting ballot in March.
If passed, ECU will have the opportunity to purchase the old
Rose High SchoolEppes Middle School property. The land will
be purchased by ECU for $6 million, but the contract includes
several terms. Included in the terms is the title to Wahl-Coates
Elementary School, which ECU will relinquish, and a six-year
hold on land usage. This six-year period will allow Pitt County the
time to build a new school, but ECU will be able to survey the land
and plan future projects.
"That probably has more impact on this university than any of
the bonds voted on in this state Eakin said.
On Minges renovations
With the opening home game of the basketball season just
weeks away, Eakin spoke of anticipation for the grand opening of
William's Arena in Minges Coliseum.
"The renovation of Minges Coliseum will have a very pro-
found, positive effect on our basketball program he said. "It is
genuinely an arena that any university would be proud of
The arena will enhance the basketball program in two specific
ways, Eakin said, including adding to the environment and help-
ing in recruiting practices.
"We can bring events in and have the assurance that it will be
a first class facility Eakin said.
On Pirate football
On the note of athletics, Eakin recognized the football team for
its dedication in accomplishing their goals. He added that the
Pirate football team was recognized by theNCA4 News as one of
the three most improved football teams in the country. Other
teams recognized were Duke and Colorado State. He spoke of the
pride he felt while in Memphis for the team's final regular season
game.
"The joy that I saw expressed by the football team over their
accomplishments is, to me, what this football season is all about�
achieving success in the face of adversity Eakin said.
From p. 1
"SG A is going to take this head-
on Eastman said. "No one wants
the fees to be increased
SGA would like to see the fee
increase rejected, but needs addi-
tional time to determine if there
are alternative solutions. If the
Board votes tomorrow, the deci-
sion will be final and fee increases
will ike effect next fall. Eastman
and his cabinet believe there are a
lot of questions that remain unan-
swered.
"A lot of these questions could
be answered if we could go over it
with administration Emery said.
The Board of Trustees meet-
ing will be held at 10:30 a.m
tomorrow in the Great Room in
Mendenhall. Eastman encour-
ages students to voice their feel-
ings on the issue by attending
the meeting or contacting Board
Members (listed on the inside
cover of the ECU phone book)
or call the office of Business
Affairs. Comments can also be
directed to the SGA office.
"I think the students can get
a lot more for a lot less said
Senior Class President Bill
Gheen.
Available
Immediately
Two bedroom apartments
very conviently located
near campus. Excellent
rent rates. Free water and
sewer, washerdryer hook-
ups in all units. Laundry
Facillity and ECU Bus
Service. Call 752-8320.
�� F-iir"wLMiwM
mmimsmmmmmmmmm.





6The East Carolinian
������-
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
December 8, 1994

For Rent

For Rent
ASSOCIATED BROKERS
919 756-8410
800 334-1135
rH
MLS

UNIVERSITY AREA 1 bedroom down
and 2 up. 1.5 baths. Hardwood tloors.
central air. nice yard. $59,900.
RINGGOLO TOWERS Perfect cr your
student or great investment opportunity
Efficiency, one and two bedroom units
available from $22,500.
ONE-BEDROOM lott condo
Convenient to university, sboppmg
Private patto. $34,900.
NICE OPEN PLAN wlarge greatroom
A dining Vaster down. Easy access to
ECU. shopping. Walk to library, park,
tennis $71,500
UNIVERSITY AREA Brick ranch with
hardwood lioors throughout. Fireplace
in large living room Fenced yard
$68,900
CALL FOR
COLOR BROCHURE
OF OTHER
LISTINGS
IWILLOUGHBY PARK Exceptionally
�nice downstairs unit. Two bedrooms.
�two baths. Dues include watersewer &
�cable. S56.900
INVESTORS, this one-bedroom lott unit
has a 1-year lease starting October I.
Non-qualltying loan assumption. End
unit. $34,900
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
�FREE AUCUST RENT
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
IT. or Tommy Williams
756-7815758-7436
SUBLEASE FOR SPRING 2 bedroom Col-
lege View Apartments free cable S350 mo.
Sean or Wyatt 758-4601 Pets welcome
HONEST, RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Preferably grad uate student S210
mo. utilities, 4 blocks from campus. Wilson
Acres, free cable, call 752-0421, leave mesage
FOR RENT Sheraton Village 2 bdrm
townhouse, fireplace, washer dryer available
Jan 1st. S525 321-3253
ROOMMATE N EEDED 2 bedroom 2 full bath-
room apartment with washerdryer. $237.50
month 12 utilities. Move in December or
January call 758-3458
FREE DEPOSIT two bdrm apt. for sublease at
Kings Row call 752-0845 ASAP
NEEDED Cool non cigarette smoking artist
tvpe female to share ultimate 3bed room house.
Cathedral ceilings, fire place, music loft (lots
of music), outdoor patio, central heat and air.
Jo animals. Must be clean and courteous,
lease required as well as security deposit. A
yery nice place for a very nice person. Call for
more info. 758-7993. Close to campus.
NEED MALE ROOMMATE for offcampus-
jionsmoker, nondrinker. Call Richard at 328-
4891
fEMALE ROOMMATE NEEEDED for apt
32 block from art building, 3 blocks from
tiowntown 2 blocks from supermarket
laundromat Rent indues utilties, phone
Table. Available in Jan. 757-1947
HOOMMATE WANTED. Available now rent
Sl92.50 plus 12 utilties, phone and cable.
IMice neighborhood. Call Cathy at 321-5688 if
no answer leave message.
1900 SQ. FT 3 bedroom, 2 full bath house.
Fenced in back yard near campus 752-8079
night 524-5790 days. Available 1-1-95 S750
"month.
ROOMMATE NEEDED S150 a month Great
location in a house. Walk to campus Shared
utilities. Own room nonsmoker. Clean Call
Chris Warren at 830-9536 move in Jan. 1st.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for spring
semester, 2 bedroom, 1 bath $167.50 a mth.
J 2 utilties. Partially furnished. ECU bus ser-
vice. Call Tracy, 758-8646
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3br, 3 bath
house located on golf course. Plenty of space,
Jiving area, kitchen, and screened porch, only
minutes from campus. 5650 deposit $250
month. Will negotiate on deposit. Call 321-
2378 and leave message
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share three bed-
room apt on Stancil. Great location. 1 2 rent
12 util Fenced in backyard call soon. Avail-
able Jan. 1. Erin or Barbara at 758-0607 Leave
message
BRAND NEW Wvndham Circle Duplex avail-
able Jan. 1.3 bedroom, 2 bath Call Kat or Holly
at 758-3693
WANTED: Single person or couple to take
over lease Jan. 1-July 1 One bedroom apt. in
Kings Row. Convenient location. $310 rent
includes cable and watersewer. Call 758-6398
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 bedroom
duplex private bedroom and private bath-
room. Within walking to campus. Please call
757-1738
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Starting January.
Neat non-smoker nicely furnished 2 bedroom
2bath duplex, Wesley Commons On ECU bus
route $250 12 utilities. Female preferred
830-3606
TAN FOR FREE. Female roommate needed
for beautiful 3 bedroom townhouse Rent is
$200 $210 deposit plus, 1 3 utilities. On site
amenities: free tanning beds, pool, jacuzzi,
laundry, weight room Full bed furnished.
Call anytime. 321-5674 321-8590
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR SPRING 95
Brand new apt private bedroom with own
bath, on ECU bus route, behind Kingston Place,
S225 12 phone elec. 758-9769
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted. Non-smoker
to share two bedroom apt - Woodlands. $180
rent, 12 utilities. No pets. 22 yrs. or older.
Student preferred. Call 355-0499
HOUSE FOR RENT: 5 bedroom house, 3 full
baths, garageand storage room. 402 South East-
ern St. between 5th and 4th street. Five houses
from ECU campus. Call Shane � 752-6508
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Three Bedroom
house at 206 East 12th St. Rents for $450 month
, also have one bedroom apt. near ECU at $225
month, call 757-3191
SUBLEASE 3 bedroom 2 1 2 bath apt. at Twin
Oaks starting Jan Call 758-6149 for more de-
tails.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom townhouse at Sheraton Village for
Spring semester. $200 per month, 13 utilities.
Call 321-4028 ASAP
FIRST MONTH'S RENT FREE! Female room-
mate, non-smoker, needed to share house. Close
to campus. Fun and comfortable atmosphere.
Rent $200 mo. Call Diane 752-1166
WANTED: Male or Female for largest bedroom
with own bathroom in 3 bedroom Tar Riverapt:
$150 deposit- $162.50month 758-8399
WANTED: Non-smoker, responsible, easy go-
ing, female to share new 2 bdrm apt. Close to
campus. Cheap rent and utilities. Furnished.
Roommate transferring. Call Dawn at 413-0079
APARTMENT AVAILABLE-take over lease. 2
bdrm near campus with ECU bus service. $380
month call 752-3840
ROOMMATE NEEDED for spring smester,
great location house on Jarvis St. $130 per month
plus utilities. Move in Jan. Call 758-9191. 758-
2159 or 756-5134, ask for Bobby Parry.
FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2
bedroom, living room combined with kitchen,
bath. Ciose to campus washerdryer, available
18 Dec. $425 utilities, tel. 758-7427
ROOMMATE NEEDED Rent 5200, Deposit
$200 one half utilities, female non-smoker Call
321-6554 after 6pm or leave message
MASTER BEDROOM, partial furnished,l2
utilities, washer, dryer, 1 block from campus
S230mo. 752-4039 ask for Jim
ROOMMATE- Quiet, serious student to share
large house in quiet neighborhood located past
the hospital. Includes rent, utilities, cable tv all
for just $260 per month. Available after Dec 17
ROOMMATE NEEDED- to share 2 bedroom
apt. washerdryer, pool, tennis court, cable.
Willoughby Apt. $257.50 per month. Call 321-
8798 ask for Matt.
PARKING SPACES l2block from campus,
on Summit St. Commuter and Full time spaces!
Leave message, 758-5294
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for spring
semester to share 2 br duplex within walking to
campus. S170mo. 12 utilities. Prefer re-
sponsible individual non-smoker. Call 757-
1966
ROOM FOR RENT in Tar River Est. available
Jan. 1 Rent 5162.50,5100 deposit call now 758-
8215
For Sale
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Residency Status
and Tuition is tht brochure by attorney Brad
Lamb on the in-state tuition residency applica-
tion process. For sale: student stores, Wright
Building.
92 TREK 8000 with Rock Shox Mag 21, Deore
XTDX components, control tech stem, Onza
bar ends, Ritchev saddle, Panaracers, more. Im-
maculate $750 752-1486
FOR SALE, 1988 Mercury Tracer, recent tune
up, 105k good condition graduating and want
new car. $1500 neg Call 756-5134 leave mes-
sage.
KING SIZE WATERBED with new mattress
and mirror bookshelf. Excellent condition
includes matching sheets and com-
forter. Moving- must sell. $100 obo
757-2684
BAHAMA CRUISE- 5 days, 4 nights
only $295 for 2 people perfect for
spring break or whenever you want to
take it 757-2684
FOR SALE: King-size waterbed, semi-wave-
less, heater and bookcase $100. 758-6152
ALPINE CLIMBER CSA-STAIR MACHINE,
new, hardly used. Independent action shocks.
Electronic monitor. Makes great x-mas gift. $100.
Call Andi at 830-5250
T BOA SNAKE. $450 756-9452
MACINTOSH PLUS COMPUTER, case, all
software, manuals, great word processor, $120,
call 321-0938
LOFT FOR SALE price nego. please call 757-
0312 (Must sell)
TIRES. BFCoodrich radial TA's,size21560
R14 over 75 percent of the tread still left. Great
condition, must sell, $75 or offer call 328-8167
HUGE GENUINE PLEATHER SOFA, chair &
Ottoman. Brown-seats A. $100 obo also round
kitchen table with leaf-cheap. Leave message at
321-1266 or call 847-0960
FOR SALE OR TRADE for computer. 1987
Honda wagon w air or 59 Jeep 4WD- $500each
or best offer. Call 752-2644 after 5:00 pm
KENWOOD HOME STEREO SYSTEM. Tuner,
electronic EQ, 125 wattschannel amplifier, 5
disc changer, dual cassette, Kenwood speakers
w12inch woofersand matching cabinet. Multi-
function programable remote and all manuals.
All Kenwood, exc. condition, only 2 years old.
5800 oboneg. 758-7615
CANNONDALE M300 men's mountain bike.
Quick release wheels, quick adjust seat. Ulock
self coiling lock included Only 7 months old,
$330. (919)238-3541
FREE KITTENS to good homes: 1 calico, 1
tabby for more info, call 752-3536
DP AIR STRIDER- Walker, stepper, jogger-
Computer does calories, rate, pulse, distance,
everything- hardly used- 5200 at Wal-Mart,
vours for $ID0 or obo Call Lori at 758-1932
For Sale
WDndering what to get far your
mom, sister, or WHend?
We have just produced a
videotape on Personal Safety
for Women An ideal gift for
the woman in your life.
Attitude, Awareness,
Avoidance are stressed as well
as simple techniques
for self defense. $15
Charles June Karate Institute
Call 752-7283
PIANO- Upright Baldwin, needs minor key
repair tuning. Need to get rid of quick. $100
Call Harold at 830-5160 ,
GREAT X-MAS PRESENT. 3-D camera. $300
value willing to let go cheap. Uses 35mm stan-
dard film as easy as a normal camera. Call 321-
8798 for Matt
I
BEAR Camo Compound Bow with quiver and
six arrows 550. Bow is four years old but used
only one season. Call Mark at 830-0722
LAP TOP COMPUTER- Toshiba T1850 manu-
als, carrying case, printer included. Pre-pro-
grammed word processing. 1 year old like new!
Call Stephanie at 328-8069
DRYER, Sears Kenmore. works well, must sell,
call Jason at 758-8215, best offer.
LJ.
Services Offered
Help Wanted
RESEARCH HFORMATION
Largest Library of information in U.S. �
alsubjKts
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COO
WMfr 800-351-0222
�ttillUar or (310 477 8226
Or. rush $2 00 to Raurch Information
n322ldaho"Ave 2064. Los Angeles CA 9002b
Travel
on
HELP WANTED
Drivers for Gumby's
Make $50 -100 a night CASH!
Make your own Schedule
Come to Gumby's and apply
321-4862
52,000month working on Cruise Ships or
Land-Tour companies. World travel (Hawaii,
Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal and Full-
time employment available. No experience nec-
essary. For more information call 1-206-634-0468
ext. C53622.
PLAYMATES NOW UNDER NEW MANAGE-
MENT: seeks ladies 18and older. Earn Big Bucks
while you learn. Full Time nights and Part-time
anytime. Call for an appointment Playmate
massage (919) 747-7686.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra cash
stuffing envelopes at home. All materials pro-
vided. Send SASE to Central Distributors Po
Box 10075, Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
$1500 WEEKLY POSSIBLE mailing our
circulars! No experience required! Begin now!
For info call 202-298-8935.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Students needed!
Fishing industry. Earn up to $3,000- 56,000 per
month. Room and board! Transportation! Male
or Female. No experience necessary. Call (206)
545-4155 ext A53621
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. Earn $1000's
weekly working at home mailing our circulars.
Free details, send SASE: R&B Distributors, Box
2035-i Greenville NC 27858
SKI RESORT JOBS - Hiring for winter quarter.
Up to 52,000 in salary & benefits. Ski
snowboard instructors, lift operators, wait staff,
chalet staff, other positons. Over 15,000 open-
ings. For more info, call: (206)634-0469 ext.
V53623
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to $1,000 plus
a week escorting in the Greenville area with a
licensed agency. Must be 18, dependable and
have own phone and transportation. Call Dia-
monds or Emerald City Escorts at 758-0896 or
757-3477
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BETTER
GRADES? Well, I'll I pay you to! Make your A's
pay by calling Student Supplements today. We
offer cash for going to class. Call now at 752-
6947
BOWEN CLEANERS Help wanted: Part time
counter sales rep. Mon- Fri. 3-7 alternating Sat.
9-5. Starting pay based on previous retail and or
cashier experience- some computer skills
needed. Apply at 3114 S. Evans or 756-680U
DEPENDABLE FEMALE WANTED for minor
cleaning, yardwork, etc. starting pay $5 hr. flex-
ible hours, must have transportation. Call Tho-
mas Cannon at Thomas Cannon Construction
Co. 321-3233 or 355-6171
EARN $500 OR MORE WEEKLY stuffing enve-
lopes at home. Send long SASE to: Country
Living Shoppers, Dept. S32, Po Box 1779,
Denham Springs, LA 70727
TELEMARKETING- Davenport Exteriors Ther-
mal Gard- S5 per hour plus bonus. Easy work,
flexible hours start today. Call 355-0210
NATIONAL MARKETING FIRM seeks stu-
dent groups and organizations to earn great
money while participating in on-campus pro-
motions for top companies this school year. For
info, call (800)592-2121 ext. 3l2
Travel
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Ov er $5 bil-
lion in free financial aid is now available from
private sector grants & scholarships. All stu-
dents are eligible regardless of grades, income,
or parents income. Let us help you. for more
info, call: 1-800-959-1605 ext F53621
TYPING Reasonable rates resumes, term
papers, thesis, other services. Call Glenda: 752-
9959 (days); 527-9133 (eves)
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINECall 1-900-884-
1400 ext 439 $2.95 min. must be 18 or older.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS: DV-1
Greencard Program, by US Immigration
Greencards provide US permaneet resident sta-
tus. Citizens of almost all countries are allowed.
For info & forms: New Era Legal Services 20231
Stagg St. Canoga Park, CA 91306 Tel: (818)772-
7168; (818)998-4425 Mon- Sun 10am-11pm.
Cancun
Jamaica
Florida
On-Campus Contact:
Angel @ 328-9961
Stephanie @ 758-8479
from ql.JjV
from QlJ5'V
fromJ.XV
DC
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn up to
Help Wanted
120 N. tUOKi St. flhoca NY WHO
lc4ftmi-aorods-484o
1-607-272-6964f-O 1-607-272-6963
RatM �'� par pane- quad occupancy Air ttmnaportaMn vti MMm ttt.
Ada �U3 J�pr�jf� !��� tor Jam md Cwci S�e lour ptoctp - to
comp:�a ttjmw and oondtnona
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You

N�JCASH7TT
� �
LUW Illi'f Wll
29 GAL. TANK with Salt Water set up and
extras 5150 Call 758-1104
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
LEVI
ETC.
Student Swap Shop
414 EVANS ST. LXDWNTOWN
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
HOOK NOW AN! SAVI
JAMAICA $439. CANCUNBAHAMAS 131
PANAMA CITY $119. OATONA 1149
ORGANIZE GROUPS. EARN CASH, A TRAVEL FREE
ENDLESS SUMMER!
1-800-234-7007
SPRING BREAK! Early sign-up specials! Ba-
hamas Party cruise 6 days $279! Includes 12
meals 6 parties! Cancun & Jamaica $399 with
Air from Raleigh! 1-800-678-6386
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring Break-How
about it in the Bahamas or Florida Keys.
Where the Party never ends. Spend it on your
own private yacht. One week only $385 per
person. Including food and much more. Or-
ganizers may go for free! Easy sailing Yacht
Charters 1-800-783-4001
EZ
GOLD INITIAL RING with initials MSR at
Bw-3onThurs. 17th. Muchsentimental value
If found please call Marcie at 758-8622
Lost & Found
Personals
STEPHANIE L 1 apologize for the misun-
derstood comment. Can I make it up to you?
I'll treat you right. Secret Admirer
Greek Personals
miss you! Please come back and visit. Love your
Alpha Delta Pi sisters.
ALPHA DELTA PI wishes everybody good luck
on exams!
CONGRATULATIONS TO NEXT YEARS EX-
ECUTIVE OFFICERS: Nan Patterson- Pres Katy
McNiff- V. Pres Kristen Schiavone- Tres Far& �
Miller- Frat. Ed, Kathy Molnar- Rush director
Tristan Lee- Chapter Promotions, Jessica Gibson- '
Social Chair, Olivia Plymale- House Manager,
Melissa Godwin- Adm. Asst.StaceyKlatsky- Schol-
arship, Kim Hite- Philanthropy, Jennifer Hemink-
Rec. Sec Amanda Baer- Corresponding Sec J
Wendi Hill- Panhellenic Delegatge, JP Worley- r
Gamma, Michelle Whitehurst- Activities, andJonni I
Waynewright- Intermurals. We are so proud of I
you. Good luck. Love your Alpha Phi sisters. ,

ALPHA PHIS AND THEIR DATES Fri night
was out-a-hand when Courtney Square turned f
intoChristmas land. When the balloonscamedown ,
and were popped much shyness came to a stop. '
Lines formed beneath the mistletoe where no one ,
left without a glow Some dates would not stop I
dancing while others dates went nkd prancing. ,
Thank you dates your number one, just another t
Alpha Phi night full of fun.
AQ
CHI OMEGA: Sat. night was really exciting.
Evan Williams and egg nog was very inviting.
"Can I have another beer please?" Oh well,
better head down to BW-3s. We enjoyed the
social and we are looking forward to " Around
the World" in Jan. Delta Chi.
CHI OMEGA, Ho Ho Ho it was a Christmas
theme: Egg nog, candy canes and other things
to be seen. Candy canes were broken and
Paul's hand was too. He didn't care, so this
toast is for you. Nevertheless, we all had a ball,
thank you Chi-O and Merry Christmas to you
all! Love Delta Chi
CONGRATULATIONS MAUREEN on
Panhellenic Pres! Your AOPI sisters are so
proud- Love ya mean it
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEWLY
ELECTED AOPI OFFICERS: Pres - Amy
Johnson, V. Pres- ADM- Holly Fleming, VP
ED- Jenny Lucas,CR-Nan Woods, Rec. Sec-
Nikki Biackstock, Corr. Sec- Stephanie
Minkove, House Mana Ashley Ratliff, Fund
Heather Edmonds, Scholar- Emily Reason, K
or R- Angel Byrd, Pan. Exec- Maureen
McKenna, Pan. Del- Lorri Murphy, Pr- Debbie
Smith, New Member edJude Nagle, Alum.
Rel. & Asst. Chap. Tres Lorie Pettis,
Intermurals-Karaa Blaha.Songleader- Allison
McCullen, Historian- Dana Hinson, Asst.
House Tres Tracy Long, Rx3- Caren Cantrell,
Social- Anne Rossiter, Beaut- Michelle Hoops
Benedetti
MAUREEN, CONGRATULATIONS on be-
coming the new Panhellenic Pres! I am so
proud of you and know you will do an awe-
some job! Alpha Love, Karen Bassetti your
AOPI Chapter Advisor
PHI SIGMA PI congratulations on bringing
home the Torchia again Baltimore was very
kind to us and it was a blast! Congratulations
toall brothers who won distinguished awards!
PHI SIGMA PI wants to congratulate all new
brothers! Kara Abbott, Karyn Alvestad,
Heather Clem, Jill Darpino, Tony Davenport,
Jennie DeGroote, Susan Dickey, Dannie Fos-
ter, Jill Hargett, Janet Hobbs, Tina McEachin,
Tim Pollard.Cindy Riedel, Maria Rocas.Stacey
Shaw, Robin Speaks, Michelle Stone, Chandra
Waddell, Carolyn Weakland, Jon Wood, Jen-
nifer Workman, and Donna Yeaw Way to go
Alpha Rho!
PHI SIGMA PI Congratulations to all broth-
ers on a fine semester. Lets make the spring
semester even better. Hope everyone has a
great holiday break!
SIGMA PI hopes everyone has a great Christ-
mas break. Good luck on finals, see you next
semester.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new Sigma PI
Exec. Council. Sage: Kevin Cale, 1st Counse-
lor: Brad Stephens, 2nd Councilor. Kent Knorr,
3rd Counceior: Brian Rubino, 4th Counselor:
Brent Hood, Herald: Britton King
PI KAPPA PHI: thanks so much for the awe-
some social last week. We all had a great time
and can't wait to get together with you guys
again soon! Love, Chi Omega
DELTA CHI- Thank you so much for a great
social Sat. We really appreciate everything
you did to make it a fun night for everyone.
Hope to do something again soon!
CONGRATULATIONS LUCY GOODWIN
for being elected Panhellenic Asistant Rush
Chair and Darcie Reasoner for being elected
order of Omega Sergeant-at-Arms. We're
proud of you! Love, your Chi Omega sisters.
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF CHI
OMEGA would like to wish everyone good
luck on exams and a safe and happy holiday
season. Have a great break!
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA supports ECU at
the Liberty Bowl! Good luck we'll be pulling
for you!
SIGMA would like to wish everyone good
luck with their finals. Study Hard!
TO ALL THE GRADUATING SIGMAS-
Good luck in everything that you do! We will
miss you very much! Love your sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO RYAN THO-
MAS for being elected Panhellenic Vice Pres.
We are so proud of you! Love your Sigma
sisters
DELTA ZETA LasiSat. night was smokin! We
hope you all had a great time at our little get
together. Let's go it again soon. Love, the
brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma
STEPHEN ANTHONY, CONGRATULA-
TIONS! On your initiation into Sigma Tau
Gamma. We hope you make the most of it.
Your new brothers of Sig Tau.
ALPHA PHI We all had a blast last Thurs
night and we hope you did too! We will have
to get together again real soon Love, the
brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma
PI DELTA Sorry that we are so late We all had
a great time and can't wait till.the next! The
brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma
WE HOPE EVERYBODY has a very Merry-
Christmas and a happy New Year! Love the
sisters of Alpha Delta Pi
CONGRATULA i 'ONS toall the graduating
seniors. We love you guys and are going to
CONGRATULATIONS LARA WILLIAMS on
your engagement. Love your Alpha Phi sisters
ALPHA PHI would like to wish everyone good
luck on their exams and a safe and fun winterbreak
DELTA ZETA, The brothers of Delta 9ig are look-
ing forward to reaching "Melt Down" Fri. night.
Delta Sig
CONGRATULATIONStoDarylCrouse on gradu-
ating. Way to go Daryl. From your brothers of
Delta Sig.
CONGRATULATIONS to the followingbrothers
of Delta Sigma Phi: Chris StainBeck, Ben
McCandliss, Greg Barnes, Jonathan Bridgets, Brad
Ellis, Jake Perry, Mark Weeks, Joey White, and
Kevin "Flava" Reed. Don't let the Journey stop
here. The brothers of Delta Sig
JAKE PERRY OR "PONCH" hanks for taking
time off from "ChiPs" to receive your award for
best little brother of Delta Sig 1994! Your Big Bro
Brent
8
PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPETENCY TEST
The Department of Exc'rise and Sport Science
Motor and Physical Fitness Competency Test is -
scheduled for Thursday, December 15, 1994, at .
1:00pm in Christenbury Memorial Gym. A pass-
ing score on this test is required of all students ,
prior to declaring Exercise and Sport Science as a
major. Direct questions to Mike McCammon or
Dr. Gay Israel at 328-4688.
PS1 CHIGIVING
Through Dec. 9, Psi Chi will be collecting any
types of seeds, VCR tapesfblank or used) and
beads. There is a box outside of the Psychology
office in Rawl 105 for everyone willing to make
donations. The items will go to the Caswell Cen-
ter, a group home for the mentally retarded. For .
more information contact F. Vance 830-5425
I
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Thursday, December 8, is the Feast of the Im-
maculate Conception. Masses for this day are:
Wednesday, Dec. 7 (Virgil Mawifc 530pm. Thurs-
day, the Feastday itself: 8am, 12:lCpv � 5'30T?'
All Masses are at the Newman Center, 95C r Jl
Street�2 houses from the Fletcher Mask Tmild-
ing.
FMPI OYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Employment Opportunities are available to stu-
dents who are interested in becoming PERSONAL
CARE ATTENDANTS to students in wheelchairs.
READERS, and TUTORS. Past experience is de-
sired but not required. For an application contact:
Office for Disability Support Services, Brewster
A-116 or A-114, Telephone (919) 328-6799
ADVENTURES IN HEALTH CHILDREN'S
MUSEUM
Presents its 3rd Annual Christmas Magic Home
Tour on Sunday December 11,1994 from 1 -5:00pm.
Advanced tickets are available for $10.00 or $12.00
on the day of the tour. For more informantion,
contact Cheryl Summers at 752-7231.
EATING DISORDERGROUP: Acounselinggroup
for women with anorexia and bulimia will be
offered on campus next semester. The group will
address self-esteem, stress management, relation-
ships and problem-solving skills The group meets
weekly beginning in January and is facilitated by
Susan Bower, MD, Student Health and Sara Shep-
herd, PhD, Counseling Center. Please call 328-
6661 or 328-6795 for more information and to sched-
ule an appointment to talk with a facilitator before
the group begins.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student Center wishes tc
announce a CHANGE OF PLACE in its SUNDAY I
MASS SCHEDULE. Beginning Sunday, January RJ j
1995, the 8:30 evening Mass Will also be held in the I
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th St 2 houses from the J
Fletcher Music Bldg. The Center will be closed I
from December 17 to January 2. For Further Infor- j
mation, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
PSI CH1G1V1NG
On Dec 12, between 4-7pm, Psi Chi will be collect-
ing old VCR's, stereo or any other kind of elec-
tronic equipment Any persons interested in do- ,
nating come by the conference room on the first j
floor of Rawl. All items will be given to the Caswell
Center, a group home of the mentally retarded. For �
more information contact F. Vance 830-5425
Fri I SCHOOI OF MUSIC EVENTS
For upcoming events call ECU-6851 or the 24-hour
hotline at ECU 4370.
YOUTH HOSTELS
Traveling over the holidays? Or during Spring ,
Break, or during the summer? Purchase a youth i
hostel card now! It is good for a year and for $25, it ,
can save you many times its cost. You will receive '
a map and a US directory of hostel locations. The
card is also good for international travel so come '
by International Programs soon for your card! The ,
office is located on 9th St behind McDonald's and '
is open M-F from 8:00-5:00, or call 328-6769 fqi !
inormation
1
i
FAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
Would you like to be a positive role model, a big -
Friend for a child in the community? Then be a part J
of East Carolina Friends. We have little friends i
ages 6-11 and starting in January students in 9th j
grade. For more information call Nikki 328-7655 i
and be sure to look for announcements and flyers j
in January. I would like to thank the volunteers for i
their commitment this semester. Keep up the good
work. Have a safe and relaxing break.
t
ArtFBBATIONOFHOPE
In Goldsboro, Saturday, Dec. 10th, with speakers ;
Rev W W Finlator, Quaker Ed King, Betsy Crites
and with music by Mike Hamer (hammer dulci- i
mer) and Scott Ainslie (blues quitar). Hope is for j
less militarized world. For transportation phone
Mike Hamer, ECU English Dept. 328-6682 or 830- J
0349
�� �-





.��. '�





The East Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiler, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifesryle Editor
Meredith Langley, Asst. Lifesryle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson, Asst. Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Printed on
�307o
recycled
papet
Thomas Brobst. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley. Typesetter
Jennifer Coleman, Typesetter
Darren Mygatt, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary-
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jon Cawley, Asst Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
Fee increases proposed So�ial Pressure msPires anorexia
r �� Rv Ancrpla McCullers
For all you who feel strongly about
tax increases, you'll love this one. ECU's
own Board of Trustees is planning to vote
tomorrow on fee increases that will jack-
up the price of a parking sticker from $70
to $96. The proposal to be voted on is
detailed and requires time to ponder.
While the Board wishes to hastily pass its
agenda, SGA is fighting to allay the vote
until after the holidays so a more informed
decision can be reached.
Is SGA's request an unreasonable one?
TEC does not believe that a hasty decision
should be reached before the students'
elected officials can study the plan and
possibly offer alternative solutions. Why
the Board of Trustees waited.until the
end of the semester to do this is
unreasonable. It leaves one to wonder
whether or not they delayed this vote just
so they could get what they want before
students knew what hit them.
Bear in mind, this is the same Board of
Trustees that voted to increase fees for us
while the bulk of the student body was on
summer vacation. This is the same shrewd
technique many members Congress used
recently when they voted themselves a huge
pay increase � conveniently after C-
SPAN's camera's had gone off the air.
Let your voice be heard on this issue.
The Board is meeting at Mendenhall's Great
Room tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. Do yourself
a favor and show up at Mendenhall
tomorrow to speak your piece, or it may
cost you. For further details concerning
this issue, see page one's article on proposed
fee increases in today's paper.
By Angela McCullers
College provides opportunity for choice
Sometimes we may think
about what it is we will actually
want to do with our lives after
college and come up with a blank
screen. This indecision can make
for more than a little anxiety while
we're here, because we often feel
we should be planning and
wot king toward whatever career
itis we're supposed tobe working
toward.
Maybe some of us are here
studying for something our
parents want us to do, and that
we've thought we wanted to do
up until now, only to realize we're
doing it for mem, not us. And,
once realized, do we have the
guts to tell them? All too often,
probably not in the best way we
could. Communication between
family members is probably
something we'll never perfect,
although we can get better at it
with age, and with a little
patience, if we can keep trying.
Some of us are probably
studying in fields that, up until
now, seemed like the thing we
wanted to do with our life, but
now its different We know more
than we did before about it and it
doesn't look the same any more.
Do we have the guts to get out of
it and try something new, after
all this time? Do we have the
courage toeven think about other
possibilities, other roads we
might take, and where they might
lead?
Theremustbesomethingout
there that we're supposed to do,
that we were meant to do,
something that we could make a
difference doing. If we don't
believe this, then what do we
believe in? If we can't make a
difference with what we do in mis
life, then what's the point anyway,
rigjit?
I think there comes these
crucial times in our lives when we
have some huge, life-changing
decisions to make. Sort of like
Robert Frost's, "Two Roads
Diverged we come to forks in
the road of our lives and must
make the kinds of decisions that
can only be made once. Once
decided, we have no choice but to
move on. There's no real point in
looking back at what might have
been.
I've always thought one of the
best things about being in the
college environment is that it gives
us these opportunities not only to
make these crucial decisions, but
to have a little time to mink about
mem before we make them, to
survey our different options and
mentally look ahead and
contemplate the consequences of
our decisions. This is an
opportunity we wouldn't often
have if we were out in the world of
nine-to-five, worrying too much
about the daily grind and basic
survival to think about what it is
we actually want to do in life.
Of course we're all in it
for money, right? At least, in the
by Patrick Hinson
beginning this must be true for
almost everyone. We all want to
get rich some day. We've been
taught by our culture mat is what
the foundational goal in life must
be. "Be aggressive That is how
we will judge the level of our
success,by how much we'reworth
monetarily when we've reached
as high as we can possibly reach.
No amount of money is going to
prevent that first heart attack,
however, from the stress of always
working, working, working for
some materialistic, personal gain.
And when the time comes to
let go of this life, will we look back
and be proud of what we've done,
whose lives we've touched, what
we've accomplished in this life.
The Bible says that a rich person
cannot enter the kingdom of
Heaven. I think, whether you're
a Christian and whether you
believe in a Heaven or not, this
warning still makes a good bit
of sense.
I also don't think it means
"rich" literally. I think it means
rich as in self-centered and
greedily rich. If all we ever do
in our short time here on earth
is take care of ourselves,
ignoring those around us and
what might have been, what we
really could have done in life,
have we really accomplished
that much at all? I think this is
something each of us must
answer individually, and better
to do it now than later.
In our society there is a "thin
is intrim is in" bias. If we do not
look like a model, many of us can
feel out of it and not very good
about ourselves. Social pressures
to be thin are intense. Popular
magazines are increasing the rate
at which they publish articles on
dieting and appearance. The
model's who are held up as
physical ideals for other women
all across the nation have grown
progressively slimmer over recent
decades.
Society has promoted the
notion that physical perfection is
important and thatour appearance
somehow defines who we are. As
a result of these notions, many
American women become
anorexic or bulimic.
Anorexia nervosa is a
dangerous eating disorder that can
harm its victims physically and
mentally as they starve themselves
in a quest for thinness. This
disorder makes a person
obsessively think about not
gaining weight. Some anorexics
become exercise fanatics and work
out for hours. At the same time,
they limit their food intake. They
also have low self esteem and a
distorted body image. No matter
how much weight they lose,
whenever they look into the mirror
they see themselves as fat.
Anorexia nervosa has been called
a "disease of abundance It is not
known anywhere except in the
affluent parts of the world, where
food is plentiful. Although it was
named first in the nineteenth
century, and has been known and
described throughout history,
anorexia is considered a fairly
recent phenomenon.
Bulimia is another eating
disorder that can be harmful to
your physical and mental health.
Princess Diana may be history's
most famous victim of bulimia
nervosa. Like anorexia, it is fueled
and propelled by a dual obsession
� thinness and food. Unlike
anorexia, which prompts a person
to starve themselves, bulimia is a
binge-purge pattern (eat a large
amount of food in a short period
of time and men eliminate the food
from the body).
Women and girls compose 90
percent of the eight million people
in the United States with anorexia
and bulimia. Eating disorders are
a result of a complex interaction of
social and psychological factors.
Anorexics and bulimic refer to
food as a way of controlling their
lives. In their quest for control,
they become thinner, sometimes
even disappearing altogether.
Women suffer from these
diseases in silence and shame, with
little advocacy for research or
prevention. In a world where most
of the hungry are female, it is a
tragic irony mat starvation �
whether economically based or
socially enforced � tastes the
same.
Is it possible today mat being
slim and attractive does in fact
offer us an adaptive advantage?
Society has gradually evolved
into a more and more visual one,
with images on film and tape
commanding our attention more
insistently than words on paper,
it's still not entirely clear why the
voluptuous female idols of the
past have been replaced by icons
of almost boy-like slimness.
For many generations and
many cultures, the pressure,
particularly upon women, to
fulfill their societies' expectations
of physical beauty have given
rise to devices meant to help the
woman along her way to the
"ideal" form Often these devices
have been dangerous and even
life threatening.
Hundreds of women are
trapped by an illness that mocks
them with illusions while it
devastates their bodies.
Hundreds afflicted with anorexia
or bulimia are trying to break
free. We should not criticize each
other so harshly for having the
appearance that does not meet
some arbitrary standard. Beauty
is a state of mind.
-Letters to the Editor-
To the Editor.
In response to Joshua White's editorial on
November 29, "Watch out, here come the
Republicans I have only thing to say, Mr. White is
right on the mark. The points he made about the
domination of moral issues in the Republicans'
platform are all true. However, 1 will not condemn all
Republicans as a part of the religious right. The
reason issues like prayer in public schools are
becoming popular right now is because groups such
as the Christian Coalition are trying to take over the
Republican party.
Not everybody in America is a Christian, nor
does everybody want to be a Christian. Article 1 of
the Constitution is clear, NOT A CHRISTIAN
NATION sic. America is definitely NOT A
CHRISTIAN NATION. However, America is a
Jewish, Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, Unitarian,
Agnostic, Atheist, Christian nation. Therefore, laws
mat are modeled around morals of groups like the
Christian Coalition should never be imposed onto
the people of this country.
I have a feeling mat most of us do not want to
carry a Bible to class everyday. Nor are we willing
to condemn homosexuals and abortion doctors as
sinners that will forever bum in hell.
But people that believe these things are now
running Congress. There is a simple solution,
however.
Getoff your lazybutts, become politically active,
and change the country. The power that these
groups have can be easily taken away. This country
does not just belong to Pat Robertson and Jesse
Helms. It's ours too, and we can believe what we
damn well want to believe.
Michael Walker
Sophomore
Political Science
With all the debate in the political arena over school prayer, those who have an interest in the issue should be
awarethalthereexislsinourConstitutimanArticlel,aswellasanAm
I is quite lengthy, but reads in part: "Section 1. All legislative Powers herein shall be vested in a Congress of the
United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House ofRepresentatives. Section 2
Amendment I is asfollows: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting
the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances
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! hi Ecisl � 9
December 8. 1994
The East Carolinian
A Drop
IN THE
Bucket
Lifestyle
November means Christmas
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
'A Drop in the Bucket" is
what it i laims to be: a
very tiny drop in the great
screaming bucket of Ameri-
can media opinion. Take it as
you will.
1 he manipulation of tacts
by the media has been a mat-
ter of discussion on many
fronts these days. I'm sure
there are some skewed facts
here and there with the sheer
number of scandals and acts
of mayhem that have occured
recently. But what about the
manipulation of the media by
the sources themselves?
Could it be possible that the
American political system
would stoop to the level of
passing along half-truths
masked as political promises?
Would they stretch the truth
in order to further themselves
or destroy their opponent?
Case in point, one of the
platforms that many Repub-
lican candidates advocated
was term limits for Congress.
rhey staunchly stood by this
idea, saying that if they were
elected they would pursue it
relentlessly. This new bill
would prevent people like
Strom Thurmond, who has
been in Congress since the
mid-twentieth century, from
being there for life. If the
President is limited in his
number of terms in office,
shouldn't Congress and the
Senate? Yes, it seems like a
good idea. Too bad they don't
plan on following through
with it.
The Republican GOP gae
to the media what amounts to
a letter of intent upon being
elected to office; it stated all
the basic platforms that most
Republican candidates were
holding as their own views. It
seemed to imply that they in-
tended to pursue the passing
of term limits until the end.
After the election, they let us
in on their real intentions.
These term limitations would
not take effect until long after
the year 2000, and it would
not be retroactive, which
means it would not apply to
those already in office. When
questioned on this, many
newly-elected Republican of-
ficials pointed to the letter of
intent, which basically said
that they would bring the
term limitations to a vote and
that it never really said that
they would make it a law. So,
in effect, the Republican party
made a strong issue out of
this concept during the elec-
tion and made damn sure that
the media and the general
public thought of it as one of
their goals, when they never
intended to actually pass the
motion. In other words, they
lied.
So there it is. The conser-
vative members of our soci-
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Christmas came early this year.
But then again, it always does at
WZMB.
Each vear, our college radio sta-
tion sponsors Christmas in Novem-
ber, a call-in giveaway promotion.
Loyal listeners keep their ears open
every November for the sound of
Santa's rocket sled, which is their
cue to call in tor prizes. This year's
promotion went well for the sta-
tion, bringing in close to 200 win-
ners between Now 7 and Nov. 30.
Among the prizes handed out
this year were free meals from
Ragazzi's, Professor O'Cool's, BW-
3, Subway and Red Lobster. Free
ice cream from Hank's was also
given away, along with various
cassettes, compact discs and video
rentals from Last Coast Music &
Video. Irtey even gave awaj tree
bowling.
According to Drew Catlin,
WZMB's Grants Manager, all the
businesses involved in the promo-
tion wereglad tohelpout. Which is
a good thing since Gatlin didn't
find out about the promotion until
mid-October. Working frantically
and putting his years of promotion
experience to good use, Catlin
pulled out a virtual truckload ot
prizes, enough for the station to
give away a prize every hour from
2-10 p.m.
Why the rush1 Since school lets
out halfway through December,
November is the only time WZMB
has to really give i ut prizi -s. a! least
tor Christmas Wi been doing
giveaways all along, we just
stepped up the pat c in ember
t iatlin said.
On Nov 30, the station gave
awa their grand prize, a dorm
size refrigerator. Notsatisfied with
a simple call-in tor the big finale,
the station decided to ha e a scav-
enger hunt. Items included on the
list ot scavenger items were a large
ice cube, a ticket stub Irom the 1991
Peach Bowl, a model of the starship
Enterprise and a foui leal lover.
Irtat last item, perhaps the tough-
est on the list was found b the
grand prizev inner, BobNowoc,as
he headed to turn in his scavenged
booty. I hs arms loaded down with
strange items, he dropped his bur-
den in the grass. As,he stooped to
pi k it up, his eyes fell upon the
lucky four-leaf clover that won him
the prize.
Hut students won't need such
luck next week, when the station
hosts the first WZMB Exam Week
Pizza Blitz, running from Sunday,
I Vi .11 to Thursday, Dec. 15. When
hungry, exam-cramming listeners
hear the Pizza Blitz jingle, they'll
have the opportunity to win free
pizza and a six pack of soda from
various local restaurants. The pizza
will be delivered to them within the
hour, courtesy of WZMB.
"Christmas in November was
tun Gatlin said, "and a great tra-
dition tocarrv on. Who knows, with
the Pizza Blitz we may be starting a
new tradition
See DROP page 11
CD Review
System
This box holds the key
to understanding the
devious ways of our CD
reviewers. Enjoy!
PATHETIC

Lame
Pretty
9 � � GOOD
yime
DOVJN IN WHOylLLS
Well, actually, this isn't
Whoville at all. No, it's just
the ECU dorms, which are
only a little like Whoville.
There's probably not any
roast beast in sight here,
but there are a whole bunch
of Christmas decorations.
So unless you're like the
Grinch, with a heart three
sizes too small, enjoy the
spirit of Christmas with our
festive holiday photo mon-
tage. And wipe that hum-
bug off your face! It might
stick!
Rebel 95
Winners
Prose
Fiction
1st Place
A Pretty Good Bike
by Johny Dale
2nd Place:
Fran
by Andy Brown
3rd Place:
The Dinner Engagement
by Andy Brown
Non-Fiction
1st Place
Chosen
by Alicia Alexander
2nd Place:
Johnny Cashes in on
American Recordings
by Gregory Dickens
3rd Place:
My Grandmother Jo, Through
Life
by Avram Klein
Poetry
Free Verse
1st Place:
The Latchkey Blues Player
by Laura Wright
2nd Place;
Bob
by Laura Wright
3rd Place:
Untitled
by Major I. Hooper
Narrative
1st Place:
Pomegranates
by James Earl Casey
2nd Place:
Untitled
by Wayne Robbins
3rd Place:
Seeing is Believing
by Gregory Dickens
Honorable Mention:
Incident in the Grocery
by Wayne Robbins
Children's Literature
1st Place;
The Live Oak
by Randall Martoccia
2nd Place:
Mamo-toto Lion
by Laura McKay
3rd Place;
Do You Want Help?
by Elizabeth Mc David
Art winners not available at
press time.
CD Reviews
m

Brilliant
Catherine
Sorry
Wow kids, wh
(. atherine's nev alb
what 1 call pureaudi
( eal drumbeal
at
urn
r
s. ti
i t
Sor
del
IK
ind'
I M IS
ighl
,unl
fresh guitar sounds (without too
many effects) were what I found
when 1 heard the first track off
their new album, "Songs About
Girls With two lead singers and
three guitar players, this band
pumps vou full of loudly enjoy-
able music.
When I saw that Billy Corgan
co-produced their first EP, Sleepy,
was kind of skeptical; 1 thought
that they were going to sound
like a Smashing Pumpkins cover
band I lowever, I must say that I
was pleasantly surprised to find
that this Chicago-based band has
a style of their own (even though
Catherine's drummer Kerry
Brown is married to Darcv.
Smashing Pumpkins bass player).
1 here are some similarities be-
tween the two bands, su h .is the
tormented vocals that both bands
make sin h good u e of. But,
Catherine has a great twist.
They're a lot more upbe.it than
Smashing Pumpkins anc that
alone puts them m a league all ot
their own.
In fact, Catherine goes so far
as to do a cover ol an old Bee
Gee's ditty, "Every Christian
Lion 1 leai ted Man Will Show
You which ends up showing
their talent as a band and their
individual talents as well. Ibis
was one ot the main upbeat
tracks on the album, and I en-
joyed it intensely
One of my favorite songs from
Sorry has got to be "2 am I'm i
sucker for songs that ha e string
arrangements, and this song defi
nitelv gave me m) till ol them
With lyrics like With empt)
hands I will io all I � an Please
understand when you fall I
won't break, but it s something I
can't take turn this song into a
well- written and beautiful piece
of music that many bands can't
touch.
The more I listened to
Catherine's album, the more it
grew on me. Their arrangements
are classic and original, but you
can still hear their Smashing
Pumpkins influences (but at least
it's subtle). You can tell by listen-
ing to this band that they enjoy
playing together and that they
are not trying to out-shine each
other with their individual tal-
ents Neil Jenden, guitarist tor
the band, laughingly admits in
their press release that they "all
bonded together so quickly as
friends that we asked Kerry (the
drummer) to join the band even
before we knew if he could play
an instrument I Ins method foi
getting musicians seems to be
quite successful since they got
Mark Rew (singer) and Keith
Brown (bass player) b) using
this process
There a ten't reallj any
tracks on thisalbum thai 1 dis-
liked, which is very rare for
me. After th. first ong
though, the'distortion ended
up kicking in, which turned
out to be the i ingon the i ake.
Bill)organ made a wise de-
cision when he tookatherine
under his v ing and i o pro
duccd Sleepy. I heir new al
bum is a swei t i hange Mom
the everyday alternative mu
sic we hear and it I were you,
I would go out and pi� k up
Sum today!
-Meredith
Langley





I
10 The East Carolinian
December 8. 1994
Jam-A-Thon set to help American Veterans
Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
The ECU Sigma Phi Epsilon
Chapter has started a "Jam-A-
Thon Philanthropy Musical
Showcase The Jam-A-Thon is
an open mic session in which
any musician, profession il or un-
professional, can come play. The
only restriction is that no ampli-
fiers are allowed. The next Jam-A-
Thon is scheduled to take place
Dec. 23 at the Plaza from 4-9 p.m.
The event helps raise money
for Disabled American Veterans.
An open guitar case accepts do-
nations in front of the stage. Rob-
ert Lewis, the Philanthropy Chair
of Sigma Phi Epsilon, helped start
the event. "I went to New Orleans
and saw people playing in the
street for money, and it seemed
really entertaining Lewis said.
"Then I was watching MTV's un-
plugged feature, and I saw artists
like Whitney Houston raising
money for South Africa, and Phil
Collins raising money for the
homeless.
"Shortly after this I was watch-
ing TV, and saw a Travis Tritt
video for Disabled American Vet-
erans. So 1 got in con tat t with the
group he's involved with, and
we decided Disabled American
Veterans was the charity we
wanted to work with
The first musical showcase
took place last October at the
Plaza. Originally, it was sched-
uled to be on the campus mall
but was moved indoors due to
rain. Eric Saddler from the Sad-
dler School of Music performed.
The Saddler school still plays a
large role in supporting the event.
Since October, three other na-
tionwide fraternity chapters have
featured a Jam-A-Thon: the
UCLA Chapter, the New York
University Chapter, and the
Middle Tennessee State Chapter.
Warner Brothers offices in New
York, Los Angeles and Nashville
are working with these chap-
ters to help support national
recognition for the event.
"Holding this event allows
a lot of different types of mu-
sic tc be played Lewis said.
"And so a lot oi different types
of people are able to come out
and support the event. It's ex-
citing, and it motivates
people
Mixed Nuts spill from the can at Hendrix Theatre
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The last sneak preview for the
semester was shown Tuesday night
at Mendenhall. The film,MaoMte,
stars Steve Martin as a likable but
hapless state worker who runs a
suicide prevention hotline called
Lifesavers. The film was written and
directed by Nora Ephron (Sleepless
in Seattle). Kudos go to the film com-
mittee for bringing three sneaks to
Mendenhall this term.
Unfortunately, the last film of
the term is also the worst. Mixed
Nuts has an unnecessarily complex
story filled with one-dimensional
characters. The story is told with no
flair and the writing trivializes com-
plex issues like suicide. The tired
punoftheclinic'snameaJoneshould
alert viewers to the depth of the
material in the film.
Steve Martin can be a hilariously
funny comedian. His sense of physi-
cal comedy has elevated many a
film, most notably All of Me, but the
few scenes of physical comedy in
Mixed Nuts add nothing to thestory.
Martin's few pratfalls stick out like
bad dialogue and elicit no laughs.
Finding quality films seems to be a
problem for Martin. He has made
many more mediocre to bad films
than he has made great ones. Mixed
Nuts will have to be remembered as
one of his worst. One of Martin's
other bombs, My Blue Heaven, was,
interestingly, also written by Ephron.
Mm'rfNufstakesplaceonaChrLst-
mas Eve in the beach community of
Venice, California. As the film be-
gins, Phillip (Martin) learns that Life-
savers is being evicted from their
offices at the beginning of the year.
Phillip feels sorry more for the other
two clinic workers than for himself.
Catherine O'Shaughnessey (Rita
Wilson) and Blanche Mur.chnik
(Madeline Kahn) have problems of
their own and rely on their jobs at
the clinic as a source of satisfaction
in their lives. Phillip fears that clos-
ing the clinic will devastate the two
women as well as deprive the com-
munity of a valuable service.
The plot involves Phillip,
Catherine and Blanche but does not
focus on any of them. Instead, we
are introduced to a host of other
characters with problems of their
own Gracie (a hopelessly miscast
Juliette Lewis) is pregnant but can-
not decide if the father of the child,
Felix (Anthony LaPaglia), is worth
staying with. Louie (Saturday Night
Lire's Adam Sandier) lives in the
samebuildingastheclinicand writes
T-shirts for a living. He has a crush
on Catherine and writes songs tor
her which he plays on his ukulele.
Chris (Liev Schreiber) is a transves-
tite who comes to the clinic because
he has no one with whom he can
talk. He ends up flirting with Phillip
and asking him to dance.
All these oddball characterseven-
tuallv converge in a preposterous
ending designed to tweak emotional
chordswhileevokingsmiles because
of the absurdity of the situation. But
nothing in the film prior to this hare-
brained ending develops the char-
acters enough for the audience to
care for them.
Rita Wilson deserves special no-
tice because for too long she has
been known only as Mrs. Tom
Han ks. She flexed her acting muscles
in Sleepless in Seattlewhen shebreaks
down sobbing while relating the plot
of An Affair to Renienibcrtotwomaes.
Wilson possesses genuine charm
and a sense of comic timing. Hope-
fully Mixed Nuts will at least allow
her to get better roles even i f the fi lm
bombs.
The few laughs elicited by this
film cannot begin to compensate for
the empty shell of a movie. Because
of the shallowness of the characters
and the trite handling of the story,
Mixed Nuts fails at every level. It
works neither as a comedy nor as a
light drama. Nora Ephron has done
CCMedi
Wed 1214 X-MAS Party
Ken Evans
Dean Gaines
Trek's Q finds new frontiers
NEW YORK (AP) � It's not
easy being Q.
Now that "Star Trek: The Next
Generation" has warped into
syndication, actor John de Lancie
finds fewer opportunities to play
the all-powerful, all-knowing, in-
sufferable nemesis of Capt. Jean-
Luc Picard.
"I can only do Q when they
ask me de Lancie said. He's
made his guest appearance on
"Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
but that old magic isn't there
when Q can't play with the
doughty captain of the Enter-
prise.
"My main squeeze has always
been Picard de Lancie said.
"That's where the tension, the
friction lies. And that's what's
good about it The more philo-
sophical it is, the bigger the ques-
tion, the better the character
works
De Lancie already has met
with the producers of "Star Trek:
Voyager the 1995 incarnation
of the Trek franchise, in which a
Federation starship, lost in a re-
mote corner of the galaxy, is try-
ing to get home.
"They've come to me to the
extent of saying, 'Nobody from
any of the series can make it over
to 'Voyager' because the distance
is so far. Of course YOU can
He adopts a producer's leer and
raises a speculative eyebrow.
"I said, 'I have a feeling that if
your ratings- are not so hot, the
distance is going to get really, re-
ally short
De Lancie feels the Star Trek
franchise has been good to him.
These days, he's even a featured
player on the computer monitors
of Star Trek fans everywhere.
"I'm a screen-saver re notes.
"They asked me what lines I
wanted. I suggested things like,
'Your hard disk is gone and
'Do you know where your wife
is?'
"They said, 'Uh-huh. Well,
maybe we'll just use lines from
the show
Star Trek also has merchan-
dised his likeness as a Q action
See TREK page 11
mm wim i.d:
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Time: 3:00pm
Date: Thurs, Dec 8, 1994
Place: Wright 313
better work and hopefully has bet-
ter work in front of her.
Mixed Nuts warrants no mixed
reviews. It is a failure.
On a scale of one to ten, Mixed
Nuts rates a three.
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5f





��I-
December 8, 1994
The East Carolinian' 1
NC artist sculpts Agnew
TRYON, NC. (AP) � Some may
consider William Behrends' use of
pure, white Italian marble, which al-
lows no mistakes, an ironic choice for
the subject of his latest sculpture �
former Vice President Spiro Agnew.
Mistakes, after all, cost Agnew his
office.
But as Behrends sculpts the bust
for the U.S. Capitol, his thoughts are
of Agnew as a part of history. For
Agnew, political life is merely part of
his personal history.
"He'soutofthatworld Behrends
said. "I got the impression he didn't
pay much attention (to politics)
Agnew left politics in 1973 when
he resigned as vice president after
pleading no contest to tax evasion
charges. Federal prosecutors had ac-
cused him of accepting kickbacks
fromconstructioncontractors, which
he denied.
SELECTED VARIETIES
CARL BUDDIG
LUNCH MEATS 2 5 oz
SLICED TO
ORDER
WHITE OR YELLOW
- AMERICAN 4 M
�59 CHEESE lb 3.69
TROPICANA
EASON'S BEST
RANGE JUICE
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KELLOGG'S
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LOW PRICES
((Jjjfit(jiit
WHITE RAIN
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SELECTED VARIETIES � 4.15 OZ.
GREAT VALUES
PEPSI OR
DIET PEPSI
2 LITER
PRESIDENT'S CHOICE
TORTILLA WHITE CORN
HUNTER FARMS
CHOCOLATE
CHIPS iooz.1.19 DELIGHT
.12 GAL
He never sought public forgive-
ness and redemption as did his con-
temporary,RichardNixon. In his 1980
book, "GoQuietly or Else Agnew
blames his demise on lying contrac-
tors, a vengeful press and a White
House snarled in Watergate.
Since then, he has lived quietly,
either at a condo in Maryland or at h is
home in California. He turns down
most requests from reporters, whom
he once labeled the nattering nabobs
of negavitism.
It was 20 years after Agnew left
office before the U.S. Senate autho-
rized the $40,000 commission for his
sculpture, even though an 18S5 Sen-
ate resolution provides for white
marble busts of all vice presidents.
Behrends, however, thought only
of the honor for him. He was pleased
that his name would be included
among the sculptors represented in
the U.S. Capitol.
Besides, Agnew is hardly the
first controversial vice president
to be honored with a sculpture.
Aaron Burr, who mortally
wounded Alexander Hamilton in
a duel, is there as well.
To make a clay model of his
bust, Behrends, 48, met with
Agnew four times during the sum-
mer of 1993. Times they were out
together, people would say to
Agnew, "I voted for you in 1968
and 1972, and I'd vote for you
today Behrends said.
Those comments surprised
Behrends, as did his own reaction
to Agnew. "The Agnew in office
was a tough character Behrends
said. "He was the guy who got the
job done. He was not the ideo-
logue I expected to meet. He was
a very open and warm person
TREK
From p. 10
figure, and he graces the latest
Star Trek pinball machine.
"There is all that cuckoo-ness
he said, "and yet it's very dispro-
portionate to the amount of times
that I've been on, so it is a little
unworldly
De Lancie's current project is
narrating a TV special, "National
Geographic Explorer: Searching
for Extraterrestrials So, John,
you've seen the film, you've read
the text: Are they out there?
"Yeah. I just don't think they're
visiting us he said. "It's unrea-
sonable, actually, to think that
they're not out there, given the
odds.
"You've got seven trillion pos-
sible places to look! You've got to
think you might possibly find
something
De Lancie, a Juilliard-trained
actor and teacher of the craft,
keeps busy with things that inter-
est and amuse him.
One of his recent projects was
directing Leonard Nimoy in a Hal-
loween night adaptation of "The
War of the Worlds" for National
Public Radio.
Currently, he's directing an all-
American cast in "Julius Cae-
sar" for the BBC. Q-like, he's
playing the manipulative bad-
guy Cassius.
De Lancie insists he's not
concerned getting typecast as
Q.
"When you think about it,
the alternative isn't so hot he
said. "I mean, an actor's got to
be known for something. Type-
casting is an unfortunate kind
of reflex punishment for hav-
ing done a good job. But what's
the alternative? To not do a
good job?"
DROP
From p. 9
ety have been harping on the
media's supposed bias toward
the liberal left, (although I never
really saw any examples of this).
The media's job is to tell it like it
is, and we can take whatever
meaning from it we can. As far
as the Republican platform was
concerned, the media was tell-
ing it like it was, they only re-
layed the information that was
given to them.
It is obvious to me now that
the Grand Old Party used double
speak to give you a reason to
vote for them. There may be
other instances of this kind of
media manipulation, but this
was the most recent and the most
obvious. This is not just an in-
dictment of Republican cam-
paign ethic�; both the left and
the right have left many prom-
ises unfulfilled. I have no data
to back it up, but I think
America as a whole places
very little trust, if any, in their
elected officials. Shall we add
politicians to the growing list
of the people who can't be
trusted? Shall we put them in
the same catagory with lawers
and used car salesmen?
The Varsity Sport of the Mind
COLLEGE
.79
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CAMPUS CHAMPIONSHIP
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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1995
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
PICK UP COLLEGE BOWL INFORMATION AND
REGISTRATION PACKET FROM THE INFORMATION
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Second place team members will receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For more information, contact the Student Activities Office. 210 Mendenhall,
328-47664711
M Put your mind to it!
LU
KZi





1 2 The East Carolinian
December 8. 1994
The East Carolinian
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Anton Gill leads the Pirates in scoring this year, with 20 points
Tuesday night.ECU lost their last two games and is 2-2 on the year.
Gill scores
big in loss
to Campbell
h
E
Ei
(SID) �Junior forward Den-
nis Hurst scored a career-high
28 points to lead Campbell to a
74-56 men's basketball victory
� over the Pirates Tuesday at the
� Cumberland County Civic Cen-
� ter
Hurst hit 7-of-13 field goals,
including 6-of-ll three-point-
ers, and made 8-of-ll free
S throws to lead the Camels (3-2)
3 to only their third win against
3 ECU in the last eleven meet-
ings between the teams.
g Zach Livers added a season-
high 13 points in only his sec-
ond career start for CU, while
- Salaam Hall contributed 10
points. Dan Pogue, the leading
�. assists man in the Trans
Sir
y America Athletic Conference,
5�:dealt nine assists on the
evening.
J Anton Gill led ECU with 20
�-points on 9-of-12 shooting and
;six rebounds. Tony Parham and
.Tim Basham added 11 and 10
�. points, respectively, for the Pi-
rates (2-2), who have lost their
last two games.
Livers' three-point play on a
pull-up jumper in the lane and
converted free throw gave
Campbell the lead for good at
10-8 with 14:51 remaining in the
first half. The closest the Pirates
would come to CU was with an
Anton Gill jumper with 9:12 re-
maining in the opening period
to cut the lead to 19-18.
Campbell, however, went on
a 15-2 run over the next five-
and-a-half minutes. Included in
the flurry was a technical foul on
ECU's Tim Basham - the first of
three techs on the Pirates during
the evening. 1 .ie ECU bench was
whistled for a tech at 10:05 in the
second half, while forward
Chuckie Robinson was called for
one at 14:19 of the half.
ECU shot 51 for the floor
(25-49) on the night, but made
sixteen turnovers and were
outrebounded 29-24 by the
smaller Camels. Campbell shot
just 44 percent on the evening
(21-48) after making 54 percent
of their first-half shots.
Campbell, however, had just five
second-half turnovers and had
only 13 in the game.
ECU's next game is against
the Western Carolina Cata-
mounts on Saturday, Dec. 10, at
7 p.m. in Cullowee, N.C.
McPhail spreads positive message
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
The life of a ECU football
player means long hours spent
on the practice field and in the
weight room. Jerris McPha a
junior running back from Clinton,
NC stays busy with a major in
Criminal Justice, but recently
took time out from football and
classes to visit with some of his
young fans at Wahl-Coates El-
ementary School yesterday. The
visit gave these youngsters a
chance to meet one of their favor-
ite Pirates, ask him questions and
to get his autograph.
For two fifth graders, Michael
Vaughn and Abhay Aneja, it gave
them a chance to interview
McPhail for their school newspa-
per, The Purple Pirate. These 10-
year-olds were impressive with
the type of probing questions they
asked McPhail. They were very
familiar with his accomplish-
ments on the football field and
knew a lot about the different
ECU players and coaches. Here
is a sample of their interview.
"Will you be the running back
after Junior Smith is gone" asked
Michael Vaughn.
"Hopefully, with a lot of hard
work I can fill Junior's shoes
Jerris McPhail said. "It won't be
easy, but I think I should be able
to do the job and our running
game won't miss a beat
"What do you want to do after
you are done witn football?"
asked Abhay Aneja.
"My dream is to become a pro-
fessional football player, but if
that doesn't work out, then I
would like to work in law en-
forcement McPhail said. "You
always have to have something
to fall back on, in case football
doesn't work out. I am confident
in my ability to play in the NFL,
but if I don't, my education will
ensure that I will be successful no
matter what
Abhay would like to be a ten-
nis player or a teacher. Vaughn
would like to be a sportswriter if
he doesn't play for his favorite
team, the San Francisco 49ers.
"It was cool meeting Jerris
Vaughn said. "I like to watch him
plav football, and I can't wait to
watch him in the Liberty Bowl.
Jerris, Junior and Marcus are my
favorite ECU players
Missi Foster is a fifth-grade
science teacher and edits the
school newspaper. She has 10
writers on her staff, and their
See MCPHAIL page 14
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Jerris McPhail is second in rushing this season for the 7-4
Pirates. He averages 20 yards per catch and caught a 67 yard
TD against UCF for ECU'S longest play of the year.
NCAA monitors Las Vegas gambling
(AP) � Between the staid
NCAA and the glamorous, any-
thing-goes Las Vegas Stripia cu-
rious tie took root.
Normally, these two are
worlds apart. The NCAA cam-
paigns against gambling at ev-
ery turn and has adopted by-
laws that will prohibit Las Ve-
gas from ever hosting its annual
convention.
Yet, both sides share a mutual
interest in the integrity of col-
lege sports. If games Were
"fixed" by players or officials
shaving points to ensure gam-
blers' winning bets, Nevada's
legal sportsbooks could lose a
fortune.
The NCAA, whose lifeblood
is CBS television money and
other revenue from its super-suc-
cessful basketball tournament,
could lose even more.
"We try to maintain contacts
with individuals in Las Vegas
said Rich Hilliard, a director of
enforcement for the NCAA who
helps keep a watchful eye on
gamblers and gambling. "It's in
their best interests when they
think something is amiss to alert
us. They will take a game right
off if there's a big fluctuation in
the point spread. These are
people who are legitimate em-
ployees of the gambling indus-
try in Nevada
For a variety of reasons, many
officials believe the climate is
ripe for a new scandal engulfing
college basketball, because gam-
bling on sports events is grow-
ing among college students in
general.
"I have no knowledge or in-
formation that something's
about to happen said Dave
Cawood, the NCAA's assistant
executive director for broadcast
services. "But that doesn't mean
it's not going to happen today.
"It's prominent for fraterni-
ties and other student groups to
sell parlay cards Cawood said.
"People don't even think about
it anymore, it's so common
Hilliard said there have been
"more cases in the past three
years involving student-athletes
and gambling than there had
been the previous five years.
"Not point shaving he
added. "I'm talking about stu-
dents and student-athletes in-
volved with parlay cards and
commonplace gambling, and
also gambling on college
events
For the NCAA, the value of
the games' credibility was never
greater. On Tuesday, the NCAA
agreed to a $1,725 billion con-
tract that keeps the Final Four
on CBS through 2002. It is the
highest total price tag of any TV
sports rights deal ever made.
The most recent point-shav-
ing scandal to rock college bas-
ketball came in 1985. Another
such scandal during this time of
heightened public skepticism
might undermine the Final Four
itself. And a point-shaving scan-
dal that damages the Final Four
might also spur congressional
intervention in college athletics,
the biggest fear of most admin-
istrators.
But officials also fear that in-
nocent players could get trapped
unwittingly.
"An athlete could be just act-
ing like any other student in a
dorm and play one of those par-
lay cards for a dollar, not under-
standing the ramifications
Cawood said. "And suddenly
his whole career and the univer-
sity and his teammates and his
coach could be tarnished by the
revelation that, 'Here's a stu
dent-athiete betting on sports
"A guy might not give it a
second thought if everybody else
in the dorm was doing it
The NCAA briefly consid-
ered, then abandoned the idea
of withholding tournament cre-
dentials from newspapers pub-
lishing point spreads.
People believe one factor mak-
ing college players more suscep-
tible than ever to gamblers'
offers is the spread of legal
casinos around the country.
"It used to be that you had
to go to Las Vegas to gamble
legally said Jim Haney, ex-
ecutive director of the Na-
tional Association of Basket-
ball Coaches. "Now there are
riverboat operations up and
down the Mississippi, gam-
bling on Indian reservations.
Things that raised our eye-
brows 15 years ago are now
acceptable. It's something
coaches are very worried
about
Others believe the biggest
danger comes from drugs.
Lem Banker, a prominent Las
Vegas gambler and author of
sports betting books, said he
would be "more suspicious
of the officials than of the star
players
"Right now I think the
game is pretty honest
Banker said. "Every star
player thinks he's going to get
a big NBA or NFL contract, so
they're going to be very hesi-
tant to risk all that for a $5,000
payoff. But a guy can get
hooked on something, and
then he could be blackmailed
Frier paralyzed after accident
(AP)�Seattle Seahawks Mike
Frier can't move his legs or fin-
gers and probably never will, a
neurosurgeon says.
"He has no sensation below
' his belly button Dr. Michael
Schlitt said Monday at Overlake
Medical Center, where Frier and
teammates Chris Warren and
J Lamar Smith were brought after
the car they were in crashed into
. a utility pole last Thursday.
"We've not seen any deterio-
ration on the neurological front
since the time Frier was admit-
ted Schlitt said. "Unfortu-
nately, we have not seen any
substantial neurological im-
provement particularly in his
hands and legs.
Frier, a third-year defensive
tackle, was in serious condition,
heavily sedated, with his skull
and spine in traction.
He was suffering from pneu-
monia in his left lung � a com-
plication resulting in part from
his inability to cough and clear his
lungs�and will probably always
be plagued with lung infections,
pulmonary specialist Dr. Ronald
O'Quin said.
However, Frier, 25, was able to
move his biceps in both arms and
had some movement in his left
tricep muscle, Schlitt said. He
likely will be able to breathe with-
out a respirator as he begins to
recover.
Pro Bowl running back Warren
broke two ribs, but played Sun-
day and rookie running back
Smith injured his foot in the acci-
dent near team headquarters in
Kirkland.
Still unresolved was the ques-
tion of who was driving the car
when it crashed. Kirkland police
said Warren was driving, but they
are continuing their investigation.
The results of a lie detector test
reportedly indicate he was not
driving.
The polygraph test was part of
a separate investigation by
Warren's legal representatives,
the Seattle Post-Intelligencer re-
ported in today's editions.
It was administered Monday
by Dr. David Raskin, a professor
of psycho-physiology at the Uni-
versity of Utah. The results sup-
port Warren's contention that he
is not responsible for the accident.
Smith has said that he was be-
hind the wheel. Warren was ar-
rested for investigation of vehicu-
lar assault shortly after the crash
near a rain-slicked road a few
blocks from Seahawks headquar-
ters in suburban Kirkland.
"In a case like this, where you
have a very disputed issue of facts,
the law enforcement agencies will
frequently rely upon a polygraph
to differentiate A from B said
See SEATTLE page 13
Hayes
goes
for two
Shay Hayes a sopho-
more forward from
Pomfret, MD's
McDonough High School
was recently selected for
Player of the Week after
her 20 point perfor-
mances in the Lady Pi-
rates undefeated start of
the season.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
. .
me





'�
December 8, 1994
The East Carolinian 13
SEATTLE From p. 12
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John Wolfe, Warren's Seattle-
based lawyer. "What this does, it
lends substantial credence to
Lamar's admission that he was
the driver and Warren's denial
that he was the driver
Warren's agent, Richard
Schaeffer, a Baltimore lawyer, said
Warren was not driving. Smith's
agent, Eugene Parker, issued a
statement through the Seahawks
that said Smith was the driver of
the car.
Kirkland police detective Jim
O'Toole said Monday that offic-
ers were still in the process of
contacting witnesses, and that
Smith's car wouldn't be searched
until sometime this week. The
department was bringing in out-
side investigators with "just a little
more expertise" for that search.
He would not say who those
people were.
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Baseball holds
winter meetings
DALLAS (AP) � Just because
major league baseball players are on
strike does not mean the game has
completely shut down.
Things are hopping at the 93rd
annual meeting of the National As-
sociation of Professional Baseball
Leagues, even if this year's gathering
is a far cry from past shows that
turned into swap meets.
OK, so the winter meetings are no
longer the boiling point of hot-stove
action. Players, agents, team owners
and general managers stopped com-
ing after the 1992 meeting ended in a
$250 million spending frenzy.
The Famous Chicken and
Morganna The Kissing Bandit are
here, and there was a fast-pitch con-
test between a guy who calls himself
the Bleacher Preacher and a lady who
styles herself Dynamite Woman.
But the meetings themselves are
little more than a trade show and job
fair this year.
The only business taking place
that might interest fans is the major
league draft of minor leaguers, and
only hard-core fans have heard of
most of the 24 players taken Mon-
day.
The only names that might ring a
bell are former big-leaguers Rich
DeLucia, Craig Worthington and Ed
Vosberg. The first player taken was
shortstop Tomas Perez, who went to
California from Montreal.
The Expos were the hardest-hit
organization, losing four prospects.
Three players were taken from the
Class AAA teams of Baltimore and
Oakland.
Other than the draft, there was not
much news to be found.
Instead, there were hundreds of
baseball wannabes milling through
the lobbies and meeting rooms at
the Loews Anatole Hotel, looking
at exhibits, attending meetings,
trying to find jobs.
Many conventioneers, who
paid registration fees of at least
$150, hung out in the "Employ-
ment Opportunity Work and In-
terview Room" looking over six
boards covered with job postings.
Some of the fliers were call-
backs for follow-up interviews.
Peoplecrowded against each other
to check out the lists, like kids
checking out a coach's cut list.
The jobs were for all sorts of
behind-the-scenes duties.
Want to be a minor-league
trainer? The Houston Astros have
an opening for a bilingual appli-
cant.
Ever thought of sales? The up-
coming Women's Professional
Fastpitch League has plenty of
openings, although it has not
picked any cities yet for fran-
chises.
And, if you think you can
"make sure the Memphis Chicks
get great media coverage the
public relations opening with the
Class AA team might be for you.
There were architects to de-
sign stadiums and companies
selling everything from dirt to
scoreboards. Two firms com-
peted to sell seats with different
types of cup-holders.
Several companies offered
pennants and other souvenirs.
And,of course, there were plenty
of people hawking bats, balls and
all sorts of uniforms.
Nomatter the labor conditions,
the games must go on. Eventu-
ally.
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1
1 4 The East Carolinian
December 8, 1994
MCPHAIL Fmm
p. 12
publication goes out about twice
a year.
"It lists science award win-
ners, honor roll students, and
now we have a little sports sec-
tion, " Foster said. "They are writ-
ing and editing their own ar-
ticles. They also sell the newspa-
per for 25 cents a copy when it
comes back from the printing
press. We get the money to pub-
lish the paper from the Pitt
County Educational Foundation.
Michael and Abhay are two of
my new writers, but I think
they'll be really good sports writ-
ers
! Seeing a positive role-model
like McPhail means a lot to teach-
ers like Foster, because it shows
the kids that a combination of
hard work and the right values
can bring success. Running a 4.38
40-yard dash and bench-press-
ing 350 pounds didn't happen
overnight. McPhail started out
just like these school yard ath-
letes, a dreamer.
"I remember back when I was
their age and I wanted to He a
football player McPhail said.
"I would dream about running
the ball like Tony Dorsett or
Walter Payton someday. It feels
really great to know that these
kids look up to me, and I want to
do everything I can to never let
them down. They make all the
hard work, worthwhile. I never
thought people would want my
autograph, but I'm happy to sign
it for them
We ran in to another Pirate at
the school, former letterwinner
Tim Marshmon. Marshmon
played defensive back for the Pi-
rates on the 1991 Peach Bowl
team and is currently a fourth
grade teacher at Wahl-Coates. He
received a Hi tachi Promise of To-
morrow Scholarship, which is
given to anyone associated with
a Division I-A football program
and has the necessary grades to
continue their education in be-
coming as a teacher.
"Today we are working on
our computer skills Marshmon
said. "I have 10 kids in the com-
puter lab, 10 in the class room
and 10 in the auditorium, sort of
like dividing up a team for of-
fense, defense and special teams.
We work on different things to
keep the kids motivated and in-
terested
Having good role models like
Marshmon and McPhail is a
credit to East Carolina Univer-
sity. They are truly giving some-
thing back to die community.
"I think it really helps our
young people to see someone
like Jem s who is setting the right
example by staving in school and
saying no to drugs Marshmon
said. "There aren't enough role
models like him around. I really
enjoy my job, and feel like it helps
my students to see someone do-
ing the right tiung
� Ms. Foster agrees with
Marshmon about how much it
- means to the kids to see a Pirate
come and talk to the kids about
education.
"They want to know his phi-
losophy of education Foster
said. "That was really important
to them to find out how he feels
about school. I think he sets a
really good example for students
who don't have the money to go
to college. B.J. Crane and Der-
rick Leaphart came here last year
and their message was "If it is to
be, then it is up to me They
really made a good impression
on these kids
McPhail also spoke to the en-
tire fifth-grade class before he
left Wahl-Coates Elementary.
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seasonal help. Check the white
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nearest you.
"I want all of you to know that
unything is possible if you set
goals and stick to them McPhail
said. "Those of you that want to
be athletes or successful in an-
other field, you need to pray to
God and listen to your teachers
and coaches. One thing that is re-
ally important is to read, because
it really helps your academics.
Also, be sure to stay out of trouble
and don't hang with the wrong
crowd. Surround yourself with
positive people and you will be a
success
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"�





TEC Presents
ECU vs. Illinois I
Vol. t
Dee
Memphis. Tenn.
LIBERTY BOWL EDIT
MAUREEN RICH
Mana�;in�v Eiiitoh
DAVE POND
Editwk, IiAYOI 1'
AARON WILSON
AsST. ElllTOH





Page 2
TEC End Zone
December 30,1994
ECU makes its way to Memphis
Pmgnosticators
Dave Pond EC 4
TEC Sports Editor EC 21 UI
17
"Pirates come out fired up
and ensure winning record
for season.
Brian Bailey EC 4
WNCT-9 Sports Director EC 24
UI20
"Junior Smith finishes a great
career with game-winning
touchdown in final seconds
Chris Justice EC2
WCTI-12 Sports Director EC 19
UI17
"Pirates want it a little more
Phil Werz
WlTN-7 Sports Director
Phil was unavailable for
comment this week.
After a strong rebound from two dis-
appointing seasons at 5-6 and 2-9, Steve
Logan finds himself in a
I By Dave new situation as a head
Pond coach � a postseason
ED,TOR bowl game. ECU will
take on Illinois in the St. Jude's Liberty
Bowl on Dec. 31.
Illinois (6-5,4-4 Big Ten) returns to
their sixth bowl game in the last seven
years. The Ilhni is coached by Lou Tepper,
who coached with Logan while the duo
was at Colorado.
Tepper's squad has lost five games
by a total of 22 points. Four of the losses
were at the hands of bowl teams�Wash-
ington State, Michigan, Penn State and
Wisconsin.
"We feel fortunate to be selected to
participate in the Liberty Bowl against
East Carolina Tepper said. "We look
forward to one more game where we can
prove ourselves on national TV
Football News All- American Eagle
linebacker Dana Howard (6-0, 236, Sr.)
leads the seventh-best defense in the na-
tion into the
BradOldham EC 9!
WMZB Sports Director EC 26
UI17
"It's the beginning of a bright
future for ECU football
Aaron Wilson EC 4!
TEC Asst. Sports Editor EC 24 ,
UI20
Pirates passing game too much
for the Illini, ECU will win this j
game and finish the season
nationally-ranked
Henry Hinton EC 2J
WCZI radio announcer EC 30
UI28
I'd hate to be their defensive
coordinator, trying to guess what
Logan's gonna do
SPECIAL GUEST j
Elvis Presley EC 18J
Back-fmm-the-dead rock legend
EC 35 UI 17
"I'm all shook upECU too
much for the Illini. See you at
Silky O'Sullivans after the win!
Please, no wagering
Cover Photo
Pirate sophomore
safety E.J. Gunthrope
6) and others gather
on a big tackle.
Gunthrope was the
team leader in special
teams tackles with 17
on the season.
Photo b Harold Wise
LibertyBowl.
Howard, has
collected 141
tackles, two
interceptions,
three sacks
and is a final-
ist for the
B u t k u s
Award, given
to the nation's
Illinois OFFENSE
TE: 87 Ken Dilger
LT: 73 Ken Blackman
LG: 64 Derek Allen
C: 68 Chris Koerwitz
RG: 63 Jonathan Kerr
RT: 54 Mike Suarez
SE: 1 Jasper Strong
QB: 13 Johnny Johnson
RB: 7 Ty Douthard
RB: 44 Rodney Byrd
FL: 83 Jason Dulick
County of 11 SID
AU-Big Ten Tinebackers Dana Howard and John HoUcek finished the regular season
combining for 233 tackles for the Ilhni, leading them to the Liberty Bowlagainst ECU.
best linebacker.
Junior rush linebacker Simeon
Rice 96-5,243, Jr.) is second in the coun-
try with 16 sacks and was a Butkus semi-
finalist this season.
Drop comerback Robert Crumpton
leads the squad with three interceptions
to go along with 37 tackles.
QB Johnny Johnson (6-1,208, Jr.)
leads an offense that has scored 25 points
while piling up 379 offensive yards per
contest. He has thrown for over 2,200
yards with 15 touchdowns.
Jason Dulick (6-5, 197, So.) and
Ken Dilger (6-5, 246, Sr.) have each
snared five TD passes on the way to
their 49 and 41 receptions, respectively.
The duo has combined for 1,067 receiv-
ing yards.
"A" running back Ty Douthard
(6-1,206, So.) has gained 713 yards (4.3
average) and scored 9 TDs coming out
of the backfield for the Coach Tepper.
Illinois has a well-balanced attack,
and makes a worthy opponent of the
Pirates on Dec. 31, especially since we
play them next Sept. 23 in the regular
season.
86 Matt Cushing
67 Charles Edwards
70 Brent Taylor
71 Predrag Jones
74 Matt Isenberg
67 Charles Edwards
16 Shane Fisher
11 Scott Weaver
35 Robert Holcombe
20 Steve Mattison
29 Martin Jones
Winnis DEFENSE
RLB: 97 Simeon Rice
3T: 92 Jason Edwards
NT: 93 Paul Marshall
57V 90 Chad Copher
ELB: 40 Dana Howard
ILB: 52 John Holecek
DLB: 51 Kevin Hardy
ECB: 21 Scott Turner
DCB: 18 Robert Crumpton
SS: 4 Tyrone Washington
FS: 8 Atwoine Patton
57 Mark Day
95 Tim McCloud
94 Mikki Johnson
99 Cyron Brown
46 Dennis Stallings
42 David James
99 Cyron Brown
20 Trevor Stargell
22 Rod Boykin
22 Rod Boykin
31 DuaneLyle





December 30, i9�
TEC End Zone
Page 3
Boothe fills a big portion of ECU offensive line
Left offensive tackle is argu-
ably the most important position on
the football field be-
By Aaron cause he has the sole
Wilson responsibility of pro-
ASST EDITOR
tecting
the
quarterback's blind
side (since most QB's are right
handed). ECU junior offensive
tackle Charles Boothe (6-7,285) has
all of the necessary qualities to be a
All-American and NFL draft pros-
pect at the position.
Boothe took over for senior of-
fensive lineman Kenny Carroll at left
tackle after Boothe had started the
first game of the year at left guard.
He had since substituted for Carroll
several times during the season be-
cause of his superior pass protection.
Boothe is now firmly entrenched as
a starter and, with one season left for
him at ECU, offensive coaches are
excited about his potential and abil-
ity.
"Boothe has come on like
gangbusters ECU offensive coor-
dinator Todd Berry said. "He looks
like a great talent and has a tough
mentality
A switch from the defensive
side of the ball was a welcome one
for Boothe after he started a few
games as a redshirt freshman at de-
fensive end.
"I like offense a lot better even
though I did have success on defense
first Boothe said. "In high school,
I played offensive tackle and
was really good at it. When I
first got here, at 209 pounds I
didn't think I'd ever be big
enough to play offensive line
at the college level
In order for Boothe to
play offense he would have to
gain weight, no easy task for
someone who describes him-
self as naturally skinny. Bob
Slowik (former ECU defensive
assistant and currently defen-
sive coordinator for the Chi-
cago Bears) raved about
Boothe's abilities and warned
his outside linebackers after
Boothe had drove upperclass-
men LB Marc Washington to
the ground.
"I liked playing tight end
okay, but I couldn't catch the
ball too well Boothe said. "1 did
catch a touchdown in high school, but
playing it here is way too hard, as far
as being a receiver. It didn't work out
too well, so I wanted to gain weight
and play offensive or defensive line
Gain weight is what Boothe did
and he had a familiar plan of attack
to put on the pounds � home cook-
ing.
"I just went home that first sum-
mer and ate Mom's cooking Boothe
said. "I gained 60 pounds, and since
I've been here I've gained almost 70
to 80 pounds
After making the switch, Boothe
Came Location: Memphis, TN
Photo by G�rrrtt Kilhan
Pirate left offensive tackle Charles Boothe has steadily improved his play after working at
tight end and defensive end his first two seasons at ECU. He switched positons in 1993.
still had a lot to learn about technique,
stance and pass protection, which is
very important for the high powered
ECU passing attack to function.
"I didn't really learn how to play
this position until last spring Boothe
said. "With all the good players, I
didn't have a chance to play until I
learned my stuff. Coach Jagodzinski
has been telling me since I was a fresh-
man that I should be an offensive line-
man. He told me to be patient and it
has really paid off for me
Boothe's main advantages for the
position are quick feet and long arms
Opponent:Fighting mini
Game Site: Liberty Bowl
Hfckfiff: 1 p.m.
Head Coach: Loe Tepper
See BOOTHE page 6
(3th year, 17-17-1 at UI)
Kev Plavers (1994 stats to date):
East Carolina OFFENSE
FL: 1 Jason Nichols
LT: 77 Charles Boothe
LG: 59 Jamie Gray
C: 63 Kevin Wiggins
RG: 78 Terry Tilghman
RT: 61RonSuddith
TE: 88 Sean Richardson
QB: 5 Marcus Crandell
FB: 4 Damon Wilson
RB: 35 Junior Smith
SE: 80 Larry Shannon
25 Derek Batson
51 Ken Carroll
73 Jake Gilray
58 Derrick Leaphart
77 Charles Boothe
74 Mark. McCall
90 Scott Richards
9 Dan C inzalez
34 John Peacock
23 Jerris McPhail
11 Allen Williams
East Carolina DEFENSE
OLB: 91 Willie Brookins
DT: 96 Walter Scott
NG: 57 John Rrawczyk
DT: 45 Lorenzo West
OLB: 7 Morris Foreman
WLB: 81 MarkLibiano
MLB: 33 B.J. Crane
40 Daniel Russ
69 Robert Santiago
54 Dealton Cotton
56 Alphonso Collins
84 Leonard Graham
53 Carlos Brown
39 Marvin Burke
37 Andree Taylor
RCB: 21 David Hart
LCB: 3 Emmanuel McDaniel 17 David Crumbie
FS: 30 Dwight Henry 46 Tabari Wallace
SS: 22 Daren Hart 6 E.J. Gunthrope
QB Johnny Johnson)
(.69 comp. , 15 TDs, 6 INT)
RB Ty Douthard
(713 rush yds 9 TDs)
LB Dana Howard
(135 tackles, 3 sacks)
LB Simeon Rice
(52 tackles, 16 sacks)
Notes.
� The Liberty Bowl will be
Illinois' sixth bowl appearance
in seven seasons.
� The Fighting Illini have
lost their five games by a total
of 22 points.
� The UI defense ranks
seventh in the nation.
� The Illini have outscored
their opponents 58-13 in the
first quarter, and 78-38 in the
fonrth.
� QB Johnny Johnson carries
1134 rating into the Bowl.





Page 4
TEC End Zone
December m, 1994
Six Pirates named to FN All-Independent Team
Football News has named six
Pirates to their 1994 All-Indepen-
dent team.
I By Dave Included in
Pond tne nominations
editor are two defensive
players � DB
Dwight Henry and LB Mark
Libiano, and four players from
ECU's high-octane offense. They
are, QB Marcus Crandell, TB Jun-
ior Smith and OLs Terry Tilghman
and Ronnie Suddith.
Crandell, a sophomore, came
back this season from a career-
threatening leg injury suffered in
1993 to throw for over 2,650 yards
and 21 TDs. He completed over 57
percent of his passes, averaging
11.68 yards per completion.
Crandell ranks eighth in Div. I-A
football in total offense, piling up
253 yards per contest.
"Marcus has a great arm, is
quick and mobile, and has great in-
stincts Pirate head coach Steve
Logan said. "He also has the lead-
ership abilities and attitude to
match
All-time ECU rushing leader
Junior Smith was also named FN
Honorable Mention All-American
for his stats during the '94 season.
He finished the regular season with
1,204 rushing yards and 9 TDs,
ranking him 23rd in the nation. He
finished 18th in all-purpose rush-
ing (137.27 ypg).
He also caught 35 passes for
306 yards and a TD.
"One would think that Junior
could have rested this spring
ECU offensive coordinator Todd
Berry said. "However, he is one
of the hardest workers on the
team. And, for that reason, he has
become a much better receiver
and picked up a step
Junior inside LB Mark
Libiano leads the Pirates with 135
tackles, including 13 for losses.
He has averaged 11 tackles per
game during his career as a Pirate,
and has netted double figures in
15 of his 25 games played.
"Mark can be as good as he
wants to be Pirate defensive co-
ordinator Paul Jette said. "He has
good instinct, runs well and has
improved his pass coverage
Sophomore Dwight Henry
was named The Sporting News
Defensive Player of the Week
(Oct.l) for his outstanding play
against Southern Miss. He fin-
ished the season with 76 tackles,
third on the squad, and lead the
Pirates in pass deflections with
12.
Senior Terry Tilghman can
play all five offensive line posi-
tions, and has started at right
guard the last 10 games of the
1994 season. He started at center
in the Pirates' opener against
Duke, and has also seen action at
right guard this season.
"Not only does Terry have
great skills ECU offensive line
coach Jeff Jagodzinski said, "but
he is one of the hardest workers
we have. He is the leader of the
Bicycle Post says
Congratulations to the
BOWL
BOUND
ECU PIRATES!
BICYCtC
530 Cotanche St
757-3616
215 E Arlington
Blvd.
756-3301
( randell photo hy Hamid Wiw, insert courtesy of ECL' SID
ECU sophomores Marcus Crandell and Ronnie Suddith (insert) are
among six Pirates named to the Football News All-Independent Team.
offensive line
Ronnie Suddith can play both
tackles slots with skill, and is re-
garded as the best pass blocker on
the Pirate front line. The duo, along
with Jamie Gray at left guard, Ken
Carroll or Charles Boothe (see pg.
3) at left tackle, and Kevin Wiggins
or Derrick Leaphart at center, have
allowed just nine sacks this season.
Football at ECU is a team
sport, and although it is nice to see
worthy athletes recognized for
their skills, it is certain that none
of it will mean much to these play-
ers should they come home Lib-
erty Bowl losers. Congratulations
on a fine year.
Congratulations to the 1994 Pirates.
The East Carolinian
wishes you the best of luck!
Hard Bodies Fitness
Center wishes the
Pirates good luck
Ringing in the New
Year with a Bowl
Victory





ft
December 30,1994
TEC End Zone
Pages
Richardson moves up depth chart, into starting lineup
At the beginning of this season,
sophomore tight end Sean
I Richardson was
By Aaron third on ECU's
Wilson
asst. editor
depth chart, behind
Dwight Linville
and Scott Richards. Injuries to both
have forced him into the starting
lineup much sooner than expected.
He has made the most of this
opportunity, catching 17 passes for a
156 yards and two TD's and two 2-
point conversions. Richardson got his
first start and career receptions ver-
sus Virginia Tech, and lias started the
last six games of the season.
A tight end's role varies depend-
ing on a team's offensive philosophy.
The Pirates make the tight end an in-
tegral part of their offensive attack.
The ECU tight end must be a strong
blocker and an excellent downfield
threat with the speed and hands to
spread out a defense. Richardson has
not quite reached the pinnacle of suc-
cess as ECU's two tight end-NFL
draft choices (Carlester Crumpler, Jr.
and Luke Fisher), but he has left a defi-
nite impression on the Pirate offensive
attack.
"I am very aware of who has
been at this position before me
Richardson said. "Those two have set
a standard for excellence. I don't feel
any pressure to perform at their level.
Every player should set goals to play
that well and I try to do that every time
I step on the football field
One thing that sets him apart
from Richards and Linville is being
more of an all-around talent in terms
of being a stronger blocker than them.
'There's always room for im-
provement, but I feel like I'm playing
the best that I can right now
Richardson said. "This position is very
deep in talent. It just so happened that
injuries put me in the starting lineup,
and I just want to make the most of
it
Standing 6-foot-5 and weighing
230 pounds, Richardson is difficult to
defend for smaller defensive backs.
After he catches the football, he rel-
Congratulations
ECU Pirates From All
Your Friends At
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&
Saloon
BEAT ILLINOIS
STXAKKOUS
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ishes the physical confrontation with
them.
"When I do catch the ball and see
a guy that is smaller than me my eyes
get real big he said. "If I can avoid
him and get six
points that is
good, but I like to
lower my shoul-
der and punish
people. In the
offseason, I want
to develop my
moves to get
away from guys
to score
While he
enjoys the glory
of scoring touch-
downs he really
likes to get down-
and-dirty in the
trenches with the offensive linemen.
"In high school all I did for three
years was block Richardson said. "I
didn't catch my first pass until my jun-
ior year. Blocking is easy for me be-
cause I am a physical kind of guy. It is
fun to bump heads with guys bigger
and smaller than me. Let's strap on the
helmets and see who's better
This competitive spirit began to
boil over earlier this year when he
didn't play much against Duke in his
hometown of Durham, NC.
"You try to be patient and wait
your turn, but it's really hard to sit on
the bench Richardson said. "The
Duke game at home, that really hurt.
It is all part of the game. I prayed to
God for patience, and it finally hap-
pened for me
Substation says:
We're proud of the
PIRATES!
Bring Home
the Victory!
BEAT ILLINOIS
Since getting his chance
Richardson has become one of QB
Marcus Crandell's favorite targets, es-
pecially on the tough catches over the
middle.
One big advan-
tage for Richardson is
his being tutored by
Willie Scott. Scott was
the 14th player selected
in the 1981 draft by the
Kansas City Chiefs vi-
ler playing at South
Carolina. He played
with the Chiefs for five
seasons before finish-
ing his career with the
New England Patriots.
"It has been a
great experience play-
ing for Coach Scott
Richardson said. "He
has played this position in the NFL,
and that really helps. He knows it in-
side and out, and that really helps me
to learn the position
Another advantage for
Richardson is a giant-sized pair of
hands. His hands easily extend all the
way around the football.
"It has always been a big advan-
tage of mine Richardson said. "I try
to spread my fingers and secure the
ball each time
All of this success wasn't always
assured for Richardson who wasn't
always recognized as a top flight Di-
vision I-A prospect.
"North Carolina A&T, Howard,
and NC State recruited me besides
See RICHARDSON page 7
O TJ T F� O S X,
T R A 1 LSH OP �
OUTPOST says:
WE'RE
PROUD OF
THE PIRATES!
Bring home the
VICTORY!





Page
TEC End Zone
December 30.1994
BOOTHE
that he uses to get leverage on defen-
sive players.
"I feel like I have good feet
Boothe said. "Running a 4.9 40-yard
dash is fast for an offensive lineman.
Having long arms helps a lot. A lot of
defensive linemen grab your jersey
and try to get in to your shoulder pads
to push you back to the quarterback.
I lock them out and don't even let
them get close to hitting Marcus
An aggressive defensive men-
tality has stayed with Boothe after
changing to the offensive side of the
ball. He received a personal foul for
a late hit against Memphis in the
Pirates's big victory. Boothe nailed a
Memphis defender and sent him tum-
bling to the grass.
"I was just trying to make a
block Boothe said. "We need more
of that kind of thing on o.ffense. You
never know when Junior Smith will
break one, so I decided to hit anything
that moves between the whistles
Boothe emphasizes that he is a
Cont. from
page 3
clean player that plays within the
rules. He doesn't like "cheap" tactics,
like leg whipping or holding.
"Well, I think if you can't block
a person straight up
then you're not a
real player Boothe
said. "If someone
beats me, then he's
just a better player
than me. I try to es-
tablish from the first
play that I'm the
better player.
Offe nsi ve
lineman never get a
lot of attention, ex-
cept for the nega-
tives that come from fans when a
holding penalty calls back a long pass
or run. Boothe doesn't let the lack of
recognition bother him.
"I don't expect or want a lot of
publicity Boothe said. "That is for
all the skill players because they score
the touchdowns. Deep down, people
know that you can't do anything with
out the line
This lack of attention for Boothe
is compounded by the fact that fans
aren't as familiar
with him, be-
cause he was be-
hind Kenny
Carroll at the be-
ginning of the
season.
"I did start
off on the bench
and it was a little
frustrating
Boothe said. "I
still came in and
helped the team
when I did play. Coach Jags put me
in at left tackle and thought I could
do the job well. It doesn't bother me
if people still think that Kenny is start-
ing. The people that need to know that
I'm starting do
Setting goals is important for
any player, and Boothe is no excep-
"If you can 9t
block a person
straight up,
you 're not a
real player
tion.
"I'd love to be an All-Ameri-
can Boothe said. "Everybody
would like to win an Outland or
Lombardi award, but that is a little
farfetched. I just want to make some
Ail-American team next year and
play pro ball. Hopefully, this can
happen if by me becoming the best
player I can be
Boothe grew up in Ft. Lauder-
dale, Fla, and attended Boyd Ander-
son High School, lettering three
times in football, twice in track and
once in basketball.
"Football down there is more
than just a game Boothe said. "It's
a way of life. We play all year round
with spring football. I played against
guys like Frank Sanders from Au-
burn every week
After making the All-County
team, Boothe was the subject of a
lot of recruiting attention after his
senior year.
See BOOTHE page 8
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December 30.1994
TEC End Zone
Page:
RICHARDSON
Cont. from
Page 5
ECU Richardson said. "I didn't
want to go to State because a lot of
people from Northern Durham High
School have went there. Carl Reeves,
Dewayne Washington. I wanted to
start fresh and not be too far away
from home
Richardson played for Kenny
Browning at Northern Durham.
Browning has coached in the Shrine
Bowl, and has had several state cham-
pionships and nationally-ranked
teams. He has since moved on to be
an assistant coach at North Carolina.
"He's a big part of my career
Richardson said. "He instilled confi-
dence in me both as a player and as a
student. He's a great motivator and a
joy to play for definitely the best
coach in the state. He gives his play-
ers confidence and makes us better
Browning's coaching paid off
as Northern Durham made it to the
state semi-finals before losing to a
Fayetteville Southview team that
eventually won the state champion-
ship.
Richardson feels like he could
improve even more with added
weight in this offseason.
"Since I got here I have had
trouble gaining weight Richardson
said. "My weight goes up and down.
My strength levels have gone way up.
If I could carry some extra weight
next year, it could really help me to
be a better football player
Having his priorities in order in
terms of football and school really
helps him to keep everything in per-
spective.
"One thing that has always been
drilled in to my head from the begin-
ning is to be a student first
Richardson said. "My mom always
stressed academics to me. Public re-
lations is the first step for me towards
a career in sports advertising. I want
to be a big success after my football
career is over and not be one of those
guys who has trouble adjusting to a
normal life
Congratulations
PIRATES
We're Throwing a
Bowl Party
Free popcorn
wings 20 cents each
75 cent draft
Professor
UBHNY
UBHHY
Eating &
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Way To Go
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9
I-
Pages
TEC End Zone
December 30. IW4
BOOTHE
Cont. from
page 6
"1 took visits to Cincinnati. Kan-
sas and ECU Boothe said. "I was
going to go to Cincinnati, but my
mom didn't like that city atmo-
sphere. She thought I would get in
trouble. I was recruited to ECU by
Coach Cassity, who now works at
Cincinnati. When he and Bill Lewis
came to my house I liked them, so I
decided to come to ECU
"Wake Forest and North Caro-
lina called me almost every dav, and
after 1 committed here Wake called
and said we would never win any-
thing. We went to the Peach Bowl
and now we're headed for the Lib-
erty Bowl and Wake is staying home.
It feels really good to prove them
wrong
Putting in the time on his stud-
ies is a big priority for Boothe be-
cause of his strong desire to help out
with his family's business.
"My major is information pro-
y�UBJ2rt-
Congratulations
to Coach Logan
and the ECU Pirates for
a winning season and
selection to play in the
Liberty Bowl.
The Methodist Student
Center - ECU
ECONOMY STORAGE, INC,
300 Farmer Street
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 757-0373
cessing Boothe said. "My dad
owns businesses, and I want to run
them some day. I have a lot of ideas
about how to improve them by us-
ing computers so my dad can relax.
He likes to stress himself out too
much
Video games are Boothe's main
hobby when he isn't playing football
or studying.
"Bill Walsh College Football is
my favorite game Boothe said.
"I'm the best in this game on the
team. For the past three years, I have
only lost two or three times. I study
the game almost like a real game. I
try to find out a guy's weakness and
take advantage of it
"You have to compete hard in
even, thing you do. not just football
he said. "I hope I can be on one of
these video games some day. hope-
fully John Madden's game, because
that will mean I am in the pros
FIRST DOWN
PIRATES!
Good Luck!
The Staff of:
The Pirate Gallery
Seafood Restaurant
710 N. Green Street
Congratulations to the
BOWL
BOUND
ECU PIRATES!





Title
The East Carolinian, December 8, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 08, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1047
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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