The East Carolinian, November 3, 1994






c
Eat too much candy?
Quit your bellyachin' and check out
the comics on page 6 and you ' II
feel all better.

Coming Attractions
Check out who's checkin in to Greenville in the
coming week with our super-cool Coming
Attractions column. See page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 56
Circulation 12.000
Thursday. November 3. 1W4
Greenville, NC
1 2 pages
Halloween festivities declared successful
Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
Witches, goblinsand all walks
of life paraded parties, down-
town and Mendenhall Student
Center last Monday night dur-
ing ECU's annual Halloween
celebration.
Traditionally, the unofficial
start of Halloween has been the
Lambda Chi Alpha Night Before
partv, which, for the last 11 years,
has been held the night before
October 31st. Sunday night's
party was no different than any-
other vear, except for one thing
� safety. "Wewanted everyone
to have fun, but most of all we
wanted everyone to be safe said
Lambda Chi president Sam
Lanier.
After last year's party, which
more than 3,000 people attended,
it became essential to make sure
safety was a priority when plan-
ning the event, or the Lambda
Chi s ran the risk of losing the
party privilege.
"they did a very good job with
security and preparing for the
crowd said Detective Best ot the
Greenville Police, who was one of
tour police officers assigned to
monitor the party. In addition to
the Greenville Police, four other
officers were hired from a private
security company to assist the
Greenville officers.
The streets around the frater-
nity house were blocked off, and
there were no reported incidents
of mischief within or outside of
the party.
"The level of alcohol consump-
tion was down, as well as the num-
ber of coolers Detective Best sa i d
"It was obvious that the students
came to socialize and have fun
rather than just to drink
Over 1,200 students attended
this year's party.
The tbemeof safety also seemed
to have carried over into Monday
night's festivities. That was the
time when the streets of (ireenville
were officially blocked off and the
partying was taken downtown,
outside the bars. For the second
vear in a row, Greenville was given
back the privilege of having the
streets blocked off after it was
taken away in 1986.
The night began around 9 p.m
when the first of the students
started showing up downtown.
At 10 p.m the streets were closed
off when "it became obvious that
the sidewalks could no longer
handle the amount of people
safely said Maj. Simonowich,
who was one of the over 100-po-
lice officers assigned to the down-
town area. Several officers from
other towns such as Bethel, Ayden,
Washington, Farmville and the Pitt
County Sheriff's Department
helped the Greenville police un-
der a mutual aid policy among the
departments.
There were between 4,500 to
5,000 people in the streets, and the
number of arrests totaled a sur-
prisingly low number of two.
"We had less arrests on Hal-
low een night than we do on a typi-
cal Friday or Saturday night
Simonowich said. "Itwas the most
well-behaved Halloween I've seen
in a long time, with the least
amount of alcohol iolations and
the least amount of problems
On campus, the number ot
problems was at a minimum as
well as under control. There were
12 officers patrolling campus and
fixe downtown, and there were
onlv 17 citations written by them.
The citations included everything
from misdemeanor drug charges
to alcohol violations.
"There was some property
damage by non-students south of
Mendenhall and around Greene
Dorm, but, other than that, every-
thing was fine said Director and
Chief of Campus Police Teresa
Crocker. "There were a lot of non-
students around and a large per-
centage ot the citations given were
to those non-students. And the only
three arrests made were to out-of-
towners, and we feel very good
about that fact
"The campus was under control
because we had enough officers on
dutv to prevent any problem? said
Sergeant Dail of ECU Police "This
vear was a lot safer because we put
a Kit of time into preparing for it
"The atmosphere was great, a nd
people were really enjoying them-
selves said ECU Police Patrol-
man Syth, who was one of the five
officers stationed downtown. "The
students realized that itwas a privi-
lege and not a right to have the
festivities downtown
Even with all the festivities go-
ing on outside, Mendenhall's third
annual Midnight Madness a safe,
non-alcoholic alternative to down-
town, drew in its highest number
of students yet.
From L p.m. until 2 a.m the
student center turned into a
fully decorated H illoween
part complete with 'ice bil-
liard, and bowling all night, in
addition to many other excit-
ing events
"We had 2,71 1 students at-
tend this year, up from last
year's 2,300 students said
Associate Director of Opera-
tions tor the Students Unions
Betty Hardee.
Among the activities avail-
able were a video karaoke1,
which staved packed all night,
and tour palm readers who had
to turn people away at the end
of the evening. A D room and
a hypnotist were equally as
popular. The University lin-
ing Services provided nee
breakfast from 11 p.m. until 1 in
the morning, as well as free
beverages and snacks through-
out the night.
"Overall, it was an excellent
and safe evening said S) th.
mn,T tne event, or uie louwwi �" .�
ECU alumni honored at Homecoming events
Todd Carper
Staff Writer
ECU honored four outstand-
ing alumni during the homecom-
ing festivities last weekend. The
awards were presented to an in-
dustrial manager, a surgeon, a
psychodramatist and a builder.
James L. Ebron Jr. and Mary-
Beth Foil of Greenville, David F.
Swink of Vienna, Va and Mark
E. Tipton of Raleigh were named
Outstanding Alumni for 1994.
They were honored at a luncheon
held in their honor at Mendenhall
Student Center and recognized
at half-time of the ECU-Cincin-
nati football game
ECU presents Outstanding
Alumni Awards annually to
graduates who have excelled in
their professions or in civic affairs.
The ECU Alumni Association se-
lects Outstanding Alumni based
on nominations submitted by fac-
ulty staff and alumni.
"Perhaps the greatest measure
of a university's success is the qual-
itv of its alumni, their personal
achievements and their contribu-
tions to the community said as-
sociation president Jack S. Fverton
of Virginia Beach, Va.
According to Everton, the four
individuals honored represented
the best ECU had to give back to
the community.
"that ECU has alumni of this
caliber on whom it can bestow
such honors as the Outstanding
Alumni Award reflects well on
the work it has been doing for
almost ninety years Everton said.
Ebron, who graduated with a
B.A. in chemistry in 1970 and an
M.S. in the same field in 1472. went
to work tor Burroughs-Wellcome
at its Greenville manufactoring site
shortly after graduation
After starting his career as a lab
chemist in quality assurance,
Ebron later moved into analytical
development and then into pro-
duction where he spent twelve
vears. In 1993, Ebron became
manager of the Greenville site.
Ebron is also an active member
in a number of community orga-
nizations, including Partners tor
Progress, which monitors
afterschool programs for at-risk
youth. 1 le is the past chairman of
the Sheppard Memorial Library-
See HONOR page 3
People on the Street
Q. What did you do for Halloween?
Photo by News Bureau
(Left to right, Jack S. Everlon, James L. Ebron. Mary Beth Fort, David F Swink. Mark E Tip on
and Chancellor Eak,n) These alumn, proudly display the awards earned for outstand ng
achievements in their communit.es and fields that reflect a positive image of ECU. The awards
were presented at a luncheon held in their honor during Homecoming last weekend.
Technology fair to be held
"I went to Mendenhall to see one of my
sorority sisters who was a fortune teller at the
festivities. The music was good. I did not
dress up this year
Tufanna Bradley, junior
"First 1 went to Mendenhall, then I at-
tended a dance at the Baptist Student
Union. Then 1 went downtown. Me and a
friend dressed up as Tweedle Dee and
Tweedle Dum
Joanna Mcilvaine, freshman
Kelly Sullivan
Staff Writer
Virtual reality will come to
Mendenhall next week, along with
music-based software, computer
mapping and other technological
waves of the future.
Academic Computing will spon-
sor the third annual 'Technology in
the Classroom" seminar (uesday,
Nov. S, in the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose Room.
The seminar, traditionally held in
October, but postponed due to fall
break, aims to educate faculty and
students alike on the ways technol-
ogy is shaping the ways students
learn and teachers teach. Demon-
strations wiil include topics from for-
eign language software to using vir-
tual reality to study cervical pafhol-
i ig)
"Students are more visually ori-
ented these days said Terry
Harris n, assistant manager f r Aca-
demic � Computing ' I ele ision,
VCRs, mo ies and video games
have all impacted the way stu-
dents learn
I lie presentation runs from
10a.m. to 3 p.m and is free and
open to the general public C a-
sual dress is preferred.
Faculty staff and students
with valid ECU IDs will receive
acopyofPCPlusor 1 incanwhen
See FAIR page 3
Rangers score high at challenge
"I went to some bars downtown, and drank
quite a few drinks
Mark Hundley, senior.
"I went downtown and walked around
dressed up like a convict
Bridget Hemenway. junior
Susan Schwartz
Staff Writer
The Armv ROT Ranger Chal-
lenge is a competition that is not for
the faint of heart. It is a rigorous
pin si aland mental competition for
men and women overachievers in
the military science program who
want to test then physical endur-
aiu e
I he competition is know n as the
varsirv sport for rm R T
ulm h teams from 2 different uni
ersitiesinthe arolina Brigadei om
pete against one another in an Army
Physical rraining(FT exercise,mili-
tary skills exercise, rope bridge com-
petition, hand grenade assault
course, marksmanship course, c m-
passcourse patrolling course, a 10-
kilometer road march in which the
cadets dress in full gear and march at
a near jog pace while carrying ap
proximate! Wpoundsofequipment
in then rucksack and a weapons as
sembh course in which the cadets
11 impete to issemble an M 1ft rifle
and an M 60 machinegun
best time
(i I snt a nine person team
to the Ranger Challenge i ompe-
tition which was held al Fort
ackson,S.( on Ocl U and 2:
Ihe team placed 12th loam - o
captain lern I ranckhauser,Bat-
talion (. omm. I Sgt. N -
pleased with the result ol
competition.
ui goal was to finish I
this year than we did List ,
I ranckhausersaid VVecertainh
See RANGER page 3





2 The East Carolinian
No ember
1994
Project pathway links parks
October 27
Biology Building � Officers responded to a report ol a large
crowd fightingsouthof the Biology Building, rhedisruption stemmed
from an altercation which had occurred downtow n 1 our students
were issued campus appearance tickets and one student was trans-
ported to Pitt Memorial tor head lacerations and contusions
October 28
Fleming Hall�Astudent left his room in Fleming after implying
that he may attempt suicide. ()fficers searched the campus could n t
locate the student
October 29
Scott Hall �Six Students and one non-student were issued state
citations for possession of a controlled substance and drug parapher-
nalia. Fhe students were also issued campus appearan e rk kets.
October 30
South of Jenkins Art Building� An officer stopped five subjects
believed to be in possession of a controlled substance A Belk 1 fail
resident was arrested for earning a .22 caliber handg n possession
of a Stolen firearm and carrying a concealed weapon. A non-student
was arrested for possession of crack 'cocaine and marijuana. Two
other students were issued campus appearance tickets for posses-
sion of marijuana.
October 31
General Classroom Building�Officers responded to an alarm
at the General Classroom Building and found a halon system on the
third floor was showing activation. The Greenville Fire I Jepartment
responded but no fire was located
November 1
Mendenhall Studeru Center � A non-student was arrested tor
damage to personal property. An officer observed him throwing
rocks and breaking the windows on t of two vehicles pa rked i n the lot.
Compiled by Tambra Zion.
Taken from official I ECU crime reports.
Correction Box
The East Carolinian regrets the oversight of the vocabulary
error in Tuesday's story "Health Sciences recognizes
contributer" and offers an apology to Dr. Edwin Monroe.
Nan Patterson
Staff Writer
Greenville residents will now
have greener pastures on which to
bit ycle and walk, thanks, to the ef-
forts of the Green Mill Run Pilot
C .reenwavs Project.
The project will connect Green
springs Park with the Elm Street
Park, therefore using the land for
bikers and pedestrians.
In addition to providing a better
transportation route, the project will
aisopresen ea natural floodplain in
(tieenviile.
"We are trying to spring the im
portance of greenway systems to
people. Thee are excellent environ-
mental watersheds, "said Andy I lar-
ns, director of planning arid com-
munity development.
Greenways are a form o! linear
parks. I he Green Mill Run Project
will be 1.1 miles in distance.
Lanier Construction (. ompany,
located in Snow Hill, N.C was
awarded the contract tor construc-
tion unnei essarj.
lesse Harris. MWB1 oordina
torfortheCitj of Ireenvilleand the
( ireenville Utilities Commission, is
enthusiastic about the contract be
ing awarded to a minority-owned
business.
"Since the inceptionof the MWBE
Program, we haven't had a minorit)
win the bid as prime contractor tor a
big project he said " This validates
the city's genuine effort to include
MWBE in fhe process works
rheNCDOl Officeofbicvcleand
in i ransportanoi
v ided i grant ol S3 0 lhe
t it of ��� em illeand itsc itizens
donated ' ise toS100,000 tor the
projei t
111 de elop. we need a K it ol
money I larris said.
The total contract awarded
was in the amount ot $391,204
rhe contract v ill cover all work
included in the base bid minus
landscaping, sinage pavement
markings and furniture group-
ings. I hi i proiw t began (Vt. 20.
Volunteers make a difference
Marguerite Benjamin
in conjunction with the I 'ointsot Right
Foundation, invited ev ervone to take
community action on Saturday, Oct
Staff Writer
The Greenville community was 22, by participating in the Annual
encouraged to take action during an Make a Difference Da challenge.
annual event for volunteers.
The event was established nation-
Hie Ritt Volunteer Action Center, wide as a "national i.U of doing
NewmanC atholic
Student Center
wishes to announce a
CHANGE OF PLACE
in its Sunday Mass Schedule
begmnin
i:jv am Mass will continue
to be held at The Newman Center.
953 E. 10th Street
8:30 Sunday evening Mass
will be held in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 244
(instead of the Newman Center.)
For Further information, please call
Fr. Paul Vaeih, 757-1991.
good said a spokesperson for the
Pitt Volunteer Action Center
"It was our first attempt to do
something for the national day, and
we were very pleased with the out-
come said Deborah Tavasso, di-
rector of the Pitt Volunteer Action
Center. "We had two groups and
four individual volunteers who
helped on SarurdaV, along with a few
students from ECU whohave agreed
to help with the center on a regular
basis now
The Pitt Volunteer Action Organi-
zation is a non-profit organization
with a primary focus on referring
volunteers tocommunitv centers and
shelters dedicated to helping others.
"The center provides serv ice ti 72
local agencies and has referred over
7(X) volunteers to those agencies
Tavasso said. Tavasso averages 20
hours of volunteer work per week
and istheonlypaid staffpera �n at tin-
center
Prior to the event on Saturday,
rkinniePcvle.axirdinatoroftheMake
a Difference Day project, stressed the
center's need for additional volun-
teers "because mere are a lot of local
� ons that do not yet have
idp they need
ravasso offered thanks to the
. and volunteer groups
who came out tor the events Bt
cause of them, many local organi-
zations got the help they needed.
I lttlec reek's Free Will Baptist
Chun, hdid a program to get kids
off i t In all. about 72
youths were present and partici-
pated .n acth ities designed toen-
hance their values. Lois Williams,
who was in charge of this proje I
had been wanting to do some-
thing like this for quite a while,
and Make A Difference Day gave
them the opportunity to organize
it.
"We were really excited about
that I iv asso said.
Although the Make A Differ-
ence I )ay Program operated on a
volunteei basis, the individuals
and groups who donated their
: not go without reward.
Upon completing a project, vol-
unteers were given the opportu-
See VOL page 3
w
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For more
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Kevin King
Comedy Club
Tuesday, November 8,7:57 pm
Mendenhall Student Center. Room 244
Sponsored by the Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
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Artist to be announced
Wednesday & Thursday
November 2&3
All Noon Day Tunes are held from 11:30 am
until 1:00 pm at Todd Dining Hall the first day
and Mendenhall Dining Room the second day.
Sponsored by the Student Union
Popular Entertainment Committee.
John Byrd
Come view the worRs of
a graduate student in the
painting department of the
ECU School of Art.
October 31 through
November 23
Sponsored by the Student Union
Visual Arts Committee.
For information regarding the annual SU New York trip, call the New York trip hotline
328-4788.





The East Carolinian3
November 3, W94
FAIR From p. 1
they bring several 3 1 2" diskettes
with them. 1 iarrison asks that disk
carriers know whether the) want
to install the program on a lap top,
hard driv e,etc . before they receive
the program
While everyone is encouraged
to attend, interested students can
als( i pick up flyers on CMS, down-
loading Hies and other topics that
will be discussed in Austin 208.
"Hopefully, studente can encour-
age teachers tc) incorporate new tech-
nology into their classrooms
1 larrison said. Students are bored
with the old methods; thev need to
teel more involved. The purpose of
this presentation is to show faculty
and students the technology avail-
able to them
VOL
From p. 2
ECU Tri Beta
THURSDAY, NOV. 10
FRIDAY, NOV. 11
7:30 am -1:00 pm
Technology in the
Classroom
i
i
I
f l-
3flill
I- i
1 l
Mendenhall
Multi-Purpose Room
November 8,1994
10:00 am-3:00 pm
Academic
Computing
at the Biology Greenhouse
Room S-111
David Powers David Powers
Special F.d Specal Erf
i Elizabeth ! Patricia Womb!
-ea-
nitv to send in a description of
their project to USA Weekend, for
review.
Ten honorees were then se-
lected by a panel of appointed
judges. Each charity chosen re-
ceived $2,IXX). Paul Newman and
Newman's Own, Inc. donated an
additional $100,000 to charity.
Fiftv honorable mention presets
also received S2,000.
"The program was actually a
celebration and a promotional ef-
fort Peek said. "Our main inter-
est was getting people to see that
they can make a difference any
and every day, not just on one
day
Pitt Volunteer Action Center
continues to make a difference on
a dail v basis and is always pleased
to have new volunteers. The cen-
ter is located at 400 West Fifth
Street, suite 209, and can be reached
via telephone at 830-6271.
RANGER
From p. 1
INFO. HOT LINE: 752-5855
Fuego Pel Alm
with very, very special uest
? jyiebmie Sparks
Friday
geets �f Good Roots
1111 ojtiiit ,4'h i� -�� - �� j j a w
Keller Williams
fa rFn HI
cisl .guies'
12th. Last year, we placed 19th
Franckhauser said he is very-
pleased with the team's improve-
ment over the course of the semester.
"We began training at the begin-
ning of the fall semester. We trained
every Monday through Saturday
morning at 6 a.m and every after-
noonfrom3:15to5:30Franckhauser
said. "In the beginning of the semes-
ter, our team's average PT score was
230 points out of a possible 300. For
competition, the team'saverage score
improved to 270
The ECU team won a "streamer of
excellence" in the weapons assembly
competition by ranking in the top
five for the timed competition. ECU
also excelled in the marksmanship
competition by scoring 394 out of a
possible 400 points.
Maj. James Cook, associate pro-
fessor of military science, was proud
ofhisstudents' performance andhow
they worked together to prepare for
the competition.
"The Ranger Challenge helps
build teamwork and confidence in
these future officers Cook said. "It
is also an individual test to find out
what these cadets are made of. I was
very proud. The cadets represented
ECU well and had a solid showing
against very tough competition
There are approximately 70 stu-
dents in the ROTC program at ECU.
Nine of them were able to make it to
thecompetition. Cadet Franckhauser
said two years of experience helped
him and co-captain Fred Howey
motivate the nine individuals and
prepare them for the competition.
"The Ranger Challenge was very-
competitive, but thecompetition was
not as important as what each indi-
vidual who competed gained. They
were able to find out what kind of
character they have Franckhauser
said. "It is very easy to quit some-
thing that is too difficult. It is also easy
to continue something that is not too
difficult
The nine cadets were trained by
Capt. JohnSchwartzandSgt. IstClass
Michael Hill, Franckhauser said. Part
of their training was to compete in
two smaller Ranger Challenge com-
petitions held earlier this semester.
One was held at the Virginia Military-
Institute (VMI) in Lexingtor Vathe
other at Camp Burner near Raleigh,
N.C. ECU did well in each competi-
tion, and placed third at the VMI
Ranger Challenge.
Maj. Cook said ECU students
interested in competing in next
year's Ranger Challenge can do so
with no obligation to the U.S.
Army.
"Students who are motivated
and want to do Ranger training
can do so as first- or second-year
military science students Cook
said. "All they need to do is enroll
in a military science class to be
able to participate
Cook said the Ranger Chal-
lenge is a rigorous competition
and that preparing for it is hard
work, not to be taken lightly. ECU
students interested in finding out
moreabouthowtoparticipatecan
stop bv the Army Military Science
department
receive a sever
HONOR
From p. 1
mnmrm CLOUD NINE
Sunday
Less than 12 price Molson
850 Molsons Nite
COMING NOV. 17th
go�1s street Wime
Board, past chairman of the
Greenville Utilities Commission
and a member of the Boy Scouts of
America Executive Committee.
Foil, a 1981 medical graduate
remained at the ECU School of
Medicine and Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital where she did her
five-year residency in general sur-
gery'at the ECU School of Medi-
cine. Afterwards, she began a
teaching career as a clinical in-
structor in general surgery. In
1988, after a fellowship in trauma
surgery at the University of Cali-
fornia at San Diego, she returned
to ECU as an assistant professor
of general surgery and was named
associate medical director for the
trauma service at Pitt County Me-
morial Hospital. In 1991, she be-
came the chief of surgical critical
care at the ECU School of Medi-
cine, and, in 1993, she was granted
tenure.
In addition, Foil conducted re-
search in traffic injury prevention
for the Governor's Highway-
Safety Program, and she currently
works with family violence cen-
ters to develop prevention pro-
grams.
Swink, apsychodramatistwho
graduated with B. A. and M. A. de-
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grees in psychology from ECU
in 1973 and 1978, went on to
intern in the National Institute
of Mental Health Training Pro-
gram in Psychodrama and
Group Psychotherapy at Saint
Elizabeth's Hospital in Wash-
ington, D.C where he helped
mentally ill patients.
Swink later joined Saint
Elizabeth's staff and adapted
techniques to train law enforce-
ment officers to diffuse crisis
situations. His company's cli-
ents include the FBI and the
U.S. Secret Service.
Swink is known to many
ECU football fans for parachut-
ing into Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium with the game ball.
Tipton, a building contrac-
tor, graduated from ECU in
1973 with a B.A. in history and
a minor in urban and regional
planning. Today he is presi-
dent of his own company, MET
Homes, Inc of Raleigh.
Throughout Tipton's career,
he has been a strong advocate
for the housing industry on lo-
cal, state, national, and inter-
national levels. He served as
president of theGreenville-Pitt
County Home Builders Asso-
ciation in 1978, president of the
North Carolina Home Builders
Association in 1980 and presi-
dent of the National Home
Builders Association in 1991.
As past president of the
Greenville-Pitt County Home
Builders Association, Mark met
with presidents Ford, Carter,
Reagan and Bush, and several
members of their cabinets, on
policy relating to the home
building industry.
In addition, the Mark E.
Tipton Greenville-Pi ttCounty
Home Builders Association
Scholarship was established to
honorTipton'scontributionsto
the building profession. The
scholarship provides $1,000 an-
nuallv to assist anTCU student
majoring in construction man-
agement.
COUPON
PURCHAS
OFF
0PEK7DAYS
W LUNCH DINNER CANTINA
WITH All ABC PERMITS
SPECIALS
SPECIALS & MORE SPECIALS
, talog
bnnection
nTVTSION OF UBE
OFF
OFF
AIM i fUW-nnop wi - � - ��
OF REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE
EXPIRES. NOV6
210 E. 5TH ST. M-S 10-6 758-8612
OFF





November 3. 1994
4 The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian
StephflpiyS
a Ziti
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Lassiter, News F.ciitor
Printed an
U�
recycled
paper
Tambra Zu.n. test. V� s Editor
Mark Brett! lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley. Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Shorts Editor
Aaron Wilson. sst. Sports Editor
Steven A. Hill, Option Pane Editor
Stephanie Smith. SMfi'Illustrator
Thomas Brobst. Copy t.ditor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson. Copy Editor
Jon Cawley. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jon Cawley, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
ihanie Mniin. Man imiw�����
rn.sn.cuJ cdtonal ,n C gmo, . fe p,nio- ol te b,on,l tort. I
For more information, call 9r) &B-6366.
Most students and faculty are aware
of the recent vote to dismiss the dean of
the School of Music. While it is an
uncomfortable topic of discussion for
those involved, the dismissal is an issue
that cannot be ignored.
TEC is not aboutto take sides between
who is right, Dr. Tait or the faculty, but
would rather discuss what fuels the
current debate concerning campus
policies of dismissal: unconfirmed
rumors.
There is a lot of ambiguity about why
Dr. Tait was voted out of his position. As
a consequence, argument thus far has
been terribly one sided. From last
Tuesday's East Carolinian wefindthatby
a vote of 30-14 Dr. Tait was found to have
been ineffective in his position. Thaf s it,
just ineffective.
This lack of information has done
nothing but strengthen suspicions and
rumors. Dr. Tait himself has not even
been informed as to why he was
dismissed. With dissemination of
information lacking, those who did not
vote are left without the reasons as to
what the criteria is tobe found ineffective
as a college administrator.
Mentioned in the Tuesday's article
was that while Dr. Tait's was at the helm
attheSchoolofMusic funds from external
agencies increased, the number of friends
of the School of Music substantially
increased and scholarships became more
plentiful.
In addition, more faculty positions
were made available, including
graduate assistants and $200,000 of
funding for cosmetic improvements and
new equipment filtered into the school,
as well as awards from the Alumni
Association and an approving
recommendation from the National
Accreditation Agency.
The reverse side of the issue cannot
be offered of course because other than
the vote that deemed him ineffective,
we have no enumeration of flaws in
leadership, therefore the argument is
clearly uneven.
Do students and faculty have a right
to know more? Perhaps there is a dust
covered legal document buried
somewhere in the archives that allows
ECU from having to tell students and
staff about such controversial issues.
Information may be the currency of
democracy, but apparently this does
not apply to the fiefdom of ECU.
Maybe the upper-crust of ECU'S
aristocracy does not owe anyone an
explanation. If that is the case, then
everyone will continue to question
the logic behind Dr. Tait's
removal.
Squirrels and birds wage war on campus
by Patrick Hinson
I was riding my bike across
campus over the fall break when,
not 10 yards away from me, a
bird with the wingspan of a 747
burst out of the hedges near Fifth
Street and chased three smaller
birds frantically up into the trees,
trailing feathers and leaves as
they went.
This was a clear episode of
predation, a bird of prey going
after a mid-afternoon brunch of
some terrified sparrows making
tracks for the cover of the trees,
and I had front row seats.
The hawk or falcon or
whatever it was looked like it
certainly knew what it was
doing, but I don't think it caught
any of the other birds.
I seemed to have startled it,
ruining its attack for the time
being at least. It flew up to a
branch a few more yards away
and sat sullenly looking down
on me.
I've never seen a hawk or ;
anything like that over our
campus before. It was really big,
a tough looking butt-kicker erf a
bird, and 1 figured it must have
stopped over the campus
because of the lack of people
around, all of them gone home
for the break.
It seems like-all the people
walking around campus the way
we tend to do when we're here
would be too intimidating an
obstacle for a bird like that to
hunt in the area, and would scare
it off.
But then just the other day I
saw the hawk again, and this
tifne over the mall on campus
(the first time had been near the
art building). There was no
doubt that this was the same
bird, anyone who has seen it
will know which one I'm talking
about.
You can't miss it if you see
it. It's obviously the new sheriff
in town.
If a bird like that has staked
its claim on our campus then it
seems the squirrel population is
about to;take a much needed
downfall. The place is
overpopulated.
The squirrels have been
multiplying and living free from
predation around here for a good
long time, and it shows. Pretty
soon we won't be able to step out
of the buildines around here
without stepping on a squirrel.
I could even start to tell about
the time a squirrel kamikazied
me on my bicycle one day on the
mall, but that's another article. I
guess it was just a matter of time
before something like this hawk
found its way here, and 1
wouldn't doubt that its now
having squirrel for breakfast,
lunch and dinner.
That damned hawk must be
living the life of Riley by now.
Before long it'll probably be
going after the smaller people
on campus, so watch your heads
while crossing the mall.
Now I've got nothing against
the local squirrels (nor anything
else to write about, obviously). I
love the little buggers. They're
cute, fun to watch and really
don't bother anything around
here. 1 mean, do you ever get the
feeling that thebirds around here
really try their hardest to crap
directly on our cars?
1 think the squirrels are cooler
about that than the birds are. If
that hawk is hunting just the
birds, well, they've asked for it
more than the squirrels have in
my book.
But I think it's the squirrels
that the hawk has its eyes on,
they're slower, fatter and can
feed the whole family. And let's
face it, we've got too many of
them. That hawk is just nature's
way of keeping everything in
fH� fAORE THINGS CHANGE
��
you KrtOW, YOU
HWE A fcEAU-W
P ATUX0cDE
ABOUT THIS.
WEAR IT Ofc
vie're Mcrr
GOHNA PO IT.
ytffl
X'AA NOT
pUTTl4' ori
THrXT'ftACOAT.
Female condom will help deter AIDS
Patrick Hinson
order. Nothing that we humans
do will ever be as perfect or
efficient as mother nature, try as
we might.
The hawk won't eat all of
them, the squirrels mat is, just
enough to put the fear of God
back into those brainless little
tree hoppers and get the rest
of them back into shape.
They're going to find out
soon that this isn't some
squirrel Riviera anv more.
When the sun comes up in
the morning, they'd better get
their butts out of bed like the
rest of us.
I love birds of prey. I
think, as the Native Ameri-
cans often felt, they can be
very symbolic in their nature.
I mean, you must interpret
the things you see in your
own way, but you have to
have your eyes open to the
world before you can inter-
pret anything, and that's what
the hawk does for me.
It reminds me that there
is more to life than the every-
day grind. At least some of us
are out there hav ing fun, sail-
ing on the wind, riding the
air currents, casting a cold,
dark, high altitude shadow
over a little nut-eater that's
about to steal his last dough-
nut, and I'm glad to see it.
I wasn'teven looking for
that bird, it just flew out of
the bushes next to me and
almost took my head off. I'm
still glad I had the opportu-
nity to see it though, and
hopefully will again.
The freedom that birds
like the hawk and others must
feel everyday is something
that the rest of us, grounded
here on earth, can only look
up into the sky and imagine,
and that's probably the way
it should be.
For years, sexually active
women have taken on the
primary responsibility for
contraception, mainly by using
birth-control pills, diaphragms
or lUDs. Now women can also
stock up on female condoms.
The female condom is
expected to have special appeal
for women who want protection
from contraception and
infection under their own
control rather than the control
of a ma le partner. A large 7- inch
polyurethane bag can be set to
do for women's independence
in the 1990s what the
contraceptive pill did in the
1960s.
This creation marks the first
official recognition of a woman-
controlled method for
protection against sexually
transmitted diseases. The new
female condom can be found at
any drug store and discount
store.
The female condom is made
of polyurethane, a material that
is thin but strong, so it is resistant
to rips an. tears during use.
Polyurethane is a better
conductor of heat than latex; and
it does not have the pinholes
that latex gets. As a barrier
device, the female condom (also
called a vaginal pouch) provides
broader coverage than the male
condom and protects the vulva
from skin-to skin contact. It
shields the entire vaginal and
urethral area from the shaft and
base of the penis.
Each condom costs $2.50
and is available in packets of
three, with a tube of extra
lubricant and a detailed
instructional leaflet.
The female condom has two
flexible rings, one on each end
of a polyurethane sheath. The
sheath is wider than the male
condom, but not longer. To use
the condom, a woman must
squeeze the ring at the closed
end of the sheath and insert it
into her vagina (mis end of the
condom contains "pleats" of
latex thatexpand to fill the upper
vagina after the condom is
inserted).
The other ring, at the open
mouth of the sheath, extends
about an inch beyond the
vaginal opening. During
intercourse, the prelubricated
sheath fills the vagina while the
outer ring lies flat against the
labia, thus shielding the partners
from skin-to-skin contact.
The prelubricated condom
lines the vagina, with the
exterior portion resting between
the woman's labia and base of
the man's penis during
intercourse. The female condom
requires no prescription and it
does not have to be fitted by a
doctor or nurse. It may be used
only once.
Although the female
condom comes with a lubricant,
you should use a spermicide to
ensure maximum protection
against HIV. It is not a wise idea
to use a maleand female condom
simultaneously. The friction
may cause one or both of the
By Angela McCullers
condoms to rip.
The female condom comes
more than a full decade into the
AIDS epidemic. Many women
have found those prevention
messages that stress abstinence,
careful partner selection and
male condom use woefully
inadequate. Whatever may have
changed about condoms and
how they are used, one tiling is
certain: they are no longer an
exclusively male accessory.
Women are now able to buy
female condoms, which have
one major advantage over male
condoms: they are designed as a
liner for the vagina and can be
inserted in advance. That, at
least, will remove the leading
objection both men and women
haveagainstmalecondomsthat
putting them on interrupts
lovemaking. Engaging in
casual unprotected sex is
dangerous, and it could be
deadly. AIDS is now the leading
cause of death among women
aged 20 to 40 years old. Up to 50
percent of women are now
infected through sex with men.
The female condom in not
all we, as females, wish for, but
it is better than no protection at
all. When used correctly and
consistently, condoms are
highly effective; when used
otherwise, they are not. We need
to educate o urselves as much as
possible about some of the basic
facts about diseases and how to
reduce the risk of both acquiring
it and, if you have it,
transmitting it.
Letters to the Editor�
To the editor:
I am a graduate student in geography
who often needs to get into Brewster
building on Sundays to get some work done
in the geography computer lab. However,
in order to get into Brewster, I have to call
the campus police to come let me in. Once
my papers have been checked and the
officer is pretty sure that I'm not a terrorist,
he or she tells me I'm free to cross the
border and let's me in the building
Consider this phone conversation that 1
had with the campus police on Sunday,
Oct. 30 (on the emergency phone outside
Christenbury):
Me: "Hello, I need to get into Brewster
building
Police: "Uh.why?"
Me. "I'm a graduate student and I need
to do some work
Police: (to another person on his end)
"Are we letting people in the buildings
today?, .(to me) Do you have your ID with
you?
Me: "Yes
Police: "Okay, wait out front.
When an officer arrived to let me in the
building, I asked her why Brewster was
locked on the weekends. She said that they
didn't want anybody breaking in and
tearing things up, and that all of campus
was that way. w
1 attended two other universities during��
my undergraduate days: Virginia Tech and
James Madison, both of which are large-
and prestigious schools (go back where I -
came from, right?). The police at those two
schools didn't treat students like they were
criminals who didn't belong in the academic
buildings, which were seldom locked.
Granted, there are people who may, if given
the opportunity, enter an building and
vandalize it. However, this hypothetical
person is locking out 18,000 other people
every weekend who are here for an
education!
Maybe I'm wrong. Maybe the Raleigh
newspaper is right and the police are
justified, since all we students want to do is
party and wreck stuff. Of course, if the
building access policies are dictated from
on high weren't so ridiculous, maybe it
would be easier to be like our neighbors in
Durham and Chapel Hill and study a
little.
David C. Terry
Geology
Graduate Student
I
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-TheEastCaroliniaiv
November 3. W94
Classifieds
The East Carolinian a
For Rent
For Rent
For Sale
Help Wanted
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Nou Taking Leases for
1 bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share a two- bedroom, 1 bath apt
for S175 a month and 12 utilities.
Available 1st December! Call 321-
0791
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA CARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
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month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
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2899-2901 East 5th Street
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"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
I T. or Tommy Williams
756-781 5758-7436
"J
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RESEARCH Hf ORMATKWi
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800-351-0222
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SALE! SALE! SALE There only 2
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1992 SUZUKI KATANA 600 MO-
TORCYCLE Creat condition! Purple
and black- 2 Double Protected hel-
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Call 830-0778
FOR SERIOUS STUDENTS AND
FACULTY ONLY: Large furnished
room in pn ate home near campus
and purple bus stop (Harris at 10th
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S230. Available immediately. Female
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BRAND NEW PAVED PRIVATE
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campus and downtown. Will rent
by year or semester. Call 756-1252 or
5o-6567
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED in Jan. to share a 3 bed-
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ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
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ROOMMATE WANTED: 2 room
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ROOMMATE WANTED Carriage
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ROOMMATE NEEDED: looking
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HOUSE TO SHARE- couplestu-
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OAKMONTSQUARE-2bdrm apt
available for 8 months subleasing.
One person needed to share or 2
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FOR YOUR USED,
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ALEXANDER JULIAN
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414 EVANS ST. DOWNTOWN
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
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TRANSCRIBING: Oral histories, in-
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FRATERNITIES AND SORORI-
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SKI RESORT JOBS- hiring for winter
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YOUTH BASKETBALL COACHES:
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time vouth basketball coaches for
the winter vouth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
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young people ages 9-18, in basketball
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Salary rates start at $4.25 per hour. For
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ATTENTION STUDENTS: I am extra
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PART TIME CASHIER NEEDED at
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DEPENDABLE PERSON needed to
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week. Experience, local references,
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SALESMANAGEMENTOPPORTU-
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HEY! to the two Martians 1 met down
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Greek Personals
DELTA CHI PLEDGEStlie brothers
would like to iommen.1 v'ou on doing
very well so far. Keep ilfjhegood work.
THANKS IO NICOLE FEDERINKO
for a great I lomecoming weekend- you
did a great job' Also, thanks to Criss)
and Mary Ellen vou guvs are great'
1 ove our Sigma sisters
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA would like to
thank Ashley Brooksand KurtStansfield
for representing us on Homecoming,
Court. You will always be King and;
Qitfeen in our eyes!
"CONGRATULATIONS KRISTEN
LOTT on your engagement1 We are all
so excited for you. Love your Alpha Phi
sisters.
ALPHA PHI AND DATES The night
started out early at 5 on the dot- Amy,
Livia's and Courtney's was the spot. On
to the Equestrian center we went- no
greater timewasever spent. I. inedances,
music, photographs and more, we all
were sad whenitwas time to head forthe
door. The night was lots of fun- look
forward to the times to come.
MONICA SWEET AND LARA WILL-
IAMS keep up the hard work! It will all
pay off soon. Love your Alpha Phi sis-
ters.
PI LAMBDA PHI- congratulations on
your charter. Good luck! We're behind
you all the way. Uve Pi Delta sisters and
pledges.
PI DELTA invites everyone to come out
to Mon. night football at the Elbo.8:30pm
Nov. 7.
QUEEN WENDE PETERS- Thank you
so much for representing us well. Con-
gratulations on being crowned Ms
Homecoming Queen We are so happy
for you. Love your sisters and pledgesof
Alpha Xi Delta.
I
Personals
LOOKING FOR CHEAP FUN? Ex-
citement? A chance for prizes? Paly
Bush Buck Global Treasure Hunt.
ON HALLOWEEN NIGHT, strangers
met on the sight, in downtown
Greenville, the secret dates were spilled.
Thanks to all dates, the mixer turned out
great! The sisters of AOPI
HOMECOMING WEEKEND wassuch
a blast. It was a disappointment to see it
pass. From the tailgating to the dance to
preview at a glance Thanks Melody
your plans were a success! Love your
AOPI sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS AMY
JOHNSON on becoming lavailiered.
Love your AOPI sisters.
DELTA SIGS- Get ready to rock the
foundation on Friday night.
Announcements
TECHNOLOC.Y IN THE CLASS-
ROOM
Tuesday November 8, 1994 in the
Multipurpose Room at Mendenhall
Student Center; sponsored by Aca-
demic Computing. With a valid FCU
ID and several 3 1 IT diskettes, fac-
ulty, staff, and students will be able
to recive a copy of PC Plus or Tincan.
Some topics: Virtual Reality, Music
based Software, SPSS for Windows,
CAD
REGISTRATION FOR GENERAL
mi I FC.F STUDENTS
General College students should con-
tact their advisers the week of No-
vember 7-11 to make arrangements
for academic advising for Spring Se-
mester 1995. Early registration will
begin November 14 and end Novem-
ber 18.
FCU GOSPEL CHOIR
The ECU Gospel Choir wil be spon-
soring APOLLO NIGHT on Novem-
ber 8,1994 Everyone is invited. The
prceisasfollows.GospelChoir Mem-
bers: SI .00, Non-Gospel Choir Mem-
bers: S2.00. and the Event will be held
at Hendrix Theatre. The show will
start at 7:00pm.
SOCIAL V QRJCCR1MJNAL
ji iQTirr m xKF-VP MEETING
Qualified S.W and C.J. Applicants
who missed the September 13, meet-
ing mav attend a make-up session on
November 3, in Ragsdale 218 at
4.00pm
ANN1JAL TURKEY TRQTJLLjN
, let ready to run or walk during the
annual Turkey Trot Run on Novem-
ber 16 at 4.00pm. If you are planning
on participating you will need to at-
tend a meeting on November 15 at
5:00pm in Bio 103. For additiona in-
formation call Recreational Services
at 328-6387.
NATURAL LIFE EVENT
Come for the boats, beaches, bingo
and Jimmy Buffett Ballads during
Jimmy Buffett Bingo on November 18
at 8:00pm inChristenbury Gym. Bring
a can of food to benefit the homeless
for admittance into this Natural Life
Event. Call Recreational Services at
328-6387 for more information.
LATINO FIESTA
The international Student Association
will be hosting its annual Latino Fi-
esta Saturday November 12, 1994 at
6:30pm in Mendenhal Student Cen-
ter, Multi-Purpose Room. There will
be a variety of food, dancing and en-
tertainment from South American. For
tickets and more information call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788.
AMFR1CAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Come and Join us for another AMA
meeting on November 3 at 3:30pm in
GCB 1031. Our Guest Speaker will be
Mr. Bill Bowen of Bowen Cleaners.
He will be speaking on how Market-
ing and Advertising can expand your
business.
HCLLlDAYjyELLFEST
Holiday Well-Fest: Fitness, Food &
Fun. All East Carolina students, fac-
ulty and staff are invited to the Holi-
day Well-Fest on Thursday Novem-
ber 10, from 10am to 3pm in the Mul-
tipurpose Room at Mendenhall. There
will be live music healthy snacks,
games and plenty of information on
various health related topics. Formore
information, call the FCU Office ot
Health Promotion and Weil-Being at
328-6793.
APPRENTICESHIPS ANDJN-
TFRNSH1PS IN PUBLIC TRANS-
PORTATION
Ms. Anna Nalevanko, representative
of the NC Department of Transporta-
tion will provide information on ap-
prenticeship and internship programs
available to graduating seniors and
graduate students on Monday, No-
vember 7. Sponsored by the Career
Services office, the presentation will be
held in Brewster C-203 at 1:00pm. Stu-
dents interested in gaining experience
in public transportation are invited,
especially those majoring in urban
planning and public or business ad-
ministration.
FCUSCHOm OF MUSIC EVENTS
All Music Events at AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall and free to all.
THURS NOV 3 - PERCUSSION
PLAYERS, Harold Jones, Director;
8:00pm � FRI NOV 4 � STUDENT
RECITALS, Ashel.ee Bonham
Gahagan, cello, junior recital; and
Megan C.rav, violin, sophomore recital;
7:00pm �Tim Odom, trumpet, senior
recital fcOOpm � SAT NOV 5 � SE-
NIOR RECTTAl Chris McCarney, per-
cussion and Rebecca Robertson, horn,
7:00pm � MON NOV 7 � JAZZ EN-
Sl MM E B, I'eter Mills, Director,
8:00pm
SOCIAL WORKCRIMLNAL
JUSTICEAPPLICATION DEAD-
I INI
students interested in applying lor the
Fall 1994orearlySpring 1995 semesters
need tosubmitapplicationsby Novem-
ber 8, to Ragsdale 104-B
STUDY ABROADSCJiQi.ARSHlP
If you are planning to study abroad
next semester, or are an international
student at FCU, the deadline for the
Rivers Foreigh Study Scholarship is
November 11,1994. Pick up your appli-
cation in the International Programs
office on 9th St Behind McDonalds.
Good Luck!
SJJJDNiTRAVELS
The Fall issue of the magazine, Student
Travels, is now in the office ot Interna-
tional Programs on 9th St. Behind
McDonalds. Come by to receive your
frre copy and also to find out more
about studev and travel abroad!
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students
$2.00
Non-Students $3-00
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
CAR�GJVEJLSJiPPQRT GROUP
A support group for persons respon-
sible for the care of an older or dis-
abled adult will meet at St. James
United Methodist Church, 2000 East
SithStC.reenvilleat7:30pmonTues-
day November 8, 1494. For more in-
formation, pleasecall Freda Wilkins at
758- 5432 orSusanReddingat 758-4622.
PRFJH a NKSG1V1NG PROGRAM
Sunday November 13 8pm Free.
Surprising facts your parents never
told you about American Jewish His-
tory. Thanksgiving refreshments will
be served Temple Beyt Shalom,
(.reenville. Rte 33 E (just beyond the
cemeteries) For additional info and
19MMUCQTjRJUYER
FOUNDATIONQJilSTER-RQAST
Saturday. November 19 - 6pm to 12am
- Washington Civic Center. Oyster
Jammin' with Jerry Thomas and the
Thomas Brothers Oysters, Oysters,
Oysters and more Oysters, Chili and
cheesebread from Steamers of Wash-
ington. $25 Members. $35 non-mem-
bers, $40 at the door.Children under 12
- half price For more information call
the PTRF (919) 946-7211 or 446-9492.
i
PICASO
Picaso, the Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization, is sponsoring an HIV
AIDS � information line every
Wednesday night from 6-9pm.
Anyone with any questionabout HIV
AIDS or related issues is em ouraged
�� 118.30-1060�
Announcements
Any organization may use the
Announcements Section of The
East Carolinian to list activities
and events open to the public
two times free of charge. Due
to the limited amount of space,
The East Carolinian cannot
guarantee the publication of
announcements.
Deadlines
Displayed advertisements
may be canceled before
10a.m. the day prior to
publication; however, no
refunds will be given
For more
information
call 328-6366.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesdays edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition





PHOEBE
BY STEPHANIE SMITH NCKO'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
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November
W4
The East Carolinian1
jlw �QSt Carolinian
Lifestyle
Halloween recaptures past glories
Shannon Gay
Phcto by Dale Williamson
Nouveau witch Susan Cribb shows how even standard costumes
can be made unique. Many originals haunted Fifth Street Monday.
Staff Writer
Greenville's annual Halloween
celebration took place Monday
night. The festivities began in
svnch with ECU's Homecoming
over the weekend, but the real
party was attended by hordes of
students in costumes and lots of
police on Monday night.
Halloween in the past at ECU
was a very big deal; people from
surrounding colleges a,id border-
ing states came to Greenville for
the momentous occasion. Unfor-
tunately, the men and women in
blue put a stop to it all.
Eversincethe Halloween when
over a hundred students got ar-
rested, the bars closed and All
Hallow's Eve was all but put to
rest, students have tried to bring
the magic back to Downtown.
The bars reopened in '92, and
the tradition here tried to con-
tinue. Slowly the occasion was
again becoming more than .1 night
of trick or treat tor those under
age 10.
Fifth Street was blocked off and
tilled with students in costume
running from acquaintance to ac-
quaintance bellowing with laugh-
ter at the costumes everyone was
wearing.
The best part about going
downtown on Halloween night is
seeing all the people in costume.
There are, 1
uirse, the standard
vampires and witches, and this
year there were a multitude of
people dressed as the Crow. But
it's always worth herding through
all the intoxicated kiddies to see
the reallv imaginative costumes.
This year, rnv award for most
imaginative and humorous cos-
tume went to the guy dressed as
a one night stand. He had a lamp
shade on his head, a table around
his waist and a sign around his
neck reading "one night stand
On his waist table there was a
high-heeled shoe, a condom, an
alarm clock and an empty cham-
pagne glass. His best addition
was the bra draped across his
lamp-shade hat. His costume was
obviously well thought out, pre-
pared and, most importantly,
original.
Also impressive was the guy in
the Ronald Reagan costume and
his secret service agents. They
were pushing their way through
the crowd dressed in suits, sun-
glasses and earphones, forcing
the crowd to make way for
Ronnie.
Honorable mention goes to Ba-
nana Man, who was equipped
w ith a banana mask, super hero
cape and a rotten banana weapon
in his hand.
Latino Festival promises more
than 'just tacos and tequila'
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
Call it "Mexico in Mendenhall
Thanks to the International
Student Association (ISA), ECU
studentscanenjov the Latinocul-
ture without ever leaving home
by attending the annual Latino
Festival.
The Latino Festival is one of
the many ways the ISA brings
cultural enrichment to the ECU
campus. This year the festival wi 11
be held from 6:30 p.m. to 11:00
p.m. on Nov. 12 in the
Mendenhall Multi-Purpose
Room. There will be music, danc-
ing and authentic Latino food for
everyone to enjoy.
A I) from Raleigh is sched-
uled, as well as dance groups from
Panama and Raleigh. The dances
are authentic and tun to watch,
and audience participation is en-
couraged.
After all, the purpose of the
festival is to have fun while learn-
ing about the Latin American cul-
ture
"We wanted to show people
that the Latino culture is more
than just tacos and tequila said
Brian Perry, a member of the ISA.
What goes into the planning of
a festival like this one? According
to Perrv, a lot of hard work, dedi-
cation and tun.
I he ISA tries to get the L atino
community in Greenville as in-
volved as possible.
Members of the community
help by pr paring food and by
advertising.
In addition, fivers are posted in
local restaurants specializing in
Spanish or Mexican cuisine, in all
the dorms and on bulletin boards
across the campus. Many of the
Spanish teachers here at ECU are
involved in the festival in one way
or another.
Tickets can be purchased at the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall.
The cost for ISA members and
children 10 and under is S3.00.
The cost for ECU students is
S5.00 and for the general public is
S7.00.
Photo courtesy ECU Student Union
Feast your eyes on this.
Jim and Franceine Rees play the roles of Lord and
Lady of the Manor for the Madrigal Dinners, a holiday
feast in the Old English manner. The dinners, an
annual event on campus, will be held Dec. 1-4. For
ticket information, contact the Central Ticket Office at
328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Wings and Week disappoint downtown
Trent Giardino
Staff Writer
(Restaurant
(Re
mew
People that like to pay atten-
tion to small details may have
noticed that the downtown res-
taurant Filibuster's has recently
had a change in management. The
new restaurant that replaced it is
BW-3. BW-3 is short for Buffalo
Wild Wings and Week. Now, I sup-
pose some are wondering what on
earth Week might be, as did I be-
fore entering the establishment.
Thinking it would be something
interesting, I was disappointed to
find out that it is just a fancy name
tor a salty hamburger bun. How-
ex er, the folks over at BW-3 speak
highly of this bun, claiming that
its ery tasty.
I he disappointment over the
meaning of Week was only the
beginning of my experience. BW-3
Student Center fights flu
Heather Zophy
Student Health Service
November is here and tem-
peratures are constantly
changing. Leaves are falling
and Jack Frost is nipping at
our noses. This time of the year
is loved by so many (football,
fires in the fireplace, holiday
spirit), yet dreaded by others
(stress, illness, bills).
Most of us are
aware that the 4
changing
seasons
bring
prime
time cold
and flu
season.
Most
upper res-
piratory ill-
nesses are
due to viral in-
fections. Other than
receiving the flu vaccine
(which still doesn't guarantee
that you will not get the infec-
tion), there really is no way to
prevent these self-limiting ill�
r isses from occurring. Rest
and time will be the best
method of treatment. Some
medications may aid in dis-
continuing discomforts or ail-
ments resulting from the com-
mon cold. There are some do's
and don'ts to consider when
treeing a common cold.
b avoid chilling. Do drink
plenty of fluids, especially
juices, warm drinks and broths
to help reduce fever, cough and
congestion and loosen up se-
cretions. Do get a lot of rest,
and sleep with your head el-
evated on pillows if sinus drain-
age is present. Do
gargle with warm
salt water to
help reduce
the pain
and swell-
ing found
with a sore
m throat
(you may
want to use
ry. a vaporizer).
Do not use
alcohol or
drugs, because
these lower your
body's resistance to colds. Do
not inhale irritating substances
such as smoke, hair spray, de-
odorant or chemicals. These
substances irritate the tiny hairs
that work to clean out mucus
and dust from the breathing
passages. Do not take hot show-
ers or baths � extreme heat can
See HEALTH page 9
is set up almost like a fast food
restaurant with only one menu
Scotch-taped to the counter by the
register. A fter perusing the choices,
I decided to go with the grilled
chicken and cheese on Week (I had
to try it). The limited selection of
items on the menu forced my girl-
friend to go elsewhere to find some-
thing to eat, but I still had an open
mind. At BW-3, you order the food,
they call your name over the inter-
com, you go get the food and seat
yourself.
As 1 waited, I glanced around
the place, taking in all I could. The
restaurant seemed much smaller
on the inside than it appeared be-
fore I went in. The bar, which
claimed to have 20 different beers
on tap only had five or six.
Granted BW-3 has just opened,
but the present set-up leaves
something(s) to be desired. Most
of the time when a new restaurant
opens, they try to have a nice at-
mosphere, but not BW-3. The deco-
rations were nothing more then
small posters of buffalo herds
tacked on the walls with thumb-
tacks. There were also numerous
televisions with that classy show
M.A.S.H playing (what fun).
BW-3 has no ambiance to speak ot.
Well, maybe the ambiance of
Dennv's, but at least someone
serves your meal to you at Denny's.
Finally, after a 20-minute wait, I
heard my mispronounced name
ring through the room. I went up
to the counter only to find that
they had gotten my very simple
order wrong. For my inconve-
nience, they gave me some cold
chicken wings for free (gee,
thanks).
I had enough, and I wanted out
of there as soon as possible. 1 found
a seat upstairs and began to in-
spect my order to see it anything
else was missing. By this time, my
girlfriend returned and had al-
ready eaten in the time that it took
for me to even get my food.
At this point, I did not care any-
more. I was hungry and wanted
something good to eat. Since ev-
erything else went wrong, I as-
sumed the food was going to be
horrible. However, the chicken
sandwich was quite good. Perhaps
the wings would have been better
iftheyhadn'tbeencold. Asavvhole,
the food was okay, but definitely
not worth the wait, or the hassle.
Week turned out to be nothing
more then a salty version of a Kai-
ser bun, but it went with the
chicken splendidly.
Perhaps if 1 had goneatanother
time, the experience would have
been more appealing. But the wait
was too long, the atmosphere less
than aesthetically pleasing,and the
low variety of menu items made
this visit to BW-3 an unpleasant
one.
Granted, the small sample of
food I received was pretty good,
but I can get a good chicken sand-
wich almost anywhere.
Kerbdog
Kerbdog
Even though all members ot
Kerbdog are Irish, their new self-
titled debut release is not some-
thing you'll enjoy if you're a big
L'2 tan I his grittv, raw-sounding
dis is their first major label re-
lease, kerbdog was signed to their
current label early last year after
winning a contract with their Nu2
demo on which they recorded
originals as well as covers by
Husker Du ("New Day Rising")
and a track by Pailhead, a collabo-
ration of Fugai's Ian MacKaye
and Ministrv 's 1 Jourgenson.
To generate this release, the
band left Ireland and came to the
U.S. last year to team up with
producer lack Fndino, who has
done production work for
Soundgarden, Nirvana and
Mudhoney. It is easy to hear in
their music how heavily -influ-
enced this young, Irish band was
by mid '80s American indepen-
dent rock
1 his disc is slow getting started,
but that is theonly fault I find in it
1 he first tew tracks, "End of
Green "Dr Riser and "Dead
Anyway" are boring and, quite
frankly, lack originality. We've
heard this style of power chords
and backing vocals before. These
cuts remind me of the "commer-
cial " alternative style of music that
has become so mainstream nowa-
days. That's about where the simi-
larities to the mainstream end.
After the first four tracks, it's
like I put in a whole different disc.
On "Earthworks" and "Dummy
Crusher I th night my speakers
were going to explode. These two
are my favorite cuts by far; these
break the mold of the popular,
grungv kind of sound.
"Earthworks" is a healthy combi-
nation of post-punk ancestry with
an angry force. In particular, lead
vocalist Cormac Battle displays
his wide range of vocal skills on
this track The introon this song is
a thumping bass solo which slows
See KERB page 9
COMING
ATMTIONS
Appearingsoon tonouredification
and amusement:
Thursday, Nov. 3
I Pt
at the Attic
nik metal)
Speed
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
action)
FREE!
Friday, Nov. 4
Flla and
Psvcho Sonic Cindy
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Six Million Dollar Band
at the Attic
(fsco)
My Fair Lady
at Wright Auditorium
(musical)
Speed
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(action)
FREE!
The Connells
at the Ritz
in Raleigh
(alternative)
Saturday, Nov. 5
The Amateurs
at the Attic
(reggae)
Priaprism
and Centaur
at O'Rock's
(heavy rock)
Speed
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(action)
FREE!
Tuesday, Nov. 8
Frank King
at Club 7:57
in Mendenhall
(comedy)
7:57 p.m.
FREE!
Bonnie Raitt
and Bruce Hornsby
Charlotte Coliseum
(blues rock)
Wednesday, Nov. 9
ECU Symphony Orchestra
Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Matt Reidv
and Tim Rollins
at the Attic
(comedy)
CD Review
System
This box holds the key
to understanding the
devious ways of our CD
reviewers. Enjoy!
Pathetic
Lame
k Pretty
9 m Good
mmm m'BRILLIANT






3The East Carolinian
November 3, 1W4
Shawshank redeems Kingfs literary talents
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Two noteworthy realizations
came to me after watching The
Shaivshank Redemption. One was
that Stephen King, who wrote the
novella "Rita Hayworth and the
Shawshank Redemption" on
which me film was based, may
vet be remembered as a great
writer. T he second realization was
that Frank Darabont, who makes
his directonMdebut with The
Sltawsliank Red motion and who
also wrote the screenplay, did a
remarkable ob ot adapting the
story tor the screen.
The Shawshank RedemytionteWs
the story of a friendship spanning
2D years between two prison in-
mates at Shawshank prison in
Maine. Andv Dufrene (Tim
Robbins) enters Shawshank ac-
cused of the murder of his wife
and her boyfriend. Upon entering
the concrete walls of the prison,
Andv meets Red (Morgan free-
man), who has already served hi
years of his lifetime sentence.
Slowly a friendship begins to de-
velop between these two inmates,
Andv (whoclaims innocence) and
Red (who sardonically boasts that
he is the onlv innocent man in
Shawshank).
Andv gradually learns how to
acclimate to prison life. He uses his
skills from the outside world as ,i
banker to help guards deal with
their taxes 1 ventualh Andv comes
to the attention ot Warden Norton
(Bob Gunton) who decides to use
ndv's skills for his own better-
ment
Even prison story needs fig-
ures ot authority to hate and The
Shawshank Redemption provides
those characters in the forms ot
Warden Norton and his sadistic
guard Captain Hadley (Clancy
Brown).
Norton tells the new inmates to
Shawshank that he believes in two
things, "discipline and the Bible.
At Shawshank he continues,
"you'll receive both Captain
Hadley takes perverse delight in demonstrate the triumph of brains
breaking up fights and punishing over brawn using somewhat
(as opposed to mere disciplining) cliched devices. Andy's intelli
the inmates. At first Andv avoids gence not only makes his stay in
conflict with authority but eventu- prison more comfortable, but those
alls'he butts right into them. same brains lead to trv ultimate
And also ha problems with a
local group ot convicts who have
chosen him to be their sexual part-
ner. Ihev repeatedly gang rape
Andv until he unearths a way ot
solving the problem forever.
The way Andv solves his prob-
lem with the rapists (as well as
how he uses his skills to his advan-
tage throughout the film) provides
one of the two main focuses of The
Shawshank Redemption. Stephen
King has found a novel way to
redemption ot the story's title.
1 venthe lichesofprisonsto-
ries seem somehow fresh in the
hand t Km; and Darabont.
See REDEMPTION page 9
"Sandwich Shop"
215E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
316S.W. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC
"(919)756-7171
See New York on a tight budget
EVERY THURSDAY IS TACO NIGHT
6 P.M. till close
2 Great Tacos for $.99
WITH PURCHASE OF A MEDIUM DRINK
(TACOS AT DOWNTOWN LOCATION ONLY)
Meredith Langley
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The ECU Student Union is
sponsoring theannual trip to New
York City, and thedeadline to sign
up has been extended until Nov.
9.
Carol Woodruff from the Mar-
keting Department says that the
trip gives students who aren't go-
ing home for Thanksgiving an op-
portunity to have a good time and
meet new people. It also gives
those who want to do something
fun and travel around New York a
chance to do so for a very good
price and no structured activities.
So far there has been much suc-
ess with this trip and its planning.
Two buses are already filled and
there are still somewhere between
25 and 30 seats left.
Buses will depart from the
Mendenhall south parking lot on
Tuesday, Nov. 22 at 11:50 p.m. and
arrive in New York at the Edison
Hotel at approximately 12:00 p.m.
on Wednesday,November23. From
the time of arrival and check-in you
are free to roam about New York
City for three nights. The group de-
parts for Greenville Saturday night
November 27 and arrive in the
iv'endenhall parking lot around noon
on Sunday.
The prices for this trip are more
than reasonable, thev are iaw-
droppingh low. lTie price for one
person in a room with three other
people is SI40 , while the price tor a
three person occupancy room is$165
. The prices tor two occupancy and
one occupancy rooms are SiL'l' apiece
and S3tH) apiece. This price includes
NOW OPEN
Full Service Nail & Tanning Salon
�Wolff Beds
�Bodv Waxing
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Sat Nov. 5th
Specials:
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1 Month unlimited $25.00
Manicures $8.00
'Buy Now Use Later
103 Eastbrook Dr.
MonFri. 9-7 Sat. 9-2
bus fare and room at the Edison l lo-
tel. Food and entertainment money
will be all you need to get by in the
Big Apple.
The trip is open to all students,
faculty and others tied to ECU. For
more information or to makearrange-
ments to go. contact the ECU ticket
office before the Nov. 9 deadline be-
tween the hours of 8:30 a sn. and 630
to pick up a reservation application
�To the Mighty Zombie
Army of Lifestyle:
Just a reminder, my
pets.we have a
meeting today at
4:30 P.M. IN MY
evil lair.
Attend or die!
ECU RUGBY
WANTS YOU
1994 STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS VS.
UNC-CHAPEL HILL
November 5, 1994
AT 2:30 PM
BEHIND ALLIED HEALTH
(NEAR R.O.C. TOWER)
THE WINNER ADVANCES TO THE
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENT
COME SHOW YOL'R SUPPORT
AND SEE WHERE EOOTBALL BEGAN!
?SPONSORED BY DIVISION OF CLUB SPORTS
ADVERTISE) tTEM POUCV: Eacr, of O
eacn rogc Store, except as specif i
offer vou vour cr.o'ce of a comparal
wnicn will entitle vou to purchase tr
veoor co'jpoi" will De accepted per
COPYRIGHT 1994 - THE KROCER CO
DAV. NOVEMBER 5. 1994 IN CREENV
DEALERS
esr- advertu
?c cer i itc '� � ' availaDle for sale
m advertised e"1" we wiii
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Wed 9th
Matt Reidy &
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Full Service Pharmacy Available
Always Good. Always Fresh.
ays Kroger.
Your Tot3lVdlue Food Store.
r
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
CAFFEINE FREE CLASSIC,
r
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola Classic
6-Pack 12-oz. cans
$�2S
Mm Limit Four 6
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mm Arliiitinnal Pl
Limit Four 6-Paks
with $10.00
Additional Purchase
CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP OR
Campbell's
Tomato Soup
10.75-02.
2sm
l
ORIGINAL
Nabisco Premium n jJC
Saltines 16-oz. mwrnw
lays 00
Potato Chips 6-oz. mwrnw
Assorted $409
Kroger Milk paper ctn. m
Keiioggs $499
Corn Flakes is-oz. m
7N THE DELI DEPT"
FROM OUR BAKERY J�
Cinnamon 53F
ROllS 6t. mW
KEEBLER REDUCED FAT M QQ
vanilla wafers 9-oz. I
FROZEN, ASSORTED VARIETIES
TOTINO'S 4$EZ
Pizza Rolls 7.5-oz. Sf
KRAFT
Macaroni & Cheese
Dinner
7J5-OZ.
09
FREE ADM witf
Platform Shoes or BeirhelrrirapS
Bottoms or a Medallion at v
Gloria Caynor JQaSt 2 JflClffiS Wi(ie til 10)30
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Pappalos
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FROZEN ASSORTED FLAVORS, PILLSBURY
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German Bologna
HILLSHIRE FARMS
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11.5-OZ.
SATURDAY 5TH
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TUESDAY 11TH
1-lb
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REE ADM for Ladies
& Over Until 11 pm
5-oz





November 3. 1994
The East Carolinian 9
Egypt swings a heavy Saul Hammer
Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Egypt, out of Norfolk, Virginia,
has just released their first full
length album, titled Soul Hammer.
They've played up and down the
east coast for the last couple of
years, and their sound has defi-
nitely changed over time.
The best way I could describe
Egypt's latest release would be to call
it a soul metal album. Soul Hammer is
pretty heaw, but I wouldn't call it
melodic and I don't know if anybody
can honestly call it a "groove inten-
sive album as their press release
claims. But it's a relatively easy al-
bum to listen to.
The lyrics are simple and very
easy to understand. Most of the songs
arc pretty predictable. But on certain,
very rare, occasions they slow down
and show some versatility. There is
definitely a market for what they're
doing. I'd like to say they have a
original sound, but they really don't.
It seems like Egypt isbetter-suited
as a live band than as a studio band.
Their music does contain a lot of
intensity. It might be more impres-
sive seeing them perform these songs
live and they're playing the Attic
tonight. They're scheduled to sup-
port the album with tours in the fall,
winter and summer.
IF YOU WANT TO MAKE IT
IN THE REAL WORLD,
SPEND A SEMESTER
IN OURS.
Walt Disney World Co. representatives will be on campus to
present an information session for Undergraduate Students on
the WALT DISNEY WORLD Spring '95 College Program.
WHEN: WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16 vi 7:00PM
WHERE: RAWL 130
Attendance at Ibis presentation is required to
interview for the Spring '95 College Program.
Interviews will be Thursday, November 17.
The following majors are encouraged
to attend: Business, Communication,
RecreationLeisure Studies, and Theatre
Drama. All majors are welcome.
We will also be recruiting graduates
who are conversational in French for
positions in EuroDisney�.
For more information contact
Cooperative Education
Phones 757- 6979
REDEMPTION
Photo Courtesy o? Cel'er Door Enterainment
Egypt brings a soul metal sound to the Attic tonight.
From p. 8
KERB
From p. 7
down to be the tempo for the
whole song. Make sure you
buckle vour seatbelt for
'Dummy Crusher" or you'll
get thrown from your chair. It
is the most explosive track on
Kerbdog's release.
Overall, this disc is definitely
worth giving a once-over lis-
tening. Though it is slow get-
ting started, it picks up mid-
way through and finishes
strong.
-Brandon
Waddell
n
Where studentt spend a semester getting
ready for Ibe not oflbeir Uvet.
e Tbc Wak DiACT Co. to cqmj opportunity anptow
King truly has a gift for creating
memorable characters in his better
tales.
Although he has a huge library
of titles, much of King's best work
is contained in his shorter pieces
like "Rita Hayworth and the
Shawshank Redemption" and
"The Body from which the film
Stand By Me (still the gold stan-
dard by which to compare film
versions of King's work) was made
Though King's horror sells well, it
is his tamer work that may yet find
a niche in American literature.
Frank Darabont had to convince
the studio heads that he was the
right man to direct The Shawshank
Redemption. A writer by trade,
Darabont felt he had the requisite
directorial
project. Th
kills to challenge this
validity of Darabont's
confidence is now recorded on cel-
luloid. He directs l'he Shaiosltank
Redemption with the perfect
complement of restrained force
and muted sentimentality.
He never allows the scenes of
brutalitv to get too brutal and he
never allows the scenes of high
emotion to get too emotional. Yet
Darabont manages to restrain his
tale onlv enough to gently tell his
tale without removing any of its
power.
Andv and Red serve as the sec-
ond focus of the film and Darabont
effectively carries King's ideas of
friendship to the screen. Comrade-
ship is a theme frequently em-
ployed by Kind and rarelv aseffec-
tively than in this storv. The
Sliaxvshank Redemption resonates
with the harmonious chords of the
true friendship shared by Andy
and Red. Like the film itself, their
friendship builds gradually to a
satisfying relationship that en
riches both men's lives.
I est the actors be forgotten, Tim
Robbins deserves mention for his
quiet role. He effectively portrays
the pain of Andy without wearing
h is heart on his sleeve. But Morgan
Freeman shines above all other
actors in the film. He once again
shows his amazing ability to cap-
ture the soul of his character.
Much like he did for his role in
Driving Miss Daisy, Freeman cre-
ates a character who will be long
remembered bv those who ex-
perience the wonder of The
Shawshank Redemption.
Tht, friendship between
Andv'tincr Red and the intelli-
gence arid wit of Andv should
prove strong enticements to see
The Shawshank Redemption.
The name of Stephen King
will hopefully begin to be asso-
ciated with quality stories and
pictures as much as for his often
subpar film adaptations. And
hopefully this will not be the
last film Mr. Darabont directs.
On a scale of one to ten, The
Shawshank Redemption rates an
eight.
HEALTH
From p. 7
cause dizziness or fainting.
The ECU Student Health Cen-
ter offers a wide variety of over-
Hurry on
down to
The East Carolinian
Account Executive Wanted!
Flexible Hours, Great Experience, Money!
The East Carolinian is looking for an Account Executive'to sell advertising
for the newspaper. The hours are flexible and the job does pay. If you
are interested please go to the student publications building, second floor,
fill out an application and give it to the secretary. For more information
call 328-6366 and ask for Chris Warren.
Applicants must be registered students with at least a 2.0
GPA. Application and resume are required.
aie Medication Clinic
in the pharmacy area
the-counter medications
through the Self-Care Medica-
tion Clinic. All ot these drugs
are provided at a reduced cost.
The Self-(
is locatec
within the Student Health Cen-
ter. No appointment is required.
All students have to do is fill out
the fuchsia sheet of paper lo-
cated outside the pharmacy and
checkoff the desired medication.
A list of symptom is provided
on the self-medication sheet and
the name of the drug is given for
each of the symptoms. The fuch-
sia sheet also contains thecostof
the medication so students know
exactly w hat they a re getting and
how much it costs. The majority
of the over-the-counter medica-
tions cost SI.06 (tax included).
Hxamples of these low cost items
include Tylenol, generic Advil,
Actifed, Sudafed, Benadryl,
Robitussin DM, Rolaids,
Cepastat Throat Lozenges, etc.
Nothing on the self-care medi-
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Sen ices & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
The Lee Building
Greenville
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZ�A
OMICRON
DELTA
KAPPA
THE NATIONAL LEADERSHIP HONOR SOCIETY
rfr

Congratulations to our Fall 1994 Tappees:
Christy Allen
Amanda Baer
Henrik Bjarheim
Roberta Burgess
Belinda Cagle
David Caudle
Melissa Collins
Michael Czzarin
Susan Fantz
Robert Gluckman
Ashley Hinkle
Jamie Holt
Laurie Johnson
Amy Listeman
Amy Martin
Michelle Myrick
Chris Penny
Regina Roberts
Amy Sadler
Heather Salter
Nell Shappley
Jeffrey Simpson
Hilary Stokes
Annmarie Vogt
Dr. Patricia Anderson
Dr. Rosina Chia
We look forward to having you at our
Tapping Breakfast on November 3,1994.

ALFREDO'S
SPORTS
BAR
Wed:
$1 Night
Thursr25c
Draft
cation sheet costs over S3.18
(tax included). Once the sheet
is filled out, the student takes
the sheet and payment to the
cashier (conveniently located
beside the pharmacy). The
cashier then hands the sheet
to the pharmacist, who will in
turn give the desired medica-
tion to the student and ex-
plain any symptoms or com-
plications that may persist.
The Student Health Center
is also offering the flu shot.
The cost of the injection is
$5.00. An appointment is re-
quired to receive the injection.
A student can receive the flue
shot by calling 328-6317 to
make an appointment. A flu
shot is administered through
our Rapid Care System, which
gets the students in and out in
a hurry.
Make sure you bundle up
and stay warm, drink plenty
of Mom's homemade chicken
soup, and come visit the Stu-
dent Health Center on cam-
pus. If anyone has any ques-
tions, thev can call 328-6841.
WE NEED
HELP!
The Honey Baked Ham Co.
is in search of help during the
holidays to fill our Sales Counter
and Production positions. We have
stores located in the following
states: Alabama, Arkansas,
Colorado, Florida, Georgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri,
Nevada, North and South Carolina,
Tennessee and Utah. Please stop
by immediately to inquire about
seasonal help. Check the whitB
pages for information on the store
nearest you.
J
MEMBER ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGE HONOR OCIETIE0 AND THE AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION
� i -






November 3. 1994
1 0 The East Carolinian
The East Carolinian
Sports
Pirates head south
Aaron Wilson
Assistant Sports Editor
Minutes after East Carolina's
victory u�r the hapless Cincin-
nati Bearcat, Pirate head coach
Steve Logan ut this win behind
him and started getting ready
tor the undefeated and nation-
allv-ranked Auburn Tigers.
"East Carolina's got the big-
gest challenge ahead of them in
this Division I-A program
Logan said. We've got an op-
portunity and a football game
coming up this weekend that's
going to be something. We'll see
if we can mount the courage and
the intensity to go down there
and play a competitive football
game
This degree of focus and in-
tensity is what it is going to take
tor the Pirates to have any chance
of beating an Auburn team that
has never lost in Terry Bowden's
two-year tenure as coach. The son
of Florida State coach Bobby
Bowden has gone 18-0 since leav-
ing Samford University.
The Tigers are ranked in the
Top 10 of the AP poll (NCAA
probation caused them to be
unranked in the USA TODAY
CSS Coaches poll) and are aver-
aging 415 yards and 35.5 points
each week out of their Pro-I of-
fense.
"The fans may not recognize
how good they are, but our foot-
ball team will because of the film
they will see Terry Bowden said.
"It won't be hard for us to get
ready. We've got to go back to
w ork because we are facing a team
that can score some points
"Marcus Crandell is a fine quar-
terback he said. "He's so good
and there hasn't been a lot written
about him. I think a lot of college
coaches are talking about him.
People who have seen him throw,
Photo Courtesy of AU SID
Auburn has reeled off 18 straight wins since the hiring of head coach
Terry Bowden (insert). However, they are ineligible for bowl games
that's all they are talking about.
He can throw and scramble well"
These words of praise may be
genuine, but they sound like a
good coach trying to prevent any
potential overconfidence on his
team's part. The Tigers are loaded,
to say the least, at every position.
Ail-American candidates and NFL
prospects are in abundance for
Auburn. They have every right to
be proud of what they have ac-
complished in the wake of the
Eric Ramsey scandal, salvaging
what could have been a dis nal
situation.
Auburn has ta ken the opportu-
nity to become national champion
despite the NCAA probation that
prevents them from going to a
bowl game or winning the confer-
ence championship. They have
gained a lot of respect throughout
the nation, and it is evident to all
observers that Terry Bowden is
intent on winning with integrity
and doing things the right way.
Monday's ECU press confer-
ence was marked by Coach Logan,
commenting about this impres-
sive Auburn squad.
"Today is Halloween and I
watched three horror movies this
morning ; Auburn's offense,
Auburn's defense and Auburn's
special teams, and I'm not kid-
ding Logan said. "They are an
elite group of athletes
This "elite group" is headlined
by several stars. Senior defensive
tackle Mike Pelton is listed as one
of 15 semi-finalists for The Foot-
ball News Defensive Player of the
Year. He has 87 tackles for the
year, six tackles for a loss, eight
sacks and one interception.
Tailback Steve Davis was the
USA Today Offensive Player of
the Year in high school and has
done nothing to disappoint Tiger
fans who expected a lot out of him
after he sat out his first year as a
TEC Presents
Prop. 48 athlete. Davis ran for 937
yards on 153 carries and 9 touch-
downs.
"Davisisjusthuge Logansaid.
"He is fast. If Davis were here, he
would be a defensive tackle. They
have compared this young man to
Herschel Walker, and I think that
statement is legit. He will run over
you, around you or through you.
He doesn't really care which way
Punter Terry Daniel is averag-
ing 45.5 yards per punt and is rated
as one of the top candidates for the
Lou Groza kicking Award.
Daniel's kicks have so much power
behind them that Mississippi State
head coach Jackie Sherrill accused
Auburn of filling up football with
helium after he boomed several
long punts against them last sea-
son.
Wide receiver Frank Sanders,
who doubles as a outfielder for the
Auburn baseball team, is Auburn's
big play threat. Sanders caught 48
passes for 842 yards and 6 TDs last
year. This season the 6-2, 200-
pound speedster has hauled in 39
passes for 604 and 5 TDs. He is
ranked among the top receivers in
the country by several publica
tions, including The Sporting
News and Street & Smiths college
football annuals.
Auburn has several other solid
football players on both sides of
the football who are overshadowed
by these headliners. Offensively,
the Tigers are very basic with a
Pro-I set featuring lots of running
plays and the occasional deep pass
to Sanders off of play-action.
Quarterback Patrick Nix has
done a solid job, passing for 1,494
yards and 11 TDs. Nix is a strong,
steady, drop-back passer who stays
in the pocket and doesn't make
many mistakes. He is well-pro-
tected by an offensive line that av-
erages 6-foot-3 and 295 pounds.
Thev are led by All-American can-
didates, Willie Anderson (6-6,320)
and center Shannon Roubique (6-
1,285).
Tight ends Andy Fuller and
Jesse McCovery are both strong
blockers who complement the of-
fensive line well. Receiver Thomas
Bailey is opposite Frank Sanders
and has caught 25 passes this sea-
son. He also returns punts and
kickoffs.
Besides Davis, the Tigers have
standout freshman Fred Beasley
at running back, who has ran
for 196 yards in a reserve role.
Beasley has outstanding speed.
Defensively, Pelton, Gary
Walker, Alonzo Etheridge, and
Willie Whitehead are reminis-
cent of the Pittsburgh Steelers
Steel Curtain defensive line of
the 1970's.
"1 hey have a wealth of talent
on the defensive line, much like
the Washington films I looked
at last season Logan said.
"They are playing eight line-
men. The starting four come in
and beat you up for a while.
When they get tired, Auburn
brings in four more to do the
same. In the meantime, their
starting four are getting rested
Linebacker is also a strength
for the Tigers, with qurk, hard-
hitters Anthony Harris, Jason
Miska and Marcellus Mostella
all starring for AU. Harris stands
6-foot-2 and 225 pounds and
lines up at strong-side line-
backer. He has 89 tackles for the
year, tying him for the team lead
See AUBURN page 12
Terry Bowden (insert). However, they are ineligible for bowl games. -
Grav helps Pirates win games in the trenches
Prognosticators
Dave Pond �AU17
TEC Sports Editor AU 38 ECU 21
"Auburn on a roll, too much for
Pirates. Tigers keep the winning
streak alive
BradOldham�AU32
WZMB Sports Director AU 35
ECU 3
"This won't he pretty.
Brian Bailey-
WNCT-TV9 Sport
AU31 ECU 17
-AU 14
Director
"Tigers break it open in the
fourth quarter "
Chris Justice � AU 23
WCTI -7V2 Sports Director
AU38 ECU 15
"Let's hope Pirates make it out
of Auburn healthy
Phil Werz � AU 21
WITN -TV 7Sports Director
AU38ECU 17 �
"The streak remains intact"
Aaron Wilsen �ECU 3
TECAsst. Spgris Editor
ECU 24ALK!1

"Pirat�nse to occasion in upset
nf the centurv "
S&ve Hill � ECU 7
TEC Opnion Editor
EC! 21 At 14
Pirate offense excellent"
7�C GUEST PICK! K
Charles Bloom - ECU 3
!( I Sports Information Director
ECl 17 AU 14
"Pirates make national headline's
Thomas Hill
Staff Writer
Being mired in the trenches
during a football game will not
win you headlines or a Heisman
Trophy, but we all know it is
where football games are won
and lost.
Jamie Gray, a 6'2" and 293-
pound sophomore from
Phoenixville, Pa provides East
Carolina with just such a
trenchfighter. His stocky build
and powerful body allow him to
get under the -ds of taller de-
fensive players and dominate
them. Technique and strength �
his bench press ranks fourth on
the team � are Gray's biggest
assets.
Every member of team has a
role to play to ensure team sue
cess, and Gray knows his.
"Beinga sophomore, still learn-
ing my position, I need to concen-
trate onexecution and technique
he said. "If I can play mistake free
football, then I will be helping the
team
Playing with versatile senior
linemen Terry Tilghman and Ken
Carroll can only help this young
offensive lineman mature.
"Pass blocking is OK he said
"There is a lot of technique in-
volved. I like to run block, trap-
ping and pulling so that I can pan-
cake people
Originally not expected to start
this year, Gray has been the starter
at left guard postion every game
for ECU.
In high school, Gray excelled
as a offensive and defensive
player. Programs such as Penn
State, Rutgers, and Temple were
interested in Gray's services, but
it was ECU that Gray signed with.
"Rutgers was
reallv interested
in me, but they
thought I was too
short he said.
"Thecoacheshere
told me I could
play, and that fi-
nalized my deci-
sion. That, plus
the fact that I have
family here in
NorthCarolina.lt
was a natural fit
Last vear, Gray
could be found on the other side
of the ball playing defensive
tackle.
"I really miss playing defense,
but the move to offense was in my
best interest he said. "To play at
the next level, offense is the way
for me to go
With two more
y.ears to develop,
Jamie Gray could
surely end up play-
ing professionally
on Sunday after-
noons.
"It has always
been a dream of
mine to play in the
NFL, but right now
there is business at
hand he said. "1
justwanttocommit
myself to being the
best offensive lineman I can be
On that note, the Pirates travel
to third-ranked Auburn to tangle
with theTigers on Saturday. Gray
is not intimidated.
"We have everything to gain
and nothing to lose he said.
"We are not going there to just
show up and play a close game.
We are going there to win the
football game, it's really the
only attitude you can have
Gray and his fellow offen-
sive linemen will have their
work cut out for them. Au-
burn, according to ECU Coach
Steve Logan, are at least eight
deep in the defensive line with
many pro prospects.
"We have got good athletes
too Gray says. "We intend to
win
A win at Auburn would be
the biggest victory in Pirate his-
tory, but the big prize this year
is a Liberty Bowl bid. It has
See GRAY page 12
Tilghman provides senior leadership
" ��, offense totallv, and not just my ably at the peak of our careers "
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
"The Schcxil of Hard Knocks
That, and learning the offensive
line backwards and forwards, has
made senior right guard Terry
Tilghman a leader on this year's Pi-
rate team.
Tilghman, a fifth-year senior in
Exercise Sports Science from Mes-
quite,Texas (near Dallas), wears num-
ber 78 for the Pirates. As a matter of
fact, since his first appearance at
Ficklen Stadium in August 1990, he's
played all five offensive line posi-
tions: left and right guard, left and
right tackle, and tenter.
Tilghman's reasoning about
choosing ECU began with an old
injury.
"My junior year, going into my
senior vear in high school, I was in the
tt p 100 offensive linemen in the state
of Texas, "Tilghman said. "In the first
game in my senior year, 1 blew an
ACI. (a ligament) in my right knee. 1
was being recruited b 38 Division-l
schools, anil it quickly went from 38
to just six
Of the six remaining schools still
actively recruiting Tilghman, only
one, East Carolina, guaranteed his
scholarship.
"If I stepped off
the plane coming
intoGreenvilleand
hurtmykneeagain
� no matter what,
I still had a five-year
education
Tilghman said.
"That's what's im-
portant to me
Tilghman said.
Tilghman had
few adjustments to
makeinmovingup
to collegiate-level
football, but there wereother changes
to consider.
"Like any other freshman, you
have to make adjustments
Tilghman said. "I think the main ad-
justment 1 had to make was being
1,400 miles from home � I had never
been away from home before
"My mom and dad had prepared
me for things that were going to go
on in school, and how to adjust with
those. 1 had been prepared tocome to
college and be a success
"1 was lucky in the fact that 1 came
up in a high school
program that pre-
pared me for col-
lege football he-
said. "A lot of the
things we did in
highscruxilarealot
of things we do
here, so 1 was ready
to play"
During his fresh-
man year,
Tilghman saw ac-
tion in just 55-60
plays, but realized
that he was going to have to work his
way up in the program � which
meant learning moreabout the game
itself.
"With experience came knowl-
edge of the game and know ledge of
theoffensivescheme Filghmansaid.
"When former ECU U Coach
Billl .ewis was here, I realh studied
the offense totally, and not just m
position. That helped me a lot, be-
cause we had key players go down
through the years, and I had to move
tocertainpositions.Idon'tthink there
was a year since I've been here that 1
played one position and one position
only
"When Coach Lewis left and they
hired Coach Ixtgan, I was blessed
with the fact that the scheme which 1
had learned and put so much effort
intoit,didnchangeTi1ghmansaid.
That helped me excel even more, to
have an offensive line that 1 could
play all five offensive positions at
will, at any time"
Tilghman began coming into his
own as an offensh e player at about
the same time Steve I ogan entered
the Pirate football program as head
coach, and the lineman saw himself
and the new ct ach grow mg together.
"You ve got to come in and learn
the ropes, earn some trust and take
pride in what's going on Tilghman
said. 'Tve seen Coach 1 .ogan evolve,
just as Coach Logan has seen me
evolve Rightnow. I think wereprob-
ablv at the peak of our careers
Reaching his final year in the
football program, Tilghman has
earned the right and the respect to
lead the team's offensive line.
"1 think I've been successful as
an individual because of the fact
that I'm surrounded by successful
people on the team, he said. "1
take pride in the fact that this of-
fensive line is my offensive line
this is my year to be the leader,
and all the guys look up to me
Tilghman credits much of his
success to those around him, in-
cluding the football staff, but es-
peciallv his wife Jennifer. The
Tilghmans have a 3-year old son
(1 erry) and a 3-month old daugh-
ter, Jordan Kay.
"ly wife understands the de-
mands of college and football that
are put on me, and my coaching
staff guides me. Thev understand
that I'm going to miss some team
functions and meetings, and
mavbe some weight-lifting ses-
See TILGHMAN page 12





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shannon Cowan lead the "Cy-
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Upcoming activities include
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will be held on Tuesday, Novem-
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ATTORNEY AT LAW
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Join these local leaders tor breakfast and learn their
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109 Menderihall Student C ei





November 3, 1994
1 2 The East Carolinian
TILGHMAN
From p. 10
sions or something like that �be-
causeof my family.and they give me
leeway accordingly. It's the fact that
msumnindwiby thoseunderstaiul-
ing people is the only reason uh I'm
still here and not back in Mesquite
pumping gas or something
Tilghman exudes confidence as
he considers the remainder oi the
1994 season, comparing the Pirates
to a pool player who sinks the re-
maining balls without missing a'
single shot.
"We're going to do what Coach
Logan says, we're going to 'run the
table We're going to finish up the
rest of the games with wins in the
winning column and go to the Lib-
erty Bowl on December 31st. We're
going to have no ideas otherwise.
That's exactly what we're going to
. do, and it's just time tositbackand do
it
At the conclusion of the season,
Tilghman has his sights already set
on higher goals.
"After this year, if I don't make it
in the NFL�which I aspire to go into
� then I'll probably come back here
and be a graduate assistant under
(offensive line) Coach Jagodzinski
and follow into the coaching field at
the college level"
"I think that the key thing for me
GRAY
From p. 10
to make it in the Ml. is just simply
getangstrongerandstayinghealthy
Tilghman saidI've tv 11 major knet
surgeries � three, with a 'scopic
afterward. I've had a shoulder sur-
gery . I have a bad left ankle now and
a hamstringI've had a couple of
concussions, and I've really been
banged up, but I keep truckin' right
along. I think the thing that's made
me successful is the ability to over-
come adversity
Thougl i Tilghman is confident in
his abilities, he's also confident in
the abilities of his teammates, and
he continually synthesizes the two.
"I don't want any individualism,
I don't want any kind of individual
praise 'Oh, you've done great,
you're the stud, you're the kid that's
done it all I just want to be an
influential figure in this team being
successful. I'm here to do my job,
and m job is to lead the football
team
been a driving force for Gray
and the entire squad
"Playing for a bowl is very
exciting he said. "It gives us a
goal to achieve rather than just
play ing for pride or a winning
season The fans have been
great; there is nothing more we -
would rather do than give our
fans a trip to Memphis. It's so
exciting
Away from football, Gray is
a laid-back individual with a
infectious smile. The hospital-
ity management major has ideas
of becoming a master chef.
"I've always loved to cook
he said "The idea of cooking
for a living seems really good to
me
Maybe on Saturday you and
the rest of the Pirates can cook
up a recipe fora upset at Jordon-
Hare Stadium against the Ti-
gers.
AUBURN
From p. 10
with . Mosteila has 8 tackles
and 5 tackles for losses.
The secondary is led by Chris
Shelling and Brian Robinson.
Shelling has made 235 career
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tackles (72 this year along with
3 INTs). Robinson is a physi-
cal player who uses his size
(6-3, 200) to intimidate oppo-
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This unit returned 10 out of
11 starters from last year and
experience has only made
them better. They allow just
16.8 points and 91 yards rush-
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13th in the nation in total de-
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Despite facing such a
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team well-prepared and fired
up about playing Auburn and
being another Homecoming
opponent.
"The players are excited
he said. "They have been talk-
ing about this game all year
long. They were excited a few
weeks ago when Auburn went
to Florida and beat them. They
wanted them to win the game
and be undefeated heading
into the game
Pirate fans can only hope
for the best as ECU faces its
toughest challenge in many
years. A strong showing or
win can only impress Liberty
Bowl representatives. Look
for ECU to surprise some
doubters who think this game
will be another blowout for
the Tigers.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1038
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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