The East Carolinian, October 13, 1994






THURSDAY
LIFESTYLE
R
FRIDAY
Land Ho!
Whether your destination is (Jutland or
Graceland, you can get there via the Lifestyle
page.
Travel plans are being made on page 9.
n
1
4
Soccer Ties!
ECU'S men's soccer team tied with UNC-
W on Tuesday afternoon. See page 12 for
the gripping details.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 52
Circulation 12.000
Thursday. October 13. 1994
Greenville. NC
14 pages
SGA elects speaker, holds first meeting
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
The Student Government As-
sociation met for the first time
this semester on Monday and
started taking care of business
right away.
All members were asked to
stand to take an oath of office
supporting SGA. Students
pledged to uphold the SGA con-
stitution and promote their high-
est idea of honor for the organiza-
tion.
Dale Emery, Demetrius Carter
and Harry Bray Jr. were nomi-
nated for speaker of the house.
Each candidate spoke on behalf of
himself, giving qualifications and
reasons for wanting the job. Dale
Emery was elected and took over
proceedings from Sheila Boswell,
SGA vice president.
"I'm looking forward to it, it's a
lot of hard work Emery said.
"I've worked with Brvnn Thomas
a lot, and all of the executiveboard
has helped me a lot and everyone
else � especially our secretary
Ms. Millie
Old business was discussed
first. Michael Carnes, SGA trea-
surer, asked if anyone had ques-
tions concerning summer appro-
priations and pointed out that
SGA has SI6,300 more than last
vear. Summer appropriations
were questioned. Demetrius
Carter asked why the FrisbeeClub
received $960 when SGA had
agreed not to give funding to
sporting clubs. Michael Carnes
explained that the group had been
invited to a national competition
and had only requested registra-
tion fees. The allocation had been
granted in a meeting called for
that purpose.
Two bills were introduced for
appropriations. A proposal to
paint and wallpaper the entire
wing of SG A of fices in Mendenhall
tor $3,840 was voted on. Carnes
explained that the bill did need to
be voted on immediately because
a delay in hiring contractors would
increase the price. A split vote was
counted and the bill was passed. A
bill for the purchase of an Apple
Power Book computer will be
voted on next week.
Pads of paper circulated the
room and members were asked to
sign up for one of four committees
if interested. The four committees
are screenings and appointments,
appropriations, student welfare
and the rules and judiciary com-
mittee. Chairs for the committees
will be voted on at a later date.
Boswell told members that a
speaker for Robert's Rules of Or-
der may come to inform new mem-
bers on the procedures used in
decision making. She said the
meeting was productive and
believes things will calm down
once everyone knows how
SGA works.
"The meeting went well for
our first meeting; it was a little
chaotic Boswell said. "I
couldn't have chosen between
the three of them candidates
for speaker because they're
all so qualified. 1 think it went
rather well, there were no ten-
sions in there � we all work
together very smoothly
Production amateurs take over Public Access waves
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Students can now actually see
what is happening on campus and
around the Greenville area with-
out leaving the comfort of their
dorm rooms by tuning in to "Cue
One a video magazine produc-
tion by ECU students aand is
shown on cable's public access
Channel 7 at 6:00 p.m. on Thurs-
days or at 2:00 a.m. on Friday
throughout the semester.
Close to 40 students involved
with video communications
courses in the Department of Li-
brary Studies and Educational
Technology are using "Cue One"
as a class project.
"They are in video perfor-
mance, video production, video
field production and aadvance
vvideo production classes said
Cariton Benz, an associate pro-
fessor of Communication and
one of the faculty coordinators
for the program. "Students in
those four classes are working to
put this production together
Benz said students will be pro-
ducing a new show each week.
"We shoot them every Thurs-
day Benz said. "We do a pro-
gram every week. So over the
course of the semester, I think
we'll have about 13 different
video magazines on tape
Benz said the video produc-
tion is similar to a magazine. The
producer correlates to an editor
and both have reporters. The pro-
ducer and reporters come up with
a theme for the video magazine,
and each person works on certain
segments for each week's show.
Mike Westbrook, a senior com-
munications major and director
for this week's episode, said each
week the students follow a set
pattern format before taping each
show.
"The producer goes and thinks
up the show topic for the week
Westbrook said. "Then the pro-
ducer assigns everyone in class a
task like working the camera
Benz said the students in the
advanced video production class
choose a student to be producer
so that students in the video per-
formance class have a 60-minute
segment to do each week.
Westbrook said the director is
the person in the studio's control
room, telling the camera person
which shots he wants and giving
other production persons instruc-
tions.
"He is basically telling every-
one what to do while the show is
being shot Westbrook said.
Benz said the production of
the show, which is filmed in the
first floor studio of Joyner Library
in the Center for Academic Com-
munication, gives students a great
learning experience.
"These students are students
here and for some of them it's
their first experience with vid-
eos Benz said. "It's a learning
experience
Westbrook said this video pro-
duction was a good experience
for his major.
"It's good hands-on experi-
ence Westbrook said. "Though
it can be rough because it's
everybody's first time
Benz said that in the past stu-
dents did the same kind of TV
show production projects. Now,
since the cable company started
its public aaccess channel this fall,
students are able to show their
work publicly-
"Usuallv, these videotapes are
just viewed in the classroom and
then nothing happens to them
anymore Benz said. "But in this
case, I think the difference is that
they are put on public access,
which is Channel 7 on the cable,
so that anyone who gets the cable
can watch them
Recently, "CueOne" aired
an episode showing alterna-
tive sports and plans to soon
air a show with the theme of
leadership.
Tonight's episode will be
about music.
Westbrooksaid thattheepi-
sode, in general, will view the
Greenville music scene like
local bands and the clubs they
play in downtown. Also, the
episode will discuss The ECU
School of Music and the ECU
concert series, and will show
a live performance from jazz
students who have created
their own original arrange-
ment for Tadd Darmeron's
song, "Lady Bird "
ECU students Rock the Vote
Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Four bands "Rocked the
Vote" in the Attic Tuesday night
in an effort to get students in-
volved with government.
"Rock the Vote is more of a
concept than an actual logo
said Bill Gheen, organizer of the
event. "They are) using music
that appeals to younger genera-
tion Americans to get them in-
volved with the political pro-
cess
Henry Acrobat, Smack
Apple, Amsterdam and Foun-
tain of Youth worked up a sweat
playing music and urging the
crowd to register to vote at the
front desk. Two registrars al-
ternated throughout the night
and registered 23 people to vote.
"It's important everyone is
registered to vote said
Scarlette Gardner, one of the
registrars. "If not, then you can't
exercise your fundamental right
to vote, which is what this coun-
try is built on
Jason Arp, chair of the college
republicans, was involved with
promoting Rock the Vote, and
said he believes the event had a
positive turnout.
" 23 sounds small but a lot of
people from Virginia wouldn't
be able to register Arp said.
"There were several other events
this week that would hamper
some people's chances of going
He said that although other
events kept the crowd down, he
enjoyed partying with the demo-
crats. Arp also said 23 is a good
number of students.
Rock the Vote was sponsored
by the North Carolina Federa-
tion of College Democrats. ECU
college republicans and demo-
crats joined together in promot-
ing the event. Fliers were distrib-
uted, groups were notified and
WZMB promoted the event by
giving away free tickets.
"Regardless of our partisan
affiliations or preferences, we
all stand to benefit from getting
college students registered to
vote Gheen said. "I'm glad to
see that democrats and republi-
cans can work together on a
positive thing instead of mud-
slinging like we usually do
Gheen said lawmakers know
who registers to vote and who
does not; the information is
available on CD ROM. "That's
what I call political reality. If
you are a candidate, what in-
centive do you have to even cam-
paign to a group that doesn't
vote consistently or at all?"
Gheen said.
A comfortable crowd had
gathered bv midnight and all of
the bands seemed to enjoy giv-
ing the show.
"I wanted to get more
See VOTE page 4
Faculty donates money
Andy Turner
Staff Writer
ECU faculty and staff members
ma v not be the hea rtless scound rel s
students sometimes see them as.
The State Employees Combined
Campaign (S.E.C.C.) allows state
employees to donate money to the
organization or charity of their
choice.
"It gives each state employee the
opportunity to show that we care
about the local community said
Michael Coston, manager of the
Student Stores and chair of ECU's
S.E.C.C. Steering Committee.
State employees can donate
money to the S.E.C.C. through pay-
roll deduction. This means the
S.E.C.C. will only have to solicit
money from each employee once,
and thereafter monev can be do-
nated directly from paychecks.
The S.E.C.C. coordinates its
drives with kxral United Way fund
drives that benefit various non-
profit service organizations whose
focus is charitable, health related,
cultural or environmental. The
S.E.C.C. provides funds for approxi-
mately 250 local, state, national and
international organizations.
Organizations that S.E.C.C. pro-
vides funds for include the Easter
Seal of North Carolina, the North
Carolina Wildlife Federation, the
Raleigh SvmphonyOrchestra,Chil-
dren International and the Ameri-
can Heart Association.
ECU's campaign in 1994 totaled
more than $126,000 in donations
last year.
VVorking with Coston on the
S.E.C.C. Steering Committee are
three co-chairs: Dr. Patricia Ander-
son, faculty chair Ellis Hall,
health sciences development
offices and Jean Garris, presi-
dent of District 65 of the State
Employees Association.
The ECU S.E.C.C. consists of
11 faculty and staff members.
TheSteeringCommitteedecides
the best way to raise money by-
working with the statewide
Steering Committee. All mem-
bers of the Steering Committee
are volunteers.
The statewide theme of this
year's campaign is Care a Little
More in '94. Locally, theS.E.C.C.
theme is Find a Treasure.
Coston believes that the
S.E.C.C. allows state employees
the opportunity to give some-
thing back to the communities
See SECC page 4
Construction
seems to be on
schedule
Construction on
Joyner Library
proceeds as
scheduled. The
entire project will
take three and a half
years to complete,
but the addition of
164,000 sq. ft. will be
ready for use within
two years.
Tailgate option sans the grill
Svv.w-y. '
Photo by Stuart Williams
(AP)�Use sliced deli roast beef and coleslaw for a quick-to-fix
sandwich that is sure to score big at a tailgate party. Stack the roast beef on
French bread spread with a combination of sour cream, honey and mustard.
Lettuce, tomato and the coleslaw finish this tasty, easy sandwich. Wrap tightly
and keep it chilled until serving time.
Teamwork is the key to keeping the meal simple. You provide the
main dish and beverages; let friends and family bring the side dishes and
dessert.
If you cannot get tickets to the game, you can still tailgate�in your family room. Invite friends for
a pre-game spread and cheer your team from the comfort of your couch.
Touchdown Beef and Honey Mustard Sandwich
12 cup light sour cream
1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
1 tablespoon honey
1 pound long-loaf French or Italian bread, or two 1 2-pound long loaves, split lengthwise
6 leaf lettuce leaves
1 cup (12 pint) deli coleslaw, creamy-style
1 pound thinly sliced deli roast beef
1 large tomato, thinly sliced
Combine sour cream, mustard and honey; mix well. Spread on cut slices of bread.
Arrange lettuce leaves on bottom half. Spread coleslaw evenly over lettuce leaves. Top
with roast beef and tomato. Close with top half of loaf. Wrap in aluminum foil.
Refrigerate up to four hours. Carry to site in insulated cooler. To serve, cut into slices
Makes six servings.
Nutrition facts per serving: 442 cat 31 g pro 52 g carbo. 12 g fat, 4.4 mg iron, 544
mg sixjium, 74 mg choL





October 13, l'M
2The East Carolinian
StfiW Cm tin Hii
Polish politics studied
.� . a npsnlvpinthesDaceofadecade.Oi
Church to be shipped from England to Kansas
What would you do with a million dollar donation?Officials
at Baker University will be shipping a Nth Century Methodist
chapel to the campus � piece by piece. The chapel built in
Sproxton, a village 60 miles from London, represents a direct tie
to the university which was founded by Methodist pioneer- in
1858.
Newest New Mexican hot spot is Chile institute
Officials at New Mexico State University's Chile Institute are
planning to erect the world's first international center devoted
to the chile pepper. Professors at the university are planning to
make the hot spot a center for research and education
Pornography lawsuit dismissed: family vows to fight
A student is appealing a judge's decision to dismiss her
5850,000 lawsuit against her university's president. She origi-
nally sued because of a violation of her first amendment rights.
after receiving an "F" in a class because she refused to read a
book she believed to be pornographic. Her family plans to take
the case all the way to the Supreme Court if necessarv
New cable channel will give 24-hour information on
dorm repair?
Students living on Middle Tennessee State University s cam-
pus will have no more worries about clogging drains, broken
heaters or anv other problems that may occur. University Hous-
ing and Maintenance has established TV Channel 39 as a hous-
ing hotline, a news-type program that will air every day at 3 p.m.
Students can call an extension to get live television information
concerning dorm closings, rules and regulations.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Katy Newton
Staff Writer
While most ECU students were
relaxing in the sun last summer,
political science professor Dr.
Maurice Simon was getting into
the meat of the major political
changes that have been going on in
Poland and in the Czech Republic.
Simon spent ten days in Prague
and three weeks in Warsaw work-
ing on a project dealing with the
Polish Parliament since NS9
As with other countries in Cen-
tral and Eastern Europe, Poland
and the Czech Republic have been
involved in a complex process of
democratic growth and change
since the demise of communism.
While the Polish government has
made leaps and boundsof progress
over the past several years, there is
still much to learn about develop-
ing a system that works for their
own circumstances.
"The most significant problem
is the lack of political consensus in
Poland Simon said. "There are
still too many parties that haven't
defined theirprograms very clearly.
Voters don't know who or what
they're voting for. Their skills of
political cooperation and competi-
tion are still rather rudimentary,
rather primitive
Simon explained that while
some degree of conflict is essential
to a functional democracy, the
Poles' problem lies in their inability
to agree on their values concerning
the nature of the political process.
"There are no compromises to
be struck in a time when there are
real financial and social emergen-
cies Simon said.
Simon pointed out that people
from western nations should be
careful in theircriticismsof theprob-
lems faced by budding democra-
resolve in the space of a decade.On
the other hand Simon said, "they
do have the benefit ot not having to
repeat many of our mistakes "
Even though Poland is having
its share ot problems, it is still faring
better than its neighbors in Russia
who are having quite a difficult
time Simon attributed mis to better
economic conditions in Poland as
well as to the relative flexibility of
Poland's former Communist gov-
ernment. In addition, Simon said
there may be over-representation
of Communists in Russian govern-
ment.
"The first parliament in Poland,
which was composed of an odd
arrangement of Communists plus
the new democratic forces, man-
aged to be much moreeffective than
the first parliament in the former
Soviet Union, which was almost
entirely populated by formerCom-
munist leaders Simon said
Also, the Poles were willing to
make more sacrifices to move more
quickly to a private economy than
the Russians have been
One thing that Poland diies have
in common with Russia is the prob-
lem that organized crime is pre-
senting to privatization. "It's much
more obvious and, in some ways,
much more disturbing than before
demcxratiationl because people
thought that they were able to get
control of their lives after 1989
Simon said, "and it's not that
simple
Simon said that both Poland and
the Czech Republic have improved
greatly since he last visited in 1992.
He encourages ECU students to join
the thousands of young Americans
who are currently traveling to east-
ern Europe to take advantage of
these new "laboratories of democ-
racy and capitalism
Simon is currently collaborating
with other political scientists from
Hazing
questioned
(CPS)�At many college frater-
nities, it is called "Hell Week" - a
week ot "character-building" ac-
tivities for new members that ot-
ter i include annoying drudgework
and skep-deprived jags' where
older members have free license to
harangue pledges in sometimes
Contract
buys As
(CTi -Want to make sure
you pass organic chemistry? Just
sign on the dotted line.
Thas what Florida State Uni-
versity professor Ralph
Dougherty tells hundreds of stu-
dents each semester that sign up
tor his lecture course. Dougherty
See GREEKS page 3
See FSU page 4
THURSDAY, OQOBER15
Climbing begins at 5:30 PM
at the Climbing Tower
(behind the Allied Health Building)
Our Climb-In Movie feature:
"CLIFFHANGER"
shown on the Climbing Tower
at 8:00 PM
cies.
"IntheWest,manvpeoplehave theU.S,EasternEuropeand former
created tooambitiousexpectations. Soviet Republics on a book about
Somehow, we think that thev can their research and experiences in
resolve all the problems that took redefining the roles of parliaments
us a century or two centuries to in Russia and Eastern Europe.
R
IffiS m (W ms (W
Natural Life
Doin what comes
NAiLBAILY
Take the cliffhanger shuttle
leaving every 20 minutes from 5:SOp.m8oop.m.
in front of Christenbury Gymnasium.
DOUBLE mfrs- COUPONS
UP TO 50
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S��n ourcnase Che averseo :e at me aavercseo once
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COPBGHT 1994 � T"E KROGER CO ITEMS
AND PRICES 0OCD SJNDAV. OCTOBER 9
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KROGER COUPON
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2-Liter
LIMIT TWO 2-UTERS WITH COUPON & $10.00 ADDITIONAL PURCHASE
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER
Df COUPON GOOD SUN. OCT. 9 THROUGH SAT. OCT. 15. 1994
REGULAR. HOMESTYLE OR
CALCIUM FORTIFIED
Kroger orange
JWCe12-Callon
GOLDEN RIPE. LOW SODIUM &
LOW CALORIE
Dole
Bananas
Pound
'IN THE DELI DEPT"
FROM OUR BAKERY
Cinnamon
Roiis
HAM OR TURKEY
Oscar Mayer
Lunchables
6-Ct.
4.5-OZ
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FULL STOP
Up special guest
fj Knock Down sum.tIIin 6
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Cheerios
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99
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Kroger Buttercrust
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6-OZ.
Viva Paper Towels
Single
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W t Classic Rock v"
f
FRIDAY 21 SEX LOVE AND MONEY
51 SATURDAY 22 MR. CROWLEY himm j
JL





Octobei i v 1994
Computers
watch
students
(( PS)�When I niversity of
Florida student ohn Stepp
i -1 d his tm.iiu ial status .it
liters in front ot l riser
I Ial I last month, the St teen gave
him mote information than he
requested.
I accidentalh entered my
� incorrecth the anthro-
senioi said ()m e I cor-
rected it. the computer gave me
.1 i omplete list of students'
� ies .T.ni Sex i.i! Security num-
ng with mv last
and si rolling to the end
� the alphabet
� hole in the mm ersitv torn
puter system program has al-
i d public a cess to not only
stepp- tec o: ds but all student
See LEAK page 4
GREEKS
From p. 2
humorous, sometimes humilial
W ,1V s
While mosl pledges spend the
morning after their final initiation
nursing little more than hangovers
and bruised egos, tar too often,
well-intentioned hazing meant as
a brotherhood-strei gthening ex
perience, can have fatal results
1 he beating death ot Kappa Al-
pha Psi pledge Michael Davis in
February at Southeast Missouri
State University has sorority and
fraternity leaders nationwide talk
ing more about finding ways to
curb hazing.
Davis' death was the 23rd fatal-
ity related to hazing in 10 wars.
And although schools and national
Greek organizations m lay out
serious penalties lor hazing pi u
tices, they are unable to punish
what they are not allowed to see
"Regulating fraternities is ditti
cult because mosl frats aren't go-
ing to let anyone in to witness what
they do to their pledges says ohn
Elliot, a member of Kappa Sigma
at Oklahoma state University.
"They really have to trust us on
our word. But it something's out
Scheduled Events :
Monda
Tuesday
Self-Defense 7-8pm
MSC Great Rra 3
Aids Awareness 8:30-9:30pm
MSC 221
Wednesday- Sex Fest 5-9pm
Between Tjler and Todd
DJ servicu provided o
6 I'J.t'M:�' i Is' Cherry
Thursday - Cliffhanger 5;30pm-6am
free rock climbing, dinner, &
movies at the Rock.
Sponsored by: ?cc Service
i ount .
In p; ' � .
kind. 16 men 1 a is
fraternitv were charged w ith the
hazing ol Davis and up to lour
�tht"�' pieiges
Si � in of the 1 'i men w ere
charged with involuntary man-
slaughter, while tour pled guilt
earlier this month to involuntary
manslaughtei i exchange for tes
tifying against others, says tape
Girardeau c ount Attorney
Morlev Sm ing
is died aftei enduring
puni the head nd the both
during an all-night initiation. Al-
ter collapsing outside, I a is was
brought to .m nfi . ampus apart-
ment When the i. oronerexamined
the body of the junior journalism
major, he found a small notebook
stuffed into the front ot his under-
wear, the onl) thing Davis was
weating w hen he died. "Hazing is
the physical conditioning ol the
mind was written .n the first
page.
" There is this rite of passage in
all human beings that savs you
ha e to go through some hardship
to really appreciate an accomplish-
ment sas Michael (.ordon, ex-
ecutive director ot the National
Pan-Hellenic Council in
Bloomington, Ind the umbrella
organization ot the nation's eight
black fraternities and sororities
" We have to figure outwhatyoung
people need for these moments ot
fulfillment without putting them
through these negative, humiliat-
ing and often dangerous epen-
en es
fhe Fraternity 1 xecurives As-
sociation, an organization of na-
tional fraternity heads, defines
hazing as "any action taken or situ-
ation created, intentionally,
whether on or oft fraternity pre-
mises, to produce mental or physi-
cal discomfort, embarrassment,
harassment or ridicule
Even Davis knew of the dan-
gers involved with pledging his
fraternity When he came home
tor a weekend with a cut on his
nose from pledging activities, his
mother was concerned. "When I
asked htm whv hi' wanted to
pledge this fraternitj . he said Ma
when ou re a pledge, you have to
take it. " Edith Da is said.
"A lot of kids go into school
thinking that they want to be
hazed, like they'll be missing out
on something it they don't go
through it, " says Eileen Stevens,
founder of the Committee to Halt
Im'Iiss College Killings, or
C.H.U.C.K. "In reality, though.
found
i foi
Steve
died in ! � lazing
from his fraternit Klan Alpine .it
Alfred (. ollege in New York
Stenzel, i ho w as 20 at the til
died ol alcohol poisoning and � �
posure to the cold
dri en an und tow n
night locked in the trunk ol a car
w ith two) 'tiier students
Stenzel was gi en a pint ot l.u k
Daniels, a bottle of wine and a six-
packof beer and was told he would
not be able to leave the trunk until
he finished them all. His blood-
alcohol lev el w as ().4f he
died, almost five timi
limit.
Stenzel's death was ruled an
accident and the involved frater-
nity, a local organization involv-
ing the school's athletes, was not
charged.
"I could never be comfortable
with the word 'accident' because
this was a planned, premeditated
activity says 1 ileen Stevens.
How widespread hazing is
across the nation is hard to assess
onathan Brant, executiv e director
of the National Interfraternity Con-
ference, estimated in "Broken
Pledges a book on hazing-related
deaths, that only 3 percent of K
members haze.
Still, despite being illegal in 3C
i ratios are not the (i
i ampus res
- . L1 j - .11 I I
is sociel ie - haze, sa s
nositivi
I rtivt
ternih
g, at least in a
part ol the fra
" e are di
-i imething that makes us stand out
m others he says. ' I here are
rituals ,)oL standards that go with
that Otherwise, someone would
just say they want to be a Ka:
Alpha Psi and that would be it
i here needs to be something thai
makeseac h fraternity and sorority
spe� ial to the person that's in it
I low ever, many colleg)
national fraternity officials say
hazing should not be a part ot
v ireek tradition In tact, since the
1470s, membersof-NIC have been
required to include an anti-hazmg
i lause in their constitutions.
t lordon says that national Greek
organizations need to concentrate
less on strict "no hazing" policies
and instead otter alternatives.
"There should be specific intake
procedures tor these Students he
savs. 'It will not be an overnight
process, but if you can teach these
young people that this sense of
brotherhood can come from other
tactic s, the problems wiil decline
ravers
GRILL'
THRIFTY
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At The Corner Of 14th & Charles S ets
Homemade
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Hoidogs
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r Innch fries
i Cotdlouniain
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wmbei
.vembi �
Topic To Be Krvirwnt
� Verbal Abiht) � i I
antonym �
� ijj' ' I i �- � V
� Arulyl i a- � � �
t oration:
a cgeui ��'��
ind logical reas
I Hut. i.
Instructor
R IcNtswa jei to ����� -
Tents
EARLY REGISTRATION DISCOUNT:
Only $150 before October 18! $170 beginning October 10
me opi
dress the

and ap te actioi
Da
ouri offii
banded tl
c ha tei
mi plans
()ther . n
similai .
ing toStevei
ficull
ally reluctant I
with inf) irmal
Students should be i
sponsible I
I hey should be m
i tffei informal
ally afraid of the rep r
for their actioi
gests that schools set
dures where studenl
anonymous informal i
potential hazing ini ide
In an effort to curb I
haps, some s� hi oli
pledge week into
mester, hoping h
more time to ad
life. Others have tu ti
hazing rules Officials at H I
University in I lempsl
have eliminated pi) I �
together, opting'tis
bination of educations
anthropic seminars foi
week.
"We trv to keep in COnt I
old and prospecth �
much as possible, 'says Vi
Creek advisor at Hofsti i
sitv. "The challeng)
these fraternity nn i
that they have to change I
tern. There has to b) net)
effort between every ore c
and it's sometimes diffii
ev eryone on the same page
This month, Kappa Alpha
members who were invi
Michael Davis' death wen' I
guiltv of hazing While mflti
Keith Allen was sentencectfo
days in prison tor his role ii
death, he will also join the I6�rth
members charged in perfojn
500 hours of community
mainly by traveling to sch -
a message against hazing.
" the entire in ident w as j
stupid and re -
eeutor Morlev 5
thatthisdeathwassoeasih
able is the most disturbing
about it
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IRTOIRVEp





4 The East Carolinian
October 13, 1994
LEAK
From p. 3
FSU
From p. 2
records for the past year.
Those students with a pri-
vacy flag - a request to place a
computer block on personal in-
formation such as telephone
numbers and addresses - are
also affected.
Stuart Hoskins, assistant
controller for UF Financial Ser-
vices, said he wasn't aware of
the hole in the system, although
Stepp had contacted him.
"This is the first I've heard of
it Hoskins said.
After briefly examining the
system, he verified that anyone
could access the confidential in-
formation.
Ed Poppell, administrative
affairs associate vice-president,
said it is an illegal breach of
confidentiality when a Social
Security number and a
student's full name are listed
together.
Instructions on the comput-
ers led students to other menus
that gave more detailed infor-
mation on their accounts.
Hoskins said the computer
system would be corrected
within a few days.
The current menu program
was set up a year ago as an
interim one.
Until the new system is in
place, which could be some time
around Christmas, students
willnot e able to access the other
menus.
Pamela Bernard, UF general
counsel, said the Buckley
Amendment protects confiden-
tial information from access by
third parties.
The amendment covers all
student records except direc-
tory information, but students
have the right to request a pri-
vate flag to restrict access to
addresses and telephone num-
bers.
Students who want to keep
directory information private
can fill out a form at the Regis-
trar Office.
There are a number of rea-
sons students protect their
records.
"When I was a student, I kept
my address private because I
lived alone Bernard said.
Bernard said the U.S. Depart-
ment of Education oversees
complaints against violations of
the Buckley Amendment.
� If a university was found
guilty of breaching student con-
fidentiality, the Department of
Education could withhold
funds.
However, if the breach was
caused by a simple error, such
action would be unlikely,
added Bernard.
"With larger institutions like
this, errors are made Bernard
said. "The university tries hard
to watch out for the students'
privacy and usually errors are
on the side of students' pri-
vacy
Bernard said the best rem-
edy for students who have a
complaint and think their pri-
vacy has been invaded "is to
bring the situation to the
university's attention
The new system may involve
using a Personal Identification
Number (PIN) for student ac-
cess to records.
However, as with any com-
puter system, random errors are
possible, Poppel said.
"All of these systems are not
100 percent fail-safe Poppel
said.
Stepp and other students
were angered by the breach.
"It is a typical example of
bureaucracy and its inability to
properly handle the concerns
of a large number of students
Stepp said.
Khajuanna Carithers, a first-
year student from Lake Wales,
Fla said her privacy had been
invaded.
"If someone used that com-
puter and went through my in-
formation, it is the school's
fault she said. "They
shouldn't have that many faults
in the system.
They are correcting it now,
but damage could have been
done
Josh Stopek, a sophomore,
said it bothers him that his So-
cial Security number was avail-
able to the public for the past
year.
"It is ironic he said. "It is a
lack of Social Security
guarantees students a passing
grade in his chemistry class if they
sign a contract with him, promis-
ing to follow basic study habits
essential to understanding the
course material.
"This is an attempt at approach-
ing the course in a new way said
Dougherty. "In order to be suc-
cessful, you have to put in the
work. There is no way around
that. The contract is there to en-
sure that students put in the time
to get a passing grade
Before Dougherty offered his
contract, 50 percent of the stu-
dents enrolled in the chemistry
course dropped it by the manda-
tory deadline for withdrawal. Of
the remaining students, less than
50 percent finished with a pass-
ing grade, setting the rate of stu-
dents who successfully completed
the class at only about 25 percent.
Since Dougherty has offered
his contract, the number of stu-
dents who have successfully com-
pleted the course has risen sig-
nificantly-
During the fall 1992 semester,
the first time the course was of-
fered, 76 percent of the students
finished the course with a grade
of C or better.
Dougherty first offered the con-
tract to his students two years ago
after being assigned to teach or-
ganic chemistry after a five-year
hiatus from the class.
From p. 1
in which they reside.
"It shows to the local communi-
ties that state employees do support
their communities Coston said.
David Bailey, executive director
of the United Way in Pitt County,
said that the ECU S.E.C.C. has done
well and that it is among the top in
the state in money raised.
"It is a good and easy and effi-
cient way for thousands of people at
the university to donate money to
the organizations of their choice
Bailey said. "Ihavebeenverypleased
with the generosity of the employ-
ees
Bailey added that many ECU stu-
dents volunteer in United Way pro-
grams such as Partnership for
Progress and the Boys and Girls
Club.
Anyone interested in volunteer-
ing for United Way programs in Pitt
County can call the Pitt Volunteer
Action Center at 830-6217.
VOTE
From p. 1
people aware and get them to
vote I just like playing for dif-
ferent causes Todd Roberts,
singer for Henry Acrobat said.
"We've played a lot of benefits
in my opinion a lot of college
students, at least the ones I'm
around daily, don't really care.
Some of them do, but it's a very
small percentage and that's one
reason why I'd like to get more
people aware. Even though they
students may not like politics,
they can help change that and
help put people into office that
have some of the same views as
students
Todd Jenkins helped as Mas-
ter of Ceremonies and said he
enjoyed the show.
"I really like rock-n-roll. It's
important for people to feel like
they should be heard even though
millions are voting and students
feel they are lost in the numbers
Roberts said. "We are in the
shadow of the baby boomers.
People talk about all sorts of mi-
norities in society today; our gen-
eration is a minority. When the
baby boomers get older and we
have to start paying for them,
it's important that we have a
voice now
October 17 is the last day stu-
dents can register to vote.
News
Writers1
Meeting
Today at
4:38.
V'V
CAMOUNA8
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TRAVELERS!
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.1

1H
. la
t:
"If I am virtuous and worthy, for whom
should I not maintain proper concern
CONFUCIUS
"The first point of courtesy
must always be truth"
EMERSON
A zero dialer is a zero indeed!9
POLITENESSMAN
1-800-COLLECT
SutfiePe1fou(ufit�44.





PHOEBE
BY STEPHANIE SMITH
BY GREGORY DICKENS





6 The East Carolinian
October 13, 1994
The East Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian
�sjrinted wf
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Chris Warren, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
I am bra Zion, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Brad Oidhatn, Asst. Sports Editor
Steven A. HIU, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
r�CyrW
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson. Copy Editor
Jon Cawley, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Phea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Jon Cawley, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
Violence will not solve problems
OKAY K1PPIE5, HERES
OUR UPPATEP US1 OF HEP
, FUL. , HrMMPY TiP5 TO EN-
SjRt A SAFE" HAllOWEEN
TVUS Efl�.
KEEP PftESM BATTERiES IN SOOP
u�5Mu6HT.
STAN IN A GRCOP.
ObE tfER�CT:VE TPiPE ON
OUR Cl-OTHES AND 6AG.
DO NO; CARRN f GUN.
HANE cand serrxfT to a lA6
R DO NOT EATANiTHlNG ANN-
ONE GlVEo NOO.
40 PRESSING UP LIKE AN INDiAN, j
3NPSN, H060y WiTCM.OR GElShA
AtHMJWS' GET A LOfiF o; 6�EAD,
PEANUT BOTTEfi.A DUi-L- �NiFE.
GET UNDE6. N00R. BED. STAV THERE
The abortion issue is a controver-
sial dilemma that elicits emotions from
those having an opinion on it. Whether
or not government regulations ad-
dressing abortion can satisfy everyone
is doubtful. Intense debate over this is-
sue is expected whenever it is discussed
but, lately, rhetoric and peaceful protest
have turned into violent acts of crime.
Former Presbyterian minister Paul
Hill was recently found guilty of vio-
And to those who believe that abor-
tion is murder and that the doctor got
what he deserved, the worn out but appro-
priate cliche seems to apply: two wrongs
do not make a right.
It seems a bit hypocritical that a man
who is pro-life would take life away. For
months Hill picketed abortion clinics with
a sign that read, "Abortionists are mur-
derers. Murderers should be executed
Soon Hill will be on trial for a murder he
lating a federal law that was intended gleefully admits to committing. While he
to protect abortion clinics and those
who utilize them. Now, Hill will face
murder charges.
It has not been a year since Paul
Hill wielded a shotgun to kill a doctor,
who routinely performed abortions,
along with his security escort. While
the writers here at The East Carolinian
do not want to take sides over the abor-
tion issue, we want to make a state-
ment concerning Paul Hill's actions.
TEC does not condone murder.
is not an abortionist, he has become what
he detested as well: a murderer.
TEC 's opinion concerning this issue
is also shared by the leading pro-life lead-
ers, including the Washington-based Op-
eration Rescue which denounced Paul Hill
as a vigilante who was not representing its
interests.
Again, TEC is not taking sides on the
abortion issue. We believe in the free ex-
change of ideas, but we do not believe in
murder.
Capital punishment serves as justice
M by Patrick Hinson
I've decided that I'm
highly in favor of capital pun-
ishment in this country. America
is known world wide for itscrime
rate and for the brutality of the
crimes committed in our soci-
ety. I realize I still know very
little about our judicial system
and how it works, but I know
what I see on the news and read
in the newspaper each day
Crime rates are skyrocket-
ing everywhere, serial murders
are becoming common, and the
more violent criminals are get-
ring younger and younger.
People in both big cities
and small towns now witness
the horrors of murder, rape and
other major crimes. I see enough
, to, know that the system we're
� jiSing now just isn't keeping up,
j6e crime rate passed us by a
- 3�ng time ago, and maybe it's
; Jme for a re-evaluation of that
system.
I believe that capital pun-
ishment is necessary, and
whether or not we should be
using it should no longer be in
question. What we should be
questioning now are the best
methods of using capital pun-
ishment to our advantage.
Our prisons are highly
overcrowded, so much so that
we are now releasingsomecrimi-
nals with lesser offenses earlier
than their original sentences to
make way for those with more
serious otfenses.
It is the tax pavers who
support these criminals once
thev are in prison, and it is the
tax pavers again who pay for
criminals walking the streets
who should definitely be behind
bars. We pay massive amounts
ot money each year to support
people who have committed
crimes against our society. Why?
Our courts are back-
logged for months, and when a
Criminal does come to trial, de-
fense lawyers have become
trained to use technicalities and
the gray, confusing labyrinth ot
our system to tie the law up in
knots. We need to restructure
the laws so they'll be simpler,
more direct and less technical,
and by .ill means, the punish-
ments should be made more se-
vere. Criminal s should know that
they will pay for their crimes. The
murderer, the drug dealer and the
rapist should know that life is the
price they'll pay.
I don't believe the insan-
ity plea should be accepted, even
for convicted murderers. I think
it's a cop-out, and when we use it,
a murderer gets a dream sen-
tence, a soft stay in a mental insti-
tution, where he is studied by psy-
chiatristsand eventually released.
If a person has the physi-
cal and mental ability to kill an-
other person, then insanity should
have nothing to do with the ver-
dict. First degree murder should
be first degree murder, and the
penalty should be standard.
The law should show no
prejudice, no favoritism. All
people should be equal before the
law, as it is supposed to be. A
mandatory, established punish-
ment should be universally ac-
cepted as the price paid for all
crimes, and the death penalty
should be accepted as the price
paid for murder.
Trials for those more ob-
vious crimes should be short and
simple. Punishment should be
swift and direct, and the public
should be well informed. The gov-
ernment should start to crack
down on crime, finally, and make
things happen. The general
ad vocation of the death penalty is
a clear step in that direction. It's
time we started defending our-
selves from within. Our laws have
perhaps become too com plica ted,
and too contradictory. They have
begun to work against us.
Many say that the death
penalty is too cruel a punishment
for human beings, and to a certain
extent I agree. Have we the right
to take another human being's lite?
Maybe not, or at least no more so
than the person who murders an-
other in cold blood. The only jus-
tice acceptable is equal just ice. The
bottom line is this: many things,
that under different circumstances
might seem immoral ,have become
necessary in today's society. The
American criminal has evolved,
ami the legal system must eventu-
ally evolve too The foundation ot
order in any society must be es-
tablished with the law.
There are a few obvious
reasons why I feel capital pun-
ishment is necessary. The first is
as a deterrent. Future, or would-
be criminals might take that deci-
sive moment to think twice be-
fore proceeding if they know
clearly the penalty involved.
Some might say that if criminals
are irrational, then the threat of
capital punishment will not de-
ter. I say that even in the event
that it does not deter, it will still
serve equal justice for the crime
committed.
Most obviously, the
death penalty serves asthehigh-
est level of punishment in this
country, and it should continue
to do so. It is important that we
have it and that we keep it, be-
cause it is one of our most potent
weapons in law enforcement and
criminal justice.
Capital punishmentshould
serve as a standard, as the un-
breakable procedure of uphold-
ing the law.
All criminals are innocent
until proven guiltv, and are en-
titled to certain rights as crimi-
nals, but when guilt is obvious,
when it is blatant, and when it is
proven, there should be a gen-
eral, accepted standard for pun-
ishment in our system
Capital punishment
serves as justice. It is the fair price
paid to society for an equally ter-
rible crime. It is the arm of the law
in action, doing the work that
must be done.
We must use it to our
advantage, as a weapon to fight
back against the growing sense
of anarchy and insecurity in our
country due to crime.
The people must feel a
sense of fairness, and that crimi-
nals, no matter what, no matter
who, will pay the maximum price
for their crime against us.
We must use the death pen-
alty to gain and maintain that
sense of security, so we will al-
ways know that despite how bad
things may seem, our system
still struck- tenaciously for the
upper hand in the tight against
crime
Violence towards females still a problem
B y Angela McCullers
Assault on females is still
a common occurrence in our
society. The experiences of
women battered by boyfriends
expose the underside of the
ideal happy couple.
Female abuse is not just
slapping, punching or shov-
ing. It can also be threats of
violence. Threatening to give
her black eyes can be as fright-
ening and intimidating as ac-
tual physical attack. Brutality
is not necessarily confined to
hitting.
Its extreme, yet infre-
quent, forms often leave
women severely scarred,
physically and emotionally.
Female abuse is a crime just as
any other crime that consti-
tutes bodily harm: assault
andor battery, aggravated
assault, intent to assault or to
commit murder.
Battered women come
from all walks of life. Social
class, family income, level of
education, occupation, and
ethnic or racial background
make no difference. Profes-
sional men batter their women
as do unemployed and un-
skilled laborers. Highly success-
ful business and professional
women are battered as well as
those with no job skills.
Female abuse is one of the
most under-reported crimes.
Some women do not see a slap or
a bruise on the legs or arms as a
form of physical abuse, but I do.
Abuse over time may have cu-
mulative physical effects: severe
bruising and body soreness ac-
company emotional distress.
As a form of terrifying in-
timidation, violence signifies
that the man's way will prevail
evenwhen the woman struggles
against this imposition.
Leaving her in a constantly
vigilant state, violence forces a
woman to worry about the time,
place, or reason for the next at-
tack. As trust is destroyed, life is
never the same again.
Because the basis for inti-
macy is trust, the entire nature
of a relationship is changed
through violence, especially re-
peated violence.
Many women give similar
reasons for staying in an abu-
sive relationship: they hope that
their boyfriend will change, he
apologized for his rage of ter-
ror, they hope he will never
strike again, (and the most fa-
mous one of all) "because 1
love him Love is not sup-
posed to hurt.
Since men have learned
to form systems through
which to protect even the
weakest male in the commu-
nity and his property, it is sur-
prising to find that women still
need protection from indi-
vidual men.
It is the husband or lover
who is expected to protect her,
but in fact abuses her.
Female abuse is a serious
matter, and it needs to be seen
by everyone as such. Ladies, it
is not alright for your lover to
beat you.
If you are in an abusive
relationship please get out be-
fore it is too late. A real man
does not beat on a woman.
There is no excuse for
such behavior. No one wants
to be man handled, slapped,
kicked, punched, or threat-
ened. If this is happening to
you, get out before it is too
late.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
With Virginia Tech invading Greenville this
weekend, ECU has the opportunity to stand in the
national spotlight. I am hoping that everyone will
remain in Greenville to withstand another Pirate
thrashing.
This is a call to all Pirate supporters: let's sell
out Dowdy-Ficklen and show the Hokies how to
really play ball. By far East Carolina has the most
and best school spirit in North Carolina, move over
"Cameron Crazies because the Pirates will over-
take you!
Lets go out to Dowdy-Ficklen to support our .
football team and Coach Logan. Why? Because we
are the Pirates of E-C-U. HEY!
Eric Bartels '
Junior
Communications
To the Editor:
My wife and I don't get too many opportuni-
ties to attend football games at East Carolina . We
did attend the recent game against Southern Mis-
sissippi during Parents Weekend. We both were
impressed with the East Carolina Marching Band,
especially their rendition of The Star Spangled Ban-
ner. I don't think I heard it played any better!
Congratulations to all who planned the
Parent's Weekend Activities. The weather was
great, the game well played and the picnic was
delicious.
Tom and Norm Hoddinott
Portsmouth, Virginia
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Faculty, Staff
and Students are invited to a
Dutch lunch with
Congressman Martin Lancaster
Monday, October 17th at 12:00 p.m.
at ToddDining Hall





- October 13, IW
The Fast Carolinian-7
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
V
For Rent
For Sale
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
l bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
p � � � � � � � � � -j
i Heroes Are Here Too t
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AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
j.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815. 758-7436
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS FOR JAN. 95. Dogwood Hol-
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bedroom, 2 bath; 2 bedroom, i bath
Watersewerbasic cable included
Call for more into. 752-8900
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
wanted tn Jan. to share a 3 bedroom
house 2 blocks from campus A C
washer drver. partial rumishtxtCall
752-3472
3BDRM HOUSE NEAR CAMPLS
$450 - Dep. .2bdrm furnished duplex
near campus S3S0dep avail. Oct
321-0303
BRAND NEW PAVED PRIVATE
PARKING LOT: now available near
campussand downtown. Will rent by
year or semester. Call 756-1252 or 756-
6567
For Sale
116 E. 5th Street
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FOR SALE: Dorm size refrigerator,
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FOR SALE: 6 piece Oak finish bed-
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Brochures! SpareFull-time. Set own
hours! Rush self-addressed stamped
envelope: Publishers (GI) 1821
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BREAK TRIPS! Sell 8 trips and go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
resume experience! 1-800-678-6386!
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
extra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Central Distributors Po Box 10075,
Olathe, KS 66051, Immediate re-
sponse.
ATrENTION JUNIORS, SENIORS,
GRAD STUDENTS Sales intern-
ship available gain valuable work
experience call Sara at 355-7700 for a
possible interview
PART TIME POSITION- Adult
entertainment agency seeks physi-
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Must have own transportation and be
between the ages of 18-25. Call 1-800-
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BW-3 REST. Now hiring all shifts;
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PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
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professional photographers. No
experience necessary; we train. Good
pay, flexible PT hours. Call 1-800-722-
7033 M-F 12-5pm.
FUNDRAISING Choose from 3
different fundraisers lasting either 3
or 7 days. No investment. Earn $$$ for
your group plus personal cash
bonuses for yourself. Call 1-800-932-
0528, ext 65
SKI RESORT JOBS- hiring for winter
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benefits. Skisnowboard instructors,
lift operators, wait staff, chalet staff,
other positions. Over 15,000 openings
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languages required. For more info,
call: (206)632-1146 ext. J53622
Greek Personals
Greek Personals
OUR FIRST BIG
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THESE ARE NAME BRANDS, QUALITY;
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BROKEN-IN, COMFORTABLE, AND UNBELIEVABLY
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ONE WEEKEND ONLY OCTOBER I3� 14 15
THURS&FRI.lOOO-nOQ.l 30-500, SAT lOfJO-lOQ

Personals
LADIES: bored? lonely? Let me
cheer you up and share those special
times. Let's see how fun this life can
be. Letter and correspondence to:
Hawk, Po Box 8663, Greenville, NC
27835
RANDI, Randi, Randi, Randi, Randi,
Randi. Hey Baby, what's up? Call me
this weekend W.
rja Lost & Found
A GREY TABBY CAT found off East
10th St. (Car wash area) about 6
months old. White balled paws. Call
752-3792
FOUND: Book Cuzcu Peru and some
postcards. Found near Greene
Residence Hall and Jenkins Fine Arts
Center. Call 752-5533 or 328-6304. Ask
for Jenn.
Greek Personals
PI DELTA- Thanx for a great "grab a
date It turned into a Pi Delta Pi
Lambda Phi social- Nicole, you did a
great job setting Amy up with her
date. Lets hope she thinks so. Love
the Pi Lambda Phi brothers.
PI LAMBDA PHI would like to
introduce the Epsilon class to ECU.
James Lewis, Chris Heath, Jon
Newton, Brandon Haines, Jeff Boyle,
Robbie Harris, Karl Vitols, David
Rowland, Lawrence Desilets, Todd
Kelly, Chris Cardy, Brian Jaeger, Dan
Clanson, Drew Davis, Mike Davis,
Philip Epps, and Aaron Lowery. Keep
up the good work.
THE BROTHERS OF PI LAMBDA
PHI would like to thank the sisters of
Alpha Phi and the brothers ot Delta
Sigma Phi for a great time we had at
the Elbo last Fn. night. Hey, Katie do
you have a date to homecoming yet?
Hope we can all get together again
real sxn.
KAPPA ALPHA, PIKA AND
ALPHA PHI: Thurs. night together
we'll be We know we'll have a blast
with everyone: partying until we see
the sun. Can't wait till tonight! Love,
Chi Omega
KAPPA SIGMA: Thanks for the
wonderful cocktail in West Virginia
It was a great "trip Love, Joy,
Laura, Grace, Amy , Jen, Kim and
Amelia
DEAR CAT-1 know you are that
special one, and to get that trust I've
waited very long. I hope you can be
there that special night, because to
see Pi Lamb get chartered will be a
great sight Oh, what a night home-
coming will be, I hope you will be
there nght next to me. I know my
brothers will give me a boo, but if
thev onlv knew, knew how much I
love vou! Lowe; your Pi Lamb buddy
WAY TO GO SIGMA FOOTBALL!
Evervone is a "main" player in this
game! Thanks David for all of your
help and support! We could not have
done it without you!
TO THE PLEDGES OF THETA
CHI- It took a while to gather us all,
but when you did we all had a ball,
we loved the roses and all the
surprises as you could see, Let's do it
again Love, the pledges of AZD!
ALPHA XI DELTA: Our big sisters
are by far the best. They treated us
with gifts, candy, and for sometime
put us to the test. We've known who
they were for a while. We love them
dearly and simply show it with a
smile. Love, your AZD lil' sisters
PI DELTA- "Grab a Date" wasn't it
great! Between Alan's dancing talent,
Jen's absence and the terrific music
played we all definitely had a blast.
The question is "did everyone leave
with the date they came with?"
PI DELTA- Congratulations Christy
for making sumv finals. Congratula-
tions to Pi Delta flag football team for
two big wins. Good job Wed. night
AOPI and Sigma for Mon. night. Pi
Delta sisters and pledges
TO ALL SORORITIES- We really
enjoyed the candlelight the other
night. It was a great way to welcome
the new members. Lets make it a
tradition. Love, Alpha Delta Pi
PI KAPPA PHI- We are looking
forward to the pre-downtown
tonight. Love, The sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi
THETA CHI- We had a wonderful
time at the pre-downtown the other
night. Lets make sure to get together
again real soon. Love Alpha Delta Pi
ALPHA PHIS AND THEIR DATES,
Stranger mixer was really great. The
preparty was crazv at "Wendy and
Daves The pimp, the prostitute, the
Bunnys, That girl, adn the lamp
shades. We headed downtown ready
to boogy down. The Duckhunters nd
their dates switched around.
Rapunel, Rapunel let down her long
hair And that photographer was
where? The night at the Cellar was
coming to an end, then Kimmie fell
down & broke something again. We all
had a crazv time, hope vou did too!
Love, Alpha Phis
PHI KAPPA TAU- Thank vou forjhe
great time last Thurs night We all.had
a lot of fun and are Uxking forward to
tailgahng with vou Sat Love the
Alpha Phis
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
lunior Panhellenic Council officers-
Pres. Courtney Blakester (Chi Omega)
V.Pres- Ashlev Smith (Alpha Delta'Pi)
Treasurer- Jennv Ijnka (PJta Zetal
Secretary- Danielle Danyi (Alpha
Omicron Pi) Sisters chair- Christina ,
Reeves (Alpha Xi Delta) Campus
Chair- Paige Bull (Sigma Sigma Sigma)
Fundraiser chair- Tony Daleo (Zeta
Tau Alpha) Community Semces-
Sherill Nannev (Alpha Phi)
ALPHA DELTA PI: Thurs night was a
blast! The Beastie Boy were a hit.
Looking forward to our next ad venture'
Love-Theta Chi j
i
AZD- Good game Mon night in tlag J
football. Congrats on your win and -
good luck in play-offs! Love your sisters
and pledges!
SUMO WRESTLING: Great job Ali
and Stephanie! We never knew you
had it in you. Love the sisters and
pledges of AZD
STYIN ALIVE WITH THE
LAMBDA CHIS Dancing to the 70s
groove, Slick Rick seemed to have all ;
the right moves, ladies and more
"ladies" or were they transvestites?
Either way, they made our disco
Dynamite That pink passion puncfv
zsure made a mess. Hey Bubba- what,
was under your pretty pink dress? Yoti
pimps and Sugardaddy's wanted to
own us all. A huge "Thanks" to you j
guys-we sure had a ball Love the
sisters and pledges of Alpha Xi Delta
PIKES- THANKS for the great pre
downtown last Thurs. night. We'll have
to do it again soon, but next time we'll
have a bonfire to keep us warm. Love .
the sisters and pledges of Alpha Xi
Delta
Travel
SPRING BREAK! Early sign-up ,
specials! Bahamas Party cruise 6 days
$279! Includes 12 meals 6 parries!
Cancun & Jamaica $399 with Air from
Raleigh! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK EARLY SPE-
CIALS! Panama City Oceanview
Room with Kitchen & free bus to bars
$129! Davtona (Kitchens) $159! Cocoa
Beach $159! Key West $229! 1-800-678-
6386
TRAVEL FREE! SPRING BREAK
'95! America's favorite spring break
company! Guaranteed lowest priced
to Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, Florida,
South Padre, Barbados. Btxik early
and save $$$! Organize small group
and travel free! Call for free info
packet. Sun Splash Tours 1-800-426-
7710
Announcements
BOOK SALE
Great Bargains! October 26 & 27,
1994 at ECU's Joyner Library. Pro-
ceeds to ECU Library. Sponsored
by Friends of ECU Library.
THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN
VOTERS PRESENTS:
Tuesday October 18 at 7:30pm in
theGreenville Recreation and Parks
Bldg. (Jaycee Park) on Cedar Lane
the League of Womens Voters will
meet and present Population and
Development: The View from
Cairo. The speaker will be Arlene
McKay, who is Director of the De-
velopment Office, Family Health
International, and President Fleet
of theNC Business and Professional
Women's Club. Ms. McKay at-
tended the recent World Popula-
tion Conference in Cairo, Egypt.
For more information call Susan
Meggs at .355-7335.
ECU STUDENTS AND FAC-
ULTY
We desperately need your help to
reach our goal of ISO units at the
upcoming blood drive at
Mendenhall Student (enter on
Tuesday, October 18, 19�4 from
12:00 Noon until 6:00pm All blood
types are needed. Remember, ev-
ery three seconds someone needs
blood! One out of three people will
need a blood transfusion in their
lifetime Everyone is encouraged
to come out and give the "Gift of
Life
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
Attention! If you love Horses you'll
love to be a member of the ECU
Riding Club. This is the 2nd meet-
ing of the year. AU ECU Students
and Staff welcome for some great
winter Fun. Don't horse around!
Come see what we're about, Octo-
ber 13at5:30in Mendenhall: Room
4 or Call 328-8549355-1515 for in-
formation.
LNTERESTED IN CONSTRUC-
TION?
East Carolina Construction Asso-
ciation is having a meeting on Oc-
tober 18th at 6:00pm Rawl 106. All
interested students are invited to
attend.
UNIVERSITY FOLK AND
DAJMCE CLUB
Sec nd I )ance Meeting of the Yea r!
Friday, Oct 14, Ledonia Wright
Blilg (behind Student Health), 7-
!():30pm. Flection of new officers.
C rime alone or bring a friend. Free!
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
FriOct. 14andSatOct. 15�Opera
Scenes, Clyde Hiss, Director (A
Fletcher Recital Hzll, 8:00pm, free).
Sun Oct 16�Faculty Recital, Mark
Ford, percussion and Nathan Will-
iams, clarinet (A) Fletcher Recital
Hall, 3:00pm, free)
ECU's ADVENTURE PROGRAM
Will be offering a Fall Break Hiking
Trip to the beautiful Pisgah Forest
located in Western North Carolina.
The trip will leave Greenville Octo-
ber 20 and return October 24. For
more trip details, contact the Recre-
ational Outdoor Center in 117
Christenbury Gymnasium or call
328-6387.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
FITNESS CLASSES
Registration for Recreational Ser-
vices fitness classes will be held Oc-
tober 17-27 in 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium from9:00am to5:00pm.
The cost for each twelve class ses-
sion is$10.lX) for ECU Students. Drop
in class tickets may be purchased tor
$5.1X). For a complete class schedule
and class description drop by 204
Christenbury Gym or call 328-6387.
SWIM IN FROM THE COLD AT
MINCES
MingesColiseum and Christenbury
Gym swimming pools. Bring your
valid ECU ID on the follwing days
and times. The hours for
Christenbury Swimming Pool are
Mon. thru Fri. 6:30am to8:00am and
11:30am to 1:30pm. Mon. thru Thurs.
3:00pm to 6:30pm and Fri. 3:00 to
6:00pm. The weekend hours are Sat.
12:00 to 5:00pm and Sun. 1:00 to
5:00pm. The open hours for Minges
Swimming Ptxl are Mon Wed and
Fri. 7:30 to 9:(X)pm. Tues and Thurs
the hours are6:00 to8:00pm and Sun
from 2:00 to 5:IX) pm.
GAMMA THETA UPSILON
The Beta Iota chapter of Gamma
Theta Upsilon, the international
Geography honor society will hold
a mandatory meeting on Wednes-
day, October 26, at 3:(X)pm in room
C-205 Brewster. All interested indi-
viduals are encouraged to attend.
Gamma Theta Upsilon is an honor
society, not a fatemal or profes-
sional organization, to be among
its membership- is a privilege and
distinction. In addition, GTU re-
cently established officers for the
1994-95 school year. They are: Mary
Beth Morde, President; KellyCarey,
Vice-President; Charles F.
Grantham, SecretaryHistorian;
Richard T. (Tom) King, Treasurer.
CALL FOR FACULTY PRO-
POSALS
The Honors ProgramCommiteeof
the Faculty Senate will consider
proposals for Fall 1995 Honors
Seminars at its meeting on Nov. 15,
1994 beginning at 2:00 in Rawl
Annex 142. To propose a seminar,
a faculty member should use the
general format of the basic New
�All ads must be prepaid
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students$2.00
Non-Students$3.00
Each additional word$0.05
Announcements
Deadlines
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to
list activities and events open to the public
two times free of charge Due to the
limited amount of space, The East Caro-
linian cannot guarantee the publication ot
announcements
Course Proposal Form and do one of
the following: Appear at the Nov. 15
Honors Program Committee meet-
ing to submit the proposal in 15 cop-
ies. Contact Doug McMillan, Dept. of
Englinsh (FC 2119, Ext. 6667 or 6041)
to schedule a tentative rime; or Sub-
mit 15 copies of the course proposal
to Doug McMillan, Dept. of English.
By Nov.4,194. If you choose also to
appear in person at the committee
meeting, Doug McMillan as above to
schedule a tentative time
PICASO
PICASO, the Pitt County AIDS Ser-
vice Organization, is sponsoring an
HIVAIDS information line every
Wednesday night from 6-9pm. Any-
one with any questions about HIV,
AIDSor related issues is encouraged
to call 830-1660.
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
For more
information call
328-6366.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition





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October 13, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Hairballs and cleavage rule Outland
H& K�S�5 NZ� PFBrWY-
Photo Courtesy of Berkeley Breathed
Mark Brett
Lifestyb Editor
Berke Breathed is slipping. Not
a lot, mind you, but he's definitely
walking on an oily incline. Since
hestopped production on his daily
'Bloom County" comic strip four
years ago in favor of the Sunday-
only "Outland Breathed has
slowly but surely been losing his
edge. Perhaps that daily grind,
which was reportedly burning the
cartoonist out, also kept him sharp.
Whatever the case may be,
Breathed's new book collection of
"Outland" cartoons, His Kisses Are
Dreamy, But Those Hairballs Down
My Cleavage, is still a nice read. It's
just not nice enough. The rather
pointed political barbs that
Breathed threw out likesourcandy
in "Bloom County" are few and far
between in this collection. Instead,
he chooses to focus on mostly so-
cial satire.
That's fine, in and of itself.
Breathed has always had a talent
for finding the Achilles' heels of
American culture and exploiting
them for humor. Even when he
finds mv own weak spots, I'm usu-
ally laughing while I grunt from
the impact of the blow.
But in Kisses, he seems to be fall-
ing ever deeper into a trap sprung
in too much humor these days: men
are buffoons incapable of under-
standing the subtle intricacies of
the female mind. Sure, this kind of
thing is funny for awhile, but
Breathed's making too many trips
to this particular comedy well. The
best example of this seems to be the
"Men's Kouch" strips. Here the
male "Outland" characters sit
around on a sofa atop a grassy hill
in their underwear and act like
morons. Basically, they're all acting
like Steve Dallas (Breathed's male
ass character from the "Bloom
County" days).
Beyond thesestrips (which make
up maybe a quarter of the book),
things are generally better. The edge
may be gone, but Breathed occa-
sionally gets off some good stuff.
The many strips dealing with the
often absurd intricacies of political
correctness (of which the "Men's
Kouch" stuff surely a symptom)
are usually pretty good. One story
line in particular, the saga of Hazel
Hedgehog, is worth attention. It's
See OUTpage 11
Go to "Graceland" without leaving campus
Jennifer Coleman
Staff Writer
As it the demands of classes,
homework, tests and jobs weren't
enough, many ECU theatermajors
feel the need to add one more re-
sponsibilitv to their already full
lives � the demands of a work-
shop production.
A workshop production is very
different from a main-stage pro-
duction such as (. Abner. For one
thing, a workshop play is gener-
ally shorter, usually only one act.
Also, workshop productions are
� performed in classrooms in the
theater building, and admission is
free and open to the public.
There are some similarities be-
tween workshop productions and
main-stage shows. Both require
many hours of rehearsal and at-
home preparation by the actors.
"You have to read the play and
find out what kind of character
vou're playing. You need to work
on certain aspects of your charac-
ter outside of rehearsals so when
you're doing the play it's almost
second nature said Alex Ewing,
who plays Rootie Mallert in the
workshop production of
"Graceland
In addition to character prepa-
ration and rehearsal time, actors in
workshop productionsare respon-
sible for their own sets and props.
In "Graceland Ewing and Paula
J. Duff (the actress who plays Bev
Davies) were responsible for find-
ing as many Elvis collectibles as
they could. A local search led them
to a shop in Little Washington
called Norm's Old and New Store.
"We spent two hours looking
and couldn't find the store. Some
guy led us on a wild goose chase.
When we finally did find it, it was
closed. So we looked in the win-
dows. It was great we were like
two little children going, 'Look at
that! Look at that Duff said.
Finding the props wasn't just
for atmosphere. Although many
Elvis collectibles were required for
the performance, the search helped
both girls discover their charac-
ters.
"It's a big part of finding your
character.The more I got into Elvis,
the more I got into my character.
The seeking out of things that re-
volve around your play helps a lot.
I could see how she'd Bev dress,
act and walk Duff said.
Whv do a workshop produc-
tion at all7 Not only are the actors
responsible for their own props
and sets, but they have to work
just as hard if not harder than
actors in main-stage productions
on their character development
and line memorization. Often, a
workshop production will have
only two or three cha racters, mak-
ing each actor even more respon-
sible for learning their lines on
time.
"After classes we run lines, on
trips looking for props we run
lines, before and after rehearsals
we run lines Duff said.
Even with all the hard work
that goes into a production like
the workshop series, the actors
are excited about the opportunity.
As Ewing said, "There are so
many great small plays out there
that people should see, and
workshops are a great way to get
them out there
Duff agreed, but added that
"It's a very good experience, both
for auditioning and for working
with different directors. It's a
smaller settingthan a main-stage,
so it also gives you a better feel
for the audience
The workshop production
"Graceland" performs on Oct.
14 at 6:00 p.m. and Oct. 15 at 5:00
p.m. in room 206 of the Messick
Theater Building. Also look for
Report From the Holocaust a
play performed for AIDS Aware-
ness Month, on Oct. 16 at 6:00
p.m Oct. 17 at 6:30 p.m Oct. 18
at 7:00 p.m. and Oct. 28 at noon.
Pronounce their name Shwa
; Shannon Gay
I Staff Writer
First the Eagles get back to-
gether and go on tour, then Rob-
I ert Plant and Jimmy Page re-
unite and now those old guys
from Shwa will be playing a
show again. What's up with this
nostalgia vibe running rampant
here in America1 Whatever it
the
event happens at
O'Rock's this Saturday, Octo-
ber 15th.
Yes, folks, you heard it here
first � Shwa will come together
again on stage for the first time
since February 12,1994. On that
fateful day so long ago, this con-
glomeration of thrash, rap, funk,
metal, grind and groove dis-
banded. The guys say the
breakup was due to personal
reasons and apparently some
conflict. They said it was diffi-
cult to get them all together to
practice, and sometimes, unfor-
tunatelv, even on stage. The band
was foimed out of good friend-
ship, a few beers, and a lot of
fun, but when it became too
much of a hassle, it was time to
call it quits. This all transpired
much to the dismay of several
See SHWA page 11
Velocity Girl hits
Pavement running
Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Pavement headlined an in-
credible show Sunday at the
Ritz that also featured Veloc-
ity Girl and David Kilgor. and
Pavement put on a incredible
Kilgor's performance was
very weak compared to that of
Pavement and Velocity Girl. He
sounded like a watered-down
version of the Connells. There-
were hardly any people near the
See GIRL page 10
m
5
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
The Mighty iMighty
Bosstones
Question
the Answers
0 m m �
I've ;ot three words tor
; ill mm!
Sun e thru fii si ielease, the
I
us .i arietv ol mu ;i and
have become one of the biggest
ska-oriented bands around. On
their new album, Question the
Answers, the Bosstones have ex-
panded their typical sound to
include jazz, hip-hop and big
band styles of the 1940s.
The first song oft Question the
Answers, titled "Kinder Words
starts oft with a killer drum and
bass line which erupts into an
incredible opening horn riff.
Then Dicky Barrett's thick,
chocolatey voice jumps in, tell-
ing us, "There's no time now tor
losing tempers, or tilling up with
rage or anger What really
makes this song is the chorus:
"Kinder words might do tin
trick It it weren t tor Dicky's
rough and raucous voice, this
song would almost be consid-
ered pop.
What really makes the
Bosstones such a good band is
their willingness to incorporate
different types of musk into their
ongs. Irombonist Dennis
Brockenboroughstates, I think
we have a message of harmony,
tolerance and compassion
among all people. We try to
reflect that attitude by breaking
down musical barriers. We like
to mix older ska sounds with
newer rock sounds. We basically
play whatever we want The
tracks "Hell of a Hat" and "A
Dollar and a Dream" both use
jazzv beats and melodies to show
that the Bosstones are a band of
their word.
1 he hard-core element that
was so prominent on (heir ear-
lier albums was not forgotten
when the) made Question the
Answers, and shows up in main
tracks, especially "365 Days"
and "Pictures of You With
horns blaring and guitars ring-
ing, the ska element is almost
lost when Dicky's voice, which
on this trai k sounds as it some-
one has given him nails to gargle,
is added to the mix. rhese two
songs help gi e the extra oomph
that pushes this album - om
pletely o er the edge
I think that the Bosstones have
really matured on this album
and have become a much tighter
band as well. In an interview
with the band, saxophonist
Timothy Burton talked of how
they took a different approach
on this album by working on it a
little at a time and by using dif-
ferent studios and producers in
order "to give the album tex-
ture Texture is one thing you
won't have a problem finding
on this work of art.
Mv personal favorites on this
album are "Toxic Toast" and
"Kinder Words Like
Goldilocks said about the por-
ridge, these songs are not too
hot and not too cold, they're just
right. Her words could not bet-
ter express the way I think of
these two songs. Coming in a
close second is the track Hell of
a Hat for it incorporates won-
derful jazz and even better Ivr-
ics that produce pure and un-
adulterated auditory delight.
This album is definitely a step
�J
ahead of their previous record-
ings, especially on the last two
tracks where their maturity as a
band and their talent at
songwriting shines through.
"Dogs and Chaplains" uses a
great hip-hop beat and melody
in the beginning of the song only
to explode into a delightful, fast-
paced ska melody. "Jump
Through The Hoops the last
track on the album, is the
clincher. It has Dicky and crew
singing a great melody with an
even better harmonic riff along
with the rest of the band back-
ing him up.
Hard work and dedication
have really done lot for this
band and you can "expect even
more from them in the future.
s. , do v ourself a favor, buy Ques-
tion the Answers today.
� Meredith
Langley
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
Appearing soon for your edificatu
and amusement:
Thursday, Oct. 13
Aquarium Rescue Unit
at the Attic
(roofs rock)
Maverick
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(comedy ivestern)
FREE!
Friday, Oct. 14
Full Stop
at the Attic
Bloodstool and All Tore Uf
at O'Rock's
(hard-core)
Graceland
at Messick Theatre Buildin;
See article for times
(play)
FREE!
Jam-A-Thon
on the campus mall
5 p.m.
(acoustic)
Open Mike!
Bring your acoustic
instrument and play!
Maverick
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(comedy ivestern)
FREE!
Saturday, Oct. 15 "2
Shwa and Sans Sobriety �
at O'Rock's
(heavy rap funk) J
See story at left
Mother Nature
at the Attic
(classic rock)
i
Graceland
at Messick Theater Building;
(play)
See article for times
FREE!
Maverick
at Hendrix Theatre
8 p.m.
(comedy western).
FREE!
Monday, Oct. 17
Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
at Wright Auditorium
(dumber music)
Wednesday, Oct. 19
Mike Armstrong
and John Marx
at the Attic
Comedy Zone
(stand-up comedy)
Vtsfem
This box holds the key to
understanding the devious
ways of our CD reviewers.
Enjoy!
Pathetic
Lame
Pretty
�� Good
ssss
wmmm BRILLIANT





Matthews creates dreams
GIRL
�Vfie ti��of tPttrrfiHhm
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rd fini
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,f I I
Steve Griffin
.
Photo Courtesy of RCA Records Label
Ml the b ' �
which thev .1 an
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done 1 hand no one to -
1 m
tirt
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ery i l em en!
when !
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calling you with
stories today!
Try not to lose any
appendages this
weekend!
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316 East 10th Street
wffjn walking distance from ECU
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Octobei I 1994
he I i ��! ' arolinian I
Orpheus
The daring group of
virtuoso orchestral
musicians who call
themselves Orpheus
perform without the aid
of a conductor, leading
to extraordinarily
powerful and intensely
personal performances.
They will perform at
Wright Auditorium
Monday night at 8 p.m.
Photo Courtesy ot ECU Preforming Arts
OUT
From p. 9
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center ,
209 S Evans St H�ur:
Pittman Building 757-UUUJ Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:00-40
m vlHe's Tj
"�r�M�i
ONLY
mSSSTur A Tfovch ot Class
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dances
WEDNESDAYS & jJl
Amateur Night lor Female Danceis I I pin-i an g
CASHPK1I
�Contestant need fci caU A Kgiriet in laJvuncc
Matt imvt ��� h mt
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullets Female "Exotic" Danceis
$Dancers wantedS
pointed oul to pus I Breathed'
pathetically ru urotii penguin)b
vounglath onaparkberu h that all
maioi i.nt'n n inimals .w- male,
any female animal characters are
girlfriend - oi ba kground charac-
ters Opus immediate!) introduces
(ves) 1 lazel 1 ledgehog histon 's
first prirtc ipal female animal toon
i ipus' friend then ii ily remarks,
i ou re sa) ing women are little pig
rodents?" Which prompt Opus to
quickl) send Hazel packing rhis,ol
11 lurse, leads the I qua! Employment
Opportunity C ommission and i
lobby ol hedgehog rights activists to
lay siege to c pus' house in the next
strip Hazel is quickly rehired, and
files a sexu il harassment suit when
smacked in the face, cartoon-style,
with an artichoke souffle
f, (ther neal strips m lude Ronald-
Ann's brain going into vacuum-lock
from watching too much rV,Olivei
WendeUJonesprogramminghispar
ents to go to church naked, and .i
series of strips that cry out against the
media destruction of our heroes.
Towards the end of Kisses, we get
to see some old friends from the
"Bloom County" days Binkley is
guilt-tripped by Man 1 ' tppirvswhen
Beavis and Butthead get into his
Anxiety 11 set am i start torching the
SHWA
From p. 9
I Winnie the Pooh We also
e,ct t. see Steve I allas trying to pick
up women in a bai
hilarious and fun andthe makeme j
wonderwhy Breathed dnpped these
11uir.si ters in the first place
While I enjoyed the sheet weird
nessol thoncw i hara tersintroduc ed
for '(hitland" (Mortimer Mouse.
1 rattles the Pig, and that big purple
rat whose name escapes me), the
final pagesof Ki i its make me long foi
those olcl "Bloom C ountv" dailies.
Breathed's humoi is sharpei with
these characters; he had developed a
diverse cast that allowed him to
handle a variety ol (opus rhe "Out-
land" characters seem a bit generic
by comparison, and thus the humor
suiters
So what's the final verdict? II
you re a fan ot Berke Breathed, pick
up His Kisses Are Dreamy But Uiose
Hairballs 1 krum Myleavage It's got
enough of thai i ld Breathed magic u i
he worth the admission pri e li
you've spent the length I )l this at tn li'
wondering what 1 was talking about,
however, give it a miss This is not
Breathed at his best, and I'd hate for
you to be introduced to his generally
wonderful work this way. Pk k up a
"BUxm County" hook instead
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECTAI
$2.00 OFF Admission An Night with this coupon �
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
s miles west ol Greenville on 264 Mi
Dickinson tare.
(behind John's Convenient Man
V;ilid N.C ID Required
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZZA
Daily
ALFREDO'S
SPORTS
BAR
Lunch Special
2 Slices 1
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and Drink
$2.25
til 3pm Daily
Thursday
Bar
SPECIAL
SI
Buttery
� Nipples
(ireenville tans Shwa had ai
quired a gi eal foll v ing bei ius
the ! that li
Shwa is the type ol band
hi mes.tlv i an'l desc ribe, there are
so main elements and styles ol
music win en together that you
I explain theii sound it's like
nothing you haveever heard l
tore.
Drummer A I i awrence re-
ally defines Shwa's sound be-
e he sets the pace and the
rhythm I is a very talented
drummer and is i urrentlv on the
drum line for ECU's Marching
Pirates His drumming ability
has always been impressive and
he s definitely an asset to the
hand
( hi is I redricks is on guitar
and m the past, had a real in-
tense sense ol tei hnique. He was
very serious and forthright about
his music. hut Chris is more laid
hat k now It will he interesting
to see it this h,)s any effect on his
guitar playing Saturday night
1 lenry Ac robat bassist, Kubeai
( arson (not to be confused with
Unsound's Cheech), will also be
a hand member to watch. Kubeai
provides the essential groove to
the band, the underlining tone
i le adds the funk to Shwa's melt-
ing pot of sound. Make sure to
i hec k him out at the show; he's a
great musician.
Rapper Chris English (aka
Aardvai k) demands your atten-
tion when he's on stage 1 le raps
right in your face and leaves no
room for personal Space I le too
is quite talented and is currently
signed with a producer in
Kinston and does WZMB's Spo-
ken Word. There's no doubt you
will notice the outspoken Aard-
vark at the show.
Mark Snyder, Shwa's ultra-
theati H .il
I hi
ire 11 'i Saturda
nd v. ith Mark, thepos
sibilities are endless I le's ,i
natural on stage; he comes alive
in front i 'I an audienc e
M.uk has strong
you e that i aptures ou 5ince
the break up oi Shwa, he has
singing for I ireenville's
Unsound, thrilling fans o( that
hii . hand with his showman-
ship Mark is an energetic per
former and th.it works well
with Shwa's music, which all
but requires sue h antic s
i he guys antic ipate placing
around 1 songs, even the in
famous "Cunnilingus which
is always a bonus "hey also
said there will he guest appeal
antes, so you'll have to wait
and see
i Ireensboro's own Sans So
briety is the opening and they
also have two singers They
are an exc client hand w ith a
heavy punk sound I hey i ome
highly rec ommended, so don't
dare miss this superb opening
act.
l able i i oss will be airing
,1 dot umentary on Shwa some
time in the near future The
guvs aren't positive about the
air date, thus all of you die
hard Shwa fans will need to
check your local listings
Sadie, if you've never seen
a Shwa show, make sure you're
there it witness history in the
making This is true ECU nos-
talgia, with guest appearances,
Mark's theatrics, and even
"Cunnilingus One can only
imagine the spectrum ol possi-
bilities transpiring this Satur-
day night Plan now to be there
If you're leaving town then
come hack You'll kick your
self if you miss this show.
Greenville, NC 27858.
SUNDAY
Margaritas &
Daiquiris
S2.00
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1. Six Dragon Wings
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Two Soups
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2. Veggie Stir Fry
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3. Veggie Lo Mein
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12
The East Carolinian
Sports
Soccer team ties at home versus UNC-W
Drew Goettman
Staff Wnter
double ov til
i hePii
: ites into '

1 r ELI men s c
broke out of a season-long losii
streak I"uesda with a 1-1 tie in
C A.A conference action against the
Seahawks of UN( -V ilmington
I he sa .) tie is like kissii
vour sister but it's nice to finalh �� �
play well and have a decent result
It's nice nol I - said Pirate lion :
imnn
Recreational Services holds fitness week
For an added bonus, try
out the stair-master at any of
Recreational ber
vices is holding rimex Fit
ness Week October 10-14. ECU'S exercise facilities ITus
During this week-long pro- exercise equipment sii
gram ECl students, faculty lates step climbing at differ-
and a!r can participate in ent levels ol intensitv '�
activities for prizes, fun and the workout, it the digital
fitness This program also console announces "winner
otters an activity for every- you can pick up your prize in
one no matter what you like Christenbury 115betwe i
to do. lust bv participating in the morning and nine p m
vou will qualify to win prizes Today at noon another free
ranging from fimex watches c lass will be ottered at 12:05
to T-shirts m Christenbury to limber
f you like to swim stop by muscles for the tree rock
Christenbury pool. If vou ac- climbing exercise at the tower
cumulate 120 minutes swim- at 5:30 p.m. Shuttle buses will
ming durum the week vou carry students to and from
will be eligible for prizes. A the event all evening tor the
poster will be available at tree climbing instructions
pool side to record the num- and a hardy Lookout. Hang
ber of minutes out tor the tun until 8 p.m
Challenge yourself to a when the movie CMfhaQgej:
good cardiovascular work- will be shown on the tower's
out through the Cross Train- wall
ing Challenge Walk, run. Be sure to make the grand
swim, evele, stair climb. finale on Friday at 5 p.m in
ght tram, aerobicize or Christenbury Gym EC I s
rock climb tor 30 minutes largest fitness class ever will
each ,jv of this week and be held tor all � ho can make
� nries Go to it A variety of instructors will
. . . available to explain work
outs and mnie 1 he workout
Get out tor a scenic out- will end with the announce-
doorstroilandifvouwalklO ment of prize winners. Re-
miles this week vou can be member to turn in all log
eligible tor prizes. A "Route sheets, signed b area super-
to Fitness" brochure can be visors, in CG 204 by Friday at
pic ked up at C hristenbury 2 p.m. Everyone is invited to
Gvm that will map out the drop in for this change of pace
that promises tun and prizes.
File P
nanv available routes that promises run anupruo, "I "
Foreman in charge of Pirate defensive unit
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
the center ot attention in both foot Foremanti
ball and basketball, earning tour let- well ringn
tersinboth In football, he was All- soloi
tate per game tackles are i
�d developed in
I el him to-
ne sea ipefull
iew position i
tackles , I
e a erased nearl 9 ta k
� important but keep him injun � man can
Outsidelmebackerthefirstthing State twice and was named siare j. -�� � -� � V runsa4.7in
Player of the Near in two pubhea- big plays are what Foreman is tcc m
tions (Daily Reflector and Wilson ingknowfoi Hehadpler
ak.
that comes to mind, big plays In
terceptions, sacks, big hits, tackle
for loss Great plavers like Lawrence Daily Times) After a post graduate �
raylor,DerrickThomasandWUber year at Fork Union Military
Marshall It is definitely a position emv Foreman i host
tailor made tor an impact player heavy recruiting competition ;Michi- quar
gan North Carolina, and N( State to pick up quickly on ottei
Upon arrival at E U in 1992 he plans especially
U over some tions t lis Ui
rterbat k and a
who make- the big play consis-
tently East C arolina h is an outside
A dash. 1 ledefinitely seems
itent on taking his game to a new
� , i Hesaid tin - I th hisex-
ind as a pectations lor thi � ' he
ov-him defense feels it ha- ing to
eing in the
lidd i f the acl I an pla
he may not be ;
yedsaferyiettegasatruefresh definite advantage foranouts.de line run and the , �
. � . :ZZ �&�Ltou backe, , rtunateK.th.potenh.h o,
bS impact on the Pirate defense starting two games. More impres- great season at his
S me is Morris Foreman. sive was the athletic ability he showed cut short b
Foreman isn't the biggest line- returning kickoffs (11 returns tor a hirnto,m.ss the last hrc gam
p
st
done with great quickness, antici- offense At the time Forem
ition .marts, and a hard-hitting weighed about 200 lbs but with a lot I
ns to have a special of time spent in the weight room and new EC!
,s to where the play is natural maturation, he outgrew the 1
eoine befon the ball is snapped, position and became an outside line
2L � , i , i i i on Foreman's import
This comes from a lotot nlm studv ba ker
n Foreman started eight rate defensive schem
i film studv ba ker
ot his opponents and more impor I a: I
tantly and outstanding football
background at Farmvilleentral back
fidencein strength ol thedefi
,rdinal i i, well and j;
: ill takeanol from
C( Football Pn ommenting allthreeofth iremanis
start
I
i ombined i '
tor tl
H
'Willie' or weakside line gu with a great tei
e has a lot of resp i I has natural instincts, is a Pla maki
,i Wedo nition ma ver witmn ni
iJ,ai k in highs( hool foreman w.i
is far as run support, pa
d blitzing the quarterbai k
an integral par!
Photo by Haroln
I !i
Ided
Santiago makes big impact Packers flee Milwaukee
aron Wilson t
niiothiiiv! .ateSantiaj vvm
Aaron Wilson
Staff Writer
ne (
donenothi
to prove to ers thai
,iii) b belongs here ! fi i real
proved m sell 1' ' � '
. � , me I wouldn ' . this i I
hull I I I ' I I � � I ' � p
A conditioi
i lera
at Dep






Octobei I 1994
1 3
SANTIAGO
From p. 12
&QW
NOW OPEN 24 HOURS
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, W! NOW HAW AN ATM MACHINE IN THE STORE
REDUCED PRICES
HARRIS TEETER
MILD OR HOT
ROLL SAUSAGE

PERDUE
STUFFER
ROASTER
shape Santia 1 team
ilv mado it easiei
b accepting me and making me
feel .it home. I oreny.o (West) and
B.I (l rane) are . . s and I
was very thankful to thru.
ting me stav v ith tl
Plavingasa true freshman is no
eas task, hut making a transition
to thedetensh e line after primarily
being an offensive plaver makes it
evenhardei Santiago is back up to
staitiT ohn Krawcz kat nosetai kit-
atui saw his first collegiate action
againsl remple.
N taiit's been a smooth transi-
tion I just go out there and work
hard and do whate it 11 an to help
the team win Santiago said I
thought I would he nervous, hut it
all happens so quickh I just got in
the huddle and got in a stani e and
started playing I wasn'tasnen ous
as I thought I would be. It uas
tn pia I) i
� ng used to the
game was the main thine, I had
get adjusted �
In high sch iol, Santiago w as an
All State selection at ffen
( luard. I le was re ruited bv v
ni.i. S rat use I ulane, and
Rutgers Hackensack High was
state i damps iri id 199 I
Santiago was nc of mam plavers
that lastarolini had success in
the North i ast re. ruiting, mainlv
due to the efforts of Assistant
coai lies t Ihk k Pag ino and I )oug
Martin
(. o.k h Paganodid a realh
job of recruiting me, Santiago said.
lie e.as ven up front ,i honest
with me and I felt comfortable with
him. It helped me to relax and he
i ailed e erv week
Making the transition toa smaller
town has not been difficult for
R. Cherry Stokes
Attorney at Law
General Practice
Family Law-Traffic Offenses-Divorce-Criminal
Drunk Driving-LandlordTennant
FREE INITIAL BRIEF CONSULTATION
11 3 W. 3RD ST. 758-22QO
lot 111
,ited both ol those
pla es an.
1 � ! Iti
because I'm used 1
ke vour til
nice.l etl ed toit.l v
rathe; but I h
deal with it I lome is when
heart is but you ha e to
and mo e awa at some point
Playing for an ex
eran i oai h likelift Yoshida has
made playing defensive line even
easier for Santiagi i "� i ishida
led Bruce Smith at Virginia
lei h and .
nati ir at Southi i ty last
season He'sn
ingtechnique Itisverj important
to have good techniques as well
as quckness md strength on the
defensive line Santiago said
"He has showed me a lot of things
that are helping me out right now
on the field "
Size is something that
EC U has traditionally lacked on
the defensive line, one of the rea-
sons that Santiago was highly
sought after.
CROP
RUSSET
Don't Miss Out!
The liast Carolinian s
l-IomecommIiallo'Nveeii issue
lead!i�e for Advertising is
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The paper will he circulated
Thurs. Oct 27.
The Lealline for Advertising in the
Homecoming Football Tabloid is
Tues Oct 18 at 4:OOpm.
Keach Students, Family and Friends
as 'w'ell as AFF the Pirate Fans of UCUl
The Tabloid will be Inserted in the Oct
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Prices In Th.s Ad Effective
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.ber 13. 1994
('arolinian
�&-)��
Batter Up!
(sort of)
Even though the
season is five
months away, the
Pirates' baseball
squad is practicing
and competing in
fall tournaments. In
�fall-ball Coach
Overton will get his
first look at new
transfers and
others who aspire
to replace Pirates
who graduated and
turned
professional.
Photo by Leslie Petty
Due to fall
break, The
End Zone
will be in
Tuesday's
Sports
section of
The East
Carolinian.
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SCOTT MUELLER





ECU vs. Virginia
Tech
Vol. 1. No. 3
I Oct. 15, 1994
J L
MAUREEN RICH
Maviuixi; .Editor
RAVE POM)
Editor, Liyoiji
KRAI) 01 MUM
Asst. Editor
AARON WILSON
Writer





Page 2
TEC End Zone
October is, 1994
Hokies travel to Dowdy-FickLn
Prognosticators
Dave Pond � ECU1
TEC Sports Editor
ECU 25 TECH 24
"Hokies hit by big-ol' purple
and gold freight train, fall out of
national rankings
Brad Oldham� ECU 11
WZMB Sports Director, TEC
Asst. Sports Editor
ECU 28 TECH 27
"Hokies always struggle in
Greenvile. Crowd will have to
be a factor in the victory
Chris Justice � ECU 1
WCTI -TV 12 Sports Director
ECU 31 TECH 30
"Until the defense gets healthy,
ECU will have to win in
shootouts
I
Brian Bailey � ECU4 I
WNCT-TV9 Sports Director
ECU 24 TECH 20
"Pirates come from way
behind to win it with a fantastic
Dowdy-Ficklen finish
PhilWerz � ECU2
WITN -7V 7Sports Director
ECU 31 TECH 21
"Make reservations for
Memphis
Richard Eakin -ECU71
ECU Chancellor
ECU 24 TECH 17
"ECU will win its toughest
game of the season
Maureen Rich-ECU3
TEC Managing Editor
ECU 24 TECH 21
"If the Pirates can force Tech
to turnover the ball more than
they do, they'll win
Frank Beamer's Virginia Tech (5-
1) squad got back on the winning track
last week with a 41-13
I By Dave shellacking of Temple
FDiTOR University. Despite the
abscence of TB Dwayne
Thomas, the Hokies piled up 361 yards
of total offense in the contest. QB
Maurice DeShazo completed 11 of 18
pass attempts for 115 yards and two
touchdowns, while running for a third.
"These guys are really a special
outfit Pirate head coach Steve Logan
said Monday. "I don't see a lot of places
on their team where I think we can
pick on them. Head coach Frank
Beamer is a guy that I really respect
The defense certainly did its part,
as Temple was limited to just 78 rush-
ing yards (216 total yards).
Temple did not score until the
fourth quarter, when a fumble at the
Hokies' 19-yard line opened the door for
Temple's first touchdown.
Also against the Owls, freshman
linebacker Tony Morrison snatched his
first collegiate interception and returned
it nine yards to set up a Tech touchdown.
Deshazo heads into the ECU game
needing just three more touchdown
passes to become VT's career record-
holder for scoring passes.
Also last week, he set a new Tech
record with his 15th game in which he
threw two or more TD passes.
"The DeShazo kid has turned into
one of the really fine athletes back in the
Hvy
illJL' w9Jwk-
iapB 1
m w'atm m11' r iHI �Li MM
Ptiolo by Harold Wk
The ECU defense had given up few points until the South Carolina game, in which
the "Cocks offense matched the Pirates before falling short 56-42 a week ago.
pocket Logan said. "We've got a re-
ally big challenge ahead
Freshman tailback Ken Oxendine
got his first collegiate start and led the
Hokies in rushing with 71 yards on 16
carries, while catching five passes for
21 yards.
However, the Hokies' offense has
lost ten fumbles through their first six
games of '94, matching their entire to-
tal of last year.
Also last week, senior split end
Antonio Freeman became Tech's career
record-holder for TD receptions when
he caught a 29-yarder against the Owls,
the 19th touchdown reception of his
career.
On the Pirate side of the ball.
Coach Logan and his staff has had to
deal with the injuries and losses of de-
fensive stars Walter Scott and Willie
Brookins.
"We are in a situation where you
take your two best pass rushers, and
now we don't have them Logan
said.
"We are going to have to see how
creative we can get as coaches, num-
ber one, and number two, have some
players step up and do some things
they haven't done before. "It's really
frustrating
Virginia Tech OFFENSEVirginia Tech DEFENSE
SE: 80 Antonio Freeman1 Michael WilliamsWLB: 21 Brandon Semones26 Korey Ibey
LT: 71JayHagood76 T.J. WashingtonDT: 98 Waverly Jackson92 Jim Baron
LG: 51 Chris Malone64 Gennaro DiNapoliDE: 58 Cornell Brown53 Chris Peduzzi
C' 61 Billy Conaty70 John MatesicNT: 74 Jeff Holland59 J.C. Price
RG: 54 Damien McMahon60 Jared HamlinMLB: 41 George DelRicco39 Andy Miller
RT' 77 Mike Bianchin60 Anthony KappDE: 56 Lawrence Lewis6 Hank Coleman
TE: 86 Kevin Martin81 Brian JenningsLB: 44 Ken Brown30 Vernon Dozier
QB: 12 Maurice Deshazo16 Jim DruckenmillerLCB: 24 Bill Yarborough15 Baron Spinner
TB: 42 Dwayne Thomas29 Ranall WhiteCB: 7 Larry Green27 Aaron Layne
FB: 32 Brian Edmonds29 Ranall WhiteFS: 9 Antonio Ban36 Danny Osborne
FL: 4 Cornelius White17 Brian StillSS: 14 Torrian Gray21 Brandon Semones





October is, 1994
TEC End Zone
Page 3
Marching to Memphis: Liberty Bowl dreams
As their football season en-
ters week six, the Pirates (3-2)
I By Dave nc themselves atop
Pond the standings in the
Eon� Liberty Bowl Alli-
ance, tied with Memphis, who
blanked Tulane 13-0 last Satur-
day. The two schools have built
a 1.5-game lead over Southern
Miss (2-4), while Tulane (1-4)
and Cincinatti (0-4-1) follow
further behind.
ECU leads all alliance
members with an average of
413.0 yards of total offense per
game, with Southern Miss
(314.5) ranking second. The Pi-
rate gridders lead both categories
when the output is broken down
further � QB Marcus Crandell
passes for an average of 257.8
ypg. while the "J-Crew" and
company have garnered 155.2
ypg on the ground.
The Pirates' offensive ex-
plosion has led them to score
29.2 points per game, with 18
touchdowns (11 aerial, 5 rush, 2
defensive). Memphis holds sec-
ond place to ECU, scoring 16
PPg-
On defense, Memphis leads
all schools, allowing just 222
yards per game. Southern Miss'
"Black Attack" defense ranks
second (321.2) followed by the
ECU defenders (365.2), who
give up an average of 100.8 rush-
ing yards, second among
L.B.A. teams. However, the
Pirate pass defense is ranked
last, and yields 264.4 aerial
yards per contest, over one
hundred more than any other
alliance member.
Moving to individual sta-
tistics, ECU running back Jun-
ior Smith leads alliance mem-
bers with 556 rushing yards,
and averages 111.2 per contest
(5.0 yards per carry). Mem-
phis' Marcus Holliday is good
for 91 yards per game, and
holds a 4.2 yards per carry av-
erage, placing him second in
the alliance. USM workhorse
Chris Buckhalter is third, averag-
ing 86.3 ypg.
Marcus Crandell gives the
Pirates another top performer,
and leads all alliance quarter-
backs with 1,214 yards in the air
and nine TD passes. USM's pla-
toon of Tommy Waters and Heath
Graham has been successful �
the two QBs have combined for
1,208 passing yards and six TDs.
However, they've also thrown 13
interceptions along the way.
ECU soph Mitchell Gallo-
way (16.5 yard average, 297 to-
tal on 18 recepts) is currently
ranked second in the alliance in
receiving yards, while redshirt
frosh Jason Nichols (19 recepts
for 237 yards, 12.5 average)
Mark Libiano is the co-leader in tackles for
the Pirates with 51. Against Va. Tech in
1993, he collected 15 in a 31-12 Hokie win.
ranks fifth in yards and second in
receptions.
On special teams, 17-year old
Pirate punter Matt Levine leads all
L.B.A. punters with a 41.9 yard
average on 24 punts. He is closely
followed by Cincinatti's Jeff
Blaylock, who averages 41 yards
per punt, and UM's Drew
Pairamore (39.3 average).
ECU place-kicker Chad
Holcomb ranks third in the alli-
ance with a 62.5 success rate on
field goal attempts. Holcomb has
made 5 of 8 attempts, with a long
See LIBERTY page 8
East Carolina OFFENSE
WR: 82 Mitchell Galloway
LT: 51 Ken Carroll
LG: 59 Jamie Gray
C: 63 Kevin Wiggins
RGl 78 Terry Tilghman
RT: 61 RonSuddith
TE: 90 Scott Richards
QB: 5 Marcus Crandell
HB: 82 Mitchell Galloway
RB: 35 Junior Smith
SE: 80 Larry Shannon
I Jason Nichols
67 Shane McPherson
73 Jake Gilray
58 Derrick Leaphart
77 Charles Boothe
74 Mark McCall
88 Sean Richardson
9 Dan Gonzalez
80 Larry Shannon
23 Jerris McPhail
II Allen Williams
East Carolina DEFENSE
OLB: 40 Daniel Russ
DT: 54 Dealton Cotto
NG: 57 John Krawczyk
DT: 45 Lorenzo West
OLB: 7 Morris Foreman
WLB: 81 Mark Libiano
MLB: 39 Melvin Burke
40 Daniel Russ
69 Robert Santiago
94 Aaron Black
56 Alphonso Collins
84 Leonard Graham
53 Carlos Brown
33 B.J. Crane
21 David Hart
RCB: 18 Hank Cooper
LCB: 3 Emmanuel McDaniel 17 David Crumbie
FS: 30 Dwight Henry 46 Tabari Wallace
SS: 22 Daren Hart 12 Jermaine Smith
FAST FACTS
Game Location: Greenville
Opponent:Virginia Tech
Hokies
Game Site: Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium
Kkkflff: 1:30 p.m.
Head Coach: Frank Beamer
(75-66-4 career, 33-43-2 at
Tech)
Key Players (1994 stats to dale):
QB Maurice DeShazo
RB Brian Edmonds
LB George DelRicco
FS Antonio Banks
Eojfifi:
� Its been four years since
Tech won a game on ECU'S
home field.
� Tech has lost just two of
its last 13 games.
� Tech has lost 10 fumbles
this year, the same number it
lost during the entire 1993
season.
� The series is tied at 4-4,
with the Hokies winning last
season's meeting, 31-12 in
Blacksburg, Virginia. In that
game, Tech scored four touch-
downs against ECU.
�Tech has won seven straight
games against non-BIG EAST
opponents.
Compiled By Bred OUhun





Page 4
TEC End Zone
October is, 1994
Offensive unit carries Pirates in South Carolina
Another strong offensive per-
formance for the ECU Pirates was
I just enough for a vic-
By Aaron tory over the USC
Wilson Gamecocks in front
STAFF WRITER
of 70,075 in Will-
iams-Bryce Stadium last Saturday.
Marcus Crandell had his best
game of the season, going 19-of-
28 for 344 yds, 4 TDs and 3 INTs.
Two of the interceptions were tipped,
and not Crandell's fault.
TB Junior Smith broke loose
for his best game of the year, as
well. Fresh from of breaking the all-
time school rushing record last week
against Southern Mississippi, Smith
totaled 192 yards on 28 carries for 2
TDs.
The combined output of these
two Pirate stars was too much for the
overmatched South Carolina de-
fense.
This type of production was
atypical against a South Carolina de-
fense that previously allowed just
14.5 points per game.
Mitchell Galloway, a
Bennettsville, S.C. native, celebrated
his 20th birthday in style, catching 4
passes for 127 yards, three going for
touchdowns.
"It feels great Galloway said.
"I expected to have a big game go-
ing in. The opportunity to score was
there and Marcus was able to get me
the ball, making it possible for me
to make plays
Galloway's final touchdown
put the Pirates ahead for good
"It was 2nd and 8 Galloway
said. "The play was 134 H Wheel
which is designed for me to run a
'Wheel' route up the boundary and
the X curls and draws the safety over.
The safety bit on the curl, and I was
wide open. He stopped moving his
feet and I ran right past him for the
touchdown. Larry Shannon, who is
the X receiver, made it happen by
drawing the coverage away from
me
Good defense is typified by
three ingredients: a strong pass rush,
good run supportshort pass cover-
age by the linebackers, and a quick
second-
a r y
breaking
on the
ball and
making
plays.
Un-
fortu-
nately, on
Saturday.
ECU
didn't
have
enough
of the
three to
have the
full for-
mula for
success,
and gave up a season-high 42
points, most of them on scores
through the air.
The absence of a consistent
pass rush gave USC quarterback
Steve Taneyhill all day to throw, put-
ting a lot of pressure on the ECU de-
fensive secondary. Even the best
coverage will break down eventually
if forced to cover for more than five
or six seconds. It is unreasonable to
expect a good performance when the
defense is breaking down in any
area.
Standout Pirate DE Willie
Brookins went down early in the ball
game, creating a huge gap in the
Photo hv Harold Wisr
Dwight Henry and the rest of the ECU defenders gave
up an astonishing 451 passing yards last week.
pass rush.
Brookins is
ECU's best
pass rusher and
usually puts
enough heat on
opposing quar-
terbacks to
make them
rush their
throws.
Brookins
was later diag-
nosed with a
hyperextended
knee and un-
derwent a
Magnetic-
Resonance
Imagery
( M R Io n
Monday to determine the extent of
the damage to his left knee.
It is improbable that he will see
action against Virginia. Tech this
week or in the games to follow.
"Willie is one of our best play-
ers, and it was good that John
Krawcyzk and Dealton Cotton were
able to step up and make plays said
ECU defensive line coach Cliff
YoshidaUohn is really playing well,
we ask a lot of him and he has re-
sponded well
Without Brookins in the
lineup, Taneyhill went 39-58 for 451
yards and 3 TD's. His one intercep-
tion proved costly, as Emmanuel
Hokies'
"4-3"
defense
The Virginia
Tech defense
enters its second
season in the
"4-3" defensive
scheme of their
defensive
coordinator Phil
Elmassian, who
coached at ECU
in 1983.
C'nurtev of
Virginia Ttrch SID
McDaniel ran it back to put the Pi-
rates ahead 42-28. This interception
was his 5th on the year and is tops
in Division I-A football.
Signal stealing is some-
thing that has always gone on in
football. Smart players take advan-
tage of what they hear and change
their formations to better serve
in defending the play.
Last Saturday, Taneyhill lis-
tened to the Pirates make their cus-
tomary adjustments and shifts on
the line before calling audibles to
change their play and run away
from the strong side of the defense.
ECU makes their calls for
stunts and coverages after Pirate
linebacker Mark Libiano views
what formation the offense is in.
Somehow, Taneyhill was able to
figure out what ECU was doing and
change the play.
"South Carolina had us
scouted extremely well said ECU
defensive end Lorenzo WestThey
would listen to our plays and then
change up what they were doing.
They were yelling out our cover-
ages and stuff before the play. This
advantage, combined with them
throwing every play out of shotgun
formation with a three-step drop,
made it impossible for us to get any
pressure
"You make a call one time
and they are definitely smart
enough to pick them up Yoshida
said. "Defensive linemen pick up
line calls all the time. If someone
makes a call and does something,
it is only logical that in all prob-
ability when the call is made again
that you will see the same thing.
This goes on all the time and we
try not to worry about it too much
Another problem for
ECU's defense was constantly
starting in poor defensive field
position.
This was a result of poor kick-
off coverage that allowed SC to re-
turn 9 kickoffs for a 152 yards, with
another long kickoff return called
back for holding.
See DEFENSE page 7





October is. 1994
TEC End Zone
Page 5
Crane's on-field play backs up off-field talk
hap
4
"Prime Time"
Sanders to
Muhammad Ali
have made names
tor themselves
not just with their
ability but with
flamboyance and
style. They are fa-
To wear the tag of greatness,
a linebacker must be able to make
all the plays. B.J.
By Aaron Crane. middle
Wilson linebacker for the
staffWRn-ER Pirates. has made
more than his
share of plays this season. He is
currentlv tied for the team lead in
tackles ith 5 I. has knocked down mows not only for
5 passes and has 1 tackle for a loss, being great ath-
The ECU defensive scheme is
designed for Crane and the other
linebackers to be tunneled towards
the ball, making it extremely im-
portant that they consistently lead
the team in tackles and are always
around the ball. Crane's play on
the field gets him a lot of attention, jects. B.J. Crane
but lately Crane's words have got- seems to be fol-
ten him even more attention.
"I don't feel like I'm contro-
versial he said. "I just say
whatever's on my mind and 1 don't
worry because my preparation and
hard work lets me back up what I
say off the field. Coach Logan has
letes, but for be-
ing quotable,
sometimes con-
troversial public-
figures with
strong views on a
variety of sub-
lowing in their
footsteps by pre-
Photn hv Htnold W it
Pirate "Mike" linebacker B.J. Crane has come on strong in his second season for Coach Logan,
dieting success Although he recently lost his starting job. Crane is the team's co-leader in tackles (51).
and bv referring
to himself in the third person.
"I don't mean to sound
cocky or overconfident. I just
and saying no to drugs
Team goals are important to
Crane, as well. He sets high stan-
ranked fourth in the state of Geor-
gia.
Crane was named Team
never spoken to me personally want to get my message across dards for both himself and his de- MVP ?.nd city-wide Defensive
about what I have said in the past Crane said. "Sometimes you just fensive teammates. "We want to Player of the Year. This left Crane
but he does tell us to watch it and have to loosen up and say what's have a Top-30 defense and play in with a lot of schools to choose
be aware of what we say and how on your mind. If you are right the Liberty Bowl on Dec. 31st from but he was mainly concerned
it is construed most of the time, then it doesn't
"Virginia Tech isn't nearly as
good as the last two teams we
played. I am confident that we will
continue our win streak and win big
over the Hokies
Regardless of the outcome.
really matter what you said, just
that everything turned out all
right
In high school. Crane
predicted that he would play on
Saturday afternoons, and now he
Crane said. "Mark Libiano and with finding a school committed
Morris Foreman are great line- to academics,
backers, and hopefully I will be "I was all set to go to South-
able to say that about myself one ern Methodist University until my
day. I want to get better every ECU visit he said. "I was very
week and have the teams scout- impressed with ECU's academic
ing us say that 33 (Crane's uni- counseling and services. This,
form number) makes things hap- and God's will, led me to come
pen. I want to grab their atten- here
Crane stands by what he says and chases another dream � a dream
doesn't worry about his mouth get- that could become a reality.
ting him in trouble. "I don't take Crane fits the prototype of a NFL tion, and after each Saturday have Crane says his religious
anything back because I mean ev- linebacker, standing 6-1, 235 teams say that 33 really came faith inspires him to greater ac-
ready to play complishments on and off the
Success is something Crane field. He sees no conflict between
is used to. In high school he was any violence on the field and be-
named All-State after a great se- ing a devoted Christian.
ery word of it he said. pounds and running a 4.6 second
"Having the courage of your 40-yard dash.
convictions is what B.J. Crane is
all about and I don't worry about
getting my opponents mad because
of anything I say. I am just trying
to fire up my teammates and moti-
vate myself to play to another level:
domination. When things are roll-
ing and I am on my game. I feel
like no one can stop me but my-
self Self-promoters are abun-
dant in professional sports today.
Athletes ranging from Deion
"Playing someday on Sun-
day afternoons motivates me like
nothing else Crane said. "I
want to play on the next level and
be a role model for youngsters,
not only in Greenville and At-
lanta but across the nation. I try
to set a good example, and play-
ing in the NFL would allow me
to reach a lot ' ki Is and spread
the good word ah ut staying in
school, respecting our elders
nior season, collecting 59 tackles
and 16 assists, two interceptions,
a blocked punt and a blocked field
goal along with three fumble re-
coveries.
On the other side of the ball.
Crane rushed for 622 yards on 92
carries (6.8 avg.) and averaged
29.6 yards on 17 kickoff returns.
The team finished 11-3. and was
"Jesus Christ was not a pas-
sive man, and I don't intend to be
a passive football player Crane
said. "In the book of John it is
written that priests were misusing
church funds for personal gain,
and Jesus became so frustrated
with their sins that he tore up the
See CRASH page .V





Page 6
TEC End Zonk
October is, iw�
Galloway becomes 'go-to guy' for Crandell and coaches
Mitchell Galloway has
emerged from relative obscurity to
become Marcus
By Aaron crandell's "go-to
Wilson �. . . .
STAFF WRITER S"y ,D CrUC,al SltUa"
tions. Galloway is
second on the team in receptions
this season with 18, but leads in re-
ceiving yards with 297. and has av-
eraged 16.5 yards per catch. This
type of success wasn't assured for
Galloway coming out of high
school as most schools thought he
was too small to play Division I
football.
Galloway is listed at 5-9 and
170 in the program but looks even
smaller. It would seem that he is
too small too be competitive
among the giants of major college
football, but Galloway has never
let that stand in his way.
"I have quickness and speed
that lets me overcome my lack of
size and height Galloway said.
"A lot of schools overlooked me
but I feel like you can't measure
the size of a person's heart and how
determined they are to play. The
Citadel, Naval Academy, and Ap-
palachian State were recruiting me
no big schools. Ruffin McNeil
(Former ECU player and defensive
line coach) was recruiting me for
Appalachian. When he came over
to ECU, he told the coaches about
me
"I came to the Pittsburgh
game during the 1991 Peach Bowl
year and I loved the atmosphere
Galloway said. "Everyone was
cheering and on their feet. The at-
titude is here and I felt at home.
All of the people on the coaching
staff and players treated me with
respect and nobody picked on me
Sometimes being the smallest
is hard because people don't pay
attention to the little guy, but Gal-
loway trys to turn this in to an ad-
vantage. "I hope people underesti-
mate me Galloway said. "Any
time someone relaxes and thinks
they are better than you gives you
an edge. I don't feel like anyone in
college football can afford to over-
look me, not if they want to have a
chance of stopping me from getting
my yards and touchdowns
Playing without fear is neces-
sary for any football player but is
particularly crucial for Galloway. "I
don't have any fear at all Gallo-
way said. "They put on their pads
the same way 1 do. When I put on
my equipment, I feel bigger. I have
never feared any man. If you are
scared you will definitely fail. I feel
like this is a man's game and if you
are scared then say you are scared
because we don't need any one on
that field that isn't ready to do a job.
Stay in the locker room if you aren't
ready to get hit
Last Saturday versus South
Carolina was Galloway's coming
out party as he celebrated his 20th
birthday with 3 touchdowns on 4
catches for 127 yards.
"It was great to have a big
game against South Carolina Gal-
loway said. "I felt like we could beat
them deep and the safeties consis-
tently bit on the play action and we
were able to make the plays
Galloway capped the big day
with a 64-yard touchdown that
sealed the Gamecocks' fate. "It was
2nd and 8 Galloway said. "The
play was 134 H Wheel which is
designed for me to run a "Wheel"
route up the boundary and the X
curls and draws the safety over. He
bit on the curl and I was wide open.
The last man to try to stop me didn't
move his feet well enough and I ran
right past him for the touchdown.
Larry Shannon who plays the X re-
ceiver made it all possible by free-
ing me up from coverage
The revenge factor was there
for Galloway against South Caro-
lina, which neglected to pay any
attention to him during his senior
year at Bennettsville, S.Cs
Marlboro HS, despite impressive
statistics and accolades. Galloway
had 42 catches for 750 yards and
six touchdowns and also had 257
yards rushing on 45 carries and an-
other six touchdowns. Galloway
also returned kicks and punts for 28
for 24.7
avg. and
11 for 16.5
avg re-
spectively.
Galloway
had 1,879
all-pur-
pose yards
as a senior
and was
named
All-State
4A and
played in
the state's
North-
South All-
S t a r
Game.
"Sruh
Carolina
never re-
ally re-
cruited
meat all
Galloway said. "They wanted big-
ger receivers and felt like I was a
little too small. They made their
decision and now they have to live
with it. It felt great to score three
touchdowns on them on my birth-
day in front of all my family and
friends
Galloway has become Marcus
Crandell's primary receivers and
has a lot of confidence in his
quarterback's ability to get him the
ball consistently "Marcus is com-
parable to Warren Moon as an ath-
lete and quiet leader Galloway
said, "rie leads with his actions. He
can move, has quick feet, and a
strong arm. He has the eye to find
the open receiver and adds another
dimension with his scrambling
causing trouble for the defense
"He throws a nice, hard spi-
ral and just has a feel for the posi-
tion Galloway said. "He is defi-
nitely one of the greatest to ever
play quarterback at ECU
Galloway doesn't feel like
their good friendship has anything
to do with him getting the ball a lot.
"We are good friends Galloway
Ptxiln b Harold Win
Mitchell Galloway has become ECU QB Marcus Crandell's
hig-play receiver, and leads the team with 297 receiving yards.
said. "That doesn't have anything
to do with me getting the ball,
though. I'm in that position where
on hot reads I get the ball as a op-
tion for him if he is rushed or no
one else is open. It all comes down
to his reads and natural progression
from first, second, to third receiv-
ers. He spreads the ball around and
I don't feel like I am his favorite or
that he has a favorite
Playing special teams is an-
other role that Galloway stands out
in. His specialty is kickoff return-
ing and he has returned 16 kickoffs
for 272 yards and a 17 yard avg. per
game. "Special teams is the key to
a ball game Galloway said. "We
have right and left returns. I just try
to run north and south and get up
field. I try to make people miss and
I just have a feel for it. It is some-
thing I did in high school and I con-
tinue to do it here in college
Galloway may be diminutive
in size but underneath 82's shoul-
der pads beats the heart of a tiger.
Galloway continually runs over and
See GALLOWAY page 7





October is, iw4
TEC End Zonk
Page 7
DEFENSE
they were so successful
R5 (Wedge Buster) F.J.
Gunthrope said. "It won't hap-
pen again. We just need to work
on staying in our lanes and not
get knocked down. I take a lot of
pride in special teams because
that is how 1 contribute to the
team. We run down to make
plays not to get blocked. We'll
get this squared away this week
in practice
This poor field position
caused a shift in momentum that
South Carolina took advantage,
and began a comeback attempt
that eventually fell short.
If not for a ECU offense
that answered every Cock score
with one of their own, the Pirates
would not have won this game.
For future success it is im-
perative that the offense keeps
GALLOWAY
around bigger players. This inner
strength comes from confidence in
himself and his preparation for
games. He currently bench presses
300 lbs and holds the school record
for the squat lift for a wide receiver,
505 pounds. He runs a 4.44 40 yard
dash, which is the fastest among the
receiving core.
"I just work as hard as I can
in the weight room Galloway
said. "With out extra work I don't
think I could play here. If you give
something your all you will always
have a great chance of being suc-
cessful
This hard work extends to the
classroom where he is on track to
graduate with a Decision Sciences
degree concentrating on computer
programming.
Every player dreams of mak-
ing it in the NFL but Galloway
feels like that w ill come in time and
doesn't worry about it. "That would
be nice if I was able to make it but
for now I just want to be the best
college player I can be Galloway
said. "Working with receivers
Cont. from
page 4
up this type of production and
the defense and special teams
can make improvement and get
back to their normal level of
play.
Remember, it takes all
three units playing well to
consistenty win ballgames. and
without any of them operating
well, the chances for winning
goes down considerably.
For ECU to win against
Tech, they will need a concen-
trated team effort and another
imaginative game plan from of-
fensive coordiantor. Todd
Berry, who pulled several
tricks out of his bag on Satur-
day.
This type of innovation is
what ECU needs to gain an
edge on their opponents and
continue their winning ways.
Cont. from
page 6
coach Doug Martin can help me get
to the next level. He focuses on our
weaknesses and works with us to
improve on our strengths
Galloway is a devoted Chris-
tian and doesn't see any conflict
between being a good Christian and
playing a violent sport like football.
"I see a lot of parallels between
football and stories I read in the
Bible Galloway said. "There were
a lot of battles and wars in the Bible
and sometimes I feel like we are the
modern gladiators, ready to fight to
the death out there on the football
field
Mitchell Galloway is making
the most of his opportunity to play
here at East Carolina. His success
story is just another of several smaller
athletes who have exceled in the game
of football. There is no set computer-
rated formula for what makes a good
football player. They come in all
shapes and sizes and Galloway may
not be the biggest, but he is proving
to be one of the best as he continues
to have a stong season and is pushing
for AH-American honors.
Pirates continue Duke series
(SID) ECU and Duke have
agreed contractually to extend
their football series, beginning
in 1999 with a game at Dowdy -
Ficklen Stadium on the ECU
campus.
The Pirates and Blue
Devils will play on the follow-
ing dates:
Sept 11, 1999
in Greenville, N.C.
Sept. 2, 2000
in Durham, N.C.
Sept. 7, 2002
in Greenville. N.C.
Sept. 27, 2003
in Durham, N.C.
We are pleased to continue
our relationship with Duke
University said ECU Director
of Athletics Dave Hart, Jr. "This
year's game in Durham was
another tangible sign of what a
game between in-state rivals can
mean to both institutions as well
as the state of North Carolina in
general
The two teams met earlier
this season, on Sept. 10, in
Durham, with the Blue Devils
defeating ECU, 13-10. Duke
leads the series with ECU, 4-2.
The 1999 game will mark Duke's
first-ever visit to ECU to play
football.
Hey, football fans!
The End Zone for next Saturday's-ECU-Tulsa
matchup will be printed in the Tuesday edition of The
East Carolinian due to fall break.
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Page 8
TEC End Zone
October is, 1994
CRANE
Cont. from
page 5
place and chased the priests out
of the church. 1 try to emulate
Him in everything I do
Recently, Crane fell out of
the starting lineup, replaced by
fellow sophomore Marvin Burke.
Although his playing time was
substantial in a reserve role, he
feels more comfortable as a starter.
"Coach Jette (ECU's defen-
sive coordinator and inside i;re-
backer coach) is trying to get, in
his opinion, the guys on the field
who can get the job done Crane
said. "B.J. Crane has to prove he
is that guy. Right now, Marvin
Burke is playing well and I take
nothing away from him. Everyone
wants to play and thinks that they
are the best linebacker
"Basically when my op-
portunity come,s I will make the
most of it Crane said. "I feel I
am fundamentally sound and can
do the job. Hopefully, with God's
help I can do that
Even the most confident
people have moments of insecu-
rity where they question them-
selves and wonder if they will be
successful. Crane is no different,
and at one point became frustrated
at not starting the last game ver-
sus South Carolina.
"I started to question where
do I go from here Crane said. "I
went and talked to Coach Jette and
he told me to show him I am the
best linebacker. Proving myself is
no problem and I feel like I have
earned everything I have gotten
here. Football is a competitive
situation and I know when the
time comes I will be in the lineup
whether it is as a starter or com-
ing off the bench
Strength and conditioning are
keys tor Crane's success. Long
hours in strength and conditioning
director Jeff Connors' weight
room are starting to pay off, as
Crane is starting to fill out a big
frame that was undersized when
he first came to Greenville.
"I couldn't be the player I am
today without his help Crane
said. "I played defensive back in
high school so I had to gain a lot of
weight when I first got here.
Lorenzo West, my roommate and
me stayed here all summer and lifted
twice a day so we could get bigger
and stronger Crane now can bench
press 365 pounds and has made sig-
nificant gains in other areas of weight
lifting as well.
ECU practices every day ex-
cept for gamedays and Mondays.
This rigorous schedule of daily
meetings, film sessions, long prac-
tices with conditioning afterward,
and time in the weight room would
send most players packing but
Crane thrives in this atmosphere.
"I don't mind putting in extra
work Crane said. "Even on my
off day I am still a football player.
When I watch film I try to visual-
ize what 1 would do. Watching film
lets me pick up my opponent's ten-
dencies so I can recognize them in
a game. Visualizing big plays and
big hits lets me think about my fa-
vorite part of football: the post-
game press conference
As the team's win total in-
creases, so has their confidence and
desire to continue their trek towards
the Liberty Bowl. Already surpass-
ing 1993's win total. Crane feels
that this success is easily visible on
the field for ECU.
"Why should I respect any of-
fense when we're 'he best de-
fense? he asked. "On Saturday af-
ternoon, it's 'Showtime, 100 miles
per hour. They better strap on their
helmets extra tight or they'll get
them knocked off
Crane can best be de-
scribed as a highly motivated in-
dividual who has strong opin-
ions about football, his faith and
his future. Predicting success
may put undue pressure on
some, but Crane feels it does
nothing but help him as far as
achieving his goals.
"Success and confidence
are contagious he said. "If ev-
eryone can keep a positive atti-
tude, we can reach our team
goal of playing in Memphis,
Tennessee on Dec. 31st.
Head Coach
Steve Logan
ECU head
football coach Steve
Logan is in the
midst of his third
season at the helm
of the program. He
has guided the Pi-
rates to an overall
record of 10-17
during his tenure,
and presently stands
3-2 during the 1994
campaign.
File Photo
LIBERTY
Cont. from
page 3
of 42 yards, while also convert-
ing 9 of 10 extra point attempts.
Also on special teams,
Nichols places fourth in the punt
return standings, bringing back
each punt an average of 6.8 yards.
UM's Ryan Roskelly leads the al-
liance with a 13.4 average on 24
returns.
On defense, Emmanuel
McDaniel leads the Pirates and
all alliance defenders with 5 in-
terceptions in 5 games, bringing
one back for a touchdown. South-
ern Miss' L.T. Gulley is second
with three INTs.
Pirate linebackers B.J. Crane
(25 unassisted) and Mark Libiano
(24 unassisted) are currently tied
for fourth place in the alliance,
and have each notched 51 tack-
les. Both LBs have collected one
tackle for a loss.
As the Liberty Bowl draws
nearer, aspirations of postseason
play and accompanying recogni-
tion abound for these athletes and
their respective teams. Only time
will tell which team will find suc-
cess in their quest, but the Pirates
look to be in good shape with six
games to go.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 13, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 13, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1034
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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