The East Carolinian, November 17, 1994







THURSDAY
Now or Never
Pirates travel to Memphis to take on the
Tigers, with the victor gaining a Liberty
Bowl berth. See page 11.
NVV�
NWVV
FRIDAY
Interview With The Vampire
Controversy surrounding Interview With
theVampire is brought forth. See page 8.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 59
Circulation 12,000
Thursday, November 17, 1994
Greenville, NC
14 pages
Communication moves toward future
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
This article is the third in a three
part series on the communication
department split.
As America's information
highway develops, the separate
bachelor of arts and bachelor of
science communications pro-
grams are planning to make in-
teractive technology a reality for
ECU graduates of the future.
"It's an exciting time to be a
communication major said Dr.
Mary Anne Leon, B.A. profes-
sor. "There are a lot of different
jobs out there
She said the B.A. program's
future interests lie in field and
multimedia learning.
"Linking computers to visual
communicating media Leon
said. "We're talking about
meshing text and graphics and
digitized video images as well
as capability for digitizing au-
dio, but that technology is not as
well advanced
Leon said she would enjoy
teaching these new technologies
if she gets the chance, but until
then will, "continue to teach pub-
lic relations theory and commu-
nication theory
An article written by B.A. pro-
gram Chair Dr. T. Harrell Allen
confirms high hopes for the de-
partment.
"The rapidly converging tech-
nologies of desktop publishing,
cable broadcasting, compact disk
storage, fiber optics, on-line data-
bases and, of course, the personal
computer are actually in the pro-
cess of redefining the entire field
of communication media Allen
said. "Central to our curriculum
is our media lab. Through private
funding and university resources,
our aim is to make it a state-of-
the-art facility with every student
extensively using a personal com-
puter
Allen wants to concentrate on
giving journalism students access
to on-line databases which can
provide instant information and
graphics for illustration.
The department of communi-
cation has added production
classes for this spring and plans
to implement documentary in-
ternship opportunities for stu-
dents in the future.
A brochure distributed by the
department emphasizes, "Stu-
dents are taught to communicate
by thinking critically, writing ef-
fectively and speaking persua-
sively. Then professional skills
courses are added to train the stu-
dent for particular careers in the
communication industry
The B.A. program lost most of
its majors when the department
split, and is actively recruiting
students to the program.
Allen said the B.A. program
has no interest in television. That
medium is more in line with the
School of Education's B.S. com-
munications program.
The B.S. program emphasizes
a more applied learning atmo-
sphere.
"Step back and look at what
we have in this department said
Dr. Larry Auld, chair of the de-
partment of library studies and
educational technology. "We
have in the library science area �
information. In the industrial
technology area, we have com-
puters, and in the B.S. communi-
cations program, we have deliv-
ery, and that is a lovely three-
legged stool.
"They fit together very logi-
cally, and as we watch technolo-
gies change, you can see that these
three areas are coming together
in many interesting ways Auld
said.
B.S. professor Dr. Carlton Benz
agrees. In a memo dated Oct. 4, to
Dr. Charles Coble, dean of the
School of Education, Benz de-
scribed the B.S. program as fol-
lows: "Our work in our produc-
tion courses is not designed solely
to provide entry into commercial
television and radio stations. Our
course work provides theory and
practical skills in forming and
communicating messages via
video and audio components uti-
lizing skills common to all medi-
ums of communication including
video
The B.S. program is planning
revisions with a target date for
next May of 1995. Dr. Auld said
he is working closely with the
faculty in deciding the best cur-
riculum for students.
"I'm confident the new B.S.
program will eventually be a
model program for the entire
state said B.S. professor Robert
Caprio.
Currently, ECU offers classes
to other schools through video
technology. Dr. Auld said stu-
dents can send and receive video
through the Internet. ECU also
has educational programming as
well as a television channel
through which B.S. students pro-
duce a show.
"The world is looking for more
education and more training and
more knowledge to be dissemi-
nated said Dr. Charles Coble,
dean of the School of Educa-
tion. "I think the communica-
tions majors are going to be
the people who make that hap-
pen in concert with a team of
other people. Some of them
B.S. majors will actually be
TV stars and will make TV
stars out of some teachers
Dr. Auld said the future of
multimedia will increasingly
dissolve media boundaries.
"Home computers, video
set receivers, can receive sig-
nals coming from the air,
through video cable or select
messages to be received via
the information highway
Auld said. In the year 2000,
B.S. studen ts should have their
hands full. "It should be flour-
ishing. We'll be adapting to
new media, some of which we
haven't even imagined. We'll
be building on what we now
have and evolving as tech-
nologies evolve.
See COMM page 4
Mystery of 'GTP' license plate prefix solved
Katy Newton
Staff Writer
Less than 30 miles away from
ECU, Kinston Regional Jetport
is the subject of plans that are
expected to change the nature of
international commerce�and
eastern North Carolina�for-
ever.
Construction on the Global
TransPark (GTP) is expected to
begin within the next two years,
and so far, there has been noth-
ing but good news about it. The
construction, itself, is going to
create thousands of jobs for
North Carolinians, and within
20 years of completion, GTP is
projected to directly employ
23,400 people. In addition, 26,000
more people will be employed
as an indirect result of GTP.
According to former Congress-
man Martin Lancaster, "The
TransPark is going to make east-
ern North Carolina a true mecca
for economic development. It will
bring to this region the kind of
good-paying jobs that will raise
the standard of living for our
people
Occupying 15,300 acres, GTP
will be a stronghold of manufac-
turing, transportation, communi-
cations and state-of-the-art tech-
nology. It will initially include an
11,500-foot-long runway for air
cargo (with room to build an-
other), as well as connections to
Norfolk Southern and CSX rail
lines, direct access to state and
national hignway systems and
close proximity to two major
deepwater ports.
The GTP master plan empha-
sizes flexibility in order to accom-
modate advancements and fluc-
tuations in technology and mar-
ket. It will be equipped with fi-
ber-optic and satellite links, as
well as tracking systems that will
be able to globally monitor all
materials that come into and go
out of GTP.
During a recent visit to ECU,
GTP Authority Communications
Assistant Lane Dunn said, "We're
looking at speed and international
trade, and it's going to be brought
together by infrastructure and
technology. That's what GTP is
all about
Dunn, an ECU graduate, be-
lieves that GTP is analogous to
Research Triangle Park, another
state project that was the first of
itskind. "Thestateof NorthCaro-
lina has a tradition of innovation
that produces a good atmosphere
for business and Global
TransPark is just a continuation
of that tradition Dunn said.
GTP is supported and pro-
pelled by three interdependent
agencies: the GTP Authority, a
state agency that is responsible
for the environmental assessment
of the impact of GTP on surround-
ing areas as well as for the devel-
opment of GTP's runway and in-
frastructure; the GTP Foundation,
a non-profit organization that has
already raised $17 million in pri-
vate pledges toward its ultimate
goal of $30 million; and the GTP
Development Commission, an or-
ganization of 13 counties sur-
rounding Kinston, which plans
to raise $25 million to support
regional development projects
that relate to GTP.
The GTP Development Com-
mission is responsible for the new
$5 license plate fee, as well as for
the new North Carolina plates
with GTP prefixes. According to
a brochure released by the Com-
mission, "The fee will help pro-
vide a $20 million trust fund for
infrastructure needs in the 13-
county GTP Zone
While the benefits of GTP will
be numerous, it is going to take a
very long time for GTP to fully
develop to its full potential. Ini-
tial construction can not even be-
gin until the GTP Authority's En-
vironmental Impact Statement is
completed and approved. Since
GTP is going to occupy such a
large area, it has to integrate
many environmental laws and
considerations into its overall
plan. Already, the GTP Au-
thority has developed a Con-
servation Plan which will in-
clude protection and mitiga-
tion of the on-site wetlands,
which make up about 30 per-
cent of GTP's total acreage.
" The Conservation Plan is
going to set aside 2,000 acres
of our site Dunn said. "It's
going to be greenways; it's
going to be interconnected
wildlife corridors and farm-
land preservation that
nobody's going to touch
So far, the Conservation
See GTP page 3
Prof adds spice to dept.
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
Dr. Leo Zonn is the black sheep
in his family. His grandfather and
aunt were successful actors, his
brother is a starving actorcarpen-
ter, and his sister, "raises horses and
marijuana The family joke says
Leo is the failure�he had to go get
aPh.D.
The joke may start to wear thin
after a while. As the chair of the
geography department and a pub-
lished author and editor, Zonn is a
success. He is also a bit of a madman.
Throughout the interview, Zonn
leaps fromarediningposition,hands
behind his head, one knee on his
desk, to his book shelf or file cabinet,
pointing to pictures or rustling
through papers. His tie, patterned
with a Tabasco bottle and macaroni,
swings in the air.
Zonn feels a passion for his work
and is eager to share his knowledge.
He puts a spin on geography most
people do not consider.
"I don't know a damn thing about
continental drifts Zonn said.
Zonn's latest book Place, Power,
Situation and Spectacle: A Geograplry of
Film which he co-authored and co-
edited, explores the way the media
portrays geography in different situ-
ations.
"Sometimes place is integral and
See ZONN page 3
Ambassadors wind down
semester, senior program
Laura Jackman
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Dr. Leo Zonn, chair of the geography department and published author and editor, adds spice
to the department with his passion for the subject and his eagerness to share his knowledge.
Staff Writer
For anyone who is looking for
something to munch on during the
Thanksgiving-break drive, The ECU
Ambassadors may just have the an-
swer you are looking for.
On Monday, Nov. 21, the Ambas-
sadors along with the ECU Alumni
Association, will sponsor the third,
and final, Senior Program Event for
this semester. The events theme is
"Mugs and Hugs and it is available
to all seniors with 96 or more credit
hours. The Free item that will be
given to all students with a purple
Pirate Pass, is a glass mug with the
senior logo on it, filled with Hershey's
Hugs candy.
The Purple Pirate Pass looks just
like a credit card, but much better
because everything you do with it is
free and simple. In order to get your
card, stop by the Student Store from
10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Monday, and
register.
"We have a printout of all the
seniors names with the valid amount
of hours needed to participate said
April Surratt, ambassadors public
relations coordinator. "All you have
to do is come by the booth and check
in with us
The card is valid all school year
long, until the last event at gradua-
tion time in May. There isa total of six
events for the school year, three this
semester and threeduring thespring.
The two previous events were very
successful, which included a Senior
Bar-B-Q during the Sept. 24, ECU vs.
Syracuse football game, and a senior
logo Frisbee giveaway, during which
over 1,000 Frisbees were given out.
In addition to the free gifts given
away, therewere also grandprize
raffles, given to one person who
participated in that day's event.
Already, a bike donated by the
Cycle Center and a class ring
donated by the Student Store,
have been awarded.
See PPP page 2
Tender
Moments!
On a damp,
cool
November
day, these two
students take
a stroll down
what they'll
one day call
"Memory
Lane The
rain is
expected to
continue
through
tomorrow.
Photo by
STUART WILLIAMS
"V-
mrnKssmmmtrnKsmm
WMIIIP1'll'l'JWMW
- 4-





2 The Easi Carolinian
November 17. 1994
PPP
From p. 1
November 9
Harassing phone calls �Two students reported receiving harassing
phone calls in their room.
Breaking and entering� A faculty member reported thebreaking and
entering into his vehicle parked south of the building. The staff decal had
been removed.
Trespassing� A non-student who had been previously barred from
campus was arrested for trespassing in Joyner Library. The man had
attempted to take a book out of the library without checking it out.
Weapon on campus � A non-student was issued a state citation for
misdemeanor possession of a .270 bolt-action rifle. An officer observed the
weapon in his vehicle while parked north of Cotten Hall. The rifle and a
knife were seized pending trial.
November 11
Larceny�Astaff member reported the theftof an orientation sign from
north of Rawl Building
Marijuana possession�A resident of Aycock hall was issued a state
citation and campus appearance ticket for being in possession of mari-
juana.
Extinguished fire � A resident advisor of Belk Hall reported he
extinguished a fire found in a garbage can in the first floor men's room of
Garrett Hall. The officer was unable to determine if the fire was set
intentionally.
November 12
Assist and rescue � An officer responded to a section in Dowdy-
Ficklen stadium to assist a subject that had fainted after swallowing some
chewing tobacco.
November 14
Larceny a staff member reported the larceny of a fire extinguisher
from the first floor hallway in Ragsdale.
November 15
Monday's grand prize is a por-
table Emerson CD stereo with .AM
FM radio, cassette and detachable
speakers, which will be given by the
Ambassadors and the Alumni Asso-
ciation. The drawing will be held at
12:30 p.m. and you do not have to be
present to win.
For the spring semester, the Am-
bassadors are planning even bigger
events.
"During February, we will spon-
sor a 'Senior Sweets' theme and the
free gift will be a box of chocolate
said Senior Program Coordinator
Wendy Jones. "The grand prize will
be a dinner for two and hopefully a
limousine ride as well
Another event to be held before
Spring Break will be "Fun in the
Sun The free gifts will be sun-
glasses, again with the senior logo on
them, a strap for the glasses, suntan
lotion and a plastic case to keep it all
in. The grand prize for this event will
be two round-trip rickets on US Air to
anywhere in North America, includ-
ing the Virgin Islands and Canada.
The last event will be in May, and
it will be called the "Grad Pack The
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St.
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
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details for this event haven't been
finalized vet, but the bee gifts will be
"beneficial to the future graduate
said Jones.
If all of this sounds unfamiliar,
that's because this is the first year
Ambassadors, now celebrating their
15th vear, have sponsored the Senior
Program.
"A lot of other schools do special
things for their seniors, and we fig-
ared that it's about time we did the
same Surratt said.
However, the Ambassadors are
more than j ust a Senior Program spon-
sor. Other activities include, coordi-
nating events in the Chancellor's box
during football games, ushering
movies at Hendrix theater, working
in the Wright Building Gi ft shop dur-
ing performances, guiding tours for
the ECU Fall Open Wou and
handing out programs during
graduation commencement cer-
emonies.
"We really are involved in a lot
of activities no campus Surratt
said.
In order to be a part of the Am-
bassadors, one must apply, sub-
mit a written essay and then be
interviewed for the position. It has
not been decided yet if new appli-
cants will be accepted in theSpring
semester, but for further informa-
tion, stop bv the .Ambassadors of-
fice, which is located in room 313
of the Erwin Building.
For now though, the Ambassa-
dors have one objective, "to get a
pass ineverv seniors hand Surratt
said.
IDalk-lns Anytime 288BE.iBth.street
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$ 6.00 $9.00 Regular Price
ftai rent WITH E.C.U. 1J.
Rcross from Highway Patrol
Behind Car-Quest
752-3318
M0N-FRI. 9-6
Worthless check summons� A summons was served on a student for
passing a worthless check at Chico's restaurant.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU crime
reports.
Expressions
for earning
Best in Show, Magazines
and Rebel
for earning
Best of Show, 2nd Place,
literary Magazines
at the
ACP Conference in
New Orleans
Sun Nov. 6, 1994.
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The has! CarolinianJ
November 17. W4
"CirtH'iivilleS (
ONLY

P
i�lil�lul�
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet- Female "Exotic" Danceis ; i
WEDNESDAYS fAiT TKjjH
Amateur Night tor Female Dancers 11 pm-1 an 'i$p?i i&zJg&P
CASH PRIZE
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Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Dancers
SDancers wantedS
We do Birthdays. Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorce
ECU STUDENT SPECIAI
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles � esi of Green ille on 264 Alt
ZONN From p. 1
sometimes it is coincidentalZonn
said. 'This discusses how the cin-
ematic medium alters experiences
to form new experiences. Real ge-
ography versus reel' geography
Movies seem to consume a part
of Zonn. He discusses the geo-
graphical impact ofRaising Arizona
as well as he describes Deliverance.
"Deliverance is man writing
about man in a very masculine en-
vironment. It is the geography of
mind versus the geography of
place� how men see their environ-
ment, culture versus control, and
how women see theirs, nature ver-
GTPFromp. 1
su nurture
A gradui I
University al N
workandhispa:
bineaftei hespentay tra-
lia in the mid :
"Ialways liked theater and i
ies Zonn said. "And
mv perceptions stat
gether. I was work
tograph) while I wa
saw how Austr ilia �
and then experieru edhcN
was
"Tfiombirds was the m
thetjc portrayal of Australi
Zo. in's next project in a docu
mentary, which he hopes will be
"H- slK 'sstul as a critique he once
M completed.Fourmonthsafterme
invasion of Iraq, Zonn critiqued
the film TheYearofl ivingDanger-
ind the documentary Roger
. I � He managed to tie the
themes intoanessayon America's
ivolvement in the Middle East.
. a's presentation received a
te standing ovation.
'That was it Zonn said. "My
ov nmgmoment.Afterthat.it's
,ill downhill
Plan has been well received by en-
vironmentally-minded agencies,
and no endangered plant or animal
species have been found in the area.
When completed, GTP will
house many companies of various
sizes and types. Once these tenants
have become a part of GTP, they
will have access to the most ad-
vanced and convenient tra
tion facility in the world tl
data and communicatio
sources, language translate
vices, an aircraft maintenance I i
itv, and on-site education for train-
ing at all levels of industry, as well
as for industry research.
GTP also hopes to establish a
mated Manliest sv-t '
-
date is Mountain V
62-plane dquat
ters in Ma
C Martin
Be The Tir�t tc
Apply!
The East Carolinian
is looking for an Advertising
Representative for the spring semester
Come down and fill out an
application and give it to the
secretary. Call Chris Warren
for more Details. 328-6366
The Varsity Sport of the Mind
� Gatolina Halt 4 c�o�n�Etcu
Starts Tomorrow
Lancaster is also excited about
the prospectof getting local mili-
tary bases involved with GTP.
I brought Admiral Ed Straw,
who is head of Defense Logistics
A gency now, and he has become
so excited about this as a model
for defense logistics that he has
added twoof his staff totheplan-
rang group because he wants
the finished product to be one
that will becompahble with what
he sees the logistics needs of the
military to be for the future
.ancaster said.
Dunn sees no need for large
companies to be the only ones to
benefit from GTP. "Small busi-
nesses will have a real good op-
portunity to use Global
TransPark" he said. "We can
envision many small businesses
being able to pool their resources
and take advantage especially of
the transportation and techno-
logical aspects of it
Governor Jim Hunt, the
Chairman of the Board of Direc-
tors of theGTP Aumoriry, is tolly
aware of the benefits that GTP
will bring to almost every one of
his constituents.
"For business and industry,
the TransPark is going to offer
revolutionary solutions and will
rewrite the book on manufac-
turing and distribution Hunt
said in the Spring 1994 issue of
the GloM TransPark Update.
"Also, it's going to open new
markets for agricultural prod-
ucts And it's going to offer ben-
efits to the military forces that
call North Carolina home. But
the most important thing for
manv people is what it will do to
make life better for our children
and grandchildren
Dunn was able to bring things
closer to home for the ECU stu-
dents who attended his presen-
tation when he said, "This re-
gion is growing, anyway, and
GTP is just going to accelerate
it, and y'all are going to have
jobs if vou want to stay here and
be a part of this
CAMPUS CHAMPIONSHIP
ALL-CAMPUS TOUNAMENT
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18,1995
MENDENHAL STUDENT CENTER
PICK LIP COLLEGE BOWL INFORMATION AND
REGISTRATION PACKET FROM THE INFORM VTION
DESK. MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER.
SPONSORED BY THE ECU STUDENT UNION SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
First place learn member will receive $25.00 each and a College Bowl t-shirl.
Second place team members will receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For mere information, contact the Student Activities Office. 210 Mendenhall, 328-4766747!
Put your mind to it!
is in Greenville!
Volunteer Leaders
interest meeting:
Monday, November 21 6:00pm
GC Building Room 3009
Please Call 752-7644 For
Additional Information
i





4 The East Carolinian
November 17. 1994
COMM From
pi
But can these optimistic 111 tures
become reality? According to the
Academic Affairs office, the de-
partment of communication came
in under budget last year. This
semester, both programs have ap-
plied for additional funding to
purchase much-needed equip-
ment.
B.S. professor James Rees cor-
rected an earlier statement toT7i?
East Carolinian that some of the
cameras B.S. students used were
lOyearsold. Rees said some were
actually 20 to 30 years old and
had been put into storage and
listed as obsolete.
An Oct. 4 memo from profes-
sor Benz to Dean Coble stressed a
severe shortage of equipment for
the B.S. program. The memo
stated that the Joyner studio has
no field camcorders or editing
facilities available. Benz wrote
that a vital component of the B.S.
students work in video produc-
tion is centered on camcorder use
and basic video editing.
The memo explained that 10
cameras and video editing equip-
ment that went to the B.A. pro-
gram are not available to B.S. stu-
dents and the department has
only three cameras and two edit-
ing stations to work with when
producing field work.
"I can understand them the
B.A. program having some of
the equipment but if you're shoot-
ing B-roll for a studio production,
you should have enough equip-
ment to do it I think there should
be a joint effort said Forrest
Shelor, a communications senior.
The B.A. program also has
problems. Upgraded memory in
the Edward's Media Lab still does
not ensure proficient use of com-
puters, and there is no word as to
when these computers will be on-
line with other information sys-
tems.
Two field cameras acquired in
the division are inoperable, and
Allen said he has no budget to re-
pair them.
jjitae department currently has
ofMjors, seven of which are jour-
nalism majors.
Allen has concerns that the jour-
nalism concentra tion has only seven
majors and none of the
department's current faculty are
journalism teachers.
" It's kind of scary to think about
Allen said.
The B.S. program may suffer a
loss of students if the program is
not marketed. Students may not
know to look for a B.S. degree in
communication under the depart-
ment.of library studies and educa-
tional technology.
"We must let people know we're
here Coble said. "If we don't do a
good job of marketing it, the pro-
gram will die
Both programs are young and
have high hopes for the future.
Chancellor Richard Eakin said he
plans to support both programs.
"I intend to do anything I can do
to help each of the programs thrive
Eakin said. "From the moment I
came to East Carolina, I have had a
strong interest in having commu-
nications in all of its aspects to be an
important pa rt of the academic pro-
gram of our university. CK'er the
past seven and a half years, I have
done what 1 could to provide addi-
tional resources and to allow the
program to grow and serve our
students
C7 e&f4Mwit4ia Q2fo& Qfeyieb
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East Carolina Playhouse
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ALL NATURAL
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EVERY MONDAY! ONLY AT
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November 17, 1994
!�
- The East Carolinian
Classifieds
The East Carolinian 5
;
r�L
V
�.�
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
�FREE AUGUST RENT
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
IT. or Tommy Williams
756-781 S7 58-7436
FOR RENT one bedroom apartment
$265month. Washerdryer hook
up. Quiet area. Great location. Call
355-7537
FULLY FURNSIHED plush
townhouse seeking roommate to
share for 5215 part of utilities. Fire-
place, washerdryer, cable, pool, and
ac. Contact Jamie 321-8306 or leave
message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for fur-
nished 3 bedroom 2 12 bath
townhouse- Quail Ridge. $250
month- utilities & cable included
plus 13 phone. Contact David or JC
756-7374 available in Dec. or Jan.
HOUSE TO SHARE- Couplestu-
dent (Black) Christian, non-drinker
or drug user, clean excellent home-
lOminutes from ECU- $150 month
for 2- Call 321-7723 leave your
number on ans. mac.
ROOMMATEWANTED:for3bed-
room, 212 bath townhouse in Twin
Oaks. $150month plus 13 bills.
Prefer female non-smoker- will con-
sider otherwise. Call 830-0579
NEEDED 2 ROOMMATES to share
3br, 2 12 bath townhouse. $150
per month. Available mid-Decem-
ber. Call Julie @ 752-3848
ROOMMATENEEDED:2bedroom
apart near campus, ECU bus stop,
furnished, laid back, $19712 utili-
ties. Call evenings 752-1033
QUARTERMASTERS RENTAL
REFERRAL AGENCY has apart-
ments, houses, condos, mobile
homes. 1-4 bedrooms near campus
or away. Pets, short leases, sublets
call us! 758-0153
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share 2 bedroom apartment. Call
752-9871 for more info.
ROOMMATE N EEDED to share a 3
bedroom apartment above BW3s.
Awesome location, resonable rent
and 14 utilities. Call 752-5353
ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 bed-
room furnished apartment, close to
campus and on ECU bus route, re-
laxed atmosphere, $197 12 utili-
ties, move in immediately, call eve-
nings 752-1033
For Sale
N�J CASHTTT
We Boy CDS, Cuacttes, and Vinyl
� MJ
Downtown
75M026
SALE! SALE! SALE!� There only 2
�months left to use the Gateway to
Greenville Coupon Book. I have so
many left and want to get rid of them
for only $2. $! per month. If you use 1
coupon you save double. Come and
save on Food entertainment and
many other things. Call 758-4459.
O'NEILL FULLSUIT, Wavelength
spring suit, & 6'2" Diamond Glassing
Surfboard for sale. All in perfect con-
dition, call Iohn at 830-1853. Leave
message if I'm not there.
FOR SALE Super Nintendo, 2 con-
trollers, 3 (6 game carrying cases),
and 7 games: Mortal Kombat II, Su-
per Streetfighter II, Streetfighter II,
NBA Jam, Ken Griffey Jr. Baseball,
NCAA Basketball and Mario World.
Asking $250 (nego.) Call Brianat321-
6381
29 GAL. TANK with Salt Water set
up and extras. $150 Call 758-1104
ELECTRIC GUITAR- Fender Squier,
Black w white pick guard, includes
Tremelo, strap, case new strings
$200, call Craig at 756-8854
EXCELLENT BUY! Bahama cruise
package for two. Must sell! Bought
for $500, will sell for $300 neg. Un-
able to go bc of work. Call Mark at
830-0722
Services Offered
Wondering what to get for your
mom, sister, or grtfriend?
We have just produced a
videotape on Personal Safety
for Women An ideal gift for
the woman in your life.
Attitude, Awareness,
Avoidance are stressed as well
as simple techniques
for self defense.
Call 752-7283
Services Offered
TRANSCRIBING: Oral histories, in-
terviews, conferences, meeting, etc.
Please call 792-5463
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! Ov
er $5 billion in free financial aid is
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
CASH
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY fflLFIGER
NAUTICA
POLO
RUFF HEWN
J. CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
GUESS
levi
ETC.
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
Help Wanted
RBURCHIfORMATON
Largest Library of information ir Uo -
al subjects
Order Catalog Today with Visa IMC or COD
ES 800-351-0222
EUlSU or (310 477-b226
" Or rush $2 00 to Research Information
1132Zldaho We 206 A. Los Angeles CA 90025
ATTENTION JUNIORS, SENIORS,
GRAD STUDENTS Sales intern-
ship available gain valuable work ex-
perience call Sara at 355-7700 for a
possible interview
now available from private sector
grants & scholarships. All students
are eligible regardless of grades, in-
come, or parents income. Let us help
you. for more info, call: 1-800-959-
1605 ext F53621
TYPING Reasonable rates re-
sumes, term papers, thesis, other ser-
vices. Call Glenda: 752-9959 (days);
527-9133 (eves)
TIRED OF PAYING HIGH PHONE
BILLS? Interested in saving 50 on
your phone calls? With Excel Service
you can, and we pay to switch you
back if not completely satisfied. Con-
tact Mike Carey at 752-2879
NEED PAPERS TYPEDWORD
PROCESSED? Low rates include
spell-check, grammatical corrections,
guaranteed work. Campus secretary
with 15 yrs. experience. Call 35�-3611
after 5pm or leave message.
ECU COLLEGIATE DATELINE:
CA11 1-900-S84-1400 ext. 439, $2.95
min. Must be 18 or older
El Help Wanted
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull-time. Set own
hours! Rush self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (GI) 1821
Hillandale Rd 1B-295, Durham, NC
27705.
SKI RESORT JOBS- hiring for win-
ter quarter. Up to $2,000 in salary &
benefits. Skisnowboard instructors,
lift operators, wait staff, chalet staff,
other positions. Over 15,000 openings.
For more info call: (206)634-0469 ext.
V53622.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT- Make up to $2,000-54,000
mo. teaching basic conversational
English abroad. Japan, Taiwan, and S.
Korea. Many employers provide room
& board other benefits. No teaching
background or Asian languages re-
quired. For more information call:
(206) 632-1146 ext J53622
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
up to $2,000month working on
Cruise Ships or Land-Tour compa-
nies. World travel (Hawaii, Mexico,
theCaribbean, etc.). Seasonal and Full-
time employment available. No expe-
rience necessary. For more informa-
tion call 1-206-634-0468 ext. C53622.
PLAYMATES NOW UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT: seeks ladies 18 and
older. Earn Big Bucks while you leam.
Full Time nights and Part-time any-
time. Call for an appointment Play-
mate massage (919) 747-7686.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate re-
sponse.
Help Wanted
BRODY'S is accepting applications,
foradditionalpart-timesales assocT
ates for the fashions you love to wear
MissyJunior Sportswear, accesso-
ries and Young Menswear. Flexible1'
scheduling options to fit most need W
10am-2pm, 12pm-9pm,or6pm-9prfKi
Retail postions include weekend!
Applications accepted Mon. and)
Thurs l-3pm, Brody's The Plaza, j i
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT- Stu- , (
dentsneeded! Fishing industry. Earn
up to $3,000- $6,000 per month.0'
Room and board! Transportatiorr"
Male or Female. No experience nec-
essary. Call (206) 545-4155 ext A536fel
THE GREENVILLE RECREATWN
AND PARKS DEPARTMENTill
beholding theirorganizationajmeet-
ing for anyone interested in Officiat-
ing in the men's winter basketball
league on Thurs. Nov. 17, 1994 at
7:00pm at the Elm Street Gym. All
interested individuals should attend
this meeting. For more information,
please call Ben James or Michael Daly
at 830-4550
Greek Personals
PART TIME SALES help needed.
Apply in person at Paynes Jewelers
684- C Arlington Blvd. (Facing
Kroger's)
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1000 plus a week escorting in the
Greenville area with a liscensed
agency. Must be 18, dependable and
have own phone and transportation.
Call Diamonds or Emerald City Es-
corts at 758-0896 or 757-3477
DISTRIBUTORS WANTED: Great
idea for fundraiser. Earn extra money
in your spare time. Work your own
hours selling some of the hottest prod-
ucts on the market today- self defense
products. Contact Mike Carey at 830-
5577
$1500 WEEKLY POSSIBLE mailing
our circulars! No experience required!
Begin now! For info call 202-298-8935.
A DEGREE IS GREAT but a degree
with practical experience is better. On
Linelnformation Services is currently
taking applications for part-time tele-
phone collectors. If interested please
apply at 1206 Charles Blvd. Greenville
Travel
TRAVEL FREE EARN CASH
Organize 15 students for
Spring Break to Cancun, Nassau,
or Jamaica!
Call 1-800-4-SUN-Bound
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
On-Campus Contact:
Angel @ 328-9961
Stephanie @ 758-8479
Cancun from $359
Jamaica from $399
Florida from $129
TUVU
SIKV1CU
120 N. AfooSt flhoca W14850
lalfree 1 -800-648-4640
1-607 272-6964fODt 1-607-272-6963
Rate ar pr peraon ad occupancy Atr trarupofWwn via Mum Air
AM $43 dspartuift tmi to- Jtm�ct and Cancun Sw tour parhopMrt tor
eomptala tarrra and condrttont
ROOK NOW
I. CANCUNBAHAIUS $3�
PANAMA CITY (111. DATONA 14
ORGANIZE GROUPS. EARN CASH, A TRAVEL FREE.
ENDLESS SUMMER)
1-800-234-7007
SPRING BREAK! Early sign-
up specials! Bahamas Party
cruise 6 days $279! Includes 12
meals 6 parties! Cancun & Ja-
maica $399 with Air from Ra-
leigh! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK EARLY SPE-
CIALS! Panama City Oceanview
Room with Kitchen & free bus
to bars SI29! Daytona (Kitch-
ens) $159! Cocoa Beach $159!
Key West $229 1-800-678-
6386
TRAVEL FREE! SPRING
BREAK ' 9 5! America's favor-
ite spring break company! Guar-
anteed lowest prices to Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas, Florida,
South Padre, Barbados. Book
early and save $$$! Organize
small group and travel free!
Call for free info packet. Sun
Splash Tours 1-800-426-7710
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY!
Spring Break- How about it in
the Bahamas or Florida Keys.
Where the Party never ends.
Spend it on your own private
yacht. One week only $385 per
person. Including food and
much more. Organizers may go
for free! Easy sailing Yacht Char-
ters 1-800-783-4001
I
Personals
TO MY "HONEYBUCKETS'
Happy Birthday! Hope its a
great one. Love always and
forever- Poo
ALL GREEK DRINK-OUT will
be held Mon Nov. 21 from 4-
6pm at the bottom of College
Hill. Volleyball, food and fun
Sponsored by Alpha Phi. Pro-
ceeds go to Alpha Phi Founda-
tion. Call 758-1880 for details!
PIKES: Cocktail is just 3 days
away! Will Rodney ever be a
man and ask anyone? Will Jer-
em end up with Reid's date?
Ken are you bringing the
porkrinds? And how will we get
by with Matt graduating? We'll
find out Sat. night
ADPI Thurs. night was a blast.
Hope to get together again soon.
Love, Delta Sig
CHI OMEGA- Thanks for the
pre-downtown the Thurs. before
last. We had fun and can't wait
till our next bash. Tke
SIGMA- thanks for the tailgate
for the football season finale.
Can't wait to get together again
soon. Tke
TO THE NEW SISTERS OF
ALPHA PHI Thank you littles
for a wonderful night, Sat. you
all had your big's in flight.
Around the town singing songs,
we weren't at one frat. house for
too long. We ended up at Lambda
Chi, wow what a huge surprise.
The night was great, we love you
all, look forward to you turn
next fall. Love your Alpha Phi
sisters
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA thank
you for showing us a great time
last Sat. night. We hope to get
together again soon. Love, the
Alpha Phis
KAPPA SIG-Thanks for an awe-
some Thurs. night on the night
train. We'll have to do it again
sometime. Love the sisters and
new members of Zeta Tau Alpha
ZETAS- Grab-a-Date was awe-
some on Sat. The fun started at
the game and lasted all night
with meat and potatos making it
just right. Hope everyone is look-
ing forward to Christmas cock-
tail.
Announcements
ECNAQ
The next Native Ameridan meeting
will be 11-21-94 at Golden Corral at
7:00pm - bring dues and can foods. If
you need a ride call Belinda Jacobs
830-6966 or Nikki Epps 328-7778.
HAPPY THANKSGIVING.
YQUNGUF5
YOUNGUFE is in Greenville. For
those interested in becoming Volun-
teer Leaders please come to GC
Building Room 309 Monday, No-
vember 21 � 6:00pm
NFHC TALENT SHOW
The National Pan Hellenic Council
is looking for talented participants
for their talent. If you want to par-
ticipate in the Talent Show contact
Jeff Watson at 328-8981. Auditions
will be held Monday Nov 21st at
5:00pm in the Ledonia Wright Cul-
ture Center. All who are interested
are welcome to come.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
RACQUETBALL DOUBLES TOUR-
NAMENT. Recreational Services
will host a men's, women's and co-
ed racquetball doubles tournament
Saturday, November 19. This double
elimination tournament will be held
at Minges Coliseum. Entry fees are
free for faculty, staff and students.
To register, stop by room 204
Christenbury Gymnasium by
12:00pm Thursday November 17.
Call Recreational Services at 328-
6387 for more details.
ATTFfsrnON ADULT STU-
DENTS AND COMMUTERS!
We need your help in preparing ar-
ticles of interest to the adult student
or commuter population. Contact
Shelly Ratelle at 328-6881 or attend
the next meeting on November 28 in
GCB room 1001 at 4pm.
NEW GENERATION CAMPUS
MINISTRIES
Will be hosting a North Carolina
NGM rally on Saturday November
19,1994 at Agnes Fullilove Commu-
nity School located at 1615 Halifax
St. Greenville NC starting at 8:00am
Performing groups will include the
ECU Gospel Choir, and PIC step
team. For more information you may
call Robin Wooten at 328-7706.
Our organization is helping in a
Thanksgiving canned food drive for
the needy from Monday Nov 14 to
Tuesday Nov 22. There will be a box
at the downstairs door of the Air
Force ROTC Detachment building,
which is right next to the Wright
Placeand Student Stores. Pleasecome
out and donate a little to those who
don't have a whole lot. Thank ou.
UNIVERSITY FOLK & COUNTY
DANCE CLUB
Last meeting Dance of the semester!
Live old-time music by Elderberry
Jam, 7:30pm, Friday, Nov 18, in
Leodonia Wright Bldg. (Behind Stu-
dent Health). Come alone or bring a
friend. Free!
ECU FOLKLORE ARCHIVE
"Wart Cures & What to do Till Your
Water Breaks: Feminist & Folkloric
Analyses of Home Remedies and
Health Beliefs" is the topic of a
Women's Studies Alliance program
to be held Thursday, November 17,
1994,4pm, in theMulti-PurposeRoom
on the first floor of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. This presentation is the
first in a 1994-95 series sponsored by
the ECU Women's Studies Alliance
and the Women's Studies Program.
For more information contact Denise
Sutton328-6389orKarenBaldwin328-
6726. Everyone is Welcome.
"THE FUTURE OF HEALTH
REFORM"
Monday, November2112:30-l:30pm,
Brody 2W-50. James G. Jones, MD
Executive Director North Carolina
Health Planning Commission, Ra-
leigh, NC. Sponsored by Deptartment
of Medical Humanities 816-2797. The
Public is invited to attend.
WRITING REQUIREMENT FOR
GRADUATION
Remember that if you entered East
Carolina University as a first-year stu-
dent in or after Fall 1993, you need 12
hours of writing-intensive courses to
graduate. To meet the requirement,
complete ENGL1100, ENGL1200, one
3-hour writing-intensive course in
your major, and any other 3-hour
writing-intensive course. Check the
Spring 1995 Schedule of Classes for
writing-intensive courses or sections
of courses in your major.
ECU LACROSSEFALL BALL
TOURNEY
ECU LaCrosse will be hosting ifs 1st
annual Fall Ball Tourney November
19-20. Please come out and support
Pirate LaCrosse.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
EVENTSATAJFLETCHER RECITAL
HALL (unless otherwise shown) and
FREE
THURS NOV 17�SENIOR RECITAL,
Fran Parrish, soprano, andJUNIOR
RECITAL, Eliazbeth Faucette, mezzo-
soprano 7:00pm FRI NOV 18�SE-
NIORRECITAL, Anna Kindley, trum-
pet 7:00pm SENIOR RECITAL Anne
Sorbera, clarinet and Rebecca
Robertson, hor 9:00pm GRADUATE
JAZZ COMBOS, "An Evening of El-
egance and Classic Jazz Ballads
Carroll V. Dashiell, Master of Cer-
emonies (Location TBA 9:00pm SUN
NOV 20�GUITAR ENSEMBLE
Elliot Frank , DirectorfGreenville
Museum of Art, 2:00pm EASTERN
YOUTH ORCHESTRA, Christopher
Kighten, Conductor 4:00pm
GRADUATE RECITAL, Natalie
Humphrey, soprano 7:00pm MON
NOV 21�FACULTY RECITAL,
Steven Laven, cello 8:00pm
THE BLIND CENTERBEAU-
FORT COUNTY
The Blind Center is having a Soup
and Sandwich Day at the center on
Wednesday, December 7,1994, from
11:00am to 1:15pm. A delicious sand-
wich and vegetable soup for $4.00,
dine in or take out. A beautiful porce
lain doll will be raffled, $1.00 dona-1
tion per chance. The Blind Center is
located at 219 Harvey Street, Wash-
ington, NC 27889 - (919) 946-6208.
Please join us.
BLIND CENTER CHRISTMAS
SHOP
The Blind Center Christmas Shop will
open November 28th and remain open
thru December 21,1994, Monday thru
Friday, 9am to 4:30pm. A variety of
Christmas items made by the blind
and visually impaired will be for sale.
The Blind Center is located at 219
Harvey St. Washington, NC 27889 -
(919) 946-6208. And remember, ycur
donations are tax deductible.
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students
$2.00
Non-Students
$3.00
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Announcements
Any organization may use the
Announcements Section of The
East Carolinian to list activities
and events open to the public l
two times free of charge. DueJ
to the limited amount of space,
The East Carolinian cannot
guarantee the publication of
announcements.
.0
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
Displayed advertisements
may be canceled before
10a.m. the day prior to
publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
For more
information
call 328-6366.





November 17. 1994
fiThe East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Opinion
JL
��
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Cfiris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor ' H
Tambra Zion, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Aaron Wilson. Asst. Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Opinion Page Editot
Stephanie Smith. Staff Illustrator
Printed on
-�� �
recycled
paper
Thomas Brobst. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary-
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jon Cawley, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
iiamv "�� ijj vJ -p.
-S5SE�S
words, wh.ch may be edited for decency or.brevity The East J J�J Gree.vi�e, N.C 27858-4353.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carohnwn. Publications Bldg hCU. uree.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366��
Pirates enjoy successful season
The Pirates' true colors were displayed
last weekend with a victory over
nationally-ranked Central Florida.
Because of the triumph, coach Steve Logan
will be able to savor his first winning
season since taking charge of the ECU
football team. And thanks to the Memphis
loss to Tennessee in Knoxville, the win
brings us one step closer to appearing at
the Liberty Bowl.
Next on the chopping block is
Memphis. A Pirate victory in the next
game will ensure our participation in the
Liberty Bowl and permit the Pirates to
conclude the season with a hard earned
7-4 record.
TEC would like to offer
congratulations to the Pirates and offer
support for the next game. Although the
team has been plagued by injuries to
some of their most valuable players, they
continued to drive on. Bravo!
The team's tenacity has given us a
winning crew and a football team we can
be proud of. Thanks for all the hard work.
Special recognition is in order for two
players in particular: Senior Junior Smith
and sophomore Marcus Crandell. Junior
Smith broke ECU's all-time rushing record,
gained an average of 113.1 yards per game
and thus far has eight touchdowns to his
credit.
Marcus Crandell gave everyone a lesson
in determination this season. Because of a
debilitating injury that left him with a
broken leg last year, Marcus played a total
of only six quarters. But that did not stop
him from coming back and leading the
Pirates to an excellent season. Also worthy
of note is that of all the eligible quarterbacks
in the Liberty Bowl alliance, Crandell has
accumulated the most yards in passing.
It's too bad that the remaining games in
the season are going to be played outside
Greenville.
Although fan support may be scarce in
Memphis, remember Pirates � we 're
rooting for you in Greenville !
4
Homelessness still haunts American society
By Angela McCullers
Equality for women at Citadel inevitable
by Patrick Hinson
As most people know by
now, there is a young lady by
the name of Shannon Faulkner
who for almost two years has
been waging legal warfare
against the Citadel military
college in Charleston, S. C, to
allow her to become a mem-
ber of the corps of cadets there.
The Citadel has been an
all-male institution in Charles-
ton since the early 1800s. It
prides itself in its long history
of service to the United States
and to the different branches
of the military.
Well, I'm from Charles-
ton, grew up there my whole
life, and even though I am also
on the side of keeping the Cita-
del all-male, I'm still some-
what torn over how I feel
about it.
Women can get into VMI,
the Naval Academy and West
Point, so why shouldn't they
be allowed into the Citadel?
Another strong argument on
Faulkner's side is that the Cita-
del is a state-supported col-
lege; therefore, if the citizens
of the state of South Carolina
are going to support the col-
lege with their tax dollars, then
all the citizens, male and fe-
male, should be allowed to
attend the school.
The Citadel answers this
argument by saying that there
are state supported, all-female
colleges in South Carolina as
well, and in most other states
in the country. Is it entirely
fair to force the Citadel to be-
come coed while allowing all-
female colleges in the same
state to stay as they are?
I can't help but feel that
Faulkner is eventually going
to win this court battle, al-
though she may be a 40- year-
old freshman by the time she
does. She's already a day stu-
dent at the Citadel, just not a
member of the corps of cadets,
as she wishes to be, but not
allowed to wear the uniform,
be recognized as a cadet, or to
go through the rigorous re-
gime that cadets must make it
through during their first year.
The heart of my argu-
ment is mainly that she has
already broken the most cov-
eted and respected rule of the
Citadel; that a cadet "will not
lie, cheat, or steal, nor tolerate
any cadet that does
Faulkner did not fill in
the blank on her application
to the Citadel regarding her
gender, knowing that if she
did tell that she was a female,
she would automatically be
disqualified as an applicant.
She was accepted to the col-
lege before they realized she
was a she. So, basically, she
lied to get in, and now she's
fighting like mad, or at least
her legal team is (sensing that
all-powerful potential for per-
sonal fame if they win this) to
stay in. Because of this, to me,
even if she does win, it will be
a tainted victory, because it
was hot cleanly won.
Despite what her vic-
tory, if she does win, will do
for the future of women's in-
volvement in the Citadel, fu
ture generations are always
going to know that the first
woman cheated her way into
this school. I don't feel that
women should be disqualified
from any branch or area of the
military, nor from any feder-
ally supported academy. It just
seems to be somewhat of a
double standard that there can
be all-female, but not all-male
academies.
What's fair for women is
not fair for men, this seems to
say. If the Citadel was a direct
link to the military, with re-
quired military service upon
graduation, it might be differ-
ent, but it is just a military
college, post-graduation mili-
tary service is not mandatory.
Fight as the Citadel may,
women will soon be making
their way into the gray line
before long. Although, I hope
that Faulkner will not be the
first.
I think that almost ev-
eryone, including myself, who
opposes her entry into the
Citadel would feel less zeal-
ous in their opposition if she
had taken a more honorable
route into the college and if
her motives for doing so were
not so questionable.
Do you really think
Faulkner is going through all
this because she wants to be a
soldier or a cadet ?
No ! I think she wants
the bucks involved with the
fame that this case will bring
her.
Every winter, dozens of
Americans literally freeze to dea th
on city streets. Every day, in cities
and towns across the country, men,
women and children dressed in
rags walk the streets aimlessly,
often begging for money.
They are often carrying plas-
tic bags or pushing shopping carts
filled with their worldly posses-
sions. They curi up on a bench or
in a doorway under discarded
newspaper or tattered jackets.
In modern societies, a per-
manent residence is regarded as
normal and necessary. To be with-
out a place called home is seen by
most as one of the severest forms
of human deprivation.
There are many homeless
people in the most affluent of soci-
eties, and their numbers appear to
be growing in America.
Homelessness is nothing new, but
it is also nothing less than a major
tragedy � and it is a tragedy that
looms in our times.
The widely held and seri-
ously mistaken view is that the
homeless are mainly derelicts, al-
coholics, bag ladies, physically
disabled and mentally ill. Bums,
winos and crazies are out there,
but they do not constitute the
majority of those who have no
place to call home. Homelessness
is a direct result of poverty.
Tens of millions of Ameri-
cans live below the poverty line,
and the members of this group are
more likely than others to lose their
housing. Suddenly the streets be-
come an all-too-real possibility.
Many middle-class people become
homeless after one or more family
members loses a job.
If homelessness was largely
the result of individuals'irrespon-
sibility or incompetence � if
homeless people truly were sim-
ply slackers and lackers � the
homeless population would be
drawn from all economic classes.
Instead, homeless people are
mainly drawn from a much larger
group who are already in a finan-
cially precarious position, most
frequently, but not always, in-
cluding those who have been poor
for extended periods of time.
The homeless seem to be
everywhere. Some are visibly
homeless, like the bag ladies, the
shopping-cart people, the dishev-
eled who huddle in doorways and
others who seem to wander in
streets and alleys.
There are the "invisible"
ones, those who "pass On the
surface many of these are indis-
tinguishable from the rest of us.
Some roam shopping malls
or the hallways of universities
during the day. At night they try
to rest in rat-and-roach infested
all-night movie theaters, lonely
school yards, their cars, subways
or cold rest rooms of public build-
ings.
The problem is not that we
choose not to see the homelessj
we pass them. Most of us try to
avoid the homeless. If we en-
counter them on the street, we
move away; we may cross the
street or change our direction
We try to put them out of our
minds because we may recog-
nize our own vulnerability to.
economic insecurity.
Homelessness affects mil-
lions, and the problem increases
dramatically, week by week,
month by month and year by
year. To blame the victims and
attribute their plight to personal.
failure denies reality.
Unless we overcome this,
denial, the homeless will con-
tinue to suffer lives of misery
and desperation. Denial and in-
difference to the truth about the
homeless have already exagger-
ated the divisions between the
"haves" and the "have-nots" in
our society.
The problems of the home-
less will not be resolved if we ;
continue to give cadence to er
roneous "blaming-the-victim" j
explanations and to base social
programs on such false perspec- j
fives. ;
Can you imagine what it
would be like to have no roof
over your head and no place to
return to at night? For many
Americans, they do not have to
imagine; they live this way from
day to day.
Qu&taBfe QpoUs
"Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body
� Joseph Addison
"We are faced with a choice between the work ethic that
built this nation's character - and the welfare ethic that could
cause the American character to weaken
�Richard Nixon
"I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death
your right to say it epitome of Voltaire
"Prisons are built with stones of Law, Brothels with bricks
� JZw �William Blake
of Religion.
Letters to the Editor
r
i
i
i
i
i
SUBSCRIBE TO
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complete your name address, and send
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To the Editor:
We have a number of thoughtless individuals
who continue to smoke in the General Classroom
Building (GCB) despite the fact that I have twice had
a faculty member hospitalized from tobacco smoke
in the GCB. The GCB recirculates the air. The smoke
or any other air born Isic substances from any part
of the building is redistributed in the building. The
faculty member who was hospitalized has a tobacco
smoke allergy which was severely increased during
pregnancy. She went to the hospital twice during
pregnancy because of tobacco smoke. This event
took placebefore smoking in theCCB was prohibited.
A number of faculty have health problems and
because of the presence of tobacco smoke have been
forced to install air filter machines in their offices.
Despite these efforts many faculty and staff believe
they are subject to headaches and breathing problems
because of the presence of tobacco smoke. I cannot
verify any cause and affect sic. Obviously the GCB
is a uniquecase. 1 believe it is thoughtless to continue
tosmokeand impose these problems on ECU faculty,
staff, and students.
I urge all who smoke in the GCB to stop now. I ,
urge all those who see them both to ask them to stop
and report them to University authorities. I urge
anv University authorities who are aware of such .
violations to take action and make violators stop. W
the smoking habit cannot be stopped while in the
GCB 'l urge the administration to move theof tenders
to buildings where the air does not recirculate. I am
saddened to report that my clear impression is that
the faculty and staff members seem to be the worst
offenders. If we cannot be better role models, 1 am
not surprised at the lack of discipline and respect
reflected by some of our students.
Robert Schellenberger
Department of Decision Sciences
Chair





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1
&AThe East Carolinian
November 17. T99
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1 n.6
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
mmm
qn
COMING
ABACTIONS
Appearing soonforyour edification
dand amusement:
it,
it i
1r
Thursday, Nov. 17
Not So Dandelions
and Schroeder
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Bruce Frye
at the Attic
"Blood Wedding"
at McGinnis Theatre
(tragedy)
(Runs through Tuesday)
Lindbergh's Historic Flight
at Hendrix Theatre
(travel film)
Friday, Nov. 18
Dillon Fence
and Spider Monkey
at the Attic
(alternative)
Henry Acrobat
and Smackapple
at O'Rock's
(funkmetal)
One Tribe Reggae
at Peasant's Cafe
Teatro De Danza Espanol
at Wright Auditorium
(Spanish dance)
True Lies
at Hendrix Theatre
(action film)
FREE!
(Run through Saturday)
Saturday, Nov. 19
Fountain of Youth
and Silly
at O'Rock's
(funkalternative)
Crazy Diamond
at the Attic
(Pink Floyd tribute)
The Other People .
at Peasant's Cafe
Sunday, Nov. 20
Gallagher
at Wright Auditorium
7 p.m.
(projectile comedy)
Wednesday, Nov. 23
Lyle Lovett and
His Large Band
at Memorial Auditorium
in Raleigh
(countryjazz)
Danzig
and Type O Negative
at the Raleigh Civic Center
(heavy metal)
Nine Inch Nails,
Jim Rose Circus Side Show
and Marilyn Manson
in Winston Salem
(industrial punk freak show)
III rH'M
Vl�'in
This box holds the key
to understanding the
devious ways of our CD
reviewers. Enjoy!

m
Pathetic
Lame
Pretty
Good
Smashing fun explodes at Wright
Brandon Waddell
Stjaff Writer
'Alright ECU, grab your urn-
�brellas, windshield wipers and
raincoats! Put on your goggles!
Gallagher will be performing
tfJTs Sunday night. The zany co-
median will
be shower-
ing Wright
Auditorium
with bits of
s m aftt e d
vegetamles,
fruit, Wig
Macsanatell
o t h e?tr
"smashable'
edibles. He
will break
out the
Sledge-O-
Matic and
other famil-
iar props,
combined
with some
never seen
before, to
create an
unforgettable performance.
Throughout Gallagher's 15-
year career, he has always been
a successful attraction on the
road. He doesn't charge a huge
ticket price and he always gives
his audience 100 percent. Flash
cameras are also allowed in
Gallagher's shows, because he
wants audience members to be
able to "take home a Gallagher
memory He considers himself
a sharp observer of nature.
"My humor makes people
think Gallagher says. "I want
people to look more closely at
this country and their lives to
see the humor and absurdity in
it all
Though
Gallagher
is quite out-
spoken in
concert, he
doesn't
even ac-
knowledge
the media.
"That's
whv he
hired me
states Ruth
Ann
Propper,
Gallagher's
promoter.
No one in
the media
can even
� ���������� 8et an 'nter"
view with
him. Gallagher feels too many
reporters have misquoted him
and ask "too many stupid ques-
tions
Propper is Gallagher's mouth-
piece, promoter and manager.
She promises Gallagher has
never done two concerts exactly
the same. "He researches the
towns he will play, reads their
Where: Wright
Auditorium I
When: Sunday, 7 p.m. �
Price: $18.50 general �
$16.50 for ECU I

students ;
STANDING ROOM :
ONLY!
Don't forget your I
PLASTIC RAIN !
SUIT! i
newspapers and if there's any
dirt or hot rumors � he'll know
them by show time she said.
His shows are never a set perfor-
mance. He feeds off the energy
from the audience to produce a
show that Ruth Ann ensures will
be "totally unforgettable; every-
one in Greenville will be
'Gallagherized' and will never
look at life the same way again
Though Gallagher performs
over 120 shows annually, he
rarely does college venues. He'll
only do three shows this year on
college campuses. Gallagher
feels as though most college au-
ditoriums are not run smoothly
enough for his type of show.
However, "this is not the case
with ECU Ruth Ann stated.
"We're laying down a lot of
plastic claims J. Marshall, as-
sistant director of student activi-
ties. "He pays for the cleanup,
students will love him and cam-
eras are allowed Marshall has
been a Gallagher fan for years
and along with Gallagher's man-
agement, they promise a show
that ECU won't soon forget.
All reserve seating tickets are
sold out. However, some stand-
ing room only tickets for the show
are stiil available from the Cen-
tral Ticket Office for $16.50 (ECU
students) and $18.50 (general
public) in Mendenhall Student
Center. The performance will
start promptly at 7 p.m so get
to Wright Auditorium early.
Photo Courtesy of ECU Student Activities
Gallagher, in his Hell's Angel disguise, readies one of his
precious watermelons for destruction via Sledge-O-Matic.
Ugly truths are revealed in Mr. Punch
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Once upon a time, the English
considered a puppet show about a
wife-beating child murderer
proper entertainment for children.
This is the central oddity of
childhood explored by Neil
Gaiman and Dave McKean in their
latest book, Mr. Punch. The rest of
the oddities we'll get to in a mo-
ment. First, a little background is
in order. Gaiman (the writer) and
McKean (the artist) are two of the
most innovative creators in mod-
ern comic books. Yes, Mr. Punch is
indeed a comic book (an oddity of
childhood if ever there was one).
I suppose the official term for
Mr. Punch would be "graphic
novel it's a sleek hardback with
subject matter definitely not in-
tended for children. But I've al-
ways had a problem with that la-
bel. It may be less misleading than
the more traditional "comic book
but it all sounds so pretentious.
Besides, Mr. Punch is only 96 pages
long, and that's hardly novel-
length.
So, casting all these semantics
aside, I'll just call it a book and get
on with the childhood oddities and
other wonders that await readers
within its pages.
Mr. Punch is the story of a little
boy (our narrator, who remains
nameless) and his fascination with
Punch and Judy shows (the vio-
lent puppet shows I talked about
earlier). In the typical Punch and
Judy show, Punch throws his baby
out the window then bea ts his wife
to death with a stick. He then goes
on a bit of a killing spree, beating
various officials who investigate
Judy's murder and finally killing
the devil when he comes to take
the villainous Punch to Hell. Yes,
Mr. Punch gets away with it. What
wholesome entertainment! Why
Disney hasn't co-opted this one
for a film, I don't know.
At any rate, Mr. Punch deals
with the horrific imagery of the
play, and the effect it has on our
narrator during a summer spent at
the beach with his grandparents.
In the course of the book, we see
the various murders acted out over
and over again, as the narrator
becomes fascinated with the
play. McKean has actually fash-
ioned puppets for these se-
quences, and the switch from
his minimalist artwork to the
richly-detailed photographs is
quite jarring. In fact, it seems to
suggest that we've entered an-
other level of reality.
Something magic happens
when the puppets come to life
in Mr. Punch. Not literally, mind
you; the magic is metaphorical,
and the puppets only mimic life
as any puppet does when you
put it on and move it around.
The narrator is allowed to wear
a crocodile puppet on his arm at
one point, however, and doesn't
want to give it up because of the
power he suddenly wields. Not
only does he control the puppet,
but he can use it to frighten his
enemies (girls, teachers and the
like).
Power seems to be the central
theme in this book. Children, as
we are frequently reminded,
have no power in the adult
See JUDY page 10
Cruise, Pitt conduct bloody Interview
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
The controversy over the movie
Intervierv With the Vampire has finally
been brought to light. Why was there
so much hype surrounding this
movie? I have a pretty good idea that
it has something to do with Tom
Cruise playing the part of Lestat, a
major character in the movie.
Anyone who's read the book by
thesamenamewouldagreethatTom
Cruise would have been the last per-
son picked to play this honored role.
He just doesn't seem the type to play
the part of a vampire, let alone Lestat.
It might not have been a wise move
for the people in charge of casting
due to the fact that a large percentage
of the population is used to seeing
him in such roles as a wild bartender
or clean-cut lawyer, not a fierce vam-
pire. Many people were in for a big
surprise when they decided to watch
Interview With the Vampire.
Loosely based on the wonderful
novel by Anne Rice, the movie opens
with the main character Louis, a 200-
year-old vampire, and the inter-
viewer in a small room above the city
streets. The vampire Louis begins the
tale of his l' fe to the nervous inter-
viewer. Louis, played by Brad Pitt,
fits and plays the role of the down
to earth vampire perfectly. Hebe-
gins by telling how he came into
darkness after meeting a vampire
See VAMP page 10
mmm m Brilliant
CD Reviews CD Reviews
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
Cinderella
Still Climbing
One of my most vivid memo-
ries is of coming home from
middle school and turning on
MTV's "Headbangers' Ball In
that mire of smoke, makeup and
leather-clad fake blondes, I would
relish the kitsch of campy metal
like Motley Crue, Quiet Riot,
Twisted Sister, Warrant, Poison
and Bulletboys. I'd escape the syn-
thesized rythym of the Huey Le-
wises, Princes, Janet and Michael
Jacksons, and I would bask in re-
ally horrible creaming imps
dressed like flea market harle-
quins and banging their multi-
hued heads to some cartoon de-
mon. It was my first excursion
into theatre and, yes, it was ab-
surd.
But that was years ago. My dis-
coveries of Cocteau Twins, Hafler
Trio, Public Enemy and James
have long since buried the relics
of mid80s tripe like Bon Jovi and
Gorky Park. So imagine the shock
of repressed memories surfacing
when I was handed the new CD
by (yikes!) Cinderella.
Yes, that Philadelphia bar band
has returned from the nether re-
gions with a fourthCD, Still Climb-
ing, and whileitowesatraceofits
sound to modern production tech-
niques and chord progressions,
it's just as purile as the last three.
Shrieking singer Tom Keifer is still
the main songsmith. This singu-
lar wellspring of fluff is dry as a
bone, and it didn't have more than
a puddle's depth to begin with.
Cinderella continues to make
music that was popular around
'86 for a '90s audience. In fact,
nearly all the songs ring bells of
recognition, particularly of bands
from Cinderella's original period.
"Bad Attitude Shuffle" is a re-
tooled version of Ratt's "Way Cool
Junior "Hard To Find the
Words" is a Motley Crue "With-
out You" rip-off. "Still Climbing"
comes across exactly like vintage
Scorpions, like, say, "The Rythym
of Love "Freewheeling" swipes
from the Crue's "Kickstart My
Heart I swear "Through the
Rain" sounds like (double
yikes!) Air Supply's "Making
Love Out of Nothing At All" in
the soft piano work at the
song's beginning. "Hot and
Bothered" echoes Van Halen's
"Round and Round "The
Road sStill Long" isdamr near
"18 and Life" from Skid Row
lyrically, but it sounds like
Winger. And Keifer himself
comes too close to Steven Tyler,
Brian Johnson and Axel Rose
to offer anything new vocally
to the limited scope of hard
rock.
The lyrics? Please. "All
See CLIMB page 10





Mm
November 17, 1994
The East-Carolinian JQ
Pirate fan sings praises
xy
atalog
mnection
jvA
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Catalog Price
Men's
Blazers
60
Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Bill Ebison, the father of an ECU
senior, has created a musical tribute
to Pirate athletics. It's an R&B tape
titled Let's Rockand Roll, East Carolina.
The release contains "Meet me at
Ficklen "TaUgate Party Time "Get
Loud Here Come the Pirates and
the title track "Let's Rock and Roll
East Carolina The songs are de
signed to stimulate school spirit and
to promote the football team. They
contain simple lyrics such as "When
we believed we took the peach We
still believe This time we want the
liberty It's not the most complex
music you'll ever hear. But it sves a
purpose. It would be well suu for
the Steve Logan Show, or fori pep
rally. Ebison definitely doesnWrite
about anything negative.
Ebison said he'd like to fgafsent
this release to ECU organizations for
feedback. He also wants to haw the
tracks played on local radio stations
to see what kind of response they'd
get.
"I've been a Pirate fan for close to
Off
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i�
10 years now Ebison said. "I've
experimented making tribute
songs for the basketball team, and
for other Pirate football teams. But
this is the first time I've ma0e
Pirate tribute songs this profes-
sionally. I compiled most of the
music on a digital keyboard, aid
later added Ronnie Daw's guifer
I solos and John Jones' vocals �
Ebison has made tribute songs
for organizations throughout the
Eastern North Carolina region. "I
started out doing comedy rou-
tines throughoutthestate Ebison
said. "Then it got to the point that
everywhere I performed I had'a
tribute song dedicated to a certain
area. I performed at the Attic oie
time and performed a song about
ECU
Ebison has been making music
for the past 40 years and he hasn't
restricted himself to making one
certain style. "I've made country,
blue grass, beach music and rock
and roll Ebison said. "I play gui-
tar, bass, piano and keyboards.
I've always enjoyed making mii-
sic
i
VAMPFromp.8
named Lestat on the streets of
New Orleans in the late 18th cerj-
tury. Lestat gives Louis a choice
mat Lestat never had: whether dr
not to become a vampire. Frorh
men on, the story as told by Louis
depicts his life as a vampire.
The scenes in which the van
pires kill and dine on the blood of
their victims are chillingly graphic
and detailed. Excellent special ef-
fects make for an evil account of
whatit would really be like to be
vampire. Louis, who at first is still
in touch with his old mortal way
oflife,refusestomakehumanshls
victims. Instead he chooses to
make rat blood his food of choice!
Numerous rats are drained of,
their blood in a gruesome man
ner, much to the dismay of the;
unsuspecting audience. However
that's only the beginning of the
movie. Lestat tries to persuade
Louis that human blood is in fact
delicious and between them they
drain the life out of many unsus
pecting victims. One of my favor
ite scenes of this movie is when;
Louis finally breaks down and;
can't resist the urge for human!
blood when he stumbles across a!
little girl.
Thegu-l'smomerhad died from'
the plague, and Louis takes the
girl and bites her neck. Lestat soon;
enters the room and proceeds to
makethegirl,Claudia,intoavam-
pire by letting her drink his blood.
After doingso,thearrogant Lestati
begins to mock-dance with the
corpse of the girl's mother. This
scene is so intense that it gave me j
shivers. Duringit,Iwitnessedsev
eral people leaving. One person J
didn't make it and threw up all
over the floor. Surprise!
I honestly do not think people !
werereadyforamovieasgraphic !
as this one was. Most did not i
think Tom Cruise would partici- j
pate in such an "evil" movie and j
were very surprised by it. Cruise j
did such a realistic interpretation
that 1 didn't even see him. I saw !
Lestat.
Brad Pitt was perfect to play i
the role of Louis and proved so i
during the movie. Vampires are �
very beautiful people and that is ;
what you can say about everyone
in the movie. Armand, the oldest
and most powerful vampire, '
made a few women in the audi-
ence faint. Brad Pitt and Tom
Cruise are also considered some '
of the most beautiful people in j
the world.
Intervieiu follows the story line m
of the book, but it has undergone 2
a few changes. One difference
? between the book and movie is �
the ending, which almost ruined
' the movie for me. To avoid spoil-
ing it, I'll just say that it involves
Lestat, and that in thebackground
they have a revolting rendition of
the Rolling Stones' "Sympathy
for the Devil" performed by
Axl Rose?
Except for the ending, Inter-
vieiv With the Vampire is very ex-
citing and well-done. It's the best
vampire movie since Dracula, and
since the book has been a favorite
of mine for a long time now, it
made the movie that much more
fun to watch.
Oh a scale of one to ten, Inter-
vieiv Withthe Vampire rates a nine-





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"Everybody's talkin at me But
nothin's soundin right They
say my future's lookin brighter
But I don't see no light How
'bout "Make my way down to
the door Can't put no troubles
on no shelf Cause when no-
body worries for you You got
to worry for yourself The rest
either plummets into power bal-
lad pap or tries pitifully to swag-
ger. The blues sound that
Cinderella tries to present is just
too far from its origins to work,
buried under yowls and bland
brass. Just how is it that
Aerosmith uses the same tools
and builds such good rock?
Could it be, like, talent or some-
thing?
A band simply can't com-
pete against funk and punk
when their main weapons are
stiff-back blues, sterile choruses
and tennis racket-and-mirror
posing. And the insipid
ry thy ms may very well be com-
ing off the dead horse of hard
rock sentimentality and faux
cowboy bravado that
"Headbanger's Ball" doled out
so long ago. It is long past mid-
night for Cinderella; the ball is
over, and the glass on their slip-
pers is simply too transparent.
However good this type of
music may have sounded a de-
cade ago, it rings of seventh
grade tastes and good times
long since past.
�Gregory
Dickens
JUDY From p. 8
world. "I lived in a land of gi-
ants in those days the narrator
tells us. "All children do
Adults, being larger and smarter
(and more corrupt), tell children
playful lies and have secret con-
versations that children aren't
privy to. For our narrator, life is
very much like watching a
Punch and Judy show. The ac-
tions of the larger-than-life fig-
ures around him don't make
much sense, justice is only a
figment, and the only time he
can see through the lies is when
he parts the curtain to see the
puppet master at work (which
is never allowed).
Is it significant, then, that all
adult actions that don't directly
pertain to children are depicted
by McKean either in frighten-
ing masks or in silhouette from
behind various drapes? I'd say
that's a safe bet.
The Punch and Judy show is
an ancient story, and like all
ancient stories in Gaiman's
work, it has deeper meaning. In
this case, the meaning pertains
to a dark and violent world
where men and their wooden
sticks hold power. The lessons
of the play are brought home
when the narrator accidentally
oversees a real-life Punch and
Judy play acted out before his
eyes. And it's not funny at all.
Mr. Punch is a remarkable
piece of fiction, and of comics
art. Neil Caiman weaves a dis-
turbing tale that conveys the
wonder and mystery of child-
hood, and Dave McKean serves
up some deceptively simple art-
work that deepens the mood in
subtle ways 1 wasn't fully aware
of until a second reading. These
two men are masters of comics
storytelling, and it shows. This
is a virtuoso performance on
every level, and I highly recom-
mend it. Ten out of ten stars.
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November 17, 1994
The East Carolinian 1 -�
The East Carolinian
Sports
a
ECU tangles with Tigers for bowl berth
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
This week ECU plays for the kind
of opportunity that college football
teams dream about: a one-game
playoff-type atmosphere with the
winner advancing to the Liberty
Bowl. The victor in this game be-
tween Memphis (6-4) and ECU (6-4)
includes a bowl bid on New Year's
Eve against a Top 25 at-large team,
national television exposure on
ESPN, and a definite edge in both
recruiting and fundraising.
Memphis and ECU are two very
different ball clubs in terms of offen-
sive and defensive philosophy. The
Tigers run a very conservative ball-
control offense whose success is
based on making as few mistakes as
possible. ECU, on the other hand,
has a wide-openbalanced attack led
by QB Marcus Crandell and TB Jun-
ior Smith.
Defensively, Memphis is a very
aggressive, blitzing unit that brings
six or seven men after the quarter-
back every play.
"They lineup in all kindof ways
Steve Logan said. "There is a method
to their madness. They are very simi-
lar to Virginia Tech in terms of quick-
ness and speed on defense
The Pirate 'D' contains opponents
well and does not surrender the big
play. They have been up for every
game so far this year. Forcing turn-
overs against MU's basic toss-sweep
offense will be the key for the ECU
defense.
"They have a great defense De-
fensive coordinator Paul Jette said.
"By looking at them on film and their
scores and statistics, you can see that
they are not going to lose the game on
offense. They try to protect the ball
and play sound fundamental foot-
ball to give themselves a chance to
win the ball game
Offensive headliners for the Ti-
gers include quarterback Joe Borich,
a highly rated JUCO Ail-American
who led Memphis in their victories
over Cincinnati and Ole Miss. He
possesses a strong arm and is an
accurate passer, but he has not been
called upon to throw much out of
head coach Chuck Stobart's I-For-
mation attack.
Running backs Marcus Holliday
and Frank Fletcher are both hard
runners who get upheld in a hurry.
"They have good running backs
Logan said. "Not as impressive as
Auburn's Steve Davis, but they do
have good vision and hit the holes
hard
Holliday has 618 yards rushing,
but has recently gave way to Hetcher
who scored his first career TD last
year versus ECU. Also, freshman
tailback Derrickjonesranfor 71 yards
on 20 carries and a touchdown ver-
sus Tennessee last week.
When Borich throws, he will go to
Billy Rutledge and Ryan Roskelly.
Roskelly, who doubles as a punt re-
turner, has 36 catches for 511 yards
and 3 touchdowns. He is a danger-
ous return man who averages 11.7
per return ,and ran one back 70 yards
for a TD against Tulsa earlier this
year. Rutledge hasn't seen the ball as
much, but has made the most of his
opportunities catching long passes
versus Tulane and Louisville.
The Memphis O-Line is a veteran
See MU page 13
Photo Courtesy of MU SID
Chuck Stobert (headset) is in his sixth season as Memphis' head coach. He has an overall record
of 29-35-1. His Tigers clash with ECU on Saturday, with the winner advancing to the Liberty Bowl.
FASTFACTS
Game Location: Memphis, TN
Opponent: Memphis Tigers
Game Site: Liberty Bowl
Kickoff: 2 o.m.
Head Coach: Chuck Stobart
(6th year, 29-35-1 at MU)
Key Players (1994 stats to date)
QB Joe Borich
(.318 comp. , 3 TDs, O ENTs)
RB Marcus Holliday
(618 rush yds 3 TDs)
LB Jesse Allen
(109 tackles, 1 sack, 1 INT)
NG Brian Barnett
(68 tackles, 9 sacks)
Notes:
� Tennessee's first-half 14
points was the most scored
against Memphis this season in
a half.
� PK Luis Tejeda has hit
field goals from 50 yards in
his last two games.
� Memphis' defense ranks
second in Div. I-A football, but
their offense is ranked 104th.
� Whoever wins Saturday's
game will return to Memphis
on Dec. 31 st to participate in
the St. Jude's Liberty Bowl.
Mattison returns to lineup in new role
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
Perez Mattison is one of the of
the most heralded quarterbacks to
come out of the state of South
Carolina in many years. At
Anderson's WestsideHighSchool,
he lettered four times, throwing
for6,202yardsand 57 touchdowns,
and completed 457 of 903 passes
(50.4 percent) during his career.
His completion total is an all-
time state record. As a senior,
Mattison was selected First team
All-State after throwing for 2,432
yards and 28 touchdowns with a
77 percent completion percentage.
As a true freshman last season,
Mattison stepped up and started
six games for injured starter
Marcus Crandell. He showed
flashes of brilliance as he drew
comparisons to former Pirate star
and current Cincinnati Bengal
starting QB Jeff Blake. Mattison's
arm strength, accuracy and mobil-
ity all drew raves from ECU fans,
even when he struggled at times
due to an inconsistent supporting
cast.
With Crandell healthy and
playing well after the spring,
Mattison was relegated to a
redshirt season in order to save a
year of eligibility and eventually re-
place Crandell.
However, in Saturday's contest
against Central Horida, this plan took
a strange twist when, due to Mitchell
Galloway's season-ending knee in-
jury, Mattison moved to the wide out
position and re-
turned kicks.
"Ihadalongtalk
with Perez when
Mitchell Galloway
got hurt Steve
Logan said. "I told
him that his career
comes first, and if
he wants to try to
unseat Marcus
Crandell every
year then that is fine
with me. When
you look back on
your career as a col-
lege football playerand what it means
to you, it should be a positive experi-
ence with a lot of playing time, not
sitting on the sidelines. It's no fun to
practice every day and not get to
play. WR and KR is his home for
now. He is one of the top two athletes
on our team and is just a beautifully
gifted athlete and nice young man
The move still surprised many
who don't know Mattison well and
how he feels about this team and his
football future.
"Coach Logan talked to me like a
man, not just as a scholarship ath-
lete Mattisonsaid. "Heapproached
me differently and put the decision
on my shoulders. He didn't demand
1 play quarterback or receiver. He
just said if I
learned two po-
sitions it would
give me a good
shot for the pros.
That made my
decision a lot
easier to make
The strong
play of starter
Marcus Crandell
had caused
Mattison to con-
sider his role and
future in this pro-
gram. Both are
sophomores, and even with a redshirt
still available to him, it would leave
only one year of being a starter in all
likelihood.
"Basically, before he talked to me
I was thinking if Marcus had sort of a
mediocre season then I should stay at
QB, but with the way he is playing
now it would be really hard to unseat
him Mattison said. "I felt like if I
could play another position, then it
would prove to the pro scouts that I
am a versatile athlete. Havingexperi-
ence atboth positions makes me more
of a prospect
His decision to play is the kind of
unselfishness that is really refreshing
to see at a time when many athletes
are getting a bad reputation for being
too self-absorbed and not focused on
team goals.
"lam really happy right now that
I was able to contribute to the team at
a crucial moment Mattison said.
"Obviously, the coaches have enough
confidence in my athletic ability that
it would give the team an added
dimension. Instead of me sitting on
the sideline, I can help us go to the
Liberty Bowl
Mattison is one of the best athletes
on the ECU squad, and runs a 4.4 40-
yard dash, has a 36-inch vertical leap
and bench presses 335 pounds. This
athleticism made the transition to
receiver a smooth one.
"It is pretty easy for me to make
this move Mattisonsaid. "I already
know all of the routes. I have a lot to
work with in terms of technique, like
mv stance, shouldersover toes, knees
bent, keep your eye on the ball ��-
fundamentals that everyone else
learned back in junior high that I
have missed. Being a good athlete
helps a lot. I see everything I saw at
QB, just from a different vantage
point
Running back kicks and play-
ing receiver are both very differ-
ent roles for Mattison because he
has always played quarterback.
"That was the first time I have
played anything but QB
Mattison said. "I know I'm fast,
but I found out on Saturday
against UCF that you don't need
to run a 4.2 to get a good return.
It's all about how you read your
blocks and hit the holes. I'm like a
kid with a new toy. Catching the
ball and trying to make some-
thing happen is a very important
role. I try to get Marcus and the
offense good field position. It is
just a matter of me catching the
ball and letting my athletic ability
take over from there
Surprisingly, Mattison feels like
receiver is a less physical position
thanQB.
"It is more physical at QB be-
cause you get hit from the back-
side Mattison said. "Once you
get hit, you feel it for the whole
game. You expect to get hit at
receiver. I took more licks last year
when I was the QB. You have to
have your head on a swivel be-
cause the defensive line will try to
See PEREZ page 12
SID NOTES
CAA hoops prove competitive
(SID)�The James Madison
Dukes fought off a determined East
Carolina squad to come away with
a 2-1 victory in the first round of the
ColonialAthleticAssociationMen's
Soccer Tournament in
Williamsburg, Va.
What had been considered to be
a cakewalk for the 12th-ranked
Dukes was in reality nothing but.
This was the same East Carolina
squad that JMU pounded 5-1 in the
season finale just four days before.
Even though JMU outshot the Pi-
rates 32 to 7, the Dukes needed a
game-winning goal by Patrick
McSorley in the second period,
along �vith some outstanding de-
fense, to finally putthePiratesaway.
James Madison got on the board
first at the 12:45 mark when Brent
Bennett stole a pass from the Pi-
rates inside their own penalty box
and drove a shot past ECU goalie
Jay Davis that landed in the right
comer.
Justtwominuteslater,EastCaro-
lina quickly answered with a shot
of their own when junior Marc
Mullin drilled a 25-yard free kick
past JMU goalie Barry Purcell.
From that point, the defenses
took over as James Madison lim-
ited the Pirates to just six more
shots at the goal while Davis held
JMU in check with a career and
season-high 14 saves.
The Dukes would break the
stalemate at the 46:56 mark, when
McSorley scored what would be
the game winner.
Juniors Marc Mullin and Drew
Racine have been named to the sec-
ond team All-Colonial Athletic As-
sociation soccer squad
Mullin,aproductof Jacksonville,
N.C, finished fifth on the team in
scoring with six assists. He was one
of three Pirates to start in all 18
games this season. It marks the first
time he was selected for All-CAA
honors.
Radne'sselectionmarks his third
time on an All-CAA squad. The
native of Raleigh, NC became the
first ECU soccer player to be named
with back-to-back games for the
Pirates, scoring one assist as a
midfielder.
This marks the third consecutive
season that two Pirate players have
garnered All-CAA honors. In 1993,
Justin Finck was a second team se-
lection, while Racine earned first
team honors.
In Pirate volleyball, junior Carrie
Bme spearheaded the ECU offen-
sive attack with a match-high 17
kills, as the Lady Pirates defeated
theUNC-W 16-14,8-15,15-10,15-10
to close their regular-season in
Greenville Friday evening.
Two of the Lady Pirate seniors,
playing their last collegiate home
match for ECU, came up with big
numbers and crucial plays. Staci
See NOTES page 13
Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The CAA will be celebrating its
10th anniversary this year with an
upcoming basketball season that will
surely be amongst the most competi-
tive ever. As it hasbeen in the last few
seasons in the CAA, it appears there
will be another dog-fight from top to
bottom of the league.
Familiar faces return to the CAA
as well as some bright, young new
ones. Amongst the new faces coming
into the league this season is the ad-
dition of three brand new coaches.
Jerry Wainwright takes over at
UNC-Wilmington this season. He is
stepping into the position after last
year'sSeahawkcoachKevin Eastman
moved to become head coach at
WashingtonState. Eastman has given
Wainwright a golden opportunity at
Wilmington, leaving behind a team
of talented, solid veterans and rising
young stars.
At Old Dominion, Jeff Capel will
be replacing the departed Oliver
Purnell. Capel has 10 letterman from
last vear's team that advanced to the
second round of the National Invita-
tional Tournament. Among the 10
letterman returning are two first-team
All-CAA performers, and the
league's Plaver of the Year in center
Odell Hodge.
Charlie Woolum begins his first
season as head coach of William &
Mary this season. He will have all
five of last year's starters back for this
season as he tries to improve on last
season's 4-23 record
Seven out of the 10 players
were honored last season for
and Second
Team honors
are back.
All eves will
be on the junior
Hodge at ODU,
who has been a
big stand-out in
his first two sea-
sons in the
CAA, being
named to the
1993 Second
Team as well as
1993 Rookie of
the Year his
freshman season. Last year, as
as being named Player of the
and First Team All-CAA, he
that named 1994 CAA Tournament
First MVP.
Hodge led the
conference last sea-
son with averages
of 19.4 points and
9.0 rebounds per
game, along with
73 blocked shots.
At 6-9,250 pounds,
it's no wonder that
Hodge is by far the
biggest threat to
other teams in the
CAA conference.
Also returning
for the Monarchs of
ODU this season is
well First Team All-CAA selection for
Year
ODU's Odell Hodge
See CAA page 12
moved to become head coach at season's 4-23 record. and First Team All-CAA, he was oee umm paye �
Green's track career races to an end
Scott Batchelor
Staff Writer
Last Saturday, senior Stacy Green
stepped on to the track in Greenville,
S.C, for the last time as a member of
the Lady PiratesCrossCountry team.
Green put the finishing touch on a
four-year running career with the Pi-
rates as she crossed the finishing line
seconds behind ECU standout Dava
Rhodes, placing her 95th of 279 run-
ners in the race.
Green's time of 19:03 was five sec-
onds better than her high mark a sea-
son ago at the N.C. Championships.
TheMechanicsville,Va.nativewas
hindered last year
by a hip injury that
turned out to be a
stress fracture. Af-
tera disappointing
junior year, a lot of
hard work in the
off season led to a
stellar senior sea-
son.
"I couldn't train
as hard last year
because of the in-
jury Green said. "But over the sum-
mer, I lifted weights a lot. I did every-
thing to go out with a good season
Coming in to this
season, her personal
best time was 18:45.
She shattered that
mark twice thisyear,
when it counted
most � at the N.C.
and CAA Champi-
onships.
"I really wailed
to place higher in the
conference " Green
said. "But it was my
best season
The senior runner also turned in
two other sub-nine minute times
this year. The first was in
Charlottesville, Virginia at the UV A
Invitational, where Green ran an
18:52. One week later, she raced to
an 18:49 at the Greensboro Invita-
tional.
Green arrived at ECU after
graduating from Lee Davis High
School, where she won the regional
competition in theindoortwo-mile
race.
"I really felt like I would fit in
here Green said. "I wanted to
See GREEN page 12
��





1 2The East Carolinian
November 17. 1994
From p. 11
take vou out. I took thi as a chal-
lenge to see if I could doit. I was able
to fight through traffic and get open
Hopefully, I v. ill be able to get the
ball in my hands soon
Having two quarterbacks on the
field gives the Pirates a unique ad-
vantage oxer their opponents.
Mattison will continue to practice at
QB as well as receiver.
"Coach Martin (VK coach) is a
real considerate teaching guy
Mattison said. "As a former QB we
'can relate really well. He knows
that I understand coverages, and he
doesn't have to explain that much
to me. I am lucky to have the benefit
of plaing tor him and Coach Logan.
Me and Marcus can communicate
and I can tell him if I see a weakness
in the defense, and we can analyze
what we see in the different cover-
ages to Coach Logan
Mattison became discouraged at
one point this season, because sit-
ting on the bench was a new experi-
ence for him. He has always been a
starter and the center of attention.
"I'm not going to lie to you
Mattison said. "I thoughtabout leav-
ing, but sitting on the bench really
made me think about m self as a
student and person not just a foot-
ball player. I evaluated myself, and
11 really think that it helped megrow
up and mature a lot
One of his big dislikes is people
that only think of him as a fwtball
player and ccaistanrly ask him about
football instead of school.
"I want people to know that we
are very intelligent people, not just
burlv and dumb Mattison said.
" e all had to makeceitain require-
ments to be here, people think we
just squeezed in to school When I
walk off the field, football is over. I
'hate to talk about football. I would
rather get to know people person-
ally. What do vou like to do? What
are you interested in? I feel like I
am equal to everyone, it is just that
(od blessed me with certain tal-
fttfs.
�Family is very important to
'M.ittison, and hasbecomeeven more
'�$3) how that he is living six hours
� n vav from liis hometown of Ander-
son,S.C
' - ' My parents are the most impor-
laYtt people in my life Mattison
"Mid. "Me and my mom are closer
than ever. She is studying to be a
Ks From p. 11
lawyer, and she is very authorita-
tive. When I was going through my
teenage years, it was hard for me to
assert myself because we are both
stubborn. Before I came to school,
my older brother passed away and
it is has brought the whole family
closer together. I don't know if I will
be here from one day to the next.
You can't take life for granted at all
Mattison will definiteiv become
the pro prospect that he wants to be
in time because of his speed, size
and intelligence. More important
though, is the type of person that he
is, an unselfish one that has his pri-
orities and values in the proper or-
der. Family, school and then foot-
ball are the way he has ordered his
life, and he is definiteiv a positive
role-model to follow for voung
people.
GREEN
From p. 11
havea well-rounded life, and not just
run, run, run all the time. ECU has
given me that. I love ECU
Green first became interested in
running at an early age. She found
herself m front of everybody when
in
seve
�it!
i-grade
running
class.
"My older sister Erin ran C Ireen
said. "That helped me get started
Gre mtinueher run-
ning after graduation, and wants
to compete in a triathlon.
"I want to do a triathlon really
badly (ireen said. "I also plai
keep running in races and keep
competing "
It the results of those races re-
semble her ECU results, Green -
competition better watch out.
the past two seasons, senior forward
Petey Sessoms. Last year, Sessoms
wasoneof the most dangerous three-
point shooters in the conference, hit-
ring a total of 90 treys on the season.
Kent Culuko comes into his se-
nior year at James Madison Univer-
sir on cloud nine after hitting "the
shot" last year that sent the Dukes to
the NCAA tournament for the first
time since 1983. Culuko was the fifth
best free-throw shooter in the coun-
try last season with a 92.1 average on
the year.
Also back for the Dukes this sea-
son is senior forward Louis Rovve.
He was an All-Colonial Second Team
selection for JMU last year, averag-
ing 14.2 points per game. He was the
Dukes' top rebounder and shot-
b locker last season, averaging five
boards a game and blocking 39 shots
on the year.
.Among one of the biggest sur-
p ri ses to the C.AA last season was the
play of junior forward Tim Fudd,
who won First Team All-CAA hon-
ors with his 19 points per game aver-
age at American University. He will
be looked at bv his Eagle teammates
to pull in a majority of the points and
rebounds this season.
UNO Wilmington has senior for-
ward Corey Stewart back for his fina 1
season. The Second Team All-CAA
selection last season was the second
leading scorer on the team with 13.9
points per game and averaged about
six rebounds per game. He was sec-
ond in the conference in three-point
shooting average, with 44.5 percent
accuracy from the long range.
Finally, senior guard Kass Weaver
will be the lone returning starter for
last year's CAA Coach of the Year,
Bill Dooley. Weaver was awarded
Second Team All-CAA honors, aver-
aging 17.9 points in CAA games.
So with new coaches and familiar
players returning to the CAA, the
task of trying to dethrone the Dukes
of James Madison will be on
everybody's mind going into the sea-
son. Teams such as George Mason
and East Carolina will be looking
toward young players to step up big
tliis season. With such a tight race
going into this year's CAA season,
the team that jumps ahead early and
the teams that stay healthy might be
in the driver's seat in the season to
come.
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Pick tip your Purple Pirate Pass there if you haven't already





November 17, 1994
The East Carolinian 13
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC BAR CERTIFIED
State Criminal Law Specialist
24 Hour Message Service
20$ Evans Street
Adjacent to the Greenville Courthouse
ja 752-7529
NOTES
From p. 11
Winters registered 11 kills, while
setter Sarah Laurent dumped the
final kill over the net as East Caro-
lina defeated UNC-VV for the sec-
ond time in five meetings this year.
"Do we have to dig a hole to come
back to win' said ECU Head Coach
Gail Guttenburg? "We won and are
now at .500. I'm happy for the team,
but I know we can play better
Trailing 8-0 in the third game of
the match, ECU scored eight unan-
swered points to tie the game. ECU
went on to win gme three 15-10.
ECU, now 16-16 on the season,
needs one more victory to ensure
the Lady Pirates of their first non-
losing season, since a 16-15 record in
1989.
UNCW was led by Leslie
Noukelak's 14 kills. Debby Taydus
added 13, as the Lady Seahawks
dropped to 19-13 overall and 0-5 in
Colonial Athletic Association play.
The Lady Pirates are preparing
for the C AA Tournament, this week-
end in Washington DC. ECU will
face fourth-seeded James Madison
in the first-round match-up. The
Lady Dukes earlier defeated the
Lady Pirates in five games in
Harrisonburg.
"We took them to five up there
said Guttenberg after the UNC-W
contest. "We have to play better than
we played tonight. If we can play
like we are capable of playing, we
can beat them
Brne became ECU's first-ever
CAA player of the week after re-
cording 50 kills in last week's
matches. j
East Carolina University's
Women's cross, country teamnad
an exceptional outing at the NCAA
District III Championships on Sat-
urday. ECU captured 26th place out
of 37 Division I schools participat-
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ing. Last year, the Lady Pirates
finished 28th out of 40 teams.
ECU was led by sophomore
Dava Rhodes, who finished 49th
out of 279 runners with a time of
18:28. Senior Stacy Green also had
an excellent race, finishing 95th
overall in a time of 19:03. Senior
Jessica Montgomery set a personal
best 5k mark of 19:33. Montgom-
ery finished fourth on the team
and 153rd overall.
The men did not field a full
team; however senior Sean
Connolly had a team-best 69th
place finish. He also recorded a
personal best in the 10k distance
with a time of 32:23. Sophomore
Paul Gorman also ran a personal
best finishing 207th out of 306 run-
ners with a time of 34:27. Fresh-
man Mike Marini also competed
for the Pirates, finishing in a time
of 35:59, good for 279th place.
MU
From p. 11
unit that averages over 275 lbs per
man. MU coaches had to replace
several starters from last year, but
did return five players who saw
game action.
Defensively, Memphis is
ranked third in he nation in scor-
ing defense, and gives up just 12.9
points per game. The Tigers have
a strong front four led by NG
Brian Barnett(68 tackles, nine
sacks). Rush end James Logan has
added eight sacks and a safety on
the year. He had two sacks last
year in Memphis's 34-7 victory
over the Pirates.
At linebacker, Jesse Allen leads
a hard-hitting group that has ex-
cellent speed and depth. Allen
leads the Tigers with 109 tackles in
1994. Dan Bonner (70 tackles) and
Duane Vandborg (79 tackles) are
good complementary players to
Allen.
In the secondary, Memphis is
led by PS Jerome Woods (84 tack-
les). He is a smart, steady player
who likes to come up and make
tackles in run support. Ken Irvin,
Barry Dillard, and Chris Smith
complete a good Memphis sec-
ondary that ranks third in the
country in passing efficiency de-
fense.
"The main thing is to decipher
what they are doing Offensive
coordinatorTodd Berry said. "They
blitz a lot, use a bunch of different
fronts. They play a lot of man cov-
erage. Memphis is not very big, but
they have some really good ath-
letes withexcellentspeed. They try
to shoot the gaps and keep you off
balance. Inherently, they are a de-
fense that can give up the big play
it is just a matter of us getting rid of
the ball and upheld in a hurry
Memphis's defense has not
faced as an explosive a offense as
ECU's this season. Their gambles
should backfire when ECU goes to
it's quick passing game or the run
behind Junior Smith. Look for a
strong performance by the Pirate
'D against a average offense that
runs very simple plays and strives
for execution over innovation.
If ECU can avoid the turnovers
that plagued them in last year's
mistake-filled game in Greenville,
the Piratesshould come home win-
ners and make a return trip to the
Liberty Bowl on Dec. 31 to play a
yet to be determined opponent.
Simply
Breathtaking!
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1 cup milk
3 tbs flour
1 tsp pepper
1 tsp salt
Cook macaroni in 5 cups salted, boiling water for 15
minutes or until al dente. Drain. In a separate pot, melt
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Stir well. Smother macaroni. Serves 4.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1042
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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