The East Carolinian, September 29, 1994






SPORTS
" I !
TODAY
Big Ben
England's own Ben Atkinson is at ECU,
telling jokes and playing tennis. Check out
the sport's section on page 14.
TOMORROW
LIFESTYLE
Downtown Rampage !
The Jackonuts frightened even jaded ECU
students with their O' Rock's show last
weekend. See what you missed on page 10
The East Carolinian
Vol.No. 48
Circulation 12.000
Thursday. September 29. 1994
Greenville, NC
16 pages
Football season has a positive kick-off
Photo Courtesy of Laura Sweet
Despite the plastic bags donated by the Athletic Department, trash still adorned the tailgating fields
both before and after Saturday's game against Syracuse. "Give a hoot, don't pollute ' Woodsy the
Owl said The Pirates take on the Golden Eagles Saturday at 4 p.m. in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
By Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
More than 40 hours of prepara-
tion and cooperative ef fork by Pub-
lic Safety, Greenville Police, the Ath-
letics Department, gatekeepers and
students made Saturday's game a
positive beginning for this year's
football season.
"I enjoved the game a great deal
and thought our young men on the
football team gave a very good per-
formance. They are obviously get-
ting better week by week and we
are proud of their achievements
said Chancellor Richard Eakin. "I
was very proud and pleased to see
the way that the game festivities
unfolded. I believe that the behav-
ior of the fans was exemplary and
we are looking forward to continu-
ing that fine tradition
Despite a few problems, Public-
Safety Director Teresa Crocker,
along with many university offi-
cials, believe the game coordina-
tion and student behavior were ex-
cellent.
"I think things went fantasric
when we compare it with the first
game last year, we're worlds apart
said Dean of Students Ronald
Speier. "I did spend time observing
the student section from the south
side or the stands, and I saw very
little difficulties other than at times
the islewavs seemed to be con-
gested. I did observe that they took
a few students out of the stadium, 1
suspect that was for some kind of
rowdiness or public consumption
compared to other games and
other events I've been at I think
we had a very positiveexperience
Crocker said two fights were
stopped, and arrests were made.
One lost child was claimed after an
announcement, and a few medical
emergencies occurred. The total of
problems reported included six in-
cidents in the stands and one stolen
picnic table.
"One big problem is that stu-
dents wouldn't come in until the
game started, which caused a ma-
jor backlog at the student gate and
also caused a major backlog when
people were trying to get to their
seats Crocker said. "It's a safety
issue When you get people on the
step peopk get knocked around,
ard people who are intoxicated may
fall
Public Safety controlled over-
crowding by regulating the num-
ber of students allowed to enter
the stands at one time.
"Our main concern is what s
going on in the parking lot
Crocker said. "Making sure that
the lots are safe and mat people
don't cause a lot of problems
Parking and traffic flow are
Public Safety's main concerns,
Crocker said. Students also need
to clean up their tailgating areas
instead of throwing waste along
the grounds. Approximately
33,000 attended the game, which
makes for a lot of trash.
"People need to use receptacles
and trash bags because it is so
ugly out there once everybody
leaves Crocker said.
Crocker said that she is looking
forward to this weekend's game
and believes the department looks
forward to game days as well.
I think for the most part people
enjoy working it because it's a
different type of assignment than
what they do everyday Crocker
said.
Athletic Director Dave Hart
was unavailable for comment.
uwi saia. me riraujb idre uii me vjuiugm i-uy.v-o ��
Nat'l, local financial aid default rate down
By Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
National statistics show that in
the past few years, student loan
default rates have dropped sub-
stantially.
According to an article in
USAToday, nationally, the default
rate dropped to 15 percent in IL
from 22.4 percent in 1990. Statis-
tics for North Carolina show the
statewide default rate at a little
over n percent. There were 2
schools in North Ca rolina that had
no default. East Carolina's over-
all default rate is 3.4 percent. The
lower rates can be attributed to
tougher oversight, higher penal-
ties for non-payment and student
financial counseling. This year,
anv ol whose default rate has
been higher than 25 percent for
the past three years can lose its
eligibility to participate in federal
loan programs.
"These figures are relatively
lowsaid Mary Rose Stelma, Stu-
dent Financial Aid director. "We
pride ourselves with a very low
default rate, in fact, we probably
have one of the lowest default
rates in the state
According to Stelma, the de-
fault rate, in simple terms, is a
percent of people who have taken
out a loan and have not paid it
back on time. A loan is consid-
ered to be in default when it is
more than 120 days overdue.
There are two types of loans
offered at most universities, fed-
erally-granted and institutionally
-granted loans. East Carolina of-
fers both kinds of loans. Federal
loans are funded by the govern-
ment and institutional loans are
funded through the individual
university. There are also parent
loans These are loans that a
student's parent takes out on be-
half of the student from other
institutions, such as banks.
According to Sherry Speight,
business affairs collection officer,
of the federally-granted loans at
ECU, the Perkins loan has a 4.97
percent default rate. The Nurs-
ing and the Health Professions
loans have 1.51 percent and 1.3S
percent default rates. The Sarah
Clement loan, which is an insti-
tutional loan, has a 7.38 percent
default rate. ECU has several
loans that are not in default. They
include loans that are given out
to students with disabilities, and
an ECU loan.
The largest and most widely
available loan to students at any
university is the Stafford Loan. At
ECU, the default rate for this loan
is 3.4 percent. 5,049 students use
the Stafford loan here at ECU, bor-
rowing 20 million dollars. These
figures are for the 1993-1994 aca-
demic year which ended on June
30. However the money does not
always arrive on time. This can
cause problems for students that
depend on these loans to pay for
their college. Accord ing to Stelma,
freshmen by law, can not receive
their loans until the first thirty
days of school are past.
"I feel that first time borrowers
should be more informed because
1 felt like I was being left in the
dark. It's not like I am borrowing
lunch money, I am taking a loan
out on my future said Adam
Eckhardt, a freshman at ECU. "I
was frustrated when I found out
that the loan wouldn't be released
until 30 days after the semester. I
guess I what really scared me was
that I didn't know about the de-
ferment
This can be a comment senti-
ment among students. Depend-
ing on the number of applicants,
the processing time could simply
take longer and often the student
is the last one to know.
"The fact that the money from
Air Force Cadet outruns 1,900 to break record
the Stafford loan has not arrived
on time doesn't really bother
me personally said Stephanie
Fritz, a sophomore at ECU. "I
have other loans and grants that
have helped me out, but I know
people who are in the red be-
cause their money isn't here
A sense of panic may set in
for first year students who did
not anticipate a wait. However,
the only problems that have
surfaced so far have surfaced
from banks that have changed
their computer programs,
which will increase the process-
ing time.
"I don't think that these de-
lays are abnormal Stelma
said. "There has been nothing
unusual about this year so far
91
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
The ECU Pirates are not the only
people fast on their feet. Cadet 2nd Lieu-
tenant Jill Metger set a national record
in August for being the fastest woman in
the ROTC program.
ROTC Leadership Laboratory, held
Tuesdav, Sept. 20, Metzger received the
Fleet Foot Award and the title of Fastest
Female in the 1994 Field Training Camp for
running the mile and half in eight minutes,
28 seconds. Metzger was selected out of
2,100 applicants to be one of the 1,900 ca-
Training
Photo Courtesy of Air Force ROTC
Program that takes place every summer.
She was stationed in San Antonio, Texas
at the Lackland Air Force Base for her
four-week training from July 22 to Au-
gust 18.
Cadets from detachments all over the
country attended the camps, located in
San Antonio as well as Panama City.
Florida and Dover, Delaware. There they
were involved in a series of workshops
and seminars in addition to rigorous
training. Each week the cadets were tested
on their physical fitness as well as their
group leadership skills, time manage-
ment and problem solving techniques.
Metzger not only excelled in all as-
pects of her testing, but she was also
awarded the title of Distinguished Gradu-
ate, which placed her at the top five per-
cent of her class.
"Jill was involved in a very physically
challenging environment said Lt. Col.
Myrick, Commander of the Air Force de-
tachment 600. "We are very proud of her
Metzger said that the award came as
an honor and a surprise to her. "I share
the award with everyone at Lackland
because without their support, I couldn't
have achieved what I did
After graduating in December 1995,
Metzger plans to stay in the Air Force "1
definitely plan to make a career out of
this she said.
Mom and Pop
boost ticket sales
By Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
Moms and dads will be arriving in
bulk this weekend to share a few days
of ECU football, food and fun with
their children. Around 3,000 parents
are expected to attend Parents Week-
end, an annual university event.
After seven years of practice, Par-
ents Weekend committee members
know how to run the show smoothlv.
offering something for everyone on
the weekend agenda.
"Our parents are our biggest sup-
porters of ECU said Laura Sweet,
chair of the Parents Weekend Com-
mittee and assistant to the dean. "It's
really an event that almost makes your
job seem worthwhile, seeing parents
come back and they're just as proud
of ECU as alumni are
There are several events, and par-
ents may chinse to attend any or all of
them. Those arriving on Friday can
register in Mendenhall between 3 p.m.
and 5 p.m. Friday night, families have
the choice to see Beverly Hills Cop 111
(the show is free) in Mendenhall or to
seeTheC apitolSteps, flu-only group
in America that attempts to be funnier
than Congress. Tickets forTheCapi-
tol Steps are on sale at the central
heketofhee in Mendenhall. The price
is $15 for adults and $7 for students
and children.
Parents had the option of pre-pur-
chasing reduced-rate tickets for
Saturday's game against Southern
Mississippi and tickets for the pre-
game picnic. Registration will be held
again Saturday at 9 a.m so parents
who have not done so can pick up
tickets and registration packets.
We (the Dean of Student's Office
are responsible for ensuring that the
activities go as planned and dis-
tributing information about activi-
ties throughout the weekend said
Ronald Speier, dean of students T
think it's great to have parents onto
the campus and seeing it's a pretty,
beautiful campus. It ought to be a
nice weekend. Parents can see
where their sons or daughters go to
class, where we have student activi-
ties, construction sites, the game, the
program before the reception with
the chancellor All of these are very
See PARENTS page 6





2 The East Carolinian
September 29. I
1 ?"�r . uiiuiiu ��
ECU encouraged to clean up
Republicans get heat for threatening President Clinton
Missouri University College Republicans are under in
gatiort by the Secret Service, the FBI and ML police fordistribut
threatening flier believed to be created by someone not affiliated
the group An unknown person(s) replaced the group s original
w itli a picture ot President lohn F. Kennedy on a coroners table
to a picture ot President Clinton with the caption 1 le's no 11 K
there S �-till time Steve Peters, vice president ot the College Re'
licans was the first one to hear about the tampering when a i
informed him that the flier was in bad taste. He thought the call
a joke until Secret Service Agents contacted him. Peters had no
that the group's fliers had been replaced throughout campus wit
threatening pictures.
nga
with
flier
next
But
uib-
aller
was
idea
l the
Actors: beware of falling props
n actor performing in Evita, brought new meaning to the
term break a leg when he suffered a broken arm alter being hit by a
falling prop Two actors were actually struck while on stage when a
screen, which was supposed to be lowered, tell and interrupted the
show for more than two minutes.
Off-season streaker graces UNC Library
Two bare bottomed students ran through Da is 1 ibrary this
month with only sandals on their feet and cloths around their heads.
Streakers traditionally run on reading day and during exams to let
their tensions lose. One library employee believed the streakers
should not be punished, but admits the activity is not conducive to
studying.
Get paid to eat in the name of research
Whether vou are a sworn meat-eater, a strict vegetarian or
one of those grapefruit juice-drinking dieters, researchers at the
Universitv of Michigan Medical Center have a deal for you. LSI
officials are paying$1,000 a week to do little more than sit around for
seven davs and eat what they are given. Researchers are hoping to
d iscover how a person's diet can enhance or hinder his or her health.
Therearedrawbacks, however, participantsmustgive tissue samples
from their small intestines on three separate occasions.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Wendy Rountree
st,itt U ritei
Students can actively help ECU
, h,in up the environnu nt by recy-
cling theold newspapers, glass and
plastic bottles, cluttering their
rooms and trash cans.
George Armistead, hazardous
waste manager tor the Office of
Environmental Health and Safety
and recycling coordinator, said the
C I egislature passed an amend-
ment to the Solid Waste Act, man-
dating all state agencies, including
universities, toret ycle. Iheamend-
ment also called-for the agencies
and universities to take the lead in
the recy ling effort.
"State agencies and universities
are supposed to take the lead on
the development ot recy ling pro-
grams and research Armistead
said. "Also, state agencies are re-
quired by this aw to give pur-
chase preference tor products i on-
taining recycled material like pa-
per and plastic trash cans
Armistead said some ot the
equipment bought by the univer-
sity for the children's playground
on campus is madeot plastic wood,
which contains UK) percent post-
consumer recycled plastic.
While Armistead is responsible
for the organization of recvcling
efforts outof the Office of Environ-
mental Health and Safety, other
departments and residence halls
are in olved.
"Basically, I am the recycling
coordinator tor the agency, and it
has been suggested in the pro-
grams that you have assistant r
ordinators Armistead said
"We've had this in place with de-
partmental safety representatives
in our office, so it was only natural
that we set up someone who is a
contact in each department for re-
cycling in administrative depart-
ments. We also have them in hous-
mg and student life
Presently, residence halls only
have aluminum can collection con-
tainers.
"The simple reason being not
enough room in residence halls
Armistead said. "The Department
of Insurance doesn't like us to
block up hallways with a lot of
trash cans
Armistead said the state fire
codes also prevented more recy-
cling containers from being in the
residence halls, particularly be-
cause of the combustibility of pa-
per.
As an alternative, ECU has de-
veloped a system to allow stu-
dents a way to recycle other items
outside the residence halls.
"We do have a trailer available
on College Hill, at Green Hall and
at Fleming Hall that rotates
through on a weekly basis
The drop-off trailer is located
on College Hill each week from 8
a.m. until 4 p.m. Tuesday, at Green
Hall from 8 a.m. Wednesday until
4 p.m. Thursday and on the Cam-
pus Mall (near Fleming) from 10
a.m. until 5 p.m. on Friday or Mon-
da
oy 1 ludson, Pitt County Rev y-
cling and C lean Sweep coordina-
tor, said that both ECU and the
citv ot Greenville work with the
center.
"ECU and the city bring their
collected recyclables to the
county's Material Recovery Facil-
ity (MRF) said Hudson.
Hudson said the MRF is where
physically and mentally chal-
lenged persons are hired to pick
and sort through the collected
materials tor preparation to be sold
for market.
Hudson said the ECU campus
trailer collects for the center glass
bottles and jars of any color tint,
number one plastic bottle types
with the actual number one on the
bottom or the recycling symbol on
the bottom, number two plastic
bottle types like milk jugs and
shampoo bottles, cardboard which
is identified by a distinct rippled
middle newspapers includ
sales papers and inserts and
glossy-coated magazines '
said that no aerosol cans
logues, phone books or text bi i
are ai epted.
Armistead said the univer
keeps a record of how much
campus recycles and files a rej
He said the university is mak
progress in the number ot iten
has managed to recycle.
"The plastics figure is
pounds Armistead said it lo
low but that is a huge voluiw
plastic One bale of plastics
weigh anywhere to 00 to
pounds. A semi-trailer tr
packed full of plastics that w
be one bale
Armistead also said that in
past year the university had
lected 13,860 pounds of motor
450,000 pounds of compost
on.
ind
See RECYCLE page 5
Correction
According to Layton Getsinger, Associate Vice Chancellor
for Business Affairs, there are 20 bicycle racks on order.
These racks will arrive and be ready for use in several weeks.
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AILIocjdlusi Now.
Cultural Awareness Week
October 3 - 6
Monday
Carlos Alzaraqui WMci ur 771
244 MSC, 7:57 pm �stl�7.57
Tuesday & Minority Within the Minority minouty
Wednesday WMm
y
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11:30 am -1:00 pm outside ECU Student Stores
Ail 'loQetli&i Aoua
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm on the Mall
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September 29, 1994
East Carolinian 3
ECU locks down patent
Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
When the late Dr. David
Gobeski found himself the
proud possessor of one of
ECU'S first patents, little did
he realize that he would be one
of the initial catalysts in a re-
vival ot Reports of Invention"
from innovative ECU faculty
members.
Gobeski, an assistant profes-
sor of industrial technology
who was shot and killed earlier
this month, was granted one of
ECU'S first patents: U.S. Patent
No. 5,167,135, granted on Dec.
1, 1992, for a "Safety Lockout
Adapter and Coupling Mem-
ber Used Therefor
"Dave had gone out and
bought a safety device to use in
class as he taught Occupational
Safetv and Health Administra-
tion (OSHA) regulations said
Dr. Darrvl Davis, dean of the
School of Industry and Tech-
nology. "He got into class that
dav and discovered that the
device didn't quite meet all of the
OSHA requirements
The situation which OSHA is
trving to prevent happens quite
frequently on an industrial site
when a piece of machinery breaks
and maintenance personnel are
called to repair it.
In one scenario, an electrician
mav come and make sure the
power to the unit is switched off
before starting to crawl inside
the machinery. If a plumber were
to come and see the power is off,
he or she might go to another
part of the machinery and begin
repairs. The electrician finishes
the work and crawls out, turning
the power back on. Being in the
wrong place at the wrong time,
the plumber could be killed or
seriously injured.
The Gobeski "Safety Lockout
Adapter" is an invention which
allows each maintenance worker
to "lock out" the power to the
machinery until all work is done.
The power would remain "locked
out" until all workers had fin-
ished their repairs and removed
Greenville walks for money
Like a good
State Farm
See me for
car, home, life
and health
insurance.
neighbor,
is there�
Bill McDonald
2710 E. 10th Street
Phone 752-6680
State Farm Insurance Companies � Home Offices: Bloomington, Illinois
their individual locks.
"It's so simple Davis said. "1
don't know why no one had in-
vented it yet
Gobeski filed a "Report of In-
vention" with the University
Patent Committee and began
working with Committee Co-
Counsel Greg Hassler, who is also
assistant attorney to the univer-
sity. "It was clearly a novel and
original idea Hassler said of
Gobeski's patent.
The patent was filed in
Gobeski's name, but the univer-
sity retained interest in the patent
as intellectual property � the
usual practice when a university
professor files for a patent which
touches on the area he or she
teaches.
Hassler remembered driving
Gobeski to Raleigh to introduce
the patent i-ea to the state
patent council � the first occa-
sion he had to spend any length
of time with the industrial safety
instructor.
"I clearly recall the way he
made it a point to compliment
me on the fact that I used both
side-view mirrors before chang-
ing lanes on 1-440 Hassler said.
As a matter of fact, we spent most
of the drive talking about the cre-
ative process in inventions � that
was the dominant point in our
dialogue
"I was most impressed with
Dave Hassler said. "I'm guess-
ing he made an incredible teacher.
He was captivating in the pre-
sentation of the patent idea he
made to the patent committee,
and I thought, 'What a wonder-
ful teacher he made
Filing had been a "smooth and
clear process according to
Hassler. Once the patent was
granted, the University Patent
Committee authorized Gobeski
to approach the Small Business
See PATENT page 5
Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
Last vear, about 300 walkers
in Greenville put their best foot
forward in an effort to help stop
local and world-wide hunger.
The walkers participated in
walks that are put on by Church
Rural Overseas Project'(CROP),
an organization that started 25
years ago that is committed to
help stop hunger.
This vear, on Sunday, Octo-
ber 16, at 2:00 p.m there will be
a CROP walk here in Greenville.
The walk will begin and end at
St. Paul's Episcopal Church on
401 E. Fourth Street. The route is
10 kilometers (6.2 miles) long and
will take walkers by different
places, such as the homeless shel-
ter, that are in Greenville.
"The route is designed so that
the walkers can see where their
money is going said Randy
Mavnard, a minister at St. James
United Methodist Church.
"Twenty-five percent ot the
mone thai is raised will be used
here in Pitt County
Last year's participants raised
over $8,000. The walkers were
time
members of local churches, cam-
pus organizations or sororities
and volunteers that wanted to
do their part to stop hunger. I he
participants signed up through
their churches or organizations
and then proceeded to get spon-
sorship. Walkers are asked to
collect donations or pledges from
other people based on the
tance that they walk, for ex
ample, a walker might take a
pledge ot 50 cents tor ever) t
lometer that he or she walk
Participants are encouraged
to walk, but in the past people
ha e run, biked and e en roller-
d. i he important thing is
not how the walk is completed,
but how much monej is raised
1 he walks are held annually
all over the country. Last year,
( R( )P raised over $52 million in
donations of not only money,
but also the means ot transport-
ing the tood overseas to those in
need. ommunities that sup-
portedR( P Walks raised over
s, million tor more than $,800
indiv iv.lci.il tood banks.
The whole purpose ot the
walk is to pro ide a mechanism
tor people to actually take part
and do something to help pro-
vide the food Maynard said.
"It's a helping hands kind of
thine
iviaynara, a minister ai di. jcimt-s otner peopie uciseu on u� u�- �.�.�
Students organize group to support Mother harth
Andy Turner
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Staff Writer
Many people complain about
the condition of the environment
and how it is being misused but
are not willing to do anything
about it. G.A.I.A a new organi-
zation on campus, has decided
to back up words with action.
G.A.I.A. in Greek Mythology
is the goddess of the earth. The
name also serves as an environ-
mental theory which holds that
the earth acts as one big organ-
ism. Dr. Joseph Luczkovich, a
visiting assistant professor in
biologv, suggested the name to
students who were interested in
starting an environmental group.
Major Hooper, a sophomore
communication major, and an-
other student questioned
Luczkovich if there was an envi-
ronmental organization on cam-
pus Luczkovich told them that
there never had been any envi
ronmen'tal group at ECU, so they
took the initiative and decided
to start a group.
G.A.I.A. has only had two
meetings and is still in the for-
mative stages. However, the
group has various ideas includ-
ing recycling, a bike raffle, des-
ignated campus bike lams,
speakers on campus and envi-
ronmentally related trips.
Hooper feels that the earth has
major environmental problems,
and something must be done
now to combat these problems.
"We have depleting resources
and thought they were inex-
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are the very resources we will
need in the future and will not
have.
"We want to go on campus to
encourage sustainable living
habits in everyone
Hooper said G.A.I. A plans to
survey residents of Fleming Hall
to see exactly vhat people are
willing to recycle He feels that
the survey will help to plan
projects and will enable them to
approach SGA for funds
G.A.I.A. currently consists ol
20 members but hopes more will
join. The group is open to any-
one who wishes to join.
"We could use all of the input
and help anyone can think i
See SUPPORT page 5
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4 The East Carolinian
September 29. 1994
Haitian parliament reopens
under U.S. protection
(AP) � Haiti took a hesi-
tant step toward democracy
yesterday when parliament,
shuttered for months, reopens
to debate a proposed amnesty
for the army officers who over-
threw President lean-Bertrand
Aristide.
Amnesty for the bloody
coup and the brutal human
rights abuses that followed
was part of the last-minute
deal between the junta that
seized power three years ago
and an American delegation
led by former President Jimmy
Carter. The Sept. 18 deal fore-
stalled a U.S. invasion.
U.S. troops were to provide
security at parliament as well
as individually for certain
rlamifipc and spn.ifors some
of whom are only now emerg-
ing from hiding in Haiti or
self-imposed exile in the
United States and Canada.
The dominating foreign
military presence is a sensi-
tive issue in this Caribbean
nation proud of being the first
black republic.
Some lawmakers threat-
ened to resign or not to show
up if U.S. troops are posted
inside the legislature.
"There will be no foreign
soldiers within the parliament
building said Frantz-Robert
Monde, president of the 82-
member Chamber of Deputies.
"The security they will give
to legislators will be on the
outside of the building
Sen. Thomas Eddy Dupiton,
who does not plan to attend,
called the U.S. occupation of
Haiti's political institutions a
"provocation
"I once admired the bald
eagle for its grace he said.
"Now I am struck by its ra-
pacity. Thev came to reinforce
our institutions. Now they are
tolling their death
Eleven other senators who
were elected during military-
rule will be barred from the
session.
American diplomats met
Tuesday with Monde and Sen-
ate president Firmin Jean-
Louis to iron out difficulties.
The Americans also posi-
tioned army Humvee jeeps with
machine guns mounted on top
:A the nearby City Hall, where
Mavor Evans Paul is expected
to return this week after nearly
three years in hiding.
Several dozen Haitians gath-
ered outside parliament onTues-
dav to watch the preparations.
Some spoke eloquently in fa-
vor of the proposed amnesty for
police and soldiers who have op-
pressed them with impunity for
years.
"We want a general am-
nesty said Daniel Vallon. "We
don't want vengeance. We want
to start over and go on with our
lives. But the amnesty will be a
favor. (The military leaders)
don't deserve it and they have to
know it
Additional legislation on the
agenda includes the separation
of the police from the armed
forces, its reorganization and re-
training, and putting the police
under civilian command.
Another 142 refugees from
camps at the U.S. Guantanamo
Bay Naval Base in Cuba came
home Tuesday. One, Vilia Picant,
said she came voluntarily but
had mixed feelings about return-
ing.
"I spent all my savings, $60,
to leave and now we'll have to
start all over said the young
woman, who is seven months
pregnant and had her 2-year-old
son by her side.
From exile in the United
States, Aristide appeared on tele-
vision Tuesday night and urged
Haitians to move peacefully to-
ward democracy.
"Since last week, I have seen
how happy you are to welcome
the American soldiers he said
on the U.S. military-run Tele
Demokrasi. "I, too, am happy to
see how they are helping us es-
tablish security for all without
distinction
He also urged his countrymen
to support the money-for-guns
program, which began Tuesday
and under which U.S. forces are
offering up to $300 for each fire-
arm turned in.
"Violence doesn't lead to de-
mocracy. Vengeance is a poison
for democracy Aristide said.
"When you talk, sing and dance,
avoid slipping into disorder
he cautioned, warning against
"traps set by the enemies of de-
mocracy
Under terms of the Sept. 18
agreement, army chief Lt. Gen.
Raoul Cedras must step down
by Oct. 15, along with fellow
coup leader and army chief-of-
staff Brig. Gen. Philippe Biamby
and police chief Lt. Col. Michel
Francois. Then Aristide will re-
turn
Ferry capsizes in the Baltic
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aboard. Must were missing and
feared dead.
Only about 90 people had been
rescued from the 54-degree water
seven hours after the ferry Esto-
nia sank in the Baltic Sea, Finnish
authorities said. They said rescue
workers found bodies, but de-
clined to say how many.
The sinking threatened to be-
come one of the worst passenger
ship disasters in recent years.
"We saw about 40 life rafts
said Swedish rescue helicopter pi-
lot Stefan Carneros. "Unfortu-
nately, most of them were empty
He said waves in the area were up
to 20 feet high.
Stormy seas and winds topping
56 mph were hindering rescue op-
erations near the site of the disas-
ter, about 23 miles from the Finn-
ish island of Uto off the country's
southwestern coast.
There was no immediate ex-
planation of what caused the 515-
foot Estonia to capsize.
"A vessel of this size should
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Finnish maritime inspector Esa
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Turku, the base for rescue efforts.
But news reports speculated
that trucks and cars on board may
have broken loose in the storm,
and that their shifting weight
caused the vessel to capsize. A
spokesman for the ship's owners
toid Estonian radio that authori-
ties believe both engines stopped
iimultaneously, leaving the ferry
vulnrable to the strong wind and
high waves.
Estonian authorities said the
ship's final radio message was:
"We are sinking! The engines
have stopped I"
Ships and helicopters from
Finland and Sweden were at the
scene. Estonian authorities were
sending rescue crews. At least
five other passenger ferries also
were trying to find victims in the
stormy, dark waters.
The Estonia sank sometime af-
ter midnight. The ferry sent out a
distress signal before it went
down. Some news reports said
the ship sank in five minutes,
while others put the time at
closer to 30 minutes.
"I v.oke up as the ship was
heavily tilted to the left one of
the survivors, Neeme Kaik, told
radio station KUKU in Estonia.
"There were huge waves. I got
dressed as fast as I could. I ran
out of my cabin to the deck to
see what was going on. There
was no message on the loud-
speaker about what had hap-
pened
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September 29, 1994
The East Carolinian5
RECYCLE
Continued from page 2
2,410,730 pounds of demolition
debris. Also, 824,000 pounds of
wood collected was donated to
the city of Greenville for fire
wood.
Hudson said that in a study
she had read in a recycling re-
source magazine, college students
living on campus generate an
average of 820 pounds per per-
son per year. This included what
the students threw away and the
resources used for students such
as test papers and food prepara-
tion wrappers.
Hudson said that students could
also use off-campus drop-off sites
like the one on Stantonburg Road
to recycle items like car batteries,
large and small appliances and
even clothing and shoes which are
sent to Goodwill. She also said
that Greenville's Public Works De-
partment has a drop off area at
1500 Beatty Street just off west 14th
Street which is opened from 7:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday.
Armistead and Hudson both
want to encourage students to use
the drop-off sites and to use them
correctly.
"Students need to do more and
be more responsible Armistead
said. "We can recycle anything
that they have recycled at home
"We always need people to
help spread the word about how
important recycling is Hudson
said. "The best thing people can
do to help to recycle is to do it
right. Find out what is recyclable
in your area, or we won't find a
market for it and it will end up in
the landfill
SUPPORT
Continued from page 3
Hooper said.
The group meets today at 5:00
p.m. at the Howell Science Com-
plex in BN 102. The group still
has not elected officers but plans
to do so at today's meeting.
Dr. Luczkovich will serve as
the club's advisor and sees
G.A.I.A. as having a "far reach-
ing objective as a club
"G.A.I.As purpose is to rep-
resent the environmental con-
cerns of students on campus
Luczkovich said.
Hooper is excited about the
club and feels that there is a
definite need for the club at
ECU. He said that he did not
want to criticize any other ef-
forts already taking place on
campus.
"(The Club) is something that
hasn't been here and I think it
needs to be Hooper said. "If
you just criticize, people will not
listen. We want to be compli-
mentary and supplementary
Anyone with additional ques-
tions aboutG. A.I. A. cancall Ma-
jor Hooper at 321-8699.
"Simplify, simplify
Henry David Thoreau
"Hey, that's not a bad idea
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PATENT
from p. 3
Technologv Development Cen-
ter (SBTDCon campus for assis-
tance in further development of
his newly- a tented product. Cli-
ent confidentiality prohibits the
SBTDC from sharing the current
status of that development.
Creative thought was a trade-
mark for Gobeski, according to
Davis. "I leard of an incident
where Assistant Vice-Chancel-
lor George Harrell was having
problems locating underground
PVC plastic pipe across cam-
pus Davis said.
Before construction workers
can tear up a plot of ground, a
metal-detector must be used to
locate the i nderground pipes for
water, sewer, gas, electricity and
communications. The problem
comes whin the pipes are made
of PVC, which will not register
on a metal detector.
"Dave was a quick thinker, and
light on his feet Davis said.
Gobeski had the i nsight to sug-
gest to Hrrell that instead of
looking ft r where the plastic
"was to use -everse logic and
look for where the ground "was
not according to Davis. Gobeski
proposed that a detector could
be created to discern between
solid grour d and ground that had
a large potket of something else
� namely, plastic andor air.
Hassler suggested that it was
this kind of everyday, innovative
thinking in Gobeski that caught
on to somt of the rest of the fac-
ulty, and soon more "Reports of
Invention" were coming before
ECU's University Patent Com-
mittee. In the recent wave of fac-
ulty inventions, though, most
"Reports of Invention" have
come from the ECU medical fac-
ulty. Since Gobeski's patent was
granted in December 1992,
Hassler is aware cf at least one
other patent which has been
granted to an ECU faculty mem-
ber, though several other inven-
tions are " n process
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6 The East Carolinian
September 29. 1994
PARENTS
continued from page 1
positive things.
Buses will be running the pe-
rimeters of campus, and will take
parents to Mendenhall and resi-
dence halls' open houses. Each
residence hall will be hosting an
open house and reception. The
times will be posted in individual
halls.
"A great time will be had by
all Manny Amaro. director of
housing said. "Good times, good
friends, great food we're excited
to have parents on campus
A new addition in the line-up
ot events is a foundation exhibit
presented by the School of Art at
a.m Sarurdav. The presentation
will be in Speight Auditorium in
the Jenkins art building. Repre-
sentatives will discuss the Fresh-
man Foundation program, wliich
includes courses in beginning
drawing and design.
"Parents Weekend is always
an important event at Fast Caro-
lina University Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin said. "It gives us a
chance to welcome parents tocam-
pus and have them see first hand
u li.it thei r students are experienc-
ing by way of their uru ersiry edu
cation
The Chancellor's reception is at
10:30 a.m Saturday at Mendenhall.
Faculty and staff members will be
present to answer questions regard-
ing university services and pro-
grams.
"The Chancellor's office does a
marvelous job putting the reception
together Sweet said. Parents can
meet the chancellorand department
representatives. Faculty and staff
people come in to meet parents.
Parents interested in supporting
ECU academics and student lite are
invited to attend the Parents Asso-
ciation Meehngat 11:30a.m. follow-
ing the chancellor's reception.
All the activities are sure to work
up an appetite and ARA services
will be ready to teed between 1p.m.
and 3:30 p.m. The picnic features a
"down east" style pig pickin' with
all the trimmings. Campus Dining
will also have cold tried chicken,
potato salad, cole slaw, spicy baked
beans, corn muffins and umho
chocolate chip cookies to top it oft.
"ARA, they have done an excel-
lent job said Lev Workman, assis-
tant athletic director tor ticket sales
and promotions. " I heir staff is pre-
pared rhe food has been good we
received manv compliments from
parents and students alike on their
good job
Workman's job is to coordinate
games and entertainment through-
out the stadium. ECU vs. Southern
Mississippi kicks oft at 4 p.m. Par-
ents had the option ot sitting with
their children to cheer the Piiates.
"1 et's have fun. 1 et's get a win
Workman said about Saturday's
game.
He said the stadium and grounds
will be polished tor parents, just as
the are tor every game.
"Every game, every week is an-
other chance to put oar best foot
forward Workman said.
1 le gives most of the credit to
ECU groundskeepers and moving
services tor getting Ficklin set into
shape for the massive crowds ex-
pected.
Parents can park in all general
parking areas Parking lots at the
bottom of the hill will be open tot We v i
parents. ElmhurstSchool is ottering times
parking for $5, which will be used
tor their librarv. First Presbyterian
church is also offering parking tor
$2. Workman said other local busi-
nesses will also be ottering their Kits
for a tee.
Parents Weekend began several
years ago when membersot the foot-
ball team hosted their moms and
dads for a weekend of FCU culture.
"A lot of parents called in saying,
'how can we get more information
on that so the next year the univer-
sity sponsored it Sweet said.
The registration money pavs for
the prixressing, food, tickets and
other areas, Sweet said. Remaining
money is turned over for the follow-
ing year's activities.
flie committee responsible tor
making Parents Weekend consists
i if represen ta rives from Menden ha 11,
the athletics department, the office
of the Chancellor, Dining, Fiousing,
the PanhellenicCouncil, ABLE,SG A,
RFiA,StudentUnions,IFPCandIFC.
done it now so manv
ev aluate ea h year to
ire that the Ipiev ious
ni.iki
year's e ents worked Sweet said
' We meet a couple of times in the
spring, maybe once a month, to
make sure everything is on sched-
ule
Parent Parking
This weekend is Parents
Weekend, so once again football
parking will be tight. Students
'and parents are encouraged to
park in general parking or at the
bottom of College Hill, both are
free. Additional spaces will be
available at First Pres. Church,
corner of 14th and Elm Sts.
($2.00) or at Elmhurst School,
beside the stadium ($5.00).
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September 29, 1994
The East Carolinian 7
The East Carolinian
Opinion
The East Carolinian iQ?t
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lasslter, News Editor
Tarn bra Zion, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Meredith Langley, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Patrick Hlnson, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Brad Oldham, Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
. Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community smce 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes etters tunned to 250
wlswThmaybeedi,
Utter, should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-1353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
Parents' Weekend evokes memories
This Friday once again brings around
that annual event known as Parents'
Weekend � that yearly excuse for the
university to make more money from the
people who make a college education
possible for most of us. (Come to think of it,
isn't the whole idea of having a "Parents'
Weekend" unspeakably cruel to orphans?)
Seriously though, this weekend is a great
excuse for parents to come visit their
homesick offspring. By this time of year
most of us are only too glad to forget about
classes, books and test and see our families
again.
Parents' Weekend brings back those
bittersweet memories we all have of open
house at elementary school. We all
remember those. Our parents got to meet all
of our teachers and hear stories about how
we had been behaving.
It also marked the first time that we
knew more about something than our
parents. For the first time, we were the ones
showing them around, pointing out the
various landmarks at school, like the gym,
cafeteria, etc.
We say these memories are bittersweet,
because relationships with parents are
always complicated, especially as we get
older. When we are away from them, like
when we go away to college, it is always
great to see them again. Spending time with
the family brings great happiness
(usually).
However, we are at the same time
slightly embarrassed. Dad always seems
to tell some silly joke around our friends,
or Mom will tell some horrible story about
something we did long ago in our
childhoods.
A perfect example of this will be seen
this Saturday at the stadium. When it
comes time for the game, do you sit with
your family or do you sit with your
friends?
One thing that the university could do
to improve Parents' Weekend would be to
extend it to include the following Monday
and Tuesday. That way parents could get
a real feel for how our lives are going. It
would give a much more accurate picture.
Plus, since the food is always better in the
dining halls when parents are around,
even those whose parents cannot come
would gain some added benefit.
So, remember this weekend that we
will be having guests to our campus. Let's
all be on our best behavior so that we will
make a good impression. (We're starting
to sound like parents here at TEC � aren't
we?)And regardless of with whom you
sit, let's all go out and support our Pirates
as they take on the Golden Eagles of
Southern Miss. Go Pirates!
THIS VOEEK IN POOTBALL ,
KANSAS CITi SULUED THE
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INDECENT LIBERTIES M!TH
THE REPSKINS.THE COvJBONS
BESWRCWEP Houston,
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0
Men with emotions needed by society
By Angela McCullers
Marion Barry does not deserve second chance
I am sort of stuck between
feeling shocked and not surprised
at the candidacy of former DC.
Mayor Marion Barry. It now looks
li ke he is a very popular cand ida te
to refill his former position, that is,
after spending six months in
prison for smoking crack on
national television.
But first, before I possibly step
into some deep doo-doo by writing
this article, let me ask you a
question. If you were on the job
somewhere, and your boss walked
in and caught you smoking�
some crack, do you think you
would keep that job much
longer, not to mention reapply
and get the job again? Only in
politics, brothers and sisters,
only in politics.
Now, I realize he was not
literally "on the job" when this
happened. But still, would you
want even one of your local
police officers to smoke crack
on his time off, not to mention
the mayor of the capital of your
country? I am one of those who
cannot help but feel that people
who hold higher offices should
live somewhat more exemplary
lives, if only because their's will
be more closely observed by the
rest of us.
However, the point is not so
much what he has already done,
which even I can forgive (although
I still sure as hell would not vote
for him again). It is what he is
doing now. Like many other
people, I find it highly
questionable.
Mr. Barry was quoted as
saying that all the people who feel
the way that I do should just get
over their hang-ups. I don't know,
I'm just having kind of a hard time
getting over it I guess. I was
shocked when I watched the now-
famous clip of Mayor Barry toking-
up, and what I believe was an
undercover prostitute in the room
with him.
I was thinking, "Gosh, that
really makes America look
wonderful, to have the mayor of
our capital city doing this in front
of all of us, not to mention other
countries that I am sure got a laugh
out of it The sad thirg is that
now I'm not really shocked at all
at the present situation. As a matter
of fact, it all makes a little sense if
you look at it a certain way.
if Barry truly is a
born-again Christian,
he should find some
other way, one more
in sync with the
teachings of the Bible
to help those he
wishes to help.
Barry is of course playing the
race card. Doesn't that make sense?
He says that he represents the
people who are severely
underrepresented by the present
administration, which I do not
doubt.
The poor, middle class and
the black population of DC. (that
makes up 70 percent of the entire
population of the city) are falling
in behind him because he is
someone to whom they can relate.
He has been held down and come
back from adversity. He is not
afraid to fight his way back and
represent the people that helped
him do it and believed in him.
I believe the poor and middle
class need this type of
representation, someone to be
B y Patrick Hinson
their voice and who will stop
catering to the rich. It is just that I
cannot help doubting if Marion
Barry is that person or if he is just
another politician taking
advantage of whatever tools he
has at hand to win back the power
he lost.
Another somewhat
disturbing aspect of his campaign
is the "born again" part. It is
certainly not that I doubt people
can be born again in the Christian
sense. I just wonder if Barry really
� is, or is he just using that as
another political tool. Shame on
him if he is.
Only a politician would have
the gall to fake something like
that, to use the Christianity front
to achieve their personal gains. I
think Barry severely failed his
job as mayor of DC and if he
truly is a born-again Christian,
he should find some other way,
one more in sync with the
teachings of the Bible (which says
a rich man cannot enter the
kingdom of Heaven) to help those
.he wishes to help.
Maybe I should be sorry for
feeling this way, but I just think
the fact that Barry is where is, that
he has used all these people to get
him where he now is � poised to
possibly retake the job as mayor
of DC. � is just one more sad
testament to the state of our nation
and to the nature of what politics
have become, namely marketing
and self promotion.
That we might elect a former
convict and crack addict who has
already abused our trust in front
of our very eyes, lest there be any
doubt, to the seat of mayor of our
capital city, is just a sad example
of how far we have gone looking
for what we hope are the right
leaders at a time when America
surely needs them.
In our society, some men feel
they should display a macho-type
image. Society trains men not to
hugand kiss one another. Hugging
and letting go emotionally can ease
internal pain of which men often
are ashamed or unwilling to admit
feeling.
These attitudes stem from
growing up in a homophobic
society where men are inundated
with pro-macho models for male
behavior. A number of men
perpetuate male stereotypes. Men
rarely discuss emotional or
personal conversations about sex,
love, insecurities, pain and loss.
According to society's rule,
men should display this macho-
type image at all times, in order to
prove their manhood. Men who
reveal emotions are classified as
"weak They give up very
important sides of themselves to
be accepted by society. In doing
so, a man will not be able to fulfill
his potential, not just as males, but
as human beings.
A great deal of people think
men are insensitive. Some women
say they want a man who
possesses sensitivity � someone
who talks, shares his feelings and
does not display a macho image.
Realistically, a few women
cannot deal with the surprises
challenges and changes that comes
along with this wish. They are not
ready, willing or able to handle a
sensitive man. Women should
realize they have spent a lot of
years with men who were
insensitive. They count on this
characteristic as "typical" for men.
Society views men as being
emotionally inferior to women.
Mothers tell their young sons, "Big
boys don't cry Society helps to
enforce this rule by saying a "real
man" can not act emotionally hurt
at any time. When it comes to
intense feelings, it seems much
easier for women to see men as
inferiors, not equals, with regards
to emotional feelings.
In many cases, a man does not
have a chance. He simply lives up
to women's low expectations of
him, because the women do not
give him a chance or time to let the
his high potentials shine.
Everyone has feelings and we
should keep this in mind. In our
society, men are viewed as macho,
insensitive and emotionally
inferior to women. Too many men
feel pain, but they do not articulate
it.
Casualties do not talk about
failure. They hate themselves
because of it. They act it out, smoke
it out or drink it out, but they will
not talk about it � they want to
appear "strong
Should we wonder why some
men are closed-mouthed and
dishonest when it comes to
women? Yes, we should. Why risk
being rejected, dismissed or
appearing unmanly if it can all be
avoided by reverting to a macho
type image, keeping a stiff upper
lip and lying.
Men have to sacrifice their
male ego in order to communicate
with other men on deeper levels.
Instead, men silently suffer; they
hold back the feelings that they
harbor within their hearts, souls
and minds.
Stereotypes cheat men of
possibilities that are sure to keep
other people from getting to know
them for who they really are:
individuals with their own
distinctive personalities and
emotions.
Society's preconceived
notions of how a "real man"
behaves makes us try to put people
in boxes that are of our own
making. When they do not fit the
boxes that we adroitly designed
for them, we prefer to penalize
them rather than change our
thinking. Society needs to see men
from an introspective way. We
should help instead of criticize.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Parking cars is not the only traffic problem on this
campus. When will the administration address the
traffic needs of bicycles and pedestrians on and around
campus? Are we not planning to become a "Pedestrian
Campus" in the next few years? Does the university
not realize that East Carolina's traffic problems affect
not only the students, professors and faculty but also
the area residents and businesses?
More students are commuting to campus on
bicycles this term since student parking lots have been
eliminated or changed to staff lots. Parking and riding
bicycles on this campus is a serious problem. Students
have resorted to locking their bicycles to trees, signs,
stair rails and leaving them on the ground praying
that their modes of transportation are not stolen during
their class time. Riding a bicycle on campus is just as
dangerous as riding a bicycle on Greenville Boulevard
Why do we not have bike paths on campus?
When will the safety of pedestrian students
become an intense issue? Are traffic lights and
pedestrians heads (cross walking lights) an issue for
the city or for East Carolina? Why do we not have a
traffic light and pedestrian head at the intersection of
BusbeeStreetandFifthStreet and at the intersection
of Founders Drive and Fifth Street?
A pedestrian head is needed at the intersection of
10th and Elm Street desperately
My last question is "Why should a student have to
ask these questions regarding the safety of students;
should not these questions already be answered by a
university official?" The university itself should
insure sic students' safety before they undertake
major additions or renovations to the university
campus.
Tammy Wright
Senior
Apparel & Textile
Editor's note: Associate Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs Layton Getsinger told TEC that 20 new bike racks
are currently on order, and the physical plant is providing enough racks to accommodate 100 bikes.
To the Editor:
Once again, in the time honored tradition of
NorthCarolina smoke-filled room politics, the inept
ECU elections board has destroyed its credibility
with the students of this fine university. The very
idea of postponing an election 48 hours before it
takes place reeks of corruption and scandal from
the top down. Having been a long (too long) time
observer of SG A on down (Ian Eastman appears to
be clean � good for you, Ian) stopped the election
so that Troy Dreyfus could gather his wits (which
only took up a minute of his time) and scrape
together a campaign in order for him to defeat his
opponent. Incidentally, Troy is slated to graduate
in December, thus if elected he will be just another
lame duck (in the proud tradition of Herbert Hoover,
George Bush and other powerless, wimpy
presidents). The senior class of East Carolina
University deserves better than another "Resume
President" and definitely deserves better than one
drafted by the vice-president of the SG A. Quit being
sheep. Civil disobedience is your birthright. Fight
the power that keeps the power away from the
student body, and vote Bill Gheen for Senior Class
President.
Kevin Blake Johnson
Senior
HistorySocial Studies
The East Carolianian is now accepting applications tor upimun cuhui.
Applications are available at the Students Pubs Building. Call Brian Hall at
328-6366 for more informatiorL
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C 0 M
BY STEPHANIE SMITH
c s
NICK O' TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS





TheEastCarolinian
September 29, 1994
Classifieds
Page 9
For Rent
For Sate
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
e
Ml
Greek Personals
I Ail
Greek Personals
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
j.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815758-7436
ROOMMATE WANTED: Tar River
Estates-5155 mo. utilitiescall 830-1271
after 7pm.
BRAND NEW 2 bedroom, 2 bath units
available at Parkview at Kingston Place.
Water, Sewer, Cable included S450 per
month. Receive 1 month tree rent with
year lease. Short term leases available.
Contact Pro Management of Greenville,
756-1234.
WILDWOOD VILLAS, available 10-1-
94. 2 bedroom, 2 1 2 bath townhouse.
$550 per month. Contact Pro Manage-
ment of Greenville, 756-1234
FEMALE NON-SMOKER to shre
room in Breezewood condo S190
month 13 utilities. Call for applica-
tion 355-8168
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
I bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
For Sale
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library ol information in US. -
all subjects
mm 800-351-0222
0' 'jS"1 52 ' Research Information
11322'danoAvt 206 A Los Angeles �'� �
GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS-
Roommate needed. S175month located
right across the street from campus and
downtown. Please call 752-3019 tor fur-
ther info.
1-4 BEDROOM HOMES, Condo du-
plexes, and apartments tor rent $190
up! Short term lease available! Finders
321-6708small tee. Near campus rentals
available now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING SER-
VICE! Need a roommate list vour ad
free. To get a list of all the people looking
for a roommate- 321-6708 small fee!
ROOMMATE TO SHARE 3 BED-
ROOM HOUSE. Malefemale Close to
campus. Rent 5200 plus 1 3 utilities.
Call 752-1541. Ask for Mark, David, or
Lisa.
ROOMMATE NEEDED tor new 2 bed-
room apartment. Share of rent SI 42 plus
utilities. Contact Todd at 321-8668 after
6:00pm.
SUNNY SIDE OYSTER BAR
Oprnns Smptmmbmr jo
Williamtton, N.C 792-3416
WE EVEN CARD OYSTERS'
(bod, tree clubbar memberships, along
w discounts on oil changes, clothing,
hair cuts more! Fall semester's Gate-
way to Greenville coupon book avail-
able at 758-4454.
84 FORDTEMPO5speed,am fmcass
beige interior, 51300 or best otter 328-
7031) ask for lames or leave message
'88SUZUKI JEEP 45.574 miles, excellent
condition Newmotorandtransmission.
531X10 cash or cashiers check only, no
personal cneck. Call 752-1334
14X70, 1991 BRIGADIER. Great loca-
tion! (Santree MHP) 2 big bednxims and
2 full baths. Includes: Vinyl Underpin-
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(SI550 down and payments would be
S171 mo.) call 830-6132 after 5:00pm.
MACINTOSH CLASSIC- Ready to go-
Microsoft word 4.0, Excel, Games and
other software included. Excellent for
tvping papers. Will demo. Asking $600.
Also for sale Sega Genesis in box game
included. Asking $70 Call 758-3905 ask
tor Andrew
I" � � � � � � � � � l
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116 E. 5th Street
757-0948
Comics and Sportscards
SEX! Now that I have your attention,
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1 YEAR MEMBERSHIP to the club for
women only. $24.50 per month. Call
752-6094
KING WATER BED- like new Firm,
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deal. Its a steal. Must move it or lose it!
753-4425
FREE MONEY IN YOUR POCKETS!
Over $300 worth of free movies, free
CHAR-GRILL
Hi- ii Purl of the Triilili'�i
MANAGERS
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CASHIERS
Pick Up Applications at
Construction Site Located .it .
315 E. 10th Street
(beside Kinko's)
Mail in Applications to:
P.O. Bo 3797
Greenville, NC 278361797
Gnut Place to Woik
Pi'
PlHlbloMoun
10 OFF wCoupon.
J expires io-3i-94 J
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Services Offered
NEEDTYPING?Campussecretary pro-
vides professional, fast service, (stored
on Macintosh disks) low rates. 15 yrs.
experience with student papers. 355-3611
after 5pm or leave message.
PARTY OVER HERE! Hey Greeks and
other social groups. Your party isn't
pump'n until Mobile Music Productions
disc jockey service arrives. MMP pro-
vides the music you want to hear .vhen
vou want to hear it. Experienced DJ's
withthewidestvarietvotmusic.Calll.ee
@ 758-4644 early tor booking
TUTOR LD teacher with 20 years expe-
rience will tutor general college courses.
Call 830-0781
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDENTIAL,
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work. Specializing in resume compo-
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term papers, thesis, legal transcriptions,
general tvping and other secretarial
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for windows software. Call today (8am-
5pm: 752-9959) (evenings. 527-9133).
Absolutely Clean
We Will Clean Anything
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Hayes Hutchens Pnone
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THE PARENTS ARECOMING! Whose
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lutely clean can stop the roommates
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Call now and ask about our Parents
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Publishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd 1B-
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LADIES WANTED: Models, Dancers,
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the cleanest club in North Carolina. Must
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tertainment. 919-747-7686.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to$1000
plus a week escorting in the Greenville
area with a liscensed agency Also need
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AGRICULTURAL RETAIL OUTLET-
Merchandiser position This is a part-time
position (up to 30 hours per week) The
job requires customer service skills, pric-
ing merchandise, stocking shelves, and
other duties as directed. Previous retail
background helpful Applications may
be obtained at Agri-Supply, Rt. 5 264 Ext
Greenville. No phone calls EOE
PART TIME POSITION- Adult Enter-
tainment agency seeking physically fit
attractive female applicants. Must have
own transportation and be between the
agesof 18-25. Call 1-800-848-6282 to setup
an interview
AVERAGE $8HR as part time delivery
person. Own vehicle, insurance, and good
driving record required-Apply weekdays
after 11am at Chop-Chop, 310-F Arling-
ton Blvd
EARN UP TO $559.89 PER WEEK, As-
semble our products at home! Amazing
24 hour recorded message reveals detaiLs!
Call today! 1-919-243-9305. Leave your
telephone number.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All ma-
terials provided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors Po Box 10075, Olathe, KS
66051, Immediate response.
LAZY BACHELOR, living 4 blocks from
ECU, is looking for a hard working "indi-
vidual" to clean his house. Call mark 758-
5235
ATTENTION JUNIORS, SENIORS,
GRAD STUDENTS Sales internship
available gain valuable work experience
call Susan at 355-7700 for a possible inter-
view
ARTISTS MODELS NEEDEDgood pay
Call Heather "58-2522 for details
COURIER: to work part-time for busy
medical practice Make deliveries, run
errands, do filing. Applicants must be
able to work Mon through Fri l-5pmand
have a good driving record along with
reliable transportation. Interested
applicationss should send their resume or
make application at Pitt Surgical, P. A. 905
John HopkinsDrive,C,reenville,NC27834
SUBWAY is now accepting applications
for all stores in Greenville All hrs. avail-
able, seeking clean, very dependable indi-
viduals. Apply in any location, please no
phone calls. Store employees, asst. man-
agers, and manager positions available.
Apply within. For manager position con-
tact Matt Smith 758-8768
AJ MCMURPHY'S BAR AND GRILLE,
the newest neighborhood restaurant is
now hiring energetic wait persons, bar-
tenders and kitchen staff. Please apply in
personat 1914Tumbury Dr. in Food Lion
Shopping Center 355-7956
ESE ESCORTS is now hiring attractive
females age 14-24. Call 758-2737
HICKORY HAMS is looking for honest,
dependable, part-time employees with
flexible schedules. Apply between 2-4
only. No phone calls please.
BZ
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LOST: Gold soft bangle bracelet in the
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Call Vickie at 752-2340 or 328-6133
Personals
"Helping (Mienis ol I'iII Couniy lo locale
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Are you satisfied with your
current child care
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having problems finding
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(919) 758-0455
600 E. 11th Street
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J
WZMB 91.3 FM would like to announce
employees of the month: News: Rodney
Young, Sports: Paul Richardson, DJ: Andy
1-araia. Specialty show of the month: Club
91 (Rap) Congratulations, keep up the
great work!
LAX D Can you hold us to under 5
goals UNC G'
CONGRATULATIONS NIKKI on get-
ring into nursing school! Good luck! I love
youGeorge
Greek Personals
see another landshark sometime soon
Your pledges are great and your brother
Rvan is B�xi! Love The Fab-Five girls
PI LAMBDA PHI would like to thank
Delta Zeta tor a great pig picking tailgate
against Syracuse. Lets do it again some-
rime soon.
CHI OMEGA BIG SISTERS: Thank
you for making last week so special.
Thurs. was a blast- we couldn't be
happier! We love vou!ChiOmega Little
Sisters
KATHY AND DEE: A special thanks
for all the support and enthusiasm
you've shown us. You're wonderful!
Love, Chi Omega Pledges.
PIKA:wedidn't know spendinga night
in jail could be so much fun! Congrats
on all your awesome pledges and
thanksagain for a great time Fri Love,
Chi Omega
KAPPA ALPHA: We can't thank you
enough for the great time we had last
Sat with you and all your awesome
pledges. We 11 have to get together and
shag again soon, and next time hope-
fully we'll get to sit together! Thanks
again for everything, and we wish a
speedy recovery to Mart. Love, Chi
Omega
CONGRATULATIONS NIKKI on be-
ing accepted into nursing school. We're
so proud of you! Love, Chi Omega
PHI PSI- Around the world in a night
people dancing, oh what a site.
America, Germany, Mexico. If you got
caught smuggling� uh oh! It was fun,
the "cops" and all, Thanks guys, we
had a ball! Love the sisters & pledges
of Gamma Sig.
SISTER OF CHI OMEGA: Were look-
ing forward to the social on Thurs. night.
Sincerely, The Brothers of Delta Sigma
Phi
AOPI: Tailgating was a blast. We hope
to do it again sometime. Delta Sig.
DELTA SIGMA PHI would like to
congratulate this semesters pledges.
Kevin Reed, Chris Stainback, Mark
Weeks, Jason Feagans, Ben
McCandliss, Jake Perry, Greg Barnes,
Jonathan Bridges, Joseph White and
Brad Ellis, rhe best pledges class on
campus!
SISTERS OF ZETA: We had so much
fun, we parried till dawn, and we're
glad y ou could come. We didn't want
the night to end, but someday soon
we'll do it again. And finally you know
where the hairy buffalo roams, hereon
East 10th st. at the Delta Sig home.
ALPHA XI DELTA thanks for the great
time at bid night can't wait till the pre-
downtown. Teke
ALPHA DELTA PI muchos gracious to
all the ladies who helped us out during
rush. Its greatly appreciated. Tau Kappa
Epsilon
THE BRO THERSOFSIGMA NU would
like to thank the ladies of AOPI for a great
"get together" last Fri. night Lets do it
again soon!
AQ
THE BROTHERS OF PI LAMBDA
PHI would like to welcome and con-
gratulate all members of our Epsilon
pledge class. Hope you guys are ready
for lots of fun this semester!
PI LAMBDA PHI- We had a blast at
your party Sa t. night! Hope that we can
TO ALL LADIES INTERESTED IN
GREEK LIFE: Open bid on Sept 29- Pizza
party. For more info call 752-8724 Pi Delta
Sororitv
ALPHA SIG- Thanks for the tailgating
party Sat. We finally found you! Congrats
to Alpha Sig pledges good luck! Love the
sisters and pledges of Pi Delta
PI LAM: Twister night couldn't compare
with bid night cause we didn't care, if the
porch was broken or if thecamcorder was
in our direction. Sparks flew with us two
and now some of us don t know what to
do. Jason and Nicole have a new job, as
DJs as they bob. Oh- what a funny sight
that was. Congrats to Pi Lam and Pi Delta
pledges. Hope you all had a terrific first
social. Love Pi Delta sisters and pledges.
ALPHA PHI: Fn. was a blast! We always
make a great team Thank you for show-
ingour new pledges such a good time. We
couldn't have picked anyone better to
spend the night with Can't wait until we
"play" again! Love- Theta Chi
DELTA CHI would like to welcome our
new Associate Members and wish them a
very fun and productive semester.
ALPHA PHI: We had a great time with
you guys Sat. Hope to get together again
soon. Delta Chi
THETA CHI- Fn night was crazy from
the start, matching our cards, we all played
a part. Thank you for showing us all a
great time and congratulations to your
new pledges Looking forward to getting
together soon. Love the Alpha Phi sisters
and new members.
DELTA CHI- We had a great time at the
tailgate last Sat thank you for treating us
to a day of fun. Love the Alpha Phi sisters
and new members
ALPHA PHI- Big sis hunt was such a
blast.Toobad it went by so fast. Dressed
up silly and singing songs, your big s
beside you all night long. Visits to the
Pantry, McDonalds and more. Frater-
nity boy waited at the door. And when
your BigSis revealed herself before your
eyes, wow! What a big surprise.
DELTA ZETA GIRLS- Get psyched for
stranger mixer! And remember- Don't
rely on fate, tell your sisters to find you a
date
KA- We had a great tiem during greek
week! Thanks for all the fun! Love the
sisters of Delta Zeta
DELTA ZETA new members- your lock-
in is just around the comer. Get ready for
a night of many adventures! Love your
sisters
THANKYOUGINGER
HOLLINGSWORTH for representing us
so well in Greek Goddess. And Kirsten
Napier- you represented Sigma Nu well!
We love you! Love your sisters of Delta
Zeta
ALPHA PHI-Thanks for allof your help
during rush! We couldn't have done it
without you and the Lizzard. Thanks
Delta Chi
THE BROTHERS OF DELTA CHI
would like to welcome Chad, Jason and
Scott. It's going to be a great semester.
THANKS FOR A GREAT TAILGATE.
Alpha Phi, lets do it again. Delta Chi
SIGMA NU would like to thank the
sisters and pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha on
a great pregame tailgate. So Don, what
happened?
FOR THE LOVE OF GOD
MONTRESSOR What is a typesetter
to do when they, like myself, get to these
horrible sections where there's way too
much space and not nearly enough text to
fill it? It isa feelingakin tobeigentombed
deepwithinthedarkened .atacombs.brick
by terrible, solitar- orick, darker and
darker,and,wel' darker, until you either
run out of ygen, go completely and
utterly ; jane, remember that you left a
ham in the oven, get fired from your job,
or eventually fill that horrible, empty
space within you by writing so much texr
that it bursts forth from the page
Announcements
PSI CHI
Psi Chi Meeting in Rawl 103, Today
5:30-6:00. Ail members please attend.
PRE-PHYS1CAL THERAPY CLUB
Pre-Physical Therapy Club: Our next
meeting will be Oct 3 at 7pm in
MendenhallSocial Rixim. Dr Albright
is our quest speaker. All are Welcome'
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
ECU CR's meet every Thursday in
GCB 3006 6pm. Do your part to eject
Clinton from office vote Republican.
ROCK THE VOTE
Party and register to vote at The Attic
on Tuesday October 11 SAVE the
countrv from disaster vote Republi-
can.
G.A.I.A. MOTHER EARTH
Environmental club will meet 929
(today) at 5pm in Rm 102 BN Howell
Science Complex
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MIN1TR1ES
Invites all Lutheran Students to
Churdh this Sunday Oct. 1st at
11:00am. The Service will be led by the
ISM Group There will be a reception
afterwards for you and yur parents
Brign a Ffriend. Also, there will be a
new member cookout. Sunday Octo-
ber Qth. All are welcome. For more
information, contact Skip Lilly 328-
8944.
ECU BLUEGRASS CLUB
will besponsonng a picking session on
October 3rd, at 8:00pm in the Under-
ground at Mendenhall. This is open to
anyone who has an interest in Blue-
grass music. Bring your instruments
or just come and listen. New members
are welcome. For more information
call Skip Lilly at S944.
THEPRE-PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
Will have its first meeting on Thurs.
Sept 29 1994at 5:00pm in Mendenhall,
Room 24H! All interested health rna)ors
are invited to come and see what this
support group has to offer.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next meeting will be held on Octo-
ber 4, 1994 at 5:00pm. The location has
been changed from MSC Room 244 to
1 lendrix Theatre.
CAREER SERVICES SCHEDULES
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
Employment interviews with a variety
of organizations will be held in the
Bloxton House during the month of
October. These include banking, retail,
insurance, public accounting, govern-
ment, transportation and computer ser-
vices firms. ECU seniors and graduate
students who will graduate in Decem-
ber, 1994 and MaySummer, 1995
should register with Career Services at
an orientation session in order to par-
ticipate. Contact Career Services,
Bloxton House, for further information.
CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
You Are What You Eat! If you could
change one thing about dining on cam-
pus, what would it be? Let Campus
Dining Services know at the next Stu-
dent Foodservice Advisory committee
meeting. All ECU students are invited.
The meeting will be held Thursday,
September 29 at 4pm in Mendenhall
StudentCenterroom212 Refreshments
are provided.
ECU CERAMIC GUILD
ECU Ceramic Guild presents its An-
nual Mug Sale, Thursday, September
29 and Friday, September 30 from Ham
to 5pm. Located on the East Carolina
University campus in the Lobby of the
Leo Jenkins Fine Arts Center on East
Fifth Street, Greenville, NC. ECU Ce-
ramic Guild is a non-profit campus or-
ganization.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP
Seniorsandgraduatestudentscomplet-
ing their degree in Dec. 1994 or May
Summer, 1995 are invited to attend an
interview skills workshoponThur. Sept.
29 at 4:00pm or Wed. Oct. 5 at 12:00
noon. Sponsored by Career Services,
the workshops will be held in
Mendenhall Student Center, Rtxim 14
Thev are also open to students seeking
internships and co-op experiences.
LEQJ30NJAVyjRIGJfE
SCHOARSH1P
The application process has been re-
opened. The new deadline is October
3,1994. Please see any member of the
Organization of Black Faculty and Staff
for an application or contact Yolanda
Burwell, 216A Ragsdale.
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOARSHIPS AVAILABLE
Approximately $21,900 will be
awarded in scholarships to School of
�All ads must be pre-paid
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students$2.00
Non-Students$3.00
Each additional word$0.05
Announcements
Deadlines
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to
list activities and events open to the pubic
two times free of charge. Due to the
limited amount of space, The East Caro-
linian cannot guarantee the publication of
announcements.
Business majors (those students already
in the School of Business). Students in-
terested in making application for these
scholarships should secure forms from
one of the following department of-
fices: Accounting GCB 3208; Decision
Sciences-3418; Finance-3420; Manage-
ment-3106; Marketing-3414. All appli-
cations must besubmitted to Ruth Jones
(GCB3210),ChairmanofSchoolof Busi-
ness Scholarship Committee, by Octo-
ber 19, 1994 Students may apply for
one or more of the scholarships listed
below. Note criteria for each befor ap-
plying.
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10a m the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
For more
information call
328-6366.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition





1 0 The East Carolinian
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
Appearing soon for you
edification and amusement:
Thurs September 29
An Evening With:
John Mayall and
the Bluesbreakers
at Hendnx Theatre
(blues)
Dean Dollar Band
at the Attic
Beverly Hills Cop 3
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
FREE!
Fri September 30
Not So Dandelions
and Sticky
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Back Doors
at the Attic
(Doors tribute)
Bo Diddley
at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
(blues)
Beverly Hills Cop 3
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
FREE
Sat October 1
Cold Sweat
at the Attic
(funk)
25th Hour
and Smart Bomb
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
John Mayall and
the Bluesbreakers
at Thalian Hall
in Wilmington
(blues)
Beverly Hills Cop 3
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy)
FREE!
Mom October 3
Carlos Alzaraqui
at Club 7:57
in Mendenhall
(stand-up comedy)
FREE'
Wed October 5
Comedy Zone
featuring Al Ernst
and Marc Rubben
at the Attic
(stand-up comedy)
Noon Day Tunes
featuring Mojo Collins
at Todd Dining Hall
11:30 a.m1:00 p.m.
(blues, country, folk
jazz, classical, rock,
easy listening)
FREE!
Thurs October 6
Jupiter Coyote
at the Attic
(roots rock)
Noon Day Tunes
featuring Mojo Collins
at Mendenhall
11 30 a.m. -1:00p.m.
(blues, country,folk
az. la i i al, rock,
easy listening)
FRE1 '
The Last Carolinian
Lifestyle
Jackonuts shock O'Rock's crowd
Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Anvone who wasn't .it
O'Rockefeller's List Frida night
missed out on a nearly religious
experience I hose who were th
and left early were tools But the
few brave soli Is who weathered
the storm known as the ackonuts
were rewarded with one of the
bestshou sl'vee erseen in( Ireen -
ville.
The evening began like an
other. Theearlv crowd w as rhin,
but O'Rock's started to til! up
around 11:30 as Ella, the night's
opening act, took the stage. Ella,
formerly known as Supple,
played a strong set of guitar-
driven alternative ro k I his
band is much-improved o er the
last time I saw them, opening
for Fountain of Youth iust a few
weeks ago. If they improve this
much between every show, 1 lla
will be a band to look out tor
Ella ripped through some
noisv stuff earlv in their set, re-
minding me a bit of disbanded
Greenville favorites
Skullbuckle. They soon leveled
out, however, as they settled into
asetof strong alternative music.
Some stand-out songs tor lla
were "A Little Murder" (a cov er
tune they handled very well),
theGo-Go's "Vacation and, my
favorite song of their set, a short
version of "The Pancreas Song
Another highlight of the show
was when the band was joined
by a mysterious musician
known only as "JT who wailed
on the trumpet during an Ella
original named after their shad-
owy horn-playing friend
O'Rock's filled quickly dur-
ing Ella'sset, as lots of the band's
friends crowded the tiny
O'Rock's dance floor to ump
around and ac; in a drunken
manner. But Ella vasonly a pre
liminarv, after all, and Green-
HL . � t what
was al
that Ath-
ens . : - muts began
, � mil on O'Roc k s I he
vour face is n it quite
sufficient to desi ribe what v. ent
on there s instru
ments w ned at konuts
singer La I bed I lie
and : red into the crowd,
who were alreadv, unusuallv
(.losf to the stage. me
t.ui1!liar v. ith ilcm ntnwn . ri ivvH
psychology Know an out-of-
tow n act can expe t to find their
audience hugging the walls, too
scaied ior too drunk) to move
up neai the stage
Butthere weall � rowd
O'Rock's stage railing expect-
ing to be entertained. Well, we
got what we wanted, in spades.
Carter cleared out a small se
non of floor in the middle of the
crowd and undid her pants. I his
raised a few eyebrows, but then
the rest of the band began to
plav and haos was unleashed.
( arter gyrated and lunged
with the surging noise guitar
beat ol the ackonuts, simulta-
neously c reating a sexual atmo-
sphere and tr ing to start a mosh
pit. The audience was stunned.
People in C arter's v icinity tried
to back off, but they were held in
place bv the sheet sie of the
crowd (and, no doubt, the urge
of those further back to see u hat
was happening)
As the set progressed, L arter
started rubbing up against
people, stil! swaying with the
ackonuts' suddenh sexual
rhythms I saw more than a few
deei in-headlights expressions
,i round tlie dance floor as C arter
played to her audience, whether
Photo Courtesy of Radial Records
See JACK page 13
Presentedhere.inalltheirglory.aretheJackonuts They'rerr I re frightening in the light. Just
ask any of the laid back Grateful Dead types who fled the building in terror last Friday at O'Rock's.
Circus to feature human oddities
Julie Totten
Staff writer
with a carnival ol freaks" v. ho i nee
enjoyself- inflicted torture. I here.
seem � � i ru aai
he n fi m tl
vd im Rose I reo
res "

v Ros
that's more like it ' nigma,gotoutottl
This fall, when Nine Inch Nails n 1992, the circus toured with he stuffed - th
fans discover their latest tour is ollapaloozaasasideshi w to the into his mouth, sendi
coming to towns all over the U.S main music events of the day. H ach inti rointestmal fr
Ihey'll say, "Oh look, there's a you were there, you may remem- American Record-
circus too her seeing a man with a leash ings also put out a video
You know, a three-ring circus around his neck and his hands premium circus pi
completewithelephants,clowns, full of live maggots and worm- rhisperl
cotton candy and good family He looked like he had broken which I he Enigma c
fun. Nah, it couldn't be! Actu- tree from a stake in the ground regurgitated
ally, I'm referring to the Jim Rose (similar to what keeps our dog in attache
Circus Sideshow. Substitute the the backyard) and was just run- piercings and swings then
wholesome images of the circus ning around mad in the audi- around, including one incredible

v. s dovv n r u ket
i Mr 1 ifto
�rtorm

treme
h
d
heKn
lag-
�)
Pathetic

Lame
)' pretty Good
0 0 &
Brilliant
Jimi Hendrix
Blues
0 00 0
There are guitar gi
tvpes these days I hei
limi I lendi i �
1 here ire namee
ds ,t all
contend with when approaching
many different arts Shakespeare
tor the written word. Moart tor
classical musi and Graham for
dance. Hendrix is one of those
people like the previously men-
tioned, that you will onK seeonce
in the histor) of the human rac
Mavbe I'm a little too enthusias
tic, but 1 think there's more than
one person who will agree with
nn on this point
rhefini i i opleaf M( re ords
havi i ired tl ves and
found iomi of sed
blues tracks; the i
eleven tra. k CU, "j
I � �
atest

HENDRIX paq
They Might Be
Giants
John Henry
I
I �
I K 1'K '
imone
iants in
�rv hm-
en-
that
� ap"
style of
. One
ample, is
�ho
x-�





September 29, 1994
The East Carolinian It.
Van Damme proves
star power in Timecop
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
With his newest action ad-
venture movie, Timecop, lean
Claude Van Damme tries to
make his mark as a bona fide
actor capable of carrying a big-
budget motion picture. Van
Damme still uses the kickboxing
techniques which made him a
hero with many teenagers, but
with his latest film he also shows
a more passionate and humor-
ous side.
He has even matured to the
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans Si
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
THE WASH HOUSE
10th Street - 14th Street - CA. East Ct.
�Modern Equipment
�Double Load Washers
�Computerized Dryer
�Cable T.V.
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1 COUPON PER WASH
8-5 MON-FRI
EXPIRES 10-5-94
point where he is capable of pok-
ing tun at himself. In one of the
early scenes, after stopping a
purse snatcher, Van Damme's
character, Max Walker, claims
that the assailant must have read
hi mind because the crook
hightails it away from him.
Walker's wife Melissa (played
with restrained loveliness by
Mia Sara), gives him a smirk
and savs, "With your English,
he'd have to Van Damme's
willingness to admit his short-
comings may signal that he has
the proper attitude to make the
transition into bigger Holly-
wood productions.
In Timecop, Van Damme finds
himself in an inferior Termina-
tor movie. Walker is a cop se-
lected to police the past because
time travel has finally become
possible in the year 1994. An
inventor has found the kev tor
traveling into the past but with
his invention has also created a
potential weapon that evil forces
could use to change the present
bv altering the past.
Timecopopens in the year 1863
in Gainesville, Georgia where a
Confederate troop of soldiers
carries gold bouillon with them.
A man who stops the troop pulls
out a machine gun and proceeds
to kill the entire patrol.
The scene then flashes to
Washington, DC. in the year
1994, where the Senate Over-
sight Committee has the pro-
posal to institute a lime Enforce-
ment Commission (TEC) before
them. The TEC would patrol the
past to arrest any time-travel-
ing villains.
I he viewer also first meets
Walker in 1M94 DC. He is a cop
Spin Doctors lose a
patient at the Creek
Quenton Pickup
Staff Writer
Thousands of rain-soaked fens
came out last Ihursda night tor a
three-band concert with the Spin
Doctors headlining. Walnut Creek
dimmed the lights about 6:30 Satur-
day evening and Cracker took the
stage.
It was evident that Cracker has
not let their recentsuccess goto their
heads Cracker frontman, I avid
1 owery, led the band through nu-
merous tunes off bom Kerosem I hit
and C racker. I here was no extensive
light show or stage set, u.st a tal-
ented and tight band that played
loud and hard tor a little over an
hour. Much of the crowd had not
shown up for the early start but
filtered into the amphitheatre
steadily throughout Cracker's set
Next up on the list were the Gin
Blossoms. Without a doubt, the Blos-
�-omsvverethesurpnseoftheevening.
These VH-1 icons disposed the myth
that they were just a one-hit wonder
with their hit "Hey Jealousy
Through numerous guitar solos and
ingenious improvisations, the Gin
Blossoms proved themselves well
against their fellow bands, surpass-
ing the Spin Doctors. The Gin Blos-
soms were joined by Chris Bacon,
Spin Doctors' lead singer, fora couple
of songs. It seemed as if the crowd
wanted him to get off so the Blos-
soms could crank out some more of
their abrasive-styled music.
The Spin Doctors came on stage
around 9:30 to an excited and enthu-
siastic crowd. It's too bad they had
niin the fun everyone was having by
playing. Bland and obnoxious are
good words to describe the Spin
Doctors show Saturday nigh
Bland fits because of the stage presj
ence and lack of enthusiasm that
they gave back to the ram-soaked
and patient audience. A person
can only take so much of a bearded,
leotard-wearing wanna-be bounc-
ing around the stage.
Monotony played its part in the
show the same way it does on
every album thev put out You'd
think it would be easy to put out a
10-song album that didn't sound
repetitive the whole way through,
butevidenilv that's extremelv dif-
ficult for The Spin Doctors. If you
were dancing to them, you didn't
even need to stop in between songs
because it ail would start up on the
same rhythm in the next song
it would be safe to say this tour
See SPIN page 13
Campus pigsties win contest
Steve Griffen
Staff writer
Milton Bfadley's game of
"Pass the Pigs" is sponsoring a
national search tor the messiest
dorm room on college cam-
puses. Students can now be re-
warded for their "piggish" hab-
its.
The contest is open to all col-
lege students across the coun-
try, including we bete at ECU.
Students must be nominated by
their resident ach isors tor the
messiest room Mark Morris,
Public Relations manager from
Milton Bradlev savs, "Pass the
Pigs is extremely popular with
college students. We really want
them to have a lot of fun with
tnis contest
Pass the Pigs is a game where
players roll two pigs as dice and
score points based on the way
they land. The first person to
score 100 points wins the game.
I guess you could use it as a new
drinking game to pass the time
away.
Anyway, the grand prize win-
ner of the contest will recieve
51,000, a professional room
cleaning, an on-campus party-
tor 100 of his her closest friends
and a Milton Bradley prize pack.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC BAR CERTIFIED
State Criminal Law Specialist
24 Hour Message Service
209 Evans Street
Adjacent to the Greenville Courthouse
752-7529
PARENTS DAST
ATUBE
f
The Shocking Reincarnation of Jim Morrison & The Doors JJ
Saturday 1st
CCIXSW
Coming Wednesday 12th
FREE! ECU Wow en find
Ceifeee Wug�
The first 200 students who come in
Saturday, October 1st with their parents
will receive an ECU Mom or Dad coffee mug
Absolutely FREE! No purchase necessary"
III Vnm ECU mm
on, Dad SvmkbMb
ECU Mom or Dad swearshirts are 12 price to
all ECU students or parents on Saturday, October 1st.
Over 200 in stock, but hurry at 12 price they go fast
SI.06 Rolling Rock WRDU Remote
Register to Win a 1995 Camaro
� The
CoMedY
MICHAEL WINSLOW
Sound Effects Star of Police
Academy Film Series
ram
u
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE
Winners will also be chosen
from each state to receive a
Pass the Pigs game, t-shirts
and other prizes.
To participate in Milton
Bradley's National Pigsty
Search, contestants must send
a 4x6 photo of their room and
a brief paragraph describing
why they're proud of their
"pigsty
Entries must be post-
marked by October 10 to: Pass
the Pigs' Pigstv, co
Fleishman-Hilliard Inc, 1330
Avenue of the Americas, New
York, NY 10019.
So all you life-long pigs out
there, get ready! Those dirty
habits your mom always com-
plained about might score you
fame and success.
TL'EXS'E!
cuett a& U attest





12, ,
��iinnin
�9, I994
HENRY
From p. 10
morous light I lu- laughter is oi
nervous variety, howe er; tlu
is dark stuff
lso in this vein iirv " soll
�dNowhere and 'Meetjames
I ht i.ittt'i oi those . mgs is
� .it a paintei from Belgium. "Be-
fore there were iunk stores before
there was junk one of the ohns
croons, "he lived with his mother
and the torments of C hrisl " I he
ston eetse en morecheerful from
there .1 we discover th.it Ensor
was once a famous and renowned
artist who has since fallen out ot
fashion and disappeared in the
.rusts of history. Vliat fun!
Alongside the dark stuff, the
Giants also ivc us weird unp
I hese are just little surreal tidbits
mat ! think are meant to be appre-
"t d mainly tor their bizarre im-
John I lenry otter Dirt
Bike which is about the ominous
ision ft dirt bike on a small
n, and the motorcycles' evil
ins. Also featured are "Spv
w hich came out earlier mis year on
an ep, and "Window
'Window" is a particularly ef-
' ctive piece that reminds me ot
Might Be Giants'early work.
i those days, they jumped into a
-ong. said what they had to say,
md got out before it became mo-
notonous In "Window theyhave
1 simple point to make: windows
- r� like catalogs of the people who
walk by them It's a nice conceit
that doesn't take a lot of time to
�iv. and the Giants don't belabor
the point here
Unfortunately, they belabor the
point quite a bit on "The End ol the
ur That's right, folks. They
Might Be Giants has recorded that
worst ot all roc k music cliches, the
"road song 1 think you can all
guess what this one s about. Yes,
being on tour is oh-so-lonely, ana
it's hard to sustain a relationship,
ami don't we all teel bad tor those
poor rock stars Granted, the Gi-
ants handle it better than BobSegar
ever did, and the song doesn't get
completely sappy, but let's face it:
we've heard it all before.
That's the way 1 feel about most
of this album. The great majority
of the 23 songs on John Henry areat
least decent, but they feel like re-
� ads to me, and I've come to ex-
pect more fr.tm Ihev Might Be
( aants. Still, it'sbetter than most of
the Grateful Dead wannabe stuff
that's out there these days. And it
blows all those Black Sabbath
power chord bands right out of the
water So maybe it's not so bad
after all. In fact, compared to a lot
ot the alternative scene these days,
Family Cat produces pleasant noise
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
mint
ui 1 h
Hntisii unite
t.imihat h
set ond album titli
pens. The band featun
esting English sound i. al -
thing but pud. tabli
first album 'Furl
sun" reached numbei one on t
I K. alternative music h irt.A .
lappens is their first (J.S
imeal-
tliinc vou
(.vnie So 1 onv: is ,1 graphic
I ortrayal ot a relationship that's
long since ended I istening to this
vou 1 an obvioush see th.it
I siiil weighs heav il on the
writer's mind The next
"Hamlet F01 Now has a theme
ery similar to the one 111 this song
I lamlet 1 or Now' is filled with
ot desperation and self-pity
I he rhythm in this song is' gradu-
i!l increasing, but at one point it
slows ,md you think the songs
about to end I hen all the sud-
den the break into three wail-
ing guitar riffs whii h quk 11
become unorganized ' 1 1
1 md i� sounds like tiir elvet
ng, I ndergroundclassic 'Euro
Son
1 ne next I WO songs.
"Goldenbook" and Ro k
Breaking ' are a lot les somber
See CAT page 13
Wtals ,M Ui
m9s
; Jnc.
Photo Courtesy of Arista Records
Hand-picked by Robert Smith to open for the Cure on a -ecent tour, the Family Cat has
just released their latest album. Magic Happens. Boasting a strong mix of alternative rock
sounds this British group can only hope to find the success of their depressed mentors.
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601 S. E. Greenvile Blvd.
next to Quincy's Steak House
756-4204
MonTuesWedFri9 to 6 � 1 huts. 9 to 7 � Sat. 9 to 2





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From p. 11
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IGreenville,
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This month's lucky
winners are:
Cassandra Coley ;
Lotto 155 � �
� 1 pair of tickets to see John Mayal J J
(Sponsored by: ECU Student Union Popular, ,
Entertainment Committee) Pick up tickets at i
Central Ticket Office MSC.
William Fairley
Lotto 1881 ; ;
� 1 pair of tickets to see Capital Steps , i
(Sponsored by: The ECU Performing Arts Series)
Pick up tickets at Central Ticket Office - MSC.
. iii
Terence Forbes � i i
Lotto 1852 ! !
� $50 declining balance from ECU Campus ' '
Dining. Pick up your declining balance card a
Todd Dining Hall Office. i
More lucky numbers will be drawn during:
CLIFFHANGER
AT THE TOWER
An event held Thursday, October 13 beginning at
5:30pm at the ECU Climbing Tower
I KI i C LIMBING FREl FtXM. YOI II Ml i III MOVIE
( I II III (il K inuli i the M.us
Call Rec Services at 328-6387 for more details
Natural Lotto sponsored by ECU Recreational Services, Housing
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further contemplation vvil
plot elements arc inconsistent
v. ithin the context of the film.
The main plot ol
Walk- apt politi-
cian named
ip laved with smarrru
Ron S ' omb plans to
lis presi '�
Walker � to disru
time ti

-
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the film I lity to please I
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tra el � � r it still man-
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but the film may signal the begin-
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were th(
show
ipsi
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enerj
madt
to on
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a six
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k i ireei
seen . ' fcoi itrol,
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in quite si
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1 4 The East Carolinian
September 29, 1994
The East Carolinian
Sports
Track twins make impact in first season
Jody Jones
Staff Writer
While some people run because
of the health benefits it provides,
others do so just to relax. Still,
there are those who run simply for
the love of it. Dava and Tara
Rhodes are among those who just
love it, and since coming to East
Carolina from Mechanicsburg, Pa
they have taken Women's Cross
Country and Track a step higher.
In high school, both were All-
State runners, but not as highly
recruited as some of the runners
thev competed against. So what
attracted them to ECU? "Location
and coaching. We really wanted to
come south. It just feels really
good Dava said.
"It just clicked. It was like I
pictured it, and the people were
really nice Tara said.
Head Coach Charles "Choo"
Justice feels really good about
having Dava and Tara here. He
called them the two hardest
working athletes he had ever
seen. "They bring a great work
ethic to the team. They are lead-
ers by example Justice said.
Since they were not recruited
very much out of high school,
expectations were not that great.
"Thev have already passed my
expectations. I just hope they
continue to improve he said.
Dava was named the 1993
CAA Rookie of the Year, as well
as ECU's Women's Cross Coun-
trv team Most Valuable Runner,
All-CAA, and the All-East team
in '94. She now holds the school
record in the 10,000 meter with a
time of 35:10. She finished first
in two meets during the '93 sea-
son. Add becoming ECU's first
female track qualifier for the
NCAA and the first ever female
track All-American, and you get
a pretty good first year of run-
ning.
Tara was also a member of the
'94 All-East squad and ECU's
Most Outstanding Freshman in
'93.
Dava and Tara have been run-
ning cross countrytrack since
the 9th grade. Dava said run-
ning for her is "like a snowball
She has been running for so long
that now it is just something she
does. "It is more of a love
hate relationship. I am glad to
have a day off, but I would
hate for somebody to tell me I
could not run Tara said.
When they are running a
race, they each have one thing
in mind � getting a good time.
"Winning is great, but I would
rather get a good time Dava
said.
Each has different goals. Al-
though thev are both currently-
majoring in Elementary Edu-
cation, their running goals are
different. Dava wants to be an
All-American again, while Tara
just wants the satisfaction ot
getting better. Their desire and
determination are sure to help
them to achieve their goals.
Flag football tournament set
Photos Courtesy of ECU Sports Information
The Rhodes twins are quickly making tracks in
their short time at ECU. Dava, (top, middle runner)
and Tara (insert), are from Mechanicsburg, Pa.
(RS) � Recreational Services will
be sponsoring the Second Annual
Flag Football Qualifier tournament
on Thursday, October 13, through
Sunday, October 16 at the Ficklen
Intramural Fields Complex. The
winner of this tourney shall receive
funding for the entry fee to the Na-
tional Invitational Flag Football
Tourney in New Orleans, Louisi-
ana during the week of December
27-31, 1994. This annual event is
held as one of a series of Sugar
Bowl events which culminates with
the football game in the Superdome
on New Year's Day. Each year,
approximately 150 Men's,
Women's, ind Co-Rec teams from
all across the nation, Mexico and
Europe compete for the national
championships in their respec-
tive divisions.
In order to enter the Qualifier,
teams must complete a registra-
tion form and roster and turn it
in with a $15.00 entry fee by 5
p.m. on Wednesday, October 12
in 204 Christenbury Gym. A man-
datory captains' meeting will be
held on Wednesday, October 12
at 5 p.m. in Biology Building,
Room 103 for all teams entered
in the tourney. Schedules, rules,
policies and tournament proce-
dures shall be reviewed at this
time. Teams may consist of play-
ers from your current intramu-
ral team or may be assembled
solely for this tournament. A
player may only play on one
team in the tourney. Men's and
Women's divisions will be of-
fered.
The tournament format shall
randomly place teams into pools
of three or four teams with
round-robin play determining
the top two teams in each pool
that will advance to a single
elimination tourney. The
single elimination tourney
shall conclude on Sunday,
October 16 with the champi-
onship games. Teams entered
in the tourney must be avail-
able to play on all three days
of the event. For further infor-
mation, please contact David
Gaskins at 328-6387 or stop by
104-A Christenbury.
Atkinson shows leadership on tennis team
Drew Gatlin
Staff Writer
On any given afternoon, the ECU
tennis courts are filled with voices
varying from sharp New England
accents to laid-back Southern
drawls, and most likely in their midst
is the distinct English accent of Ben
Atkinson with the ECU men's ten-
nis team.
A native of Sheffield, England,
Atkinson is a senior with a double-
major in communications and En-
glish, specializing in public relations
and writing. Being a double-major
can be hectic enough, but Ben is also
co-captain of the tennis team.
The obvious question people
want to know is, how did he find
Greenville?
"My last year of high school in
England, I was interested in pursu-
ing studies overseas Atkinsonsaid.
"I played several tournaments at
home and did well enough to get
the opportunity to be approached
by some coaches from overseas
Though ECU was not one of the
schools courting Atkinson in high
school, a " friend of a friend " created
contact between Atkinson and the
Pirate men's head tennis coach, Bill
Moore.
"Theprogram sounded like what
I was looking for Atkinson said.
"The emphasis was more on com-
peting, rather than a win-loss sort of
thing. Coach Moore placed a high
emphasis on academics, which was
my primary reason for coming to a
university
"First of all, you have to under-
stand that it's a very select popula-
tion of kids who are willing to leave
their country, not knowing anybody
and come here to the States Coach
Moore said. "They realize that it's
going to be a long time before they
see home again; It's going to be very
different
Atkinson found that adjusting to
the American lifestyle was not as
radical as one would ordinarily sup-
pose. To begin with, he still has the
busy scheduleof academics andath-
letics.
"Food is a major adjustment for
most of these international kids
Moore said. "Tea, crumpets, what-
ever �we don't have that. That's an
immediate adjustmentfor them. But
at the same time, it's a tremendous
opportunity for them
A major reason for Atkinson's
desire to study abroad is that inGreat
Britain, one cannot do both academ-
ics and athletics on the collegiate
level.
"Either 'go pro which I wasn't
good enough at the time, or go to a
university Atkinson said. "East
Carolina gave me the opportunity to
doboth.Atthe university athomeI
would have had a lot of time on my
hands. But here, balancing academ-
ics and athletics, I don't even have a
minute to spare
"It's been quite hard, adjusting to
the academics Atkinsonsaid. "The
first two years of 'general college' �
I dropped those subjects when I was
15 or 16
At that age, British education al-
lows students to move into more
specialized fields of study, so it has
been a few years since Ben has seen
core curriculum subjects like math
or foreign language.
"One thing that's made my ad-
justment here so good has been the
hospitality � everyone in the area,
plus the assistance I've received from
the coaches, other players, athletes
Atkinson said. "Basically, everyone
on campus. People go out of their
way to help you. It's been a positive
experience
Those who spend time with
Atkinson agree that he returns that
positiveattitudeto those he isaround.
"One of the things which very
much impresses me about Ben is his
strength of character Moore said.
"He's got good perspective, and a
tremendous role model, I consider,
for kids
"This year, I hope that he's able to
teach some of these guys some pa-
tience Moore said. "As freshmen,
they're going to get very frustrated,
because they're going to lose a lot.
Ben's been there. He's lost a lot. In his
four years here, he's been through
the battles, and he's struggled with
his gameand the freshmen are go-
ing to go through that. He's going to
have a tremendous potential to help
these kids when they start strug-
gg"
"The things I learned my fresh-
man year, 1 can also see them learn-
ing the same way I did Atkinson
said. "Things like time management,
self-discipline, communicating with
others on-court and off-court �
there's a lot of things that they're
learning quickly
Leadership is an important qual-
ity in a senior a thlete, and Atkinson is
a strong example of this quality, ac-
cording to Coach Moore.
" Whenyou'retalkingabouta 'peer
leader who is different than a coach
orassistantcoach, they have the great-
est potential to influence other play-
ers Moore said. "A lot of people
talkabout-headcoachingleadership,
but I'm telling you, in terms of really
getting people 'on the same page
day-in and day-out at practice, it's
the peer leaders who are in the place
to influence the kids the most. They
see the players off the court, they
see them downtown, they know
what's going on. A lot of times,
coaches don't know a lot compared
to what the peers know
"I think the biggest thing with
Ben, in terms of qualities, is that he's
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
incredibly honest'Moore said. "He
takes care, in terms of 'showing by
example he takes care of all the
details. He goes to class; he's at
practice. You never have to worry
about whether he's putting out the
most effort � he always puts out
"The other part of it is that he
stays on the kids as well Moore
See ATKINSON page 16
NC Central football
player dies suddenly
(AP) � A North Carolina Cen-
tral University football pla yerdied
Tuesday after telling friends with
whom he was talking on campus
that he did not feel well.
Al Carpenter and several team-
mates had just finished a class and
were talking to the head of the
school's criminal justice depart-
ment about their plans when Car-
penter sa i d he was not feel i ng well.
Carpenter lav down on the floor,
and emergency medical person-
nel were summoned.
"The last thing he told me was
that he would be all right said
teammate Charles Patterson, a
defensive back.
Carpenter was pronounced
dead at Duke University Medical
Center at 3:51 p.m.
"I thought when we put him in
the ambulance, he'd be OK said
George Wilson, chairman of the
Criminal Justice Department.
"He was talking and answering
questions
Carpenter'scauseof death had
not been determined Tuesday
night, but Wilson and others be-
lieve a blood clot caused by a
broken foot suffered on the foot-
ball field went to his brain and
caused a stroke. Carpenter's
body was sent to the state medi-
cal examiner's office in Chapel
Hill for an autopsy.
Carpenter started at left guard
for the Eagles during the 1993
season and moved to center this
year.
Football coach Larry Little
called his players together Tues-
day, told them of Carpenter's
death, called for a silent prayer
and dismissed practice.
Legend Of
the Gridiron
This Saturday,
Carlester Crumpler
Srs (seen left) career
rushing record at ECU
will likely be broken by
senior running back
Junior Smith. Crumpler
was a star running back
here at East Carolina
during the 1971-1973
seasons. He would
later go on to play in
the NFL for the Buffalo
Bills. Read more about
Crumpler and his ca-
reer at ECU in this
week's edition of The
End Zone.
Photo Courtesy of ECU Sports
Information





September 29, I 994
The East Carolinian 15
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NOW OPEN 24 HOURS
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE, WE NOW HAVE AN ATM MACHINE
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College coach suspended
(AD � Johnson C. Smith head
football coach Ray Lee was sus-
pended by the university Mon-
day, school officials said.
Lee will be suspended indefi
rtitely while school President
Dorothv Cowser Yancy conducts
an internal investigation to find
out it he used an ineligible player
in at least one game this year.
Randy Bethel, a Bulls assis
tant coach for three years, has
been named interim head coach.
"We have to work through
this Bethel said after a news
conference Mondav at which
Lee's suspension was an-
nounced
Lee was not at the news con-
feren e and was not on campus.
When re hed by telephone by
I In' Charlotte Observer, he de-
clined to comment.
Yanc) was made aware of the
possibility ol an ineligible player
through a letter last week from
Central Intercollegiate Athletic
Association Commissioner Leon
Kerrv and a report from Smith
athletic director Horace Small.
"I saw a player I wasn't posi-
tive should've been out there
Small said of a Sept. 17 game
against Winsion-Salem State. He
declined, as did Cowser, to name
the player. "But all of us respect
and admire coach Lee so we
don't think he'd do it intention-
IN THE DELI-BAKERY
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Prices Effective Through Oct. 4, 1994
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday September 28. Through Tuesday, October 4, 1994 In Our Mecklenbura County Stores
Only We Reserve The Right To limit Ouantides. None bold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal FoocTStamps
SUB STATION
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215E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
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ally
Yancy said she hopes to com-
plete the investigation bv
I hursdav.
The Sports
Department is
continuing to
take applica-
tions for new
writers. Drop
by for our
sportswriters
meetings, ev-
ery Monday
afternoon at 2
p.m or call
328-6366 and
ask for Dave
or Brad.
INSTRUCTIONS IN USING JOYNER LIBRARY'S ONLINE
CATALOG AND CD-ROM DATABASES
The Reference Department of Joyner Library is offering sessions
on using the Library's online catalog and CD-ROM databases.
Sessions will be held in room 104 in the West Wing of Joyner
Library, located in the northeast corner of the Reference Room. No
previous sign up or reservation will be required for participation.
Sessions for October will be as follows:
MonOct. 311a.m.Online catalog
3 p.m.CD-ROMS
Tues Oct. 119 a.m.CD-ROMS
3 p.m.Online catalog
Wed.Oct. 1911a.m.Online catalog
3 p.m.CD-ROMS
Thurs Oct. 2711a.m.CD-ROMS
3 p.m.Online catalog
Mon.Oct. 3111a.m.Online catalog
3 p.m.CD-ROMS
.i.U
A
If you have any questions about these sessions, please call the
Library's Reference Department at 328 -6677.
wickedly funny
political satire
just in time for
parents weekend
Bring your Mom & Dad. You II laugh.
They'll laugh. (But not at the same things.)
Sept. 30 - 8:00pm - Wright Auditorium
For tickets call 328-4788 or stop by The Central
Ticket Office at Mendenhall Student Center M-F 8am-6pm





�; o - Carolinian
A rK!NSON Continued form page 1 i
Ltothem he'svei , Atkinson's busy semester sehed-
He'sa nice guy, but ule takes a break during the �
�i t n, , itmmr " in anything related to tennis, Ithinkthec
back home in bhemeld, Auonson n t r irkplaci
faty-ou: mer.vh.chhndshimi.avarieo, l� 11 The fact that I'm an ienj -
rt you at a teammate, situations � Uk?; ' , lt h, ho - coach " Atkinson .aid! 1 m lucky American degree, a lot ol people lot Vtkinson
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Members oi , given team will though we both traveled through n ' s
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t's just basically
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� saidl le'svery
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ei - like bun because he's got a
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Like most students, a summe, t ve got a fifm year on my vaa,
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lawn, and such � - that paid the said. "I'd like to go out West 1 ve
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Page 2
TEC End Zonk
October i, 1994
Golden Eagles fly into Greenville
Pmgiiosticators
Dave Pond � ECU 10
TEC Sports Editor
ECU 27 USM 17
"Pirates correct last Saturday's
mistakes. Junior sets record in
action-packed game
Brad Oldham�ECU1
WZMB Sports Director, TEC
Asst. Sports Editor
ECU 21 USM20
"Whoever loses definitely will
not be going to the Libery
Bowl
Chris Justice � ECU 4
WCTI-TVI2 Sports Director
ECU 22 USM 18
"Junior breaks the record, the
Pirates break thorugh by
winning a close one
Brian Bailey � ECU8
WNCT-TV9 Sports Director
ECU 24 USM 16
"Junior shatters rushing record
and scores three touchdowns
Phil Werz � ECU 2
WITN -TV 7Sports Director
ECU 23 USM 21
"Pirates pissed that they are 1
2 instead of 3-0
Ian Eastman-ECU14
SGA President
ECU 31 USM 17
"Pirate offense comes alive
Maureen Rich-ECU3
7"EC Managing Editor
ECU 24 USM 21
"If the Pirates could slather
some glue on their hands for this
game, they'll win
TECGUEST PICKER
Heather Hariey - ECU10
Manager Wild Bird World
ECU 24 USM 14
"Go Pirates! Shoot down the
Golden Eagles
Please, no wagering.
As the Pirates (1-2) are coming
off of a tough 2118 loss to the Syra-
cuse Orangemen, Jeff
I By Dave Bower Southern Miss
hmtor Golden Eagles (2-2)
come to town alter hav-
ing their wings clipped by Texas
A&M, 41-17. A win for the Pirates
would place them in a tie for first place
in the Liberty Bowl Alliance, but a loss
would put them a game-and-a-half out
of the top spot.
Last time these two squads met,
USM rallied from a 10-3 third-quarter
deficit, winning 24-16 in Hattiesburg,
Miss. ECU held the Eagles to just 168
total offensive yards, but the Pirates
had three interceptions, two fumbles
and 92 penalty yards working against
them.
In 1994, USM has beaten Tulane
(25-10) and Memphis (20-3). Both op-
ponents are Liberty Bowl alliance
members. Their two losses have come
against Texas A&M and Virginia Tech
(24-14).
This year's defensive unit has
drastically improved their statistics
from a season ago. The unit, led by
preseason All-American DT Michael
Tobias (6-3, 275). has allowed just
19.5 points per game (down from 28.3)
and gives up an average of just 151
passing yards (down from 268.6).
LB Eugene Harmon (6-0. 220)
leads the squad with 45 tackles, while
DE Robert Brown (6-2, 245) is well
on his way to becoming USM's all-
lime single-season sack leader. He
has six through the Golden Eagles
first four games, and the record is just
ten (Chris Jackson 1983).
USM is also plus nine in the
takeaway-turnover category, much
better than their ratio of minus eight
a season ago.
FS L.T. Gulley (5-11, 185) is
tied with Tobias for second on the
team in tackles with 31, and leads
the Golden Eagles with 3 intercep-
tions
On offense, junior Chris
Buckhalter (6-0, 180) has averaged
just under 90 rushing yards a game
this year, after totalling just 212 dur-
ing all of 1993.
FB Howard McGee has added
160 yards on just 20 carries, but 60
of those yards came on one run. Both
backs have the ability to explode out
of the backfield.
Senior Tommy Waters (6-1.210)
lines up under center for USM, and
will come to Greenville after totalling
587 passing yards and 5 TDs through
the first four games. However, he has
thrown 4 INT's already.
Waters' main targets this year
have been WRs Mark Montgomery
and Fred Brock. Montgomery (6-1,
180) has 16 receptions for 176 yards
so far, while Brock (5-10, 175) has 8
receptions for 120 yards and 2 TDs.
On special teams, punter Chris
Courtew nf Southern Miv. SID
Fred Brock has been the big-play WR
for QB Tony Waters and USM this year
Pierce (5-1 i, 190) has averaged 37.5
yards on 31 punts, with his longest punt
traveling 50 yards.
However. PK Johnny Lomoro is
just 2 of 7 on field goal attempts, and
is in danger of losing his position to
Pierce.
The Golden Eagles have worked
out their rebuilding problems from a
year ago, and will bring their newfound
confidence to Greenville on Saturday.
The Pirates will have to be ready, be-
cause USM has scored 40 percent of
their 1994 point total in the first quar-
ter.
Southern Miss OFFENSE
Southern Miss DEFENSE
WR: 81 Ryan Pearson
LT: 68 Brent Duggins
LG: 77Rod011ison
C: 54 Kenny Ray
RG: 63 Coty Jones
RT' 72 Tim Metevia
TE: 86 Scott Harper
QB: 17 Kevin Bentley
TB: 36 Chris Buckhalter
FB: 35 Ronald Jones
WR: 80 Adam Kennedy
87 Mark Montgomery
70 Mark Byrd
51 David Clemmons
56 Will Symes
75 James Doresy
73 Jeremy Lindley
83 Larry Norton
10 Rickey Carroll
38 Howard McGee
7 Fred Brock
OLB: 32 Albert McRae
LT: 90 Quentin Jackson
DE: 99 Steve Latson
RT: 94 Michael Tobias
ILB: 43 Marchant Kenney
DE: 48 Robert Brown
OLB: 22 Eugene Harmon
CB: 18 Derrick Hervey
CB: 3 Rod Thomas
FS: 29 L.T. Gulley
SS: 30 Melvin Ratcliff
46 Terry Nunn
74 Melvin Winn
58 Jamie McPherson
52 Kendell Dunn
57 Cedric Walthaw
98 James Robinson
49 Deke Adams
5 LaBarion Rankins
23 Alvin Dempsey
13 Shaun Gamble
20 Roy Stabler





October i, iwi
TEC End Zone
Page 3
'Crumpler' synonymous with 'legend' at ECU
For as long as their will be
football at East Carolina Univer-
� � sit. Carlester
By Brad
()i dham Grumpier. Sr. will al-
vssistani vwis been men-
,1,m,R tinned in the same
breath as one of the greatest run-
ning backs to ever play here. He is
a living legend of Greenville. He's
attended school here, raised a fam-
ily here, watched his own name-
sake mature into an NFL tight end.
and helped other people at ECl all
along the way. In everything he
does, class and pride shine through.
Now. as Grumpier is watch-
ing senior running hack Junior
Smith inch closer and closer to
breaking his all-time career rush-
ing record here at ECU, he remem-
bers back to his glory days from
over two decades ago. when
Crumpler was making history on
the gridiron of Ficklen Stadium.
"1 never really thought about
the record as 1 was approaching it
Crumpler said. "Yet. I had never
even thought about it until a few
years ago about how long it has
stood. 1 guess that I accomplished
more than I thought 1 had at the
period of time which ! did it. I'm
real honored that its held so long.
It's a thing of pride and when your
trying to accomplish something
you do the best that you can, and
to know that standard has stayed
for nearly twenty years, its got to
be an honor and I'm really proud
of it
A member of the ECU Ath-
letics Hall of Fame, his perfor-
mance on the field during the
1971-1973 seasons earned him
respect nationwide. He was an
Honorable Mention AH-American
in 1972 and 1973. He was voted
Southern Conference Athlete of
the year in 1972. Crump made the
All-State team two years and
played in the Blue-Gra All-Star
Classic in 1973. He would go on
to be a fourth round draft choice
bv the Buffalo Bills.
His name on the rushing
records here at FCC dominate the
pack. Not only is he the current
career rushing leader with 2,889
vards. he is the career carries leader
with 658. In 1972 alone. Crump
carried the ball 340 times. He's the
touchdown leader of ECU. with 37.
His 1.042 yards his senior year is
the most ever for a senior Pirate. His
career average of 90.3 yards per
game is the highest in school his-
tory. In 1972, Crumpler had a
school record six consecutive 100
yard games. He would go on to have
nine that season, and left ECU with
a record 14 one hundred yards or
more rushing games in his career.
With Smith just 41 yards away
from breaking the career rushing
record, Crumpler reflects on him
both as a person and a player break-
Junior Smith
ing his record.
"I've been a person � and I
don't want to sound cocky about it.
� but a person of character and one
who wanted to represent my family
well, as well as East Carolina Uni-
versity Crumpler said. "You like to
think that anyone fhat'sthinks that
way, that they'd have the same kind
of values. Junior Smith has that. He's
a Christian, he works hard. Every-
body always told him he was too
small to do this and do that, yet he
has proven everybody wrong no
matter where he goes from here.
Every time he's been given a chance
he's always proven himself
East Carolina OFFENSE
East Carolina DEFENSE
WR: 82 Mitchell Galloway
LT: 51 Ken Carroll
LG: 59 Jamie Gray
C: 58 Derrick Leaphart
RG: 78 Terry Tilghman
RT: 61 RonSuddith
TE: 83 Dwight Linville
QB: 5 Marcus Crandell
HB: 23 Jerris McPhail
FB: 35 Junior Smith
SE: 11 Allen Williams
1 Jason Nichols
67 Shane McPherson
73 Jamie Gilray
78 Terry Tilghman
77 Charles Boothe
74 Mark McCall
90 Scott Richards
9 Dan Gonzalez
82 Mitchell Galloway
23 Jerris McPhail
20 Linwood DeBrew
OLB:9 Willie Brookins
DT: 96 Walter Scott
NG: 57 John Krawczyk
DT: 45 Lorenzo West
OLB: 7 Morris Foreman
WLB: 81 MarkLibiano
MLB: 33 B.J. Crane
CB: 18 Hank Cooper
CB: 3 Emmanuel McDaniel
FS: 30 Dwight Henry
55: 22 Daren Hart
40 Daniel Russ
69 Robert Santiago
94 Aaron Black
66 Jeff Griffin
84 Leonard Graham
53 Carlos Biown
39 Melvin Burke
21 David Hart
17 David Crumbie
21 David Hart
6 E.J. Gunthrope
FAST FACTS
Game Location: Greenville
Opponent:Southern Mississippi
Golden Eagles
Game Site: Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium
Kickoff: 4 p.m.
Head Coach: Jeff Bower
(13-20-1 career, 13-20-1 at
SU)
Key Players (1994 stats to date):
QB Tommy Waters
(61-124, 587 yds 5 TDs)
DT Michael Tobias
(31 tackles, 2 sacks)
RB Chris Buckhalter
(84 carries, 355 yards, 1 TD)
FSL.T. Gulley
(31 tackles. 3 I NTs)
Notes:
� Gulley, a junior, has also
returned 6 kickoffs for an 18.3
average, and eight punts for 7.8
a yard average.
� USM's kicker Johnny
Lomaro has made just 2 of 7
field goals in 1994.
� Southern Misswon the
last meeting between the two
squads, a 24-16 victory over the
Pirates in 1993 in Hattiesburg.
� USM leads their series
with ECU 15-4, and has only
lost once (8-1) in Greenville.
Compiled B Dave Pond





Page 4
TEC End Zone
October i. i"�4
Hart instills changes to better Pirate athletics
Dave Hart Jr ECU's Direc-
tor of Athletics, has to meet many
criteria for his job.
I By Warren He has to have or-
SlMNER i 1,11
Istaffwri.hr gamzational skills,
the ability to make
tough decisions and the integrity
to run his program. But one qual-
ity that is important for Hart is pa-
tience.
It is common knowledge that
ECU is not exactly high on the to-
tem pole of athletic budgets. ECU
is a proverbial small in the big
pond of Division i athletic pro-
grams. Hart and his administra-
tion are forced to work harder for
fund-raising, obtaining confer-
ence affiliations and public rela-
tions in order to improve his pro-
gram on the national level.
This hard work has brought
Hart respect on this level, and he
has been courted to leave ECU by
a number of larger schools, most
recently Maryland. Hart has de-
cided to stay with the Pirates to
see through some of the renova-
tions that he has brought about in
his tenure. However, he makes no
suggestions that the decision he
made was an easy one.
"Sure, when opportunities
arise, you have to look at them
Hart said. "It would be not telling
the truth to say that it wasn't a
tough decision. I've been here for
twelve years, so I don't feel that I
have to defend my loyalty to
ECU. I've never sought another
job, I have always been ap-
proached. Yes. the situation at
Maryland warranted a hard look,
but I still feel extremely excited
about the commitment we've
made here at ECU
Hart said that one major fac-
tor in his decision to stay is the
prospect of conference affiliation
for the football program. He said
that the process of ECU's possible
entry into the Metro conference
is being slowed at the presiden-
tial level by the institutions cur-
rently in the fold of the affiliation.
'Our position has not football game with N.C. State. The
changed Hart said. "I feel we have two teams ended their contract af-
represented our institution and our ter the 1987 season after a so-called
athletics program in a professional "riot" by ECU fans. The teams' last
and positive light; basically, we meeting was in the 1991-2 season
have done all that we can do at the Peach Bow 1 in Atlanta, where
Hart said that there are several ECU defeated the Wolfpack in a
factors, both positive and negative, come-from-behind victory. The
that could play im i meeting was a tre-
the conference's
decision to add
the Pirates. He
lists the weak eco-
nomic and expo-
sure capability in
ihe area as a sig-
nificant hurdle to
overcome, but
feels that the ex-
pansions cur-
rently manifest-
ing on the cam-
pus will help the
school's chances
tremendously.
mendous financial
success, prompting
fans to call for re-
newal of the series.
Hart is excited
about the prospect
of that resumption,
but wants it done
under the right cir-
cumstances.
"We have be-
gun again with for-
mal conversations
with N.C. State.
There isn't a doubt
in my mind that the N.C. State vs.
"There are currently $! 20 mil- ECU matchup could be the biggest
lion in facility improvements tak- game in North Carolina. We would
ing place or planned for as we certainly love to see that happen, but
speak Hart said. "That is a signifi- not any cost
cant commitment. And anytime you Hart said the program is con-
are the pursuer rather that the pur- sidering a proposal that the two
sued, you need to do the best job teams meet in Charlotte every year,
you can in promoting the best im- but the priority would be the estab-
age possible lishment of a "home and home" se-
Right now, one of the subjects ries with the A CC team,
being pursued by Hart and the pro- "We are very interested in
gram is the resumption of an annual playing in Charlotte, but that does
Dave Hart, Jr.
USM's
"Black
Attack"
The Southern
Miss defensive
unit returns 22
lettermen from
last season's
squad. They ar?
led on the field
b Ali-
American
candidate
Michael Tobias.
'iurt(r of
.Vnjlhtxn Mis, SID
not preclude our interest in play-
ing in Greenville he said. "Our
proposal is that by the game
would be played, we would
have a stadium sized to accom-
modate 50,000, so there would
be no viable argument for them
not to play here
Hart is optimistic about
ECU's athletic future, and saj s
he has cause to be. Hart said that
some proposals made for the
program 11 years ago have be-
come realities and that they
seemed just as impossible to
meet as the ones set for the pro-
gram now
"We have a comprehenshe
non-revenue sports program,
with 19 intercollegiate sports
teams we are very proud of. We
have enhanced women's sports.
All these goals have been tough
and are ongoing. But we've
come a long way
Hart said he is particularly
grateful towards the ECU stu-
dent body for providing the level
of support they have shown dur-
ing his tenure.
"I can't name another stu-
dent body in the nation that
shows the level of support ours
does during football season. As
long as I have been here, the stu-
dents have been that way, and its
just great. Now, we need to get
the students just as supportive of
basketball
"To try to show our appre-
ciation to the students for that
support, when the renovation to
Minges is complete, the entire
downstairs section of the facil-
ity will be for students Hart
said. "We arc going to try to go
through IFC and some of the
other student groups on campus
to try to get the suidents out in
force. Except for a lew occasions
our experience with student fans
has been great and we want it to
be a tun atmosphere but con-
trolled where we don't have a
few create a negative we want
it to be wild and loud





October 1.1994
TEC End Zonk
Pages
Santiago makes
huge impression
on Pirates
Roberto Santiago, a 6-2, 300
lb. true freshman from Haekensack,
INJ.(HS)hasbeen
By Aaron e( f :okes
Wilson
STAFF WRITER ab�Ut h�S Wei�ht
all his life. Fat
jokes don't bother Santiago, even if
they do come from teammates and
coaches.
"I have been hearing about it
my whole life and it hasn't bothered
me yet he said. "I don't let criti-
cism bother me. I just go out there
and do what I have to do
The struggle to get into play-
ing shape has been an ongoing one
for Santiago. When he came down
over the summer to condition
Santiago weighed 335 lbs. With the
help of strength and conditioning
coach Jeff Connors, he trimmed
down to 318 lbs prior to fall camp.
As of last week . Santiago was at
300 lbs and continues to shed
weight
"Coming down early was a big
advantage for me as far as getting
used to Greenville and getting in
shape Santiago said. "My team-
mates really accepted me and made
me feel at home. Lorenzo West
and B J. Crane are great guys, and
Fm very thankful to them for letting
me stay with them
Playing as a true freshman is
no easy task, but making a transi-
tion to the defensive line after pri-
marily being an offensive player
makes it even harder.
Santiago is backing up John
Krawczyk at nose tackle, and saw
his first collegiate action against
Temple.
In high school, the All-State
Santiago was recruited by West Vir-
ginia, Syracuse. Tulane. and
Rutgers, but chose ECU.
"Coach Pagano was very up
front and honest with me Santiago
said. "I felt comfortable with him
If Santiago can continue to
improve, he should cause big
problems for the opposition.
Brookins becomes ECU defensive force
Willie Brookins. a 6-1. 240
lb. junior college transfer from NE
I Oklahoma A&M
B Aaron js a prominent im-
scutes Pact player on the
Pirate delense.
Brookins is a cross between an end
and an outside linebacker, a
Lawrence Taylor type of football
player who loves to put the heat on
the quarterback. Brookins has been
highly successful so far as a Pirate
being selected as a member of the
All-Independent by the Football
News.
Brookins" si.e makes it a
challenge for him playing against
much larger players. "At this posi-
tion it requires you to be physical
and aggressive to battle with big
offensive linemen that have a
weight advantage Brookins said.
"My speed gives me the freedom
to rush the quarterback and get up
field
Speed is something Brookins
has plenty of. running a 4.65 for
NFL scouts on Pro Timing day this
past Spring.
Technique and strategy are
necessary attributes for Brookins
at line play. "My favorite tech-
nique is the outside speed rush
Brookins said. "I sometimes
bullrush because offensive line-
man expect me to go outside all of
the time because I have good
quickness, so they jump outside to
cut me off. that is when I cut in-
side and push them back to the
quarterback Brookins strength is
often underestimated because of
his size, but he bench presses 405
pounds and inclines presses 340
pounds.
These talents have been
useful tor Brookins, but rushing the
quarterback is something he has
been doing at every school he has
played for. At Suncoast High
School in West Palm Beach.
Florida, he was ,
fensive Player o
"I have al
rusher even tin
aided their De-
he Year.
; been a pass
some people
PtliiIoh Han.ld Wi
In his senior season, Pirate DE Willie Brookins has made his presence
felt, collecting a sack-and-a-half, 16 tackles and forcing a fumble.
have wanted me to play linebacker
Brookins said. "I am a physical, ag-
gressive player and a linebacker is
more of a thinking position. I just
want to get out there on the corner
and chase the quarterback all day.
Some people look at my size and
personality and are surprised I play
so hard with so much intensity
Recruiting attention was al-
ways present for Brookins in to high
school. "I was recruited by Michi-
gan St Florida. West Virginia, and
the University of Georgia
Brookins said. "They were on me
pretty hard but I didn't have the aca-
demic requirements to attend those
colleges at the time To continue
his football career Brookins chose
NE Oklahoma A&M. a junior col-
lege in Macalester, Okla.
His experience there w as both
successful and enjoyable as
Brookins won a nation Jl'CO
championship, lettering two seasons
and totaling seven sacks, a fumble
recovery, and a blocked punt as a
sophomore. "Mike Lloyd (head
coach at NE Oklahoma A&M) is a
really good coach who respects his
players to the utmost Brookins
said. "He really cared about us and
treated his coaching staff and player
as men. Respect was a big thing on
our team. All the guys were close
w ith each other, one big family. We
fought through a lot of hard times
together
After the culmination of his
JL'CO career, the recruiting process
started all over again. "There were
quite a few schools but they wanted
me to play a true linebacker posi-
tion. I was going to do that at one
point at NEO but I didn't like it
Brookins said. "Iowa University
wanted me to play linebacker as
well as Georgia and Georgia South-
ern University
His decision to attend ECU
See BROOKINS page 8





Pai;f 6
TEC End Zone
(( TOBFR 1. W4
Former track star shines on ECU gridiron
Safety In definition, means
security, impregnability, a safe-
I guard. In football, a
m AvRON safety serves sev-
WlLSON , "
STAFi writer eral purp.�cv. in-
cluding defensh e
signal caller, pass coverage and
run supporl Musi importantly, the
safety is the last line of'detense be-
tween the line of scrimmage and
the end one
The ideal person to put back
there is someone who can run last
enough to cut off opposing ball
carriers and who has enough re-
covery speed to make up for his
teammate's mistakes and prevent
lon� tuns and passes. Fortunately,
ECU is blessed with Dv ight
Henry, a tree safet) who has speed
to burn
Henry hails from Ft. Lauder-
dale. Florida's Plantation High
School, deep in the hotbed that is
Florida high school football. Ev-
ery year blue-chip athletes come
out of the hot Florida sun to ma-
triculate at big-time football
schools all over the country.
This type of stiff competition
is what breeds top athletes, espe-
cially at the skill positions. The
weather allows for yearlong train-
ing in outdoor sports like track and
field and football. Henry thrived
in this competitive atmosphere.
w inning the state championship in
the 400 meters, and he made the
All-Blowhard County team in his
senior year while rushing for over
800 yards.
He showed his versatility by
playing free safety, cornerback,
running back, wide receiver, and
kick returner. This blend of speed
and versatility that attracted col-
lege recruiters and. ultimately,
brought Henry to ECU.
Unlike most of ECU's foot-
ball players, Dwight Henry partici-
pates in two sports. Last year, dur-
ing his freshman season, he let-
tered in both football and track. He
enjoyed a great deal of success in
both starting seven games and fin-
ishing with 41 total tackles, in-
cluding 29 solos
He also made one tackle tor
a loss and deflected two passes.
In track, he won the 400 meters
at the Colonial Athletic sst.ela-
tion Championships with a
record time "I 46.97 and ran the
anchor leg foi ECU's champion
1C4A 4X100 and 4X400 rela)
teams.
"Track reall helps me to
develop speed and endurance,
he said. Running short tiis
tances helps me cover a lot ol
iund m a short period of
time
tlem .i soc ial work ma-
jor and wants to eventuall) work
with counseling youngsters in a
boy's club - so time man
agement and hard work on his
studies is essential for him to
balance two sports as well as his
academics.
Football is time consum-
ing, and track is not. Whenevei
1 was behind during football sea-
son. I could make up for it in
track season
Henry made an impressive-
debut against the Blue Dev ils. col-
lecting six tackles and knocking
down two passes, but most impres-
sive was his touchdown saving
tackle on Duke split end Jon Jensen
who was off to the races after a 75-
vard completion before being
caught from behind by the sopho-
more safety.
"First of all 1 knew I had to
catch him before he scored and as
soon as I caught it and started run-
ning down the sideline Henry
said. I knew 1 could catch up to
him
Henry runs a 4.36 in the 40
this season, .omparable to NFL
defensive backs.
"I have a tendency to rely too
heavily on my speed he said. "1
need to work on my anticipation
and be a little more aggressive. As
a unit we haven't changed much
of anything except for disguising
our coverages better and breaking
on the ball better
Ptimnh, Hjn.ld �i
I)�isht Henry has deflected two passes and intercepted another for the
Pirates this season. He also made a touchdov�n-savinS tackle against Duke.
Henry gives a lot of credit to
secondary coach Chuck Pagano
who formerly coached defensive
basks at Miami and was defensive
coordinator at L'NLV.
We couldn't ask for a better
coach he said. "1 feel he is the
best change our secondary could
possibly go through, and 1 have
definitely seen a dramatic im-
provement in the unit since he has
started coaching us
Henrv said that two things
motivate him on Saturday after-
noons � Coach Pagano's pre-
izame speeches and knowing his
girlfriend Christine is in the
stands cheering for him. Look
for big things in the future from
this young Pirate DB who should
be a fixture at the free safety po-
sition for the next three vears.
SUBSCRIBE TO
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October i, 1994
TEC End Zone
Page 7
Linville battles injury while filling All-American-size shoes
I By Scott
Batchelor
staff writer
The tight end is one of the key
components in any successful of-
fense, a fact proven
by Dallas' Jay
Novacek or
Pittsburgh's Eric
Green. After backing up Carlester
Crumpler, Jr. for the last two sea-
sons, Dwight Linville is ready and
willing to take over and man the
position for the Pirates.
Through the first three games
of this season, the Winston-Salem
native has already matched last
year's statistics. In 1993. Linville
collected three receptions for 36
yards. In the two Pirate road games
against Temple and Duke, he has
totalled four catches for 35 yards.
" I want to play a full four
quarters when I am one hundred
percent healthy he said. "Then I
will help the team become better
Linville was unable to play in
Saturday's home opener against the
Orangemen of Syracuse because of
a separated shoulder suffered in the
Pirates' win at Temple.
"After I made the reception. I
was tackled and my shoulder hit
the turf at a bad angle Linville
said. "Watching from the bench I
felt helpless. I wanted to go in the
game and help out
However, Linville will be in
the lineup for the purple and gold
when they square off with fellow
Liberty Bowl Alliance-member
Southern Mississippi.
"I feel I could have played
Saturday against Syracuse he
said, "However, the coaches didn't
want me to injury myself again. It's blocking and receiving he said
better to come back at one hundred "The tight end possesses a key role
percent
When
Linville dons his
jersey Saturday, he
will be ready to
make things hap-
pen, and plans on
using both his size
jf
and his speed to his
advantage.
"I consider
myself as a re-
ceiver he said. "I
try to run my routes
perfectly, so that I
can become a
weapon in the of-
fense
As a wide receiver in high
school, Linville used his speed to
amass 41 catches for 912 yards in
his last two seasons at North Forsyth
High School. Now, he deftly de-
ceives linebackers with that same
quickness (4.95-40 yard dash).
"The linebackers don't expect
me to get behind them as quickly
as I do. It is a definite advantage
for me Linville said.
The mobile Linville compares
his play to both receivers and tight
ends in the NFL.
As I said before, I think of
myself as a receiver. I look at Jerry
Rice San Francisco 49ers WR as
well as Brent Jones, the tight end
for the 49ers
Linville's role here at ECU is
well defined.
"I do a combination of both
-����-�-���-��������� P�L
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in this offensive scheme. The tight
end's number is
called often. I'd
say it is a 50-50
situation
All he
needs now is to
stay healthy,
and. in turn,
Linville's recep-
tion numbers
could start to go
through the
roof.
Linville
feels the Pirates
have what it
takes to be suc-
cessful, even though they possess a
not so impressive 1-2 record.
"We have to learn to win he
said. "All we have to do is cross that
barrier where we come out on top
in a close game. You know, it is not
a long process. All it takes is one
Dwight Linville
game to start the ball rolling
He hopes this Saturday's game
versus USM will be the one that
puts the Pirates on the winning
track. USM currently stands at 2-2,
and a win over the Golden Eagles
would put ECU in the thick of
things in the Liberty Bowl alliance
standings. -
However, a loss would put
them one-and-a-half games behind
Southern Miss, a possible back-
breaking situation from which re-
covery is doubtful.
"We are going in to this game
as if it were the Liberty Bowl itself
Linville said. "This is do or die. We
have to come aw ay wrth a win and
that is what we plan on doing
Saturday's game will be put-
up or shut-up' for ECU. If Linville
has his way, and all goes according
to Coach Logan's plan, the Pirates
will take a big step in prolonging
their season until December 31 �
when they will play in the Liberty
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Page 8
TEC End Zone
October i. iwi
BROOKINS
was determined by two factors:
playing time and geographic loca-
tion. "I felt like coming out of
JUCO. one of the main things is to
get in to a program where I would
get to play right off the bat. because
we only have two seasons of eligi-
bility Brookins said. "Another rea-
son was at NEO it was a 20 hour
drive home and ECU is an S hour
trip
At ECU. Brookins has
emerged as a leader. Fie started eight
games last season, making 61 tack-
les (41 solos) and five tackles for
losses, with seven and a half sacks.
Brookins also led the team in quar-
terback pressures. So far this sea-
son he has 18 tackles with one and
a half sacks, one forced fumble and
one tackle for a loss. Against
Temple, he had seven quarterback
pressures. 'I feel great playing
alongside such players with so
much talent like Walter Scott. John
Krawczyk. and Lorenzo West
Brookins said, 'it has helped me
playing beside guys that know their
responsibilities. Making plays
comes as a result of having good
players around you. For example,
if Walt takes on a trap and spills the
ball out to me that leaves me open
to make the tackle
Brookins sets high goals for
himself both on the field and in the
classroom. "One of the most impor-
tant goals for me is getting out of
here with a degree Brookins said.
"I don't want to not graduate and
feel like I have wasted 4 or 5 years
of my life. I am a Criminal Justice
major and a lot of my relatives are good to go out there and sack the
pretty prominent in law enforce- quarterback. Some people are not
ment. I would like to follow in their capable of playing at my level and
footsteps and have them help me get
acclimated to that job market after
graduation
The NFL is definitely one
of Brookins' driving ambitions.
Scouts from the Arizona Cardinals.
Tampa Ba Buccaneers, and New
Orleans Saints were at the Syracuse
game to scout him. They were
highly impressed by his hustle, ag-
gressiveness, and speed. "1 really
couldn't say much about my
chances of making it because I don't
know much about how they evalu-
ate college players Brookins said.
"My coaches have told me that
scouts have been pulling informa-
tion on me and are excited about
watching me play. It adds a little
pressure because I know the expec-
tations are a lot higher now
His size will likely mean a
change of position for Brookins
next season as a NFL rookie. "1 feel
at the Pro level that I would be at
an outside linebacker position and
I feel I am a good enough all pur-
pose player to play there Brookins
said. "If a team needs some one with
pass rushing skills and ability I can
fill that role. I have never played
linebacker before but I feel with my
speed I can adjust and play like a
Lawrence Taylor or Derrick Tho-
mas. Lawrence Taylor is a good role
model for me. Looking at him I see
myself, a good player who gets re-
spect from the other players. I see
aspects of him in myself. It feels
it makes me feel good as an athlete
kind of like a standout
Playing against Southern
Mississippi has Brookins excited
and raring to go.
"That is the type of offense I
have better games against rather
than complicated offenses with so
Cont. from
page5
many different responsibilities
Brookins said. "Physically I look
forward to playing basic, smash-
mouth football
Willie Brookins should be
able to make the transition to out-
side linebacker smoothly at the
next level. His speed and size
should make him a multi-talented
professional whether it is at line-
backer, end, or in a special teams
role.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 29, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 29, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1030
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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