The East Carolinian, September 22, 1994






Ttodav
Tomorrow
Lifestyle
Coming Attractions
What's going on downtown,
on-campus, and around the state?
Making weekend plans? Check
out our weekly Coming Attractions
feature, on page 9.
n
Hart Foundation"
ECU football twins have
opponents seeing double.
Check out page 11 for more
details on this dynamic duo.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 46
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 22,1994
14 Pages
Army ROTC cadets gain air-combat experience
By Susan Schwartz
Staff Writer
It is not very of ten that col-
lege students get to experience
on-the-job training while still in
school. It is even less often that
college students get to ride on
the Army's UH-60 L Black Hawk
helicopter, which is used to trans-
port troops into battle. But that
is exactly the experience that
ECU's Army ROTC students got
as part of their military training.
Last Friday, Sept. 16, the
ROTC was picked up at Belk
Field in Greenville. The students
were transported by two Black
Hawks flown by pilots of the
North Carolina National Guard,
to Camp Bonner, a Boy Scout
Camp near Aurora, North Caro-
lina. There, they conducted an
Air Assault Reconnaissance Op-
eration.
"In a Recon Mission, the
object is to take a look at what the
enemy is doing and report back
said Tom Earnhardt, ROTC Ca-
det Battalion Commander. "This
gives the combat unit the ability
to know what it is going to re-
quire for them to make an attack-
including guns, troops, ammuni-
tion and equipment.
"(The mission was ar-
ranged so that the groups landed
in Black Hawks and there was
actually an opposing force there
in place. There were two separate
and simultaneous missions go-
ing on.
Earnhardt said the training
was a huge success, with the ca-
dets receiving valuable on-hand
training.
"We were able to place se-
nior-level cadets in a new site with
radio control and they were able
to report back he said. "It was
Enrollment down
By Teri Howell
Staff Writer
From the looks of the
people who are swarmed
around the student store and
the bustle of backpacked stu-
dents, one would not guess that
the student enrollment at ECU
this fall is slightly down.
Last fall's enrollment
number totaled 17,728, but this
fall's count is 17,570, a differ-
ence of about one percent, said
Chancellor Richard R. Eakin.
Eakin said the decline
stems from a loss of continuing
students who may have opted
to sitout for the fall semester but
plan to return in the spring.
"To be down 158 is a small
number, said Eakin. "This is nor-
mal fluctuation; some years we
will be up, others we'll be down.
"We'd like to keep the num-
ber of students level said Eakin.
"We're able to predict with almost
certainty the number of students
that are coming in, but keeping it
the same is nearly impossible
Eakin said Pitt and Wake
counties had the highest count of
students enrolled at ECU this fall.
There are 2,147 from Pitt County
and 1,455 from Wake, Eakin said.
The remaining eight counties that
See DROP page 4
Eppes land purchase drags on
By Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
There is a simple solution
to the lack of space at ECU: buy
some land. Buying CM. Eppes
Middle School would allow ECU
to expand the campus borders to
accommodate the university's
larger population. However, the
purchase is still in the negotiat-
ing stages after five years.
According to Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for Busi-
ness Affairs, in December 1992,
the university received a letter
from the chairperson of the Pitt
County commissioners indicat-
ing that the commissioners sup-
ported the $5 million sale price of
the middle school to the univer-
sity. In the fall of 1993, the citi-
zens of Pitt Count' voted on and
passed a bond referendum,
which allowed ECU to buy the
middle school from the county for
$5 million. Then, in the spring of
1994, the Pitt County commission-
ers decided they could not sell the
school for $5 million, but instead
for $10 million because this was
the amount of money needed to
build a replacement for the school
without putting the burden on the
Pitt County taxpayers.
"The chairman endorsed the
referendum which was for S5 mil-
lion Brown said. "That's why
we were surprised when they in-
dicated they could no longer go
through with it. The county com-
missioners believe they need ad-
ditional funds to replace Eppes
school
Layton Getsinger, associate
vice chancellor for Business Af-
See LAND page 3
great practice for them to use
radio equipment and deal with
problems such as terrain
Earnhardt said the cadets
had to move through high
ground as well as low ground
and swamps. This slowed them
down and they had to deal ac-
cordingly. They were faced with
a myriad of problems and they
really handled themselves well.
"There were lessons
learned as well said Earnhardt.
"They learned to be stealthiul
and to communicate without
speaking by using hand and arm
signals. They also learned to
make quick, on-the-spot deci-
sions
Earnhardt felt that the mis-
sion gave the cadets the opportu-
nity to prove that they are not
only students at ECU, but profi
See ARMY page 4
Photo Courtesy of Tom Earnhardt
A UH 60 L Btackhawk approaches Belk Field to lift Army ROTC cadets to
Camp Bonner. CLTC Tom Earnhardt briefs soldiers prior to their
mission held last Friday afternoon.
Public Safety
prepares for game
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
The tailgating fields will
not be the alcohol haven they
have been in the past, with
tougher administration of the
law by ECU Public Safety.
According to Teresa
Crocker, director of Public
Sa fety, members of ECU's squad
will be collaborating with Alco-
hol Law Enforcement (A.L.E.)
to reduce the amount of under-
age drinking during pre-game
celebrations. Crocker felt that
students should be forewarned
that their identification will be
checked.
"The officers who are as-
signed to the parking lots will
ID the students Crocker
said.
Also on the topic of al-
cohol consumption, Crocker
warned that fans who are bla-
tantly drunk will not be al-
lowed into the stadium.
Gatekeepers will be check-
ing bags for illegal sub-
stances and alcohol.
"If you are obviously
drunk and disruptive, then
you aren't going to be al-
lowed inside the stadium
she said. "The alcohol is not
allowed inside the stadium
Crocker felt that mem-
bers of the ECU police team
will be taking a "pro-active
See SAFEpage 4
Profs win money
for excellence
Photo by Stuart Williams
Students should enter Gate 5 located on the north
side of the stadium, beneath the student sections.
Students must present their valid identification
cards to be admitted into the stadium.
By Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Often the work of professors
goes unnoticed and unappreciated,
taking the back burner to criticism
by students. However, three ECU
professors were recently honored
with $1,000 Teaching Excellence
Awards.
Dr. Jonathan B. Bascom, as-
sistant professor of geography, re-
ceived the Robert L. Jones Award
for Teaching Excellence. Dr. C.
Rebecca Brent, assistant professor
of education, received the Mavs
Award for Teaching Excellence. Dr.
Rita R. Reaves, assistant professor
of industrial technology, was the
first recipient of the J.C Bradford-
Singleton-Blackwood Award.
The winners were selected by
the Teacher Effectiveness Council
(a committee of the Faculty Senate)
from as many as 30 applicants. The
council consisted of 12 alumni, fac-
ulty and administrators.
The awards are designed to
honor professors who are effective
teachers. The council looked for
professors who displayed good or-
ganization of subject matter and
course, effective communication,
knowledge of and enthusiasm for
the subject ma tterand teaching, and
positive attitudes toward students.
Professors were alsojudged on fair-
ness in examinations and grading,
flexibility in approaches to teach-
ing and appropriate student learn-
ing outcomes.
"The awards are a notion
of excellence in teaching said
Dr. Patricia J. Anderson, chair of
the Faculty Senate.
Anderson, a 1984-85 win-
ner of a teaching excellence
award, feels that to be a good
professor, it is necessary to be an
effective teacher.
"The winners are highly
respected by colleagues and well-
deserving of the award said
Anderson. "They are the bright-
est and best of our teachers
The awards were named
for individuals who have pro-
vided ECU with support through
financial assistance and sen-ice.
Robert L. Jones, for whom
one of the awards was named,
was a member of the ECU Class
of '58. Jones served as chairper-
son of the ECU Board of Trust-
ees, and also as Chairman of the
Board of Governors of the North
Carolina System.
The Mays award is named
for Robert and Liana
Worthington-Mays, both mem-
bers of the Class of'51. Robert
Mays is a former president of the
Alumni Association, and recipi-
ent of the 1973 Outstanding
Alumni Award.
A new award, given for the
first time this year, was named
for Carl Blackwood and Wes
Singleton and the J.C. Bradford
Company. Thisaward recognizes
See WINpage 3
People on
the Street
Q. Do you care that
the major league
baseball season has
been canceled due
to the strike?
"Major league baseball
players are too greedy.
They should bring in
minor league players to
replace them with a
standing salary cap
"Yes, I feel it is ridiculous
that players are taking
for granted how much they
make. There are people
out there like firefighters
saving lives, that will
Photos by Leslie Petty
Shane Pongpairoj, junior. nftver make that much
"Because of the loss of
jobs, for example the food
vendors at the games and
promotional employees,
all have to suffer due to
the strike Sarah Vestal,
senior. .
"I think it is sad that
America's so called
favorite sport will not be
held this year. I can not
believe there is going to
be no World Series
Nicole Ashi, freshman.





2 The East Carolinian
September 22, 1994
Making shellfish into paper: NCSU researchers have devel-
oped the process
A polymer found in shellfish, known as chitosan, can
i iow be converted into fluffy cotton-like fibers and formed into
paper. It may even be better than paper made from trees
because chitosan paper looks and feels like regular paper, but
is stronger wet or dry. The polymer may also have medical
uses. Tests have shown it is effective in helping to heal wounds.
One researcher believes there will be an industry based en-
tirely on chitosan within the next ten years.
Wide receiver under investigation for talking to the "pros"
Acting on a tip from the NCAA, the University of Texas
will investigate wide receiver Lovell Pinkney on charges that
he made a trip to Los Angeles to visit a sports agent earlier this
year. School officials have hired a private investigator, and if
found guilty, the player may be declared ineligible to play for
the remainder of his college career. Pinkney and a fellow
player have already been suspended once this year for accept-
ing a rental car free of charge for over one month.
Freshman chooses boys over bids
Jennifer Drew lost a bid to join Alpha Delta Pi after being
quoted in her school newspaper as saying meeting men was
the main reason she was rushing. Drew had already been
offered the bid which she told the reporter she planned to
accept. The sorority withdrew the bid the day after the article
ran. She is now ineligible to rush for at least one semester, and
because of her new celebrity status, has requested that her
phone number be unlisted.
Former player suing University of Miami over a broken
promise
Bryan Fortray is suing his former coach and the Univer-
sity of Miami because he said he was promised the position as
top quarterback for the Hurricanes. Fortray, 22, said head
coach Dennis Erickson promised him the quarterback posi-
tion for the 1991 season, but named Gino Torretta, who ended
up winning the Heisman trophy, to the job instead. Fortray is
suing for $1 million claiming the university damaged his
chances for pro football.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Students urged to join voters
By Jon Cawley
Staff Writer
For three-quarters of a cen-
tury, the League of Women Vot-
ers has worked to ensure voting
rights and keep the governmen-
tal process accessible to the gen-
eral public. This year, the League
celebrates its 75th anniversary.
The League of Women Vot-
ers led the struggle for women's
suffrage, ran citizenship schools
and in the 1930s worked for the
passage of mother and infant
health care, child labor laws and
against McCarthyism.
More recently, the League
has worked very hard on a cam-
paign finance reform law, and
has done pesticide studies that
have influenced schools to go to
non-toxic pest control, said Su-
san Meggs, head of membership
for the League of Women Vot-
ers.
"The work the league has
historically done to register
people to vote is not as impor-
tant now, with easy voter pro-
grams at courthouses and
DMVs Meggs said. "The
League concentrates now on get-
ting issues out in the open in a
totally non-partisan way
According to the League's
brochure, the League is a strictly
non-partisan and semi-political
organization that does not sup-
port or oppose any candidate or
political party.
The multi-issuo organiza-
tion works to ach: e positive
solutions to today's problems,
research, study and take action
on policy issues, produce infor-
mative publications on the is-
sues while working to educate
and inform all citizens about the
issues, encourage citizen partici-
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"The League is a grassroots
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September 22, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
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LAND
fairs, said he thought the county
could be passing up a good deal.
"There's only one buyer in
this community that could pay $5
million and give them a reasonable
turn on the investment Getsinger
said.
Getsinger said the neighbor-
hood surrounding the school is
aging, and does not have the stu-
dents to support the school.
"The neighborhood is no
longer the same that supported the
school Getsinger said. "They
could locate it someplace else and
service the needs of the commu-
nity
Getsingersaid theState Prop-
erty Office in Raleigh represented
ECU and other state universities
when the schools wanted to ac-
quire properties. The office evalu-
ated the middle school and i ts prop-
erty and decided the fair market
value was between $4 and $6 mil-
lion.
"The State Property Office is
like our real estate agent
Getsinger said. "Thev negotiated
the $5 million sale price
Getsinger said ECU and Pitt
County originally had a hand-
shake agreement in 1989 over the
terms for buying and selling the
school. Before the university's re-
quest for the monev could pass
through the N.C. General Assem-
bly, the state went into a recession.
The recession caused the state to
tighten its budget, leaving no
money for the university.
"The money was not there,
though we struck a gentlemen's
agreement Getsinger said. "I
don't think it was brought to writ-
ing because, at the time, we thought
it would be a quick closure
Since the state of North Caro-
lina is the actual buyer of the prop-
erty, the university is not able to
raise the offer price.
"The state has only provided
S5 million Brown said. "No other
resources are readily available
However, Brown said the
university has recently been able
to offer the county a compromise.
"As a compromise, we of-
fered to postpone taking acquisi-
tion of the property for five years,
even though we would be buying
it now Brown said. "This was to
Cont. from
page 1
WIN
the relationship between the
t iniversity and the business com-
munity.
Dr. Reaves, first-time winner
of thenew award, wasdelighted to
be chosen as the recipient.
"I felt special. My mother
graduated from East Carolina
Teachers College in 1945 Reaves
said. "It meant a lot to me on a
personal level.
"Itwasagreatsurprisetome.
I know, as director of the Writing
Across the Curriculum Program,
how many outstanding teachers
there are Reeves said.
Reaves stressed that her
teaching environment, and the sup-
port she receives from the School of
Industry and Technology have
helped to make her a more effec-
tive teacher.
The Teaching Excellence
Awards were presented by the ECU
Alumni Association at the annual
faculty convocation on August 22.
Continued from page 1
give the school district time to plan
and build its new middle school
Brown said though ECU
wanted the middle school prop-
erty, the university may have to
use its $5 million elsewhere.
"The university will continue
to discuss with the county com-
missioners as long as thev pursuea
resemble resolution Brown said.
"Ultimately, we will need to deter-
mine how to spend these funds
Brown said ECU is sur-
rounded by residential areas which
leavecampus little room toexpand
and remain contiguous. Therefore,
the university is more interested in
land than buildings. Purchasing
the middle school property which
is behind and adjoining College
Hill, would be a prime addition.
"The primary interest is not
so much for the building, but the
property Brown said. "It's 19acres
of land. The building would need
substantial renovations for use by
the university
Brown said the building
would initially be used for reloca-
tion.
"We would use it as a place to
relocate departments and functions
as we repair and renovate build
ings that currently house those
operations Brown said.
Getsinger said the middle
school would eventually be torn
down and replaced by a new build
ing. Though for now and for the
initial relocation phase, the univer-
sity would benefit financially by
purchasing the building.
"Building a building is a lot
more expensive than purchasing
the building Getsinger said.
Getsinger also said the uni
versify has had a master plan for
the campus since 1992. This plan
projects the needed growth of the
campus for the increasing popu-
lationof students and faculty dur
ing the next 15 years. In this plan,
the main campus will become a
"core of education having only
classrooms, labs and faculty of-
fices. On the perimeters of cam-
pus like the middle school prop-
erty, buildings will be constructed
to house student services such as
housing and financial aid in a more
centralized area for student con-
venience.
News
Writers
Thanks for the
hard work and
for not missing
your deadline
(well, some of
you).
Don't forget the
meeting today
at 4:40 p.m.
VOTE
Cont. from
page 2
said. "The local, state and na-
tional system really works, and
what we've got is a body of posi-
tions on national issues that all
members agree on such as hu-
man rights, world peace, voter
rights and open meeting laws
According to Meggs, the
League provides individuals
with the opportunity to become
directly involved in the political
process.
"Making wrongdoings
public is very empowering, let-
ting all of us have a roll in keep-
ing the government working in a
clean and open manner she
said. "The League gives power
and access to the government
process that few can have as in-
dividuals
The League is planning
many activities to bring atten-
tion to the 75th anniversary. The
national group has already had
Hillary Clinton and Janet Reno
speak in Washington, D.C and
every state is doing different
things, Meggs said.
Nationally, a number of T-
shirts and posters will be distrib-
uted. The League is currently
working on a poster collage fea-
turing a number of historic pho-
tographs depicting the history
of the Suffragettes, Meggs said.
The North Carolina group
is planning a gala in March, and
several other activities are in the
works. To bring attention to the
up-coming elections, the Pitt
County League of Women Vot-
ers is holding candidate forums
at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 25 and Nov. 2 in
Rose High's auditorium. There
will also be a world population
forum with a U.N. report, fol-
lowing the Cairo summit at 7:30
p.m on October 18 in the Cedar
Lane Community building at J.C.
Park.
"We are also planning a fun
event for the International festi-
val we will have an American
desserts booth fund-raiser on
September 22nd in downtown
Greenville Meggs said.
In accordance with the 75th
anniversary, the League also
hopes to gain some new mem-
bers. The League has reduced its
membership fee from $35 to $15.
"Students would come to
the meetings and want to be
members, but the $35 was too
expensive, so we worked very
hard and the national office has
allowed the reduction just for
this year. We are hoping students
of any sex or affiliation will take
advantage of that Meggs said.
Meggs also points out that
it is interesting that almost one-
quarter of the League's mem-
bers are now men and are very
active.
The $15 membership cov-
ers communications and mail-
ing. A national magazine comes
out four times a year and covers
the hot topics the League will be
working on, said Meggs.
Organizations or groups of
people can team up and join un-
der one membership, however,
working with the League does
not require a membership. "We
want it to be more accessible to
students, and like a gift, any citi-
zen can be a member She said.
HE
H
Stores
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY MEETING
Thursday, 22nd
5:30 pm
GC 1031
m
Agenda:
Advisor Search
Program Planning
Social (Pizza & Drinks)
m





4 The East Carolinian
September 22, 1994
SAFE
Cont. from
page 1
stance" to halt prospective
problems.
Fans will be allowed into
thetailgating fields five hours
prior to the game (11 a.m. on
SatuTda). Once the game has
begun, all fans will either have
toenter the stadium or depart
from the fields.
"We'll also be making sure
that once the game begins, that
people who are left in the park-
ing lot are asked to leave
Crocker said. "We are hoping
toremove any problems that
we might have with people who
didn't have any intentions of
going to the game anyway
� Crocker said officers will
be' patrolling both the tailgat-
ing fields and the stadium on
foot, bike and in patrol cars.
During entrance into the
fiejds, fans will be given trash
bags, provided by the Athletic
Department. Crocker urges
people to use the bags to keep
up the appearance of the fields
and to help with clean-up.
"When the game's over,
there's trash everywhere she
said.
DROP
Cont. from
pagel
represent the bulk of students at
ECU are: Craven, 664; Wayne, 601;
Cumberland, 543; Lenoir, 517;
Beaufort, 471; Nash, 469; Onslow,
431; and Mecklenburg, 421.
Virginia and Maryland have
always been strong states in enroll-
ment, said Eakin, with Virginia's
count at 944, and Maryland's at
342.
Eakin said ECU is not wor-
ried about the small decline and
hopes that it will increase this
spring semester.
"Over the years, this univer-
sity has had more students drop
out after the freshman year, said
Eakin. "We have had a 70-75 con-
tinuation from freshmen entering
their sophomore year, and we met
our target of 2,400 freshmen this
fall
According to the 1993-94
ECU Facts Book, the women are in
the majority with 57 percent, men
at 43 percent. The 1993 enrollment
numbers totaled 8,078 for the
women and 6,429 for men.
Eakin said ECU is now seek-
ing to bolster the spring enroll-
ment to offset the small reduction
in students this fall semester.
ARMY
Continued from page 1
cient soldiers as well.
"The seniors have already had
some training, so the mission al-
lowed us to not only train, but to
show some of our talent he said.
'For such a huge operation, this
was a tremendous success because
it was good training and a lot of
fun
Like Earnhardt, Maj. James
Cook, professor of military science,
felt that the operation gave the ca-
dets real experience.
"This was great training. The
cadets planned and coordinated
everything and it allowed the new
cadets to be exposed to real Army
training Cook said.
According to Cook, ECU's
ROTC is one of the few ROTC units
that have worked with the state
national guard, which is valuable
for the group. After the mission,
Cook said the cadets had a chance
to calm down and enjoy themselves.
"This was the first chance I
had to work with these cadets over-
night Cook said. "I was able to
watch them work. They did a great
job. When it was over, we were able
to grill out, socialize a little and talk
about how well the training went.
This is fun stuff. A lot of soldiers in
the Army have never been able to
get out and ride in these helicop-
ters
Cook encourages others to
come out and see future missions.
"We will be doing a similar
training event in a couple of weeks
with the helicopters Cook said.
"Anyone w'hoiscurious to seew'hat
the inside of a Black Hawk looks
like can come and see the helicop-
ters. Faculty and staff are welcome
to come out to Belk Field and bring
their children along. The helicop-
ters will land and there will be a
short safety briefing by theNational
Guard pilots
The helicopters will land in
Belk Field on Charles Boulevard
on October 14 at 4:00 p.m.
"ROTC is a great opportu-
nity for students to see what the
Army is like and gain excellent
training experience Cook said.
Any student interested in
Army ROTC can enroll in military
science classes for two years with
absolutely no obligation to the
Army. The Military Science De-
partment is located on the third
floor of the Rawl Building.
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC BAR CERTIFIED
State Criminal Law Specialist
24 Hour Message Serv:ce
209 Evans Street
Adjacent to the Greenville Courthouse
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(J PLAYERS)
It's FUN!
Sign-Up for any of these 3 Qualifier Matches:
Register by:
Friday, Sept. 23 for Monday, Sept. 26 contest
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Friday, Oct. 14 for Monday, Oct. 17 contest
Register in 204 Christenbury Gym and pick up a rules sheet.
Here's what you can win:
Final 4 teams win NFL hats & T-shirts.
Campus winner advances to regional competition.
� National Championship will be held in Miami with
the winning team receiving Super Bowl XXIX
tickets.
Call Nelson at ECU Recreational Services (JZ8-0J87) for more details.
1
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September 22, 1994
The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Asst News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Kris Hoffler, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Brad Oldham. Asst Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Printed on
recycled
paper
Thomas Brobst. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Utters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
N&O apologizes to ECU (sort of)
Many of us at The East Carolinian were
excited to hear that the Raleigh News & Observer
published an editorial last Thursday that
apologized for its vicious attack on the
reputation of ECU.
However, after eagerly perusing a copy of
the paper, our excitement turned to dismay.
Anyone who has read the editorial can see
that this is obviously an attempt to appear to be
sorry for the story without really being sorry.
The editorial begins with another recitation of
the now infamous fraternity president's
remarks.
It then makes one of the best rebukes of
said president that we have yet seen: "Whoa,
son. Hope you enjoyed that trip to the
chancellor's office, because something tells us
you made one. "
The editorial then makes a few positive
statements about our "successful medical
school" and our "splendid arts program
This sounds like the beginning of a passable
apology. Unfortunately, the restof the editorial
is devoted to making "clear that the image
isn't entirely unjustified
The editors of the N&O missed the whole
point of why so many ECU students were
upset. Like most universities, ECU has some
elements that are not helping to promote a
positive image of the school.
What was disconcerting about the
original article was not the "revelation" that
some members of the ECU student body
party to excess. The main concern was the
transparent attempt of the original article to
make ECU appear to be unique in this matter.
The obvious pu rpose of the article was to
single out ECU fans and students as drunk,
stupid and dangerous to be around
(especially at football games). In writing and
publishing the story, the N&O forgot two of
the basic necessities for good reporting:
objectivity and truth.
This is the issue that the editors at the
N&O should be addressing. How did the
N&O think that story which quotes five
people out of a student body of over 17,000
(or about .03 of one percent) would give an
accurate picture of an institution. One could
surely go to any college in the country and
find a like proportion of any student body to
say similarly bad things about that school.
We bet we could find such a percentage of
N&O employees who would tell us all sorts
of bad things about that paper.
So to our editorial colleagues at the N&O,
keep trying. If you want forgiveness, you are
going to have to try harder next time.
Semester hiatus brings new focus on life
About two years ago, I took a
fall semester off from school, just
to try to get my mind back together
and attempt to focus on what it
was I wanted to do with the rest of
my life.
My grades had fallen, there
was trouble at home, and I really
was not looking forward to
another aimless semester of
getting drunk and blowing off
classes. So that fall I took a job
working on a golf course at home,
outside every day, six days a week,
from six-thirty in the morning�
until the early afternoon.
At first, I hated the job,
totally and with a passion. I am
definitely not an early morning
person. But before long I started
to enjoy just being outside all
day, out in the sun and close to
nature, as the golf course was
ringed by beach on one side and
woods and marsh on the other.
Each morning I started my
work right on the beach. I would
always stop and watch the sun
rise over the ocean at six-thirty,
every day. It became somewhat �
of a ritual. I could not really feel
good about getting started until I
saw the sun show its face. Then
during the day, I would watch for
the familiar sights of marsh ha wks
hunting over the woods or lake,
circling far up in the sky or sitting
up in the high branches watching
me.
At other times, before the cold
season moved in, I could ride right
up close to a resident alligator
sunning itself near one of the
lakes, watching me through dark,
ancient eyes. He or she was one of
the last alligators left on what
used to be a barrier island
inhabited by probably hundreds
of them.
Once or twice, very early in
the morning, I would even stumble
onto huge deer feeding themselves
on the grass or in the nearby brush.
They would freeze when they saw
me and look back like statues
through shining black orbs, ears
pointing straight up like natural
radar.
There was always that almost
electric feeling between the two of
us of silence, instinct and fear. You
could stare right at them and
almost lose them in the
surroundings.
By Patrick Hinson
semester off, I probably would
never have even thought about
how much things change from
season to season and how the
inhabitants of the earth, ourselves
included, adjust to those changes.
I would have never thought about
anything but the next test, next
pay check, next party.
Life for us, it seems, becomes
nothing but a mad rush toward
the end. We concentra te and worry
about the trivial things while
ignoring the very facts of life going
�on
around us. The Native
I think the real gOal Americans who lived here long
t5 before us let their dreams lead
them through life. Now it seems
our lives dictate our dreams.
I still think there are natural
visions out there, natural guides
that attempt to lead us through
life. It is just that we have not
learned to look for them, or, when
we see them, we do not recognize
them for what they are or attempt
to interpret them.
It took me a while to really
think about what that semester
-meant for me. I soon realized
that I was thinking too hard about
things I could not control, and
worrying too much about things
that I could. I am still not all the
way there, to total comfort with
myself, but I am not sure if that is
the goal anyway.
I think the real goal is just to
learn to enjoy the gift of life as
much as we can, while we have it,
and to turn around and help others
to do so too. We also have to try to
preserve that vital part of the earth
that has no voice, the animals
around us, for perhaps they are
still the keepers of the dreams
Without them, the world would
surely be a lonely place. We might
all end up aimless and lost
together.
is just to learn to
enjoy the gift of life
as much as we can,
while we have it,
and to turn around
and help others to
do so too.
When they finally felt safe they
would bound off and in one jump
just disappear into the brush like
ghosts. I always felt so weird,
thankful almost, to have been able
to experience that, just the deer
and I alone like that outside in the
early mornings.
That semester I watched the
tidal changes, the creeks rise and
fall, the sunrises and sunsets. I
watched the fall come, and then
the winter, with Antarctic-like cold
mornings and wind-chills that
froze to the bone. I worked outside
in rainstorms and high winds, and
around me I watched the world
slowly roll over from summer to
fall to winter.
If I had never taken that
The East Carolianian is now accepting
applications for Opinion Editor. Applications are
available at the Students Pubs Building. CaJI Brian
Hall at 328-6366 for more information.
CUSTOMER SERVICE
HAS EVERNONE
r WORKING HERE Irt
THE PAST D6CADEC
BEEN CM GOOD
TERMS UUTH EAC!
OTHERN �
OVERLOOKED
HOSTILITIES
of? GRUDGES
ffiBL
NOBODNS
BEEN FIRED,
tfECENTLW
WHO MAS
OvjJNJ A
r HANDGUN.
. and INTEND
TO OSE IT ON
CUSTOMERS
AND EMPLOYEES
ALIKE? ��
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JUST HONING
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OUR
SHOPPING
HERE.
1
LtfC
Road to love begins with love for self
By Angela McCullers
Each of us at birth begins
the journey on life's road. It is
a road which glistens like a
river in the sun. For those of us
who get a chance to go some
distance, that journey, from
first breath to last, can be one
of total confusion, as we are
swept along in a directionless
current.
Our roads have signs along
the way, placed to guide, direct
and give us choices. For years,
we may pass the signs blindly,
not seeing the detours,
warnings and dead ends.
Often, we wind up lost,
confused, hurt, disheveled,
tired and uncertain, no longer
trusting. We hit a stone wall
again and again, almost numb
before we realize that these
signs exist.
These signs can be read, if
we choose to look at our lives
clearly. By learning to
recognize and understand
them, we can smooth our
journey, make the rough spots
a little easier and help to avoid
those wrong turns.
Remember those times
when something said don't, but
you did anyway and you
shouldn't have?
OK, you are traveling on,
feeling good, learning the signs
and your self, savoring each
step as you go. Yet, you are
still dissatisfied, searching for
others with whom to share the
way. You try to find a few
people whose roads seem to
blend with your own. And so
we ask for someone with whom
to care, share and be. Vaguely
asking � no praying � for a
friend's love, a lover's love.
Then someone comes and the
signs seem right. We open our
road to another. Yet somehow,
sadly, we find ourselves
unfulfilled with that someone.
We are still so alone � in
anguish and alone, cold and
alone, hurt and alone. Alone.
We have an ache here, a
scratch there, wounds that are
often unseen � yet so
apparent, leaving you baffled,
asking yourself what went
wrong.
You thought that you saw
an oasis. Instead, you found a
mirage. You are still thirsty.
While looking for a river of
love, you settle for a trickle
here, a drop there. You ask
again and again, please send
me love so that I can love.
Sometimes we never know that
love, like those signs, can only
be seen and appreciated and
cherished once we search
within and find our own
beauty and worth. The water
we seek must first be found
within ourselves.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Imagine yourself, alone, in a thickly wooded
forest. Suddenly you hear and feel an enormous tree
fall to the ground. Yet recent legislation has been
passed, stating that trees no longer fall to the ground
at random. Fearing accusations of heresy, you remain
silent, and the world goes on believing their legislative
gospel that continues to be expand upon daily�The
End.
As American citizens, we are witnessing our
collective personal freedoms falling prey to the
double-headed legislative axe. The tragically hip
"political chains of correctness" are being secured
around our free speech. At the first apathetic glance,
it seems to resemble the concept of "loving the
neighbor Consequently, when our dictionaries start
shrinking, so does our range of thought and debate.
Speech and writing are the only channels for the
completion of human thought, short of playing
"charades Each citizen should be able toconvey his
or her own views without a centralized "thought
police" steaming the mail glue.
Presently, the business and private sectors are
being corralled onto the information (super?)
highway, due to raised postal fees, therefore let us
not forget the convenience and anonymity of the
interception of electronic telecommunication (E-
mail).
Now, imagine a super highway moving thoughts
at breakneck speed around the globe. You attend a
conference through your lap-top computer (from a
tropical beach). You have one too many drinks with
umbrellas in them, and a contraband word is used.
You are immediately ticketed for "reckless speaking"
and are impounded.
American forefatherpolitical philosopher
Benjamin Franklin felt that those whom were willing
to trade constitutional freedoms for luxuries,
deserved (and will eventually receive) neither. "�
Bless America
Jason A. Horton
Senior
To the Editor: �
There is a growing consciousness among
Minority students (African American) about the
grading policy at East Carolina University. The (un-
written) policy whereby African American rarely
achieve sic an "A" must be addressed by the
present administration. The Department of Minority
Affairs has been powerless in addressing this
grading policy without cooperation from past and
present administrative staffs.
The conscious of some (not all) professors is
that a "B" is alright for minorities instead of the "A"
they worked hard for. No a "B" is not alright.
Minority students by no means are asking for grades
or breaks, only a lifting of the un-fair grading policy
praticed sic by some professors at East Carolina
University.
This written complaint is not intented sic to
cause any problems. However if this legitimate
complaint offends anyone apologies are greatly
extended. "Please, Please for the sake of (All)
minorities who are attending East Carolina
University and future minorities please urge fairness
in the sometimes (un-fair) grading policy among
some professors at East Carolina University.
Charles Vincent
Sophomore
History
To the Editor:
Recently I was riding my bicycle near Falkland
when I discovered two puppies standing in the
middle of the road licking something from the
pavement. To my horror, it was a pool of blood
form a third puppy that lay dead in the bushes
nearby.
I have seen dead animals before and in fact I
consider Eastern North Carolina one giant killing
zone. I have seen headless deer in the woods, game
birds lying uncollected in the fields, cats smeared
on the highways and even at ECU the packs of
dogs who roam the campus. I suggest some
changes. First, if you absolutely need a pet, get it
neutered and then put it on a leash.
Second, if you are a student do not get a pet in
the first place. Most students have difficulties
getting themselves to class on time and as a result
have little time to care for the animals you see
chained in the front of houses where students live.
Third, while gun enthusiasts insist on killing
for sport as a means of population control, they
should have the decency to take the whole dead
animal home with them.
Some argue that humans are the pinnacle of
the food chain and that it is our prerogative to kill
and maim as we see fit. If we are superior, which is
debatable, then let us have the wisdom to protect
our pets and utilize the resources we have available.
Tim Payne
Grad Student
History
The East Carolinian welcomes all Letters to the Editor. However, all
letters, in order to be considered for publication, must be typed, under
250 words, and contain, your name, class rank, major and a working
daytime phone number
wmmmmmssm
�MMi MM �
wmmmmmmsf





TheEastCarottnian
September 22, 1994
Classifieds
For Rent
For Sale
Services Offered
r
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AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
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ALSO
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2899-2901 East 5th Street
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�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
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756-78157S8-7436
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
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WE EVEN CARD OYSTERS!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
ASAP! 3 blocks from campus. Rent
$135 call: Amanda at 758-7879
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
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TOWNHOUSEFORRENTiBrookhill
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fireplace, dishwasher, disposal, ceil-
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Michelle or Jenny 321 -7155
ROOMMATE WANTED: Tar River
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ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
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Call Kerri 757-0615
ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 bdr 2
bath apt. at Arlington Square. Prefer
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BRAND NEW2bedroom,2bath units
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FOR SALE: Women's health club
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LEADING TECHNOLOGY COM-
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tion. Only $75. If interested contact
Mike at 328-8210
WETSUIT: Full 32 O'neill Reactor in
perfect condition. Call Van at830-1853.
Leave message if not there.
NEED TYPING? Campus secretary
provides professional, fast service,
(stored on Macintosh disks) Low rates.
15 yrs. experience with student papers.
355-3611 after 5pm or leave message.
PARTY OVER HERE! Hey Greeks and
other social groups. Your party isn't
pump'n until Mobile Music Produc-
tions disc jockey service arrives. MMP
provides the music you want to hear
when you want to hear it. Experienced
DJ's with the widest variety of music.
Call Lee @ 758-4644 early for booking.
BELLY DANCE! For women 8-80years
young. Dance exercise to keep you fit.
Tues. at 5:30 call 355-5150. Starts Sept.
20.
TUTOR LD teacher with 20 years expe-
rience will tutorgeneralcollegecourses.
Call 830-0781
FEIDENKRAIS METHOD: Develop a
flexible body and a flexible brain with
Awareness through movement. Free
intro session Sept. 28 and classes begin
in Oct. Call Therapeutic Innovations
830-6886 for details.
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL resumesec-
retarial work. Specializing in resume
composition wcover letters stored on
disk, term papers, thesis, legal tran-
scriptions, general typing and other sec-
retarial duties. Word Perfect or
Microsoft Word for windows software.
Call today (8am-5pm: 752-9959) (eve-
nings: 527-9133).
Lose Weight!
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Order Catalog Toaay with Visa MC or COD
800-351-0222
0' 31 477-8226
Or. rusi S2 00 to Research Information
11322IdahoAve 206A LosAigeles CA9002i
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
CHAR-GRILL
MANAGERS
LINE COOKS
CASHIERS
Pick Up Applications at
Construction Site Located at
315 E. 10th Street
(beside Kinko's)
Mail in Applications to:
P.O. Box 3797
Greenville, NC 27836-1797
Great Place to Work
i 5 linr14�'11
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mailing Bro-
chures! Spare Full-time. Set own hours!
Rush self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers(GI) 1821 HillandaleRdlB-
295, Durham, NC 27705.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Dancers,
Escorts, Masseuars. Earn BIG BUCKS
in the cleanest club in North Carolina.
Must be 18 Years Old. PLAYMATES
Adult Entertainment. 919-747-7686.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
SI 000 plus aiWeek escorting in the
Greenville area with a liscensed agency.
Also net J one part lime receptionist at
$7 ph. Must be 18, dependable and
have own phone and transportation.
Call Diamonds or Emerald City Escorts
at 758-0896 or 757-3477
EARN$2500&FREESPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell 8 trips and go free! Best trips
& prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Jamaica,
Panama CitySGreatresumeexperience!
1-800-678-6386!
WANTED America's fastest growing
travel company now seeking individu-
als promoting trips to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida, Padre, Barbados. The
easiest way to free travel, fantastic pay.
Call Sunsplash Tours 1-800-426-7710
SPRING BREAK '95- Sell trips, earn
cash & go free Student Travel Services
is now hiring campus represenatives.
Lowest rates to Jamaica, Cancun,
Daytona and Panama City Beach. Call
1-800-648-4849
AGRICULTURALRETAILOUTLET-
Merchandiser position. This is a part-
time position (up to 30 hours per week).
The job requires customer service skills,
pricing merchandise, stocking shelves,
and other duties as directed. Previous
retail backgroundhelpful. Applications
may be obtained at Agri-Supply, Rt. 5
264 Ext Greenville. No phone calls.
EOE
FUNDRAISING choose from 3 differ-
entrundraiserslastingeither3or7days.
No investment. Earn $$$ for your group
plus personal cash bonuses for your-
self. Call 1-800-932-0528, ext 65
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Cen-
tral Distributors PO Box 10075, Olathe
KS 66051. Immediate response.
BABYSITTER NEEDED- to care for 2
small children 2 or 3 days a week. Ap-
proximately 4 miles from campus.
Transportation needed. References re-
quired. If interested, please call 355-
5067.
COUPLE SEEKS PHOTOGRAPHER
for December Wedding. Musthaveown
equipment and samples of previous
work. Call 757-3059 between 6-9pm.
Ask for Brian
ENJOY WORKING WITH THE
CLOTHING YOU LOVE TO WEAR.
Brody's is accepting applications for
part-time sales associates in such areas
as JuniorMissy Sportswear and Cos-
Personals
jum
Page 6
metics. Flexible scheduling options:
10am-2pm, 12pm-9pm, or 6pm-9pm.
All retail positions include weekends.
Clothingdiscount.Inten.iews held each
Mon. and Thurs. l-4pm, Brody's The
Plaza.
BRODY'S FOR MEN is accepting ap-
plications for part-time sales associates.
We offer clothing discounts flexible
scheduling options: 10am-2pm, 12pm-
9pm, or 6pm-9pm. All retail positions
include weekends. Interviews held each
Mon. and Thurs l-4pm, Brody's The
Plaza.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD for cer-
tain responsibilities. Must be trustwor-
thy, responsible female. Call 321-8975
for details.
PART TIME POSITION- Adult En-
tertainment agency seeking physically
fit attractive female applicants. Must
have own transportation and be be-
tween the ages of 18-25. Call 1-800-848-
6282 to set up an interview
AVERAGE S8HR as part time deliv-
ery person. Own vehicle, insurance,
and good driving record required-
Apply weekdays after 11am at Chop-
Chop, 310-F Arlington Blvd.
WANTED stocksales person, heavy
lifting required; Please apply at Youth
Shop Boutique, Arlington Village
ANDY'S at the Plaza is now accepting
applications for cashier server. Must
beabletoworkTThll:30-2orMW
F nights. No phone calls please
EARN UP TO $559.89 PER WEEK,
Assembleourproductsathome! Amaz-
ing 24 hour recorded message reveals
details! Call today! 1-919-243-9305.
Leave your telephone number.
AQ
Greek Personals
KAPPA ALPHA: Looking forward to
all your Southern hospitality at the
tailgate this weekend! Love, Chi
Omega. (Congratulations Clark and
Dee!) I
PHI TAU ROB- You were great last
Sun. night, vou did your best, no mat-
ter about the rest. What a wonderful
job- you are definitely our Greek God!
Love your sisters and new members of
Zeta Tau Alpha
THETA CHI- Greek week was the
best- we made a great team! Love the
sisters and new members of Zeta Tau
alpha.
GO GREEK! Interested in sorority life?
Zeta Tau Alpha invites you! Tonight
5:15at508W.5thStreet for more infoor
rides call 757-1811
VANESSA AND BRANDI- you girls
did a great job, representing Zeta Tau
Alpha at Greek Goddess. Love, The
sisters and new members.
CHILD CARE
� p.p. T � I -0 � H -S-
-Helping parents ol Pitl Counly to locate
quality child cart and aiding providers in
improving the current care ollered
Are you satisfied with your
current child care
arrangement? Are you
having problems finding
child care that meets your
specific needs? Let us
help!
(919) 758-0455
600 E. 11th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
HEY CHERIE, Hope to see you tomor-
row night! W.
Greek Personals
CHI OMEGA PLEDGES This week-
end was the greatest. We hope that you
had as much fun as we did. You all
mean so much to us and we don't know
what we would do without each one of
you. Hope that you enjoy this Big-Little
week and that you are as excited to
meet your big sis as they are for you to
find out who they are. Love, Dee and
Kathy
Still unclear about
tDK RUSH? &!��
Let
Phi Kappa Psi
clear up your worries!
Come see us at the AOI1
house tonight
It's never too late!
Sir " ���- M' Mnit
DELTA SIG Good luck during rush-
We're looking forward tobid night Fri.
Love the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha J
ALPHA XIDELTA would like to thari
everyone who participated in GreA
God this year! A big congratulations to
the 1994 Greek God Will Temple, 1st
runner up Scott Gagain and 2nd run-
ner up rob Ugaley! Thanks guys!
DID ANYONE NOTICE that 3 of the
top lOGreek goddesses were Alpha Xi
Deltas? Congrats and thanks to Stacie
Sullivan, Renee Hood Janet Stubbs!
You represented us well. Love your
sisters pledges
BARBIE Another good party down,
with many more to go, no?, kind of
makes me wonder about the meaning
of life itself. I mean, we sit there at the
old bar, staring those brewskis in the
face and I can't help but thinkGosh, if
only there was some way I could do
this for a living ,you know? I wonder
howpeople get those jobs as beer
tasters? Or maybe I could just be a
stemo bum for the rest of my life, a bar
fly, sleepin in alleys at night, living life
to the hilt, and not worryin about takin
showers Hey, it could happen. Well,
until next time, study hard and party
hard. Your greek buddy, Kentus-
Uranus.
S.P- Will you do that first thing? Mr.
DD says he wants you to. Today was
3illadayP.C.
Announcements
ECU LAW SOCIETY
Law Society meets for all students
interested in attending Law School
after,graduation. All majors are wel-
come to attend. Monday we will elect
officers and set the agenda for the fall
semester. Meeting will be Monday,
September 26, 5:15pm in 206 Rawl.
For more Info contact Joyce Reid at
324382.
LEODONIA S. WRIGHT SCHOL-
ARSHIP
The application process has been re-
opened. The new deadline is October
3,1994. Please see any member of the
Organization of Black Faculty and Staff
for an application or contact Yolanda
Burwell, 216A Ragsdale.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
"Jam-a-thon '94" Sigma Phi Epsilon is
�n the process of trying to organize the
largest unplugged music jam in NC
history on the mall in October with
donations to benefit Disabled Veter-
ans of America. Any band or person
who would like to participate call Rob-
ert Lewis at 756-4916 or 757-0487. In
thiseventthereisan unlimited amount
of peoplewhocan participate justplay-
ing at your own freewill, and and all
typesof music welcome,butthere will
be no main stage and no amplifiers
please.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College republicans wil meet
Thursday September 22, 6:00pm at
GCB 3006. All members required to
show. New members welcome.
FXPR ESSION S MAGAZINE
ATTENTION: African-Amc rice n Stu-
dents. If you have any response to the
letter you received from the Admis-
sions Office requesting the names and
addresses of possible African-Ameri-
can students; or any other issue relat-
ing to the African-American popula-
tion on campus, please write it down.
Bring all responses to the Expressions
Officeorthe Media Board Office on the
second floor of the Publications Build-
ing. Thank you.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
On Monday, September 12, the
Newman Catholic Student Center
started its program entitled "Beauty
and Belief An In-Depth look at Ca-
tholicism This program is an inquiry
program for any student wishing to
learn more about Catholicism. It is also
for Catholics who may want to make
their CONFIRM ATION or First Com-
munion. The program begins at 7:30.
For further details, please call Fr. Paul
Vaeth at the Center, 953 E. 10th St. 757-
1991.
CHRISTIAN STUDY GROUP
Christian Study Group meetsbiweekly
to discuss Acceptance of Homosexual-
ity and the Bible. For more info and
meeting place: 758-8619 or 830-2080.
NATIONALSCHOLARSHIPS
Serious candidates for a national schol-
arship or fellowship (like the Fulbright,
Rhodes, or Truman) interested in at-
tending a workshop on the preparation
of the application should call Dr. David
SandersattheHonorsOffice(328-6373)
or Dr. Linda McGowan at International
Programs(328?6769).Successfulcandi-
dates normally have a specific project in
mind, close to a 4.0 gpa, competency in
the language of the country they want
to visit, some study abroad experience,
and a history of earning merit scholar-
ships.
ECU WATER SKI CLUB
Come let'sgowaterskiiTheECU Water
Ski Club is look for some people inter-
ested in water skiing. Come to our meet-
ings on Tuesday nights at 9:15-10:15 in
Mendenhall Room 14 or for more infor-
mation call Thomas or Jason 758-8215.
Beginners are welcome.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT MAR-
SHALS
Any student interested in serving as a
University Marshall for the 1994 Fall
Commencement may obtain an appli-
cation from Room A-12 Minges. Stu-
dent must be classified as a junior by the
end of Spring semester 1994 and have a
3.0 academic average to be eligible. Re-
turn completed application to Carol-
Ann Tucker, Advisor, A-12 Minges by
October 1,1994. For more information
call 328-4661.
UNIV. FOLK & COUNTRY DANCE
CLUB
FirstmeetingDanceof theyear! Contra
& Square Dance, Live old time music by
Elderberry Jam. 7pm, Sept. 23, Ledonia
Wright Bldg. (behind Stu. Health). Free
if space permits come alone or bring a
friend.
CO-REC BASKETBALL
COMPETION
Guys grab your girlfriends, and gals
grab your boyfriends, and head to Biol-
ogy 103 at 5:00pm on September 27. It's
time for theCo-Rec Basketball competi-
tion. Recreational Services is proud to
bring you Intramural Sports.
RFrRFATIONALSERVICES
SECOND CLIMBING 1
WORKSHOP
for the fall semester is being offered on
Sept. 22. This three hour workshop in-
troducesyou tothebasicsof rockclimb-
ing. Instructions begin at the Climbing
Tower and space is limited. Call 328-
6387 for more info. or. stop by
Christenbury Gym room 204. This
workshop is brought to you by Recre-
ational Services
JOIN THE RECREATIONAL
OUTDOOR CENTER
for a leisurely day of canoeing along
GooseCreek. SunSept. 25head for the
wilderness and be ready to see and hear
creatures of all sorts. For more info, call
328-6387 or stop by Christenbury Gym
room 204. This trip is brought to you by
Recreational Services
TAKE A BREAK FROM
W ATCHTNG FOOTBALL
on the big screen and play it yourself at
the Ocean Spray Table Top Football
Competition. Competition is on four
�All ads must be pre-paid
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Announcements
Deadlines
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to
list activities and events open to the public
two times free of charge. Due to the
limited amount of space, The East Caro-
linian cannot guarantee the publication of
announcements.
consecutive Mon. beginning on Sept'
26. Call Nelson Cooper at 328-6387 for
more info. This program is brought to
you by Recreational Services.
NEED AN EXCUSE TO GET AWAY
FROM SCHOOL? Try thebeachhorse-
back riding day trip with the Recre-
ational Outdoor Center. Spend up to 3
hours walking and sometimes racing
down white sandy beaches exploring
tidal pools and sand dunes. For more
info, stop by the ROC in room 117 at
Christenbury Gym or call Recreational
Services at 328-6387.
CM Am I ATE BIBLE STUDY
A graduate student bible study is in
the process of being formed. Allgradu-
ate students are encouraged to partici-
pate in this exciting new study. For
further info, contact Dave Woolever aU
355-8277
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
For more
information call
328-6366.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition
mjmwmwmmmm
.IJ1L.JJI1II.UlI.
a �mm.Mm





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The East Carolinian
September 22, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 9
James Taylor blends in, electrifies Creek
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
James Taylor started his Sun-
day show at WalnutCreeksimply
enough. The veteran performer,
wearing casual pants andaT-shirt,
just walked out on stage to a deaf-
ening roar, smiled a shy smile and
said hello to his audience.
Taylor was the pinnacle of
relaxation, withhis large forehead
providing a stark contrast to the
long curly hair thatnearly reached
his shoulders. He looked like a
displaced hippie instead of an ac-
claimed perfonner; there was little
about Taylor that would hint at
his celebrity status.
Of course, there was no need
for pomp and circumstance; Taylor
simply came home to play for his
"hometown folks because before
JamesTaylorwasJAMESTAYLOR,
he was a student at the University
of North Carolina. Taylor had come
home, and the people of his native
state were glad to see him back.
Playing a three-hour show to a
capacity crowd at the Creek, Taylor
brought out his unia ue voice and
off-beat sense of humor to delight
his "folks Starting with a song
entitled "Let It Be Taylor and his
eight-piece backing ensemble be-
gan the show in a laid-back fashion.
The Creek crowd was sitting, but
still swaying toTaylor's music. Tay-
lor followed with his hit "Mexico
and got the crowd standing in ap-
proval at the end. A quiet Taylor
thanked the audience for their ova-
tion and got another one when he
told them "itfeelsgood tobehome
Taylor followed with "Prom-
ised Land a song about ecological
conservation that the crowd en-
joyed, but "Handy Man" drew a
better response when its chorus
raised the voices of most of the au-
dience.
Taylor continued his first set
providing the Creek with a collec-
tion of songs that seemed to satisfy
the crowd. "Country Road" contin-
ued the vocalization by the crowd
and "Shower the People" brought
sighsof contentmentfrom theaudi-
ence. "How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved
By You)" got young and old danc-
ing in the aisles, and Taylor left to a
15-minute intermission and one of
many standing ovations.
The second set proved even
more memorable than the first, as
the hit parade reemerged. After
beginning the set with a version of
a Chuck Berry tune, Taylor plunged
into "Carolina On My Mind" and
sent the crowd into a deafening roar.
This song sounded identical to its
album version and brought a host
of Tarheels to their feet for an ova-
tion that must have lasted two min-
utes.
"You've Got A Friend" contin-
ued to lull the crowd in the second
set, and it looked as if Taylor would
end the show in light-rock format
until he and his band unleashed
"Steamroller
On this blues number Taylor
provided what could have been the
highlight of his show. An animated,
dancing Taylor sang the song with
so much soul and conviction that it
seemed his larynx might pop out of
his throat. An awkward dancer,
Taylor wasn't the slightest bit awk-
ward in his showmanship, and his
outstanding band brought the
house down with their solos. The
crowdregainedits feet in the middle
of this tune and screamed louder
than they had theenrirenight. Thus
far, that is.
After finishing his second set
with tunes from his latest albums,
Taylor left the stage to thunderous
applause. The performer made his
Lackluster performances encourage a hung Jim
By Ike Shibly
Staff Writer
Film, like television, is a busi-
ness. The discerning viewer tries to
look past the obvious attempts by
any film studio to make money
and focuses instead on the artistic
aspects that emanate from quality
films. Rarely do television shows
make any claim of art, but instead
make a blatant play for a maxi-
mum number of viewers. A film
can often make an intelligent, artis-
tic statement because film studio
allow some of their pictures a cer-
tainartisticlatitudewithoutalways
looking at the bottom line of their
balance sheets.
Films that make no attempt at
artistic significance generally have
some hook, usually comedic, that
will lure viewers. If the film has no
obvious hook then the film is often
sent straight to video and a sharp,
stylish video cover will be crafted to
serve as the hook necessary to entice
viewers to rent their shoddy film.
A new film called Trial by Jury
should have either been a made-for-
TV movie or a straight-to-video re-
lease. Rarely will one see such blue-
collar attitudes pervading every as-
pect of a major studio release than in
this film. Everyone involved in the
picture seems to have been hired
only because they were promised a
paycheck at the end of the week.
Health Minute
The East Carolina University
Student Health Service is coordi-
nating a Student Health Advisory
Committee (SHAC) to help meet
the needs of ECU students. The
advisory board will consist of stu-
dents, faculty and staff. The com-
mittee will assist the director and
other department heads within the,
Student Health Center in making
decisions, forming policies, ad-
dressing changes or improvements,
Jetc.
Many other colleges and uni-
versities have very active Student
HealthAdvisoryCommittees. Stu-
dents provide input on issues such
as the following: HIV testing pro-
vided on campus, types of medica-
tions offered through the Student
Health Pharmacy,possiblein-house
clinics to be offered (Allergy Clinic,
Colposcopy Clinic), hotlines, and
many other ideas. Students serving
on SHAC will also take part in the
Health Fair and other health-pro-
motingactivities;students will help
in developing health-related sur-
veys,andorassistwithother events
involving the Student Health Cen-
ter.
The main concern of Student
Health Service is fhestudentsatEast
Carolina University. Having stu-
dents helping with the continual
growth and development of Stu-
The actors, including the usu-
allysolidGabrielByme and William
Hurt, look bored by the film. The
writers have crafted a prolonged
story based on what might have
oncebeenaninterestingidea by com-
pensating for their lack of ingenuity
wifhanentiretruckloadof cinematic
caricatures and cliches. The director,
Heywood Gould, cares little about
involving the viewer. His main con-
cern seems to be to shoot the scenes
with as little trouble as possible to
convince the studio heads that he
was indeed directing a film � and
thus ensure his paycheck.
The story begins auspiciously
with the detailing of jury selection
for a major murder trial involving a
By Heather Zophy
Student Health Services
dent Health will enhance the rela-
tionship between the providers and
students, will address students'
health care needs and concerns on
our campus, and help improve ECU
StudentHealth Services all together.
Anyone interested in becoming a
member of SHAC or anyone inter-
ested in providing any type of input
related toStudentHealth,pleasecon-
tact Heather Zophy, Health Educa-
tor, at 328-6794 between 8-5, Mon-
day-Friday. The first meeting is
scheduled for Monday, September
26, at 3:30 p.m. The meeting will be
held upstairs in the Student Health
ResourceRoom. Remember, living a
healthy lifestyle is what if s all about.
known crime boss. Trial by Jury
quickly drops its exploration of the
jury process and what makes citi-
zens stay to sit on a jury to tell the
sordid tale ofjury tampering. Valerie
Allston (Joanne Whalley-Kilmer) is
coerced into casting a vote of not
guilty in the trial of Rusty Pirone
(Armand Assante), a Mafia kingpin.
The mob, using ex-cop Tommy
Vesey (William Hurt) as the messen-
ger, threatens to kill her only son if
she does not cooperate. Valerie con-
siders telling DanielGraham (Gabriel
Byrne), the state's prosecuting attor-
ney, about the tampering but in-
steaddecides to try toappease Pirone
by casting a vote of innocent.
As intelligent as Valerie seems
to be, she thinks that if she agrees to
Pirone's demands she will be free of
him forever. If Pirone escapes im-
prisonment only one person will
knowthathetamperedwiththejury
so all he would have to do is to have
thatpersonkilled.Ifagullible viewer
like me, who is almost always
shocked by the ending ina mystery,
can see that Valerie needs to have
other options, ther. the writers did a
shoddy job in setting up the plot.
Not only does Pirone want
Valerie's cooperation but he also
rapes just to prove that he has com-
plete control over her. The story in-
cludes this sickening scene only to
See JURY page 10
return to an encore of "Fire and
Rain probably his biggest rut,
TheWalnutCreeklightshowhighv
lighted this poignant song witK
color changes and smoke screen?
Taylor then played a new song
titled "Light of Hope another
ecological song that spotlighted
his four background vocalists.
Taylor exited only to return with
"Sweet Baby James" as his final
encore.
Taylor left the stage as hum-
bly as he had entered on it, with.
his same shy smile and a now-
soaked T-shirt. Undoubtedly
many of those present to see him
Sunday night can't wait for him to
come home again.
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
Parody steps to Wright
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Capitol Steps will offer some
comic relief at the expense of the
country's current state of political dis-
array. This group of former and cur-
rentCongressionalstaffmemberswill
present a political satire performance
at Wright Auditorium on Sept. 30 at 8
pm.
The show will feature imperson-
ations of Bill Clinton, Ross Perot, and
various members of Congress.
Capitol Steps started in 1981 at
theofficeof Sen. Charles Percy (R-IL),
and have since recorded over ten al-
bums. Some of their more popular
releases were tided "Stand by Your
Dan "76 Bad Loans and "Foolson
theHilL'TheyVesold lOOOOOcopies,
and they perform 300 shows a year
nationwide.
Capitol Steps also has a regular
feature on CNN's "Inside Politics
and they have also appeared on such
national broadcasts as "Good Morn-
ing America "The Tonight Show
"2020" and National Public Radio's
"All Things Considered
Former President George Bush
saidCapitolStepsmakesiteasierto
leave public office The Washington
Post labeled them Washington's "fa-
See STEPS page 10
J Pathetic JJLame JJJ Pretty Good
Afol
Brilliant
Jackonuts
On You
l�
m m m
What would happen if Sonic
Youth,Fugazi,AliceDonut, the Bore-
doms, and some really out there
improv jazz outfit all climbed into a
pit filled with slime and barbed wire
and copulated for about a hundred
years under in tense heat? Well,aside
from one hell of a mess, I think some-
thingverymuchakintothejackonuts
would climboutwhenitwasallover.
And to think, these kids hail
fromAthens,Georgia,hometoREM
and morejanglypoetbands than you
can shake a dead ferret at. And
speakingofdeadferrets,theJackonuts
have released what appears to be
their first real full-length album, On
You. This raging little disc features
eight songs-worth of the Jackonuts'
jazz-punk assault on the senses.
Syrupy noise guitar backs up
the obsessive stream-of-constious-
ness vocals of singer Laura Carter,
shaping the music into a hateful fe-
ver dream. Carter, formerly of goof-
punk outfit the Bar-B-Q Killers,
boughtintothejackonutsby sinking
a big chunk of cash into getting an
early recording released. As far as I
can tell, she's been nothing but an
asset to the band, venting all the
pent-up anger of her years with the
much nicer Bar-B-Q Killers ontodisc
for her new pals.
An example of the Jackonuts'
venom can be found in the opening
linesof "Q "Why don't people you
hate have the decency to hate you
back?" Later topics in this insane rant
include running someone over in a
car (and enjoying it), Flannery
O'Connor, getting high and com-
mitting patricide. A rambling hos-
tile romp, "Q" reminds me a bit of
early Fugazi, but I don't think
Washington's favorite punks were
ever this mean.
An equally hateful, but slightly
more coherent, effort is "Hook the
album's opening track. "Hate the
halo of PC clone Recycling, veg-
etarian, feminist, animal and human-
ity lover It ain't natural to not be
carnal Didlseeanotherponytailgo
by attached to a horse's ass?" Wait.
Did I say this was more coherent?
Maybe not
Another gemis"Gtation which
includes the memorable line, "Lost
the past in a hazy cloud Shit it out
with the Friday trash" The center-
piece of On You, according to the
Jackonuts' press package, is "Raw
Candle Vote This anfhemic tune
features all the surging guitars and
fanfare of a band playing a magnum
opus. But the vocals are too sub-
merged in those mighty guitars on
this one, and picking out the band's
venomous lyrical extremes is half the
fun here.
Butlthinkmyfavoritetrackhere
has got to be the depressing "Show-
case With the devastatingly true
opening line, "Despair is often mis-
taken for desire Sometimes desire
has its own desperation this gets
my vote for the Jackonuts' harshest
cut. In the other songs here, you see,
they'rejuststrikingout Buton "Show-
case they reveal a hideous truth.
And that's much nastier.
On You is a good disc, and the
Jackonuts' live show is supposed to
be even more outrageous. I guess
we'll all find out this Friday, when
they play O'Rock's. Check the
Jackonuts out; they're a rare rock and
roll experience.
� Mark
Brett
Jupiter Coyote
Wade

12
Jupiter Coyote's recent
release Wade features a good, simple
sound, but it's hardly a new sound.
They're from Macon, Georgia and
their sound definitely reflects this,
because they sound almost identi-
cal to other Macon bands like
Allgood and Widespread Panic.
That's not an entirely bad sound,
but it gets old fast.
The first song is titled "Flight of
the Lorax and it's a long drawn-
out southern rock tune (a format
they hardly veer from on this al-
bum). It's really easy to listen to, but
the lyrics are very limited.
The next cut, "On Trial is a
decent song, but it's incredibly pre-
dictable. It sounds almost exactly
like Allgood. The writing on this
album is mediocre at best. Almost
every song is loaded with cliches,
such as "my friend turned on me
justbecauselfollowedmydream
One of the more interesting
songs is titled the "Ballad of Lucy
Edenfield It's a fast-paced
rockabilly tunewhichfeatures Matt
Mundy playing the mandolin. It's
the only song on the album that
isn't in the same old worn-out for-
mat that so many southern hippie
bands use. It's one of the few songs
that isn't too long.
"Hopkins County Stew" fea-
tures some basic guitar riffs, but
nothing outstanding. "Narrow
Line the first song on the second
side, features some interesting
instrumentals. It attempts to create
a spacey transcendental effect.
Excluding "Narrow Line the
second half of the album is incred-
ibly mediocre. By this time I was so
tired of hearing the same chords
thatlwasjustwaitingforthe songs
to change or the album to end.
Unfortunately, nothing changed. I
was really disappointed with this
release because I've seen this band
perform, and they have a lot more
talent than they exhibited on Wade.
� Daniel
Willis
Appearing soon for your
edification and amusement:
Tlmrsday, Sept. 22
Breakfast Club
at the Attic
(Early-80s Retro)
Movie: The Croiu
at Hendrix Theatre
(action)
FREE!
Jim Swenson
at Mendenhall
(acoustic)
Friday, Sept. 23
Jackonuts
at O'Rock's
(punk)
Purple School Bus,
Fuego Del Ama and
Knocked Down Smilin'
on the Campus Mall
Everything and Spider
Monkey
- at the Attic
(rock)
Movie:Tie Crow
at Hendrix Theatre
(action)
FREE!
Saturday, Sept. 24
Smackapple
at O'Rock's
(alternative)
Bruce Frye and
the Lonely Ridei Band
at the Attic
(rock)
the Specials
at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Spin Doctors
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Movie: The Crozo
at Hendrix Theatre
(action)
FREE!
Sunday, Sept. 25
Jesus Lizard and
Girls Against Boys
at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Monday, Sept. 26
Scofflaws,OtisReem,
and the Jumpstarts
at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
Tuesday, Sept. 27
Acoustic Bus
at the Attic
(nwts rock)
Wednesday, Sept. 28
Comedy Zone:
Mad Hatter and Laura
HoUis
i'H
wiM�IMjn nil jm





10 The East Carolinian
September 22, 1994
Cont. from
page 9
vorite political cabaret troupe
Capitol Steps calls themselves
"the only group in America that at-
tempts to be funnier than Congress.
All of the members have worked on
Capitol Hill, some for Democrats,
sitme for Republicans and some for
politicians thatsitfirmly on the fence.
Thanks to the scandals and screw-
ups of our elected officials, there's
never a shortage of material
Vice President Al Gore, Pat
Robertson, and Surgeon General
Koophaveperformedwiththegroup.
Some politicians have performed in
routines that target themselves.
Tickets for the Capitol Steps at
Wright Auditorium are $7 for stu-
dents and youth, S12for ECU faculty
and staff, and $15 to the public. All
tickets are $15 at the door.
JURY
Continued from page 9
ensure that the viewer adequately
hates Pirone (like they needed any
extra help). All the scene did tor this
viewer was turn me off of Valerie's
character, who the filmmakers
seemed to want to make a reluctant
heroine, and the entire film as well.
VVhallev-Kilmer, Assante, Byrne
and Hurt all havegreatworkbehind
and in front of them. In Trial by fury,
all of them seem to be biding their
time until a promising film comes
along. Buying groceries and paying
the mortgage seem to be the only
sensible reasons to agree to do this
film. Tn'rtninhasabsolutely noth-
ing original to offer the viewer, and it
cannot even tell a trite story with any
flair to at least try to make it interest-
ing.
If Trial by fury does anything for
the viewer it reminds him of Holly-
wood at its worst: making tired pot-
boilers with money as the only object.
Hollywood films often look like they
weremadejustforthesakeof putting
pictureson celluloid,butrarely is that
disinterest as evident as in this film.
On a scale of one to ten, Trial by
jury rates a three.
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I
The East Carolinian
September 22, 1994
Sports
Page 11

Hart Foundation" makes presence known
Daren Hart started all 11 games
in 1993, finishing the year
By Drew Goettman
Staff Writer
The ECU football program
was the only college program to
recruit both twin brothers Daren
and David Hart from Winston-
Salem's Carver High School two
years ago. Since then, the package
deal has paid defensive dividends
for the Pirates both on and off of
the field, and has included na-
tional publicity.
Daren Hart, who was named
to several All-Independent teams
last season is the starting strong
safety for the Pirates, and remem-
bers when the accolades were not
all pointed in his direction.
"Our senior year in high
school, David got all-conference
Logan
stresses
defense
(AP) � The football fairy
finally granted East Carolina
head coach Steve Logan his
wish � a game with no turn-
overs.
The Pirates, ranked No. 1 in
the country in turnover ratio,
recorded five takeaways in a
31-14 win over Temple Satur-
day.
They hope to continue the
trend this week when they face
Syracuse.
"I've sat here for two years
straight talking about no turn-
overs and we finally got a no-
turnover game Logan said
Monday at his weekly news
conference. "What that allowed
us to do was orchestrate the
game.
"Coach (Paul) Jette talked
about creating four turnovers a
game when he came here and I
thought that was astronomical.
But in two games, we have had
four and five. We had a chance
at eight Saturday, but we
dropped three interceptions
Logan now might be able to
expand his offensive scheme.
He and his coaches were hesi-
tant to add plays, fearing that
the Pirates would not be able to
take care of the football.
"Not turning over the ball
will allow me and our offensive
staff to maybe add some things
to the offense Logan said. "I
told our offensive players we
were just going to line up and
run a high school offense until
you prove you can take care of
the football. We may be able to
expand now if we can go out
and play a turnover-free game
again this Saturday
See LOGAN page 12
Photo by Harold Wise
for the Pirates at strongsafety
with 97 tackles.
and I got all-conference, but David
made Defensive Player of the Year
and went to the N.C-S.C Shrine
Bowl Daren said. "I wasn't get-
ting as much publicity then, but we
knew that we were equal (in abili-
ties). Last year, I got a lotof publicity
here at East Carolina � the focus
may have turned around, but we
still knew that we were equal
David, who started the open-
ing game against Duke at right
comerback, also remembers his
high school days together with
Daren on the gridiron.
"I've played all positions on
defense. I've played tailback, and I
got the ball a lot more than he did
hesaid. "Daren likes to hit, hit, hit.
I'm more laid back, with more fi-
nesse. I got a lot of publicity in high
school because I was the one who scored the
touchdowns � but he always blocked for me
When it came time to choose a college or
university, David had plenty of options Da vid
got more offers than I did, but they wanted only
him, not me Daren said. "In the end, he took
East Carolina because they wanted us as a pack-
age deal. We've only been apart from each other
for as much as a week when David went to a
summer football camp at Duke
"We had hoped that coach Logan wouldn't
put us in the same position, to compete against
each other for that starting spot David said. "So
far, it's worked out that we are on different posi-
tions so we can be on the field at the same time.
We get a thrill out of that I don't know of any
other identical twins that are playing together on
the same team. We've been doing it since we grew
up
Playing both offense and defense is com-
monplace in high school football, but at the colle-
giate level, the Harts focus is solely on defense.
"I'm the hitter Daren said. "I don't want to
play offense. I'm fast enough butI just like to
hit
"Me, on the other hand, I could play both
sides David said. "I wouldn't mind playing
offense sometimes, but I get a kick out of hitting
people too. If I get the ball in my hands, though,
it's just like I'm on offense.
Getting his hands on the ball is something
David got a taste in the Duke game � he picked
off a Spence Fisher pass for his first interception of
the season.
"I knew I had to catch that ball David said.
"I was in good position, and the quarterback just
threw it up in a crowd and I caught it. When I
caught it, I could've stayed up and ran with it, but
I was so into just catching it, I fell
"Now, by catching thatball and going through
all that process, I've gotten over that fear of 'just
making the play Last year, I was in a lot of
situations where I didn't 'make the play' � I got
a lot of criticism for not being fast enough in the
secondary
David got off to a slow start last year, as he
was sidelined during much of his first year with
a pulled groin.
"After making that interception, I'm over all
of that (self-doubt), and I'm ready to continue
on David said.
Daren recalled his biggest play, which came
last year during the Kentucky game.
"It was like, 3-3, and they were going in
Photo by Harold WIm �
m
David Hart played in 10 games last season, but was plagued with a �
groin injury most of the season. Off the field, he is a member of �
Football Academic Leadership Team and a Computer Science major. 5
(fourth and goal on the Pirate two yard line)
he said. "It was a goal-line stance and I came
off the end and tackled the runner in the
backfield. That was the biggest play of last
year that I can recall
Being in good health and good form
during the 1993 season, Daren's honors for
last season's performance included being
named to the All-Independent football teams
for Football Action, College & Pro Football
Neivsuvekly, and College Football Scene.
"I really want to lead the team in tackles
(this year), but the middle linebacker is usu-
ally the one to get the tackles�but I want to
be up there he said. "I was second last year,
and I want to at least be in the top four,
leading the team in tackles
"My goal is to have an interception in
every game Davidsaid. "I've got one so far
rhisseason, and we've played two games,so
I gotta get two this week
With a full year of Pirate football under
their belts, the Harts looked at the differences
between high school and collegiate football.
"Football is football, but the players are
much bigger, and the game is much faster
Daren said.
"The crowds are the big difference
David said. "And you're playing on the level
where everybody is just as good as you are
and you got to take into consideration that if
you make a mistake up here on collegiate
level, you're going to pay for it. In high
school, you can make a mistake and pretty
much get away with it
Overall, team spirit seems to be unques-
tionably high, according to the twins.
"This past summer, everybody got to-
getherandstayeduphere'Darensaid. "They
didn't go home like most students. Every-
body went to summer school. We stayed up
here together and really formed a team. It's
like a family now. We go somewhere now, if s
not like 'offense and defense but a team.
"We have a closeness that's going to carry
us through the hard times and thegood times
David said. "I know that I can count on any
one of my teammates. Personally, I feel that
our secondary is better than a lot of secondar-
ies, but nobody really knows it � and I feel
that later on this season, we're going to start
getting the recognition we deserve
Dickinson tees up for 1994 season
By Jody Jones
Staff Writer
Golfisasportthatmanypeopte
follow on a professional lecel, but
do not follow on a collegiate leveL
For mat reason, most people are
unaware thatECUhasanexcelleny
golfer in Josh Dickinson.
Originally from Kinston,
Dickinsonhas played golf since he
was eight years old, when his fa-
ther introduced him to the game.
Growing up, Dickinson said that
he admired several golfers, includ-
mgFredCouplesandPaulAzinger.
Anzinger reentiy returned to the
PGA tour after a year-long battle
with lymphoma cancer.
At Kinston High, Dickinson
was named the golf team's Most
Valuable
Player each
season for four
years. As the
team'snurober
one seed for
three seasons,
Dickinson led
the squad two
twoconference
and two dis-
trict titles.
Dickinson
was recruited
by several
schools, but fi-
nally nar-
rowed his
choices to ECU
Wilmington.
and UNC-
"I chose ECU because of ECU
golf Coach
Hal
Morrison he
saidltwashis
attitude that
sold me
Since
joining the Pi-
rat e s ,
Dickinsonhas
taken eight
shotsoffofhis
score, and
atributes that
tohisgrowing
up as a player
and being
redshirted in
1992
"Your game gets better as you
mature he said.
The most strenuous thing
about golf for Josh is the mental
aspect
"Ifs tough to hang in there
when you are having a bad day
he said. "I constantly work on my
all-around game, but focusalot on
chipping and putting
His favorite golfing memory
camefromtheCurtisStrangeshrine
Classkafewyearsagowhenhehad
theopportunitytocaddyfarMichael
Jordan.
Dickinson aspires tobecome a
professional golfer. He still has two
mor years to play collegiately, and
wimtnetalentanddeterminatkxuo
improve that he already possesses,
hemaysc�nedayreali2ehisdreams.
"I think about it every time I
play he said.
Duke QB
brushes off
� m �
criticism
(AP) � When Spence
Fischer looks over his shoul-
der now, he's trying to find
Duke teammate Robert
Baldwin in the backfield and
not Joe Pickens on the side-
line.
The junior starter isn't
conjuring up memories of
Sonny Jurgenson, Leo Hart
or Dave Brown, but he's been
efficient enough to take the
Blue Devils to their best start
since 1988. Also, he's doing
it with confidence.
"I'm 3-0 right now as a
starting quarterback. As long
See DUKE page 13
�Ml
Giants jump out to
early lead in NFC East
(AP) � Being the
only undefeated team in
the NFC hasn't sparked
much celebration
among New York Gi-
ants players.
While it's some-
what surprising for
them to have a better
record than the Dallas
Cowboys and San Fran-
cisco 49ers, Giants play-
ers say their 3-0 record
means little with 13
games left in the regu-
lar season.
"Iguessyoucansay
I'm surprised veteran
guard William Roberts
said Tuesday as the Gi-
ants left for a five-day,
bye-week vacation.
"I'm happy and I'm
proud. I'm not content
though he said. "We
are going to see most of
our adverse situations
ahead of us. We have to
enjoy this now and re-
alize it is going to take
a lot more to get it
done
In starting 3-0, the
Giants have overcome
the retirement of
Lawrence Taylor, the
salary-cap decision to
let Phil Simms go and
the loss of six other
starters to free agency.
"People didn't ex-
pect us, of all people,
of all teams, to be sit-
ting here linebacker
Corey Miller said. "It
really feels good go-
ing into the bye week,
ha ving beaten three di-
visional teams and sit-
ting at the top all by
ourselves. It's early,
but we have to be ex-
cited about what we've
done
See GIANTS page 12
Go
Crazy!
ECU prides
itself on
having one of
the best
intramural
programs in
the state of
North
Carolina. Flag
Football is
about to enter
its third week
of play. Stop
by room 104 in
Christenbury
Gym for more
information.
File Photo
�MMHKMmi





��
12 The East Carolinian
September 22, 1994
GIANTS
Continued from page 11
Many experts predicted
nothing better than an 8-8 record
fortheGiantsafter an 11-5 record
and wiid-card playoff berth in
1993. Even coach Dan Reeves'
best estimate was 9-7.
"I knew that's the way it
would be after three games
Reeves cracked Tuesday. "That
was my prediction all along
What the Giants have done
is find a way to win. Special
teams and Dave Meggett did
the job in the opener against
Philadelphia. The defense
stepped up the following week
against Arizona. Then Meggett
and Dave Brown came up big
Sunday against Washington.
And when the two-time de-
fending Super Bowl champion
Dallas Cowboys were stunned in
overtime 20-17 by the Detroit Li-
ons on Monday night, lo and be-
hold, the Giants were atop the
NFC.
"I'd be crazy to tell you I was
cheering for the Cowboys Miller
said. "But, hey, it's early. We
started out last year the same way
and thev lost their first two, and
they came back and ended up
taking the division from us. We
have to stay on our toes, rest up
and get ready for a 13-week
stretch
LOGAN
The Pirates enter Saturday's
home-opener against the
Orangemen as the No. 28-ranked
defense in the country. Logan
knows the first real test for his
defensive unit will be against Syra-
cuse and big-play wide receiver
Marvin Harrison.
"This Saturday, we're going
to find out how credible every-
thing is Logan said. "We will
use this game as a measuring stick;
it will be a standard that we can
say, 'We are light years away, close
or even ahead of where we hoped
Continued from page 11
to be "
"When you turn on this
(Syracuse) film, it's not like
watching Duke or like watching
Temple. These guys can run a
million miles an hour and they
don't get knocked down. When
they do get knocked down, they
don't stay down for long. We'll
find out how credible we are
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September 22. 1994
The East Carolinian 13
DUKE
Continued from page 10
as I keep winning, I'll still be that when the time come. I'm go-
there Fischer says. ing to go out there and play my
"I'm confident in the game and not worry about mak-
coaches'decision, and if he feels ing mistakes he says. Once
he needs to pull me, then he'll do you start doing that, you 're going
to make those mistakes and I'm
just going to go out there and
have fun
Fun might have been the fur-
thest thing from Fischer's mind
when the Blue Devils announced
that Pickens was leaving Ohio
State and coming to Durham.
"It kind of caught me by sur-
prise when he came. I had heard
of him and I knew he was a great
quarterback Fischer said. "I
knew a lot about him
Pickens brought some im-
pressive credentials. He was a
high-school All-American who
had led St. Ignatius to a 27-0 record
and two Ohio state titles in his
last two years. In his prep career,
he passed for 5,140 yards and 40
touchdowns.
He barely played atOhioState
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Each Customer Receives a
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Ever- 10th Customer Receives a
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after being redshirted as a fresh-
man, then made the switch to
Duke.
Fischer didn't quite have
Pickens' numbers in high school.
He was an all-state and all-At-
lanta quarterback at the Lovett
School, but at Duke, he wasn't the
big man.
"1 obviously realized that go-
ing out and trying to sign sucrvan
all-star type quarterback, they had
some expectations for him
Fischer said. "I really wanted for
them to have expectations for me
as well. I think I really took it
upon myself to just become a
better quarterback
In 1992, Fischer played in nine
games and started six as Pickens
watched, a result of NCAA rules
which prevent a transfer from
playing in his first year at a new
school. Last season, Pickens
played in five games, passing for
413 yards, two touchdowns and
five interceptions. Fischer com-
pleted 54.9 percent of his passes
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for 2,563 yards, 12 touchdowns
and 14 interceptions.
Although Fischer won the
starting job for this season, new
coach Fred Goldsmith promised
in preseason drills that Pickens
would get to play. He got his
chance in the Armv game, and
suddenly everyone forgot about
Goldsmith's promise and de-
clared Duke in the midst of a
quarterback controversy.
"Coach has a lot of confi-
dence in both of us and he told
me don't worry, I'll be back in
there. He just wanted to give him
a shot to see how mentally he
was into the game Fischer said.
"He's a great player. He's going
to do well and I know that. But 1
know I'm the starting quarter-
back. There's no controversy
here ;
Fischer says he's becomi?
good friends with Pickens. How-
ever, Fischer knows there's no
relaxing.
"I think he helps me become
a better player because he's so
good Fischer said. "I know that
I can't become complacent. He
could alwavsstep in and take my
spot and lead the team
Sportswriters meet-
ing every Monday at
2p.m say most
honorable Masters
Dave and Brad.
TAILGATERS' SPECIAL
THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 2pm-6pm
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COPYRIGHT 1994 - THE KROGER CO ITEMS
AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY. SEPTEMBER
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MHMHBI
ll� I-
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS

H -E
m"
FLASH YOUR JRURFLE FIRA TE FASS
and receive
FREE PARKER'S BARBECUE!
SENIOR TAILGATE 12:00
FBRST 2SO SENIORS WILL PIG OUT
SEPT. 24 ECU VS. SYRACUSE
BEHIND THE ALLIED HEALTH BUILDING
(AKTE 1VIAYBE WIN A CLASS RJNG TOO!)
Sponsored y the Ahomrri Association, ECU Ambassadors, and SGA
UPCOMING SENIOR EVENTS
MOVIE MADNESS-NOV. 14-15
PASSES TO LOCAL MOVIE
THEATERS WILL BE
DISTRIBUTED.
SENIOR SWEETS-FEBRUARY 14
BOXES OF VALENTINE CANDY
WILL BE DISTRIBUTED.
FUN IN THE SUN-MARCH 2
SPECIAL SPRING BREAK PACKAGES
DOOR PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED
AT EACH EVENT
SENIORS PICK UP YOUR
PURPLE PIRATE PASS
NEXT SENIOR EVENT-
SENIOR TAILGATE THIS SATURDAY!
FEEDING FRENZY BEGINS AT 12:00.
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR PURPLE
PIRATE PASS
PASSES WILL BE AVAILABLE AT
THE EVENT TO SENIORS WHO DO
NOT HAVE ONE
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE NEW AMBASSADORS
Cammy Benton
Angela Bryant
Alex Cheek, Jr.
Danielle Danzi
Michael Edgerton
Ann Gallagher
Alisa Godwin
Sarah Ihrie
Holly Kunkel
Deana McLeod
Dan Smith
Jenai Stern
Celeste Tayao
Rich Boustead
Carole Carr
Gina Churpakovich
Mike Dees
Valerie Elks
Joseph Garris
Liliana Gomez
Megan Jacobs
Clara Mackey
Elizabeth Rooney
Jennifer Sparboe
Joanna Stout
Dwayne Wright
Nancy Brenseke
Latabia Cephus
Jennifer Crowell
Michelle Diepold
Allie Furman
Randi Gibbons
Carrie Herrman
Mike Jones
Heather Mackie
Marta Santiago
Amy Stanton
Tracy Tart
WELCOME BACK TO ALL RETURNING AMBASSADORS
Chris Cardy
Mandy Fisher
Brian Johnson
Stacey Klatsky
Shelby Lusk
Wayne Overby
Todd Stevens
Jamie Caviness
Susan Gannon
Wendy Jones
Carter Lawrance
Heather Misenheimer
Karen Page
Michelle Streath
Eric Clark
Angela Gilley
Holly Karas
Skip Lilly
Kristen Oliver
Darcie Reasoner
April Surratt
SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR GRADUATE ASSISTANT
AND ADVISOR WES BOYD AND TAMI GARDNER
MHHVHHIff
nHKHMm





Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1028
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58493
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