The East Carolinian, October 27, 1994







f
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 54
Circulation 12,000
Thursday, October 27, 1994
Greenville, NC
24 pages
WZMB alters format
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
WZMB has undergone a for-
mat alteration in an effort to
attract more listeners. The sta-
tion will now plav more main-
stream music to attract a larger
audience.
"It's a slight modification
between the hours of 6 a.m.
and 6 p.m. What we're aiming
for is more of a mainstream
sound and the emphasis there
is on sound said Jeremy
Leftwich, program director.
The format changes are a re-
sult of a survey WZMB con-
ducted through the marketing
department last fall. The station
does not plan to play strictly top
40 or alternative music, but is
aiming for songs from any band
with a mainstream sound.
"The changes we have initi-
ated are in response to the sur-
vey that was taken suppos-
edly it was done by random se-
lection, which someone told me
is the best way of getting an
accurate response from the gen-
eral listenership Mike
O'Donnel, general manager,
said. The survey stated that
the number one reason stu-
dents do not listen to WZMB
is because of the format.
"They're playing much
better music now, more al-
ternative, like college rock
Nicole Peele, a sophomore,
said.
Leftwich said WZMB will
continue to play requests,
even if they come in during
the hours between 6 a.m. and
See WZMB page 7
Photos by LESLIE PETTY
Hank's Homeade Ice Cream celebrates Halloween by decorating the shop with creepy
ghosts and goblins (top). Above left, this pumpkin takes first place in the Health Services
annual pumpkin decorating contest. Above right, the "Pirate Pumpkin" takes second
place for its school-spirited rendition of the traditional jack-o-lantern. Students can view
these spooky decorations at Health Services all week. Don't forget to be safe on
Halloween � avoid past downtown disasters.
Roads lead to injuries
Aluminum tab
collection to end
Nan Patterson
Staff Writer
Time is running out to collect
all of the aluminum can tabs left
lying around from this past week-
end.
As of Nov. 1,1994, The Ronald
McDonald House of Greenville
will no longer collect can tabs from
aluminum cans to raise money. A
campaign to collect bar tabs from
Scott paper products will be
launched.
"We appreciate all of the effort
put into tab collecting, but would
like to turn that energy into col-
lecting labels said Suzie Walker,
executive house director.
The tabs were once prosperous
for the Ronald McDonald House,
but due to a recent drop in the
price of aluminum, the tabs will
no longer be collected.
"The time and effort put into
collecting tabs is no longer cost
effective Walker said.
Originally, the tabs brought in
65 cents per pound, now it is hard
to revenue even 25 cents per
pound.
Scott PaperCompany sponsors
the bar code collection campaign,
and offered it to the Ronald
McDonald House. Scott will do-
nate 10 cents to the RonalJ
McDonald House for every label
collected.
"We plan for this campaign to
be ongoing indefinitely, "Walker
said. "Bar tabs are easier, cleaner
and less costly
This program encourages the
ise of Scott paper products, and
provides those who already use
the Scott brand the opportunity to
help the community.
The Scott products include toi-
let paper, paper towels or baby
wipes with the "Scott" name on
them.
"Cottenelle, Viva and Baby
Fresh brands are also included
Walker said.
Glisson's Enterprises, located on
Stokes Highway, will be collecting
tabs for The Ronald McDonald
House in Greenville.
"Glisson's was willing to do this
for us � they are doing us a favor
Walker saidThey will be mailing
a check to us for the value of tabs,
all as a donation
Also, the McDonald restaurants
in Carteret County and Jackson-
ville .vill still collect tabs, and the
earnings will be sent toGreenville's
Ronald McDonald House.
Labels can be collected and
mailed to Ronald McDonald House,
549 Moye Boulevard, Greenville,
N.C. 27834.
There are four Ronald McDonald
Houses located in North Carolina.
The cities include Chapel Hill,
Durham, Winston-Salem and
Greenville. The organization is
growing with 157 houses across the
world, 122 of which are in the U.S.
The Ronald McDonald House of
Eastern North Carolina provides
lodging or a "home away from
home" for the families of seriously
ill children visiting the Children's
Hospital in Greenville.
"Since Father's Day, 1987, the
House has housed over 5,500 differ-
ent admissions representing over
3,300 different families, "Walker
said.
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Students should be alert at in-
tersections and pedestrian
crossways around campus.
On Wednesday, Oct. 12, at 5:00
p.m Carolyn Weakland, a jun-
ior philosophy major, was a pas-
senger in one of the cars involved
in a three car accident at the in-
tersection of Fifth and Meade
Streets.
Weakland said her roommate,
Michelle Ball, a junior pre-physi-
cal therapy major, was driving
down Fifth Street when a white
truck, leaving campus, pulled out
of the street between the School
of Nursing and Speight Build-
ing. The driver of the white truck
hit another car head on. Ball did
not have time to stop and the
three cars collided.
"There was no time to stop
Weakland said. "The three cars
flew all over
The car was totaled and
Weakland and Ball were taken to
the hospital and treated for mi-
nor injuries.
"If we weren't wearing
seatbelts, it could have been re-
ally bad Weakland ?aid.
Weakland said the man driv-
ing the truck said that he did not
see Ball's car because another car
turned onto Fifth Street, block-
ing his view.
"I honestly believe the poor
guy didn't see us Weakland
said.
While at the scene of the acci-
dent, Weakland said the attend-
ing officer, Officer Robert Jones
of the Greenville Police Depart-
ment said he had himself been
involved in an accident with an-
other car at the same Fifth and
Meade Street intersection, while
driving his police car, when the
other car pulled out in front of
him.
Weakland said she would
like to be involved with mak-
ing the intersection safer.
"I want to see what I can
do to get a light there
Weakland said.
Weakland said that mem-
bers of the Alpha Delta Pi So-
rority, whose sorority house
is on the corner of Fifth and
Meade streets, who saw the
accident and a number of oth-
ers were thinking about start-
ing a petition for a stoplight.
"They were trying to get
involved with getting a light
there Weakland said.
Dr. George Harrell, assis-
tant vice chancellor for facili-
ties, said the department
would have to look at the situ-
ation before deciding if there
is a need for the university to
See WRECK page 7
RDI, CAT celebrate service
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
ECU celebrated two anniver-
saries last week as the Regional
Development Institute (RDI) rec-
ognized 30 years in existence and
the Center for Applied Technol-
ogy (CAT) commemorated 10
years of service.
On hand for the luncheon and
commemoration ceremony, held
Wednesday, Oct. 19, were Chan-
cellor Eakin, Congreeman Mar-
tin Lancaster, past RDI director
Janice Faulkner, as well as the
widows and families of past di-
rectors Th( mas Warren Willis
and Rufus Timothy Brinn. Por-
traits of Willis, Brinn and
Faulkner were unveiled by Eakin.
"East Carolina University,
from its very beginning has had
as its motto 'To Serve Eakin
said. "That is not only a motto,
but it is something that is taken
very seriously by this institu-
tion
Willis, the founding director
of RDI served from December
1964 through July 1981. Willis
was preceded by Brinn, who
served from August 1981
through January 1983. Faulkner
served from February 1983
through January 1993. Al Delia
is currently the director of RDI.
RDI provides eastern North
Carolina with a number of ser-
vices including: community
planning and development,
grant assistance, site designs and
feasibility projects and research
information. RDI serves any lo-
cal, state or federal government
agency, non-profit organizations,
businesses or individuals. RDI
helped with grant approvals for
the Kinston Regional Jetport and
the Center for the Sound at
Mattamuskeet Lodge.
"Center for the Sounds is go-
ing to put northeastern North
Carolina on the map for the fast-
est growing tourism model that
we have anywhere and that is
Ecotourism Lancaster said.
Also recognized during the
service was the Center for Ap-
plied Technology which opened
10 years ago. According to the
Center's brochure, it has seven
primary goals which include in-
tegrating service activities with
the university's teaching and re-
search missions, providing uni-
versity-based support to com-
munity businesses, expanding
economic development while
improving the area's quality of
life, coordinating clients and ex-
perts, providing management
advice, developing custom train-
ing programs and providing a
networking outlet.
Dr. Mark Friend is the current
director of CAT. Friend and
other CAT staff members pro-
vide clients with information
about environmental and safety
issues such as OSHA require-
ments.
Martin Lancaster spoke to the
group on regional development
in eastern North Carolina and
focus on the progress of the
Global Transpark in Kinston
and the Center for the Sounds
at Lake Mattamuskeet.
"The Global Transpark, in
my opinion, is the most excit-
ing economical development
concept under study and de-
velopment anywhere in the
world Lancaster said.
Lancaster said the
Transpark will put eastern
N.C. on the map, as it is al-
ready gaining world-wide
publicity.
"In Thailand, for instance,
a Global Transpark is being
developed. They call it the
North Carolina experiment
he said. "All of that is pos-
sible because this institute, at
a very, very important time�
when regionalism was a dirty
word in eastern North Caro-
lina, saw the wisdom of put-
See RDI page 6
AmeriCorp applicants needed
Susan Schwartz
Staff Writer
This story contributes to an ar-
ticle printed in The East Carolin-
ian on October 11
By launching the AmeriCorps
program, President Bill Clinton
has called upon America's finest
resources � its own citizens � to
fix what is wrong with America.
Volunteers are needed to clean
up our environment, educate our
young and patrol our neighbor-
hoods to make them safei for ev-
eryone. ECU students can make a
difference by becoming
AmeriCorps members.
Students interested can apply
by calling the AmeriCorps hotline.
An operator will collect general
information about interested ap-
plicants and will send them an
information brochure with a re-
ferral form enclosed.
Students then fill out the refer-
ral form and send it back to the
Corporation for National Service.
The referral form allows applicants
to specify their geographic prefer-
ence, whether they are interested
in providing service in their own
neighborhood, state or region, or
any rural or urban area anywhere
in the United States.
Once the referral form is pro-
cessed by AmeriCorps, students
will receive a directory of the pro-
grams available. While
AmeriCorps is designed to be com-
munity-based and community-
driven, members work as part of
the AmeriCorps network toward
four national priorities in the ar-
eas of education, human needs,
public safety and environment.
Students applv directly to the
program that interests them and a
representative from that pro-
gram will call or write to notify
applicants of acceptance. Join-
ing AmeriCorps will be very
competitive, but also very re-
warding.
In exchange for sen-ice, the
AmeriCorps brochure says,
"Members will receive a liv-
ing allowance averaging $7,500
per year health care, child care
when needed; and an educa-
tion award of $4,725 per year
to finance their higher edu-
See CORP page 6





2The East Carolinian
October 27. 1994
CRIMfifSENE
Poppies commemorate veterans
October 19
Assault � A student reported he was attacked by in the courtyard
of Scott Hall. The suspect struck and kicked the victim. The victim was
transported to Pitt County Memorial Hospital by rescue workers.
Auto Collision � Two officers assisted the Greenville Police
Department at the corner of Tenth Street and College Hill Drive by-
directing traffic at an accident involving two students and a faculty
member. No injuries were reported.
Larceny � A staff member at Christenbury Gymnasium reported
the larceny of a spring board used for gymnastics.
Auto Larceny � A student reported the theft of his automobile
from the Third and Reade Streets parking lot. A search concluded
with negative results.
Weapon Possession � A Scott Hall coordinator reported the
discovery of a resident in possession of a knife. The resident stated the
knife belonged to his roommate.
Larceny � A student reported the larceny of a bus stop sign and
post from the northwest side of Mendenhall.
October 21
Larceny and Damage to Property � Two residents of Garret Hall
were arrested for larceny and damage to property. Thev were ob-
served breaking the lights off from barricades southwest of Joyner
Library. The students were also issued campus appearance tickets.
Attempted Breaking and Entering � A plumbing contractor
reported the attempted breaking and entering of an equipment trailer
near the Joyner construction site.
Vandalism�A staff member reported the larceny of a windshield
wiper blade arm from his vehicle while parked on campus.
October 24
Suspicious Activity � The coordinator and a resident advisor of
Belk Hall reported seeing a previously reported suspicious person
east of the hall. The person was identified and banned from campus.
Failure to Appear � An order for arrest was issued to a Garrett
Hall resident for failure to appear in court on a worthless check
charge.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU crime
reports.
Photo by STEPHANIE LASSITER
Wreaths of poppies adorn the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (Le Ton(
Beau Du Soblat Inconnu) under the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. The
poppies are sold to recognize those who fought in past wars.
Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
This weekend will host several
annual events including ECU's
Homecoming, the traditional Hal-
loween gala and the selling of
Buddy Poppies by the Veterans of
Foreign Wars (VFW).
Several times a year, groups like
the VFW sell poppies to raise money
for veterans and their families and
the families of deceased veterans.
The VFW holds its sale every year
during ECU homecoming week-
end. World War II veteran Hugh
McGowan, jr. believes this is an
ideal time to make students aware
of the importance of the poppy in
relation to the veterans.
"I wish the college students of
ECU would realize the importance
of the Veteran's Buddy Poppy
days he said.
In 1924, the Buddy Poppy was
copyrighted by the VFW. During
that time, the poppies were made
of red tissue paper by French
women who were hoping to rec-
ognize the blood shed by the sol-
diers. Today, the poppies are made
of a silky red material which is
more durable than the tissue pa-
per.
"The VFW brought the Buddy
Poppy over to America
.McGowan said.
Europeans continue to use
the poppy as a symbol of the
lives lost during the war.
Flanders Field in Belgium is the
resting place for thousands of
American soldiers. The poppies
grow in the field of graves. Like-
wise, "Le Tom Beau Du Soblat
Inconnu" (Tomb of the Un-
known Soldier) under the Arc
de Triomphe in Paris is adorned
by visitors with wreaths of pop-
pies.
"It means more to me repre-
senting my budd ies when I can't
go to Normandy McGowan
said. "There is no way to thank
them. All we can do is pray
McGowan, a Greenville na-
tive and resident, fought in
World War II as a reconnais-
sance non-commissioned officer
for a tank battalion attached to
the 45th Division. During D-
Day ceremonies held this sum-
mer on Normandy Beach,
McGowan's name was added
to a list of war participants.
The VFW will be selling the
poppies tomorrow and Satur-
day throughout Greenville. Pro-
ceeds go to benefit veterans and
their families.
Cyn
t&fc floras,
a Cynthia Taylor
8 E�Bt Tenth Street
Greenville, NC 27858
(919)757-1892
Order your Homecoming Flowers Today
NOoN DaY
Tunes
Melanie Sparks
Performing from
11:30 am until 1:00 pm at
I Mendenhall Dining Room
I The Student Union Popular Entertainment
I Committee Presents
An Evening With
Gallagher
7:00 pm, Sunday, November 20,1994
Tickets are on sale now at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student Center. For
more information, call 328-4788.
TIME
CHANGE
Don't forget to
set your clocks
back one hour
midnight
Saturday.
WANTED:
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to start with guaranteed raises to $40,000 in just four years! Top health,
recreation, and vacation benefits. Interested? Then,
All films start at 8:00 pm in Hendrix Theatre
and are FREE to students, staff, faculty, and
one guest with valid ECU I.D.
We're More Than Barefoot!
For information on upcoming events,
watch the activity boards located at
Wright and at the Croatan, or call the
SU Hotline at 328-6004.
&�lo
BE AN AIR FORCE OFFICER
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Acquisitions
Computer Systems
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-Medical
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-Space Operations
�Transportation
Dont't forget to be
here for Thanksgiving!
Get all the facts!
Contact
ECU Air Force ROTC
at 328-6597
You'll moveforward fast
For information regarding the annual SU New York trip, OQQ.l "7QQ
call the New York trip hotline at OO" f JJ.
AIR FORCE
ROTC





October 27. 1994
The East Carolinian 3
History recalled in Nov.
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Manv people have notions
of Native Americans that are
derived mainly from televi-
sion and movies. The East
Carolina Native American
Organization (ENCAO) will
trv to change some of those
preconceptions in November
during Native American
Heritage Month.
"Native Americans are ste-
reotyped by television as hav-
ing long, straight dark hair
and dark skin, but not all
Native Americans have those
same features said Kim
Sampson, a senior hospitality
management major and presi-
dent of ECNAO.
In November ECNAO has
tentative plans for activities de-
signed to promote awareness on
campus. These activities in-
clude a booth in Mendenhall, a
mini pow-wow, guest speakers,
a medicine well, pamphlets in
the dining halls and articles on
Native American culture and
customs in The East Carolinian.
ECNAO will be working along
with the Student Union during
Native American Heritage
Month.
Greenville's
Exclusive
"Natural Store1
Tees & Sweats Featuring
Over 100 Nature Print Designs
New Age, Nature
Classical Music
�Sculptures
�Jewelry
�Educational Gifts
�Posters, Puzzles
�Great Selections For Kids
Portions From Your Purchases Are Donated
To Preservation Of Our Environment
Plaza Mall'Greenville BlvdGreenville
Annabelle's Entrance Next To Food Court
321-6380
"We want to educate the cam-
pus as a whole about the Native
American Heritage said Nikki
Eppes, a sophomore exercise and
sports science major and vice
president of ECNAO. "There are
a lot of things people don't un-
derstand. We just want a little
recognition
ECNAO was reorganized in
the spring of 1992. The group
began possibly as far back as
1971. Currently, there are be-
tween 10 and 15 members. Tribes
represented in ECNAO include
Cherokee, Lumbee, Coharie,
Haliwa-Soponi and Waccamaw-
Siouan.
There is a $10 yearly member-
ship fee, which can be paid $5 a
semester.
ECNAO is designed to pro-
vide fellowship for Native
American students enrolled at
ECU. The group also strives to
increase knowledge and aware-
ness of Native Americans on
campus and to serve as a source
of information about Native
Americans and Native Ameri-
can issues.
The group hopes Native
American Heritage Month will
be a success and that students
will benefit from the programs
that ECNAO conducts on cam-
pus.
"People think you are not a
true Indian unless you live in a
reservation or a teepee
Sampson said.
Sampson added that ECNAO
welcomes any new members.
"We are looking for new mem-
bers Sampson said. "If you
want to join just show interest.
Normally we put announce-
ments in The East Carolinian be-
fore meetings
Anyone who would like more
information about ECNAO or
Native American Heritage
Month can call Nikki Eppes at
328-7778 or Kim Sampson at 752-
2319.
Has been rescheduled until
Thursday, October 27
beginning at 5:30p.m.
� FREE COOK-OUT
� PRIZES
� RIDE THE "CLIFFHANGER" SHUTTLE
� FREE CLIMBING ON ECU'S HOTTEST
ADVENTURE TOWER
AND
Watch the motion picture hit
"CLIFFHANGER1
on the Climbing Tower
ECU students, faculty, and staff are welcome!
Call Recreational Services at 128-6387 for details.
Olympians get help
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
The North Carolina Special
Olympics holds the Equestrian
Championships each October.
ECU senior xnne Johnson was a
member of the first group from
Pitt County to attend the event,
held this year in Fayetteville.
Johnson, a rehabilitation ser-
vices major from Kinston, N.C
was a horse-leader for 9-year-old
Mark Bradley. This year's eques-
trian competition featured ap-
proximately 60 participants from
North Carolina's 100 counties,
and Pitt County participants
brought home two bronze med-
als.
"It's the first time ever to have
a Special Olympics equestrian
team here in Pitt County said
Maria Bryant, who operates the
nonprofit GDJ (German Dressage
and Jumping) Challenge, Inc.
The GDJ Challenge, located in
the Greenville area, is a free pro-
gram specializing in rehabilita-
tive efforts that involve horse
riding with handicapped indi-
viduals. The GDJ Challenge spon-
sored the Special Olympics team
from Pitt County.
Mark Bradley, on a horse led
by Johnson, competed in the
Western Equitation class and
earned the bronze medal. Missy
Moore, 18, competed in the Hunt
Seat Equitation class (led on horse
by her mother) and brought home
Pitt County's second bronze
medal. There were approximately
a dozen entries in each of the two
classes.
Johnson said her involvement
with GDJ Challenge (and the Spe-
cial Olympics) all began with the
volunteer portion of her major.
Last spring, she was required to
volunteer for 30 hours in an orga-
nization connected with rehabili-
tative services.
Rehabilitation services majors
can choose from any human ser-
vice organization or social service
organization around the Green-
ville area for their required vol-
unteer experience in the field.
"We weren't really limited �
just some area that would allow
us to get some experience
Johnson said. "I rode for about 10
years when I.was younger. I
thought it would be a good way to
combine horses, which I enjoy,
with working with people with
disabilities and helping them en-
joy riding
"Anne started working about a
year ago Bryant said. "She did
her volunteer work with me
and she just stuck with us. She
came back all the time
"That semester, I went over
there each Saturday morning,
three to four hours every morn-
ing Johnson said. "When that
was over in April, I continued.
Maria would call me � 'could I
help with this or 'could I come
this weekend and do this We did
a circus one time in the Greenville
area, and we had a fund raiser for
the Children's Miracle Network
along with the GDJ Center
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Volunteering with the GDJ
Challenge might have been a
surprise for any other rehabili-
tati ve services major, but not for
Johnson. She knew what was in
store for those who work with
horses.
"It's usually a third working
with the kids, and the other two- �
thirds is getting the horses ready ;
for the kids Bryant said. "You ;
always have to work with the
horses. It's the smallest amount
of time working actually with �
the kids
"Most mornings, I get the ;
horses saddled up and ready for ;
Mark to ride Johnson said. "We
usually ride from 30 minutes to
an hour, and then I do other odd �
jobs around the stable if I'm ;
needed feeding the horses, ;
cleaning up the stables. That's
mainly about it, just something !
Maria might need: 'We need to �
fix this fence'or'We need to talk ;
about this that we're looking to ;
do � can you help us?' Every ;
now and then, I might help with ;
another rider besides Mark !
"Oh, the kids love her !
Bryant said. "Anne is not here '�
every time, because now she's �
got other things to do. Every ;
time she's here, the kids say
'Anne They really love her.
She's absolutely great � she's a,
jewel
Most of Johnson's volunteer
hours have been spent working
with Bradley, both during and
after her credit hours. It comes
as no surprise that the Bradley
family wanted her involved
when the prospect of the Special'
Olympics arose.
"I really got involved in the
Special Olympics through Dr.
Bradley, who is Mark's dad
Johnson said. "Mark was riding
down at the farm he asked me
if I would be a part of the Special
Olympics, and that was in Au-
gust. They asked me � since I
had worked with Mark before
� if I would be there as their
leader
"Anne had to go to a training
session to get qualified for the;
Special Olympics � certified as;
a horse-leader Bryant said.I
"She's shown horses before, sol
See GDJ page 5 �
ECU RUGBY
WANTS YOU
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VS.
UNC-CHAPEL HILL
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30 1994
AT 2:30 PM
BEHIND ALLIED HEALTH
(NEAR R.O.C. TOWER)
THE WINNER ADVANCES TO THE
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COME SHOW YOUR SUPPORT
AND
SEE WHERE FOOTBALL BEGAN!
SPONSERED BY DIVISION OF CLUB SPORTS





4 The East Carolin
mn
October 27. l�-94
Drinking varies among races
African-Americans drink the least
(CPS) � African-American
students drink alcohol less of-
ten than their white counter-
parts and goon drinking binges
far less frequently, according to
a new study released bv the Core
Institute of Southern Illinois
University.
The study found that black
students consume 1.8 drinks per
week, compared to an average
of 5.6 drinks a week for white
students. Black students sur-
veyed were also much less likely
to binge drink, or consume five
or more drinks in one sitting.
According to the study, 21M per-
cent of the black students sur-
veyed reported binge drinking
during the previous two weeks,
while 45.4 percent of the white
students admitted that they
went on a drinking binge.
"We were surprised to find
such a dramatic difference said
Phillip Meilman, director of the
counseling center at the College
of William & Mary and co-di-
rector of the Core Institute,
which studies alcohol use
among students nationwide.
"Black college students are
drinking at much lower levels
than white students. The num-
bers are obvious.
And while it's good news for
black students, we have to some-
how find a way to bring down
the level for white students as
well
Louisiana State University
student Sherri Robinson said
she doesn't drink as much as
most college students because
she doesn't have the time.
"If I'm not in class, I'm either
studying or at work she said,
"And if I go out on the week-
ends, I don't want to get that
messed up because I'll be a
waste the whole next day
But Robinson, an African-
American, said she isn't about
to make any major generaliza-
tions about why she drinks less
than most students on the Ba-
ton Rouge campus, especially
any based on race. "I see black
students and white students
drunk all the time so it's hard to
say she said. "People in college
drink. That's true for almost ev-
erybody
The Core Institute study was
taken in response to a recent re-
port on college drinking from the
Center of Addiction and Sub-
stance Abuse at Columbia Uni-
versity that said college drinking
was reaching epidemic levels.
That report has been disputed by
many in the field of alcoho1 con-
sumption research who say it
greatly exaggerates the problem.
"We realize the importance ot
all of our research, but we wanted
to see if the drinking results were
the same for all students
Meilman said. "When it comes to
alcohol abuse, it's hard to clas-
sify the college community be-
cause there are vast differences
in drinking levels by race
Mikel Daniels said he and his
friends at North Carolina State
University go out drinking on
the weekends, but usually take a
pass during the week. "It takes a
lot for me to do well in my
classes Daniels said "I mean, I
stud) a Int. I don't want to screw
up my grades because I'm out
getting drunk
Daniels' weekday-priority at-
titude is echoed by other African-
American students on the Core
Institute's survey. Fi r those stu-
dents that indicated they drank,
almost 25 percent of the white
students said that poor academic
performance was a result of their
alcoholic consumption, while only
13 percent of the black students
did.
1 rurty-two percent of the white
students say they miss class be-
cause ot drinking the night be-
fore, while 17 percent of black
students admit the same.
Why do black students drink
less1 Meilman isn't sure, but he
said mat whatever the reasons,
white students should follow their
example. "If we could bring the
level ot drinking tor white stu-
dents down to the level of black
students he says, "we would be
making tremendous progress
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Students can
get debt help
(CPS) � "Buv now, pay later"
may sound prettv good today.
But when von find yourself still
paying tot the pizza that you
gulped down in your freshman
dorm � and it's two years after
vour college graduation, you
may think again, say credit card
counselors.
"It's difficult enough fora col-
lege grad to make ends meet,
without having to pay for pizzas
they polished off years ago said
Gerri Detweiler, author of The
Ultimate Credit Handbook.
But you can get help.
One of the first options, of
course is parents. Michelle
Bedell, 22, savs she is now sorry
she waited until she was in deep
credit trouble before talking to
her parents.
"I think it's important to have
a credit card, but really know
what you are getting into
Bedell says. "Take the time to
learn about interest and talk to
your mother. Make sure that you
have money every month to pay
it off.
"You can't use a credit card if
you don't have any money
If talking to your parents is
not an option, often a school's
financial aid office can help. And
mostcitieshavenon-profitcredit
counseling services affiliated
with the National Foundation for
Consumer Credit.
One is the Consumer Credit
Counseling Service (CCCS),
which has 200 offices nation-
wide.
"We are dedicated to helping
people out of credit difficulty
and helping with personal fi-
nances says Gary Stroth, di-
rector of CCCS in Los Angeles,
who estimated his office has seen
a 15-20 percent increase in col-
lege students seeking help in the
past few years.
Students, however, should
learn techniques to manage their
credit card usage before any
trouble begins.
"There's really nothing wrong
with credit says Stroth, adding
that CCCS offices hold free semi-
nars about credit management
at colleges nationwide. "The
problem is we really don't teach
students how to use it
aSrmrt college students will
get a credit card in college and
use it carefully, says Detweiler.
jThat way, they 11 graduate with
a good credit rating, but without
a leu of credit card bills.
If you are in trouble with
credit card debt, counselors can
act as an intermediary between
you and the credit companies
and help to work out reason-
able payment terms and pre-
vent long-term damage to your
credit rating. One condition of
these terms is that you destroy
your credit cards until you are
out ot debt.
i or additional information
on handling credit cards, send
SI for the pamphlet, "What on
Don't Know Gan Cost You to:
Bankcard Holders of America,
Gustomer Relations, 24 Branch
Drive, Salem, Va. 24153.
Next week's
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Monday, 3 p.m.
and Tuesday, 3
p.m. While ya'll
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Tin
East Carolinian 5
October 27. 1994
Happy
Halloween
FREE PR
MW or
TEST
FreeQ�(en(llal
Servfcfcs Cwirising
Carolinafegftancy Center
209 S Evans St J 'JLl Hour: .
Pittman Building &5J4M& Monday - Friday
Greenville NC �SSL 8:00-40
GDJ
From p. 3
Shivering
Timbers
Greenville residents get spooky for
Halloween by decorating their yards
with inflatable ghosts and bats, a
popular option to the traditional
"sheet ghost Watch out for those
creepy goblins, ghouls and ghosts
that ease out of coffins on cold Hal-
loween nights.
Photo by STUART WILLIAMS
Tution fees on the rise
QO PIRATES1
Homecoming
rmd Jmpwttioii
(will be closed)
Oct. 29th
us
1400 S. Charles Blvd.
Suite 500
University Center
TuesFri. 9:30-8:00
Sat. 9:30-5:00
Come bu and ZlaiiaaU with
Jiet us Sau ZJhanksl
(LCU -Discounts
for faculty I students
830-1987
Aaik-3nsl 4ppointnenti
(QS) � An annual survev of
tuition and fee increases at
American colleges contains both
good and bad news for college
students.
First, the bad news: On aver-
age, tuition increased this year,
more than double the rate of in-
flation. Increases in tuition and
fees at American colleges and
universities rose by 6 percent,
according to a new study by the
College Board.
That means the average un-
dergraduate attending a private,
four-year college will be paying
S702 more for their education.
However, the good news is
that the tuition rates are increas-
ing at a lower rate than in past
years, indicating that many in-
stitutions are doing a better job
of holding the line on spiraling
college costs.
Still, the average college stu-
dent is not only paying more for
their education but is borrowing
more to cover costs, said Donald
Stewart, president of the College
Board.
Although this year's 6 percent
increase was the lowest in sev-
eral years, the survey indicates
th.it undergraduates are paying
anywhere from 553 to $702 more
for their education. At two-year
public schools, students are pay-
ing $53 more this year; students at
four-year public institutions are
shelling out an extra $151; stu-
dents at two-year private institu-
tions are paying $283 more; and
students at four-year private in-
stitutions are paying an estimated
increase of $702.
Stewart said as tuition and fees
continue to increase, more stu-
dents must turn to financial aid
for assistance.
Unfortunately, many students
are finding that the federal grant
programs are failing to keep pace
with rising tuition costs. The
HouseSenate education spend-
ing bill for 1995 freezes funding
for many student financial aid pro-
grams.
This means that many college
students are borrowing more
money to cover basic education
costs. According to Stewart, bor-
rowing in the Federal Family Edu-
cation Loans Program increased
by more than 40 percent in 1993-
94 over last year.
"The risk is as thebalance shifts
more toward loans and away from
grants, the most disadvantaged
students will look for options
other than college Stewart said.
"We have to look hard at the grow-
ing grant-loan imbalance and ask
ourselves how much we can rea-
sonably expect the poorest stu-
dents to borrow. One of the pur-
poses of a college education is to
help people create a better future,
not a deeply mortgaged future
While most colleges and uni-
versities are controlling costs, a
handful of both private and pub-
lic schools continue to raise tu-
ition by large amounts, causing
the national average to jump,
Stewart added.
"The fact remains that college
is still affordable for most stu-
dents he said. "Everyone has to
keep the issue of college costs in
perspective and not focus on the
few high-priced schools that mess
with the averages
So where is all the money go-
ing?
Despite the continuing in-
creases in tuition and fees, offi-
cials report that less money is go-
ing toward actual classroom learn-
ing than ever before.
"Low student-faculty ratios
translate into a large number of
See FEE page 6
OO
O O G O O
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NewmanCatholic
Student Center
wishes to announce a
CHANGE OF PLACE
in its Sunday Mass Schedule
beginning Oct 30th, 1994
"Mass will continue"
to he held srf T�e Newman Center,
953 E. 10th Street
8:30 Sunday evening Mass
will be held in
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 244
(instead of the Newman Center.)
For Further information, please call
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
she knows pretty much
Favetteville was just far
enough from Greenville to war-
rant the need for motel rooms
during the two-day event, but
the Pitt County team did not
get to sleep in, Bryant said.
"We started off at 5:00 feed-
ing the horses Bryant said.
"Saturday morning, they had
events until about 2:00, then
we went back to the hotel. In
the evenings, we went to a
place called Showbiz � the
kids all had a ball. They went
to bed pretty late
"They rode on Sunday
said Bryant. "Sunday, itstarted
at around 6:00 feeding the
horses, and they started riding
at around (�:00
"When Mark was riding, his
horse was a little excited to be
where he was Johnson said.
"Just to see Mark be able to
handle him as well as he did
usually at the horse farm, the
horse is used to everything,
and Mark can concentrate on
riding. Here in Favetteville
he had to extend himself and
deal with the other outside
distractions to the horse
anything else mat was going
on. It was just really great to
see him be able to deal with
that, and to know that I was a
part of it. It's something I'll
always remember, that I had
the chance to help him
Johnsor. talked about her
plans beyond her upcoming
graduation this summer.
"I want :o pursue a master's
degree in rehabilitation coun-
seling at ECU Johnson said.
"I'm reall eager to get out
and work � I want to get into
the mastes program, try to
work for awhile and then de-
cide if I'd rather get my doc-
torate
"I'd like to work in a voca-
tional rehabilitation setting,
where you would help people
go back io work Johnson
said. "Or I'd like to work in an
'independent living' setting,
where yov. help people regain
their independence if they're
in an accident. I'd like to help
them go from a dependent
lifestyle, and then be able to
work, anc things that they'd
like to
More than just an item on
the resume, Johnson will re
member her experiences with I
Bradley and the other handi �
capped individuals at GDJ
Challenge � and especially
with the Special Olympics. �:
"It was very rewarding to; I
be able to help Mark partici I
pate in something that was so; -
exciting to him, and so won ;
derful, that he might not get. ;
the chance to do Johnson
said. "Just seeing the other rid- :
ers that were there from the!
other cities and programs � it -
was just wonderful for me to' ;
see what they could do. We
got the chance to meet a lot of
new people and find out about
their programs; we did a lot of �
'networking' to get ideas
"I than k Dr. and Mrs. Brad-
ley for asking me to be a part
of Mark's venture into the Spe-
cial Olympics Johnson said.
"I was really honored that
they'd ask me to be a part of it.
It was a wonderful experience.
I'd also like to thank Maria for
giving me the opportunity to
help them
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6 The East Carolinian
October 27. 1994
Hunt alarmed
by violence
RDI
(AP) � Gov. Jim Hunt didn't
know when he scheduled a stop at
Grimslev High School to launch a
campaign against school violence
that his message would hit so close
to home.
Hunt's visit Friday with about
150 shocked students, some weep-
ing, came just two days after a 16-
vear-old Grimsley High student
shot and wounded an assistant prin-
cipal before killing himself.
"I don't have any answers for
vou all a somber Hunt told stu-
dents in the school's auditorium.
"I'm the governor of the state, but 1
don't know anv better than you
why these things happen. But 1 want
you to know I care about you
On Wednesday, Nicholas
Atkinson shot and wounded Bill
Whites, assistant principal Bill
Whites in theshoulder with a 9 mm
handgun. Whites was treated at
Moses Cone Hospital and released.
After shooting Whites, Atkinson,
a lOth-grader who had been sus-
pended for smoking, walked 30
yards down the street and shot him-
From p. 5
self in the head.
Ironically, Hunt had planned
weeks ago to come to Grimsley on
Friday to launch a pubic awareness
campaign on school violence.
"Instead of that, I want to listen
to you Hunt told the students.
"One of the toughest thing?about
this is that people don't start taking
itseriouslv until it happens to them.
Then it's too late
Local school officials had asked
the governor to move his news con-
ference to another school to give
the students time to grieve. But the
students praised Hunt for coming
on Friday.
Human resources officer Steve
Roberts said theattention theshoot-
ing was getting could motivate stu-
dents, parents and teachers to work
together to rid their schools of weap-
ons.
"We're going to yell and holler
like we've never done before Rob-
erts told the students at the rally.
"We need help
See HUNTpage 7
People on the Street
Q. "Now that WZMB has
altered its programming, will
you be tuning in?"
From p. 1
"No, I will not be tuning in because they have
joined an already flooded market of main-
stream stations Kelly Cates, sophomore
"The change has not affected my listen-
ing because I usually only listen to the
specialty shows Vickie Sessoms, jun-
ior.
facultv and increased health care
costs said David Warren, presi-
dent of the National Association
of Independent Colleges and Uni-
versities, "The administrative
costs of complying with govern-
ment regulationscontinues to sky-
rocket, and up-to-date labs and
computer facilitiescontinue to take
a large bite from academic bud-
gets
Increased room andboara costs
also factor into the rising costs of
college. According to the College
Boarfl, students at private institu-
tions are paying an average of
$4,976 this vear for campus living,
up $188 form last year. Studentsat
public colleges and universities
are paying $3,826 this year for
room and board, $149 more than
last year.
James Appleberry, president of
the American Association of State
Colleges and Universities, said the
growing tuition burden for indi-
vidual students represents a failure
of the entire educational system.
"When the Higher Ed uca tion Act
was written in 1965, the idea was
that anyone should be able to at-
tend college regardless of his or her
economic status he said. "This
was based on the belief that educat-
ing citizens benefits the country as
a whole.
"Today, when institutions and
government continue to transfer
more of the cost to the students, the
original premise is in question. Edu-
cation becomes a product viewed
as only benefiting the person who
buys it, and tuition becomes a user
fee levied on the backs of students
"No, because if I wanted to hear mainstream
there are already many stations to choose from.
College radio should be diversity, not mainstream
Ed Salizeno, junior.
"I really haven't listened to 91.3 that
often, but now that it has changed I may
tune in more Holly Stephens, freshman
ting together support for the
Kinston Jetport, and now that
regionalism is a good word
Faulkner, who left ECU to
become the N.C. Secretary of
Revenue, reflected on 30 years
of service of RDI by giving
anecdotes about various staff
members and her memories
of the institute.
Faulkner grew up in nearby
Martin County, attended ECU
and later joined the staff.
"She brought to the univer-
sity a special individual tal-
ent for making people feel
good about themselves and
confident in their future said
Jim Lanier, vice chancellor for
institutional advancement.
"She came to RDI in 1982 as
the third director, and, under
her leadership, I think this
program began to move into a
period of maturitv. She has an
infectious personality and a
sparkling wit that wins friends
wherever she goes
Faulkner helped inaugu-
rate the umbrella approach to
regional development, while
helping faculty members stay
focused on their mission.
"The service area of the Re-
gional Development Institute,
as it was established by the
Economic Development
Agency, was identified as the
32 counties east of 1-95
Faulkner said. "A previous
professor put together a grant
and applied for one of those
federal grants to establish a
university-based service
agencv that would concen-
trate on extending the services
of the university into the re-
gion
RDI and CAT, along with
the Survey Research Labora-
tory (SRL) and the N.C. Small
Business and Technology De-
velopment Center, comprise
Regional Development Ser-
vices (RDS). RDS is located in
the Willis Building, in down-
town Greenville.
CORP
From p. 1
cation or to pay back student
loans. Under certain circum-
stances, members could serve
part time and receive an educa-
tion award of $2,362 per year
AmeriCorps service time is
typically full time for a one to
two year term. Full time is a pe-
riod of 1,700 hours of service over
nine months to a year. Some
members will serve part time for
a minimum of 900 hours over a
two-year period. Students who
are still in school can extend for a
third year of service in some in-
stances.
People of different ages and
backgrounds are welcome to ap-
ply. To qualify, students must be
at least 17 years or older. In some
instances, 16 year-olds will be
able to apply for specific youth
programs. Members must also
be a U.S. citizen or legal resident,
and in some instances, a high
school graduate.
For ECU students interested
in joining AmeriCorps, the
hotline number is 1-800-94-
ACORPS (1-800-942-2677). TDD
users can dial 800-833-3722.
R. Cherry Stokes
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FRIDAY
10$ DRAFT
(also $2 Ice Teas)
FREE ADM. for EVERYONE until 10:30
Downtown Gmovffle
SATURDAY
25$ DRAFT
Si.50 Margaritas
$1 Miller
SUNDAY & MONDAY
1DRAFT
(also $2 Ice Teas)
SYSTEMS MANAGER NEEDED
The East Carolinian is currently looking
for a systems manager with Macintosh
experience and working knowledge in
Ethernet network applications.
Applicants must be registered students
with at least a 2.0 GPA.
Apply at our offices on the second floor
of the Student Publications Building
(across from the library).





Oclobei 2 . I'H'4
irolirtianT
HUNT
From p. 6
NOW
CD.
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, WE NOW HAVE AN ATM MACHINE IN THE STORE
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
BUY ONE LOAF CRUSTY
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AND GET ONE
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SELECTED VARIETIES
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BUY ONE 1 4 OZ. PKG.
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t a meetin
1 hint and the students si
ideas about reducing schixil vio-
lence Proposalsin luded increas-
ing the number ot police resource
officers in the schools and i real
ingstudent mediation board
school courts to resoh e disputes
before the t �H alati
I hint told the gn w as
readv to make state tuniK aail
high -speed chasi th
stokesdale in his
able to hire more resource officers
Guilfordountv has five resouro
officers that are responsible for I I l ad lla For su
schools had gained the nicknami IikKx
For the county to get the officers, from friends, who remembere
local officials need to put up some
matching funds, Hunt said
Atkinson's friends admitted that
he had skirmishes with sheriff's
deputies and school offi ials. In uh .
Ukinson led sheriff's deputies on a
WRECK
From p. 1
him mostly for his friendliness and
kindness.
Bed ire lea ing, I hint urged the
rUs to use the tragedy to m.
pro e safety in then s �
'You can m
safe, hesaid 'But we can always
do more than w an di
push tor a stoplight a I tins inter
sei tion
Most ot the traffic lights out-
side of campus are the i itv s or
the State Road ' Apartment's re-
sponsibility Harrell said
"We, the university, don't have
any traffic lights. ITieonlv ones
we would have would be ones
on the interior of campus not in
tow n
Weakland still thinks about
the accident when she drives
"It's like when I'm dri
I Hi n ondering it they will stop
Weakland said.
Harrell said the university is
currently concentrating on the
safety ot students who cross 10th
Street in front ot Christenbur)
"We think the worst place right
now in on 10th Street Harrell
said
I hough there have been no ac
i identson 10th Street across from
Christenbury, Harrell said he
would like for students tobeeare-
tul, particularly pedestrians
w hili mg 10th Street i
urges them to use theolli
I fill traffic light crossing
lo increase student -ateiv
I larrell said that construi I
a new interse tion w. ith
light in front ot t hristenburv is
scheduled to be finished b
Novembei or in I )e eml h
Harrell also said that because
of the i ongestion on ampus stu-
dents driving around campus
should sta alert and r
tion to the speed limits.
WZMB
From p. 1
b p.m. And the format alter-
ations will not change the
station's format. WZMB will
continue to be an alternator-
station, i.ettw ich said
O'Donnel said most of the
responses have been positive,
and he believes the de ision
was madi' after careful consid-
eration.
"They're playing much bet-
ter than before because I hate
pop 40 sfutt I he were play-
ing all hard music but now it s
like listening to the station l
like back at home enn
Monser a sophomore, said
1 hose against the format al-
teration have also responded.
Moreso from the hardcore
WZMB tans that were afraid
that this would be an overall
upheaval of the or mat
l.eftwuh said "Whenevei the
words format change are men
tioned, everything ust gels
blown (Hit ot proportion I
don't think that anybody's go-
ing to notice a real definite dif-
ference other than more quality,
more listening sound
Leftwich predicts the format
alterations will eventually ex-
tend into nightly programming
II believes the station will be-
come more popular because ot
the modifications and the
station's ability to appeal to a
local audience.
"It has been getting better re-
cently but it's a little too conger
vative and mainstream for mv
tastes said Dan Machold, em-
ployee Ttt a local music store
1 he format change took sev-
eral weeks to pass through the
Media Hoard.
I was in favor of it ,nd
Susan Stewart, chairperson ot
the Media Board. "We have
strayed away from using the
word change this might mean
WZMB listeners may lose what-
ever made WZMB special to
them
Stewart said she has rei eived
positiv i ns trom the al-
terations.
"So far I v e heard posith e
things Stewart said "Nobod)
has come to me with a problem
except some of the DJ's came to
ofr first Media Hoard meeting
and saul thev did not support
it "
Three WZMB Hi's were i
ta ted, and all three stated that
thev did not have n opinion.
O Donne! said students are w
crime to submit opinions ad-
dressed to WZMB m Mendenhall
Student Centei
"1 like it better student An-
thony Gelardi said. "There's
more popular tnusi I hope
thev keep on doing it
V MB isompletelv student
run and receives funding
through the Media Board. The
station also receives grants trom
area businesses
Jumpin
Jack-o-
Lanterns
The faces of
evil, and not-so-
evil. shine
through these
ack-oanterns
Wiil these pretty
treasures wind
up busted on
the Greenville
streets?
! Z. Photo by LESLIE PETTY
mjUUJJUJ
casant s
You Wanna Know Whats Scary:
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Peasant's is proud to present: �"�� IMIHIIM
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J Hope we don't scare themm too much
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(Bass, Becks, Killians, & Bud)) V
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Only We Reserve The Right To limit Quantit
Ji November 1, 1994 In h
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LrrLr






BOBS
m res
PHOEBE
BY STEPHANIE SMITH
BY GREGORY DICKENS
LAKE IMP U.S.A
BY JOHN MURPHY MAGIC 101
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October 27. ! 9S4
The East Carolinian 9
The East Carolinian
L
The Clearly Labeled Satire Page
New registration process excites campus
Housekeepers kiss black-and-blues goodbye, students rejoice
4-
O
4-
a
a;
Staff Reports
The Least Carolinian
Students, faculty and
staff members can all cel-
ebrate ECU's new registra-
tion process, which has
been described by many as
the cutting edge of technol-
ogy-
The new registration
process has no waiting and
no busy phone lines, all you
have to do is drop your de-
sired schedule off at the
registrar's office and pick it
up one week later. The of-
fice has hired 500 tempo-
rary faculty in order to
avoid the normal confusion
students may encounter.
'I'm so delighted
said Elda Ladee. a house-
keeper. "Maybe now I
won't get knocked down
when I unlock the doors
during registration
The new system was
designed through com-
bined efforts of all admin-
istrative offices on campus.
Faculty and staff worked
closely together for years
before unveiling the pro-
cess.
Departments are now
planning to follow in the
footsteps of other schools
and offer enough classes for
all students, w ith the excep-
tion of freshmen.
"I will do anything 1
can do to make students
more comfortable. I will
fight and scratch for new
technology at ECU said
Chancellor Richard Eakin.
"It is important that ECU
try to be a step above the
rest
Various offices do-
nated money to pay for the
extra employees and Chan-
cellor Eakin said he would
pay the difference if more
money is needed.
"I'll sell my house and
my car, it's the least I can
do. What does it matter
when student were standing
out in the cold and rain at
all hours of the night?"
Eakin said.
Previously, student
have had to wait in frustrat-
ing lines and seek out un-
known professors for spe-
cial permission to enter a
class. This will no longer be
a problem. ECU has moved
to a complete honor system.
"We trust our stu-
dents. From now on. if a
student believes he or she
can perform and achieve
class requirements, they
can just sign up for the
class said Fatch Ance,
registration operations man-
ager. "Students pay a lot of .
money to come here and
should be given fast and
courteous service when
signing up for classes.
Student may pick up
schedules according to class
and alphabet each day next
week. Every student will
receive a scheduled time
on
Dizzy workers grab wrong blueprints
Chancellor loves new addition to campus, taxpayers feel gypped
Staff Reports
sheet in the mail containing
information on how to ad-
dress any problems or con-
cerns.
"Students of the future
will have no idea how hard
it was for us John Smith, a
junior, said. "This process
has definitely changed our
university for the better
The 500 employees
will be bused in to avoid any
parking confusion.
While this article is
completely satirical, the staff
of The East Carolinian
would like to voice its com-
plete support for a program
such as this. We're begging.
in
rr
fD
in
rr
l
D
4-�
O
L
0)
a
The Least Carolinian
In what can only be
described as a wondrous
example of faith in the as-
sembly instructions, the
construction intended to ex-
pand Joyner Library has led
to a recreation of the Old
Country here in Greenville.
Instead of adding 164. 000
square feet of space to ac-
commodate an increase in
student enrollment, ECU is
the proud ow ner of a per-
fect replica of the Eiffel
Tower.
"I can't really explain
it said Edward Midler,
foreman on the Joyner ex-
pansion project. "We got
about halfway through and
someone pointed out that
we weren't really building
something that looked like
meeting rooms and book-
shelf space
"While I think artistic
endeavors have their place
on campus, this just isn't
what we paid for, " said a
chagrined Chancellor
Eakin today, which was
scheduled as the deadline
for the construction.
"We always said
ECU had a little of every-
thing for everybody, but we
didn't expect to offer an op-
portunity to recreate great
international architecture
When asked if he
liked the structure, the
chancellor answered: "Oh.
I love it. It's classic and cer-
tainly eye-catching but I
think it's safe to say that
when the voters approved
the bond referendum to pay
for the expansion, they did
not expect for their money
to take this shape
Midler said he sus-
pects that when one of his
assistants went into Joyner
to inspect new blueprints
for the construction, he mis-
takenly picked up the new
library acquisition. French
Architecture In Depth, in-
stead of the blueprints.
The book, with de-
tailed schematics of famous
French structures, looked
so similar to the library
plans that no one noticed
the discrepancies before
construction was well un-
der way.
Midler said the com-
pany responsible would
build the additional library
space next to the nouveau
tower at no cost.
"It's the least we could
do, "he said. "Besides, we
can't tear it down without
threatening the existing li-
brary and you can't keep all
those books on the glass el-
evators now, can you?"
One concern left for
T
Students can now
enjoy the beautiful
replica of the Eiffel
Tower, built at the
intersection of
Founders Drive and
Alumni Circle by-
crazy workers
attempting to put
additions on Joyner
Library. Geez. guys,
aren 't von a little
off
m
rr
a
all those to ponder is just
when Wendy's was demol-
ished to make room for the
tower. -But the inadvertent
construction did have a sil-
ver lining.
"Well I'll be darned,
said the chancellor. "We got
some parking space
Bert, Ernie out of closet
Staff Reports
The Least Carolinian
Yes folks, iust when
you thought you had
heard it all, another crazy
thing happens. To the
many of you who missed
the Okra Winnifred
show, you missed hear-
ing the story of two of the
biggest known stars
around.
The life and legacy
of Bert and Ernie from
Sesame Street has put
parents in an uproar, and
kids not knowing what to
think.
After seeing Bert at
the infamous club, The
Limelight, everyone
knew that he had gotten
on a one-way train out of
Sesame Street. When
Okra asked him what he
was doing there, he re-
plied that he wanted to
expand his horizons, and
learn some new skills to
take home to Ernie.
The audience looked
at Bert with eyes of won-
der and jaws to the floor.
What did he mean by "tak-
ine home some new skills
to Ernie?"
This is when Okra's
show and her ratings went
through the roof. Bert and
Ernie came out of the
closet.
Yes, Bert and Ernie,
childhood heroes to mil-
lions, told the world that
they were gay and proud.
They had been lovers for
the last 12 years.
When a disgruntled
audience member asked
what they would do if they
were asked to leave the
show, they replied that
they would fight it tooth
and nail, and that they se-
riously doubted that it
would happen.
Ernie went on to ex-
plain that being gay does
not make himself or Bert
any different than any of
the other muppets, it just
gives them another angle.
He also went on to
say that parents and little
children should not be
alarmed and think that
thev are going to become
gay by watching them.
"Sesame Street is a
way for kids to learn and
a way for them to explore
different cultures and
lifestyles Ernie said.
Bert and Ernie think that
by coming out of the
closet, they will expand
the minds of millions, and
teach people a thing or
two about homosexuality.
They also think that
adults and children alike
need to be exposed to this
lifestyle, because they be-
lieve it is not something
that will just go away.
Okra said at the end
of the show that she was
"delighted to have two
such great stars be so open
and honest about their
lives and "it was nice to
know that muppets have
lives outside the television
too
Animals mimmick human habits
They keep suing, and suing, and suing
in
Q
rr
Staff Reports
The Least Carolinian
Animal rights groups are up in paws,
er, arms following a period of legal rulings
concerning their cause. Three weeks ago.
members the symphony orchestra of Eu-
reka, Ca balked at the idea of performing
the classic "Peter and the Wolf because it
displays the wolf in an unflattering light.
Some quit the symphony, some thought it
was silly, most were confused. What, they
wondered, would be next? The answers
weren't long coming.
Last week, the American Really, Re-
ally Nice Wolves Organization (ARRWO)
filed a class action suit in California against
Little Golden Books for disuibuting propa-
ganda against them.
"Shameful, very shameful said Big
Bad Wolf of Annapolis, Md. "We as wolves
have taken a beating for years. Little Red.
The damn pigs. We're sick as a dog about
it
The Brotherhood of Artistic and Re-
covering Kanines (BARK) quickly sued
ARRWO for defamation of character.
"Alright, sure, we're not in the best of
health Rover D. Mutt of Santa Anna NM.
said "Most dogs aren't as healthy as they
could be, but to suggest that all dogs are
sickly is ruinous to the image that we as dogs
are trying to project.
"I mean, we want to nip this in the old
bud before it continues further. We're not
having a cow over it
BARK was immediately sued by the
Hell's Cows for slander.
"Why, oh, why, oh why, do people
have to suggest that they are being burdened
with bovine children to suggest that they
can't cope with a situation questioned
Moosey Bessie of Kansas City. "I put in a
good day's work. I got the cud. I got the
milk; I'm working like a dog here"
"None of that, Ms. Bessie responded
Mutt
"Sorry. Rover answered Bessie But,
geez. they make a calf sound like a white
elephant
Hell's Cows was sued by We. the Huge
Elephants of the World (WHEW).
"Miserable said Babar Simba of
South Africa All those animal metaphors
is horrible to peoples. It no good. It every-
where. It getting so you can't swing a dead
cat by the tail without hitting an animal
metaphor
Without missing a beat. Cats Out the
Wazoo sued WHEW.
All cases are pending the assignment
of judges who can resu ain themselves from
slapping the whole lot of them.
a
m
rt-
T
in
rt-

-

"3
Happy Halloween!





1 OThe East Carolinian
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. S240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
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2899-2901 East 5th Street
� Located near ECU
� ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
IT. or Tommy Williams
756-7815758-7436
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
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Looking for someone dependable, but
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For more info, call 830-2055
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom, 112 bath- Cannon Court.
S200month 12 utilities- Contact
Fred or Jessy at 757-1053 available
immediately
FOR SERIOUS STUDENTS AND
FACULTY ONLY: Large furnished
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and purple bus stop (Harris at 10th
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Use of Kosher-style kitchen, screened
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immediately. Female preferred. Call
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For Sale
N�JCASHffi ,
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The East Carolinian
Classifieds
Services Offered
CL
rHeroesAreHereTooi
116 E. 5th Street
757-0948 !
Comics and Sportscards j
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Greek Personals
PI DELTA PLEDGES- You all are
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tions on your win. You guys are great'
Goodluckon vourgametonight. I ove,
the sisters and pledges.
SIGMA FOOTBALL-We're so proud
of you. Our coach David, team Mom
(Elizabeth) too. You fought and made
it all the way, until AZD won, but
that's okay! You did great
WITCHES, GOBLINS, WOLF MAN
JACKWe'resoglad Halloween isback!
The tailgate, the game, the night be-
Personals
WML
Greek Personals
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SPRING BREAK! Early sign-up
specials! Bahamas Party cruise 6
days S279! Includes 12 meals 6
parties! Cancun & Jamaica $399
with Air from Raleigh! 1-800-
(78-6386
SPRING BREAK EARLY SPE-
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and travel free! Call tor free info
packet. Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710
LOOKING FOR CHEAP FUN?
ExcitementA chance for prizes?
Paly Bush Buck Global Treasure
Hunt. Where? International pro-
grams, 306 E. 9th Street. Call
328-6769 for information
times.
fcEFl
Personals
the 14th at 1pm. You were car-
rying a manilla folder. I was
vvearing a baseball hat. Should
have asked your name. Up for a
cup of coffee? Come by Java Shop
Fri. 28th around 3pm. Hope to
meet you!
tore too, I lave fun but be safe & we will
too! Lo e. the Sigmas
CONGRATULATIONS Rita Holmes
for making Homecoming court. Your
ACPI sisters'are proud of you!
AOPIS AND SIG EPS all dressed in
white to party in the bat k yard, beneath
the black lights. Marking c n each other
in colors so bright, interesting things
were learned by the end of the night.
Thanks Si; Ep we had lots of fun. we li
have to partv again who knows whats
to come. Sisters of AOPI
AZD GIRLS are the best in the world
In flag Football that is. Congrats on
winning the Sororitv Championship!
eknewya'llhaditinvouLoveyour
Sisters and Pledges.
on
RODE THE ELEVATOR IN
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AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
One and two ������� �prt�ieiits.
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tale Rent Rates as well
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Call 752-8320 between
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Looking For.
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A job?
Someone to type your papers?
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anaconda?
The East Carolinian Classifieds
Page is where to look or advertise
to get what you need.
To place an ad, come by our
offices on the second floor of the
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from Joyner Library)
or call ECU.6366.
I
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Announcements
ECU HOMECOMING STEP
SHOW
2 "Ain't No Half-Steppin with the
n Greeks of ECU Saturday, Oct. 29 at
T- Wright Auditorium. $5 for students
$7 for non-students. Doors open at
�� 5pm and the show starts at 7pm. This
if is a Homecoming Event you don't
t want to miss.
j-
t MIDNIGHT MADNESS
Don't miss all of the fun at this years
Midnight Madnesson Monday.Octo-
ber 31 at 9:00pm in Mendenhall. For
more information call Recreational
Services at 328-6387
MAIORSfMINORS FAIR
Confused about a Major? Attend the
MajorsMinors Fair, 12:30-3:30pmon
Wednesday, Novermber 2 in
Mendenhall's Great Room. The fair is
being sponsored by the Career Ed uca-
tion Committee. It will give ECU stu-
dents an opportunity to meet with
facultv and students to discuss poten-
tial majors and minors. There will be
over 40 academic departments in at-
tendance. An excellent opportunity
for students who are undecided, un-
certain, or just curious about a major.
All studentsareencouraged to attend.
OFFICE OF COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
PAID SUMMER JOBS throughout
North Carolina available for all ma-
jors. If interested, pleaseattend a YAIO
information seminar on November 1
at 2pm in room 1032 of the General
Classroom Building. For more infor-
mation, contactCooperative Education.
GCB 2300,328-6979.
EAST CAROLINA GOSPEL
CHOIR
The East Carolina University Gospel
Choir is cordially inviting students,
faculty, alumni and friends to join us at
our Fall Concert, during the Home-
coming Weekend on October 30, 1994
at 5:00pm in the Fletcher Recital Hall.
Please join us at the spectacular event.
APOLLO NIGHT AUDITION
If you can sing, rap or dance here's a
good chance to show off vour talent.
APOLLO NIGHT AUDITION will be
held on November 1, 1994 at 5:00-
7:00pm at the Ledonia Wright Cutural
Center. For more information contact
John Lynch at 328-7055 or Sherman
Loveat 757-3289. Everyone is welcome
to audition! Apollo Night will be held
on November 8, 1994 at 7:00pm in
Hendrix Theatre.
NOON TIME LECTURE SERIES
Monday, October 31 12:30-1:30pm
Brody 2W-50. "Compromised Immu-
nity" by Andy Kirby. To be presented
by ECU School of Medicine Readers'
Theater Company.
KAPPA DELTA PI
Kappa Delta Pi is having it's first orga-
nizational meeting Thursday, October
27 at 5:00 in room 129 Speight. Those of
you that have a 3.4 GPA and have com-
pleted at least eight hours of education
courses, please attend to find out what
Kappa Delta Pi, an International Honor
Society for Educators, has to offer you.
UNMASKING THE POWERS
College of Arts and Sciences, ECU, Re-
ligious Studies Program presents the
3rd Annual JarvisLectureonChristian-
ity & Culture Unmasking the Powers.
Walter Wink, PH.D, Professor of Bibli-
cal Interpretation, Auburn Theological
Seminary, NY. Monday, October 31,
1994 - 8:00pm at ECU Nursing Bldg.
Room 101 (parking lot at end of west
6th street). Reception immediately fol-
lowing.
SUNDAY MASS SCHEDULE
The Newman Catholic Student Center
wishes to announce a CHANGE OF
PLACE in its SUNDAY MASS SCH ED-
UI.F. BeginningOct. 30 the 8:30 Evening
Mass will be held in Mendenall Student
Center, Room 244. For further informa-
tion, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-
1991.
CLIMB INTO ACTION AT
CLIFFHANGER
Cliffhannger has been rescheduled for
Thursday, October 27 at the climbing
tower. There will be free rock climbing
which begins at 5:l()pm tollowed by a
free cook out and the movie Cliffhanger.
For more information call Recreational
Services at 12S-t3S7.
BOOK SALE
Great Bargains! October26 & 27,1994 at
ECU's Jovner Library. Proceeds to ECU
Library. Sponsored by Friends of ECU
Library.
CALL FOR FACULTY PROPOSALS
The Honors Program Commitee of the
Facultv Senate will consider proposals
for Fall 1995 Honors Seminars at its
meeting on Nov. 15, 1994 beginning at
2:00 in Rawl Annex 142. To propose a
seminar, a faculty member should use
the general format of the basic New
Course Proposal Form and do one of
the following: Appear at the Nov. 15
Honors Program Committee meeting
to submit the proposal in 15 copies.
Contact Doug McMillan, Dept. of
Englinsh(FC2119,Ext.6667or6041ito
schedulea tentahvetime;orSubmit 15
copies of the course proposal to Doug
McMillan, Dept. of English. By Nov. 4,
1994. If you choose also to appear in
person at thecommitteemeeting, Doug
McMillan as above to schedule a tenta-
tive time.
PICASO
PICASO, the Pitt Counrv AIDS Ser-
vice Organization, is sponsoring an
HIVAIDS information line every
Wednesday night from 6-9pm. Anyone
with any questions about HIV, AIDS or
related issues is encouraged to call 830-
1660.
TREASURE CHESTS AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests. Be sure to
pick up vour FREE video yearbook
Available at the Student Store. The Fast
Carolinian, Joyner Library, Mendenhall
and the Media Board office in the Stu-
dent Publications Building.
�All ads must be pre-
paid
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The East Carolinian "11
October 27, ll94
The East Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
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Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
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Steven A. Hill, Opinion I'uiie Editor
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Printed on
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rryHO CANDW. PUT THE SWlNV
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'KAE TO K�fEAT NSEL.P?J. DorV'T
�� UNDERSTANDS, GUVS
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For more information, call 9I�.) 328-6366.
American feminist movement divide
After all, bail is just too expensive
Halloween is upon us once again. Many of you work hard and
Time to don the garb of your favorite deservedly believe you should repay
Koon or goblin and have a good time, yourself by playing hard. Play hard but
While the holiday is an excuse for please don't be stupid Studies have
children to solicit sweets, the adults who shown that there is a correlation between
observe the festivities more often seek alcohol consumption and acts of
pleasures of a different sort. stupidity - imagine that! The staff at
TheHalloweenritualformanyyoung TEC asks everyone to take responsibility
adults who attend ECU includes going for their own actions during the
downtown and imbibing to excess their
favorite alcoholic beverages. If you are
of legal age to drink alcohol, there usually
is no problem.
However, the staff at The East
Carolinian would like to remind everyone
Halloween festivities, no matter where
the party may be.
Kudos to all who attended last year's
celebrations at Mendenhall and
downtown, apparently things went
smoothly. It will take at least a couple
of FifthStreet'sless-than-glorioushistory more successful repeats to reassure the
conrning Halloween festivities local officials that ECU students are
AndTEC implores the new generation responsible when it comes to relieving
of freshmen to not repeat history, scholarly stress
Apparently the downtown area has been
the scene of some raucous Halloween
parties.
In fact, things have gotten so much
out of hand at times that local officials
have closed Fifth Street bars. Even such
Stalinist tactics as banning the holiday
celebrations downtown altogether have
It would be unfair not to mention the
out-of-towners who will surely show up
to have a good time. Set an example for
them and use your better judgment if
crisis erupts. Put your best foot forward
to insure that they too try to have a safe
Halloween.
Now that the sermon is over, let us go
ceieoranons owirawmi �bcui" ��.
beenusedtopreventany volatile activity, forth and safely en)0y Halloween.
Fools remove all doubt by speaking out
by Patrick Hinson
The feminist movement has
seen its better days. Today the
group that once represented the
plight of millions is facing a
crucial turning point. It seems to
have lost control of its message
and its image. This rift has been
created by two key factors: the
leaders have lost touch with the
women they are supposed to
represent, and primary party
objectives have been abandoned
for substandard causes.
In an insightful article,
Feminism's Identity Crisis, Wendy
Cramer notes that "The popular
image of feminism as a more or
less united quest for androgynous
equality is at least ten years out of
date
American women still feel the
need for a strong women's
movement but an outstanding 86
percent reject the feminist label.
Ask any woman why she's
not a feminist and its probable
that she will tell you: I like being
a woman; I respect the right of a
woman to stay at home and raise
children if she wants to; I don't
view men acting as gentlemen as
a form of social control; and I
don't hate men.
The reasons seem to sound
legitimate, but they are exactly
what theextreme sisters who have
come to define the movement
have campaigned against.
The extremist sisters have
tragically changed the battle cry
of "lama woman, I am strong, "
to the neurotic "I am a woman, I
am oppressed, victimized, and
powerless Mainstream women
realize that this is not the right
way to approach getting equality.
History has shown that the best
way to demonstrate that a belief
works is to prove it. Simple laws
will not change ways of
thinking, proof will.
For example, during the
1960's, civil rights legislation
was passed to advance the
rights of minorities. This was
beneficial from a legal
standpoint, actual public
opinion did not change until
time allowed the assertions to
be proven.
Mainstream women do not
believe that it is necessary to
work against men to achieve
the goals. Extremists fail to
realize that it is far better to
work with men rather than
abuse and condemn them.
The second cause of
separation in the feminist
movement is that there has
been an abandonment of party
objectives for fuzzy-headed
ventures into political
correctness.
In order to curb the rate of
sexual violence towards
women in America, we have
adopted polices regarding
consent, and most people
regard this to be a good thing.
But in the case of one small
college in Ohio, the extremists
have blown it entirely out of
proportion. In short, the rules
state that all sexual contact
must be consensual.
Consent must be obtained
verbally at every stage of a
physical relationship (i.e may
I unbutton this, may I take this
off, may I touch that.) Will
students soon be required to
turn in well written documents
of all their amorous activities
By Chris Arline
at the end of each semester.
The truth is that working
women who still make only 76
cents to every male dollar
realize that the true power rests
in capital. To coin a phrase
from the Republican National
Campaign in 1992, " Its
economics stupid I once
heard an ignorant sexist state
that women can have all the
rights they want because men
still own everything anyway.
While this statement is
certainly lacking taste, to say
the least, it does have some
truth to it. The true power in
society has always rested in the
hands of the class with the
higher socioeconomic status.
Until women achieve equal
economic status it will be
extremely difficult to achieve
a level playing field.
The feminist movement has
long held a respected place in
America, and it is a tragedy to
see it falter so badly after
coming so far and doing so
much.
Women cannot afford to
disenfranchise their extremist
sisters for the few things that
differentiate their objectives.
The extremists cannot
afford to alienate themselves
from the very movement they
claim to represent.
Through a close
cooperative team effort, the
two can once again pursue the
worthy goal of socioeconomic
equality.
It's time to rekindle the
flame and reclaim the saying
"I am a woman, I am strong
Divided you will fall.
Ever notice that there are
certain issues you really just can't
discuss with your friends? You
know, stuff like religion, politics,
and abortion, that kind of really
hairy stuff that begins as
conversation and ends with that
mutual feeling of wanting to go
for each other's throats.
Even when we achieve
these higher levels of education.
can't we sit down and just try to
reach some form of agreement on
issues that areas far-reaching and
important to all of us as a
community, instead of just
throwing gas on the fire as we get
angrier and angrier because the
other person refuses to
understand? Communication
between human beings can all
too often become a very
complicated and annoying
undertaking.
Everyone has their own
stance on things, and it is natural
that we feel strongly that what
we believe in is the right thing,
the only thing. Sure, we feel that
we're pretty liberal and open-
minded for the most part, but the
truth is we're really not. We all
need something to believe in, to
hold on to, to make us feel that we
are balanced and intelligent
beings. We pick up our beliefs,
unfortunately, from our parents
in the beginning, as much as many
of us would like to deny, and
then we pick up and hold the
things we believe in and agree
with as time goes by.
When people come along
mat have a different viewpoint,
and one that they adamantly
stand behind, well, we often think
they must be idiots. Some idiot
must have drilled the wrong
information into their heads.
Then, usually, we do our best to
de-program them, to attempt
make them see the error of their
ways. What fools we are.
I do my best to avoid
these touchy subjects when at all
possible. I believe the best policy
is to remain silent and let
everyone else duke it out and
make fools of themselves as they
try to prove that theirs can be the
only logical, moral, or intelligent
stance, and the rest of us are just
flat-out wrong.
Take politics for example.
Look at the lengths that Walter B.
Jones and Martin Lancaster are
going to try to make us vote for
them.
One might start to fear
that their example and the
examples of most every other
politician running for office today
might rub off on the younger
generation, those students
running for SGA offices at
colleges and universities. Wait,
no, that would never happen
would it? The younger generation
must surely see how ridiculous
that looks, right? Guess again.
I was nothing more than
embarrassed watching campaign
for SGA president this year
(although no more than I was last
year, I suppose, which wasn't any
different). I felt like I was reading
abouttwo kindergartners fighting
over a toy on a playground
somewhere.
Two greedy little brats is
what it all came down to, and do
you think we didn't see it? I feel
close to the same thing now,
watching the JonesLancaster
battle. The campaigners, by
avoiding almost any reference to
what they can and have done
positively themselves, focus only
on what a lying, stealing,
incompetent moron their
opponent is (as if to say, "he's
more of one than I am"). The
whole thing, the whole process of
political campaigning (and the
fact that its allowed - the level of
mudslinging - that is) just makes
me pretty sick and ashamed that
even today in this advanced age
we fail so miserably to
communicate effectively.
Politics are just one area
though. You can choose almost
any topic you can think of and,
with time, we will tend to
disagree and that level of
disagreement will grow. And as
that level grows, we seem to
resort to more and more
primitive actions and measures
to achieve the prize that we now
so desire, to win the argument.
All too often, in the end,
we even end-up killing each
other over something that almost
surely we could have agreed
upon, or at least compromised
on, if we could have kept a level
head for a while longer. At every
level of human interaction, in our
own homes, to the street gangs
in our every town, to the Arab
militants who blow up buses and
buildings full of innocent people,
to the superpower leaders who
decide the fate of thousands if
not millions of otherwise
innocent lives over something
that could have been talked out,
we often make the most
unintelligent choice when given
the chance to do something right
or wrong.
Being quiet, I know, is
�Letters to the Editor
To the Editor
I am baffled as to why WZMB canceled the New
Age Show. If there is such a thing as alternative
music, New Age was it. It was a soothing part of my
weekend that is greatly missed. Give us a break
from all the head banging stuff that surely repulses
most of your listeners. Remember variety? Please
live up to your credo of being an alternative station,
bring back the New Age Show.
Marine E. Hill
Accounting
Sophomore
To the Editor:
Since the beginning of the semester, several of
the fraternities on campus have commented on the
lack of attendance of some of the sororities during
pre-planned socials and events that have been
scheduled to take place.
A lot of fraternities go to a lot of time consuming
hard work, not to mention going deep into their
expense account, to plan these socials and tailgate
activities in which very few of the sisters show up. I
am not trying to criticize any certain sorority, but all
the fraternities would love to see a better turn out
after we put out our efforts into creating these events.
For those of you who take the time to show up sic
we thank you for coming.
This commentary not only applies to the sororties
but to the fraternities as well. If you guys get invited
toa sorority function and if you have the opportunity
to go, just try your best to show up. After all, these
girls go to a lot of trouble and expense to organize these
events also. During my years in the Greek system at
ECU sic 1 have seen the best response of attendance
by a group of people in which many brothers and
sisters try to teach and provide guidance to,sic our
very own pledges. A large majority of the pledges
seem to be very excited and interested in attending
different pre-planned events and do a great job
attending. Maybe if we watch and listen a little more
we can learn more from them than we thoughrsic
The main point that I feel should be emphasized is
that a good fraternity or sorority should be composed
of diversity and individuality in which builds a
stronger unity. To sum it all up, don't let the fraternity
or sorority think for you, think for the fraternity or
sorority or just think for yourself.
Robert Lewis
Criminal Justice
Senior
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
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October 27. 1W4
The East Carolinian 13
A Drop
IN THE
Bucket
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Come home this weekend
Brandon Waddell
Staff
.ier
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
"A Drop in the Bucket" is just
wliat it claim to be: a very tiny drop
in the great screaming bucket of
American media opinion. Take it as
you will.
Hope comes back from the
grave for the fourth time to ruin
Bo's love life. The question at
hand: is she really Hope?
Victoria marries her mother's
love toy who could have been
her half brother.
Charlene has three different
personalities, one of which is a
very funny hooker.
Vivian implants herself with
her arch enemy's eggs in order to
steal away her husband (who
used to be in love with Vivian).
These stories are of course fic-
tional, but events such as these
do happen everyday if you tune
into the world of soap operas.
You would think that after years
of crazy off the wall story lines,
and people constantly coming
back from the grave, the Ameri-
can public would eventually get
tired of it all and tune in to some-
thing a little more "educational
Well, that certainly is not the
case. Soap Operas have been a
way of life for many people for
the last 25 to 30 years. House-
wives started tuning in after little
Tommv was down for a nap or
while doing the laundry, and the
addiction was passed down to
Iheirchildrenand grandchildren.
; I will admit that I tune in to
Days of Our Lives" occasion-
ally, but before I came to school,
k was a show that I almost never
missed (thanks to our VCR). I
began watching "Days as it is
affectionately called by its fans,
when I was still in the womb. My
mom has watched the show since
its first episode, and thus passed
the tradition down to me. My
mom and her friends were so
involved in the show that I be-
gan to think that the people on
the TV were part of my family as
well.
In some cases, soap operas
can bring families together. My
dad and I, who have never really
had verv much in common, talk
about the latest power-trips by-
Vivian, and the other scandals
on "Davs I find it amusing the
times I call home, and my dad
will pick up the phone and ask
me if I have been watching the
show and what I think of what's
going on. It's great when he talks
about that instead of harping on
grade point averages and the re-
sponsibilities of being in school.
One thing about soap operas
that I learned in my first year of
college is that you can't escape
them. Many times when I would
come home in the afternoons
from class, every room I walked
by had a soap or. People were
popping popcorn and throwing
it at the screen when their char-
acters weren't doing what they
were supposed to, or when some-
thing was amiss. In fact, a few
people I know scheduled their
classes around their favorite soap
because they didn't want to wait
until late afternoon to see it on
tape.
So, what is the big appeal of
soap operas? What makes people
want to skip class and skip to a
j place right in front of the TV to
j watch them? Personally, I think
I soaps allow people to escape the
clutches of reality without using
mind altering drugs. House-
wives started watching to pass
the time, but when the people
dressed up in their fancy clothes
and went to their high class
shindigs, it made many female
watchers teel more glamorous
and a part of what was happen-
See DROP page 8
Manv people at ECU look upon
Homecoming as being the single
biggest event during the school
year; this year will be no excep-
tion, it the ad ministration, alumni,
clubs and groups have anything
to do about it.
"Years of Shared Visions"
events will be held all this week to
promote school spirit in prepara-
tion for the football game at 2 p.m.
on Saturday against the Univer-
sity of Cincinnati Bearcats.
Piratefest will be held tomor-
row evening from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at
the University Mall. Among those
scheduled to perform are the Pure
Gold dancers, ECU cheerleaders,
ECU'S Marching Pirates, the ECU
Gospel Choir and ECU Dance Ex
pressions. Local radio personality
Jeff Diamond will be the master ot
ceremonies There will also be
drawings for prizes from Univer-
sity Book Exchange (UBE) and The
Student Stores.
The Homecoming parade will
start at 10 a.m. Saturday at the
corner of Tenth and Elm Streets.
The parade route will go down Elm,
turn left onto Fifth, and turn right
on ReadeCircle (at MiLino's). This
year's parade promises tobeheavily
attended; viewers should get out on
those streets early.
The parade will include the
homecoming court, l bands, 20
floats, the Army R.O.T.C. Drill
Team, ECU. cheerleaders and of
course, what parade could be com-
plete without clowns? The ECU
Marching Pirates and bands from
14 area high schools will be com
peting for plaques and trophies.
Floats for the homecoming pa-
rade are made by clubs, fraternities
and sororities on campus who
worked diligently on these tor
weeks in preparation forSaturdav's
parade. I f all this seems to be a little
much to come out for on a Saturday
morning, TV station WITN (channel
7) will be televising the event for the
second year in a row.
One major change to homecom-
ing this year will be the crowing of
a homecoming king, as well as the
traditional queen
"This modification is to accom-
modate all students at Last Caro-
lina said av Marshall, assistant
director ot Student Activities.
The homecoming court is made
up of eight queen finalistsand eight
king finalists. Queen finalists are
Jennifer Beard, Ashley Brooks,
Krissv Eaton, Tiffany Ferretti, Rita
Holmes, Patricia Marapoti, Wende
Peters and Celeste Tayao.
KingfinalistsareCraigDourette,
Brian Johnson, Jeff Jones, Christo-
pher R. Murphey, Jason Painter,
Tim Pinkard, Fred Royer and Kurt
Stanfield. The homecoming king
and queen will be announced at
half-time of the game.
Following the game, the ECU.
Gospel Choir will present their an-
nual Fall Concert at 5 p.m. in
Fletcher Recital Hall, and admis-
sion is free to everyone.
There will also be a step show
sponsored bv the National Pan Hel-
lenicCouncil at Wright Auditorium
from 7 to 11 p.m It is a presentation
by the seven African-American fra-
ternities and sororities featuring
dance steps unique to their own
group.
kJllJlVl V.IIV'11 "I'W � �� � � 0
Only You could be and is so sappy
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Enchanted April, Sleepless in Se-
attle, and, most recently It Could
Happen to You are all timeless
Hollywood romances that
sparkle with the magic that tran-
scends the screen and goes
straight to the viewer's heart.
All these films contain many tan-
gible attributes, and a few intan-
gible ones, that combine to make
them wonderful motion pic-
tures. They all have enough
originality to obviate the
viewer's concerns about cliches
and they all have the able hand
of a quality director keeping the
tale focused.
The newest Hollywood con-
tender for inclusion into the
circle of great romantic comedies
is a Norman Jewison Moon-
struck) film called Only You.
Many of the intangible qualities
cannot be accounted for, but it is
the plethora of tangible ones that
doom this picture to obscurity.
Only You begins as an 11-
year-old named Faith (played as
an adult 14 years later by Marisa
Tomei) finds the name of her
destined spouse through a Ouija
board. The name of her destined
lover is Damon Bradley and
Faith patiently waits for him to
appear in her life. Unfortunately
Faith finds Dwayne, a podiatrist
with no charisma, and agrees to
marry him.
Ten days before her wedding
an old friend of Dwayne's calls
and tells Faith that Damon Brad-
ley phoned. Faith swoons and
then decides she must rush to
the airport (Damon is flying to
Italy) to meet Damon.
Damon's plane leaves as Faith
arrives so she books the next
plane to Venice, dragging her
sister-in-law Kate (Bonnie Hunt
in a charming performance).
From then on Only You stays in
Italv while Faith tries to track
down her fated Romeo. Though
the scenery is lovely, thanks in
large part to the cinematogra-
phy of Sven Nykvist (who
worked closely with Ingmar
Bergman), the story is too vapid
to enjoy.
Although Cinderella stories
are inherently unbelievable,
some grain of truth propels the
characters. In Enchanted April the
truth is that the women lead dull
lives and need some magic to
enrich those lives; in Sleepless in
Seattle'Meg Ryan desperately
wants a Hollywood romance and
finds one through the media of
radio; in It Could Happen to You
Nicholas Cage's integrity drives
all his actions and therefore the
film.
In Only You the truth for which
the main character searches is
one she learned from a child-
hood game. The setup itself be-
lies credibility and therefore
undermines all that transpires
after it. Faith's character never
gets developed. The reasons for
her adherence to her misguided
belief in a Ouija board are never
clarified. Her entire search seems
to occur only to sell movie tick-
ets instead of touching the
viewer.
See ONLY page 17
Go mad at
Mendenhall
76e �ast @viUuum 'i.
Brandon Waddell
Staff Writer
In case you're in a whirl-
wind of confusion concerning
Halloween, there are alterna-
tives to the drunken state of
mind that has become legend-
ary with Halloween in Green-
ville. "Midnight Madness" has
been programmed by the stu-
dent activities department for
the last three years. "It was
originally designed as an alter-
native to downtown, but now
has evolved into an event in
itself said Steven Gray, di-
rector of student activities.
Mendenhall Student Center
will be transformed into a medi-
eval castle with a variety of sub-
stance-free activities for stu-
dents. Activities will start at 9
p.m. Monday night, and they
will run simultaneously until
about 1 a.m. Events include
video karaoke in room 244, and
(the most successful event last
year) horse and dog races will
be projected onto a movie screen.
HypnotistComedian .
Medicine Hat will perform two
shows Monday night in Hendrix
Theater at 10 p.m. and midnight.
See MAD page 17
Super-Obscure
Trivia Quiz Answers
I Finally, we get around to running the answers to ourfrustratingly J
I difficult and oh-so obscure trivia quiz! We're running questions I
I again for your convenience. The topic was Children'sTelevision, I
I the questions were maddening, and we hope you've enjoyed all I
I the hair-ripping fun!
I
I1
I
I.
Y
I
I
I
Q: What was the name of the race of monkey people on "Land j
fiiliT' A.l-i�DiLj-iri a
of the Lost?" A: the Pakooni
Q; What was the title of the movie playing at the drive-in
during the opening of "The Flintstones?" A; The Monster
.3 Q: What Sid and Marty Krofft show featured a land populated
by giant talking hats and starred Charles Nelson Reilly? j
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
Appearing soon for your edification
and amusement:
Thursday, Oct. 27
Edwin McCain Band
at the Attic
(classic rock)
Exorcist II: the Heretic
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(horror)
FREE!
Melanie Sparks
at Mendenhall
Noon Day Tunes
FREE!
Friday, Oct. 28
Breed 13
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Captain Cook and
the Coconutz
at the Attic
(Buffet Tribute)
Flyin' Mice
at Peasant's Cafe
(roots rock)
John Jicha, Ron Meyers,
and the Alumni Exhibition
at Gray Art Gallery
American String Quartet
with Valery Kuleshov
at Wright Auditorium
The Hitcher
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(horrorsuspense)
FREE!
Saturday, Oct. 29
25th Hour and
Not So Dandelions
at O'Rock's
(alterative)
Chairmen of the Board
at the Attic
(beach music)
Homecoming Parade
10 a.m.
See article forletails
Flowers in the Attic
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(horror)
FREE!
I
L
A: "Lidsville"
Q: On "Thundercats what was Snarf's real name?
A: Osbert
I
I
I
, J
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
Janet Speaks French
The Planet Janet
m m
Janet Speaks French is an eccen-
tric five member alternative rock
band based out of New York City.
For some reason this band seems to
be uniquely tied to the cultist world
of underground 'zines and pseudo
comics. The band claims to have
been locked into a never-ending
battle with the evil physicist Dr
Enrico Mandini and his masters) n
chronizer. This battle is said to have
taken place in one of the many alter-
nate universes affected by foul syn-
chronized music go figure.
Must of the 16 tracks contained on
Planet lane, the group's latest release,
are led bySeanO'Sullivan, with Dave
Stern leading four of the 16.
When the second track, "River to
Mv Soul first starts out, it'll remind
you of that old REM tune "Orange
Crush It's almost as if REM them-
selves are playing this one. "World
on Wire which is about the closest
this band comes to true metal, would
be better-received minus the strain in
Sean's voice. At times this becomes
an identifying characteristic through-
out the CD.
Without a doubt the most pro
nounced instrument in this band is
Chad Sonenberg's guitar. Chad is
capable of creating sporadic riffs
which could be described as spacy
and nerve moving. Incidentally the
February 1994 issue ot Guitar Playet
magazine featuresC had'ssoloproject
See JAN page 17
Downset
Lies
When Rage Against the Ma-
chine unexpected! v became suc-
cessful on the popular music
charts, I wondered how long it
would take for their influence
to show up in other bands. I'm
guessing there are a bucket tuil
o! Rage-type bands springing
up all over the place, espec ially
with the pseudo-punk revival
and the public acceptance of all
that corporate America sees as
alternative. I submit Downset as
the first obvious Rage-influ-
enced band.
Downset are from that capitol
of mayhem and destruction, Los
Angeles. The first song on their
self-titled debut CD is full of ref-
erences to their hometown. "An-
ger" is an indictment of the
L.A.P.D. and according to the
lyrics, they are responsible for
the death of the lead singer's
father. Many of their songs are
about some typeof human rights
violation committed by either
the L.A.P.D. or the LS. govern-
ment. "My American Prayer" is
also in this same vein. It has the
standard accusations of geno-
cide and enslavement, but moves
more into the realm of trying to
figure out what the real problem
is. Lead singer Rev Oropeza
screams "Man's diversity is
America's greatest enemy " I rue
See LIES page 17
Sunday, Oct. 30
Dead Calm
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(horror)
Monday, Oct. 31
Purple Schoolbus
at the Attic
(deadhead)
Midnight Madness
at Mendenhall
See story for details
FREE!
CD Review
System
This box holds the key
to understanding the de-
vious ways of our CD
reviewers. Enjoy!

Pathetic
Lame
Pretty
Good
"m
Brilliant





1 4 The East Carolinian
October 27. I994
New disc could cause Widespread Panic
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Photo Courtesy of Capricorn Records
Here we see the boys from Widespread Panic yukking it up at the reservoir. Their talent has taken
them from being mere local favorites to regional stardom and a national recording contract.
Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Widespread Panic just released
a very unique album titled "Ain't
Life Grand It includes a lot of
variety. I definitely can't say that it
sounded just like the past three
Widespread albums.
The first song, titled "Little Kin
was a lot harder than their usual
material. It was kind of strange
with "Little Kin" as the first song.
I wondered what the rest of the
record was going to sound like but
I soon found out that I couldn't
use one song to identifv the entire
album.
The next track, "Airplane"
started out very slow, but got pro-
gressively faster. It spoke of the
reluctance to travel when it's ob vi-
ouslynecessary.Guitarist John Bell
said, "The song was written on the
wav to a real airplane being wa i ted
for
One of the more psychedelic
tracks on the album was "Raise
the Roof It was a verv mellow
song that featured soft bongos and
acoustic melodies. Bassist Dave
Schools said, "It was such a mellow
and moodv song, and the waj u e
plaved it had a combination of ten-
tativeness and spookiness We
wanted to keep that mood
The next song, "Junior changed
the pace immediately. It was prettv
hard, and featured guitar leads that
seemed to go on forever. The lTii
dealt with childhood issues, but thev
weren't very impressive Thev were
relatively simple lyrics. But the mu-
sic was very intense.
One of the moreinteresting songs
was titled "L.A It was entirely in-
strumental. But not the kind of in-
strumental that you might expect
from Widespread. It was more like
fusion. "L.Awas probably theeasi-
est song to listen to on the album.
Thev exhibited incredible versatil-
ity with this song.
The last two tracks on the album
were "Fishwater" and "Jack Thev
sounded most like the traditional
Widespread songs that were fea-
tured on previous albums such as
"Space Wrangler" and "Every
da) Ihevhad moreota Athen's-
musk feel.
Strangelv enough, both
"Fishwater" and Jack" came from
the original demos. School said,
"We kept 'Jack' because Mike was
in love with his guitar solo and he
never plays it the same way
twice Bell said, Fishwater' was
born on stage; we've played it for
years
Many times bands trv to redi-
rect their music to create a differ-
ent effect, and it just doesn't work
out, while other bands might con-
tinuously plav the same worn-out
format. But Widespread Panic has
definitely progressed to another
level with this album. Bell said, "I
feel good about the progression of
our albums because every one has
been more of a group effort. More
of a "bandness' is coming out. It's
another year; we're a little older.
VTiat we do � improvisation in a
rockand roll, R&B format�we've
been doing a lot and we're getting
better
Can 'Chicago Hope' to beat ER' at new time?
(AP) � Maybe you think
"ER" stands for "Emergency
Room
Wrong, doc. "ER" stands for
"Everything's Rosy
Plenty rosy for "ER's" An-
thony Edwards, who plays
emergency-room resident Dr.
Mark Greene in the NBC hos-
pital drama, airing at 10 p.m.
EDT Thursdays.
A guy who served as Tom
Cruise's doomed co-pilot in the
feature "Top Gun who had a
recurring role as the
hyperallergic "Bubble Man" on
"Northern Exposure now, lo
and behold, Edwards is slicing
and dicing his way to stardom
on his hot new doctor series.
"It's the hardest thing I've
ever done says the 32-year-
old actor � "but in a fun way
So what's the hardest part?
"Putting on your rubber
gloves at the same time you're
saying your lines
What's the most fun part?
"Saying things like 'ven-
tricular tachycardia' and
'Babinski as in Babinski re-
flex: If the patient's toe bends
back when vou stroke the sole of
the foot, that means ix-nay with
the ain-bray
Of course, another big new
Chicago-based doctor show set
up practice in the same time slot
this fall. CBS' "Chicago Hope"
stars Adam Arkin and Mandy
Patinkin as world-class surgeons
at a world-class medical center
whose world-class facilities (you
could store the Spruce Goose in
that lobbv!) the rough-and-
NewmanCatholic
Student Center
ALL SAINTS DAY,
TIESDAf. NOVEMBER 1
MASS SCHEDULE:
VIGIL MASS-MONDAY,
OCTOBER 31:
ALL MASSES WILL BE AT THE
NEWMAN CENTER
(955 E. 10TH STREET 2 HOUSES
FROM THE FLETHER MUSIC BDG.
tumble "ER" docs can only
dream about.
NBC's "ER" and CBS' "Chi-
cago Hope" represent TV's big-
gest medical breakthrough since
NBC's "Dr. Kildare" and ABC's
"Ben Casey" virtually invented
the genre in 1961, made instant
heart-throbs of Richard Cham-
berlain and Vince Edwards �
and even inspired a teenybopper
hit song ("Dr. Kildare! Dr. Casey!
You are wanted for consulta-
tion").
Those two medics co-existed
happily, Casey on Monday
nights, Kildare on Thursdays. In
that more innocent era, the net-
works weren't so quick to aim
similar series at each other and
risk neutralizing them both. Such
strategy was left to nations with
nuclear arsenals.
But this year, CBS fired
"Hope" at NBC's "ER NBC
fired back. Instant cliche: "duel-
ing doctors
As everybody knows, "ER"
(which also stars George
Clooney, Sherry Stringfield,
Noah Wyle and Eriq LaSalle)
prevailed from the very first
round. This gave rise to another
instant cliche � "CBS blinks
� when the so-called Eye Net-
work quickly moved "Hope" an
hour earlier on Thursdays, to 9
p.m. EDT. The next week,
"Hope" vaulted from 59th to
31st place. "ER" remained a
Top 10 fixture.
The showdown had lasted
all of two weeks. Yet the no-
tion persists � among TV crit-
ics, at least � that a blood feud
remains to be settled, and that
when the dust clears, only one
of those two shows should be
left standing.
It's only sporting that this
should be so. Except this isn't
sports, it's drama.
"What I hear from our writ-
ers is, they're so busy just try-
ing to create good drama
See ER page 16
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OPEN 10 - MIDNIGHT EVERYDAY
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'tJthJJP"





October 27. 1W4
The hast Carolinian15
'Mad About You' is not so mad after all
�P) sk anyone who
works on "Mad About You"
where they get their ideas and
nobody will admit they're se-
cretly taping the conversations
of millions oi married couples.
But that's exactl) what most
of their studio audience believes.
Thev ve forfeited a Friday
night to ciime to a taping of their
lives � or, more accurately, the
lives of Paul and Jamie
Buchman, the Everycouple from
New York who are the focus of
the NBC sitcom.
The woman warming up the
audience asks how many people
think the show is about them A
wave of hands shoots into the
air.
Paul Reiser is dodging in and
out of the crew's way, sipping
Evian and shaking hands, while
the theme song he wrote plays
for the crowd. Helen Hunt is read-
ing lines, keeping largely to her-
self while a hairdresser flits
about. Reiser's real-life wife,
Paula, is chatting on the side-
lines.
But once the cameras roll,
something bizarre happens �
Reiser and Hunt are echoing
tights, reconciliations and con-
versations you and your spouse
probably had last night, or last
year.
We wanted it to feel more
like life than it did television
savs Reiser, the star, co-creator
and co-producer. "People come
in a little deeper with vou, be-
cause they relate to you more. So
it's very much what we hoped to
do, and it's gratifying when it
happens
lad About You which airs
at 8 p.m. EDT Thursdavs, has
started out its third season in im-
pressive fashion: it nearly cracked
the Nielsen top 10 in recent rat-
ings, coming in 12th. Last year, it
hovered around No. 30 among
prime-time shows.
The series' art-imitates-life
style frequently has been com-
pared to that of another, even
more successful NBC Thursday
comedy, "Seinfeld" � something
"Mad's" makers accept with
equanimity.
"The first wave is compari-
sons. The second vvae is ques-
tions about the comparisons
says Reiser. "It's.not really an
issue
Executive producer Danny
Jacobson, who co-created "Mad
About You" with Reiser, isn't
complaining either.
"I love being mentioned in the
same breath as 'Seinfeld " he
says, adding that such compari-
sons mean "there's people out
there doing good stuff on TV
It seems no detail is negligible
when it comes to creating a sense
of realism. One set decorator de-
cided to replace the bag of dog
food sitting in a kitchen corner
because he thought theBuchmans
would teed their beloved mutt,
Murra-v, a better brand
And the actors and writers are
devoted to duplicating the ca-
dence or everyday speech. s
Hunt's Jamie makes dinner,
Reiser moves in and out of the
kitchen, talking to her, interrupt-
ing, absent-mindedly changing
the subject.
At times, he talks around the
business card he's using to pick
at something caught in his teeth.
She works a screaming tirade
around the theatrically perilous
job of tearing off cheap
pantyhose.
"In real life, you never stand
in the middle of the room and
talk to each other. Ever. You
shout from another room,
you're busy doing something
and you cut each other off
Reiser savs. "And in copying
those rhythms, vou have to do
a lot more work. You have to
stage differently, you have to
memorize lines differently
If you ask Reiser about the
question raised in last season's
closing episode � will the
Buchmans have a baby? � he
answers with a bit of personal
experience.
"The answer is, we're talk-
ing about it. As characters,
we're talking about it. It's ex-
actly what's going on in my
lite
Heller's story is no Catch-22
(APi � In 1470, Paramount
Pictures released a film version
of the classic anti-war novel
C.itcli-22. Author Joseph Heller
had little to do with the pro-
duction, but he met with direc-
tor Mike Nichols before shoot-
ing began.
"We had dinner and he was
talking about the book and what
he wanted do in the film
Heller recalled. "I had to smile
to myself.
"I was smiling because he
was talking about those char-
acters as if they were flesh and
blood. But they're not. They're
just characters in a novel
Nichols wasn't alone in
thinking otherwise.
For millions of readers, the
exploits of Capt. John Yossarian
and the rest of that unfortunate
World War II bomber squad-
ron seemed not so much larger
than life, but part of life itself.
Could anybody forget the
elusive Major Major, who only-
permitted visitors to his office
when he wasn't there, or the en-
terprising Milo Minderbinder
and his chocolate-covered cot-
ton!
Started in 1953 and published
eight years later, Catch-22 antici-
pated the disillusion in Ameri-
can society brought on by Viet-
nam and Watergate. The title
alone became a way of saying
the world was insane and the
only hope for escape was by go-
ing crazy � which, as the good
Colonel Korn would point out,
was proof vou were normal af-
ter all.
Those characters lived on in
reader's minds. Did Yossarian,
last seen evading the knife of
Nately's whore, succeed in his
mad rush to freedom? Did Chap-
lain Tappman ever get over his
ision of a naked man in a tree?
Heller, interviewed recently
in Manhattan, said he didn't
think much about it � at least
until a few years ago.
"I found myself thinking not
so much about the characters,
but about the idea of doing a
novel, set in the present, taking
very much from my own experi-
ence. And my experience in-
cluded a relationship with Catch-
22 and the characters said the
71-year-old author, who brings
back Yossarian, the still-haunted
chaplain and a handful of others
in the novel Closing Time.
"I remember waking up with
a thought in my mind and writ-
ing it down. The note was: In
the middle of the second week,
Yossarian began dreaming of his
mother and he knew again he
was going to die I began to
think about Yossarian. I knew
he would be living and would
be about the same age as me
Set in present-day New York,
Closing Time is Heller's mellow-
est work, and his bleakest. It con-
trasts the optimism of Yossarian,
now wealthy and involved with
a nurse, with a world that seems
unlikely to outlive him very long.
While the cover of Closing
Time bills it as "the sequel to
Catch-22 Heller'scurrent novel
is only loosely connected to his
famous first book. Many new
characters have been introduced
and the mood shifts between
social satire and melancholy re-
flection.
"I did not want to do a Catch-
22 redux said Heller.
"It wasn't going to have doz-
ens and dozens of young men. It
was going to be more about
growing old, where you have a
number of friends you don't see
very often. There wuld be less
physical activity, as it is in nor-
mal life
This is a book about the gen-
eration that thought of "the war"
as World War II and not Viet-
nam.
It's about illness and death
and long-term relationships. It
looks back on the settings of
Heller's childhood, his years in
the service and the jobs he held
before writing Catch-22.
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�'
16ru' East Carolinian
October 27. 1994
NC band enjoys corrosion
PHILADELPHIA (AP) �
School was not Pepper
Keenan's forte. But he grew up
plaving writing games with a
group of word-happy friends.
That's how he learned to love
manipulating language, and
putting it to good use as singer,
guitarist and chief lyricist for
the hard-core band Corrosion
of Conformity.
"We used to write stuff all
the time the feisty Keenan
says. "I would write a para-
graph and a friend of mine
would write a paragraph.
You get really creative, because
you try and confuse the guy
who's coming on after you.
"I failed English every year,
but I wrote more than anybody
I ever knew Despite what he
calls his "uneducated, street
level" upbringing, his writing
is rich with imagery, laden with
clever wordplay and rife with
alternately hidden and clear
meaning.
In "Broken Man for ex-
ample, he snarls: "The struggle
inside of vour mind is a waste of
time, purest thoughts evapo-
rateDark clouds reveal how
you feel in vour idle time, your
own tail becomes the bait
He savs the writing he does
on COC's major-label debut on
Columbia, "Deliverance is
based on "an outsider's point of
view
"To this day, I stay on this
guy's floor he said. "I don't
have a house. I have my bank
card and a really big duffle bag
and a bunch of books and that's
about it
The books are his journals �
he scorns reading, saying, "Some
people read books and some
people write 'em.
"I tend to write about things I
can touch or feel. I've never re-
ally been one to write about
atrocities in South Africa or
something, because it doesn't
really affect me
Keenan dropped out of Loui-
siana State University, though
not bv choice � he couldn't af-
ford to go anymore after com-
pleting a year. One new song,
"Senor Limpio deals with not
being given the chance to make
it.
"I just finished paying off the
bill he said. "I just want to try
and explain that just because
somebody's holding you down
and you don't ha e all the shots
in the world, don't take it as a
bad thing
He till yearns tor art school;
he's a talented photographer.
"(When) we go on tour, I still
check out art schools every once
in a while and see what's going
on he said.
COC fired its singer, Karl
Agell, and lost its bass player,
Phil Swisher, in the process.
Agell had sung the tracks on
"Deliverance but the rest of
the band wasn't pleased with
the results, so his vocals were
scrapped. The band then rehired
former bass player Mike Dean.
Keenan, a New Orleans na-
tive, wrote several songs and
sang on one on the Raleigh,
N.C band's last records, 1991's
"Blind
He's a chameleon-like singer,
and he's comfortable with his
expanded role.
"It's a weird thing when
you're writing lyrics and you're
trying to get somebody else to
sing them Keenan said. "It
doesn't convey properly.
"I'm not a great singer, but if
I'm going to go ahead and write
the (stuff), I might as well go
ahead and sing it, because it
means more to me. I don't re-
ally care about actual singing
technique � it's just how con-
vincing the person makes a song
feel he said.
ER
From p. 14
they're not really concerned with
either trying to imitate,or trying
to be different from, anything
Edwards replies when the com-
pare-arid-contrast question
conies up.
" The success or failure of ei-
ther Chicago Hope' or 'ER' is
based on whether or not people
want to watch the characters
And it really doesn't have much
to do with where the characters
happen to work he adds.
Nonetheless, critics have
struggled to pigeonhole the two
series into just about every con-
ceivable set of polarities. Thus is
one show labeled "fast the
other "slow one "rich the
other "poor one "young the
other "old Well, how about
"Democrat" or "Republican"1
"Window" or "aisle"? "Paper"
or "plastic"?
The truth is, "ER" and "Chi-
cago Hope" are both just what
the doctor ordered for viewe rs
who like good I V drama.
Watching one of these hos-
pital-set series need not pre-
clude watching the other, any
more than a viewer must
choose one and only one among
the police dramas "NYPD
Blue "Law & Order" and
"Homicide
Whk h brings us back to the
fix the networks still have us in
come Thursday night: Who in
his or her right mind wants to
sit through two hospital dra-
mas � however different, how-
ever excellent �back-to-back?
lust trv watching a two-hour
stretch of "Hope" and "ER
then see what kind of dreams
you have.
CBS and NBC continue to do
both shows, and their viewers,
a disservice. You don't have to
be a doctor to make your diag-
nosis: It's bloody stupid.
Primitive Flemish art on the road
ELTNtO
Walk Ins Rnytime
288BE.1Bth. Street
Eastgate Shopping Center
Rcross from Highway Patrol
Behind Car-Quest
752-3318
man's hair styling shoppe jjj- �j � g fi
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WITH E.C.U. I.D.
BRUGES, Belgium (AP) �
After 500 years, it's a trium-
phant homecoming for many
paintings of Hans Memling,
one of the greatest Flemish
Primitives. But some of
Memling's staunchest admir-
ers wish they had stayed away.
Several thousand people a
day visit the megaexhibit, lin-
ing up to get a glimpse, often
over someone else's shoulder,
of the vibrant colors, minute
details and sublime aura of
Memling's wood panels.
For most, it will be their only
chance to see works of the
Bruges master lured from as
far as Melbourne, Australia,
Pasadena, Calif and Gdansk,
Poland.
His biblical scenes and por-
traits of merchants made
Memling (14307-1494) one of
the most renowned masters of
an age that also produced the
brothers Jan and Hubert Van
Eyck and Rogier Van der
WCeyden.
-But with the reunion of the
delicate works on show here
through Nov. 15, a controversy
hs flared up over whether
such irreplaceable art should
travel at all.
"There are certain things that
should be left in peace. It's the
people that have to travel, not
the art said art re-
storer Roger
Marijnissen.
Wood panel paint-
ings are extremely
brittle, with thin layers
of pigment on a vola-
tile surface. "Panels
can shrink, create blis-
ters � paint starts peel-
ing Marijnissen said.
But even visions of
irreparable damage
have not deterred the
show's organizers, nor
has it kept 35 museums
from sending
Memlings on the road
to this center of Gothic and Flem-
ish Renaissance art.
"You have to try to do the
maximum with a minimum of
risk said Hilde Lobelle-
Caluwe, curator of the Memling
.1.
museums can afford to avoid.
While Paris' mighty Louvre
Museum refused to send its
Memlings for fear of damage,
the Narodovve Museum in
Gdansk didn't have
the option to be so pro-
tective. It sent
Memling's massive
triptych, "The Last
Judgment
"The Polish mu-
seum is in bad need of
museum and exhibit
infrastructure. A loan,
with compensation, is
the ideal way to help
meet the museum's
needs said Dr.
Valentin Vermeersch,
head curator of
Bruges' museums and
a co-organizer of the
show.
Such bartering "smacks of cul-
tural opportunism complained
The Financial Times.
In return for "The Last Judge-
ment" loan, Bruges promised,
Judgment" is now the star of the
Bruges show.
Measuring roughly eight feet
by 12 feet, the work shows Saint
Michael weighing the souls of
the dead, sending the chosen to
heaven and the damned to the
furnace of hell.
The brilliant golden colors
and the tormented expressions
of the damned leap out in con-
trast to his serene and realistic
later works.
Sent from Bruges to its owner
on a Florence-bound galley in
1473, it changed course when
the ship was hijacked by a pirate
and taken to Danzig, now
Gdansk.
There it stayed, despite inter-
ventions by the pope.
Poland lent it to the Louvre
and Berlin in the early 19th cen-
tury but hadn't let it out since
1956, until its current controver-
sial tour, which also included a
stop in Cologne.

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i ibcr
IW4
he Eastarolinian 17
JAN
From p. 13
d his endorsements v ith
;uitars and I libson sti ings
'in guv knovt s his
� �' i guitar
� ' f.ii liic most pr
M4D
From p. 73
DROP
From p. 73
OALV
From p. 73
- in terms ot ersatilih,
������� ists those wind
ii rifts and bears a striking
loeSatriani FTtefol-
� is likable,
. the K rics. i ere 1 ave
I mt a man wishing he
igain in order to shun
� respi insibilitiesandtherat-
( hie erse reads, "It I
hild again I'd pull the
m head I et the
i rld remain a mvs-
fore er unexplained " Funn .
1 sometimes feel the same w a .
Ii iri lane Speaks French's
i ontains several
gtunes Most are simplis-
ticalh written whuh works well.
On the down side though, their
sound ismissingsomethinginterms
of zeal or zest despite the loft abili-
ties of Sonnenberg's guitar.
�Martin
Newton
nig
M�
ful show sat othei
�-late
All din i toi � � ol
� � ted
.
I he i ill bedn
giving advice I
St v cii I wee! tioi
mentation,
� '
Studi ties con
inced that .nue vou comi
ou v on t want to tea e; so, it
vour Halloween will be sub-
stance-free, come to 'Midnight
Madness" in costume Monda
night.
it's HsM-oweeN!
Enjoy your snaRe op
blood &d neSn, but
Bewafce THe slimy ptfs
OF OVeR-ODNSUMPTlON!
ok, and that
- le sin ial is-
sm di orce and dis-
f the issues that
ha e been i up on these
shows I ven though there are ven
tew stneth monogamous relation-
Lies. Rape
ase an
tin show that safer sex is
rt mt and there are alw avs a
lot ol AN S tests happening I ami-
important on soa
hi iw someot the trials
and tribulations that a lot oi families
hrough.
1 ven though thev are trash and
often liae incredible storv lines,
soap operas do ha ea grand follow -
ing ol viewers I personalh don't
think that thev rot your mind, nor
do they make vou want to go out
and i heat i n on signifit ant others.
Until this vear I never realized
some of the good shows that came
onduring the time I watched I )avs
and 1 am glad that I'm not so ad-
dieted to the show that I can't watch
something else sometimes. Buttoall
of you diehard soap opera tans,
happy w atching!
Uniuerditu
GRILLf
Homemade
Chicken Salad
& Pimento Cheese
I . en the names in i
too corn to I I� ed
Faith, the audience is meant to
believ e, has just that. I he man
w ho does tall in love with her is
named Peter Wright (Robert
I ow nes , Jr.) I ��. en the name of
her destined partner resembles
I )amien (of the I hm n trilog i
Because of the names the viewer
knows the ultimate fate of ea h
i liarai ter
rhe shallow pess of the plot
must ha e been evident to
lew ison and writer Diana 1 )rake
because the include a substan-
tial subplot involving Kate, who
wants to leave her husband. In
Italy she meets a suave seducer
who tests her resolve. This sub-
plot mosth proves even more
interesting than the main one
because the characters have
more understandable drives and
desires.
1 ike Si . in Seattle the
characters in Only You talk of
mo ie romances and at one point
evoke Roman Holiday (the Gre-
gory Reck Audrey Hepburn ro-
mance) which bears little resem-
blance to Only )ou. In Sleepless
in Seattle the theme of movie ro-
mance was carried throughout
i no ci i
t in An A'
rail
ser e as a wa to pass the time
None of the themes in Only
You gets carried very tar I he
film ha- a jerky feel to it, drag-
ging the iewer through its ob-
vious manipulations the wav
Faith drags Kate through Italy.
I nlike Kate, the audience will
simn lose patience with the trip.
Only You goes on far too long
with little focus. Ideas are devel-
oped then dropped In the end
the audience is happy just to get
to the predestined ending so thev
can forget the film and maybe
rent a real romantic comedy later
in the week.
Only You does show that
lomei nd Downey, Jr. should
stav in supporting roles or in
ensemble i asts Neither one can
carry a film. 1 he lack the neces-
sary presence to hold the
audience's attention.
The fate of Only You may be
written in the stars. And because
those stars are Tomei and
Downey, r. (as well as ewison
and Drake) that fate is obscurity.
On a scale of one to ten, Only
Yon rates a tour.
LIES
From p. 13
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enough for nov , but it may
a'so be om greatest asset.
Their sound s somewhere
between R ge a nst the Ma-
chine and i IdS i cidalTenden-
cies, although Downset is not
as hard oi as good as either
band They can fade to soft tunk
and explode .r,to thrashing
choruses with much scream-
ing and rai ing tempo, but that
is a ver c immon thing these
days. As musicians they are
good, but the formula thev use
has been done much better bv
other bands
Some ol the more original
songs address such topics as
the condition of women in our
society and the abilitv of sci-
ence to reduce life to a chemi-
cal and moleculai structure.
Ironically, the hardest song on
the CD is one of heartbreak.
"Holding Hands is vour stan-
dard mv-girl-left-me-and-I-
feel-like-crap song, but it has a
stronger feel and harsher vo-
cals than most of the protest
type songs
There is even a song ad-
dressing the state of alterna-
tive music these days.
"Prostitutionalized" is a re-
minder thac it is more than just
music, this phenomenon is the
soundtrack for an intelligent
subculture. "Is Doc Martin
more important than a move-
ment, or is it so cheap that a
passing st ie is what makes
you sleep7 You must under-
stand the v Uue of our light
agree for the most part, but is
alternative 'eallya movement7
If so, what is our ideology7
Downset is good, but they
lack originality. A few of their
songs approach something
new, but they never really take
the leap into developing their
own distinct st le. I anticipate
more of the same in the not too
distant future.
� Kris
Hoffler
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Friday 28th
Capt. Cook and the Coconutz
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Saturday 29th
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Monday 31st
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HOW TO KEEP PEOPLE'S
HANDS OFF YOUR MONEY.
O Carry only enough cash to last the day.
Anyone who tries to borrow your last five spot
isn't a friend, anyway.
P Label your spare-change jar "beetle farm
Then, put your beetle farm in a ja? labeled
"spare change
O Mark up every space on checks.
Don't leave room for someone to fill in their
name and extra zeros.
O Keep your wallet in your front pocket.
It discourages pickpockets. So does wearing .
really tight pants.
O Put your picture on your credit card.
A Citibank Photocard is tough for anyone else
to use, unless they look just like you.
OTlBANiG
to4A4o4
armAmm
WE'RE LOOKING OUT FOR YOU.
To apply, call I -800-CITIBANK.
&m ism ?.f& P
Apply for the Citibank Classic card by completing the application in this issue or by calling I- 800 - CITIBANK





October 27. p)�)4
The East Carolinian 19
The East Carolinian
Sports
Pirates defeat Golden Hurricane 28-21
Dave Pond
Sports Editor
Last year's 2-9 record prompted
many teams to schedule the Pi-
rates as their homecoming game,
one that is supposed to be a
"gimme" in the win column.
So, on Saturday, the ECU toot-
ball team traveled to Tulsa, Okla-
homa, and, as expected be the
University of Tulsa coaching staff,
the l'irates were promptly
Pirate Report Card
Offense: Junior pilt-s up yardage. Crandell stilled b Tulsa defensive backstirade
cl
Ddems Allows wa) in much yardage i mediocre team Harts make fusion(Jrade
C

Special Teams: Levine boomin' kicks GaJlowa) runs back 92-yarder Coverage KGrade
A-
Coaching: Call lo go enJ one 4lh snd ' joesii'l hun. Good game plan.Grade
B
Overall: ECU squeaks out a M in. need lo get more intenseAuburn's coming!(irade
B-
outplayed, outpassed and outrun
m Skellv Stadium.
i owever, the Pirates won 28-
21 and presently claim a 2-0 record
as homecoming spoilers (USC 56-
42).
funior Smith rushed tor 14 ot
the Pirates' 269 total yards, while
QB Marcus Crandell was held to
1 l(i yards passing, his lowest total
ot the season. Sophomore Mitchell
Galloway scored two touchdowns,
including a 45-yard catch with4:32
lett in the game, the deciding score
in the PCI victory.
Golden Hurricane QB John
Fitzgerald led a Tulsa offense that
garnered 481 total yards, and com-
pleted 21 of 41 passes for 233 yards,
a Tnand two interceptions.
Against TL David and Daren
Hart became the first identical
twins in NCAA history to inter-
cept passes in the same game.
Daren picked off a first-quarter
attempt and returned in 2 yards,
while David picked off Pitgerald
on the first plav of the second quar-
ter, returning the INT 18 yards.
On the l'irates' first possession,
Smith piled up 3fi yardsen route to
a Damon Wilson l-yard touch-
down dive, putting the Pirates up
7-0.
Tulsa came back quickly led by
KB Solomon White, who marched
downfield tor 35 of his team-high
151 yards, capping off the drive
with a 9-yard run and tying the
score at 7-7.
However, on the ensuing kick-
ott, ECU sophomore Mitch Gallo-
way sprinted 47 yards for a touch-
down and a 14-7 Pirate lead. The
run was Galloway's career best and
the fourth-longest in school his-
torv.
lulsa's next drive would end
with Daren Hart's first intercep-
tion of the season, and the Pirates
took over on the TU 22-yard line.
Junior Smith, after a 1 U offsides
penalty, barreled straight ahead
for a 10-yard scoring run, putting
the Pirates up by 14, 21-7. Smith
netted 73 yards in the first quarter.
Tulsa would strike just before
the half ended, as Fitzgerald found
Michael Kedzior on a 12-yard TD
completion, shrinking the Pirate
See TULSA page 23
Photo by Garrett Killian
ECU'S Marcus Crandell-led air attack was considerably stifled by the Tulsa secondary.
Crandell did not complete a pass until the second quarter, and finished with 116 yards.
Swimming scrimmage held
Player of the Week
Eric Bartels
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Jackie Schmeider set varsity
records in five different races last
season for the Pirate swimmers.
Staff Writer
For the ECU swim team,
Tuesday, October 18 was an
exciting day as the pre-season
ended.
The annual Pirate Purple
Gold inter squad scrimmage
symbolized that all the pre-
season practicing and training
were over, and the season is
about to begin.
"I was very pleased with
their performance said Coach
Rick Kobe, who foresees a
strong team.
For both the men's and
women's teams, the gold squad
dominated the purple squad.
The men's gold won 122-94,
while the women's gold won
easily 135-101.
Coach Kobe can look tor-
ward to another winning sea-
son, after both his men's and
women's teams broke more
records.
In the women's competition,
the 400-yard medley relay team
of Amanda Atkinson, Bizzy
Browne, Sandra Ossmann and
Hilary Stokes set another mark.
Freshman Amanda Atkinson
broke the 200-yard backstoke,
as she established herself as a
premiere swimmer. In the 50-
yard freestyle, Hilary Stokes
tied the long-standing record.
For the men, Chris
Bembenek broke the 200 back-
stroke record, while in the 200-
vard breaststroke, Patrick
Kesler easily set another mark.
See SWIM page 23
(SID) � FCU's men's golf
team finished 13th at the John
Ryan Iron DukeClassi- Monday
afternoon at the Duke Golf Club
in Durham, N.C
Senior Dave Coates led ECU
with a two-round total of 153,
tying him for 28th place in the
141-player field. Trey Jarvis was
two strokes back at 155, and tied
for 48th place.

In football news, ECU has
added two more games with
Wake Forest, and will play them
four times starting in 2001. On
Sept. 1, 2001, Wake Forest will
travel to Greenville, and on Sept.
20,2003, the Pirates will travel to
Winston-Salem.Theaddidtional
games will be pla ved in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium on Sept. 4,2004,
and at WFU's Groves Stadium
on Sept. 9,2006.

In recent women's soccer ac-
tion, the I .ady Pirateseamed their
first career shutout, blanking
Barton College 8-0. ECU's Stacy
Schott scored four goals and re-
corded two assists to lead the
team in their second win of the
season. On Oct. 22, the team was
blanked 12-0 by William & Mary
, and on Oct. 19, the Lady Pirates
weredowned 5-1 by UNC-C h.n
lotte.

In men's action on Tuesday,
ECU shut out Francis Marion 4-
0, behind Marc Mullin's three
Draft plan complete
See NOTES page 23
(AP) � Including players fac-
ing offseason surgery in the NFL's
veteran allocation draft pool will
not he as bad as the Carolina Pan-
thers fear, according to the head of
the Denver Broncos organization.
The Panthers and Jacksonville
Jaguars each will select 30 to 42
players from other teams in an
allocation draft scheduled for mid-
February. All 28 existing clubs
must place six players in the allo-
cation pool.
Carolina officials were relieved
when the Player Access Plan, fi-
nalized last month, stipulated that
each existing NII club could place
only one player on injured reserve
and one veteran with 10 or more
years experience in the draft pool.
"I think many people outside
of football realize thata lot of play-
ers have offseason surgery; I'd say
as many as 12 per team said CEC
member Pat Bovvlen, president
and chief executive officer ot the
Denver Broncos. "I could point to
a lot of our veterans. Karl
Mecklenburg, for example, has
had offseason surgery almost ev-
ery year for one thing or another.
"Most are more ot a corrective
type of thing, and those are very
legitimate players. Believe me,
these surgeries are very common
Nevertheless, Panthers general
manager Bill Polian said includ-
ing players facing offseason sur-
gery in the a I location draft is "com-
pletely unacceptable
"We need serviceable players,
not people who'll spend the pre-
season rehabilitating themselv es.
Nor should we have the obliga-
tion ot picking up surgical costs,
workman's compensation, injury
grievance procedures or injury
protection guarantees Polian
said.
One ot the Panthers' chief concerns
about the allocation draft has long been
that existing teams would try to unload
only old or injured players.
Panthers president Mike
McCormack, while concerned about the
change, doesn't think every NFL team
will dump injured players in the pool.
See NFL page 23
Mark Libiano
Jr2L, LB, 6-3, 235
Libiano collected 21 tackles
in the Pirates 2S-2I victory over
the Golden Hurricane last
Saturday in Tulsa. Oklahoma.
"There are still ways I can
improve Libiano said. 'l am
only going to get better every
week
He also batted down John
Fitzgerald's final attempt to go
to the end zone, killing any
chance of a TU comeback
victory.
"Someone had to step up and
make the play he said. "Fortu-
nately. 1 was in a position to do
that.
Cone wins AL
Cy Young Award
(AP) � If Ewing Kauffman were
alive today, American League Cy
Young Award winner David Cone
knows what he would tell him.
"1 would tell him thanks What more
can you say for giving me a chance to
come home
Kauffman, owner and founder ot
the Kansas City Royals, had nothing to
do with the 1487 trade that sent a home-
town boy and promising pitching pros-
pect to the New York Mets. But it was
Kauffman, dying of cancer, who took
personal charge of negotiations six
years later when the hometown boy
became a free agent.
Kauffman's illness had advanced
even further in the spring of 1993 when
Cone got off to a horrible start in his
lirst year with the Royals.
"When I was0-5and Mr. Kauffman
was in very bad health, hi' had the
presence of mind to tall me lMM.1 say he
didn't regret the move, that he was
very happy with me being in Kansas
City Cone said "That had a pro
tound impa t on me
Kauffmandied later during the Itw3
season, just as Cone was beginning to
turn things around and get tolling
toward a strike-shortened 1MM4 sea-
son that became the tincst ot his ca-
reer
"It it wasn't for Mr. Kauffman, I
wouldn't have been wearing a Royals
uniform said Cone.
Cone, coming oft the worst season
of his career, began concentrating
more on finesse and lesson strikeouts
and was 16-5 with a 2.94 ERA when
the strike halted play on Aug. 12. Cv
Young runner up immy Kev was 17-
4 with a 3.27 1 RA for the New York
Yankees and led the majors in wins.
Cone received 15 of 28 first-place
votes n finished with 108 points in
balloting announced ITuesday bv the
Baseball Writers Association of
America Kev got 10 first-place votes
and 96 points
"I thoughteithei oneol uswould've
made a deserving winner. I'm hoping
to get a ham :e to i all him and tell him
thatone said
See AWARD page 23
New coach hopes to
turn around ECU's
volleyball program
Eric Bartels t
Staff Writer
With a new attitude and the promise of turning
the women's volleyball program around at East
Carolina, coach Gail Guttenberg sees her role as a
coach taking on many tasks
The first-year coach at ECU, from New Wash-
ington, Ohio, came from Judson College in Elgin,
Illinois. She comes to ECU staff after successfully
guiding Judson College to a second-place finish in
the Northern Illinois Intercollegiate Conference,
in which they finished last the year before.
Guttenberg brings to ECU a new and more posi-
tive attitude for her team to share amongst each
other.
"Attitudes are very important, and the way I
act around the team is just as important
Guttenberg said. "The way 1 act around the team
is symbolic to the way they act and play"
She also brings with her a great coaching phi-
losophy for her new team.
"I want them to know that they are winners,
that they can compete. Most of our games this
season have been decided in the fifth sets, by
scores of 17-15 or 20-18 Guttenberg said. "I ook
at last year's results. Most of their games did not
last past three sets
Guttenberg will bring to her team a sense of
equality and fairness.
"My coaches meant a lot to me, so I want to give
that back to my team. I want to let them know that
they can talk to me if thev have anything on their
See BALL page 23
i,
��S�i'V : 'i ��2i'
���-1 . :��:�
�'�� :�'��� ��'�s ,�UV� '��'�'� � '
'� � '� � '�:I ���fcr- l1wSiii1'
vNvv; rj � �rUv tu�
�' .V - C;v-V '
J.iVY. fair 'jr. , t iHi i,
Ii;ljQj
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
New Lady Pirate volleyball coach Gail Guttenberg has
experience rebuilding programs � she took Judson
College from last pice to second place in one season





Woods leads team UNC coach sees Robinson ends
in Shoal Creek win long road ahead NB a holdout
1 ven I i.ill I homp- ' � '
nee vowed tli.it his played host I
� �. ntrv i lub v ould onship
reed into act epl n
had to acknowledge he said � ' ho th
t seen the future of his came the first black
a lanky, black teenager I S Amateur "hi a-as
named I iger before Ni� klaus w ent crazy with
"You're a great player said his designs It's pretty flat and
m, extending his right straightforward, and not so dia-
ongratulate riger bolicalarou ;reensexcept
VVoi Is on ruesda We're .it Is rhat's the way I like it
proud of you. You're superb. I ntering the da three shots
Woods had just tamed Shoal behind Auburn's Ian Steel,
ek, a gorgeous lack Woods overcame that deficit be
sJicklaus-designed lavout thai fore the made the turn Bui
became a pariah after the com- Stanford teammate William
ments b rhompson, its Yanagisawa came on strong, fin
founder, prior to the 1990 PGA ishing at 208 with his seco
Championship. But any social straight 68 to put the pressure
rele ance of the victory seemed on Woods heading into the final
lost on the 18-year-old Stanford two holes
freshman. tthepar-5 17th, Woods'e
rhe significance to me is plosive power allowed him to
our team won, and I also hap- go for the green in two shots,
pen to be the individual cham- and he wound up on the left
pion Woods said after his two- fringe about 50 feet from thehole.
stroke victory in the err Pate
National Intercollegiate helped
the Cardinal wipe out a strong
2-team field. "That's what we
ime to do U e pla to v in.
Shoal Creek does have a
black member now, a promi-
nent Birmingham businessman
who was quickly added to the
rolls tour oars ago to dissuade
protestors from descending on
the front gates He isstill just an
honorary membe and has yet
to be joined by another black as
the club had promised
A tno of protesters were i e
mindfulot that fact as they pk k
eted outside the front gate I ues-
day, but Woods found Shoal
Crook much to his liking its
racial record notwithstanding.
He birdied the final two holes
fora 5-under-par67, gi ing him
a throe-round total of I (under
nee I
hultled m
Wi
See WOODS page 23
2 1 North i arojina v ith threi
final foui games this eai
it in state ri als i. State not tl
V ake I oresl and No 16 1 uke in
I hrov mlemson, a long i �
time 1 ai I leel fi lotball ri al, and i �
a banged up offensiv e line and 2 V (
linebacking corps and coach
� 3i vi bel ie es his lub
will be fai ing pressure cookers en
ti (l the next month
1 he V t offit e -i heduling
has changed the focus of a lot I
things in this league right now it - a mu -
because 1 don't know it there don t feel
has evei been this main games
that ha e been this important in
a row at the end ot the year he
saul 1 uesday
' asi �. ear i e i ould -a ll
this t( am heats them, they are
. to w m that one o or there
and that will help us some But
right now we have five crazy,
exciting weeks lett o) college
i he11 � �
It I w ould ha e said last
V'il ima u a

1
- s �
�T.
XtT "�mm
Seafood 'house and Oyster Bar
0th Street extension 11 vx 33 MonThurs. 4pm-9pm
3 indes east ol Food Lion InSat. 4pni-lOpm
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Mini Scallops $3.95
Soft Shell Crabs $6.95
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Cholestrol Free Food - Take Out Orders Welcome
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FREE COVER TILL 9:00 PM
Come into any club entrance Thursday and then
feel free to roam from club to club!
FREE MEMBERSHIPS
MNCe- BILLIARDS ROCH H ROLL
BLOCK PfiRTY
See TAR page 23
� 11 i i - o a
ie . . and returned to
the Portland l"rai B ��. thoul
; e tension he
But when pi
hinson was m
� m I He did n I
thei hour H
v. as lo� ked oui o( my I
s ,is th.
ierne I
Iiisi w hat, ii am thing, was at
� : �. the In ildout is un
Robinson agreed to retui n aftei
meeting with Blazers owner Paul
Allen at Allen's home in Seattle on
M. indav
-itln
I Sill
�ill ai
Robinsi in, though
See ROBINSON, i je 23
GET READY FOR HOMECOMING AT
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October 27. llW
Worley put on inactive list
AP) � The Chicago Bears are
notsayingmuchaboutwhatcaused
running back Tim Worley to miss
the team flight to Detroit and sub-
sequent loss to the Lions.
But they have placed Worley on
the reserve non-football injury list
and filled the opening with receiver
kennv Shedd from the New York
lets' practice squad.
he Bears said Tuesday thev Ao
not know when Worley, who they
say is attending to personal mat-
ters, will return to the active list.
Spokesman Bryan Harlan would
not comment further Tuesday.
Neither the Bears nor Worley's
wile. Becky, even knew where
Worley was until Sunday. The sec-
ond-string back finally showed at
home that afternoon, a day after
nusmg the flight.
Worley, who met Monday with
Bears coach Dave Wannstedt, has
been unavailable tor comment.
The Favetteville Observer-Times
reported that sources close to
Worlev,ananveof I umberton,N.C,
said Worley was suffering from de-
pression and had not relapsed into a
problem with cocaine, which led to
his suspension forsixgamesin 1991.
Sources in Chicago and
Lumberton verified that Worley left
tor the Midwest Tuesday to seek
help for depression and possible al-
cohol abuse, the Observer-Times re-
ported.
"He's somewhere seeking pro-
fessional help one source said.
"He's in a mental fog and is having
a tough time coping with the lack of
playing time. 1 le's just not handling
the pressure of big-league football
right now. Right now,he'sdepressed
to the point he's not saying a word
and is keeping everything to him-
self
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECl
758-0000
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An All-American at Georgia,
Worlev was the PittsburghSteelers'
first-round draft pick in 1989 and
gained 770 yards as a rookie After
an injury-tilled second season, he
was suspended tor six games in 1991
after twice testing positive tor co-
caine.
He also was suspended from the
NFL from April 1992 to May 1993
after he skipped two mandatory
drug tests.
last season, the Steelers traded
him to the Bears tor a fifth-round
draft choice in 14 and a condi-
tional pick in 1995. Worley rushed
tor 437 yards in ID games with C'hi-
i ago.
This season, he has 17 yards on
rune carries and often expressed dis-
appointment about playing behind
Lewis Tillman
Worley, who the Bears said had
been taking three drug tests a week,
has 2,238 career rushing yards.
Shedd, Worley's replacement on
the roster, was taken in the fifth
round of the 1993 draft by the Jets.
He was on the practice squad all
season before being signed to the 53-
plaver roster for the final game.
Shedd made the Jets' opening-
dav roster this season, but was
waived in the third week and re-
joined them a week later on the prac-
tice squad.
The 5-foot-9,171 -pound receiver
set the NCAA Division 1-A A career
record with seven punt returns for a
touchdown for Northern Iowa 1 It
also set conference records in receiv-
ing yards, punt returns and kick
return yards.
CHARLOTTE � KANNAPOLIS � SALISBURY � HIGH POINT � GREENSBORO
BURLINGTON- DURHAM � RALEIGH � SELMA -WILSON - ROCKY MOUNT
TOP
TEN
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10. You won't get a ticket for doing 79 mph.
9. You won't run out of gas.
8. You won't get lost.
7. It's a great place to meet girls.
6. It's a great place to meet guys.
5. It's mindless and hassle-free
(like our favorite instructor).
4. It's environmentally correct.
3. You have more time to sleep or study.
2. It's as low as $36 round trip from
Charlotte to Raleigh.
I. It's not just a trip, it's an adventure.
AMTRAK'S
CAR0LINIAN
" NEW YORK- RALEIGH - CHARIX)TIE
The Carolinian is jointly finuM by Amtrak
ami the North Carolina Department � Transportation
AMTRAK
I
THERE'S SOMETHING ABOUT A TRAIN THAT'S MAGIC.
The new Carolinian Connector provides daily van service for ticketed passengers
from the Salem Inn in Winston-Salem to the Greensboro Amtrak station.
Departing daily from the Salem Inn
for Greensboro in the morning and returning in the evening.
Call your travel agent or Amtrak for details at 1-800-USA-RAIL.
UC hopes to avoid another
pounding by Cornhuskers
(AT) � Two years ago, an unde-
feated Colorado team went to Ne-
braska as a national championship
contender. It left with a humiliating
2-7 loss. Memories of that depress-
ing day are still vivid as the second-
ranked Buffaloes prepare tor
Saturday's game against the No. 3
C ornhuskers in Lincoln.
"1 he thoughts 1 haveot'that game
uvn't very pleasant said tight end
Christian Fauna, one of 12 current
Coloradi i seniors whi i played in the
1992 game.
"It was a total slap in the face. It
was like going into someone'shome
and thev slap you around, spit in
your face and then kick you out. It
was one of the worst experiences
I've had playing football
Colorado was 6-0-1 and ranked
No. S going into the game. The loss
was the second-worst tor the Buffa-
loes under coach Bill McCartney, a
disaster dubbed the "Lincoln As-
sassination" by a Denver writer.
"We were emotionally prepared
to play, hut we started poorly and
Nebraska gained momentum
McCartney recalled. "They just ran
roughshod over us. It was total
domination
Colorado lost three fumbles,
threw three interceptions, was
sacked five times and outrushed
373-8. The scene on the sidelines
was as ugly as the one on the field.
' There was a lot of bickering and
fighting said receiver Michael
VVestbrook, whocaught three pass,
in the game. "We couldn't believe
what was happening
Tailback Rashaan Salaam was a
freshman resen e in 1492. Now he's
the nation's leading rusher, scorer
and the front-runner for the Heisman
Trophv.
"The completely shut down our
running game in '42 said Salaam,
who carried twice for five yards.
"The game just got out ot hand
Nebraska led 7-0 after the first
quarter and 24-7 at halftime. The
Cornhuskers added a touchdown
in the third period and three more in
the fourth quarter.
"It was embarrassing
cornerback Chris Hudson said. "We
just couldn't stop them
Hudson is one of the Colorado
seniors who has never beaten Ne-
braska. The Buffaloes lost 21-17 last
year in Boulder and tied the
Cornhuskers 14-14 in 1991.
"Every game is important, but no
game is as important as Nebraska
Fauria said. "Practices are a little
more intense and guys are a little
more serious
Fauria, Hudson and Westbrook
were redshirts in 1990 when Colo-
rado beat Nebraska 27-12 at Lincoln
and went on to win a share of the
national championship. They hope
that history repeats itself this year.
"We want to win the national
championship, and Nebraska is in
our way VVestbrook said.
flurry on down
to
The
East
Carolinian
Account Executive Wanted!
Flexible Hours, Great Experience, Money!
The East Carolinian is looking for an Account
Executive to sell advertising for the newspaper. The
hours are flexible and the job does pay. If you are
interested please go to the student publications
building, second floor, fill out an application and give
it to the secretary. For more information call 328-
6366 and ask for Chris Warren.
Applicants must be registered students with at least
a 2.0 GPA. Application and resume are required.
The East Carolinian 21
Dawkins
returns
asCBA
hoopster
(AP � The man who broke
backboards and once declared
his homeland the "Planet
Lovetron" is back as a kinder,
gentler Darryl Dawkins.
Dawkins, who played 14
seasons in the NBA, begins his
attempt to return to the show
next month when he plavs tor
the Sioux Falls Skyforce of the
Continental Basketball Asso-
ciation.
Skvforce coach Flip
Saunders said Dawkins has
been almost genteel to work
with as the team prepares for
training camp that begins Nov.
3.
"He's done a lot of things
and I think there's a peace
within himself Saunders
said.
The 37-year-old center once
known for smashing
backboards with a single dunk
and twisting reporters ears af-
terward with tales of his imagi-
nary homeland, "Planet
Lovetron said he wants to be
a quiet role player in the NBA
as a backup center.
Dawkins, a.k.a. "Double-
D once came up with meaty
names for his dunks like the
"Rim Wrecker "Co-Rilla
"In Your Face Disgrace" and
the backboard-shattering
"Chocolate Thunder
Now, he talks about play-
ing 20 minutes, scoring a bas-
ket or two and collecting a few
rebounds.
"When I first came into the
league you had to do it all
Dawkins said Tuesday in a
telephone interview from his
home in New Jersey. "I'm look-
ing to come back as a role
player to do whatever the team
needs
Dawkins and his Skyforce
mates will play against teams
like the Harrisburg, Pa Ham-
merheads, Mexico Aztecas and
See DAWKINS page 23
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22 The East Carolinian
October 27, 1994
Wolfpack
(AP) � North Carolina re-
fused to fire back.
N.C. State's Carl Reeves
guaranteed his team would
beat the 24th-ranked Tar Heels
on Saturday, but no one in the
North Carolina camp Tuesday-
was willing to get into a war of
words with the Wolfpack de-
fensive lineman.
Least willing of all was Tar
Heel coach Mack Brown, who
didn't seem bothered by Reeves'
bold prediction.
"Carl is a great young man
and he believes (N.C. State) is
going to win every Saturday
Brown said. "That's part of the
reason he plays so good.
"If somebody comes out and
says something bad about Caro-
lina, I usuallv don't like it. I
don't think it's good for our pro-
gram when they say something
negative about somebody else
because that's not what we want
to do in our lives.
"But when Carl says some-
thing positive about his team, I
don't blame him. 1 would hope
that our players would believe
that � whether they would say
that or not. He stands bv it on
the field
Reeves, of Durham, may be
more fired up than normal for
the backyard rivalry, consider-
ing a broken leg kept him out of
last vear's game � won by North
Carolina 35-14.
"They're going to be fired up
anyway regardless of whether I
said anvthing Reeves said
Mondav. "This is an arch-rival
game. If they're not fired up,
they're disappointing us. We're
expecting to be fired up when
we step off the bus
After a 34-10 blowout loss at
Virginia, the mood of the Tar
Heels (5-2, 2-2 ACC) can be de-
scribed as one of cautious opti-
mism. One thing is certain: there
are definitely some bruised egos
around Chapel Hill.
"1 don't like it. I don't like
it. It's definitely a lack of re-
spect defensive lineman
Greg Ellis said of Reeves' com-
ments.
"It's just words. We always
talk around here to respect ev-
erybody, all the football teams.
I personally have respect for
N.C. State. I know they are a
good football team
L.A. fights controversy
(AP) � For the second time
in as many weeks, the Los
Angeles Raiders are trying to
put controversy behind them.
Quarterback Jeff Hostetler
denied Tuesday that coach
Art Shell directed a racid
comment at him during an
argument on the sidelines
and strongly defended his
coach.
"1 feel extremely angered
that Art had to go through
this and that I'm any part of
this Hostetler said. "We're
not just talking about the little
game of football. This is his
whole life, his whole reputa-
tion.
"We're talking about a
guy's livelihood here, a guy's
life. I really feel for him right
now. He's the head coach, he
takes the majority of the
blame. We've had a rough
beginning this year and I
think he's handled it well
The coach and quarterback
got into a shouting match at
Miami on Oct. 16 during the
Raiders' 20-17 overtime loss
to the Dolphins. The argu-
ment concerned decisions by
Hostetler changing running
plays to passes.
Shell downplayed the in-
cident last week and the mat-
ter seemed closed until
shortly before the Raiders' 30-
17 victory over Atlanta on
Sunday.
ESPN's Chris Mortensen
reported on the network's
pregame show that, during the
dispute, Shell derisively com-
pared Hostetler to former Raid-
ers quarterback Jay Schroeder.
Allegedly, Shell called
Hostetler, "another white quar-
terback, just like Schroeder
Reportedly, the statement was
filled with expletives.
Shell and Minnesota's Den-
nis Green are the NFL's only
black head coaches.
On Monday, Shell denied
making the racial remark.
Hostetler, who did not com-
ment on the report then, called
his own news conference Tues-
day at the Raiders' training
camp.
"I don't know where it came
from. I have no idea where it
came from Hostetler said. "I
recall nothing like what's been
reported. There was a long dis-
cussion, a heated discussion. I
can honestly say I never heard
a racist remark said by Art
Mortensen stood by his story
Monday after being informed
of Shell's remarks, and in
Tuesday's Los Angeles Times,
three independent, unidenti-
fied sources were quoted as
supporting Mortensen's ver-
sion.
"Most situations that I've
dealt with like this, the best
thing to be said is nothing
Hostetler said during his 15-
minute meeting with reporters
on Tuesday. "Obviously, that
doesn't work in every case.
"We've got one person who's
started a blaze and has nothing
to back it up. I don't call that
real responsible. It only takes
one bad apple to ruin the bunch.
To not even check with the par-
ties, I find that truly amazing. I
talked to Art this morning. I
was really bothered. I don't read
the papers, I don't listen to the
news. I guess this tells you
why
Asked if he thought the re-
port caused a distraction,
Hostetler replied: "It's been
huge. Ever since Sunday after
the game, when I was made
aware, I've been thinking about
it the whole time. I'm sure it's
been on Art's mind.
"It's done with, it's over, it's
a shame it's come down to this
Hostetler, in his second sea-
son with Los Angeles after nine
years with the New York Gi-
ants, said he met with Shell two
days after the Miami incident
and felt things were resolved.
He also said he believed the two
had renewed respect for each
other.
ROBINSON
From p. 21
think a commitment had been
made in the meeting, which also
included Whitsitt and Robinson's
agent, Brad Marshall.
Robinson smiled broadly when
asked if he was confident he
would get a contract
extensionYes he said. "Ex-
tre- ely
. On local radio talk shows, and
in the newspaper, Blazer fans
haven't been sympathetic to
Robinson's situation.
J "I really don't let that type of
stuff bother me he said. "I've
been playing basketball for a
while now and I've had a lot of
things said about me. It really
doesn't matter. I'm here to play
basketball. Once I start getting
out there and doing what I see
rhat, I think it will turn around. If
;Jit doesn't, it doesn't
J Whitsitt also had some stern
words for Robinson when the
'holdout began Oct. 14, but the
� player says he holds no bitter-
jness.
Robinson, in his sixth season
jwith the Blazers, was the team's
I
1
I
leading scorer last year at 20.1
points per game, but slumped in
the playoffs for the second year in
a row. He won the NBA's Sixth
Man award a year ago and be-
came a full-time starter last sea-
son.
He has never missed a regular-
season or playoff game in his ca-
reer. His streak of 406 consecutive
games is the fifth-longest in the
NBA.
Robinson has two years remain-
ing on a four-year, $9 million con-
tract and said he wants a contract
that assures he will be a Trail Blazer
for the rest of his career.
But Whitsitt would not make
that commitment. He said
Robinson is an important part of
the team but he would not rule out
trading him.
"I haven't made that commit-
ment to anybody. I'll never do
that Whitsitt said. "Anybody
who would ever tell a player that
isn'tbeing truthful because look at
all the great players who have been
traded. Anything could happen.
That's professional sports
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Buckeyes set for Penn State
DAWKINS
(AP) � John Cooper has
watched the shadowy figures
floating across the screen, and
he is frightened.
They are not ghouls, but
there is something more terrify-
ing for Ohio State's football
coach: Penn State players scor-
ing touchdowns.
"I don't need to look at
any Halloween movies this
week Cooper said Tuesday at
his weekly news conference.
"I've been looking at scary pic-
tures all week
Ohio State plays at top-
ranked Penn State Saturday. A
review of Nittany Lions game
films is enough to make any
coach cower.
But Cooper, while prais-
ing Penn State, also realizes that
no one can be the best team in
college football until they have
played all their games. It is some-
thing he constantly tells his team
and staff.
"One comment I make
six or eight times a day to my
coaches and to the players is:
'Don't make them better than
they are In other words, make
them beat you on the field
Cooper said.
To cite an example, Coo-
per said he has coached in al-
most every postseason all-star
game. He is constantly amazed
that the players he has heard so
much about all season turn out
to be ordinary.
"So everybody's got
good players, but nobody's got
a monopoly anymore on all of
the great players he said.
In other words, not even
Penn State. The Nittany Lions
still must prove they are No. 1 to
Cooper and his Buckeyes.
Yet Cooper said he has
seen lots of signs that back up
that lofty ranking.
Ohio State is not exactly a jun-
ior-college team. They are 6-2 on
the year and ranked 21st in the
From p. 21
the Rapid City Thrillers.
Saunders said several NBA
teams already have contacted
him about picking up Dawkins.
He said he expects Dawkins to
play in the CBA for three or
four weeks before moving up to
the NBA.
Dawkins said he was ahead
of his time as a player because
he was not afraid to promote
himself. A Sports Illustrated
story about Dawkins in April
1980 carried the headline "I
Come From Another Planet
Dawkins said his imagination
is as ripe as ever. But he had no
new stories about imaginary
planets or rambling definitions
of funk music. Instead, he talked
about how he learned to speak
Italian when he played basket-
ball in Italy the past five years
and about his love of the game
that took him to championship
finals with the Philadelphia
76ers in 1977, 1980 and 1982.
"I'm looking forward to just
getting out there and having fun
and letting people know that
basketball is not a just a busi-
ness anymore Dawkins said.
"It's still fun. There's still
people that enjoy playing the
game
Dawkins notched his first
broken backboard Nov. 13,1979,
against the Kansas City Kings.
That dunk led to collapsible
rims in the NBA.
He said he still has the moves
to make a shot or two in one-on-
one situations if he can just get
some playing time.
But first, Dawkins has to
overcome labels of inconsis-
tency and laziness that dogged
him throughout his NBA career.
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country. But Cooper used terms
to describe the Nittany Lions that
he has not used for any team in
his seven years at Ohio State.
"They're mavbe the best
offensive football team I've
ever seen he said.
He added, "They're just
unreal.
Another time he said,
"They're one of the most ex-
plosive offensive teams I've
seen in all my years as a foot-
ball coach
The statistics back up
the hyperbole. Penn State
leads the nation in scoring and
total offense, averaging 48
points and 538 yards a game.
Quarterback Kerry Collins is
tops in the country in passing
efficiency, completing 68 per-
cent of his throws for 14 touch-
downs with just three inter-
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October 27. 1994
The East Carolinian 23
TULSA From p. 19
lead to 21-14 at the half.
In the first half, TU piled up
259 total yards while eating up
18:19 of the game clock. Fitzgerald
led the team with 87 yards rush-
ing on 5 carries (a la Tech's
Maurice DeShazo) whilecomplet-
ing 10 of 19 passes for 100 yards
and a TD.
ECU had just 123 total yards,
and 101 of them came from
Smith's first-half rushing on-
slaught. Marcus Crandell wasjust
3 of 10 for 20 yards passing, hit-
ting JerrisMcPhail Derrick Batson
and Jason Nicholson shortstrikes.
After the Matt Levine (8 punts,
47.4 average) punt, completing
the Pirates' opening drive of the
second half, Tulsa tied the score
on another Solomon White 9-yard
run.
The punting game continued
between Levine and TU's Mark
DeLozier (8 punts, 36 yard aver-
age), until, on a drive that ended
with TU freshman Jason Ander-
son missing a 52-yard field goal
attempt, ECU took over at their
own 35-yard line.
Crandell connected with Gal-
loway on two quick passes, find-
ing him in the end zone on a 45-
yard strike with 4:32 remaining in
the game. Chad Holcomb's PAT
would be the final score of the
evening, as the ECU defense stood
its ground and prevented a Tulsa
touchdown.
SWIM
From p. 19
BALL From p. 19 I NFL From p. 19 I AWARD From p 19
More strong performances
came from the divers. Senior
Scott Kupec enjoyed one-meter
and three-meter wins, as did
sophomore Beth Hanna, who
took first place in both the com-
petitions for the women. Other
strong performances came from
the Pirate squad.
For the Ladv Pirates, Amanda
Atkinson won the 200-yard in-
dividual medley, and 200
backstoke. Freshman Samantha
Edwards won the 500 freestyle
and the 1000 freestyle. Also,
Sandra Ossmann took the 200-
yard butterfly, and junior Hilary
Stokes stole the 50 freestyle and
100 freestyle. Participating in the
first place finish in the 400-yard
freestyle Relay, Beth Humphrey
also garnered the 200 freestyle
victory.
In men's competition, Jim
Broughal took the 200 individual
medley and participated in the
win of the 400 medley relay. Lee
Hutchens won the 500 freestyle
and assisted in the win of the 400
freestyle relay. Also, junior
McGee Moody helped win the
400 medley relay, 400 free relay
and solely took the 200 freestyle.
On October 30 at 1 p.m. in
Minges Aquatic Center, Virginia
Tech comes to Greenville on
Homecoming Weekend.
Graduation
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YOUR NAME AND DEGREE
mindsGuttenberg said. "I
want to be a part of the team,
instead of them looking up at
me as if I were on a pedestal
Coach Guttenberg will at-
tempt to bring East Carolina
up to nationally ranked stan-
dards. George Mason is ranked
9 in the Southeast region be-
hind top-ranked Florida,
Texas, and Duke. By far the
toughest team in the Colonial
Athletic Association in '94 is
George Mason, followed
closely by American Univer-
sity.
As a coach who will have
plenty of tasks in her first year
at East Carolina, Guttenberg's
focus during and shortly after
the season will be recruiting.
"I will lose five seniors at
the end of the v�ar, so right
now I have to find five players
for next year Guttenberg
said. "Since there was not any
recruiting this year, I will need
to find five immediate replace-
ments. But next year, when I
lose my five junior girls, then
recruiting will be as impor-
tant
"I have many hats � I'm
coaching, and without an as-
sistant coach to take care of
most of the recruiting, I have
to travel to recruit for ECU
Guttenberg said.
"Even though I have a
graduate assistant helping me,
she's busy, and, of course, not
sanctioned by the NCAA to re-
cruit
Things should look brighter
for this year's Lady Pirates.
With a new coach, there also
comes a new persona.
"Be yourself. I watch other
coaches at matches sitting very
composed, not getting ani-
mated or too excited, but I am
very active and I feel that I am
a reflection of the team
Guttenberg said.
This year's Lady Pirates
have both a positive attitude
and a better record (10-12) to
boast about, which is a drastic
improvement from a season
ago-
saving: "There will be some who
will understand that is not the right
and fair way to do it
Bowlen said no matter what the
Panthers get from the allocation
draft, they're blessed with extra
college draft picks and the ability
to pursue veteran free agents.
"Bill Polian is a very good CM
and with the way this new system
is set up, he'll be able to put to-
gether a very good team, espe-
cially with all the money they'll
have available Bowlen said. "Re-
gardless of what anyone may want
to say in Charlotte or Jacksonville,
that ability to sign free agents is a
very, very important part of this
equation
The Panthers have estimated
they'll have up to SI5 million to
spend on unrestricted free agents
prior to next season.
as a
immv
Key-
'Mv first instinct is to feel thi
might be a once-in-a-lifetime op-
portunity. I don't want to demean
the award because ot the strike.
But when you look at the award,
you're going to think about the
despair of 1994
With the Mets, Cone led the
NL three times in strikeouts. But He used to try to strike people
the Royals persuaded him to out
make use of Kansas City's strong
defense and let the infielders
make the put-outs. This allowed
him to conserve his strength by
throwing fewer pitches.
"At first it was very difficult
he said. "I thought strikeouts
sell now
style
The two were teammates on
the 1CW2 Blue Jays.
"That is a compliment Key
said after hearing Cone's com-
parison. "1 think David, for
whatever reason, has changed.
Seattle's Randy Johnson, 13-
6 with a 3.19 ERA and a major
league-leading 204 strikeouts,
received two first-place votes
and finished third with 24
points. Mike Mussina, 16-5
with a 3.06 ERA for Baltimore,
were expected of me. I was 3-2 on got one first-place vote and was
a lot of guvs. I threw a lot of fourth with 23 points.
gu
pitches. It was tough for me to
break that cycle
Cone, 31, who is getting mar-
ried on Nov. 12, describes him-
Greg Maddux won his
record third straight Cy Young
with a unanimous victory in
the NL voting Monday.
WOODS
From p.20
Unlike the more seasoned
pros, who can recount every
shot at the end of a round,
Woods seems to put it all be-
hind him as soon as he walks
His first putt had nearly perfect (two rounds were played Mon-
speed, rolling just past the cup day). My distance control, my di-
for an easy tap-in. rection, everything was good
At 18, a downhill par-4, "He's just a lot better than ev-
Woods' second shot rolled into a ervone else said troubled PGA
valley on the steeplv sloped star John Daly, who was on hand away from a hole,
green, 25 feet from the cup. He to help coach Arkansas, his alma "I have no clue he
calmly pushed the putt over the mater, during his sabbatical from said when queried about the
incline for another birdie. the PGA Tour. The Razorbacks length of a particular putt. "I
"More putts fell today finished fifth in a field that in- don't keep track of it. I just
Woods said. "I felt like I hit the eluded the last four NCAA na- play. That's what you're sup-
ball exactly the same both days tional team champions. posed to do
TAR
From p. 20
but I would have felt worse
Brown said of his team's 34-10
loss to the Cavaliers.
"I can't say that we have to
beat N.C. State. That's where
you get into trouble if you come
out and say this is a must win
but if we don't win I still have
to show up next week and coach
these guys against Clemson.
"I think when your team
shuts it down and quits is when
you give this ultimatum of, 'We
have to All we want them to
do is play good because we have
proven when we play good
we've pretty good. When we
play bad we're real bad
NOTES
From p. 19
assists and Chris Padgett's two
goals. Coastal Carolina shut out
ECU 5-0 on Oct. 22, but beat Barton
2-0, earning their first shutout of
theseason in Wilson. Padgett scored
both ECU goals vs. Barton.

Finally, the ECU volleyball
squad was swept by American and
George Mason last week.
American's Natasha Sylvain had
17 kills in the Lady Eagles' 7-15,
15-8,15-6,16-14 victory over the
Lady Pirates on Oct. 20. On Sun-
day, ECU fell in straight sets 15-
5,15-8,15-13 to the Lady Patri-
ots. Carrie Bme led ECU with
eight kills, and Staci Winters and
Tara Venn added six a piece in
the defeat.
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Homecoming 1994 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991 � Homecoming 1991
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Mary Beth Foil
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
1994 HOMECOMEING
PARADE LINE-UP
OCTOBER 29,1994
Greenville Police Department
ECU Police Department
Airforce ROTC Colorguard
Outstanding Alumni Recipient
Outstanding Alumni Recipient
Outstanding Alumni Recipient - Mark E. Tipton
Outstanding Alumni Recipient - David F. Swink
Student Homecoming Committee
ECU "Marching Pirates" Band
Alpha Delta Pi - Float
Robbyn Shulman, 1993 Homecoming Queen
Mattamuskeet H.S. Band
Pi Lambda Phi - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Brian Johnson representing the Ambassadors
- Tiffany Ferreti representing ECU Panhellenic
Swansboro H.S. Band
Resident Hall Association - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Tim Pinkard representing Garret Hall
- Rita Holmes representing Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority
Army ROTC Drill Team
Lejunne H.S. Band
Health Sciences Library - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Craig Doucette representing R.H.A.
- Celeste Tayao representing Fleming Hall
Clowns
Bertie H.S. Band
Campus Challenge - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Kurt Stanfield representing Sigma Sigma Sigma
- Wende Peters representing Alpha Xi Delta Sorority
Purple and Gold Dancers
Dixion H.S. Band
Alpha Xi Delta - Float
Delta Sigma Phi - Float
Years of
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SHARED VISIONS
"YEARS OF SHARED VISIONS"
Schedule of Events
Thursday October 27, 1994 "Noon Day Tunes" 11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Mendenhall Student Center
Friday October 28,1994 PIRATEFEST" 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
The University Mall
Saturday October 29,1994 Homecoming Parade 10:00 -11:00 am
Elm Street - Eppes Middle School
Homecoming Football Game 2:00 pm
University of Cincinnati Bearcats vs. ECU Pirates
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Homecoming Court Announcement,
Half-time
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NPHC Step Show 7:00 pm -11 pm
Wright Auditorium. Tickets are on sale
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, East
Carolina University. All tickets are
general admission. For more
information, call 1-800-ECU-ARTS
(328-2787) or 328-4788.
MAP OF PARADE ROUTE
CO
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8
New Hanover H.S. Band
Lambda Chi Alpha - Float
Cheerleaders
East Carolina Purple Dune Buggy
Richlands H.S. Band
Sigma Phi Epsilon - Float
Gospel Choir - Float
Student Council for Exceptional Children - Float
Northeastern H.S. Band
Alpha Omicron Phi - Float
Hospitality Management - Float
Panhellenic United Way - Float
Jacksonville H.S. Band
Zeta Tau Alpha - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Jeff Jones representing White Hall
- Jennifer Beard representing Tyler Hall
J.H. Rose H.S. Band
Garrett Hall - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Chris Murphey representing American Marketing
Association
- Trish Marapoti representing Alpha Delta Pi
D.H. Conley H.S. Band
New Generation Campus Ministry - Float
Rocky Mount H.S. Band
American Chemical Society - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Fred Poyer representing Sigma Lambda
- Ashley Brooks representing Sigma Sigma Sigma
Havelock H.S. Band
ECU Ambassadors - Float
Homecoming Representatives
- Jason Painter representing Phi Sigma Pi
- Krissy Eaton representing White Hall
Plymouth H.S. Band
Visual Arts Forum - Float
EA Laney Band
Sigma Lambda - Float
Horses
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Page 2
TEC End Zone
October 29,1994
Winless Bearcats visit Greenville
Oldham 's Corner
Luckily for head coach
Steve Logan and ECU, los-
ing in the game statistics
doesn't mean a loss in the
scoring column, because
boy. would we have lost on
Saturday!
Looking over the post-
game stats after the Tulsa
game, Stevie Wonder could
have seen that we were
vastly overplayed by the
Golden Hurricanes. In just
about every category, the
Pirates came up on the
short-end of the stick. All of
course, except the one that
really matters: points.
Look closer at the
stats, and you focus on the
category in which nine out
of ten coaches blame all
losses on: turnovers. ECU
had no turnovers in the
game, while forcing the
Tulsa offense to fumble
four times, recovering one.
The Pirate defense also
came up with two intercep-
tions.
So the stat that ended
up saving the Pirates is the
one that, miraculously, has
shined all season for ECU.
With a 1.7 turnover aver-
age per game. ECU is now
tied for fourth in the nation
in turnover margin.
This coming from the
same team who last season
was 97th in the country in
turnover margin, losing
1.18 turnovers a game.
Outstanding perfor-
mances against Temple,
where the Pirates forced the
Owls into five turnovers,
and Southern Miss where
ECU forced eight turn-
overs, have strengthened
ECU's turnover margin
greatly.
Homecoming is an event which
allows alumni to see how their hard-
I earned dollars are be-
Bv Aaron ing put to use jn the
s�tkr f��aU Pr��ram- T�-
ditionally, athletic di-
rectors and football coaches are care-
ful to schedule a weaker opponent, and
pick up an easy win to please the fans.
ECU's Director of Athletics Dave
Hart, is no dummy, and chose the 0-6-
1 Cincinnati Bearcats for this year's
homecoming game.
The Bearcats are in a rebuilding
situation, similar to that of last season's
ECU squad. They are led on the field
by first-year coach Rick Minter, who
was defensive coordinator at Notre
Dame last year. He has experienced the
lows of being a rookie coach this sea-
son after finding much success at
Notre Dame.
Last week versus Liberty Bowl
Alliance-leader, Univ. of Memphis,
Cincinnati was defeated 26-3. They
were held to 158 yards total offense
and allowed 270 yards rushing. This
performance was typical for the
Bearcats, who have had trouble stop-
ping anyone, allowing an average of
380 yards per game in total offense and
27.3 points per game.
They even have had trouble with
weaker Mid-American Conference
teams like Bowling Green and Miami
(Ohio), losing to Bowling Green 38-0
and tying the woeful Redskins of Mi-
ami. Cincinnati averages just 10.7
points per game and is coming off of
a season-low total offense versus
Memphis, the third ranked defense in
the country.
The Pirates on paper are supe-
rior in almost every way the two
teams can be measured.
Offensive headliners to look for
in Saturday's game are UC receivers
Sean Stewart and Anthony Ladd.
Stewart has 24 catches for 280 yards
and Ladd has 28 for 375. The quar-
terback position is an unsettled posi-
tion, with Eric Vibberts starting three
of the last four games. Vibberts has
a decent completion percentage, but
has thrown five interceptions and last
week threw for just 87 total yards.
When healthy, JUCO transfer
Todd Preston has been the starter, but
he has been sidelined with back
spasms. Preston was very effective,
completing 50 of 93 passes for 531
yards and a pair of TDs. However, he
is unlikely to see action this week.
Cincinnati has three running
backs with over a hundred yards rush-
ing this year. Leading rusher Craedel
Kimbrough has run for 455 yards, but
has been slowed by a knee strain.
Redshirt freshman Jermaine
Sturkle started for him last week and
has run for 101 yards in a reserve role
on the year. He may start again this
week.
Fullback Paul Black wood, a
Cincinatti OFFENSE
Courtrvv of UC SID
UC Head Coach Rick Minter is yet to
have his first taste of victory this
season. Minter, shown with QB Todd
Preston, has an 0-6-1 record in '94.
transfer from Grand Rapids Junior
College, has been running hard in-
side, with 242 rushing yards and all
four of Cincinnati's rushing touch-
downs. He, also, is suffering from
the injury bug, and did not travel to
Memphis. He was replaced by Daryl
Royal, who averaged four yards per
carry last game. Freddie Smith may
see extensive playing time this week
versus ECU.
Senior offensive guard Matt
Vaupel (6-5, 291) is a post season
honors candidate, having been se-
See BEARCATS page 7
TE: 86 Jesse Olverson
LT: 66 Rick Simons
LG: 64 Jamie Lemire
C: 70 Pat Oakes
RG: 73 Matt Vaupel
RT: 67 Jason Fabini
FL: 4 Sean Stewart
WR: 18 Anthony Ladd
QB: 17 Eric Vibberts
FB: 38 Daryl Royal
TB: 24 Craedel Kimbrough
37 Scott Smith
78 Pierre Brilliant
56 Trevor Foster
69 Brian Posey
69 Brian Posey
56 Trevor Foster
2 Robert Tate
25 James Scott
16 Brent Petrus
20 Freddie Smith
44 Jermaine Sturkie
Cincinatti DEFENSE
DE: 98 Dorian Adams
DT: 85 Ernest Allen
DT: 95 Derrick Ransom
DE: 91 Darrius Felder
SLB: 42 Reggie Hudson
MLB: 93 M. El-Mubarak
WLB: 45 Phillip Curry
CB: 9 Chris Hewitt
CB: 32 Darrel Harding
FS: 1 Robert Garnett
SS: 7 Sam Games
99 John Kobalka
77 Kevin Ward
63 Diron Bolar
99 John Kobalka
80 Josh Anderson
33 Eric Patterson
47 Mark Stephens
40 Chad Baker
10 Reggie Grant
84 Kevin Jackson
35 Artrell Hawkins
'�&&&�?�
� . " �





October 29.1994
TEC End Zonk
Page 3
Pearson suffers career-ending injury at USC
Injuries are a part of foot-
ball. It is a violent game where
bodies collide with
I By Aaron forces as strong as
Wilson � �
STAR-WRITER a CdT aCC1
dent. Helmets and
shoulder pads are used as weap-
ons. Players grit their teeth and
play so intensely that some-
times people get seriously in-
jured.
NFL players like Mike
Utley. Darryl Stingley and Den-
nis Byrd are prime examples of
catastrophic injuries that have
occurred.
They are the victims of
freak accidents that have left
them either partially disabled or
wheelchair bound for the rest of
their lives. In Stingley's case, a
vicious hit by Los Angeles
Raiders safety Jack Tatum left
him paralyzed for life.
No one wants to feel like
football is dangerous or unsafe.
What about safety precautions
team to become special teams cap-
tain, and had become one of the
best players in that area of the Pi-
rates' game.
Pearson is one of the wedge-
busters, those players who run
down and, without any regard for
and me"dical technology? Newer their personal safety, throw them-
and better equipment? Some- selves at enemy blockers in an et
times, this isn't enough, and a
major injury does occur.
Two weeks ago versus a
South Carolina safety, ECU's
Bruce Pearson, a walk-on who is
fort to open up holes for the re-
turn man.
Special teams play is not for
the faint of heart.
players trying to block me. They around and had full movement
grabbed my arm � it was holding, from the neck down just a few
I saw the ball carrier and I moved days after the injury. However, he
in to make the tackle. had little recollection of what
"When I got down low to hit happened because he had sut-
him his left knee hit the right side fered the concussion,
of my head and drove through it, "I do remember sitting on
knocking me out for a few seconds, the bench and trying to figure out
My nc.k really hurt but I thought where I was Pearson said. "I
it was just a stinger or something looked at the scoreboard and was
It turned out to be a whole lot like, 'When did those points hap-
more than a stinger. Pearson had pen'7' I wanted to find my helmet
fractured his fifth vertebrae in and go back in the game. They
three different places. hid my helmet from me and
An inch more to the left or locked it in the equipment chest
right, and spinal cord damage and Being in a HALO isn't very
paralysis would have occurred, comfortable at all. Pearson has to
Pearson's doctors told him. wear it for 2-3 months and can
Pearson was diagnosed a few not shower. He has to take sponge
days later after X-Rays. He was
hospitalized in the intensive care
unit and watched 24 hours a day
for 4 days.
"I was in traction, and then
they fitted me for a HALO, which
is a device designed to keep my
head and neck from moving and
prevent any more damage
Pearson said. "I have four pins
drilled in to my skull connected to
four rods that go to my chest. The
bones will heal back together. I
have some pain, but the medication
is helping. I was lucky � in a split
See PFARSOS' page 6
FAST FACTS
C.ame Location: Greenville
Opponent-Cincinnati Bearcats
Game Site: Dowdy-Ficklen
"idon'trememberthe.pla:
legally deaf in one ear. was lined because I had a concussion, second I could have been para
up in kickoff coverage. Pearson Pearson said. "I watched the film lyzed
had worked his way off the scout a few days later and I saw two Pearson was able to walk
Stadium
Kickoff: 2 p.m.
Head Coach: Rick Minter
(0-6-1 career, 0-6-1 at
UC)
Kev Plavers (1994 stats to date):
East Carolina OFFENSE
WR: 82 Mitchell Galloway
LT: 51 Ken Carroll
JjG: 59 Jamie Gray
C: 63 Kevin Wiggins
RG: 78 Terry Tilghman
RT: 61 Ron Suddith
TE: 90 Scott Richards
QB: 5 Marcus CrandeU
HB: 82 Mitchell Galloway
RB: 35 Junior Smith
SE: 80 Larry Shannon
1 Jason Nichols
67 Shane McPherson
73 Jake Gilray
58 Derrick Leaphart
77 Charles Boothe
74 Mark McCall
88 Sean Richardson
9 Dan Gonzalez
80 Larry Shannon
23 Jerris McPhail
11 Allen Williams
East Carolina DEFENSE
OLB: 40 Daniel Russ
DT: 54 Dealton Cotton
NG: 57 John Krawczyk
DT: 45 Lorenzo West
OLB: 7 Morris Foreman
WLB: 81 MarkLibiano
MLB: 39 Marvin Burke
RGB: 18 Hank Cooper
LCB: 3 Emmanuel McDaniel 37 Andre Taylor
FS: 30 Dwight Henry 46 Tabari Wallace
SS: 22 Daren Hart 6 E.J. Gunthrope
12 Jermaine Smith
96 Walter Scott
94 Aaron Black
56 Alphonso Collins
84 Leonard Graham
53 Carlos Brown
33 B.J. Crane
21 David Hart
QB Eric Vibberts
(67-109, 2 TDs, 5 LNTs)
TB Craedel Kimbrough
(100 carries, 455 yards)
SS Sam Games
(87 tackles, 3 pass breaks)
LB Reggie Hudson
(41 tackles, 5 sacks)
Notes:
� UC has the fifth-oldest
football program, as it is in its
108th season.
� The 'Cats have averaged
311 yards of total offense per
game this season.
� ECU sports a 7-1 record
against the Bearcats, dating
back to 1986, but UC took last
year's meeting 34-14.
� Last week, the 'Cats lost
to Independent Alliance front-
runner Memphis 26-3.





TEC End Zone
October 29,1994
Page 4 ���
McDaniel becoming a star in ECU secondary
ECU's secondary last season was
constantly victimized by the deep pass.
Time and time again.
opposing quarter-
ly Aaron , , . 1. , 1,
backs took advan-
WlLSON
staffwriter tage of this unit
made up o' two
sophomores and tvo freshman. These
talented, young players benefited
oreatly from this baptism under lire,
and entered the '94 season a much im-
proved group subjected to higher ex
pectations year due to their experience
and depth of numbers.
CB Emmanuel McDaniel has
reaped great rewards from last year s
learning experience, and is currenih
tied for fourth in the nations in inter
ceptions per game.
McDaniel. a Jonesboro, da na-
tive, has five picks going into this
week's game against Cincinnati.
"1 just have a lot more confidence
this year McDaniel said. "1 took it
personally when they went deep on us
last season. We were like the bomb
squad, now we look forward to pass-
ing downs
McDaniefs dramatic improve-
ment over last season's meager 29 tack-
les and two interceptions is no surprise
to this athlete who wouldn't give up
on himself when others were down on
him.
"A lot of times last year people
would criticize the secondary and
blame us for losing games McDaniel
said 1 think that was unfair, because
one person or position doesn't lose a
game for you. You win and lose as a
team
McDaniel and the other members
of the Pirate secondary have set higher
goals for themselves this season. They
have totaled 16 interceptions through
last Saturday's win at Tulsa. already
surpassing last year's season total of
12 pickoffs. ECU ranks among the
nation's leaders in turnover margin �
a key statistic for winning games.
"We have only allowed a few
passing touchdowns McDaniel said.
"Our goal is to allow nothing through
the air. It is up to us to stop teams from
piling up yardage and make big plays
against us
Pirate cornerback Fmmanuel McDaniel has registered five interceptions SoinS into this weekend's contest against the
oTlCinltH Bearcats. The Jonesboro. � native is tied for fourth p.ace in the nation in .ntercept.ons per Ran,
Improved efforts against the
run and pass have been the norm for
ECU this year, ranking 36th nation-
ally and 29th. respectively. ECU is
38th in the country in scoring de-
fense. McDaniel has gotten into the
scoring act, returning an interception
46 yards for a touchdown versus
South Carolina.
"When the ball is in the air I
feel like I have just as much right to
it as the receiver McDaniel said.
"It feels great to make big plays, but
there is still a lot of football left to
play. You can't relax and celebrate too
much. 1 just make the plays and go
on
Playing good team defense is
impacted greatly by consistent play
from the defensive line, linebackers,
and secondary. If any area breaks
down, it is next to impossible to (unc-
tion effectively. Last season was
marred by inconsistent play out of all
three of the units. In every game, one
would break down, putting the oth-
ers at a disadvantage.
�'When the guys up front rush
Bearcat LB
Dorian Adams
Last season. Dorian
Adams played in all II
games during the
Bearcat's 8-3 season
under Tim Murphy. He
collected thirty tackles,
(including five for a loss),
recovered two fumbles
and registered one sack
after switching from tight
end after two games.
I'ourteM of
(intinalli SID
the passer well and force him to
throw off rhythm plus the lineback-
ers stuffing the run makes our job
easy McDaniel said. "We know that
they are going to do their job and this
makes me feel less pressure. I don't
feel like teams can run or throw on
us. We are beginning to dominate
Big plays are commonplace for
McDaniel. He has won or preserved
three of the Pirates' four wins this
season. Against Southern Miss,
McDaniel picked off two passes, one
in the end zone, helping to prevent
the Golden Eagles from scoring
through the air. At South Carolina.
McDaniel's interception return put
ECU ahead lo stay. Versus Tulsa.
McDaniel baited down a pass in-
tended for a wide-open UT receiver,
and the Pirates escaped with a 2S-21
victory.
"I look al it as not just me be-
ing successful McDaniel said. "It
is the whole defense playing well, we
all help each other out
A major change for the second-
ary is new coach. Chuck Pagano. tak-
ing over from Chris Thurmond.
Pasano coached the outside line-
See EM AC page X





)( TOBKR 29, I94
TEC Knd Zonk
Pages
Blake gets starting nod versus Cowboys
l'i � What a way for spots for them on the 53 man camp and was released, mak-
.iett Blake to get his first Ml roster by waiving two backups, ing him wonder whether he'd
I he pass protection is mokie tackle Ronald Edwards ever get a chance in the NFL.
lousy, the receivers are aside and wide receiverkick rel In he said.
I I 1 i � C i . - ' � M
penuaole and tni ' MU iai
tv o Super Bow I rii
Wliiir B
nati Bengals
depth chart
"It's (he
chance ol a lite-
time lor me
Blake said.
"I've be e n
waiting lor it f,i
lor three ears Former Pirate quarterback Jeff
Blake will get his first NFL start with mnnt,
now. I m going
to take lull ad-
so I've
taken a lot more
hits than most
NFL quarter-
backs said
Blake, who went
to East Carolina.
"I might be a
little more im-
uld mi
e his standing by playing
respectably.
"I just want respect
be said. "I just w ant them to
say, 'Well, this guy can come
in and play. We've got a solid
backup quarterback Or an-
other team can say that. That's
all I want
'Cats To Watch
85 Ernest Allen
(6-4, 280, Sr.)
19 Tom Dallen
(5-10, 210, Sr.)
tin- Bengals on Sunda against the
. Well, we li
World-t hampion Dallas I owboys.
vantage of the see. Klingler
opportunity I'm going to yet. took a beating in college, too,
I'm going to go out and be read hut it was nothing compared to
and be as poised as I can be and his injury-interrupted three years
tr to run the team. in Cincinnati. He got a concus-
" The re's no pies sure on sion two weeks ago and sprained
me. I have nothing to lose. I'm his right knee last Sunday,
already at the bottom. I can't get Blake knows a lot ol
an lower than I am. except by people will be watching to see
not havin� a job. period how he reacts to getting knocked
Blake is expected to get around by the two time Super
his first start Sunday against the Bowl champions.
Dallas Cowboys because the "I'll get my mind right to
rest of the Bengals" quai ' iy poised and Blake
backs are hurt. David Klinglei -aid. "You don't evei gel rattled
sprained his knee and Don you get sackei u gel up.
Hollas separated his shoulder You don't ever lay down I'm
Sunday in a 37-13 loss to Cleve that type of pei I never lay
land. down
Although Klingler was That he has made it even
slightly improved Tuesday, this far is a sign of his persever
coach Dave Simla was still pes- ance. He was a sixth round draft
simistic that he'll be able to pick ol the New York Jets in
play. The Bengals signed tree 1992 and appeared in only, three
agents Erik Wilhelm and Todd games during two ieasons with
Philcox � both former Bengals New York,
quarterbacks - as backups He lost his roster spot lo
The Bengals cleared rookie Glenn loley in training
THE WASH HOUSE
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Wash Your Clothes While
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1 COUPON PER WASH
8-5 MON-FRI
EXPIRES 11-17-94





Page 6
TEC End Zonk
PEARSON
baths because he cannot get the
vest over his chest and shoulders
wet. He has a Pirate insignia on
one of the strips of metal that
goes around his head.
"This is my helmet for
now Pearson said. "It feels like
I am wearing a helmet and shoul-
der pads 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week. It isn't too great, but I'm
dealing with it
Keeping a positive attitude
has been the key for getting back
to a normal life, as least as nor-
mal as can be expected.
"Before games, I get dis-
couraged because I want to play
Pearson said. "It is a tough situa-
tion because I love football. I just
have to fight off the bad feelings
and be thankful for what I have:
family and friends that love me.
If I had to get hurt, at least it was
in a game. I always have set goals
for myself, and now I am mak-
ing new ones and working to ac-
complish those goals
Being hearing impaired
would seem like a major obstacle
for anyone trying to make it in
NCAADiv. I-A football. It would
seem impossible to get the sig-
nals and understand what is go-
ing on.
"I had spinal meningitis
when I was seven years old
Pearson saidThis caused me to
lose almost total hearing in my
left ear. I weai a hearing aid and
it helps me to understand
people
"The coaches signal in the
calls and I learned all of the sig-
nals, so I know what my respon-
sibility is Pearson said. "Also,
I read lips to get the call in the
huddle
Pearson stands 6-1. 200 and
runs a very average 4.86 in the
40-yard dash. His hard work is
what makes him stand out on the
field.
"Somebody has to have a
special teams role Pearson said.
"My job is to cover kicks and
make big plays. Being a walk-on,
October 29.1994
Cont. from
page 3
it is hard for me to expect to see
any action on defense. I feel like I
proved I could play as well as any
other player. I don't let not being
a great athlete or having full hear-
ing stop me.
"I feel like this is unfair. I put
all my time and effort in training
to see playing time. My goal was
to work hard and play in all 11
games. It just doesn't seem right
for me to get hurt like this after
everything else I have gone
through. I'm going to be all right
though, this won't stop me
Going through tough times
lets a person see how many friends
he or she really has. You realize
how important your family is.
They have spent almost every
waking hour with Pearson since
his injury.
"They have been great
Pearson said. "I couldn't get
around with out them. This whole
thing has brought us even closer
together
Mail has poured in to the
ECU football offices filled with
get-well cards addressed to
Pearson. One letter that he re-
ceived means a lot to him, and he
�ave permission to have it re-
printed here.
Bruce,
I am heartbroken to
learn of your injury but I'm
thankful that your prognosis is so
good. A lot of people care about
you and we are all wishing you a
speedy recovery.
Thank you for giving
your best to Pirate football and
thank you for being a wonderful
example to so many of us. You are
a winner in football and a win-
ner in life. I am very proud to
know you.
God Bless You
John McMillan
"That letter means a lot to
me Pearson said. "He is a real
supportive Pirate fan that comes
to every ball game. We keep in
touch a lot and know his two kids.
They look up to me and that re-
ally makes me feel good
Pearson is a devout Chris-
tian who feels that his faith is what
lets him overcome obstacles.
"I go to church every Sunday,
and read the Bible every day
Pearson said. "It helps me to keep
my sense of mind. I really believe
that if you have a strong faith any-
thing can happen
"I feel I am a role model,
both before and after the injury
he said. "I want kids to under-
stand that they can do anything
they put their heart in to. You
just have to set goals and be de-
termined to let nothing stop
you
Playing again seems un-
likely due to the risk of
reinjuring his neck. Any further
damage would probably mean
permanent paralysis, so Pearson
decided to forego any comeback
attempt.
His playing career may be
over, but Bruce Pearson isn't
forgotten by the ECU program.
Pearson and his family
have been the special guests of
the athletic department at each
home game since the injury.
"Bruce is a very special
young man head coach Steve
Logan said. "He will always be
a part of this program. He has
so much heart and courage. We
are praying for him and I know
that Bruce will be okay
It takes a lot of pride and
courage to go out there and put
one's life on the line every week
for the entertainment of fans.
Perhaps people should re-
member Pearson's story the
next time someone says that
athletes are spoiled brats who
get whatever they want. Use
this as an example of courage
and dedication that most of us
will never have.
. 1





October it, iw
TEC End Zone
BEARCATS
lected to the Sporting News All-In-
dependent 2nd Team.
Vaupel. a Pittsburgh. Pa. na-
tive, is also a tri-captain along with
fellow seniors DT Ernest Allen and
OLB Reggie Hudson.
Allen, a 6-4 280-pounder
from South Bend. Indiana, and
Hudson were both named to the
Defensive 2nd Team by the same
publication.
Safety Robert Garnett was
named to the first team, but has
been replaced by sophomore Kevin
Jackson.
Defensively, the Bearcats
have caused 12 turnovers through
the Memphis game. They are led
by Allen and defensive ends Dorian
Adams and Darrius Felder. who
both have the ability to make big
plays. Their numbers are slightly
down from last year.
Freshman Derrick Ransom
got his first start last week and is
expected to become a standout on
the defensive front.
Page 7
Cont. from
page 2
Hudson leads the linebacking
unit with his nine tackles for losses
and five sacks. Phillip Curry, a 6-1
215-pound freshman, has 71 tack-
les with two tackles for loss.
Muhammad El-Mubarik is the other
starter.
The secondary is a strong point
for the Bearcats, led by sophomore
safety. Sam Games. Games leads
the team in tackles with 87.
The rest of the secondary is
made up of Chris Hewitt, Darrell
Harding and Kevin Jackson. Hewitt
has been described in one publica-
tion as the most talented player on
the roster.
Special teams may be the only
edge Cincinnati has over ECU with
four year regulars, Jeff Blaylock and
Tom Dallen. both seniors.
Blaylock handles the punting
and has netted a 39.4 average, land-
ing 36 punts inside the 20 yard line
over the past three seasons.
Dallen has connected on 23-
of-33 field goals during his career
and has scored 108 points. Returns
are handled by Robert Tate and
Darrell Harding.
ECU leads the series with Cin-
cinnati. 7-1. UC's return to Green-
ville is also a homecoming for their
defensive coordinator, Mike Cassity
.who served in the same capacity at
ECU before leaving for Georgia
Tech after the Peach Bowl.
Cassity was relieved of his du-
ties last season, and this is his first
season at UC.
Cincinnati is a member of the
Liberty Bowl Alliance, but is
mired at the bottom of the stand-
ings. A ECU win plus a Memphis
loss to Louisville would tie the
two clubs for first place in the
standings.
Memphis also has games
against Ole Miss and Tennessee
prior to playing ECU in the final
game of the season.
Look for the Pirate ground
game to keep up the good work
this game as Junior Smith ap-
proaches the 1.000-yard mark.
Smith has totaled 756 yards
and five TD"s so far. The passing
game slipped last week versus
Tulsa, but Marcus Crandell
should be able to get the ball to
receivers Jason Nichols and
Mitchell Galloway.
Crandell is having an im-
pressive, injury-free season go-
ing 132-for-247 (53). He has
throw n for 1,662 yards and has
12 TD's to just 8 interceptions.
Cincinnati is no match for
the Pirates on paper and in sub-
stance. The only way ECU could
possibly lose this game is if they
take Cincinnati lightly.
"We can't take any team
lightly running back Jerris
McPhail said. "As soon as you un-
derestimate someone, you relax
and give them a chance to beat
you. Cincinnati is a better ball
club than people think. We need
to play better than we did last
week to win this game
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Cont. from
page 4
backers last year hut he has a great
deal of experience coaching defensive
backs at Southern California, Univer-
sity of Miami, and sen ing as both de
tensive coordinator and secondary
coach at UNLY
"We are playing the same cov-
erages as last year McDaniel said.
"The mindset is just different play
ing them
"He has taught us fundamen
tals McDaniel said about Pagano.
"The keep you sound and eliminates
mistakes. We aren't susceptible to
mistakes when we play the consistent,
fundamental fcx itball that he teaches.
! eeling comfortable with your
n coach is extremely impor
tant. and McDaniel and his teammates
know that Pagano always
open if they need
��y McDaniel
said. "He's one of us. You can talk to
i about anything. II he can be ol
an) help then you know that he will
whatever it takes to help you.
whether it is about academics01 foot
ball, whatever you want to talk
about
When you aren't the biggest
plaver out there (McDaniel stands
5' 10" and weighs 167 pounds) you
has to plav w ith reckless abandon and
can't worn about the other players
being bigger.
It doesn't seare me to plav
against anybody McDaniel said.
"bear is the worst thing for a football
plaver
McDaniel runs a 4.5 40 yard
dash, good speed for a cornerback.
He balances this with a 325 -pound
bench press, impressive considering
he suffered a serious shoulder injurv
this spring that had ECl I's coaching
staff concerned about him being able
to return this season.
McDaniel credits a lot of hard
work this summer in rehabilitation
and working with strength coach Jell
Connors.
All of this success on the defen-
sive side on the ball is surprising to
some, because McDaniel was noted
more for his offensive abilities when
he was recruited bv ECU. Former
ECU Offensive Coordinator. Steve
Shankweiler. currentlv in same posi-
tion at Georgia lech, brought
McDaniel here as a running back.
McDaniel w as resistant to playing DB
.it first, but has gradually learned to
accept the change.
1 came to ECU to plav running
back McDaniel said. In fact the
main reason I picked PCI' overN.(
State. Georgia Tech, Tennessee. (cor
�ia, and Ga. Southern was that thev
wanted me to plav running back. 1
didn't plav DB in high school, but it
is something I always wanted to do. I
feel like I can plav an) skill position
because thev are interchangeable.
pon his arrival at ECU in 1991,
lan has some time i
'Ik
McDaniel said. "I wasn't
n and 1 v,
home, plus I hail nevei
been awa from home. Alter a while
I started to become comfortable up
here and now I realh don t mil
ingawa) from home so much.
Academics are also a priority for
Mcl )aniel, w ho is majoring in Crimi-
nal Justice and is a member ol PC I s
Football Academic Leadership Team.
"1 want to get my degree ant!
come back for a masters in criminol-
ogv ' McDaniel said. 1 would like
to eventually become a lawyer and
help people
In his spare time McDaniel en-
joys living up his low -rider Mustang
and putting more and more stereo
equipment in it.
1 like listening to music like
! rapper Outkast McDaniel said. 1
listen to almost everything, none ol
that hard, rock stuff. 1 really like work-
in on im car and trying to hook it
up
Going in to this week's contest
against Cincinnati. McDaniel feels
confident in the defense's ability to
shut down the Bearcats passing at-
tack.
We should be able to stop
them McDaniel said. "I feel like
when we plav the way we are capable
of that no offense can score too many
points on us
PeeDee
the Pirate!
got
We've
Peedee the
Pirate, they've
got the Bearcat.
There are three
versions to the
story as to how
PC earned the
B e a r c a t
in o n i c k e r.
Literally, a
bearcat is a
native animal of
Southeast Asia, a
carnivorous
mammal known
to be ferocious if
provoked. Also
known as a
binturong, it is a
relative of the
ECU RU06Y
WANTS YOU
1994 STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS
VS.
UNC -CHAPEL HILL
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30 1994
AT 2:30 PM
BEHIND ALLIED HEALTH
(NEAR R.O.C. TOWER)
THE WINNER ADVANCES TO THE
NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNAMENT
COME SHOW YOUR SUPPORT
AND
SEE WHERE FOOTBALL BEGAN!
SPONSERED BY DIN ISION OF CUB SPORTS





Title
The East Carolinian, October 27, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1036
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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