The East Carolinian, December 1, 1994







SPO
Tickets for sale!
Tickets for the Liberty Bowl in Memphis on
New Year's Eve will be on sale for
students ONLY ON MONDAY. Seep. 13.
I
TODAY
High 62
Low 35
High 57
Low 32
TOMORROW
HOOTIE BLOWS IN RALEIGH
TEC's reviewer scrutinizes the
success and fall of the popular band
Hootie and the Blowfish. See page 9.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 62
Circulation 12.000
Thursday, December 1, 1994
Greenville, NC
16 pages
Army ROTC presents
The Old Guard
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
The president's guards are com-
ing � no, not the Secret Service-
men, but members of The Old
Guard.
Friday, eight members of the
U.S. Army Drill Team, Honor
Guard, 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment
will demonstrate precise drill tac-
tics in an effort to promote pride in
the country and pride in the art of
perfectionism. The demonstration
will be held at 1 p.m. in front of the
Student Stores.
"This demonstration is not only
to show pride in the country and
Army, but pride in perfection
said Cadet Lt. Col. Tom Earnhardt.
Whenit originated 30yearsago,
the drill team consisted of 16 men,
but today the team has grown to a
group of 24. Women are not al-
lowed to be on the drill team be-
cause all of the team members are
infantry soldiers and, currently,
women are not allowed to be infan-
try soldiers.
"They originally started out 30
years ago as a 16-man team'
Earnhardt said. "They were made
up of members of the Honor Guard
who were considered the best in
rifle drill and marching
The Old Guard's primary mis-
sion is to protect the president and
the powers in Washington in the
event of invasion, but like other
soldiers, the team is required to
train in the field once each month
in infantry. The drill team travels
throughout the world demonstrat-
ing its skills.
The drill team uses M-1903
Springfield rifles which weigh ap-
proximately 10.5 poundseach. The
rifles are fixed with a sharp
chrome-plated bayonet.
The demonstration is being pre-
sented by the Army ROTC and is
being solely coordinated bv the
senior staff of the Army ROTC.
Prior to joining the military sci-
ence staff of ECU, MSG Charles
Thomas was assigned to the Old
Guard E-Co 3rd U.S. Infantry as
1st Sgt. Thomas helped the group
in organizing the event.
"Very seldom do we have the
chance to do anything for the Uni-
versity such as entertainment, and
tlris gives us the opportunity
Earnhardt said.
After the demonstration here,
the group will travel to D.H.
Conley High School to perform
the demonstration to the JROTC.
Later, the group has been invited
to Dining-In, an all-military func-
tion attended by ECU Army ROTC
members and their invited mili-
tary guests.
Incidentally, members of ECU's
drill team, the Pershing Rifles, have
been invited to present the colors
during the Liberty Bowl in Mem-
phis on Dec. 30.
Photo Courtesy of U.S. ��mv
Members of The Old Guard line in formation during a drill demonstration. Friday, eight drill
members will be on campus to demonstrate their skills of precision and perfectionism with the rifle.
SPORTS ENTHUSIASTS!
Athletic Director Dave Hart, Head Football Coach Steve
Logan and Men's Basketball Coach Eddie Payne will meet
with students at 5:45 p.m. on Monday (immediately following
SGA) in Mendenhall rm. 221 to discuss the Liberty Bowl, the
upcoming basketball season and other pertinent athletic
information. Anyone is welcome to attend.
AIDS awareness raised
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Today in over 180 countries
throughout the world, people will
observe World AIDS Day in re-
membrance of the lives lost to
AIDS, to honor those still fight-
ing the disease and to raise
awareness of AIDS. m
In Greenville a number of
activities to commemorate
World AIDS Day nave been
organized by the Pitt County
AIDS Service Organization
(PICASO). These activities in-
clude a 1:40 p.m. bell ringing
by Pitt County churches in
unison with other churches
throughout the state; an open
house at PICASO from 2-5:30
p.m a silent commemorative
march leaving from Jarvis Me- ��
morial Church at 5:30 p.m; a
6:00 p. m. candlelight vigil and pro-
gram will take place at the
Greenville town commons and a
reception held from 6:30-8 p.m. at
Jarvis Memorial Church.
This is the seventh annual ob-
servance of World AIDS Day. This
year's theme is "AIDS and Fami-
lies: Protect and Care For the Ones
We Love The goals of World
AIDS Day are far reaching and
include the strengthening of the
worldwide effort to stop the spread
of HIVAIDS by encouraging
commitment from individuals and
communities; recognizing that
education is the most effective
form of prevention; promoting
It is estimated that
17 million people
throughout the world
are already infected
with Hiythe vims
that causes AIDS
support and care for all people
with HIV AIDS along with their
families and friends and to em-
phasize that families are essential
in providing support and stability
for their members.
"This is something that over
180 countries participate in, and
basically it is to focus attention on
AIDS and this year in particular
AIDS and the theme of families
said Gregg Allinson, executive
director of PICASO. "How to
stop it and issues surrounding
AIDS. Letting people know
there are people dying from
this and we need to stop it
It is estimated that 17 mil-
lion people throughout
the world are already in-
fected with HIV, the vi-
rus that causes AIDS. In
North Carolina, 19,000 to
25,000 people are esti-
mated to be living with
HIV.
"As a matter of fact in
the next 24 hours, 6,0CJ
people will die from
AIDS Allinson said. "It
is just a way to stop and
take a minute to observe
the pandemic that is the
� result of this disease
Pitt County ranked
seventh out of 100 counties in
North Carolina for people in-
fected with HIV and AIDS. Pitt
County also leads the nation in
gonorrhea cases and is fourth
in the nation in syphilis cases.
Allinson believes the major-
ity of ECU students are on scale
with the rest of societv in their
See AIDS page 5
ECU illuminates streets
Luminary proceeds to aid Ronald McDonald House
Susan Schwartz
Staff Writer
It is that time of year again �
Christmas trees, mistletoe, parties
galore and decorating for the fes-
tivities to come. Christmas is also
time to think about the less fortu-
nate. While many children are
gathering underneath the Christ-
mas tree to see what Santa has
brought them, others will be in
hospitals, fighting various ill-
nesses.
The Ronald McDonald House
of Eastern North Carolina hopes
to provide a comfortable atmo-
sphere for the families of seriously
ill children visiting the Children's
Hospital in Greenville.
The Greenville Ronald
McDonald House is getting ready
to kick off its annual "Light A
Luminary" holiday fund-raiser.
Luminary kits are sold to various
neighborhoods after Thanksgiv-
ing and are to be illuminated on
Christmas Eve. The distribution
dates for the kits are Dec. 3, 7, 10
and 14, from.10 a.m. to 2 p.m. All
proceeds from sales of the kits are
given to the Ronald McDonald
House to offset the cost of the
$227,000 annual operating budget
of the house.
"The 'Light A Luminary' project
has grown to be our biggest fund-
raiser of the year said Suzy
Walker, executive director of the
Greenville Ronald McDonald
House. "We are preparing 10,000
kits this year, and if we sell all of
them, our net profit will be over
$50,000
Each luminary kit costs $6 and
consists of eight candles, eight
white bags, a bag of sand and an
instruction sheet. Spaced about
five feet apart, the luminaries will
cover roughly 40 feet. Most yards
and porches will require at least
two kits. The kits are on sale in
neighborhoods around Greenville,
at Sunshine Garden Center, Evans
Street extension in Greenville and
at all Sunshine Garden Center lo-
cations in Eastern North Carolina.
"Thanks to the help of Sunshine
Garden Center, we are selling lu-
minaries in New Bern, Morehead
City, Goldsboro, Greenville and
Smithfield at Sunshine outlets
Walker said.
Walker said ECU students
have played a large part in
putting together the huge
project of assembling the 10,000
luminary kits by volunteering
their time.
"We are indebted to ECU
student volunteers who
helped with this project
Walker said. "We could not
have put this project together
without them. They have been
wonderful. I am very im-
pressed with the dedication
and caliber of the ECU stu-
dents that have worked here
Walker said it says a lot for
the university when students
are willing to take time away
from their busy schedules to
volunteer to help others.
Lynda Harrington, owner
of Sunshine Garden Center,
agreed that ECU students have
been a big help in organizing
the fund-raising project.
"We have received excellent
help from ECU students. They
See ECU page 5
Photo by HAROLD WISE
ECU student volunteers fill bags with sand and candles at the Sunshine Garden Center.
Proceeds from the luminaries' sales will benefit The Ronald McDonald House.





�to
2The East Carolinian
December 1, 1994
November 22
Medical School Complex �A staff member reported the larceny
of two light fixtures from the entrance to the building on Moye
Boulevard.
Fletcher Hall � A resident of Fletcher reported the breaking and
entering of her room and the larceny of her word processor.
Scott Hall � A staff member reported the larceny of a fire extin-
guisher from the basement television room of Scott.
Fletcher Hall � A resident of Fletcher reported receiving harass-
ing telephone calls in her room.
November 26
Minges Coliseum �An officer responded to the construction site
at Minges. A construction worker was complaining of stomach
cramps and was transported to Pitt County Memorial Hospital by
Greenville rescue workers.
November 28
Fletcher Music Building �Five students reported the breaking
and entering of several rooms in the building. A clarinet, several
tuners, a CD player and various other items were taken from the
rooms. There were no signs of forced entry into the rooms; the
investigation will continue.
Jones Hall � A student reported larceny of his locked bicycle from
the Jones Hall bike shed.
Student Stores � A non-student was arrested for trespassing in
the Student Store. The man was previously banned from campus;
charges are pending further investigation.
November 29
ECU Police Department �A non-student was served an arrest
warrant for assault with a deadly weapon (motor vehicle) at the
police department. The victim is a student and the offense occurred
off campus.
Aycock Hall � An officer responded to Aycock to assist rescue
workers with a student who was unconscious. The student was
transported to Pitt Memorial Hospital by Greenville Rescue workers.
14th and Berkley parking lot �A student reported the breaking
and entering of her vehicle parked in the lot. The right door was
damaged, but nothing was taken from the vehicle.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken fromofficial ECU crime
reports.
OSHA aims to standardize
Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
Last year in industry-related
jobs, 9,100 people lost their lives in
work-related accidents in the
United States. Proper education
and training could have helped to
prevent some of these deaths.
In 1970, the Occupational Health
and Safety Act (OSHA) was en-
acted to help create a safer work-
ing environment for workers by
regulating the safety standards
used by industry related jobs.
OSHA is also responsible for work-
shops on job-site safety.
Throughout the year at ECU,
faculty members involved with
OSHA have put on their own work-
shops to help inform the local in-
dustry of the constant changes in
OSHA regulations. These work-
shops usually focus on training.
Lately though, OSHA has been
giving workshops on the 25 most
frequent violations. These include
the handling of hazardous materi-
als, problems involving electrical
wiring, failure to wear personal
protective equipment and failure
to provide safety training and edu-
cation.
"North Carolina has the distin-
guishing characteristic of setting
off a real focus on safety in the
construction industry said Dr.
Doug Kruger, the chair of the con-
struction management depart-
ment. "After the fire in Hamlet,
OSHA really kicked into high gear,
especially in North Carolina
OSHA has inspection officers
make rounds often and hold sur-
prise inspections. These inspec-
tions are designed vo catch people
who arebreaking the rules and not
just cleaning up their act before the
inspection. If there is a violation,
steep fines are usually imposed on
the violating company.
"What we really want is people
to go to these workshops to learn
the regulations enough to be famil-
iar with them said Mark Friend,
director of the Occupational Safety
and Health Consortium and Cen-
ter for Applied Technology. "Hope-
fully these industries will use OSHA
as a guideline for their own pro-
grams. Over time companies will
see it is beneficial to make a small
investment to cut back on their in-
surance costs and to prevent more
injuries on the job
In early December, another
workshop is being offered on
the 25 most frequently violated
regulations. What will make this
workshop unique is the fact that
it will be conducted from ECU to
other campuses across North
Carolina through a teleconfer-
ence. Everyone will see the exact
same thing and when a question
is asked, everyone will be able to
see who asked the question. This
workshop will focus on identi-
fying common general industry
OSHA compliance violations
and offer tips helpful in correct-
ing them.
"I guess that OSHA's main
importance is that through
proper training and education,
the chances and the severity of
injuries will greatly decrease
Kruger said.
Air Force supporters soar high
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
ECU students are earning
their wings, Silver Wings for
Angel Flight. Angel FlightSil-
ver Wings is a service organiza-
tion supported by Air Force
ROTC. The group is soaring high
to gain new members and recog-
nition for its projects and service
to the community.
Angel Flight began a support
group for women involved in
the military in the 1950s, and it
gradually progressed into a ser-
vice organization for women,
said Lt. Col. Michael Myrick,
director of ECU Air Force ROTC.
"Angel FlightSilver Wings is
small at ECU with ten members,
but at larger schools, the num-
bers are closer to sorority sizes
Myrick said. "They go on trips
together and have created a spe-
cial friendships between them
This year, Angel FlightSil-
ver Wings has helped with Habi-
tat for Humanity, blood drives
and canned food drives around
the area, the Special Olympics
and the Boys and Girls Club.
For Halloween, the organiza-
tion helped with spooky festivi-
ties for the children and will help
Santa and his Helpers at the mall
during the Christmas season.
Myrick said Angel FlightSil-
ver Wings attended ARCON, the
regional weekend in Atlanta, Ga.
where other Angel Flight orga-
nizations come together to dis-
cuss and talk about upcoming
service projects, such as work-
ing with the veterans for the now
passed Veterans Day.
This semester, Angel Flight
Silver Wings has worked to help
clean up some of the buildings
that need a little Spic and Span
and elbow grease.
This special organization is for
both male and female and one
does not have to be involved in
ROTC of the military to become
a part of Angel FlightSilver
Wings, Myrick said.
"Angel FlightSilver Wings
did use to be a strictly female
organization Myrick said.
"But this year, we do not have
one male, which is why we are
changing our name from Angel
Flight to Angel FlightSilver
Wings and we would like more
men to be a part of the organiza-
tion
Ann Lewis is part of the An-
gel FlightSilver Wings service
organization at ECU.
"We make our lives separate
from ROTC, because we do not
own projects and we make our
own decisions Lewis said. "We
do not depend on them except
for the fact that ROTC's direc-
tor is the same as ours, and he
is extremely supportive
Lewis is also a member of
ROTC and grew up is a mili-
tary household.
"I plan to go on with my
military service, but one does
not have to pursue a military
career to be a part of Angel
FlightSilver Wings Lewis
said. "In a way, there is a
unique bond between all of us
because we seem to have the
same mind, and we all are
very dedicated to this organi-
zation
R. Cherry Stokes
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Next Week: Mother Nature, Amateurs, Cold Sweat
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ECU Student Stores More then just textbooks!





December 1, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Quayle hospitalized
�. r i- u�:i,i v,o v,� ic tVi.it h,i i.n sutiniKi'ci to Ouavle'soroeresswas"betterth
f AT) � Dan Quayle, hospita
ized with a blood clot in his lung,
missed a planned golf game with
George Bush. His wife says that's
about the only major political out-
ing the tormervicepresidentplans
to forego.
Quayle "had a restful night. His
vital signs continue to improve
Pr. 1 lomer Twigg said yesterday-
morning. Quayle, 47, was admit-
ted to University Hospital Mon-
day after complaining of a pro-
gressive shortness of breath.
The hospital stay won't derail
her husband's plans for a possible
presidential run, Marilyn Quayle
said Tuesday.
"One of the biggest misgivings
he has is that he was supposed to
plavgolf today with President Bush
and Freddie Couples, and he didn't
get to do that and he's prettv disap-
pointed Mrs. Quayle said at a
news conference with her
husband's doctors. Couples is a
professional golfer.
'it's basically a blip, and he will
continue with the timetable that he
set for himself she said. She said
he would "be back on his feet shortly
and will decide what he wants to
do with the future
Quayle was set to announce early
next year whether he'll seek the
Republican presidential nomina-
tion.
Twigg said on Tuesday that
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Quay le's progress was "better than
expected" and he predicted a com-
plete recovery
Quayle was admitted to inten-
sive care asa precaution and would
likely be there until Thursday,
Twigg said.
Blood clots in the lungs, called
pulmonary embolisms, start in the
calf and work their way up the
body, through the heart and be-
come lodged in the pulmonary vein
of one of the lungs.
It can take a month to a year for
such a clot to dissolve, Twigg said.
With medication, doctors said
Quayle should be able to do what
he wants without restrictions
Twigg could not predict how long
it would take for Quayle to recover
fully, but said he should be out of
the hospital within a week.
Twigg said the problem was
unlikely to recur "because he's
healthy and we can't find any risk
factors.
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4Thi I
Pilots afraid to fly, flights cancelled
American Eagle Air- the French-and Italian-made ATR nil Bui
I more than a dozen in toul weather, American I I 68 men I
hts out ofChicago after some said, rhose flights were also can- people aboa killed tinue
pilots balked at flying in icy celed. Fed fl it .
weather in the same type of plane "No one refused to fly said determined the cause o! crash, that the,
that crashed a month ago in Indi- Bob Baker, chairman ol AMR- but some pilots have suggested tthr
ana. American Eagle. 'It's like when a ice on the wings might have been "Th
American Eagle said it can- pilot says there's a mechanical responsible. siblefor.
celed 14 commuter flights from problem with his airplane. When After the edera! as ti
O'Hare Airport on Sunday after a pilot saysI think there's some- Aviation Administration issued "he
the pilots demanded more thing wrong with this airplane, rules aimed at reducing the time said eai
weather safety information be- let's check it out that's not a re- A 1 R plain's spend flying in it "ba
tore they would take off in the fusal to fly. I think that's a legiti- weather sion of h
ATR turboprops. mate function of command 1 he FAA acknowledged that
Three other pilots previously The American Eagle ATR-72 some pilots have expressed con-
balked at taking off from O'Hare, that went down in Roselawn,Ind cern about flying the AIR until
samt
t iih
time
. i
into
iuld
n a
Amei i .1:1 I aglesaid the A I R-
d illei 1 R-42 ha
ifully tli� million times
ent into
id h.i e flov n safelv in i
11 1 around the world.
II
have
itS s 111 I
.
blamed
� proi ed
diana 1 rash was
R Marketing olhantilly, volving an ATR
onnd.
also citing concerns about flying on Oct. 31 was flying to Chicago the cause ol the crash
Rapper Tupac shot five times
I Pi � Rap star Tupac Shakur.
whose "gangsta rap" lyrics echo his
own iolent way of life, was shot
tive times in a robberv last ednes-
day, a day after a fury began deliber-
ating sexual assault charges against
him.
He was listed in seriousbut siable
condition at Bellevue Hospital with
gunshot wounds to the hand, head
and groin. After undergoing sur-
gery, Shakur checked himself out of
the hospital against medical advice,
said hospital spokesman Larry
Dugart
"He was in satisfactory condi-
tion" when he left early last Wednes-
day evening, Dugansaid. He had no
more information about Shakur s
medical condition.
The sequestered jurors at his trial
were unaware that the 23-year-old
musician and actor and hb manager
had been wounded and robbed of
S43,000 in jewelry shortlv after mid-
night in the lobby of a recording
studio.
Police said the gunmen appar-
ently didn't know the identity of
their victims. ButShakur told police
he believed the assailants knew him
and were after him, said a police
source who spoke on condition of
anonymity.
Shakur and another man, 24-year-
old Charles Fuller, are on trial on
charges ot sodomizing and sexually
abusing a woman in their Mew York
City hotel room last year.
Neither was in court last Wednes-
dav.and fudge I )aniel Fitzgerald told
the jurv that "circumstances beyond
their control" were responsible
'Please don't hold it against them
in any way Fitzgerald said. The
jury retired f r the night Wednesday
without reai lung a erdict.
Shakur, u 'ho has the words " Fhug
I lie" tattooed on his torso, has faced
criminal charges fiveothertinies since
March 1993
In 1992, then-Vice Pres lent Dan
Quayle urged record chains to re-
move his album "2Pacalypse Now"
See SHOT page 5
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V4
� III'
� �I � � i �
December 1, 1994
The East Carolinian 5
ECU
From p. 1
have helped to create 10,000 bags
and have done a superb job
Harrington said.
It takes over 50 tons of sand,
80,000 candles, 80,000 white bags
and more than 10,000 sheets of
paper to put together the 10,000
luminary kits. ECU student vol-
unteers, local civic clubs and or-
ganizations help put the kits to-
gether.
Supplies for the kits were do-
nated by local businesses.
McDonald's donated the white
bags, White Concrete supplied
sand, Kinko's gave copies, Vie
Daily Reflector donated advertis-
ing and Wal-Mart contributed
plastic bags.
"We are very proud to be a
part of helping the community,
especially the Ronald McDonald
House Harrington said. "Ev-
erybody has worked together to
create a project that will be ben-
eficial to the community. Every
cent goes to the Ronald
McDonald House
Coming
Soon!
It won't be long before
the doors of the newly
renovated Williams
Arena in Minges
Coliseum will be open
to Pirate Basketball
fans. The first home
game is scheduled for
8:30 p.m Jan. 6,
1995, against East
Tennessee State.
Support Pirate
athletics.
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
BO L LET
c4 'rTouctn o� OMasfi
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11 pm-1 an ,
CASH PRIZE @
�Contestants need to call & register in advance.
Must arrive by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
STl DIM SI'KCIAI.
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
j Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
w Dickinson Ave.
r.
a
m
Ylb following
Arkansas,
Colorado, Florida, Gsorgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nevada, North and South Carolina,
Tennessee and Utah. Please stop
by immediately to inquire about
seasonal help. Check the white
pages for information on the store
nearest you.
Liberty Bowl Trip
For Students, Faculty, Staff, & Alumni
$190 Per Person
Trip Includes
Round-Trip Bus Transportation
Liberty Bowl Game Ticket
Hotel Accommodations For Two Nights
SCHEDULE
Thursday. December 29
Departure at 6:00 pm from
Mendenhall Student Center
Meals and Rest Stops on the Way.
Friday. December 30
Arrival at motel east of Memphis
Transportation to downtown Memphis for Evening
Saturday. December 31 Overnight stay at motel
9 am Transportation to Graceland for optional tour
1:00 pm Liberty Bowl Game
After game, depart for return trip
Overnight stay in Nashville, TN.
Sunday. January 1
Trip Home-Arrival in early evening at
Mendenhall Student Center
For More Information
Contact Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
328-4788 or 1-800-ECU ARTS
Double Room Occupancy
oirie advertising takes as long to
work as this tree does tojroiu,
But not our classifieds.
You'll get immediate results from
advertising in our classifieds.
Off w 1 From p. 4'
because of lyrics condoning vio-
lence against police.
In his new video "Natural
Born Killaz Shakur � who
starred with Janet Jackson in the
movie "Poetic Justice" and also
appeared in "Above the Rim"�
plays an officer who guns down
fellow rappers Dr. Dre and Ice
Cube.
Police said Shakur lost a large
diamond ring and an assortment
of gold chains in the holdup at
Quad Recording Studios.
According to police, Shakur
and his three-man entourage
were followed by two robbers
into the building, where a third
robber was waiting.
"Anybody who was going
into that building at that time
was going to be robbed said
Assistant Police Chief John Hill.
Shakur was shot when he re-
fused the gunmen's order to get
on the floor and lunged for one
of their guns, police said.
Shakur's manager, 24-year-
old Freddie Moore, was shot in.
the abdomen and chased the
gunmen into the street before
collapsing, police said. He was
listed in stable condition.
Six months ago, Shakur spent
15 days in jail for assaulting a
video director. Two weeks ear-
lier, he was held overnight on
weapons and drug charges. Last
year, he was charged with as-
saulting a limousine driver.
AIDS From
P-1
lack of knowledge concerning
AIDS and HIV.
"As a society people are not
educated about AIDS Allinson
said. "ECU students are no better
or no worse than anyone else
Several groups on campus are
supporting World AIDS Day and
PICASO, including the Residence
Hall Association and Tri Beta, the
biological honor society.
Fletcher Hall, sponsored
through the Residence Hall Asso-
ciation, held a raffle Nov. 30 to
benefit PICASO. At the raffle, win-
ners received prizes such as t-shirts,
free dinners, free bowling and bil-
liards.
The Residence Hall Association
will also participate in the march
and vigil departing from Jarvis
Memorial Church at 5:30 p.m. The
dorms participating in the march
include Fletcher, Clement and
Aycock.
"We are hoping that we are rais-
ing an awareness about the devas-
tation AIDS is doing said Jeff
Gersh, coordinator for residence
life in Hetcher Hall. "We are hop-
ing also to get people involved
with PICASO
Tri Beta will also be holding a
raffle in connection with PICASO
along with a canned food drive.
Tickets for the raffle can be pur-
chased from any member of Tri
Beta for $1. Beginning next week,
Tri Beta will sell tickets in front of
the student store. Tri Beta will
opera te the booth Monday through
Thursday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
and�on Friday from 9 a.m. to 12
p.m.
The winners of the raffle will be
drawn in front of Mendenhall at
SHOW YOUR iff.
to receive up to
ssoo
College Graduate Rebate
on selected new cars.
31355-3333
East Carolina
Auto & Truck Center
Lincoln Mercury�Chrysler Plymouth Dodge
MEMORIAL DRIVE � GREENVILLE, NC
355-3333
1-800-849-3355
4:30 p.m. on Friday Dec. 9. A
check from proceeds of the raffle
will be presented to a represen-
tative of PICASO at that time.
The grand prize of the raffle
is a color television. Second prize
winners will receive such prizes
as basketballs, sweatshirts and
cameras. The third prize win-
ners will receive passes for free
dinners and movies. All of the
prizes were donated to Tri Beta
by local businesses.
Along with the raffle, Tri Beta
will also be collecting canned
foods to benefit PICASO.
Canned food canbe turned in at
the Tri Beta office located in
44A Biology North. Tri Beta
will also be collecting canned
foods in front of the student
stores next week where raffle
tickets are being sold.
Wade Anderson, president
of Tri Beta, feels PICASO is an
excellent opportunity for Tri
Beta to work together as a team.
"We were trying to think of a
charitable cause. During the
meeting our vice president
brought up PICASO as being a
local group that we could sup-
port within our community
Anderson said. "It promotes
cohesiveness within our group
to work on a project.
"The members are doing this
as a community service project,
so we can support a charitable
cause within our community,
especially during the Christmas
season. The members feel good
to give something back to the
community
Anyone desiring further in-
formation on World AIDS Day
events or anyone who would
like to volunteer for PICASO
can call Gregg Allinson at 830-
1660.
Apply nozu to be a Creative Director at Ifu East
Carolinian for the spring semester. Paid salary,
flexible hours, and great experience. Macintosh
computer skills are helpful Must be a registered
student zuith a 2.0 QtPJL or better to apply.
Apply at (The "East Carolinian office or call Chris
Warren for more information at 328-6366.
M
a
Don't be scared
you'll be glad you
did it.
0SX
-v-
� 'J-HIIU
� .
�;?





i
6 The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
December 1, 1994
For Rent
i
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
�FREE AUCUST RENT
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
l.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815J58-7436
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
beroom duplex near campus, in-
cludes private bedroom and bath-
room with walk in closet. $225
month. Call 752-6330 available now.
TWO ROOMS FOR RENT, 1 Mas-
ter private bath, partial furn. $220
m o 1 bedroom partial furn. $190,
both 1 block from campus, ask for
Jim 752-4039
WANTED: Male or female for larg-
est bedroom with own bathroom in
3 bedroom Tar River apt. $150 de-
posit- $162W month 758-8399
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for spring semester, 2 bd, 2 bth,
Fairlane Farms Apt. for information
call Katherine, 756-5883
VERY QUIET furnished bedroom
for rent. Adjoining bath, kitchen
washroom privileges. Central air, all
utilities $195.month. On golf course.
Non-smoking graduate or physical
therapy students or professionals
only, "one of the best rental situa-
tions in Greenville" said a former
renter, call 756-2027
SUBLEASE FOR SPRING 2 bed-
room College View Apartments
free cable $350 mo. Sean or Wyatt
758-4601 Pets welcome
HONEST, RESPONSIBLE ROOM-
MATE WANTED: Preferably gradu-
ate student $210mo. utilities, 4
blocks from campus. Wilson Ajres,
free cable, call 752-0421, leave
mesage
FOR RENT Sheraton Village 2 bdrm
townhouse, fireplace, washer dryer
available Jan 1st. $525 321-3253
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE: In
Wilson Acres, 3 bedroom, $160 per
month, 2 females needed, effective
Dec. or Jan. Call Gina or Amy at 752-
0270
ROOMMATE NEEDED 2 bedroom
2 full bathroom apartment with
washerdryer. $237.50 month 12
utilitif Move in December or Janu-
ary call 758-3458
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share nice 2 bedroom apt. Rent $175,
1 2 utilities, ECUbus service. Clean-
liness is a must! Call 551-7638. Ask
for Deanna
FREE DEPOSIT two bdrm apt. for
sublease at Kings Row call 752-0845
ASAP
NEEDED Cool non cigarette smok-
ing artist type female to share ulti-
mate 3 bedroom house. Cathedral
ceilings, fire place, music loft (lots of
music), outdoor patio, central heat
and air. No animals. Must be clean
and courteous, lease required as well
as security deposit. A very nice place
for a very nice person. Call for more
info. 758-7993. Close to campus.
ROOMMATE NEEDED:3bedroom
duplex; $135 a month plus 13 utili-
ties, 13 phone bill. ECU area! Call
830-9514 after 5:30 weekdays. Refer-
ences needed.
NEED MALE ROOMMATE for
offcampus- nonsmoker, nondrinker.
Call Richard at 328-7891
'FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEEDED
for apt. 1II block from art building, 3
blocks from downtown 2 blocks
from supermarketlaundromat. Rent
indues utilties, phone cable. Avail-
able in Jan. 757-1947
TO SHARE 4 bedroom house 12
block from art building. Preferably
female, no furry animals. $160 a
month plus lf4 utilties. Call Amy
752-8555 �
ROOMMATE WANTED. Available
now rent $192.50 plus 12 utilties,
phone and cable. Nice neighborhood.
Call Cathy at 321-5688 if no answer
leave message.
1900 SQ. FT 3 bedroom, 2 full bath
house. Fenced in back yard nearcam-
pus. 752-B079 night 524-5790 days.
Available 1-1-95 $750 month.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
non smoker preferred. For spring se-
mester, 2 bd, 1 bth, furnished $220
mo utility. Ringgold Towers. Call
757-8709 ASAP
LOOKING TO ASSUME LEASE on
2 or 3 br. house near campus and
downtown Call 355-0615
ROOMMATE NEEDED $150 a
month. Great location in a house.
Walk to campus. Shared utilities. Own
room nonsmoker. Clean Call Chris
Warren at 830-9536 move in Jan. 1st.
FEMALE KIOMMATE NEEDED
for spring "mester, 2 bedroom, 1
bath $167.50 a mth. 12 utilties.
Partially furnished. ECU bus service.
Call Tracy, 758-8646
For Sale
Wardering what to get for your
mom, sister, or grUnend?
We have just produced a
videotape on Personal Safety
for Women An ideal gift for
the woman in your life.
Attitude, Awareness,
Avoidance are stressed as well
as simple techniques
for self defense. $15
Charles June Karate Institute
Call 752-7283 J
For Sale
FOR SALE: Couch, chair, carpets;
moving- must sell immediately. Call
830-5347
85 SUNBIRD auto pwr- steering. 4
door, new tire, muffler, battery, runs
great. $800 or best offer. Call 757-1238
or message.
70s YARD SALE: Saturday Dec. 3rd,
10:00am- 3:00pm. A-Line, Levis, cor-
duroy, velour, stripes, bell-bottoms
and disco. Come early, the good stuff
goes fast. 102 S. Summit St. Backyard.
Good Prices.
92 TREK 8000 with Rock Shox Mag
21, Deore XTDX components, con-
trol tech stem, Onza bar ends, Ritchey
saddle, Panaracers, more. Immacu-
late $750 752-1486
WASHER FOR SALE $50 or best of-
fer. Please call 757-1738
CLOTHES SALE! SaUDec. 3 7am-
3pm Everything unde20! Half of all
proceeds go to PicassoFitt County's
local Aids foundation. Sale located in
front of ECU Belk building (Allied
Health) Raindate 124 10am-4pm.
FOR SALE, 1988 Mercury Tracer,
recent tune up, 105k good condition
graduating and want new car. $1500
neg. Call 756-5134 leave message.
FOR SALE creme colored sofa and
love seat 2 yrs. old. Good condition
$150 or best offer. Call 756-5134 leave
message.
FOR SALE Buff cocker spaniel to good
home. Female, AKC registered. Mov-
ing and cannot keep dog. 1 yr. old $50
nego. call 756-5134, leave message.
FOR SALE a 90 gallon fish tank, sup-
plies and accessories- $300, for more
info, call 757-3177
Services Offered
o
NeeJ CASHTTT
W. B�y CDS, Caaacttc, and Vmyl
Downtown
29 GAL. TANK with Salt Water set
up and extras. $150 Call 758-1104
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Resi-
dency Status and Tuition is the bro-
chure by attorney Brad Lamb on the
in-state tuition residency application
process. For sale: student stores,
Wright Building.
FULL'SIZE COMPLETE FUTON:
$100. Queen size mattress (limit, use):
$125, Twin size mattress: $50, Laser
disc player 4 movies: $200, Halogen
desk lamp (very cool): $25 Call Jenk
at 830-0117
CAMERAS: We buy, sell, trade qual-
ity used equipment. Top dollar paid.
Why pay twice as much for new when
you get quality for less? ASAP Photo
& Camera, Bells
GREAT GIFT IDEAS: Rock, Jewerly
and mineral sale today in the first
floor in the Graham building. Last
Day!
RBEARCRMFORMAriON
Largest Library qf information in U.S.
al: subjects
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COO
H 800-351-0222
�nil my
" Or. rujti S2 00 to Research Inlormation
1132Zldaho'Ave . 206 A. Los Angeles. CA 90025
for your Christina ana bpnng socials
and formals. Don't miss out on the
chance to have the best Disc Jockey
service in the area playing what you
want to hear when you want to hear it.
Call Lee @ 758-4644 for booking.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS:
DV-1 Greencard Program, by U.S.
Immigration. Greencards provide U.S.
permanent resident status. Citizens
of almost all countries are allowed.
For info & forms: New Era Legal Ser-
vices 20231 Stagg St Canoga Park,
CA91306Tel: (818)772-7168; (818)998-
4425 MonSun 10am- 11pm.
MODEL PORTFOLIOS: Ten 8x10
color prints in quality zippered case.
Studio and shooting fee included.
Three day turn around. All for $99.95.
ASAP Photo &. Camera, Bells Fork
Square, 321-8888
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELlNCall
.1-900-884-1400 ext439$2.95min. must
be 18 or older.
HAVING TROUBLE FINDING A
ROOM FOR THE LIBERTY BOWL?
Let me find one for you! These rooms
are right in MemphisF! Not in sur-
rounding cities. Also get New Year's
Eve celebration info. Call 551-7638 for
more details.
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Ov
er $5 billion in free financial aid is
now available from private sector
grants & scholarships. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, in-
come, or parents income. Let us help
you. for more info, call: 1-800-959-
1605 ext F53621
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
FRATERNITIES AND SORORI-
TIES! Mobile Music Productions Disc
Jockev service is now booking dates
f
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull-time. Set own
hours! Rush self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (GI) 1821
Hillandale Rd 1B-295, Durham, NC
27705.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
up to $2,000month working on
Cruise Ships or Land-Tour compa-
nies. World travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
the Caribbean, etc.). Seasonal and Full-
time employment available. No expe-
rience necessary. For more informa-
tion call 1-206-634-0468 ext. C53622.
PLAYMATES NOW UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT: seeks ladies 18 and
older. Earn Big Bucks while you learn.
Full Time nights and Part-time any-
time. Call for an appointment Play-
mate massage (919) 747-7686.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J.CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
a GUESS
LEV!
ETC.
Student Swap Shop
414 EVANS STDOWNTOWN
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI10-12,1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRTVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
13
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
$1500 WEEKLY POSSIBLE mailing
our circulars! No experience re-
quired! Begin now! For info call 202-
298-8935.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Stu-
dents needed! Fishing industry. Earn
up to $3,000- $6,000 per month.
Room and board! Transportation!
Male or Female. No experience nec-
essary. Call (206) 545-4155 ext A53621
PARTTIME CASHIER NEEDEDat
Szechuan Express- The Plaza Mall.
15-20 hours a week. Experience pre-
ferred. No phone calls please. Apply
in person
DISTRIBUTORS NEEDED. Earn
$1000's weekly working at home
mailing our circulars. Free details,
send SASE: R&B Distributors, Box
20354, Greenville NC 27858
SKI RESORT JOBS - Hiring for win-
ter quarter. Up to $2,000 in salary &
Benefits. Ski snowboard instructors,
lift operators, wait staff, chalet staff,
other positons. Over 15,000 open-
ings. For more info, call: (206)634-
0469 ext. V53623
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1,000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a licensed
agency. Must be 18, dependable and
have own phone and transportation.
Call Diamonds or Emerald City Es-
corts at 758-0896 or 757-3477
WANTED: CNA or HHA for 30 year
old male Quad. Flexible hours pos-
sible live in. For appointment call
355-0615
EARN $500 OR MORE WEEKLY
stuffing envelopes at home. Send
long SASE to: Country Living Shop-
pers, Dept. S32, Po Box 1779, Denham
Springs, LA 70727.
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE BET-
TER GRADES? Well, I'lll pay you
to! Make your A's pay by calling
Student Supplements today. We of-
fer cash for going to class. Call now
at 752-6947
NEED COLLEGE STUDENTS to
sell T-shirts. Make $3- $4 per shirt
commission. Call Les or Cheri @ 752-
6953
EXPECTANT MOTHER NEEDS
SOMEONE to help with house clean-
ing immediately and possibly some
help with infant care after Jan. 1st.
Part-time, $5 per hour. Please call for
an interview between 8am and 8pm,
756-5747.
FREE RIDE TO FLORIDA. Drive
professor's car to Central or Western
Florida anytime after 1208. Return
with her 01 01 or 02. References re-
quired. 830-9125.
BOWEN CLEANERS Help wanted:
Part time counter sales rep. Mon
Fri. 3-7 alternating Sat. 9-5. Starting
pay based on previous retail and or
cashier experience- some computer
skills needed. Apply at 3114 S. Evans
or 756-6800
Travel
SPRING BREAK! Early sign-up spe-
cials! Bahamas Party cruise 6 days
$279! Includes 12 meals 6 parties!
Cancun & Jamaica $399 with Air from
Raleigh! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK EARLY SPE-
CIALS! Panama City Oceanview
Room with Kitchen & free bus to
bars $129! Daytona (Kitchens)
$159! Cocoa Beach $159! Key West
$229! 1-800-678-6386
IAQ
wmmmmaaaam
Greek Personals
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY! Spring
Break- How about it in the Bahama
or Florida Keys. Where the Party nevfg�2'
ends. Spend it on your own privatgy
yacht. One week only $385 per pejjjjjj
son. Including food and much morr���
Organizers may go for free! Easy sajPjjjj
ing Yacljt Charters 1-800-783-4001 -
Cancun
Jamaica
Florida
On-Campus Contact
Angel @ 328-9961 J
Stephanie @ 758-84791
from �J�5V
from JJV
from 31V
120 N. Ajotci SI. Itrxo. W U850
lolfree 1-�OO-6404849
l�7-272-6964F I 607-272-6963
Ratea are par parson quad occupancy Air transportation via Wkami An,
Add S43 partura taxes tar Jamaica and Cancun. Saa lour paractp&r' lor,
complete terms and ������-
rvJ

ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
HOOK NOW AND SAVE
JAMAICA $439. CANCUNBAHAMAS S399
PANAMA CITY $119. DATONA 1149 �
ORGANIZE GROUPS. EARN CASH, A TRAVEL FREE.
ENDLESS SUMMERI
1 -800-234-7007
EZ
Lost & Found
LOST: Ladies goldtone Bulova wato
Engraved. Great sentimental value.
Reward offered. Call Toni at 816-22&
or 758-3361
KELLY, Will you marry me?
EVERYONE TOLD US NOT TQ
FALL IN LOVE IN EUROPE. Looks,
like one of us didn't listen to rulesi
Thank goodness rules are brokerr! J
Who would have thought six months. 't
later a diamond would have entered"
our lives. Congratulations Tara Henke
and Eric Rhom on beginning youi ?
new life together. I love you both
Laura 'f
STEPHANIE LASSITER you are rjfttj
cutest girl I know. Ya must call me
asap. I have been noticing you frorrC-
afar but now I must tell ya. CW.
�a�����PaaVaVaBaVVaaaB'VaaVHHaaBSaHeVVai'
PI KAPPA ALPHA The brothej J
would like to congratulate Matt �
"Squeeze me tight" Hedrick and Erk Jj
"Loverboy "Conrad for finally gradu- J
ating. Best of luck to you both. Ma� �
come back and visit. See you at the
Liberty Bowl. Eric we know why you �
are staying, maybe we will see you ��
more this time?? Everyone havejfc
warm and safe Christmas. Eric atiff.
Matt we will miss you both.
SIGMA NU would like fc
congradulate our newest brothers ol j
Pi pledge class: Shawn Johnson, j
George Schwab, Jonathan Hoy, Briar �
DeLong, Dave Matthews Band, Dave j
Creech, Andrew Sullivan, and Todd .
(BW) Haher- great job fellas. Joyce m r
brothers
PI DELTA- Get ready girls, its formal J
weekend! Grab your dates and head j
to New Bern for some boating on the j
Belle. It's going to be a night we'll ;
never forget! Ps Happy Founders Day
Charting "
yotirjuture,
You'll find lots of options
in our classifieds'
Announcements
BLOODMOBILE!
THE AMERICAN RED CROSS IS
EXPERIENCING A SEVERE BLOOD
SHORTAGE: ETA SIGMA GAMMA
will spoSsor a bloodmobile on Mon-
day, Member 5, 1994. The blood-
mobileill be held in Mendenhall
from lf:00pm to 6:00pm. All blood
types are needed, (especially O posi-
tive, O negative and B positive).
Please get in the spirit of giving this
holiday season by giving the gift of
life.
A CLOTHES SALE
A Clothes Sale will be held on De-
cember 3, from 7am - 3pm. This is
sponsored by the Junior OT students
and will be held in front of the ECU
Belk Bldg.( Allied Health). Half of all
proceeds are going to the charity
named PICASQ. PICASO is the Pitt
County AIDS Service Organization.
All items will be under $20.00. All
students are welcome to come pro-
vide support for a much needed char-
ity. Rain date is Sunday 124 from
10am -4pmfc
MASSAGE CLINIC
You are invited to a massage clinic
given by junior physical therapy stu-
dents tonight, Dec. 1 from 6-9. Tickets
at the door $2.50 for 10 minutes.
ECU POETRY FORUM
Will meet on Thursday, December 1st
in Mendenhall Student Center, Room
248, at 8pm. Open to the general pub-
lic, the Forum is a free workshop. Those
planning to attend and wanting criti-
cal feedback on their work should
bring 8 or 10 copies of each poen.
Listeners welcome.
CHRISTMAS SALESCHOOL OF
ART
ECU School of Art Christmas Sale
December 1st and 2nd: 8am to 6pm,
December 3rd: 10am to 3pm. Gray Art
Gallery, Jjnkins Art Building (on 5th
Street across from the Chancellor's
house) Handcrafted jewelry, mugs,
bowls, plates, vases, brass bells. Christ-
mas ornaments, cards, prints, silk and
wool scarves, gourmet coffee and food.
WORLD AIDS DAY
THURSDAY DECEMBER 1, 1994:
Schedule of Events 1:40pm Participat-
ing Pitt County churches will ring their
bells in unison with others throughout
the state in commemoration of the ob-
servance of Worlds AIDS Day. 2j530pjn
Open House at PICASO. Light refresh-
ments, comaraderie and fellowship.
5:30pm Silent commemorative march
leaving from Jarvis Memorial Church.
6:00pm Candlelight vigil and program
at the Greenville town commons. 6:30-
8:00pm Reception at Jarvis Memorial
Church. Refreshments, PICASO sales
and information booth: For more infor-
mationCall PICASO at 830-1660.
ST. PFTER'S CHURCH AND
SCHOOL
You are invited to a Delicious Holiday
Buffet of Hot and Cold Hors d'Oeuvres
served with Holiday Punch or Wine and
an array of Desserts and Pastries 6:30pm
to 8:00pm Saturday, December 3,1994 in
the Parish Hall of St. Peter's Catholic
Church. Adults$7.00and Children $3.50.
Proceeds will benefit St. Peter's Church
and School.
TALENT SHOWPRE-EXAM JA.M
The National Pan-Hellenic Council is
having a Talent Show Friday, Dec. 9th at
Jenkins Auditorium at 7:00pm. General
Admission is $3. Afterwards there will
be a pre-exam jam at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center from 10:00pm-2:00am.
Costs are $2 for students and $4 for non-
students.
"NONSENSE ABOUT ANIMAL
MINDS"
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2. 1994, the
Dept. of Philosophy will hold a joint
colloquium with the ECU Cognitive
Science Discussion Group. The
speaker will be Dr. Willem Landman,
Professor of Philosophy at the Univer-
sity of the Western Cape in Cape Town,
South Africa. Dr. Landman is cur-
rently Distinguished Visiting Profes-
sor in the Dept. of Medical Humani-
ties at ECU School of Medicine. His
talk is entitled, "Nonsense About
Animal Minds It willbeheld in Gen-
eral Classroom Bldg Rm. 1001 from
3:30-5:00pm. For further information
contact John Bickle, Dept. of Philoso-
phy 328-6121.
FRIDAY NIGHT EXAM IAM
Relieve all of your stress during this
year's Fri. Night Exam Jamon Dec. 2at
8:00pminChristenbury Gymnasium.The �
building will be open for volleyball, bas- i
ketball, weight lifting, fitness classes and !
more! For more info, call Recreation Ser-�
vices at 328-6387
"THE MORA I STATUS OF AN1-
t
t
MALS"
Monday, December512:30-1:30pm Brody ;
2W-50: "The Moral Status of Animals" J
Willem A. Landman, Ph.D. Distinguished �
Visiting Professor Department of Medi-
cal Humanities ECU School of Medicine!
For further information call: Department!
of Medical Humanities, 816-2797. The!
Public is Invited to Attend. tc'
-�mm
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS ��
Especially for Anorexics and Bulimics WflT
meet on Mondays, 6:30pm at Memorial
Baptist Church. AH are welcome. No fees,
weigh-ins, or religious affiliation required;
just understanding and support offered.
Call 758-9373 or 756-0449 for more infor
mation. i

eiTiBJUig
�MMMaMN





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- -V
8 The East Carolinian
Decemoer i, it
The East Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Assr. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson. Asst. Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith. Staff Illustrator
Printed oo
recycled
paper
Rape continues to plague our world
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley, Typesetter
Jennifer Coleman. Typesetter
Darren Mygatt, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary-
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jon Cawley, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Charles Peele, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
TEC shocked by Senator's remarks
North Carolina's own Senator
Jesse Helms has recently been the cen-
ter of attention for remarks he made
about the President of the United
States, William Jefferson Clinton. The
hullabaloo started when Senator
Helms was queried about the
President's competency as com-
mander-in-chief of our nation's mili-
tary. The Senator answered honestly
and asserted that the President was
not an effective military leader.
Such a downgrading reply from a
Senator sent Democrats, the media and
even some Republicans into a rage.
Not long after the vote of no con-
fidence was given on television by
Helms, he was quoted as saying he
believed the President would need a
body guard for protection if he vis-
ited North Carolina military bases.
This near-mutinous statement
sent politicians, especially Democrats,
into a raging fury, and the press into
a feeding frenzy (hey, they got a story).
Senator Helms made an additional
statement regarding the "bodyguard"
remark: He admitted that the com-
ment was not to be taken seriously,
and that he simply engaged in a little
hyperbole to make his point about the
poor state of readiness he believes the
U.S. military is in at the moment. How-
ever, he did not apologize.
Many contend that Helms over-
stepped the line of decency and deco-
rum in speaking so disparagingly of
President Clinton. Many found remarks
that threatened Clinton's life as utterly
deplorable. Still, many others share the
Senator's opinion about the President's
military competency.
We at TEC believe Senator Helms
remarks were ill-considered and agree
that he should have been more diplo-
matic in voicing his opinion. Saying
that the President is not performing
his job as the commander of our mili-
tary is one thing, but to even jokingly
suggest that Clinton's life is threat-
ened is another. Hopefully, the Sena-
tor and the new Republican majority
have learned a lesson from the public
outcry over Helms' remarks. Along
with leadership comes responsibility;
one should think before one speaks.
Emasculation of the United Nations
by Patrick Hinson
While looking through a
news magazine the other day, I
saw a photo I know I won't soon
forget. A seven-year-old boy lay
face down on the pavement in
the city of Sarajevo in Yugoslavia
in a spreading pool of his own
dark blood.
I couldn't seem to take my
eyes off the face of that little boy,
lying there as if napping, his
short life ended by a sniper's
bullet. A sniper, mind you, not a
random shell fragment, not a
wild shot fired into a crowd.
Someone actually set this
little boy, a little seven-year-old
boy, probably running for his
life in the street like everyone
else in that city, in between the
hairlines of the scope of their
high-powered rifle and shot him.
You see a photo like that and
you think, "Who could possibly
do such a thing?
The same people who killed
this boy are probably the ones
burning and killing entire
hamlets and villages (and
children) out there in the former
Yugoslavia. The same people
rocketing hospitals and homes
and shelling market crowds of
innocent people.
If we're not going to help,
and if the United Nations isn't
going to help, then we should
pull the United Nations' forces
out of Yugoslavia now, because
they're really not much more
than a joke and a rather shameful
symbol of the United Nation's
ineptitude, cowardice and failure
to intervene in an all-out massacre
(or will holocaust soon become a
better word?).
The United Nations and
European nations can't get their
heads out of their butts long
enough to make any kind of
concrete decisions.
Meanwhile, people die. The
United Nations just can't decide,
can't agree, and they wait and wait
for someone to please do
something.
Meanwhile tne Serbs bully
them and slap them around and
laugh much like the big kid on the
block when we were little. Much
like Adolf Hitler must have been
laughing, while the SS mobile
killing squads rounded up people
in Poland for slaughter and we
watched. Where does it all end?
Yesterday on the news the U .S.
said that the war in Yugoslavia is
now allbuthelpless, that everyone,
the United States and the United
Nations, has given up any ideas or
hope of helping them. The
marines, who spoke on television
about it not being their job to fight
an overseas war that has nothing
to do with U.S. security, have every
right to feel the way they do. Our
armed forces are charged first and
foremost with defending the
United States, not intervening in
foreign civil wars.
It was the United Nations' job
to stop this murder, yet they have
Quotable Quote;
"A generation which ignores history has no past � and
no future
� Robert A. Heinlein
author
"Avarice, the sphincter of the heart
� Matthew Green
English poet
By Angela McCullers
Many women know the
paralyzing fear of walking on
campus at night, hearing
mysterious footsteps clicking
behind, wondering whether the
night out was worth these
moments of terror � the dread
that strikes us when we hear that
a female has been raped on campus
� the sudden resolve to be more
cautious, not to accept the offers
of dubious men to walk us home,
or not to go out at night at all.
Rape is not a very pleasant
subject. Most of us do not like to
think about it. And when we do,
we usually think of a stranger with
a knife hiding in the bushes. He
waits for a woman to walk by, and
then he attacks.
That is why a lot of us know
not to walk alone after dark. But
that is not the only kind of rape.
Some rapes are acquaintance
rapes. Eighty percent of all rapes
are, in fact, acquaintance rapes.
The number of acquaintance
rapes against college women is
alarmingly high. The reasons for
this include societal socialization
of males, females and males
having almost unlimited access to
each other as a result of
coeducational residence halls and
the abolition of curfews, and
students advertising for rides on
unmonitored "ride boards"
(similar to the one located in
Mendenhall).
Rape on college campuses
usually happens to women early
in their college careers, before they
know the social "rules" (a victim
may also experience further
episodes later on). It frequently
takes place after a party, especially
backed-out or been beaten back
by nothing more than armed thugs
once again, and once again it will
be the civilians who will pay with
their lives (and with their children)
for the United Nations' failure.
The United Nations, the world's
police, have been reduced to global
janitors and global social workers
to be smacked around at will.
One hard strike or one
really heavy blow, and we could
crush the Serbs, or at least send
them reeling back to lick their
wounds for the long winter.
They're like a rogue wolf:
hungry, dirty, and with a mean
growl, but one good kick in the
face would send them running
back to the woods.
One series of really heavy
air strikes, not the mosquito
bites that we've been giving
them, and we might give at least
a few more seven-year-olds a
future to dream about. Is that
not worth fighting for? And,
perhaps more importantly,
what if it were us? How would
we be feeling if our roles were
reversed with the victims out
there?
How would we feel now,
with the cold winter
approaching, barbarians at the
gates of our city and the rest of
the world slowly turning its
back on us? How would we feel
if that were our little boy in the
street? Betrayed? Deserted?
Forgotten. Doomed.
one held in a fraternity house and
where alcohol is served. Peer
pressure, alcohol, and all-male
groups are important elements
that combine to increase the
likelihood of campus rapes.
Even though sexual assault is
relatively common on college
campuses, few cases are reported
to the authorities. Even fewer cases
are referred to the criminal justice
system or for campus judicial
action.
Victims usually do not report
cases to anyone, especially the
authorities, because they often
believe that they are at fault for
drinking and for going out
voluntarily with the man who
raped them. They often worry that
the authorities will blame them
for the rape.
Like other crimes too
prevalent today, we will never be
able to completely eliminate rapes
on college campuses. However,
effective steps can be taken to
significantly reduce their
incidence.
Education and prevention
programs and swift and certain
punishment for this heinous crime
can be effective deterrents. The
"boys will be boys" mentality
must be removed from society's
mind set and be replaced by the
conviction that acquaintance rape
is rape, and rape is a serious crime.
Rape on college campus continues
to remain a problem.
Although it is not talked about
as much as other issues that college
females face, it still exists. Rape is
obviously a bad, indeed a horrific
thing. It belongs to the real world
in which people are hurt,
humiliated and abused. No
woman is safe from rape.
The area of campus sexual
assault Is an important one; the
lives of many young men and
women in college are
significantly affected by it. We
owe it to them to recognize it as
a problem, to make every effort
to reduce its incidence and to
handle it in the best possible
way when it occurs.
Rape, we must remember,
is a crime; women are the
victims of it. Rape is not the just
desert of any woman who
dresses casually, goes out at
night, or live alone. Women do
not cause rape by their growing
freedom.
If we place the blame
anywhere other than on the
criminal himself, we must look
at the society that creates him.
Rape victims have been treated
as the guilty ones, the outcasts,
for too long.
Imagine a world in which
women had no cause to fear
rape, be it at home, on college
campuses or any where at all.
Imagine a world in which the
word 'rape' no longer served
any function, there being
nothing for it to refer to � a
world in which to speak of 'safe'
areas or streets, towns or cities,
was to speak in a mode
comprehensible to none but a
few historians.
Imagine a world, then, in
which to feel safe no longer
made any sense to women, the
very memory of any threat
having faded away. What sort
of world would this have to be?
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
You know, just when I forget how out of touch
Jesse Helms is, he makes a stupid comment like this.
In case you haven't heard, Jesse was asked about
Clinton coming to N.C. bases, and he said "Mr.
Clinton better watch out if he comes down here.
He'd better have a bodyguard Uhhh I believe
making threats like this is a federal offense. Some
people pass this off as a joke and don't consider what
Helms said a threat. If you or I were to do this, not
only would we be arrested, but we would be grilled
by the FBI, the SBI, as well as other agencies. Helms
has disgraced the armed forces of our great state. It is
unthinkable that a U.S. Senator would state the
president's life would be in jeopardy were he to come
to N.C. military installations.
Helms says he made "an off hand remark in an
attempt to emphasize how strongly the American
people feel about the ntion's sic declining defense
capability Which American people are you talking
about Jesse? I'm not headed to the fallout shelter yet.
Oh yes, he says "I didn't expect to be taken literally?"
Whatever We'll j �t sweep all other assasination
sic rumors under the rug. In a period where Clinton's
safety is already at risk, Helms' remarks are extremely
innappropriate sic.
Let's not forget he made these remarks on the
day JFK was assasinated sic. Helms has had a
history of disparaging remarks, and this one tops it
off. He should be censured by the Senate and he
definitely should not be allowed to be head of the
important Foreign Relations Committee. I have been
impressed so far with Newt Gingrich and Bob Dole's
desire to work with the president, but Helms can
only add to the gridlock on Capitol Hill.
Hey Jesse, you work for Bill Clinton, you idiot!
I am ashamed to call Helms my senator. I didn't
agree with Bush's polices, but I respected the
president of the United States. Conservatives would
have you believe that everyone in uniform hates
Clinton Jesse even thinks they would "rub him
out but this isn't true. In the News and Observer,
Senior Airman Rich Lewis admitted Clinton is
doing a pretty good job. I didn't vote for him, and
I still wouldn't, but he's surpassed my expectations.
It's just a bad time to be president right now
To all you yelling Impeach Clinton, is he really
doing such a horrible job? On what standard are
you basing his performance? He has kept his
campaign promises, passed a lot of legislation, and
has improved the economy. Helms says our defense
is in serious trouble, but last time I checked, the
"commies" aren't bothering us any more. In this
post cold war era, the defense built up in the '80s
has to be scaled down. We still have the best armed
forces in the world, but Jesse Helms says that they
would stoop low enough to take the life of their
Commander-in-Chief. Helms is the epitome of
bigotry, hate and fear, but then again, don't blame
me, I as sure as hell didn't vote for him. Impeach
Clinton? I say impeach Helms, and rid our state of
an embarrassment.
Larry Freeman
Political Science
Junior
To the Editor:
To be able to criticize the President is a freedom
we have in this country. In many governments in
the past, this would cause one to lose his head.
Now Senator Jesse Helms has been critical of
President Bill Clinton. The liberals in this country
are even more critical of this Senator. Saying things
like 'a Southern windbag with a screw loose' is not
very respectful.
How can they be so blind? Here they are
pounding on a SENATOR with more venom than
what Senator Helms did pound on the President
with.
As far as needing a bodyguard to come to North
Carolina, since long before I was born any President
(Republican or Democrat) needs a swat team just to
enter his own home!
I think the Northern liberals (and their Southern
Carpetbagger allies) are a bunch of hypocrites and
who show more disrespect for a Senator than a
Senator did to the President.
If Senator Helms had criticized Presidents
Eisenhower, Reagan or Bush then maybe the liberals
might have a legitimate complaint. But this current
President was very critical of President Nixon during
the Vietnam War. He demonstrated! He smoked
pot! He did things that should have disqualified
him from being elected President. But since we are
such a decadent society, he seemed to be the ideal
man to lead our perverted nation.
Now to condone rebellion is wrong! But to
condone a bunch of hypocrites ganging up on
someone who has more grit than the rest of our
nation put together is even worse!
Now listen to me all you aging liberals who
were protesters of the Vietnam War! You rebelled
against the United States of America! You are now
reaping what you have sowed! If Senator Helms is
a hammer that is to be used to punish not only the
President, but the whole polluted generation that
President Clinton represents why don't you
liberals just be passive like you were about
Vietnam? (Sort of ironic you shouldn't be very
passive now!)
Why don't you just take your "whipping" like
a man. All of you are like a bunch of lap dogs who
think that by yipping at the heels of Senator Helms
you can bring disgrace on him and other
conservatives! Think again! You are about to get
an overdue whipping for your rebellion during
the Vietnam War!
The "Clinton" generation did inhale! And they
are now about to reap what they have sowed
during the '60s!
Love and peace hell! A piece of your hide!
That's the only "peace" there will be from here on
out!
Donald Raymond Wheatley
Grifton, North Carolina





�II II i�
ii i � i ili
!
December 1, 1994
77re �asf Carolinian 9
77? �tfs Carolinian
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
Appearing soonfbr your edification
and amusement:
Thursday, Dec. 1
Big Fish Ensemble
at Peasant's Cafe
Captain Cook and
the Coconutz
at the Attic
(Jimmy Buffet tribute)
Madrigal Dinners
at Mendenhall
(Historical Christmas Feast)
Cyrano de Bergerac
at Hendrix Theatre
(romance)
8 p.m.
FREE!
See story at right
Friday, Dec. 2
Fighting Gravity
at the Attic
(ska)
Breed 13
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Madame Bovary
at Hendrix Theatre
(drama)
8 p.m.
FREE!
See story at right
Saturday, Dec. 3
Unsound
and Room of Humor
at O'Rock's
(heavy metal)
Gib Droll Band
at the Attic
(classic rock)
Three Men and a Cradle
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
8 p.m.
FREE!
See story at right
The Inflatable Living Project
at Wright Auditorium
2 p.m.
(inflatable comedy)
Thesis Exhibition
at Gray Art Gallery
(art exhibit)
Sunday, Dec. 4
Too Beautiful for You
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(comedy)
ECU Symphonic
Wind Ensemble
at Wright Auditorium
3 p.m.
FREE!
Wednesday, Nov. 23
Mike Mesmer "Eyes"
at the Attic
(hypnotist)
Lifestyle
The French invade at Hendrix
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
It's time Greenville
experienced some
culture for a change.
Thanks to the ECU
Student Union and
Interama, Inc the
people of ECU have a
chance to do just that.
Due to the success
of the 1993 Festival of
French Films, Nicole
Jouve, president of
Interama, Inc an-
nounced the 1994
French Film Festival.
Interama, Inc. special-
izes in the distribu-
tion of classic French
films to theater and
television video mar-
kets. Through the co-
operation of Student
Union, the French
Film Festival has
come to Hendrix The-
atre.
Starting the festival
off last night was Luc
Besson's La Femme Nikita. This
sexy thriller has become a huge
international hit. Starring Anne
Parillaud as the hitwoman, La
Photo Courtesy of ECU Student Films Committee
Gerard Depardieu portrays the great iover with the mighty proboscis in Cyrano de
Bergerac, playing tonight at Hendrix Theatre as part of this week's French Film Festival.
Femme Nikita was remade in Hol-
lywood as Point of No Return .
Tonight,
Cyrano de Bergerac
will be playing.
Written by Jean
Paul Rappeneau,
this film is based
on the same clas-
sic story as Steve
Martin's Ameri-
can comedy
Roxanne. Playing
the part of the
man with the soul
of a poet and a
nose the size of
Texas is Gerard
Depardieu.
Then on Fri-
day, Claude
Chabol's Madame
Bovary, starring
IsabelleHuppert,
is a beautiful ren-
dition of the
novel by the same
name being shot
on location in
Normandy.
Huppert give a
fine performance as the ro-
mantic, "bourgeois" Emma
Bovary.
On Saturday comes the
movie that spawned the
American hit Three Men and A
Baby, Three Men and A Cradle.
The original French version got
much better reviews than its
American counterpart and
won the French Oscar (the
Cesar) for best film.
The final film in the festival
is Bertrand Blier's Too Beauti-
ful For You. This film, again
starring Gerard Depardieu, is
about a confused man torn
between his beautiful wife and
a temporary secretary who is
nothing more than plain.
All five of these French films
are showing at Hendrix The-
atre through the weekend. All
movies are of course in French,
but will be subtitled in English
(instead of annoying dubbed
voices). So go out and see the
movies that inspired some fa-
vorite American movie hits.
The differences may surprise
you.
Jump into action with ECU martial arts
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
In his book, The Tao of Jeet
Kune Dot the late Bruce Lee stated
that the martial arts must be ap-
proached with the idea of mas-
tering the will. "Forget about
winning and losing; forget about
pride and pain. Let your oppo-
nent graze your skin and you
smash into his flesh; let him
smash into your flesh and you
fracture his bones; let him frac-
ture your bones and you take his
life! Do not be concerned with
your escaping safely � lay your
life before him
The martial arts have grown
in popularity in the last few
years, partly due to Hollywood's
glorious portrayals of these arts
on the big screen. Monies with
Jean Claude Van Damme, Steven
Segal, The Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles and the new TV hit of the
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers
have brought the sport into the
spotlight. Their techniques are
flashy and seem to work flaw-
lessly every time, but there is
more to this art than what Hol-
lywood shows.
The martial arts have their ori-
gins in many different cultures
and traditions that have just as
many philosophies and strate-
gies. These arts of self-defense
and combat originate mainly
from China, Japan, Okinawa and
Korea. They all have the same
basic idea of bringing the mind
and body closer together to make
a more efficient unit, but not just
for fighting exclusively. In fact,
most styles stress humility and
use violence only as a last resort.
It would probably be safe to say
that what they teach can be ap-
plied to many areas of life.
For a town of its size, there
are many different styles and
systems represented in
Greenville that are out there for
the taking. If you are an ECU
student there are even more op-
portunities, and most of them
have already been paid for by
your student activities fee. ECU's
recreational services offers five
different martial arts in its Club
Sport program. They offer Goju
Shorin and Isshinryu karate, Tae
Kwon Do, Ninjitsu and Tai Chi
Chaun.
Karate styles are usually ei-
ther Japanese national, or come
from the Japanese city of
Okinawa (which has its own dis-
tinct styles), and generally con-
sist of combat techniques that
utilize the entire body in both
strikes and blocks. Goju Shorin
and Isshinryu are the two karate
styles represented. Isshinryu ka-
rate is a 40-year-old Okinawan
style that utilizes locks and
breaks along with the standard
punching and kicking. Their par-
ticular focus is in mid-range and
inside fighting techniques.
Goju Shorin is one of the old-
est and largest clubs associated
with ECU Recreational Services.
Their style is a hybrid of Japa-
nese and Okinawan systems that
were fused together around
1930. Their overall focus is on
realistic self-defense, mental and
physical fitness and sport. This
system does
retain some
of the tradi-
tional as-
pects of the
practice
while taking
the effective
techniques of
many styles
into its arse-
nal, includ-
i n g
kickboxing.
Tae Kwon
Do is similar
to karate in
form and has
its origins in
Korea. Its lit-
eral transla-
tion is Tae (foot) Kwon (hand
fist) Do (art of combining mind
and body)- With the exception
of Judo, it is the only martial art
in the Olympics. In some ways it
is less combat-oriented than
karate and more focused on
the art aspects. It differs from
karate in the fact
that the move-
ments are a little
more fluid and
there is more of a
focus on kicking
in the system.
Togakure Ryu
Ninjitsu, or just
Ninjitsu, is a 900-
year-old self-de-
fense combat
system consist-
ing of methods
for striking and
grappling. Their
focus is on fluid
body move-
ments and condi-
tioning the body
through tum-
bling and breakfalls. This sys-
tem in particular has been bas-
tardized quite a lot by Holly-
See KUNG - FU page 12
Has success ruined Hootie?
Hootie and the Blowfish make good but play bad at the Ritz
Brandon Waddell
Big Fish Ensemble
Hate Parties
�)
This box holds the key
to understanding the
devious ways of our CD
reviewers. Enjoy!
0
Pathetic
Lame
K k PRETTY
i Good
m
Brilliant
Finally, there is a Grateful Dead
wannabe that got it right! On the
modem musical landscape, littered
as it is with young bands feeding
off the corpses of their ancestors,
Big Fish Ensemble is a welcome
sight. Hailing from Atlanta, this
band evokes memories of the early
Dead. Their jazzy folk-rock songs
are sharp little pop gems that will
linger in your mind long after the
album's over, much like the stuff
Garcia and company cranked out
in their starvation days in Haight-
Ashbury.
And the Dead aren't the only
musical spirits called up on I Hate
Parties, Big Fish Ensemble's sopho-
more effort. I can hear They Might
Be Giants lurking in corners of this
album. Not only do the Giants seem
See HATE page 12
Smashing Pumpkins
Pisces Iscariot
Smashing Pumpkins' latest ef-
fort, Pisces Iscariot, is a compilation
of B-sides from their multiplatinum
album Siamese Dream. The album is
terrific, if you can fast-forward
through about three bad songs and
move on to the rest of the goods.
Pisces Iscariot's name is a combi-
nation of two different ideas. Pisces
being a zodiac symbol and Iscariot
being the surname of Judas, the
betraver of Jesus. These two ideas
together make an album title, but
separately don't mix. It's an appro-
priate title for the album, though,
because Pisces Iscariot is a combina-
tion of sounds from their two pre-
vious albums. It combines the na-
ked energv i f Gish and the polished
perfection of Siamese Dream. Again,
it's two ideas musically meshed
See PISCES page 11
Staff Writer
With the new-found commer-
cial success that Hootie and the
Blowfish have been enjoying in re-
cent months, it was easy for me to
assume their show in Raleigh last
Friday night would be one of the
best I have ever seen. Unfortu-
nately, it was average, at best.
The South Carolina quartet rose
from playing tiny bars (where ad-
mission was free) as recently as last
spring to currently having a long
string of sold-out shows (for $12
each person) in large venues. An-
other disappointment was that the
band has a reputation for playing
awesome, energetic performances.
"Before we had a label, we had to
play hard to get people to like us
Hootie frontman Darius Rucker
told TEC just prior to showtime.
At 10:30 Friday night, opening
actCravin Melon had just finished
warming up the 2,600 Hootie and
the Blowfish fans for the sold-out
performance. Thehousetights went
up inside the arena and after half an
hour, Hootie was introduced to the
fanatical mob of fans. The band's
first song was an upbeat tune called
"Hannah fane This song had the
audience soexcited, one fan climbed
a support beam almost to the ceil-
ing of The Kit directly in front of
the band
But that was it. b then, the
screaming sweat) hordes of tans
were read) to gel 1 raz) he band
answered b) pla) ing lour slow
songs that took away all the energy
they had previously captured with
the introductory song. The slowest
part oi the show was an acappella
version of "Look Away" by Darius
Rucker.
The show continued until mid-
night and included most of their
major label debut release Cracked
Rear Vieiv and all of their first EP,
Kootchypop. After a brief recess the
band exploded back on-stage to
starving fans and performed
"Drowning" and their most popu-
lar track to date, "Hold My Hand
The band played two encores, and
this was the most popular part of the
show among audience members.
I lootie and company are currently
on tour in support of Cracked Rear
Vim, which went gold three weeks
ago. Hootie's video for "Hold My
Hand" hasbeenplayed frequently
on both MTV and VH-1, which
the band feels is a large reason
why their music is becoming so
popular so fast.
"Our music is being sold na-
tionwide now. Being on Atlantic
we got better resources and a bet-
ter producer (Don Gehman) to do
this album said bassist Dean
Felber.
The album itself is fantastic, a
blendingof folk-rock with refined,
polished musicianship. But the
band should have recognized that
each fan fought crowds, got tick-
ets in advance, sold-out the venue
and packed into The Ritz like sar-
dines to observe a better than av-
erage show. Hootie obviously did
not recognize this and settled for
mediocrity.
Photo by STEVE ANDREWS
Darius Rucker, frontman for North Carolina's own Hootie and
the Blowfish, smiles for the camera and his new adoring fans.





1 0 The East Can
iimiiin
December l. 1994
Holiday binge and purge: the dangers of bulimia
Heather Zophy
Student Health Services
The holidaj season
which usually means three things
food, food and more food. Tradi-
tions of Thanksgiving, Hanuk-
kah, Christmas, Nev Y
normally invoh eal njoj
ing the company ot loved ones
and a time tor enjo) ing a lot of
fi iki The a erage person usually
tends to gain an u here from three
to 10 pounds over the holidays.
Sometimes the tear ol gaining
weight, or an obsession to be thin,
can lead individuals to partici-
pate in some unhealthy behav-
ors � especially over the holi-
days. One of the most abused
weight-reduction beha iors prac-
ticed is bulimia nervosa.
Bulimia originates from the
Greek word meaning "the hun-
ger of an ox The hunger sterns
from psychological upsets more
an from a physical standpoint.
Bulin led the
binge-purge s ndrome, because it
i cha . � a pattern ot
binge eating followed by
luced purg-
ing. This eating
der is
aim-
m o n
among fe-
males, but
a f f e t s "9
males as
well. �
Bulimia
is o 11 e n
one ot the
hardest eat-
ing disorders to
detect, because
people with bulimia usu-
ally do not show a significant re-
duction in weight. Some cues that
can lead one to think that an indi-
vidual may be suffering from
mmediate trips to
throom t meals, the
it omit. dis � dotation of
teetl i the acid in the
mitus), deterioration
ot the skin and nails
on the fingers
� .in' to the
id), abuse ol
laxath es, di-
uretic en-
emas, etc
fc swollen
glands, men-
strual irregu-
larities, etc.
Bulimia
nervosa can be
ife threatening if
untreated. Profes-
sional help is necessary for
an individual to be able to over-
come bulimia, anorexia or any
other type of eating disorder. Here
on the ECU campus help can be
sought through a number of
sources. The Counseling Center
offers support groups and indi-
vidual counseling (328-6661, con-
tact Dr. Saia Shepherd). The Stu-
dent 1 lealth Center offers physical
exams by providers, educational
information and Mental Health
Services (328-6841). Peer Health
Educators offer a nutrition-based
program that contains information
on healths' eating and eating dis-
orders (328-6793, contact Dr. Egge).
Please remember that while the
holidays may make it tempting to
indulge in foods that are high in
saturated fat and calories, mod-
eration is the key. Everyone tends
to overdo it during the holiday
season. Try to utilize the Food
Guide Pyramid, us than are consumed by
sparingly. Remaining ealthy and exercising,
the most important ruli s for yourself,
trying to lost do so in u can do it and remain
healthy mannei burn oft more healthy.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC BAR CERTIFIED
State Criminal Law Specialist
24 Hour Mtssage Service
209 Evans Street
Adjacent to the Greenville Courthouse
Mac 752-7529
I
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 19954996 Term
Any full-time student with
a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available at the Student Union Office -
Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline To Apply: January 13, 1994
Greenville Buyers Market
Greenville, N.C.
321-6960
Belinda Jones
Student & Senior
Citizen Discounts:
Relaxer touch-up
$35.00 (reg. $45.00)
Curls & Body Waves $55.00
Hair is Hair would like to welcome Belinda
Jones, formerly of Wright Cut Beauty Salon
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Thursday Coles
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Also:
The Beatles- BBC Sessions
Black Sheep - Non Fiction
The Best of Unplugged
ON SALE
$10.98 CD
$ 7.98 Cassette





December 1, 1994
The East Carolinian 11
JUST PLANt
Thoughtfully dark
humor marks The
Book of Frank
M CLASSIFIEDS
AMONLYSHOR
11 WORDS WITW
A VALID STUDENT
.D.
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
Attention all nihilists and rebel-
lious youths everywhere. A book
has been written that might be of
some interest to those who are just
fed up with society. This book por-
trays the life of one person that has
grown to hate society and the way
society views things, especially art.
The Bookof Frank, written by Simon
Black, is a satirical look at one man's
point of view of the world while he
is involved in his own private punk
movement.
Frank, the one telling the tale, is
the kind of guy that has seen or at
least tried it all. He takes up a civil
service job and tries to make an
honest living like "normal" people,
yet he doesn't remember why.
Soon after, his life undergoes a
drastic change when he meets
Henry, a beautiful darling of the
East Village art scene all dressed in
black. Frank vows to himself to
win her over and becomes a self-
styled performance artist to get
her attention.
He quits his job and lets his life
slide to become a transient. In his
debut performance he sets his hair
on fire and smashes a mirror try-
ing to make what he calls an artis-
tic message to Henry. This perfor-
mance did manage to attract atten-
tion from the high priestess of the
punk scene, a black magic drug
dealer named Luz. Luz introduces
Frank to all her freakish friends
and enlists them to help in Frank's
finale to win Henry. They plan one
final show: a public crucifixion.
Simon Black does an excellent
job painting a portrait of the artist's
dilemma, as well as an inside view
of the conformity necessary by
even the weirdest social cliques.
PISCES From p. 9
This book takes a very personal
tone that lets the reader get inside
the head of a person with a very
troubled and unlucky life. Black
explains in every detail the inner
workings of Frank, a man who has
gone from a civil servant to a self-
destructive bum who hates every-
body and everything.
The Book of Frank makes some
very interesting comments on so-
ciety and the people in it. Black
uses many subplots about Frank
that usually have an underlying
theme. Frank makes reference to
the fact that nothing is unexpected
anymore. He also expresses his
opinions on music and art in ways
that caused me to reanalyze my
own opinions. This book is filled
with the thoughts of someone who
has had a chance to do a lot of
thinking about life. The social com-
mentary Black makes is accurate
to the point of being disturbing, as
the newspaper's declaration at the
end of the book, "MAN DIES FOR
ART goes unnoticed.
Surprisingly, this book was very
easy and fun to read. Black's won-
derful style of writing made it seem
that I was in Frank's head listen-
ing. Very personal and common
happenings cause you to relate to
Frank's plight.
If you are at the point of being
fed up with the people of today's
close-minded society, then this
book is for you. The Book of Frank
is not just a superficial glimpse
into the workings of a screwed-up
society, it has many insightful
thoughts and reflections on an al-
ternative viewpoint. I highly rec-
ommend this novel and I feel that
it can help people who are just at
their breaking point by describing
a life that is quite possibly worse
than theirs.
together to create one album that
separately wouldn't be associated.
Pisces Iscariot starte out like it's
going to be Siamese Dream: part
two with the opening track
"Soothe that's very meiiow and
relaxing, much like the song title.
"Frail and Bedazzled" changes
things and resembles something
off Gish. This song is fast-moving
and quite catchy. Already, the flip
flop of ideas has begun.
"Whir" and "Blew Away" have
floating harmonies that sound as
if they were left off Siamese Dream.
The lyrics are sweet but sad and
the music is somber as well, in
true Smashing Pumpkins style.
The cover of Fleetwood Mac's
"Landslide" is superb. If this track
is released, the song will become a
huge hit. The lyrics were written
by Fleetwood Mac's siren Stevie
Nicks and express a deep pain she
feels within her. It's a song about
unwanted, but needed, change in
her life and how terrifying it is to
watch your life crumble, so it can
begin again. A great line from the
song is, "I've been afraid of chang-
ing 'cause I built my life around
you, but time makes you bolder,
children get older and I'm getting
older too Nicks' lyrics are as
heart-wrenching as any Billy
Corgan song. If you aren't famil-
iar with the Fleetwood Mac ver-
sion of "Landslide then the
Pumpkins' version could eas-
ily be passed off as one of their
own due to the bitter hurt it
conveys.
"Blue" comes just in time to
save you from depression with
the lively music and simple lyr-
ics. It resembles "Tristessa" off
Gisj with a rocky and groovy
sound. The music was obvi-
ously Written first and the lyr-
ics written second to fit around
it. It is a terrific song that's stra-
tegically placed to revive you
before the album ends.
The next to last track, "La
Dolly Vita is notably the best
one on the album. It combines
the two previous albums' tones
to create a new polished and
raw sound. This song stands
alone musically, because it's a
well-crafted piece and a per-
fect way to end the album.
Pisces Iscariot is a must for
your Christmas list. The com-
bination of Smashing Pump-
kins styles makes it enjoyable
for a true Pumpkins fan. If you
can just get past about three
bad tracks, it's a wonderful ef-
fort and a great album.
�Shannon
Gay
DON'T BE A WIMP -
WITNESS REAL
ACTION!
DON'T MISS THE ACTION OF THE
1994-1995 MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL SEASONS. SURE,
LAST YEAR HAD ITS SHARE OF
STRESSFUL, HIGH-TENSION,
NERVE-RACKING MOMENTS. WE
CAN PROMISE THE SAME
ENJOYMENT THIS YEAR.
For about a dollar a day
both will give pu the power you need to
survive this semester.
Only $33.00 a month'

Macintosh Performa' 6J6CD
SMBRiW2WMH hard drive, CD-ROM drive, 14'color monitor,
keyboard, mouse and all the software youn likely to need.
With the Apple Computer Loan and 90-Day Deferred Payment Plan, you can take advantage of
already great student pricing on a Macfor about $33 per month with no payments for 90 days
Students who qualify can take home any Macintosh" personal computer, printer, CD-ROM drive or
other peripherals with no hassle and no complicated forms. Let's face it, the holidays aren't exactly
conducive to saving money. In fact, they can leave you broke. But you can still buy the computer
you want and not worrv about payments until long after the decorations are down. The
Apple Computer Loan and 90-Day Deferred Payment Plan. The solution Atwlp I
that gives you the power every student needs. The power to be your best: ZippJC
PAY NOTHING TOR 90 DAYS
Student Stores
Wright Building � 328-6731
Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
Hurry in today and shop before the holidays!
�bjtrred.wie Computer
JjfcSwS�T�ta mmjm -41 be mm, tbe reauesuJUxm mmt UttW jmammmklperakp �
pmatagemUsioM-n assumes tbe 9
' ' e'jruy s; ifmafymft ituacnt
itnU be added upmKipal.ariJlbepTVK amount as nmreased
r'm-m.ru abnvum calculated asm an esUmateoJsales tax mSmrandsco.g tbe aftUM sales tax is
. �mmum if $l,m to a maximum of (10,000. J�1�1T.Z5
! - Mn� subject to emit approOmputer l and 90-1 inferred rmerU Plan ofirs
ifc of. ifple Computer. mc Mac is a trademark ofA(fle Computer, mc.





1 2
HATE
From p. 9
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZZA
Daily
Lunch Special
tainine
mple
fu
would seem dort e
t's like to b�
KUNG- FU
: rum-
'it,live
the �mlcrdoul
manMark
nd1. It'sBrett
2 Slices 1
Topping
and Drink
$2.25
til 3pm 1
ALFRE1
BAR
Wed:
' $1 Nigltt
Thurs: 25(
Draft
-i
Thursday
- Kir
SPt-LlAL
SI
Buttery
Nipples
From p. 9
knew , the guys
in black withoniv their
wing that are endowed
ythical qualities of in- in each
stealth. looV i I
!hiChaun is the one style Most styles
� m the rest. While
.t just
ense, the
� many as
uir st is men-
ed on speed and
nt. It is a slow
ditation that caters
that people of vary-
can participate. It
is in China where it
ia arm up and cool
Fu warriors before
ronfrontation. So it
- are not for
a want the benefits
- stem is the
MJO
also

12PRKEDINNER
. Purchase any combination dinner plate & get a combination dinner plate
of equal or lessor value lor 12 price Sunday thru Thrusday with this coupon
Expires 12-31-94
A, PIRATE'S GALLEY
ALL YOU CAN EAT LUNCH BL'FFETT
SUNDAY THRU FRIDAY
�Mon: Fried Oysters $10.95
�Tues: Seafood Buffett S5.95
�Wed: Se;
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�Thurs: Deviled Crab $7.95
Scallop Cakes $9.95
�Sat: Crab Legs $17.95
�Sun: Fried Catfish $9.95
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January 1-7
&Y
You can't miss this! It's way too much fun so listenfirst thing we
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Oh yea? it's all sponsored by Budweiser.
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13
� olinicm
Sports
ECU wins on last-second shot
k a i im
�al at
Piral
. d tht
out in then
that'
Robinson, a
from Char
d the Pirates vvith
ints while Skipp
mer added 16. Gill and
: ld : .At and
se enrel
the Piral
Anton i
I immy took the shot, and I gi tt
ition and was
lead of th id
at tl irk on a sevt
. ould ne
one of t
Braswell hit a thi
tie the score, 78-78, wit
onds left. That set the �
m's heroics.
inthrule,
Idt
he seconchilf
: i 6 percentin
0 minute
See BALL page 16
Bradner excels as
sophomore on
Pirate swim team
Senior Chuckie Robinson, shown here in the Pirates' exhibition with Croatia, hit a last-second shot
to give the Pirates a victory over Appalachian State, boosting the team's record to 2-0 on the season.
Athletic tickets on sale at stadium
uted from the tei
ly-Fi

I
.
See TICKETS page 16
Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
an athlete; intensity and the V
edge that you can be a wini
what j
d it is
something that less fortunate com-
petitors would be glad I r practice, bul
But this success also has its
inthefactthatitgoeshand-inhand thing jus
that
with extraordinary Once
you've been near the top, )
expected to return then. U
don't believe that, just ask Eliza-
beth Bradner.
Bradner, in her first year
to v m, l
Bradm i
thatathli
im
mer, burst on to the it-ath-
s
scene, dropping ECU swimming
records as she went She was a
CAAchampion in the 100am
meter backstroke e ei
both the freshman
records in each She
second-
anyth
holds ming taki ich time.

�ared to a social life and stuff like that. But
h at the ECA( you .
10, turning Out
ther featur-
; will be $30 each " 11"1
,vith -
dby
-
-
h against
sV.me of the
t o ug he
competition
in the United
States
W h a t
makes these
that
miiih more
amazing is
that Bradner
still has.three
years of eligi-
bility remain-
ing Three
years of eligi-
bility and
three yeai
pressure.
" Y e a h ,
there is a lot
of pressure
Bradner said
Before the
CAA- I
didn't swim well during the v i
but 1 trained really hard, so when I
to the meet everything woi
out fine
Bradnersaid that one
tributing factors to her su(
a training ritual known as "taper-
ing which is commi im-
It allows athletes to turn 1 w ip my
down their training
little, for the weeks before a big
meet. It also im �
diet and sleeping habits to a
the athlete optimal performan
target meet.
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Elizabeth Bradner has made quite a
splash early in her career as a Pirate.
or anv-
thin
�list
wanl
Baiir
her
said that si
teaching pi
swimming S. and
rtu-
nitv to work with children
blity

dolls an.
them
Freshman Levine gets his kicks on the football field
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
urn 14th
the
unt-

I U
li

the �
. king specialist,
eel at both anting and kicki
1 do whatever it I
help thi I team v
Lev ine played quarti
i nd,
unt
'
felt
-
I
See LEVINE paqe16
Upcoming ECU Sports
Saturday, December 3
i i 4





1 4 The East Carolin
Super hoops finals come to Christenbur
Champions hit the road
&&&
Seadcuiai QelmAxitdO
Thursday, December 1, 1994
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Mendenhail Second Floor Gallery
mm.
usic by the
spel Choir
Free rood
Sponsored by the Student Union
Special Events Committee and
Cultural Awareness Committee
Bowe takes shots at Donald
fxr
FREEPREGNANCY TEST
mfidential
nselinjL"
trolina Pregnancy Center
uilcHi)! 757-0003 ion,

Pee Dee the
TRY0UT CLi
DEC. 5th & DE
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vs.
IRTCIRVED
Thursday 9am - 7:15pm
Friday 9am - 4pm
Dec 1-2, 5-7
OrdGr by Friday for guaranteed holiday delivo
Student Stores
IS
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December I. 1W4
The East Carolinian15
RIPE
BANANAS
FRESH
SEAFOOD
SALAD
WITH CHEESE OR
LB
SELECTED VARIETIES
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�Ot JUICE goesTc
FAMILY PACK
(AP) � Troy Aikman, who said
ast week that he might be abje play
against the Philadelphia Eagles this
Sunday, now wants to skip another
game to be sure his sprained left
knee is fully healed.
Aikman will be in uniform Sun-
day, but the Dallas Cowboys hope
their quarterback problems don'tget
so bad that he has to play.
Aikman, who suffered a knee liga-
ment sprain 10 days ago, will be the
Cowboys' designated third quar-
terback.
Either Jason Garrett, who rallied
Dallas from a 14-point deficit to a 42-
31 victory overGreen Bay on Thanks-
giving Day, or sore-thumbed
Rodney Peete will start against the
Eagles.
"We'll know more later in the
week, but both Jason and Rodney
will be in the mix Dallas coach
Barry Switzer said Tuesday. "Troy
will suit up and probably be the
third quarterback. I think Rodney
should be healthy, and both he and
Jason will be taking a lot of snaps
this week. 1 sure like what Jason did
against Green Bay
Aikman said he hasn't ruled out
playing against Philadelphia.
"I think it would be extremely
optimistic to a that I'm going to be
ready to play in the game Aikman
said. "I'll certainly be ready the fol-
lowing week(Dec. lOagainstCleve-
land). My knee feels better. I'm able
to runaround and do things I haven't
been able to do, although I'm not
totally pain-free
Switzer said he is still concerned
about Peete's thumb, which was in-
jured Nov. 20 against Washington,
the same game in which Aikman
was hurt. Peete was in uniform, but
did not play against the Packers as
Garrett threw two touchdown
passes.
"Rodney is still throwing the ball
with four fingers and not using his
thumb in the throwing motion
Switzer said.
Garrett said he understands if
If 0 fAj"Pf Dallas faces QB controversy
B HMV P W 0P WJr IP (AP) � Troy Aikman, who said Jason will be taking a lot of snaps him aside li
MEANS 10W PRICES!
' Rodney lias more experience
than I do Garrett said. "I
wouldn't have any problems with
that. I understand my role on this
team
Switzersa id he wants theCow-
boys to go ahead and clinch the
NFC Eas,t division title against
the Fagles so they don't have to
worry about it anymore.
"I don't think we'll lose our
edge if we do clinch because of
our stumble against San Fran-
cisco Switzer said. "We've got
to take care of business week to
week to stay on track for the
home-field advantage. "
Dallas has a 20-6 record in
games played after Thanksgiv-
ing. Last vear the Cowboys de-
feated Philadelphia 23-17atTexas
Stadium after Thanksgiving.
The Cowboys beat the Eagles
24-13 at Texas Stadium in the
sixth game of the season.
Swimmers fail doping tests
(AP) � The International Swim- about positive drug tests involving
ming Federation will demand an Chinese swimmers, a top official said
explanation from Chinese officials Tuesday.
1.89
PARTY CUPS �89 WAFFLES 23
Prices Effective Through Dec. 6, 1994
PATIENTS WANTED
FOR ASTHMA
RESEARCH STUDY
If You Suffer From Asthma, You May Be Eligible To
Participate In A Research Study For A New Asthma
Medication. Age 18-70, Male Or Female, With Mild
To Moderate Asthma, Non-Smoker, Have Not Taken
Any Steroids Within 3 Months, And Have Not Had
Any Respitory Tract Infection In Last 4 Weeks. If
Interested Call East Carolina University Asthma And
Allergy Clinic At 919-816-3428 OR 919-816-3389.
Benefits: Possible That Asthma May Respond
Favorably To Treatment; Reimbursment; Study
Medication, Tests, Examination Free Of Charge.
Dr. W. James Metzger Conducting Study. Cathy
Critchfield, R.N Study Coordinator
As manyaseightChinese swim-
mers were among 11 Chinese ath-
letes who failed doping tests at last
month's Asian Games in
Hiroshima, Japan, according to
Japanese news reports. The swim-
mers reportedly include Lu Bin,
who won four gold medals and set
a world record in the women's
200-meter individual medley.
The positive tests seem to sub-
stantiate allegations that the phe-
nomenal success of China's
women swimmers is due in part to
the useof performance-enhancing
drugs.
GunnarWemer,secretaryofthe
international federation FIN A, said
if the positive test results are con-
firmed the world body will seek an
accounting from China's national
swimming federation.
See DRUGS page 16
WANTS
TO PICK
YOUR
BRAIN.
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Saturday, November 5
Mendenhall Student Center.
Pick up a College Bowl Information and
Registration Packet from the Information
Desk, Mendenhall Student Center.
o�NT v Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee
Registration deadline is November 2 at 5 pm.
First place turn members will receive $25.00 each and a College Bowl t- shirt.
Second place team members will receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For more information contact the Student Activities Office, 210 Mendenhall, 328-47664711.

"VWJI JMm'ilMJIULJJilMQ1 HiMI ailtaif W'MWWWBBBHI





December 1, 1994
1 6 The East Carolinian
LEVINE
From p. 13
Earlier this season, Brian Will-
iams had a few bad snaps, one
costing the Pirates a win versus
Duke in the opener � he sailed
the snap over Levine's head.
Williams has worked through
this initial miscues and has been
very efficient in getting the ball
back to Levine improving in
quickness and accuracy since
the beginning of the season.
" Brian has put in a lot of time
in improving his snaps Levine
said. "He takes a lot of pride in
what he does. He made a mis-
take, and it happens to be in a
facet of the game where he was
singled out and that makes it
seem a lot bigger. I think right
now everything is going
smoothly, and me and Brian are
going to continue to be a good
team out there
The time demands that Divi-
sion I-A football requires has been
the hardest adjustment for Levine
to make so far. Levine was in the
National Honor Society in high
school and doesn't want to let
football get in the way of his stud-
DRUGS
From p. 15
ies.
"I think the main difference in
making the transition from high
school to college is the magni-
tude of which football is empha-
sized Levine said. "In high
school you practice for maybe 2
12 hours a day and that's it.
Here with meetings and practice
it is easily five hours out of your
day that is occupied. I would say
one of the main things you have
to do is use your time wisely when
you aren't playing football and
concentrate on academics
As far as goals go Levine
doesn't set any foi awards or
post-season recognition.
"I would like to be a Academic-
All American he said. "It is re-
ally important to work hard in
school and not let football hurt
your grades. Football is a lot of
fun, but you can't play football
forever. How well you do in
school determines your future �
not kicking a football
Be The first tc
Apply!
The East Carolinian
is looking for an Advertising
Representative for the spring semester
Come down and fill out an
application and give it to the
secretary. Call Chris Warren
for more Details. 328-63B6
"We will request an explanation
about the situation and then an in-
vestigation about the backgrounds"
of the swimmers involved, he said.
Werner said FINA is in-
clined to believe that "one or several
coaches" could be responsible for the
doping cases, rather than the Chi-
nese federation itself.
"We have no real reason to sus-
pect the Chinese f edera tion is behind
this he said by telephone from
Karlstad, Sweden "I would be very
surprised if the federation is behind
it
He noted that FINA recently
banned an Indonesian coach for pro-
viding a swimmer with drugs.
The FIN A official rejected the idea,
suggested by some sports officials,
that China should be banned from
major swimming competitions until
the doping problem is brought un-
der control.
"It's very easy to say thatbut with-
out any kind of proof, we can't take
any action like that Werner said.
"Let's just wait and see how many
(positives) there are, where they are,
BOX
From p. 13
and get an explanation from the Chi-
nese federation, before we go any
further
Allegations of drug use escalated
at the World Championships in Rome
in September when Chinese women
won 12 of 16 gold medals. The Chi-
nese won all 15 of their races at the
Asian Games, raising further suspi-
cion.
If the new cases are confirmed,
they would bring to 13 the number of
positive tests for Chinese swimmers
in the past two years. That compares
to only seven positives among other
swimmers since 1972.
The International Olympic Com-
mittee (IOC), the world's highest
sports authority, is accentuating the
positive aspect that the drug-testing
system is working rather than ac-
knowledging that there may be a
major problem in China.
There was no official comment
from IOC headquarters in Lausanne,
Switzerland. Last month, IOC presi-
dent Juan Antonio Samaranch had
declared that "Chinese sport is very
clean
Bowe expressed no remorse,
Bevrooty said, adding that
Donald left the press conference
almost immediately after the in-
cident. Bowe stayed around to
answer more questions.
"Heck, no Bowe said when
asked if he regretted throwing
the punches.
"This was the first time in all
the years that I've gone to these
kind of press conferences that a
guy was actually hit Beyrooty
said.
Saturday night's bout is
scheduled for 12 rounds.
Donald, 27, is 16-0 with 12 knock-
outs. Bowe, also 27, is 34-1 with
29 knockouts.
Bowe beat Evander Holyfield
on Nov. 13, 1992, to win the
undisputed heavyweight cham-
pionship, but lost in a rematch
on Nov. 6,1993. Bowe's last fight
was against Buster Mathis Jr. on
Aug. 13 in Atlantic City.
The bout wa s declared no con-
test because Bowe hit Mathis
while he was down.
TICKETS
From p. 13
up their free ticket at the Ath-
letic Ticket Office (with a valid
ECU ID). Tickets are available
beginning at 8:00 am on a first-
come, first-serve basis, and any
student tickets not picked up will
be made available for sale
After the Opening Bright
game, student ticket pick up days
will be the day before each home
game (beginning with the Janu-
ary 11th game).
This year's basketball season
will also include the "Perfect Pi-
rate Fan Contest If you attend
all 12 men's games and two of
these three women's games (Jan.
29, Feb. 10 or Feb. 12), you will
become eligible to win a
Spring Break trip for two and
the opportunity for NCAA
tournament tickets, should
the Pirates qualify. Further
details about the contest will
be distributed to the students
as they pick up their tickets
on December 8.
BALL
From p. 13
Appalachian State was led by
William Cook's 18 points, Chad
McClendon had 14 and Braswell
added 11.
The win for the Pirates was its
first in Boone since 1974, going
five straight games without vic-
tory at Appalachian State.
The Pirates will continue their
eight-game road swing on Sat-
urday when they visit Georgia
Tech in a 1 p.m. start.
P JIIMIIIIIti"
$ School of Art $
CHRISTMAS SALE
Handcrafted Jewelry, silk & wool scarves,
mugs, bowls, plates, pitchers, wood items,
prints, Christmas cards & ornaments,
gourmet coffee & foods
and MUCH MOREII!

Thursday & Friday, December 1 & 2: 8am-6pm
Saturday, December 3: 10am - 3pm
Location: Gray Gallery, Jenkins Art Building
(across from the Chancellor's house)
Come buy that special someone a special
one-of-a-kind
gift!

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Title
The East Carolinian, December 1, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 01, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1045
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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