The East Carolinian, September 20, 1994






Sports
Endangered Owls
The Pirates traveled to Philadelphia, beat
the Temple Owls 31-14, earned their first
victory since last October and broke their
six-game losing streak.
Check out page 10.
Today
IsW?
High 79'
High 76'
Tomorrow
mMUiiMtiuUtmmmmmmmmmm
Lifestyle
Variety Abound!
UFOs, acrobats, castaways and
prostitutes lurk between the lines
of our Lifestyle section. Turn to
page 7 and choose your pleasure.
The East Carolinian
VoL69No.45
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, September 20,1994
12 Pages
ECU displays growing minority enrollment
By Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
ECU actively recruits mi-
nority students for undergradu-
ate enrollment and has one of
the best rates in the state for
graduating minority students,
said Dr. Brian Haynes, director
of the Office of Minority Student
Affairs.
"According to thelatestfig-
ures that we have, last year mi-
nority students were about thir-
teen percent of the overall stu-
dent population on campus he
said. "Our minority student
population is not the highest in the
state, but it is somewhere upper to
middle of the pack. So, we are very
proud of that and, of course, are
looking to improve on those num-
bers
Haynes said out of the total
of 17,750 students last year, 1,600
were African- Americans, 213 were
Asian-Americans, 144 were His-
panic-Americans and 79 were Na-
tive-Americans.
"By those figures there, you
can see the vast number of the
minority students on campus was
that of African-Americans he
said.
Haynes said the Admissions
Office aggressively recruits minor-
ity students, particularly African-
American students. Because of the
history of the state of North Caro-
lina in dealing with minority stu-
dents, ECU and other state univer-
sities are mandated by the state to
seek minority students.
ECU has a high number of
minority students who graduate
within five years. Haynes said he
feels the key to the high gradua-
tion rate is the large number of
minority students who remain at
the university for their entire un-
dergraduate career.
"One of the things we are
very, very proud of and pleased
with is our retention rate of Afri-
can-American students here at East
Carolina University hesaid. "Ac-
cording to the last data that we
have, retention for African-Ameri-
can students as full-time freshmen
at ECU was 86.9 percent. That
means that of the 251 African-
American students who entered
ECU in the fall of 1992, 86.9 per-
cent were here in the fall of 1993.
That is an extremely high percent-
age and well above the national
norm
Haynes said on the national
level, the graduation rate for Afri-
can-American students who attend
predominately white institutions
is about 30 percent. Within the state,
about40 percent of African-Ameri-
cans graduate from the state's pre-
dominately white universities in
five years. ECU's graduation rate is
constant with the state's average.
"This is slightly higher than
the national average but still rela-
tively low when compared with
other groups of students on cam-
pus he said.
To aid minority student re-
tention and ultimately graduation,
the Office of Minority Affairs offers
a number of services.
" The office's main respon-
sibility is to ensure that minority
students' stay on campus is as
positive as possible he said.
Haynes said the office of-
fers mentoring services and as-
sists in finding tutors. Also, the
office advises student groi ips and
works with the university union
and other departments to bring
minority-type programs to the
campus.
"Those are just some of the
simple things we do to assist mi-
nority students to graduation
hesaid.
Students work in Third World country
By Andy Turner
Staff Writer
While many students spent
this summer enjoying lazy days
on the beach or working a part-
time job, a nine-member group
of ECU students and professors
traveled toQuezaltanango, Gua-
temala, to work with Habitat for
Humanity International.
The volunteer group made
cement blocks, chiseled rock
from the side of a mountain to
clear a lot, dug through lava and
rock to lower the floor in a house
and inventoried building sup-
plies currently on hand at the
local Habitat office. In order to
complete these tasks, the volun-
teers worked alongside the fami-
lies who would inhabit the dwell-
ings after their completion.
The volunteers did more than
just physical tasks. They learned
about the living conditions of a
third world country and felt that
they had bonded with the families
thev had worked with.
"I learned a lot of patience
said Karen Benson, a senior an-
thropology major. "I saw the true
meaning of what it is to survive.
You really realize how lucky you
are as a U.S. citizen.
"People in this country are
very impatient and intolerant of
different types of people. Technol-
ogy has set us back
Benson got a little more
thanshe bargained for when she
contracted an anemic deciendary.
"I stayed in a public hospi-
tal. It looked like a barn Benson
said. "Nobody spoke English,but
people treated me really good.
Technology was not very good
Despite having to stay in a
hospital, Benson enjoyed work-
ing with the Habitat for Human-
ity and plans to go back to South
America sometime in the future.
"I applied for a job with the
Habitat for Humanity Benson
said. "I would like to get a job in
South America. I am going back
with or without the Habitat orga-
nization, maybe for graduation.
"It is a good experience for
anybody caught up with the stress
of this country. I really learned a lot
of patience
The main goal of the Habitat
For Humanity International is for
people in need to have decent
homes in decent communities.
"It helps faculty and students
in understanding the third world
said Dr. Rick Barnes, associate pro-
fessor of health education. "It was
a tremendous opportunity to see
the differences between a regulated
and unregulated society
Barnes used his health edu-
cation experience to help citizens,
many of whom are illiterate, to
leam basic sanitation issues such
as making drinking water safe.
See HABITAT page 3
Photo Courtesy of Carol Shields
Greek week kicks off fraternity Rush
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
The Interfraternity Coun-
cil (IFC) wrapped up a success-
ful Greek Week on Saturday
night and has now focused its
energy on Fall Rush, which be-
gins tonight.
In the past, Greek Week
was held during the spring se-
mester as a celebration of the
hard work accomplished dur-
ing the fall. This year, however,
Greek Week moved to the fall to
help strengthen fall rush.
"During this time of year,
people are more active said IFC
President, John Ezzell. "Placing
Greek Week right before rush
helps a lot with publicity
The move is only one aspect
of the plan to strengthen the Greek
system. IFC also sponsored "Go
Greek" seminars during summer
orientation to welcome new stu-
dents to the program.
"As a result of 'Go Greek
we saw a greater interest in the
system, from both students and
their parents said rush chair-
man Rob Senseney.
"We acted as a soundboard
for freshmen with questions
IFC sees this as a good build-
ing block for a strong year. Each
night of Greek Week consisted of
activities sponsored by different
fraternities or sororities. The Al-
pha Xi Delta Sorority kicked it all
off last Sunday night with their
annual Greek God contest at The
Attic. Throughout the week, vari-
ous events kept the enthusiasm
going strong, and the last party
featured a band at the Phi Kappa
Tau house on Saturday night.
"We had a great turnout this
year Ezzell said. "We're hoping
all that enthusiasm reinforces a
strong rush
For the next three nights, ev-
ery fraternity will take part in rush.
Beginning at 8 p.m men inter-
ested in Greek life will have the
opportunity to meet the brothers
of each house and catch a glimpse
of what the system is all about.
Each fraternity sponsors its own
rush by providing food and
drinks, and IFC will provide bus
transportation from Mendenhall
to each of the rush locations. Fra-
ternities without houses usually
Piof gets look at real politics
By Katy Newton
Staff Writer
An ECU professor spent
eight months rubbing elbows
with Washington politicians
during the height of the health
care debate. As a member of
the 41st class of Congressional
Fellows, political science pro-
fessor Dr. Sean Kelly learned
more about the political pro-
cess through hands-on experi-
ence.
The fellowship was spon-
sored by the American Politi-
cal Science Association, and
Kelly won his position by par-
ticipating in a competitive, na-
tionwide application process.
"It gives a handful of Con-
gressional Scholars an oppor-
tunity to deepen their under-
standing of Congress by work-
ing inside Congress as a pro-
fessional staff member Kelly
said.
After participating in a
month-long academic orienta-
tion, Kelly joined the staff of
the Senate democratic Policy
Committee, which is chaired
by Senator Mitchell of Maine.
While working on the com-
mittee, Kelly focused entirely on
health care. His job was to edu-
cate himself about the democratic
health care plan and then to au-
thor most of the materials that
the Democratic Policy Commit-
tee would dispense to other Con-
gress members and to the media.
Kelly noted that while most
Congressional Fellows worked
for individual Congress mem-
bers, his job with the Democratic
Policy Committee gave him the
opportunity to interact with and
observe many members of Con-
gress in several different contexts.
"Working at the DPC, it's
not so much that I worked with a
single member, I worked with all
the democratic members, and so
I could get into 'senators only'
meetings where I could see sena-
tors interact with one another
Kelly said. "I got to observe quite
a bit and that's a very different
experience from sitting in a back
room somewhere, writing con-
stituent lettersor putting together
briefs on Whitewater
Kelly's firsthand observa-
tions of the democratic process
allowed him to come to his own
conclusions about how his gov-
ernment works, especially with
respect to the health care issue.
"I'm a little disappointed
by the fact that the debate over
health care did not focus as much
on substance as I hoped that it
would Kelly said. "Healthcare
isn't, and shouldn't be, a parti-
san issue
Kelly's colleagues in the
ECU Political Science Depart-
ment have been enthusiastic
about his opportunity.
"We are very pleased that
Dr. Kelly received this presti-
gious fellowship which will ben-
efit greatly the university as well
as his teaching said Dr. David
Conradt, chairman of the Politi-
cal Science Department.
Kelly is happy to be back at
ECU and looks forward to set-
tling down and concentrating on
his research and his teaching. He
plans on writing about his expe-
rience as a Congressional Fellow
and is excited about incorporat-
ing what he has learned into his
classes.
hold rush in rented party rooms
or sorority houses.
Traditionally, Fall Rush has
been stronger than Spring Rush.
This is due, in part, to a more
collegiate atmosphere during the
fall. IFC hopes it can change that.
Last week, Senseney was elected
as new secretary for the execu tive
board, and, along with other board
members, has begun planning up-
coming events.
"Our goal is to strengthen
the system Senseney said. "I'd
like to see IFC attain its strong
organization status again
� � �
Greenville
considers
curfew
By Tully Beatty
Carter seeks peace in Haiti
(AP) � The figurehead
president of Haiti pleaded for calm
when American troops landed
Monday to enforce an agreement
that will oust the military leaders
and restore exiled President Jean-
Bertrand Aristide to power.
The last-minute accord,
reached Sunday after President
Clinton ordered American para-
troopers into the air, halted a land,
sea and air assault by American
forces.
The capital was generally
quiet after midnight, but there was
scattered gunfire earlier after an
American delegation headed by
former President Jimmy Carter
ended two days of intense talks
with Lt. Gen Raoul Cedras and
Brig Gen. Philippe Biamby, army
chief of staff.
The generals who toppled
Aristidein September 1991 backed
down in the face of overwhelm-
ing military might and agreed to
let American forces enter the coun-
try peacefully to oversee the trans-
fer of power.
Haiti's 81-year-old presi-
dent, Emile Jonassant, went on
television just before midnight to
announce he had signed the ac-
cord and asked his "Haitianbroth-
ers" to maintain calm. "You may
go to sleep knowing that there
will not be any invasion he said.
"I don't know what's going
to happen said Brutus Talma, a
hotel security guard. "Only the
Haitian soldiers know if they're
going to make trouble for the
American soldiers
He echoed the uncertainty
about what happens next in Haiti,
a desperately poor Caribbean na-
tion wracked by violence and with
no tradition of democracy.
There was no immediate
comment from Aristide, who has
been living in exile in the United
States since the coup that drove
him from power. The agreement
did not name Aristide or say when
he would return.
Although Aristide is revered
by much of Haiti's impoverished
majority, there were no displays
of public jubilation at word of his
promised return.
Thousands of people fled the
capital in recent days, anticipat-
See HAITI page 4
Staff Writer
Following the ex-
amples of larger cities,
Greenville will soon discuss
the much-debated option of
enforcing a curfew for juve-
niles. The Greenville City
Council will hold a Com-
munity Meeting tomorrow
at 4:00p.m. at theCityCoun-
cil Chambers, City Hall.
"The purpose of the
community meeting is to see
whether there is a commu-
nity consensus to push for-
ward with the proposal
said DeWitt "Mac"
McCarley, City Attorney.
"There is no specific pro-
posal, but the models that
we are looking at generally
regulate teen-agers � 16-
years-old and younger
The request for the
proposed curfew was made
by a parent support group
called Tough Love. The
group is for families with
problem and delinquent
children.
"The request from that
group grows out of their ex-
perience with their children
and their desire for some
assistance in controlling be-
havior McCarley said.
The planning stage for
the curfew is in its most el-
ementary form. There will
be a bramstorming session
at the meeting for those at-
tending to identify prob-
lems in the community that
See CURFEW page 4
i �
�SiW��-�� "





2 The East Carolinian
September 20, 1994
CRI
TS
SENE
Shuttle landing delayed due to weather
September 12
Cotten Hall � A resident was transported to Pitt Memorial after
falling from the loft in her room.
September 14
Suspicious Activity � A student was stopped at Minges for
offering rides to people from Christenbury to Minges for the past
two weeks. A campus ticket was issued for harassing others.
Mendenhall Student Center � A student reported he was as-
saulted by a student who pointed a gun at him. The charges were
later found to be false. The suspect was found to have been
innocent of anv wrongdoing. The non-student who filed the
complaint has been criminally charged for filing a false complaint.
September 15
Rawl Building � An identified male student was reported of
having possible involvement in suspicious activities in the bath-
room in Rawl building. The suspect left before officers arrived.
September 16
Communicating Threats � A student said that her roommate
threatened to beat her. Coordinators, dorm staff and counselors
� responded. Two non-students were banned for causing trouble.
Charges are pending investigation.
Seventh and Cotanche Streets � A student was arrested for
driving while impaired. He was also charged with having no
driver's license and a fictitious license.
September 17
General Classroom Building�A resident of Jarvis Hall reported
being assaulted south of General Classroom Building. A non-
student was positively identified as the suspect and arrest war-
rants were served.
Parking Lot at Third and Reade Streets � A student reported that
he was assaulted by a subject with a gun. The subject pointed the
gun at the student and then fired into the air.
September 18
Cotten Hall � A resident was issued a state citation and a campus
appearance ticket for possession of drug paraphernalia in her
room.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from official ECU crime
reports.
(AP) � NASA watched
uncertain Florida weather Monday,
hoping to bring Discovery home
after a 10-day mission that included
climate research, robotic manufac-
turing and the first untethered
spacewalk since 1984.
The space shuttle and its
six astronauts were set to land at
Cape Canaveral, Fla at 2:23 p.m.
EDT, but stormy weather was fore-
cast. NASA could send the shuttle to
Edwards Air Force Base in Califor-
nia later in the day instead.
"It's been a great mission to
planet Earth MissionControl told
the crew in this morning's wake-
up call. "I think it's safe to say
we've demonstrated a new tech-
nology for studying our planet's
atmosphere. Unfortunately, ifs
time to return
"Well, you never can tell
replied commander Richard
Richards. "Maybe our planet's at-
mosphere will keep us up here one
more day
Discovery pilot L. Blaine
Hammond Jr. said the crew was
looking forward to some earthly
pleasures�showers, for one.
"It's pretty fatiguing up
here Hammond said Sunday. "I
think a lot of us are looking forward
to getting home, getting a good
shower and some good old earth-
bound things we enjoy.
"However,of course, I think
given another day or so to be up here
ifwe had thechance, we'd all jump at
it just because it's an opportunity so
rare he said.
The astronauts, launched
into orbit Sept. 9, achieved every-
thing they set out to do. They re-
leased and retrieved a sun-gazing
satellite, collected data on shuttle '
exhaust plumes and assisted j
ground controllers with a weather-
scanning laser.
The high point was
Friday's seven hour spacewalk by
Mark Lee and Carl Meade, using a
slimmed-down version of the jet
pack employed in the last
untethered spacewalk 10 years ago.
The new pack is intended
to be used as an emergency rescue
See SPACE page 3
Irish leaders seek U.S. opinion on peace j
(AP) � Leaders from both
sides of Northern Ireland's sec-
tarian divide go to Washington
this week to argue their cases,
emphasizing the importance of
U.S. opinion as they grope for a
peace settlement.
The Irish Republican
Army's declaration of an open-
ended truce has raised hopes that
peace may be at hand at last in the
British province, where 25 years
of sectarian and political strife
has killed more than 3,100 people.
Roman Catholic nationalists
who seek an end to British rule
and unification with Ireland want
Washington to help get Sinn Fein,
the IRA-allied political party, in-
volved as soon as possible in peace
talks. Pro-British Protestants want
to dampen U.S. enthusiasm for
the 19-day-old IRA truce.
Both sides assume the
United States will increase eco-
nomic aid to Northern Ireland to
See IRISH page 4
NEW
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Available At:
ECU Student Stores
PQ Box 80728. Una � 68501
BIOLOGY � CALCULUS � CHEMISTRY � ECONOMICS � PHYSICS � STATISTICS
"Great Scott"
CLUB 7:57
COMEDY CLUB
Comedy Magic
Tuesday, September 20,7:57 pm
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 244
Sponsored by the Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
D O N LEE
"DAZZLING AND .
FIERCELY HYPNOTIC
i1
' 1
"A FAST-PAGED.
TRIUMPH!
A rylih'saya o( vigilante j
Br.union Lqc i a vivid pre
in-the title rok
3rd Annual
SierMSunSpWi
Orange Crush
Concert on the Mall
Featuring
Y itfe'pw
All movies start at 8:00 pm in Hendrix Theatre
and are FREE to students, staff, faculty, and one guest
with valid ECU I.D.
noon day
Tunes
Jim Swinson
Wednesday & Thursday
September 21 & 22
All Noon Day Tunes are held from 11:30 am
until 1:00 pm at Todd Dining Hall the first day
and Mendenhall Dining Room the second day.
Sponsored by the Student Union
Popular Entertainment Committee.
eAVjDEy
We're More
Than Barefoot!
For more
information, call
the SU Hotline at
328-6004.
Fuego del Alma
Knocked Down Smilin'
Sponsored in part by ECU IFC,
Panhellenic, & SGA.
Friday, September 23
7:00 pm until 11:00 pm
on the Mall
Rain Site: Christenbury Gym
STUDENT UNION POPULAR
ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
AN EVENING WITH
JOHN MAYALL &
THE
BLUESBREAKERS
WITH THE MINISTERS OF
SINISTER
8:00 pm in Hendrix Theatre
Thursday, September 29,1994
Tickets on sale now at the
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
Call 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS
We accept MasterCard & VISA
W S F Lgg
bb n u an
For information regarding the annual
SU New York trip, call the New
York trip hotline at 328-4788.
Rush Rush Rush Rush Rush
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Founded at ECU: April 1, 1959
Housing: We own two houses that
house 23 people as well
as a large party room.
Manpower: Sigma Phi Epsilon is
ECU's largest fraternity
with over 70 members.
Sports: Sigma Phi Epsilon is always
a strong force in intramurals
as well as a dominating winner
of the coveted Chancelor's Cup.
Academics: Sigma Phi Epsilon stresses
academics and gives out
various scholarships every
semester to its members.
Special
Events: Socials, Homecoming, formals,
band parties, tailgating, fund-raisers
and philanthropy projects.
On Campus: Sigma Phi Epsilon is heavily
represented on the Student
Government Association (SGA).
We are also represented on the IFC
�MHM
mmmmmmse





-�
September 20, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
fe�0!Rt
Cafe
Serving Downtown Greenville Since 1950
Full Breakfast & Lunch Menu
Mom's Kitchen Away From Home
We Welcome
Take Out
757-1716
Orders Monday - Friday 8:00-5:00
"Save fioom For Dessert "
Km Across From the Courthouse J
HABITAT
Cont. from
page 1
Dr. Trenton Davis, an envi-
ronmental health professor, and
Dr. Leo Zonn, a geography profes-
sor, also went with the group on
the trip. Zonn taught the citizens
about how geography had affected
Guatemala. Davis taught about
things such as air and water pollu-
tion, seat belts and personal and
community sanitation.
This was ECU's fourth trip
with Habitat for Humanity Inter-
national. Previously, there were
three other trips to Guatemala and
one to Mexico.
"We worked in a rural vil-
lage where tourists would never
dream about coming within miles
of Barnes said. "It provided an
appreciation for the opportunity
to get an education and the life we
live
Other students who went on
the trip included Gina Benson,
Candee Blanton, Karen Mills, Carol
Shields and Amy Walker.
HAITI
Continued from page 1
CoWefflf
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ing violence, and Aristide sup-
porters who might be expected to
celebrate instead cowered indoors,
some feeling the need to sleep in
safe houses.
There was reason to fear. A
burst of automatic gunfire was
heard downtown near army head-
quarters and a hotel packed with
foreign reporters. Two cars were
stolen by gunmen who told their
former occupants they needed
them "to patrol the city for the
government
The accord comes nearly a
year after Cedras reneged on a
U.Nbrokered deal that would
have had him step down and per-
mit Aristide to resume power.
Under Sunday's agreement,
Haiti's dictators agreed to step
down as soon as the Haitian par-
liament passes an amnesty law to
protect the coup leaders and their
supporters from retribution. The
pact requires this happen by Oct.
15.
The agreement does not re-
quire Cedras to leave Haiti or even
mention him by name. He did not
sign the agreement�that was left
to Jonassaint.
The new agreement also
promises an end to the UN. em-
bargo imposed after it became
clear that Cedras would not honor
last year's agreement. The sanc-
tions failed in their aim to force
Haiti's military rulers to their
knees but devastated an already
wretched economy.
It is unclear whether the
army and its several thousand
paramilitary auxiliaries will com-
ply with new orders and assist the
incoming U.S. troops in paving
the way for Aristide's return.
Even as Carter's motorcade
left for the airport Sunday night,
about 900 pro-army demonstra-
tors who had been gathered out-
side the army headquarters all af-
ternoon chanted, "Aristide, No
SPACE
Cont. from
page 2
device for future space station
crews.
Lee described the
spacewalk as a once-in-a-lifetime
"special treat
"There's a mix between
having to concentrate very hardon
maneuvers to make sure you do
them right and the exhilaration
of seeing some sights thatrmprob-
ably never going to see again and
never experience Lee said.
A $25 million laser ma-
chine spent more than 50 hours
flashing light pulses at clouds, at-
mcsphericparticlesandtheEarth's
surface. Atelescopeonboard gath-
ered the reflected laser light far a
study of global climate.
One target was Typhoon
Melissa in the Pacific Ocean. Dis-
covery flew directly over the
storm's eye, allowing atmospheric
scientists to record cloud heights
and densities throughout Melissa.
u
s
H
DELTA SIGMA PHI FALL RUSH
TUES. SEPT 20 ROUND THE WORLD AND MEET THE BROTHERS 8 PM
WED. SEPT 21 INDOOR PUTT PUTT AND BINGO 8 PM
THUR. SEPT 22 GRAFFITI NIGHT 8 PM
FRI. SEPT 23 INVITATION ONLY PLEDGE PARTY. DINNER AT 6 PM
FOR RIDE OR INFORMATION CALL 757-1817 (DELTA SIG HOUSE)
DELTA
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TIME: 8-11
FOR MORE INFO
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. W 7
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. i i i





4 The East Carolinian
September 20, 1994
IRISH
Cont. from
t
help cement a peace agreement.
John Hume, the Catholic
leader whose secret talks with
thepresidentcfSinnFeinhelped
to pave the way for the IRA
cease-fire, is to begin a four-day
visit to Capitol Hill today. He is
to meet with House Speaker
Tom Foley, the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee and
Friendsof Ireland congressional
members, including his friend
Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass.
Hume is the only North-
ern Ireland politician with a pro-
file in Washington. He has ag-
gressively pursued U.S. invest-
ment for a British-ruled prov-
ince badly in need of jobs, par-
ticularly in his mostly Catholic
hometown of Londonderry.
"We see America coming
in with support, particularly eco-
nomic, rather than solutions
said Mark Durkan, chairman of
Hume's Social Democratic and
Labor Party, which wants Ire-
land united but opposes theIRA
"But in Northern Ireland,
where you have two traditions
and twogovemmentsoften care-
fully balanced against each
other, the influence of America
� a third-party interest with a
benevolent role � can be help-
ful in creating movement
Durkan said. "It was certainly
helpful in moving Sinn Fein for-
ward
The Ulster Unionists,
Northern Ireland's largestparty
and the group mat gets the bulk
of the the pro-British Protestant
vote, are sending four senior
members Wednesday for ex-
pected meetings with Vice Presi-
dent Al Gore, Foley and Na-
tional Security Council advis-
ers.
Sinn Fein leader Gerry
Adams is planning a tour of eight
to 12 cities lasting at least two
weeks�even though he has yet
to secure a visa.
Britain is pressing the
Clinton administration to with-
hold a visa until Adams makes
clear that the IRA truce is per-
manent
In January, Clinton over-
turned longstandingU.S. policy
and gave Adams a 48-hour visa
to address a New York confer-
ence on Northern Ireland.
Huge media attention
transformed Adams into the
best-known Northern Ireland
politician in America, but also
put pressure on him to deliver
an open-ended IRA truce.
Sinn Fein now hopes to
cultivate more sympathy in
Washington and sell its retooled
peace message to the Irish-
American grass roots on both
coasts.
Britain says Sinn Fein can't
take part in peace talks until Lon-
don is assured the violence has
stopped for good.
Sinn Fein strategists think
U.S. support for early talks be-
tween Sinn Fein and British offi-
cials could tip the scales in their
direction.
"If s clear the U.S. admin-
istration has an interest in the
situation here and will lend
weight to efforts to move the
peace process forward said
Adams' media adviser, Richard
McAuley.
"The long-term effect of
US. interest willbetobringpres-
sures to bear during any period
of negotiation McAuley said.
CURFEW
RESGGOLD TOWERS
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could be solved by a curfew.
Based on the problems
brought to light, the partici-
p nts will then decide on the
pros and cons of a curfew.
"Our goal is to have the
first Community Meeting this
month McCarley said. "We
plan to put some informa-
tion out into the community
based on what goes on in that
meeting and do some more
research with the police de-
partment.
"If an ordinance draft
looks like the direction we are
going, we hope to have that
by the first week in October.
We hope to have a second
community meeting some
time in the middle of Octo-
ber, and if we have a refined
draft at the end of October,
we'll present it to Council in
November
The Council has been
studying models of curfews
used in Dallas, Texas and
Jacksonville, N.C.
If instated, the curfew
will be 11:00 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and mid-
night Friday and Saturday.
Although all ECU stu-
dents should be out of the age
limit to be affected by th cur-
few, several addressed the is-
"I think that what makes
the kids baad in the first place
is lack of discipline by the par-
ents said Randall Rozzell,
junior.
Another student felt that
while there are some unruly
teenagers, others who are dis-
Continued from page 1
ciplined may be ill-affected
by the curfew.
"Looking at some of the
16-year-olds I've seen, maybe
they should have a curfew
said Melanie Burke, junior.
"But it's not fair for the disci-
plined ones
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To find out more ate Lieutenants French or Pait in the General
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iO





' " � n� i �. iA i
September 20, 1994
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Stephanie B. Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zion, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Kris Hoffler, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Dave Pond, Sports Editor
Brad Oldham, Asst Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
r
Baseball strike hurts American workers
Something that Edmund Burke, the
founder of modern conservatism, said about
tradition and responsibility seems most
appropriate regarding the baseball strike
and the decision made last week to cancel
the remainder of the season. Burke held that
every member of society had a responsibility
to uphold society's traditions to those who
lived in the past, those who live in the present
and those who will live in the future.
While not quite ready to completely
endorse such a sense of corporate
responsibility, the editors of TEC feel that
those who have inherited a national treasure
such as major league baseball have such an
obligation.
Baseball has long been considered the
American game. For much of this century,
Americans followed baseball passionately.
The heroes of those days � Babe Ruth, Lou
Gehrig, Mickey Mantle, Jackie Robinson,
etc. � are still cultural icons today, in ways
that Michael Jordan, Shaq O'Neal and Joe
Montana will never be.
Baseball is also the sport most associated
with tradition. The game is still played with
nearly the same rules today as it was in the
1920s. The film of a game of the 1950s looks
like a black-and-white version of today's
games.
However, this grand tradition is being
ruined by both sides in the current labor
dispute. Both the players and the owners
make hundreds of millions of dollars every
year. The sight of the two sides fighting
over a few million dollars is like seeing two
four-hundred-pound men fighting over a
Twinkie. It is a sickening and disgusting
sight � no wonder most Americans think
that both sides are wrong.
Moreover, they are damaging more than
just the reputation of baseball. Around
30,000 jobs have been lost due to the strike.
Since only 700 of these are actual playing
jobs, this means that thousands of everyday
citizens that do the real work in baseball�
vendors, groundskeepers and the myriad
of other jobs needed to put on a major
league game � are without a job today.
Major league baseball managed to put
on a World Series during World War I,
World War II, the Korean War, Vietnam
and the San Francisco Earthquake. To have
the Fall Classic canceled for the first time in
90 years due such a trivial reason may be
more than the sport can stand.
Even if the strike is somehow settled
this winter and play begins next spring,
bitter memories of this appalling behavior
will linger for years. And rightly so. We
should be reluctant to forgive either side for
their intolerable greed and insensitivity to
the people who really make the game
possible � the fans.
American education taken over by feds
On March 31,1994, President
Clinton signed a document that
seeks to improve America's
educational system�Goals 2000:
Educate America Act. But do not
be fooled, Goals 2000 hopes to do
much more than raise a child's
SAT score.
While nationalizing the
education system, the law will
allow the federal government to
direct the inner workings of our
nation's schools. They hope to
accomplish the latter by directing
educators to follow prescribed
course contents, to utilize
particular textbooks, to meet
their set achievement
standards and much more.
Soon after the president
signed his education
legislation into law, The New
York Times called it a "federal
blueprint to educate our
children Given the track
record of other federal blue
prints, I am understandably
concerned about the future of
our youth who will eventually -
be our nation's leaders.
Other federal blueprints that
boasted worthwhile ends such as
cutting taxes, balancing the
budget and even restoring
principled behavior in the White
House have of course failed. I do
not believe that President Clinton
should be trusted with educating
our children for several reasons,
namely his open embrace of the
gay lifestyle.
But if you are seeking
reassurance concerning this issue
from elsewhere within the
Clinton Administration, perhaps
you can find solace in the opinion
of our illustrious Attorney
General, Janet Reno. While federal
education doctrine states that
schooling should begin in the
womb and end in the tomb, Reno
too has jumped on the
bandwagon by declaring that we
need to focus on the early stages
of children's lives�particularly
between ages zero and three. I
found this to be very comforting
coming from a childless person
who bears responsibility for the
Waco debacle � where children
were gassed and burned to death.
Inherent to federal efforts to
educate kids are programs that
ostensible allow children to
engage in values clarification. It
sounds pleasant, but an aspect of
values clarification is that it
favorably addresses the
homosexual lifestyle.
Given the track
record of other
federal blue prints,
I am concerned
about the future of
our youth.
Children in many schools are
told that homosexuality is
nothing more than different, and
not at all unacceptable. Through
such timeless classics as Daddy's
Roommate and Heather Has Two
Mommies, gay activists have been
permitted to infiltrate our nation's
schools.
And if the ethical standards
you wish to impart to your child
do not match what the school says,
the government dictated
education system will happily re-
educate the youth by professing
what the state deems as moral. It
reminds me of a quote form Adolf
Hitler: "When an opponent
declares, 'I will not come to your
side I calmly say, 'Your child
belongs to us already
With schools in our country
that celebrate "National Coming
Out Day" as a high holy day, I do
By Steven A. Hill
not doubt that our nation's
children are being indoctrinated
with the ideology of Gay Rights.
New York Assemblywoman
Deborah Glick, an avowed
lesbian, confirms my worst fears:
"I think that the reality is that
most parents themselves have
tremendous prejudice and
bigotry that have been passed on
for generations And the reality
is that we as a society must
provide a counterbalance to what
kids are obviously learning at
home
The preceding quote paves
the way for government social
workers to enter every home
to insure that you are raising
your child "correctly
At a minimum,
government educational
designs are going to further
diminish the status of the
family. This sounds ironic since
these nefarious ambitions are
promoted by our president,
who claims to be concerned
about the welfare of the family
in American society.
A Stanford University
professor asserted recently that
government run schools are
involved in "unrelenting guerrilla
warfare against the traditional
values of society and against the
very role of families in making
decisions about their children
At least one of the Founding
Fathers believed that a
government that governs least
governs best � and I agree.
President Clinton seems hell-
bent on doing just the opposite
�everything from crime control
to health care is being usurped
by federal muscle. Efforts to
centralize the educational system
are dangerous.
President Clinton, or any
other government official, is the
last person I want teaching my
child right from wrong.
Salutations show lack of concern for others
Salutations. The following
trite and empty expressions can
be heard being uttered somewhere
by someone on any given day:
"What's up?" "What's
happening?" and the most
commonplace of all, "How are
you?"
These already overly-used
greetings are not only irritating
owing to their habitual use but
also because of the lack of sincerity
with which most people say them.
When someone say, "how are
you?" it is generally intended in a
rhetorical sense and does not call
for a response. At least such is the
reality of the phrase's use in our
society.
One usually hears the
standard "How are you?" in two
common cases: passing a stranger
on the street or being greeted by a
receptionist at a public place such
as a bank or a hospital. "How are
you?" is the accepted obligatory
greeting that most people use to
acknowledge each other in a
sociably-indifferent manner. In
any case, it is commonly used
between persons that have no
personal connection � a formal
and bureaucratic greeting.
Some readers will no doubt
object to the hospital reference and
view it's inclusion as unwarranted.
At a hospital, one would expect
that the employees there were
genuinely concerned about the
welfare of the patients. Right?
However, this writer can recall
an instance when the first words
spoken to him by a hospital
receptionist were actually "Do you
have insurance?" After
establishing the fact that I did have
insurance, then I was asked "How
are you?" If I did not have
insurance would the receptionist
have even extended the
perfunctory "How are you?" I
wonder?
Apparently, today's fast-
paced does not have the time to
stop and inquire about the
contentedness of its fellow
members, much less take the time
to think of a new greeting besides
that of the insipid and nonchalant
"How are you?" To those who
actually read my last article on
individuality by inventing a new
greeting. After doing this, then I
would try to get in tough with
your own sense of humanity.
Personally, I have grown
weary of the same tired crap in
our society. From superficial
greetings to media-induced
identities, the artificiality of
American society and its plastic
personalities is frankly nauseating.
When are people going to remove
the cloak of affectation?
No one, including myself, is
immune from what is rapidly
becoming another contagious
disease in the 90s, social
indifference. The symptoms might
be increased crime, an unstable
economy and technological
progress being crammed down
our throats, but the only cure is a
daily dosage of compassion for
others.
A sincere greeting extended
to one's fellow man is the first step
towards recovering from a bout
with our own egocentric
perspectives. Maybe Mignon
McLaughlin was right when he
said "No one really listens to
anyone else, and if you try it for a
while you'll see why Perhaps
our reluctance to actually stop and
hear someone respond to being
By H. White
asked "How are you?" comes from
the fear that not everyone's
response will be the expected
"Fine, thanks
After all, you were nice
enough to humble yourself and
ask the person "How are you?"
but does that mean that you should
be subjected to someone else's true
feelings or problems? I mean, do
you have the time to worry
whether the rest of society is happy
or not? The other guy's problems
are not your concern � not until
the other guy's problems manifest
themselves in your backyard
anyway.
Society's priorities concerning
respect for individuals and their
feelings is all screwed-up. We
worry about our own happiness,
while others tormented by
loneliness and discontent pass us
by in "quiet desperation" or end
up taking their lives, so that the
rest of society does not have to be
burdened by asking "How are
you?"
Most of society feels that it is
easier just to deal with social
problems from a monetary
standpoint. If you are unhappy
then money can be substituted in
place of affection or kindness.
The problem is money cannot
compensate for basic human needs
such as the need to belong. We can
build more prisons, increase law
enforcement and spend more
money on going to therapy, but
eventually someone is going to
have to make the supreme sacrifice
and ask in all sincerity "How are
you?"
A more appropriate greeting
for the 90s might be "Are you
happy?" rather than "How are
you?'
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Once again, "The New and Disturber" showed
its bias against ECU with its headline, "Reputation
for Rowdiness" in the Sept. 10 paper. Steve Politi
obviously knows very little about ECU if all he can
talk about is what happened in 1987 at NC State. Get
a grip and let it rest! I noticed there was no mention
of the 1992 Peach Bowl victory when ECU defeated
NC State with one incident.
East Carolina is not a "party school but like
other state universities, it definitely has a social
atmosphere. Actually, ECU has an extremely diverse
student body, but the one thing we all have in
common is that everyone here is extremely friendly.
Our students do not walk around with a chip on
their shoulder, like at some other schools!
The atmosphere in Greenville and ECU is the
best you can find anywhere. If someone fails out of
ECU they only have themselves to blame. College is
what you make of it. If one chooses to party all the
time, they will fail out no matter what school they
attend.
East Carolina has always had to struggle for
everything it has achieved, and negative journalism
such as the N&O's will not stop us now. I just hope
that people who are not familiar with ECU do not let
such a poorly written article influence their opinion
on what a well-rounded and excellent school ECU
really is.
Troy S. Dreyfus
President
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
To the Editor:
Yesterday a recent article in the Raleigh New &
Observer was brought to my attention. It was the
story in which the Theta Chi President pounded his
chest in defiance of good taste to boast of his and the
university's insatiable thirst for partying. At no
time in the four years I've spent at this school have
I seen a better wake up call for us to clean up our act.
To make the statements these students made do
not reflect the true nature of what this school is
about. It does, however, show a problem segment of
the campus community that can no longer be
ignored. Right now as a campus leader, (Student
Union President) I am begging the faculty and staff,
the media and every student at this school to CUT
IT OUT!
We are cursed in three ways. We have an anemic
faculty and staff. Professors far more concerned
with their research than their students, academic
advisers that rarely advise and members higher up
who only care about profit margins, enrollment any
sic expansion and NOT student interests.
We have a state paper who hates us (The Neios
& Observer) and a pathetic school newspaper
(pathetic). The East Carolinian rarely writes stories
on campus alternatives to downtown, concentrate
sic on entertainment of campus, and do sic
nothing to promote that this school does have alot
sic to offer.
But last to blame myself and thousands of other
students who choose not to stop the issue but only
perpetuate it. I see who cares for the students and
who doesn't.
None of us have heard the last of this issue. We
built this beast, now we have to kill it. Over the next
few weeks a lot of fingers will be pointed but the one
hardest to point will be at ourselves.
Michael Preston
Senior
English





.
September 20, 1994
������� I� mi I li I n " -
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 6
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For Rent
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3 ROOMMATES NEEDED ASAP to
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
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FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
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ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 bdr 2
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355-3611 after 5pm or leave message.
PARTY OVER HERE! Hey Greeks and
other social groups. Your party isn't
pump'n until Mobile Music Produc-
tions disc jockey service arrives. MMP
provides the music you want to hear
when you want to hear it. Experienced
DJ's with the widest variety of music.
Call Lee @ 758-4644 early for booking.
Help Wanted
CHAR-GRILL
H. (� tlu- T.
LINE COOKS
CASHIERS
f-iM .Up A0Dlic.Vior.Si .)�
Ons'ruCTiOn S'tp LOCVt- i i'
315 E. 10th Street
. (teside Kmko s)
Mai! m Applications to
P.O. Box 3797
Greenville. NC 27836 1797
. Great Place to VVOfk ,
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mailing Bro-
chures! Spare Full-time. Set own hours!
Rush self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers(GI)1821HillandaleRdlB-
295, Durham, NC 27705.
SALES-PART-TIMEFULL-TIME
Beauty International has positions open
on campus, extra dollars or full-time
income. Call Kim 910-353-9684.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Dancers,
Escorts, Masseuars. Earn BIG BUCKS
in the cleanest club in North Carolina.
Must be 18 Years Old. PLAYMATES
Adult Entertainment. 919-747-7686.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up to
$1000plusaweekescortingintheGreen-
ville area with a liscensed agency. Also
need one part time receptionist at $7 p
h. Must be 18, dependable and have
own phone and transportation. Call
Diamonds or Emerald City Escorts at
7584)896 or 757-3477
EARNS2500&FREESPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell 8 trips and go free! Best trips
& prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Jamaica,
PanamaCityiGreatresumeexperience!
1-800-678-6386!
WANTED America's fastest growing
travel company now seeking individu-
als promoting trips to Jamaica, Cancun,
Bahamas, Florida, Padre, Barbados. The
easiest way to free travel, fantastic pay.
Call Sunsplash Tours 1-800-426-7710'
SPRING BREAK '95- Sell trips, earn
cash & go free Student Travel Services
is now hiring campus represenatives.
Lowest rates to Jamaica, Cancun,
Daytona and Panama City Beach. Call
1-800-648-4849
AGRICULTURALRETAILOUTLET-
Merchandiser position. This is a part-
time position (upto30 hours per week).
The job requires customer service skills,
pricing merchandise, stocking shelves,
and other duties as directed. Previous
retail background helpful. Applications
may be obtained at Agri-Supply, Rt. 5
264 Ext Greenville. No phone calls.
EOE
FUNDRAISING choose from 3 differ-
ent fundraisers lasting either 3 or 7 days.
No investment. Earn $$$foryour group
plus personal cash bonuses for your-
self. Call 1-800-932-0528, ext 65
SUBWAY is now accepting applica-
tions for all stores in Greenville. All hrs.
available, seeking clean, very depend-
able individuals. Apply in any location,
please no phone calls.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Cen-
tral Distributors PO Box 10075, Olathe
KS 66051. Immediate response.
DISTRIBUTORSWANTEDtEarnex-
rra money in your spare time. Work
your own hours selling some of the
hottest products on the market today-
self defense products. Great for
fundraisers.ContactMikeCareyat830-
5577
PART TIME POSITION-ADULT
AGENCY seeking physically fit, attrac-
tive female applicants. Must have own
transportation and be between the ages
of 18-25. Call 1-800-848-6282 to set up an
interview.
BABYSITTER NEEDED- to care for 2
small children 2 or 3 days a week. Ap-
proximately 4 miles from campus.
Transportation needed. References re-
quired. If interested, please call 355-
5067.
COUPLE SEEKS PHOTOGRAPHER
for December Wedding. Must have own
equipment and samples of previous
work. Call 757-3059 between 6-9pm.
Ask for Brian
AQ
Greek Personals
ENJOY WORKING WITH THE
CLOTHING YOU LOVE TO WEAR.
Brody's is accepting applications for
part-time sales associates in such areas
as JuniorMissy Sportswear and Cos-
metics. Flexible scheduling options:
10am-2pm, 12pm-9pm, or 6pm-9pm.
All retail positions include weekends.
Clothingdiscount. Interviews held each
Mon. and Thurs. 1 -4pm, Brody's The
Plaza.
BRODY'S FOR MEN is accepting ap-
plications for part-time sales associates.
We offer clothing discountsflexible
scheduling options: 10am-2pm, 12pm-
9pm, or 6pm-9pm. All retail positions
include weekends. Interviews held each
Mon. and Thurs l-4pm, Brody's The
Plaza.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD for cer-
tain responsibilities. Mustbe trustwor-
thy, responsible female. Call 321-8975
for details.
BEE
Personal
ALLCRIMINALJUSTICEMAJORS!
This may be an opportunity for you to
be recognized for your high academic
achievement! Alph Phi Sigma invites
you to become a member of our nation-
ally recognized HonorSociety. Require-
ments: 3.0 GPA overall and 3.2 GPA in
major. For additional info, call Chuck
Gould at 752-8823
Greek Personals
&m & &
Eieta cis
ex
312 E. 11th STREET
758-6969
THE SISTERS AND NEW MEMBERS
OF AOPI would like to thank the Kappa
Sigs for the social last Wed. night. We'll
have to get together again soon!
KRISTI ROGERS- It must have been
the coconuts! Congratulations on win-
ningGreekGodess! We are so proud of
you! Love your Sigma sisters
BIG CONGRATULATIONS and
thanks to Will Temple- you did a great
job in Greek God! Love the Sigmas
THE PLEDGES OF ALPHA PHI
would like to thank the sisters for mak-
ing us feel so welcomed and loved. We
appreciateeverythingandcan'twaitto
become your sisters. We love you guys!
SIGMA NU would like to invite any-
one interested to come Rush Sigma Nu
this week. The honor fraternity is the
way to go
THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA NU
would like to wish good luck to the
ECU football team this weekend vs.
Syracuse. Go Pirates!
CHI OMEGA: Congrats and thanks to
ourGreek Goddess contestants: Cindy
Ladas, Joy Newman, and Darcie
Reasoner. Great job! Love your sisters.
SIG EP: Thanks for your letter and
again for the awesome time at the Indi-
ans game. We had a ball! Season tickets
next year? Love, Chi Omega
jA:(ongratstoall our won-
derful pledges: Jessicaa Ennis, Ann-
MarieGehring, Beth Thompson, Dana
Blackwell, mary Marshall Harris,
Cou rrnev Blakeslee,Dana Thiedeman,
Brandy Wood, Leslie Burke, Jen Nolan,
Nikki Sears, Wannapa Pasookhush,
Kelly O'Connel, Debra Nagle, Lauren
Carletto, Laura Partin, Renee Silber,
Gayle Mohler, Stacey Diener, Sara
Matyiko,Cindy Ladas, TeraStutzman,
Trish Smith. You're doing great! Keep
u p the good work girls Love, y ou r Chi-
O sisters.
KAPPA SIGMA: Thanks for the
groovin' time at the 70s social. Hope
we all catch the boogie fever again real
soon! Special thanks to sexy legs Pat
Munley for being our Greek God con-
testant. Great job! Love, Chi Omega
PIKA: Cheers to you for yet another
awesome champagne brunch! Let's
keep up the tradition! Thanks again
also for an incredible Pref night. It's a
honeymoon we'll never forget! Love,
Chi Omega
GREEKS: Field Day was a great suc-
cess To bad Margarets car became a
mess! The Boys and Girls Club arrived
at four So many kids who could
handle more. They played some games-
a tug or war Not one moment was a
bore. The Kids and greeks had so much
fun Order of Omega your number
one! Special thanks to Betsy, Amy,
Monica, Christy, Mehryn, and Renee.
Wecouldn'thavedoneitwithoutyou.
DELTA SIG, Justin (Jason!) and Ray,
the cigar raft actually made it (thanks
to Pi Delta Power). Tar River was full of
surprises. The moon was full, water
had a nice fish aroma and we all
definately got our exercise. Thanks to
thebrothers and sisters that supported
us. Love, Nicole, Jenn, and Pi Delta
sisters
ALPHA PHI Congratulations on the
football game well played Wed. night.
Love the sisters of Pi Delta
THANKS TO J.D. ourGreekGod and
Vickie, Anna and Lara ourGreek God-
desses. Ya'll did a great job. We love
you guys! Sisters of Alpha Delta Pi
GOOD LUCK to all fraternities on
Rush this week. We know ya'll will do
a great job! Love the sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi
ALPHA DELTA PI wants tocongratu-
late the girls of the new varsity soccer
team. Good luck this season!
TO ALL GREEKS- Greek week went
well. We look forward to it next year!
Love, the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi
SIG EP- We had a great time at the
Duke game. Lets get together again
soon! Love, Alpha Delta Pi
BARBIE I love you. Had a great time at
Splash last night. You shore do know
how to drive this good ole' boy
wild.Waahooo! Let's meet in Pantas
tomorrow night and talk crap about
our friends. Sound sweet? Love Ken.
WHAT'S FOR DINNER? B. �Thank
you for being so patient and tolerant
when I am the worst judge of time. I
owe you many dinners. Let's go to the
bach! �M.
Announcements
UNIVERSITY STUDENT MAR-
SHALS
Any student interested in serving as a
University Marshall for the 1994 Fall
Commencement may obtain an appli-
cation from Room A-12 Minges. Stu-
dent must be classified as a junior by
the end of Spring semester 1994 and
have a 3.0 academic average to be
eligible. Return completed application
to Carol-Ann Tucker, Advisor, A-12
Minges by October 1,1994. For more
information call 328-4661.
ECNAQ
East Carolina Native American Orga-
nization will hold its second meeting
on Wednesday, September 21, 1994
from 7:00pm to 9:00pm in room 014
Mendenhall Student Center. Impor-
tant plans for the 94-95 year will be
discussed. All members and other in-
terested persons are urged to attend. If
there are any questions, please call
Kim Sampson at 752-2319 or Nikki
Epps at 328-7778.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
"Jam-a-thon '94" Sigma Phi Epsilon is
in the process of trying to organize the
largest unplugged music jam in NC
history on the mall in October with
donations to benefit Disabled Veter-
ans of America. Any band or person
who would like to participatecall Rob-
ert Lewis at 756-4916 or 757-0487. In
this event there is an unlimited amount
of people whocan participatejustplay-
ing at your own freewill, and and all
types of music welcome, but there will
be no main stage and no amplifiers
please.
ECU COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The ECU College republicans wil meet
thursday at GCB 3006. All members
required to show. New members wel-
come.
EXPRESSIONS MAGAZINE
ATTENTION: African-American Stu-
dents. If you have any response to the
letter you received from the Admis-
sions Office requesting the names and
addresses of possible African-Ameri-
can students; or any other issue relat-
ing to the African-American popula-
tion on campus, please write it down.
Bring all responses to the Expressions
OfficeortheMedia Board Officeon the
second floor of the Publications Build-
ing. Thank you.
WOMEN'S STUDY ALLIANCE
The Women's Study Alliance will have
an organizational meeting on Tues-
day, September 20 at 2:30pm in GCB
20i4.
UNIV. FOLK &. COUNTRY
DANCECLUB
First meetingDance of the year!
Contra & Square Dance, Live oldtime
music by Elderberry Jam. 7pm, Sept.
23, Ledonia Wright Bldg. (behind Stu.
Health). Free if space permits come
alone or bring a friend.
ALL PLEDGES OF PHI SIGMA PI are
reminded of the first pledge meeting on
Sept. 21 in GCB 1028 at 5pm. Congratu-
lations on your invitation and best of
luck pledging
RECREATIONAL SERVICES SEC-
OND CLIMBING 1 WORKSHOP for
the fall semester is being offered on
Sept. 22. This three hour workshop in-
trod uces you to the basics of rockclimb-
ing. Instructions begin at the Climbing
Tower and space is limited. Call 328-
6387 for more info, or stop by
Christenbury Gym room 204. This work-
shop is brought to you by Recreational
Services
JOIN THE RECREATIONAL
OUTDOOR CENTER
for a leisurely day of canoeing
alongGoose Creek. Sun Sept. 25 head
for the wilderness and be ready to
seeand hear creatures of all sorts. For
more info, call 328-6387 or stop by
Christenbury Gym room 204. This
trip is brought to you by Recreational
Services
TAKE A BREAK FROM WATCH-
ING FOOTBALL
on the big screen and play it yourself
at the Ocean Spray Table Top Football
Competition. Competition is on four
consecutive Mon. beginning on Sept.
26. Call Nelson Cooper at 328-6387 for
more info. This program is brought to
you by Recreational Services.
NEED AN EXCUSE TO GET AWAY
FROM SCHOOL?
Try the beach horseback riding day
trip with the Recreational Outdoor
Center. Spend up to 3 hours walking
and sometimes racing down white
sandy beaches exploring tidal pools
and sand dunes. For more info, stop
by the ROC in room 117 at
Christenbury Gym or call Recre-
ational Services at 328-6387.
BACKPACKINGRECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Take a weekend backpacking trip to
Pisgah National Forest. There you will
be able to slip and slide down Steele
Creek's natural waterslide into six pools
of crystal clear water. Guaranteed to be
a weedend of fun and adventure. Call
328-6387 or stop by Christenbury Gym
room 204 for more information. This
awesome trip is sponsored by Recre-
ational Services.
TENNIS SINGLES TOURNAMENT
If you've been practicing your tennis
this summer, come out to the Tennis
Singles Tournament with Intramural
Sports. Theentry deadline is5:00pm on
September 21. You can sign up in
Christenbury Gym room 204 or call
Recreational Services at 328-6387. We
want to see that swing.
FRISBEE GOLF SINGLES TOUR-
NAMENT
Isn't it about time for a break from all of
that studying? On Wednesday, Sep-
tember 21 at 3:00pm, take a break and
come ut to the Frisbee Golf Course for
the Frisbee Golf Singles Tournament.
Join us for a round of frisbee fun, spon-
sored by Recreational Services. For
more information on how to sign up
call 328-6387 or stop by Christenbury
Gym room 204.
TREASURE CHESTS AVAILABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests are here!
Be sure to pick up your FREE video
yearbook. Available at the Student
Store, The East Carolinian, Joyner Li-
brary, Mendenhall and the Media
Board office in the Student Publica-
tions Building.
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Announcements
Deadlines
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to
list activities and events open to the public
two times free of charge. Due to the
limited amount of space, The East Caro-
linian cannotguarantee the publication of
announcements.
Displayed advertisements may be
canceled before 10a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
For more
information call
328-6366.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's edition





I
The East Carolinian
September 20, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 7
Alien abduction thrills fans of "X-Files

By Mark Brett
Lifesyle Editor
Are you an X-Phile?
What, you may ask, is an X-
Phile? Well, it's sort of the equiva-
lent of a Trekkie, except instead
of being addicted to Star Trek, an
X-Phile is a devotee of the Fox
Network's best-kept secret, "The
X-Files X-Philes are often a bit
paranoid, seeing conspiracies
around every corner. They have
a tendency to keep an eye on the
night sky, furtively glancing up-
ward to catch a glimpse of visi-
tors. They also tend to wear more
black than Trekkies, in general,
and have cooler hair.
"The X-Files" itself isa televi-
sion show that plays to the fears
A Drop
in the
Bucket
By Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
"A Drop in live Bucket" is just
what it claims to be: a very small drop
in tliegreatscreamingbucketcfAmeri-
can media opinion. Takeitasyou will.
"Just sit right back and you'll
hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip
That'squiteapromise, isn'tit?
You'dthinktherewouldbeagrand
tale of adventure to follow, some
tragically heroic myth cycle to illu-
minate our culture. But, of course,
aUthatreallyfollowedthosewords
of great portent was "Gilligan's
Island That didn't stop me from
watching as a child, however. It
didn't keep me from spending an
obscene number of hours in front
of the TV set, enticed by those
words into an inexplicable fasci-
nation with the show.
And inexplicable is the word.
"Gilligan's Island" had to be, con-
sistenuy,oneoftheworstshowsin
television history. Unlike most
showsofthe'60s,Ican'tevenclaim
that theblack-and-white episodes
wereokay. Comparing "Gilligan"
to its contemporaries makes the
show look even worse! "Be-
witched" had wackier stories.
"Andy Griffith" had better scripts,
acting, and direction. "Hogan's
Heroes" had wittier gags. Even
"The Beverly Hillbillies which
was working on about the same
no-brainer level as "Gilligan
made better use of its stupidity
and turned out some fine camp
comedy. "Gilligan's Island" was
about as vapid and empty as TV
gets.
Truly, "Gilligan'slsland" was
horrible television. But it's still
popular now, 30 years after its
premiere broadcast. Thaf s right,
"Gilligan's Island" debuted on
Sept. 26,1964. It seems the closing
theme was prophetic: the cast-
awayshave indeed been there "for
a long, long time I know, I know;
technically, they escaped the is-
land in those reunion movies. But
those don't count. To me, they're
still out there somewhere, in those
same pristine clothes, just like on
TBS.
But we're avoiding the ques-
tion here. Why is "Gilligan's Is-
land" still so t "pular? In prepara-
tion for writing this piece, I sat
down in front of my TV to watch
the show for the first time since I
started college. It was every bit as
bad as I remembered it being. No,
strike that. It was worse. Infinitely
worse.
I couldn't help thinking back,
though, to when I was a kid, and
howmuchlreallyloved "Gilligan's
Island I would rush home from
school to see it, in fact. If my bus
broke down, I was heart-broken.
"They might be showing one of
those Wrong-Way Feldmanshows
today, or maybe the one with the
Japanesesoldierwhodidn'tknow
See BUCKET page 8
and interests of these people. It's
about two FBI agents, Fox Mulder
and Dana Scully, who investigate
paranormal activities. UFOs, genetic
anomalies, telepathic killers and bi-
zarre cults are their venue, despite
the resistance and sometimes Ma-
chiavellian plotting of their superi-
ors. The show's cult following is
enthralled.
"X-Files" creator and executive
producer Chris Carter has said that,
for his part, he just wants to put
something scary on TV again. A fan
of the 70s occult series "Kolchack
the Nightstalker Carter feels that
he's just filling the fright gap.
If that's the case, he's doing a
good job. "The X-Files" is way
scarier than "Nightstalker" ever
was. Through moody atmosphere,
understated acting and direction
from the Alfred Hitchcock school,
this show can be downright creepy.
Few viewers will ever forget the
episode with thegenetically-altered
twin sisters who kill their parents
and make it look like a UFO abduc-
tion case. Even fewer will forget the
contortionist serial killer episode,
which featured visuals of an actual
contortionist stunt double slither-
ing down the mouth of a chimney.
Which brings us around to the
real focus of this article, "The X-
Files season premiere, whichaired
Sept. 16at9:00p.m. Attheend of last
season our heroes had come a little
too close to "the truth" (a big con-
cept on the show), finding an actual
alien fetus in cold storage in the
Pentagon. In response, the govern-
ment shut down the X-Files opera-
tion and killed "Deep Throat
Agent Mulder's secret upper-ech-
elon contact.
This season opens with the
agents reassigned to tedious duties.
Mulder sequesters himself in the
long-abandoned Voyager receiving
station and spends a night hearing
mysterious encoded transmissions
from outer space. Events escalate
into chaos until Mulder himself is
abducted by aliens in a blinding
flash of light. The ultimate wet
dream for X-Philes! Agent Mulder
makes contact!
Actor David Duchovny, who
plays Mulder, has outdone himself
this time. Mulder's usual cool exte-
rior cracks in this episode, and we
get to see the paranoid obsessive
that has always been lurking be-
neath the surface. The episode ends
with an uncharacteristically vulner-
able Mulder, and Duchovny comes
through with a performance that
speaks volumes to long-time fans of
the series. The loss of the X-Files
operation has taken away Mulder's
sense of purpose, and Duchovny
finally drops the stoicism we've all
come to expect from the character.
And if this episode was a sub-
dued tour-de-force for Duchovny, it
was at the very least challenging for
his co-star. Gillian Anderson, who
plays Agent Scully, was about six
monthspregnantatthetimeof shoot-
ing. Her character, however, was
not. To work around Anderson's
stomach, she's shot mostly in close-
up. In the few full-body shots used,
she wears a large trench-coat. Her
part is small, however, and the
direction is careful, so these cam-
era tricks are barely noticeable.
The season premiere brought
fans exactly what they've come
to expect from "The X-Files
spooky atmosphere, nice acting
and a little conspiracy along the
way. Considering this show's
consistent quality of script and
acting, I can only hope that the
Emmys don't make the same
mistake they did with "Star Trek:
the Next Generation" and snub it
until its final season. It deserves
better treatment and a bigger
audience. So what are you wait-
ing for? Become an X-Phile! I
know you've already got the
black t-shirts for it.
Hemy Acrobat walks the tightrope at CRock's
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Once again Greenville's bastion
of local music, O'Rockefeller's,
brought us some innovative and
different sounds this past Friday
night. The "hot and all-male" (ac-
cording to the flyer) Henry Acrobat
was the featured band, with Bur
Monter as the opening act.
Bur Monter opened the
evening'smusical festivities toavery
sparsely-populated O'Rocks. As I
walked in, a friend at the door said
they were kind of an early '80s,
Motels type of thing. After taking
them in for awhile, I decided on an
early Cure type thing for a compari-
son. You really wouldn't expect
something this delicate and ethereal
to come out of Fayetteville. Bur
Monter is a five piece band includ-
ing drums, bass, keyboards, guitar
and lead singer.
In between songs, downtown
celebrity Melvin and I would shout
comparisons at each other to see
who could come the closest to nail-
ing down an influence. Joy Division.
TheCure. TheCranes. They do have
that eerie and often dreamy sound
associated with thosebands.Siouxsie
and the Banshees. Cocteau Twins.
The la tter is probably the closest. The
female lead singer has a voice very
reminiscent of the Cocteau Twins,
and the rest of theband sounds more
like The Cure than anything else So
there you have it, comparisons ga-
lore, take what you can from it.
Henry Acrobat, also known by
the acronym HA, was the next to
take the stage and I'm sorry to say
that thecrowd remained small, even
with the addition of a wily group
whowerehell-bentonknockingover
the speakers and spilling their beer
on innocent bystanders. HA is no
stranger toGreenville,eachmember
ha ving been in some other local band
at some time or other, which gives
them the added feature of experi-
ence. They are the traditional three
piece: bass, drums and guitar.
HA thrives on the familiar
sounds of hard-core, but an intelli-
gent and intricate hard-core. Their
songs are generally high energy
romps throughsomenicely-layered
melodies that soon turn to crunched
and distorted audio assaults via a
plethora of power chords.
Since I degenerated into com-
parisons for the last band I guess
I'll have to do the same here, al-
though HA is much harder to cat-
egorize. Maybe a little taste of Di-
nosaur Jr or even some of the hard
and funky tracks by Fishbone are
some accurate comparisons. Then
again, I may not have a clue.
A bouncy good time was had
by all,even though they werefew in
number. Oh, and by the way, if you
are trying to lose weight, O'Rock's
may be the place to go. It often has
the humidity and heat of a real
sauna, complete witha liveband to
entertain you while you sweat.
Melanie Griffith shines in Milk Money
By ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Sometimes as a critic, one
must distance momentary
surges of feelings from objec-
tive judgement. A mediocre
film can often appeal to one's
emotions on a particular day
and cloud the film's true mer-
its. As a film viewer, that cloud
sometimes need not be recog-
nized. If a film works on a par-
ticular day, then the film will
be remembered favorably by
that person. Unfortunately, a
critic is empowered to write
partly because of his unspo-
ken objectivity.
Milk Money, a new film
about yet another "hooker with
a heart of gold touched me
with its fairy tale ambiance so
that I overlooked many of the
film's faults. As the credits
rolled I groused to my wife
that being a critic is not always
fun, because I wanted to relish
the good feelings of Milk
Money, yet my mental gears
were already moving to assign
a number from one to ten to the
film. I wanted to halt the criti-
cal processes spinning in my
cranium, but the best I could do
was moderately slow the rate at
which the criticisms formed.
In Milk Money, Melanie
Griffith plays a prostitute named
"V" who takes off her top for
three adolescent buddies who
have ventured into the city with
over $100 to find a woman who
would undress for them.
Through
Milk Money is
harmless enough,
hut its obvious
manipulations are
far too serious.
a series of
misad-
ventures,
including
a mug
ging and
some sto-
len bi
cycles, V
winds up
driving
the boys
back
home
Her car will not turn over once
she stops at the last house where
Frank (Michael Patrick Carter)
lives. Frank invites V to stay with
him and his father (Ed Harris)
until her car can be fixed.
Since Frank does not want
to alert his dad as to V's profes-
sion, he tells her that she is a
math tutor. V sleeps in Frank's
tree house unbeknownst to
Frank's dad. While V bides her
time, she and Frank forge a shaky
friendship that slowly grows as
the film proceeds.
The obvious conclusion to
this story is evident from the out-
set, but the fun is in getting there.
Frank's mom died during child-
birth, so Frank
has never had
a mother fig-
ure.
V be-
comes the
closest thing
Frank has ever
had to a
mother, and
obvious ma-
ternal bonds
form between
V and Frank.
Griffith
and Harris seem at ease in their
respective roles. Griffith, who has
become more charming as she
ages, once again lights up the
screen in a mediocre film. Harris
exudes the perfect amount of
warmth and befuddlement. His
role is relatively small compared
to Griffith, but he handles it
nicely. Richard Benjamin, who di-
rected Mermaids, likes to handle
tales which center on children, but
he cannot seem to find the proper
tone.
Mermaids became far too
melodramatic near its conclusion
and so does Milk Money. The end-
ing has been predetermined from
the opening, so the decision to
extend the film so long is ill-ad-
vised. The inclusion of missing
money and a gangster searching
for that money serve only to
heighten the triteness of the film
and detract from some of its
charm.
Milk Money is a harmless
enough comedy, but its obvious
manipulations come across as far
too serious. The filmmakers could
have learned a lot from It Could
Happen to You, which demon-
strated how wonderful a prede-
termined love story can be. It Could
Happen to You found the perfect
tone to convey its fairy tale,
whereas Milk Money seemed to
struggle throughout the picture
to find the right tone. The unfold-
ing of the story seemed to occur in
hitches rather than in a smooth
See MILK page 8
J Pathetic Lame j JJ Ptetty Good AWt) Brilliant
Lir
Magico Magico!
mmm
I must admit that before I
popped in the CD of this five-
piece rock band from Dublin, Ire-
land, I anticipated a sound simi-
lar to U2 or The Commitments,
for some strange reason�not
even close.
Lir (pronounced Leer) defi-
nitely has its own sound and iden-
tity. I'd say about the closest
sound I could compare Lir to is
the band Simple Minds, but Lir is
noticeably lacking in the areas of
emotion and depth. Magico
Magico, their American debut CD,
houses 12 tracks which are mostly
a combination of two earlier Irish
releases.
Several cuts stand out for their
classic rock feel. Take "New Song"
and "Three Legged Guy for in-
stance. The latter opens up with a
rock guita r riff straight off WRDU.
Most of the cuts are lyrically sim-
plistic and therefore rather easy
to follow. Instrumentally. there's
not a great deal of versatility
from song to song, but the sing-
ing is another story. Dave
McGuinness, the lead singer,
does have a rather distinctive
voice. Distinctive because he
sounds like several different
people.
"Not To Be Overlooked" is a
ballad in which McGuinness
sounds excitingly close to Billy
Corgan of Smashing Pumpkins.
Unfortunately, the track is
strangely short. "In The Parlor"
sports a mixture of that classic
rock sound with a brief electroni-
cally- distorted voice in the back-
ground. Sounds like Ad Rock of
The Beastie Boys�well, kinda.
Good Cake, Bad Cake" is a bit
folkish and bland.
My pick of picks is track ten,
"Two Worlds This one could
Gravity
battled
at Attic
By Quenton
Pickup
be described as dreamy, musically
as well as lyrically. It kind of sounds
like Sade. I liked this one a lot.
Metal heads may even be tempted
to raise a brow to this cut, especially
the breakdown and guitar riffs.
Unlike many other bands from
Ireland, Lir offers few, if any so-
cially- or politically-conscious
verses.
The average age of the musi-
cians in this band is 22 and word
has it that they've been performing
together since they were 15.
Overall, their sound is mature
and together, despite the occasional
lack of versatility. We're sure to
hear much more from them in the
future.
� Martin
Newton
Staff Writer
The Attic was the meeting
plaoelastThursdaynightfortwo
up and coming regional bands.
Headlining the show was Fight-
ingGiavity(fonnerlyBoyOBoy)
from Richmond, Virginia. Tfie
AttkalsowelcomedGod'sCodv-
ics from Columbia, South Caro-
lina.
The show started up about
11:00, when God's Comics took
the stage. This band was very
tigh t and had a �"ery strong foun-
dation. Their setwent off incred-
ibly with very little or no mis-
takbeingmadeatalLThemusic
consisted of basic rock with a
coupleof refreshing twists. There
was a heavy emphasis on the
drums that is usually uncharac-
teristic of the rock and grunge
sound.
This was God's Comics'
fourth trip to Greenville. Tpdir
mostmemorable show was fh�r
opening spot for Dillon Fdhce
lastyear.Havingseen their strong
set on Thursday, I really got the
feeling that God's Comics were
out to prove something, after
pkyingGreenvilkfourtimesand
still getting little recognition. As
God's Comics' set was closing,
you could tell the audience was
impressed andalsosurprisedby
this powerful band.
Fighting Gravity took the
stage a little after midnight. For-
merly known as Boy O Boy,
Fighting Gravity played at
OTRock's their first few times in
Greenville, but have changed
since then. They've vastly im-
proved, not only as musicians,
butaJsoasperformers. They play
a mixture of ska and pop. At
times it seemed as if there was a
little bit too much of the pop
sound. The horns worked beau-
tifully when accompanied with
the heavy bass and the snap and
crash effect of the drums. The
lead vocals were dean, dear and
well harmonized, which is quite
special, considering the ever-
growing grunge sound of today.
See GRAVITY page 9
���
�� BMHrn





8 The East Carolinian
September 20, 1994
�BUCKET
Continued from page 7
�World War II was over I would
"Jhink, and feel even worse. That was
Jjome funny stuff.
With mat nostalgic thought in
my head, I channel-surfed a bit and
.found such high-quality shows as
Charles inCharge"or"FullHouse
"which lack even the empty-headed
�imagination of "Gilligan After see-
ing oneof the interchangeable Olson
twins (interchangeableprimarily due
to their mutual lack of talent) mug for
the camera a few times, 1 really missed
Bob Denver.
But again, we're avoiding the
question. Or are we? Is it that the crap
we're producing now is so much
worse than the crap we produced
then? Actually, I think that's only part
of it Part of it is also nostalgia: if I
hadn'tenjoyed "Gilligan" whenl was
a kid (and a much less demanding
audience), I wouldn't be writing this.
Butthere'ssomethiiigelse. Some-
thing that's more insidious than even
nostalgia (one of the more insidious
aspects of the American mind set, to
my wayof thinking). Ultimately Ican't
label it, but there's something there.
"Gilligan's Island" possesses some
quality that draws people to it, and
whatever that quality is, it works.
I think it's some kind of sublimi-
nal message implanted by the Pro-
fessor. But then again, I'm sort of
weird.
"So join us here each week, my
friend, you're sure to get a smile.
Fromsevenstrandedcastaways,here
on Gilligan's Isle
Or maybe not
MILK
Continued from page 7
procession.
Though my objective self can
find much fault with Milk Money,
the emotional pull of the film is
strong enough to make criticisms
seem unnecessary.
Milk Money finds enoughofa
right tone to carry off the love
story between V and Frank's
dad. Still, the film did have far
too many obvious flaws to rec-
ommend it So I compromised
and gave the film the rating with
the highest waffle factor.
On a scale of one to ten, Milk
Money rates a five.
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epteinuer 20. 1994
Tne Last Carolinian 9
GRAVITY
Continued from page 7
came
Fighting Gravity
equipped with theirownlightshow
and illuminated backdrops. With
the combination of the strobe lights
andtheband'sstagepresence, there
wasasinceretouchof professional-
ism.
Even though some of Fighting
Gravity's songs seemed to last a little
too long and sound a little monoto-
nous, they are still a good show. It's a
shame that more people don't make
an attempt to see rising bands. The
crowd at the Attic was minimal, but
very enthusiastic. A lot of energy was
created by FightingGravity itself. That
may be what they do best: get people
moving. All the chairs were emptied
as Fighting Gravity came on and re-
mained that way as thecrowd danced
throughout the show.
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The East Carolinian
September 20, 1994
Sports
Page 10
Pirate youth takes over Veterans Stadium
By Brian Olson
Staff Writer
When it rains, it pours.
That is a good way to describe
the way Temple Owl fans must
have feltafter the ECU Pirates came
to visit Saturday night.
ECU (1-1) rolled over Temple
(1-1) 31-14 at Veterans Stadium in
Philadelphia, Pa, which ends the
Pirates' six-game losing streak dat-
ing back to last season.
"For about 48 to 50 minutes of
a 60 minute game, we played some
really sound, solid, fundamental
ball head coachSteve Logan said.
"We had some lapses. The lapses
came about when we were putting
some of the young dudes in the
Pirate Report Card
Offense:Grade
"J-Crew" breaks loose. Crandell still shaky, although no turnovers.Bf
Defense:Grade
Showed Duke game was no fluke, collected five turnovers.A
Special Teams:Grade
Unsettled placekicker, blocked punt show question marks.D
Coaching:Grade
Logan going on 4th and 4 set tone for game. Good preparation.B
Overall:Grade
Strong performance. Pirates attain 1 turnover ratio in NCAA.B
ECU notes
(SID) � American's Jen
Hershberger scored twogoalstolead
the Lady Eagles to a 4-2 victory over
EastCarolinainwomen'ssoccerSun-
dayaftemoonm Washington Ameri-
can raised their record to 2-3 on the
season
Lady Pirate Mandy Gaster re-
corded the first goal of the match to
give ECU the lead. American's Jen
Hershberger scoredshortiy after totie
the match.
In the second half, American
scored threeconsecutivegoalstoraise
their lead to 4-1. ECU's Barbara
Gottschalk scored the last goal of the
match to make the score at 4-2
Gottschalk, along with Gaster,
scored their first intercollegiate goals
of their careers.
The Lady Pirates, now 1-3, will
return to action Saturday, September
24,as they travel to Lynchburg, VA to
face Liberty University.
On the mens' circuit, George
Mason did all its scoring in the
firstperiodof play as they builta4-
0 lead before intermission to down
East Carolina 4-1 in CAA men's
soccer action on Friday afternoon
at ECU.
The Pirates' (0-5,0-2 in CAA)
lone score came at the 86:40 mark
when freshman Kyle England
scored his first goal of the season
off a precision pass by Jason Kelly.
The Pirate defense, which contin-
ued to struggle, gave up 27 shots
on goal, while being limited to just
eight attempts of their own.
ECU head coach Scooty Carey
continued to try and find a remedy
to cure the Pirates' woes by start-
ing his third different goalie in as
many games. Senior Chris Libert
made his first start of the season,
giving up three goals and record-
ing two saves before being replaced
by Jay Davis mid-way through the
first half.
East Carolina will be back on
the road this Wednesday, Septem-
ber 21st as they take on Methodist
CoUgeat4:00P.M.
In cross country action, ECU
continued the 1994 season at the Uni-
versity ofVirginialnvitationalonSat-
urday.
Dava Rhodes had a great race,
finishing second overall with a time
of 18:18. Senior Stacy Green also had
a good race finishing in ninth place
overall with a time of 18:52
The overall winner was Marcie
Homan from William & Mary witha
time of 17:08. For the men, Senior
Sean Connolly had the best Pirate
finish with 24th. His time of 26:31
was 215 off the pace.
SophomoreLarryLewiswassec-
ond on the Pirate squad in 83rd place
with a time of 28:53. The men's over-
all winner was Brian Hydefrom Wil-
liam & Mary with a time of 24:16.
game for the first time
Coming into the game, the
P'rates knew they had to step up
tu2ir offense. They did not just
step, they leaped way over a weak
Owl defense.
Leading the charge was Jun-
ior Smith. The senior ran for 165
yards on23 carries and two touch-
downs.
"It's a good feeling Smith
said. "It just feels great to get that
victory. We're trying to get things
back on track here at East Caro-
lina. Maybe it will have a snow-
ball effect on everything
Halfback Jerris McPhail also
carried his load with 81-yards on
16 carries and a touchdown. The
Pirates gained 281 yards total on
the ground and sophomore quar-
terback Marcus Crandell threw
for 170 yards on 17-of-36 passing.
The offense also had no turn-
overs compared to Temple's five.
Coach Logan said that he
wanted to use the speedy McPhail
more in the backfield to help com-
pliment Smith. The combination
eventually gave Temple the
knockout blow.
"I'm enjoying having
McPhail in the backfield Smith
said. "It gives me time to come
onto the sideline, settle down and
get my head in the game and see
what I can do to help the team. I
can leam from what he does, the
kind of breaks he gets in the game.
It gives me a chance to rest and go
back in and give 100 percent so
my teammates can feel assured
that I'm in there to play my best
The improved Pirate defense
picked up where it left against
Duke. For the second straight
week, the Pirates held the oppo-
nent to under 100 yards rushing.
Temple rushed for only 63 yards.
Temple did gain 270 yards
through the air, but most came in
the second half when the Pirates
were in a prevent defense and the
second unit was used in live ac-
tion.
Mark Libiano led the defense
with eight tackles and linebacker
B.J. Crane collected seven. Morris
Foreman, Libiano and Emmanuel
McDaniel each collected an inter-
ception.
"I think we stepped back a
little bit more Libiano said. "We
were not as enthused about play-
ing Temple as we were at Duke. It
happens like that. We stepped
back a little bit, but next week we
have to step back forward
The victory gives Crandell his
first win as a college player in
which he has played the whole
game, and it gives thePirates their
first road win since Oct 24,1992
against Pitt
"Hopefully this is just the be-
ginning of a good offense
Crandell said. "Hopefully, our de-
fense will keep it up and we'll
have a winning season
The game heated up early on
Marcus Crandell drops back to
play of the ECU offensive line
ECU's first possession. ECU
marched 38 yards to the Temple
four-yard line after McDaniel's in-
terception. On fourth and goal from
the four, Logan decided to go for it.
Crandell dropped back and tried to
run for the end zone, but was
stopped at the one-yard line.
"We had to establish the fact
tha t our coaching staff, our team, no
pass against a helpless Temple defense. The outstanding
gave him plenty of time to work in the pocket
matter whether we make it or not,
we came here to win Logan said.
"It was just an attitude call on our
part, there was no hesitation. I was
really disappointed wedidn'tscore
on that first drive
At the time, rher play seemed
to give a hint of how ECU's day
would go.
Not even close.
Corcoran leads improving soccer squad
By Daniel Antonelli
Staff Writer
With the inaugural women's
soccer season well underway, the
improving ECU squad is undef ea ted
at home, which suits the team stop-
per, junior Maureen Corcoran, just
fine.
An impressive crowd of fans
and news media watched last
Wednesday's home opener against
the UNC-Wilmington Seahawks.
The game was competitive early,
and provided lots of action.
Holding off a late charge, the
Bucs won the game by a score of 3-
2. This was the team's first NCAA
Division I win, but the Lady Pirates
know that more challenges lie
ahead.
"It's been tough coming to-
gether, but we are really starting to
play like a team said Corcoran,
after the victory.
The Lady Pirates have a team
of eighteen women who come from
all over the country, ranging from
New Jersey to Bel Air. All of the
girls have extensive backgrounds
in soccer and were standouts for
their high school teams.
Led by Robin De Pasquale on
offense and Corcoran on defense,
ECU could be a threat to upset
people early. With only three fresh-
man on the squad, the team should
mature rapidly and improve with
every game.
Also by May '96, the team's
goalistohavebecomeanEastCoast
powerhouse, and with the enthusi-
asm this team has shown already,
that should not be a problem. The
Lady Pirates will try to keep their
home winning streak alive on Oct.
5, when they take on NC Wesleyan.
The Lady Pirates havebigplans
for this newly-formed program and
show it through the focus and de-
termination of all the players. How-
ever, they know that the team is not
where they want it to be just yet
This feeling is best put into words
by Corcoran.
"We've got a lot to prove
Notre Dame "legend" has rough outing
(AP)�The people who started
calling him the next Joe Montana did
the kid no favors. And the guy who
said he'd win two Heismans before
he was through?Thanks,for nothing.
With friends like those, Ron Powlus
isn't going to need opponents.
Any other kid bombs in his third
college start, and he gets a pat on the
back and the prospect of a better to-
morrow. But legends-irt-the-rraking
don'tget many more days like theone
Powlus had at Michigan State over
the weekend. Or else they wind up
making a living at something else.
HowbadwasitSaturday?There
were four interceptions, four rushes
for four yards, just 3-of-18 comple-
tions by halftime. With the Irish
coaches finally figuring out how to
spread the field, Powlus managed a
more respectable 10-of-30by the end.
Other than the Irish defense bail-
inghimoutwitha21-20win,thatwas
it on the good-news front
"What did I leam?" Powlus said,
considering the question on the short
tripfrom the locker room tothe bus. "I
guess I learned that everything isn't
going to work out the way you like
Harshasitseemstoyouraverage
20-year-okifewrhingsdo. And when
you come from where Powlus did�
Berwick,Paoneoftnemeccasofhigh
school football�and when you pile
honor atop honor and success up on
success like Powlus did, thaf s one
lesson you can't learn too soon
Nobody coming into the college
game in recent memory labored un-
dergreaterexpectations. WhenPowlus
turned up at Notre Dame as a fresh-
man in 1993, coach Lou Holtz was
impressed enough to let him have
Montana's old number � 3 � and
was fully prepared to let him have
Montana's old job. But in the final
preseason scrimmage last year,
Powlus' stopover in South Bend on
the way to Canton and the Hall of
Fame got extended
On the fifth play, he got planted
by two Notre Dame defenders and
wound up with a broken right collar-
bc�Te.Then,mOctober,itgotextended
again when he broke the collarbone a
second time, this time while throwing
during a non-contact practice.
"The second injury was really
strange'RonPowlusSr.recalledSat-
urday, leaving the job of tracking his
son's progress from the farthest
reaches of Michigan State's stadium
to his wife for a moment
"Before he got hurt the first time,
none of us could ever remember
Ronnie missing one play, let alone a
whotepradfogoingallthewayback
to midget football.
'Then he winds up getting hurt
againandmissingawholeseason.He
never doubted he'd be back, but he's
a tough, kid who expectsa lot of him-
self. It really got him down
See POWLUS page 11
Former tennis champ and broadcaster found dead
(AP) � Vitas Gerulaitis, a free-
spirited tennis professional who won
the 1977 Australian Open and later
becameabroadcaster,wasfounddead
at a friend's home on Sunday.
An autopsy on the 40-year-old
was scheduled for Monday. Police
said there was no indication of suspi-
ctouscircumstances when they found
Gerulaitis' body Sunday afternoon at
a friend's home.
Gerulaitis played tennis last
WednesdayinSeattleontheChampi-
onsTour,acircuitformen'splayers35
and over. He withdrew from the event
the next day because of a bad back.
"The whole tennis community is
going to be in shock and really sad-
dened said former player Tim
Mayotte, who played golf and tennis
with Gerulaitis this summer. "He
broughtheartandenthusiasmandlife
to tennis, and thaf s really rare
An excellent shot-maker who
played tennis and partied at
Manhattan's nightclubs with equal
fair,Gerulaitis:achedtheNo.3rank-
ing in 1977 and made the finals of the
US. Open and French Open in 1979
and 1980.
Heacknowiedged using cocaine
during the late 1970s and 1980s and
said his drug use and late nights
undercut his ability as a player. He
was treated for substance abuse and
was implicated, though never
charged, in a cocaine-dealing con-
spiracy in 1983.
Butforallnisexcessess,Gerulaitis
remained a durable and imposing
player, outlasting many opponents
not only with deft volleys or drop
shots, but with strength and perse-
verance.
"He was an incredible talent,
cnjjck,scrappy,radagDodforehand
Mayotte said. "But he didn't have
thatortebigweapon-Ithinkhemaxed
out on his talent"
Gerulaitis, wholeftthernaintour
in 1985, worked a week ago for CBS
at the US. Open as a studio analyst.
He also played in the men's 35 and
over doubles event during the tour-
nament.
"Thaf s a very big loss for tennis
because of Vitas'personality and his
play'tennisstarMichaelChangsaid.
"He was very easy going. All the
players wereabletojokearound with
him He was very easy to talk to
Chang spoke Sunday night after
losing an exhibition match to John
McEnroe in Berkeley, Calif. McEnroe,
who knew of the death before taking
the court, left immediately after play-
ing and issued a statement through
the ATP Tour.
"I won mis match for my buddy
Vitas, and I'm too distraught to talk
about it he said.
ANewYorkerwithshaggyblond
hair, Gerulaitis enjoved some of his
best moments at the US. Open, a
tournament not far from his birth-
place in Brooklyn or his home on
Long Island.
He lost the finals of the 1979 US.
Open and the 1980 French Open In
one of his finest matches, Gerulaitis
rallied to beat Roscoe Tanner in the
semifinals of the 1979 US. Open after
trailing by two sets and down a ser-
vice break.
He won the Italian Open in 1977
and 1979. In 1977, he lost in the
Wimbledonsemifinals,fallingtoBjom
Borg in a five-set tiebreaker. He won
the 1975 Wimbledondoubles title with
Sandy Mayer.
ml979,hewonfour tournaments
and five of six Davis Cup matches to
help the United States retain the title.
Heplayed on theUS. teamfrom 1977-
80.
Gerulaitis, No. 4 in the world in
1984, won 27 singles titles and nine
doubles championships and had ca-
reer earnings of more than $27 mil-
lion.
Geriaitis is survived by a sister,
Ruta, and his mother, Alodonna.
Prognpsfwoioin standings
Name
Points
Dave Pond-TfC 1
Brian Bailey - WNCT 3
Ihris Justice - WCTI 3
Phil Werz - W777V 13
Brad Oldham - WZMB, TEC 14
Note: Points are given as distance
from the spread, and at the end of the
season, the prognosricator with the low-
est score is the winner. In the event of a
tie, closest actual score takes precedent.
Example: Last week, Bobby Den-
ning was our celebrity picker. He picked
ECU 24-20, with a four point spread.
The actual score was 31-14. Therefore,
Denning's score for week one would be
13.
On the next two possessions,
Chad Holcomb hit field goals of
32 and 17 yards. The second field
goal drive was helped by a per-
sonal foul call that gave ECU a
first down instead of setting up a
punting situation.
Libiano's interception off
See TEMPLE page 12
ECU shows
team unity
after victory
By Brian Olson
Staff Writer
Philadelphia is known as
TheQty of Brotherly Love. Sat-
urday night the ECU football
team showed the city some of
its own love and affection.
After ECUbeatTempkSl-
14 in Veterans Stadium, the
players did something as a unit
that has not been seen in a long
time, if ever at ECU.
The players gatheredon the
fieldand did push-ups together
in unison after the win.
Thaf s something Junior
Smith does linebacker Mark
LibiarADsaid. "We do push-ups
iokeeptheteaminspirit. Wedo
it after every practice, before
every game and after a win. So
hopefully well get to do it a
little bit more"
Some players were so
estatic after the win that they
took off into the locker room
and missed me little workout
"We started it way back in
the beginning of summer
school libiano said. "There
was almost 50 guys here for
summer school and we just
started doing push-ups It's
something to keep the team to-
gether, havefun and keep team
unity
Libiano explained that the
team doesas many push-upsas
there are games left. Every three
push-ups is equal to one and by
the end of the summer he ex-
plained, they were up to sixty.
During the course of the
game, the ECU offense dis-
played its togetherness. The
players held hands as they
huddled together.
"That's just a unity thing
that's been going on for years at
East Carolina Smith said. 'Tt's
how we huddle up and try to
get tight, go out execute the
plays and do our best
Let's hope there are many
more wins and push-ups to
come this season.
Coming Thursday
The
End
Zone
&
2��"
-





September 20. 1994
The East Carolinian 11
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POWLUS
Continued from page 10
What followed his rehabilita-
tion almost made the younger
Powlus feel worse. To protect his
prizepupil,HoltzmadePowluswear
a bright yellow vest over his practice
jersey, effectively putting him off-
limits to the Notre Dame defense.
"We never heard a complaint
the whole time he was hurt, but I
noticed a big change in him once fall
football started SusanPowlus said.
"He was happy again, the happiest
he'd been since his (high school) se-
nior year of football. I think it was
because a big part of his life had
returned
And for a while, it seemed like
little had changed. For all the hype
Powlus' debut against Northwest-
em this season managed to generate,
he proved equal to the billing, tying
a school record withf our touchdown
passes. And he was only slightly less
effective, but no less spectacular in a
loss the week after at Michigan. It
was during a late touchdown drive
in that one that Powlus' cool and his
commandottliesituationthatbroiight
a torrent of Montanacomparisons rain-
ing down from the ABC broadcast
booth.
"Sure,it wasan ego-builder Ron
St wassa vingnow faut i talsoseemed
very unfair.
"And fortunately he added,
"Ronnie's mature enough to know
that at this point in his career, it's a
stretch
By nightfall Saturday, no one
needed reminding of that, least of all
Powlus. He had to think back to his
sophomore year in high school to re-
member the last time he threw four
interceptions in one game.
Yet Holtz, who never had a quar-
terback throw four in a single game,
was the first to rush to Powlus' de-
fense.
"It wasn't like he was wanted to
throw them Holtz said. "We just
have to give him more help. He's still
the quarterback
And he's still not Joe Montana.
Yet.
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12 The East Carolinian
September 20, 1994
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TEMPLE
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EAT-IN OR
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f you love golf but don't have a tremendous
amount of extra cash to spend on playing, try
sophomore QB Henry Burris, came
on the next possession at the Temple
34-yard line. Logan did not run the
ballearly (becauseof differentTemple
defensive schemes) but was able to
get the ball in Smith's and McPhails
hands on this drive. Smith carried for
31 yards on the drive and McPhail's
13 yard runup themiddle,alongwirh
CrandeU's conversion pass to Larry
Shannon extended the lead to 14-0
with 7:01 remaining in the second
quarter.
The Pirates were not finished.
Foreman's awesome strip gave
theBucsfheballontheOwl'sl7. The
three-play drive ended with Smith's
10-yard run, and the PAT extended
theleadto21-0with6:27rernainingin
the half.
ECU'slongestscoringdrivecame
in the third quarter. Smith's one-yard
runcappedal2-play 67-yard drive to
extend the lead to 28-0 with627in the
third.
The ECU domination brought
another star to shoot for, a shutout
"Wewantedtheshutout,butwe
didn't get it" Libiano said. "After
that,youjustgottoplaytowin.Thafs
going to be our goal all year, to have
a shutout"
LasttimeECUshutoutanoppo-
nent wasOct 23,1982againstIllinois
State.
Wim220remainingmthe third,
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left to play and pitted the score at 31-
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Ttefinalscorecamecrabkxked
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Nextweek, the Piratesplay their
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 20, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 20, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1027
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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