The East Carolinian, September 15, 1994






�M�
Today
High82�
Tomorrow
Lifestyle
Comic book reviewed
See what happens when
Superman and
Spiderman are joined.
Check out the Lifestyle
section, page 10.
Sports
TEC's End Zone
Look on page 14 for your latest tabloid
guide to Pirate football. Find out about the
team's latest opponent, the Temple Owls,
and how they plan to acheive their first
victory.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 44
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 15, 1994
16 Pages
Tailgating option offered to students
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
The hot, humid days of
summer are long gone, and
the cool days of the pigskin
are here. As ECU students gear
up for afternoons filled with
tailgating and socializing with
friends, the athletics depart-
ment is planning how students
can more conveniently enjoy
Pirate football at its best.
Upperclass students may
remember the anxiety of get-
ting to the stadium gates only
to stand in line to be pushed
through the turnstile, and then
to stand in line again to await
entrance into the stands. In
order to better serve the stu-
dents, the athletics depart-
ment has added a new gate
designated for students only.
The gate, which will be lo-
cated beneath the student sec-
tion of the stadium on the north
side, has 10 slots which students
will enter through. The gate pre-
viously used for student en-
trance has been permanently
closed due to construction on
Minges Coliseum.
Construction is not the
only hurdle that the athletics
department has had to jump.
Parking spaces previously lo-
cated at Allied Health are now
used for freshmen parking,
therefore limiting parking for
football fans and tailgaters. Lee
Workman, assistant athletic di-
rector for ticket sales and pro-
motion, is hoping students will
park at the bottom of College
Hill. Workman says that this
area will be more accessible for
students because it is closer to
the student gates and also to the
core campus.
"We have lost a lot of park-
ing spaces out by Charles Bou-
levard Workman said. "We
are encouraging students to
park at the bottom of College
Hill
Workman believes this
will be very convenient. Stu-
dents who can simply walk up
the Hill, across 14th Street
(which will be partly closed off
on game day), across the intra-
mural field�directly to the new
student gate.
All gates to Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium will open one
and a half hours before kick-off.
All bags will be inspected at
gate entrance for alcoholic bev-
erages.
Some students may feel
that this is a simple solution to
exclude students from tailgat-
ing with other fans, as well as to
keep the students out of sight,
but Workman says that was not
the intention of the committee
who came up with the idea.
"We are trying to spread
people out to make it easier for
parking he said. "That seemed
like the logical move
Parking will still be avail-
able on the Frisbee-golf field, in
the Allied Health paved park-
ing lot and in some of the field
designated for freshmen park-
ing. Any spaces in the freshmen
lot not taken can be used for
football parking.
After the much publicized
fight which occurred during the
televised game against Syracuse
last year, group seating was re-
voked. Student groups of 25 or
more students were allowed to
pick up blocks of tickets within
the same section, but the seat-
ing areas were not reserved.
Again this year, groups can pick
up blocks of tickets, but seats
will not be reserved. Students
interested in group seating can
call 328-4500 for more informa-
tion.
"We will have group seat-
ing the way we did last year
after the Syracuse game Work-
man said.
Group tickets will be avail-
able on Mondays prior to Satur-
day games. Individual tickets
can be picked up on Tuesdays,
Wednesdays and Thursdays.
Students tickets will be issued
on a first-come, first-serve ba-
sis. Students will have the op-
tion to purchase half-price
tickets for guests while they
last. The guest tickets can only
be bought between 8 a.m. and
5 p.m. at the Athletic Ticket
Office, temporarily located on
the south side of Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium, adjacent to
the Press Box. Students tick-
ets will also be available at
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. un-
til 6 p.m. No half-price tickets
will be sold at Mendenhall.
Workman said students
will be required to sit in the
sections designated on their
tickets. This year, a new pro-
fessional usher staff has been
hired to help control seating.
See RULES page 4
New light
By Wendy Rountree
traffic
Staff Writer
Student safety and con-
venience are the main reasons
for the construction in front of
Christenbury, said Dr. George
Harrell, assistant vice chancel-
lor for facilities.
"This is a student-benefit-
ing project Harrell said.
Harrell said by the end of
the year, there will be a fully
functioning stoplight intersec-
tion in the area in front of
Brewster on 10th Street.
Currently, cars can only
make a right turn from
Christenbury onto 10th Street,
but with the addition of the
new intersection, cars will be
able to make both right and
left turns.
Harrell said the univer-
sity wanted the intersection to
enable student buses to loop
back to College Hill Drive with-
out the hindrance of having to
make a right turn, then turning
back towards College Hill. Also,
he said the intersection will aid
students who cross 10th Street
to reach campus.
"It allows the student tran-
sit system to operate more effec-
tively and allows a pedestrian
crossing area, which improves
the safety for the students cross-
ing 10th Street Harrell said.
He said there is a plan to tie
the pedestrian bridge over Green
Mill Run to the new intersec-
tion.
The gravel in front of
Christenbury will be replaced
by pavement when the Lanier
Construction Company of Snow
Hill, N.C paves the area this
weekend.
The next step in develop-
ing the intersection will be re-
ceiving the traffic light.
Russian students explore
Harrell said the traffic
light was on order and took a
long time to be delivered be-
cause the manufacturer custom
makes each traffic light.
"We expect the light to be
up by the first of the year he
said.
Since 10th Street is a state
road, the construction is being
managed by the N.C. Depart-
ment of Transportation, not Fa-
cility Services. The department
is doing the project to improve
10th Street.
Until the intersection is
completed, Harrell asks that stu-
dents cross 10th Street with care.
"I would like to remind
the students to be careful cross-
ing 10th Street during construc-
tion and until the light is up he
said. "They should use College
Hill Drive intersection until the
other light is in, for their own
safety'
By Teri Howell
Staff Writer
ECU is not only home for
many freshmen this year, but
also a new and different home
for six graduate students from
Russia and the New Indepen-
dent States (NIS) involved in a
year-long program, the Free-
dom Support Act Graduate Fel-
lowship Program.
The six women school-
teachers from Russia are part
of a funded fellowship program
sponsored by the U.S. Informa-
tion Society and the Soros Foun-
dation. Elena Belotserkovets,
Tatiana Kirgizova, Ludmila
Spiryakova, Marina
Kudritskaya of Belarussia and
Valentina Kushnarenko of the
Ukraine are extremely excited
about the new opportunities
that lay ahead of them, said Dr.
Gregory A. Hastings of the ECU
Photo Courtesy of News Bureau
Marina Kudritskaya(r) and Valentina Kushnarenko,
Russian students study American customs and language
Division of Continuing Education.
Hastings said the Soros
Foundation is providing funds for
this year-long program that will
lead to a master's degree by
next July's second summer ses-
See NEW page 3
Biology students explore Canadian waters
Kitty Tull(l),
Paramore.
Bill Tarplee and Lee
By Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
When a group of
ECU biologists traveled
to Nova Scotia last May
to study the striped bass
population in the
Stewiacke River, they got
more than they bar-
gained for. The biologists
endured freezing tem-
peratures, cold rains and
a river whose water level
increased by as much as
12 feet every six hours.
The research team
consisted of two gradu-
ate students, Kitty Tull and
Lee Paramore and under-
graduate student Bill
Tarplee. They were led by
Dr. Roger Rulifson, an ECU
biologist. Their goal was to
study different aspects of
the striped bass population
in the Stewiacke River.
Kitty Tull went to
gather data for her thesis,
which focused on the effects
of the salinity on the striped
bass which is a predomi-
nately fresh water fish. This
was important because the
Stewiacke River is a tidal
bore river which means that
the tides from the Atlantic
Ocean affect not only the
water level, but the salinity
of the water as well.
The other graduate
student, Lee Paramore,
looked at the fish them-
selves and their physical
characteristics such as
weight, length and their
scales. One of the most im-
portant parts of Paramore's
study was looking at the
fish's otoliths. Otoliths are
bones near the fish's inner
ear. The biologists looked
See CANADA page 4
Career Day kicks off
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
The semester may have just
begun, but it is time to start looking
for the perfect career and the per-
fect employer. To help students in
this quest, Career Services and the
School of Business are sponsoring
the Business Career Day on Tues-
day, Sept. 20.
"The career day is designed
for students to meet employers and
exchange information said
Margie Swartout, assistant direc-
tor of Career Services.
The event, which is prima-
rily designed for juniors and se-
niors, is open to any student inter-
ested in working in a business
environment.
"Business Career Day
gives students a chance to net-
work and get acquainted with
employers who are coming from
a variety of environments
Swartout said.
Career Day willbe attended
by some 60 employers represent-
ing banking institutions, retail
organizations, accounting firms,
manufacturing firms, insurance
agencies and federal government
agencies.
Employers will be available
from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. on the first
See DAY page 4
People on
the Street
Did ECU'S
reputation of being
a party school
influence your
decision to come
to school here?
Photos by Leslie Petty
"No, I am an elementary
education major and they
have a really good pro-
gram at ECU for that
Dayna Goins, senior
"No, it was close to
home and more
convenient when I was
younger
Greg Boyd, senior
"Not really, I like the
school and it was a good
school for my major�
nursing
Charlene Holt, sophomore
"No, I just came here
because I knew they
would accept me
Nana Cunningham,
sophomore





2 The East Carolinian
September 15, 1994
. 4,
n-MlLCsmpus
Family care
benefits surveyed
UNC receives donation for gay studies
Charles Williamson, a UNC medical school graduate from
San Francisco who died in 1993, designated a $170,000 grant in his
will for gay education and awareness classes. University officials
must now design a curriculum for gay and lesbian studies to be
approved by the deceased's executor of state. If all goes well, the
monev will be in place by December.
Yale scientist contracts rare virus and exposes many after lab
accident
A Yale scientist was experimenting with tissue contami-
nated with a deadly tropical virus, Sabia. The Sabia virus comes from
Brazil, where it is believed to be carried by rodents. Symptoms
include high fever, internal bleeding and shock. After time, organs
begin to decompose and the victim bleeds from every orifice of the
body, including eyes, ears and pores of the skin. The scientist failed
to report the incident to Yale officials, breaking federal and school
policy. Although he did not realize it for a week, he had exposed five
people, including two children, before seeking medical attention for
a 103 degree fever. An experimental antiviral drug eventually stopped
the illness, but not before the scientist came in contact with 75 other
people.
Lawsuit filed against fake psychiatrist
Lee H. Shoemate's name has become synonymous with
trouble in the past few years in the UNC hospital's community. No
one in the area has seen or heard from the man since he resigned in
1990 after officials discovered he had falsified credentials by saying
he was a certified doctor. Last month new charges came up against
Shoemate. Rebecca Dunkley has accused Shoemate of abusing his
power by manipulating his patient into having forced sex with him
while he posed as a psychiatrist for almost a year in the late '80s. She
is also accusing him of having threatened to commit her involun-
tarily to a psychiatric hospital if she told anyone.
Geology student stumbles across dinosaur
Heather English, a student at Modesto Junior College in
California, usually spends her time looking for minerals and rocks,
not bones. When she stumbled across a jawbone while on a dig in
Montana this summer, her instincts told her she had found some-
thing big. English had unearthed a Tenontosaurus, a large plant-
eating dinosaur. The area, near Yellowstone park, is thought to be
dinosaur rich.
Compiled byTambra Zion. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Susan Schwartz
Staff Writer
Working full-time and being
a parent or caring for an adult
family member creates day-to-day
challenges for many ECU faculty
and staff members. Recently, a
Family Care Survey has been cir-
culated to ECU faculty and staff in
an attempt to meet these chal-
lenges.
The Family Care Survey
came abou t through a request from
the Chancellor to assess the needs
for dependent care facilities for
ECU faculty and staff members.
The survey was put together by a
subcommittee of the Committee
on the Status of Women, accord-
ing to Dr. Barbara Lyons-Hines,
chairperson of the Committee on
the Statusof Women. Lvons-Hines
said that the purpose of the Fam-
ily Care Survey is "to gather basic
information regarding what the
needs of employees on campus
are in relation to dependent care
Survey results will be used
to plan for the future of depen-
dent-care facilities for ECU fac-
ulty and staff and their families.
"We don't have any solu-
tions right now, but we realize the
importance of the issue of depen-
dent care as it relates to employee
productivity and satisfaction on
the job said Lyons-Hines.
The survey consists of four
sections designed to gather spe-
cific information and a final sec-
tion which allows respondents to
make comments about the survey.
Section One of the survey
See CAREpage 3
Grants to
aid women
By Andy Turner
Staff Writer
A grant given to the ECU
School of Medicine by the Kate B.
Reynolds Foundation has pro-
vided funds for outreach clinics to
screen post-menopausal women
for osteoporosis.
Osteoporosis causes low
bone mass and deterioration of
bone tissue. As a result of the thin-
ning of the bones, bones are more
susceptible to hip, wrist and spine
fractures.
Women are at a greater risk
than men of developing
osteoporosis. This is due to the
decrease of the production of the
female sex hormone estrogen,
which protects against the dete-
rioration of bones.
In the case of loss of estrogen
in post-menopausal women, es-
See MEDpage 3
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Good at participating
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Get
Cultural!
ECU's newest
exchange stu-
dents met Mon-
day, Sept. 13, at
the Interna-
t i o n a I
House.ECU of-
fers programs
which give stu-
dents the oppor-
tunity to travel
and earn credit.
Photo by Leslie Petty
Poet focuses
on fiction
By Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
Joe David Bellamy be-
came the first David J. and
Virginia S. Whichard Dis-
tinguished Chair of Hu-
manities at ECU, on Aug.
22. Bellamy's appointment
is for the next two academic
years.
"I am very pleased
and honored to be here
under these auspices
Bellamy said. "It is really
an honor to be an endowed
p.ofessor, and I want to do
my best to live up to the
honor, and I hope that I can
really make an impact
while I'm here
Bellamy, formerly a
professor at St. Lawrence
University in Canton, N. Y
is a widely published writer
who has written andor ed-
ited 11 books. His fiction,
poetry, non-fiction, and re-
views have appeared in
over 70 magazines. Among
his numerous awards are
the Editor's Book Award
for enduring literary value
for his novel Suzi
Sinzinnati, and a collection
of his stories was chosen
for an Associated Writing
Programs award.
"I guess that the main
thing that I want the stu-
dents to know about me is
that I have written for a
long time and now I'mhere
to teach fiction writing
Bellamy said.
Not only is Bellamy
teaching English at ECU,
he is also reading from
some of his works through-
out the year. On Wednes-
See WRITEpage 4
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i in 'nfiiB�Wri
September 15, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Moyewood center to open
By Tully Beatty
Staff Writer
The Greenville Housing
Authority will celebrate the
grand opening of the Moyewood
Community Center, on Sept. 30.
The center, under the direction
of Michael Best and Zina Boyd,
will be serving not only the
Moyewood district, but also
seven other public housing com-
munities as well.
"The center is essentially
an all-purpose cultural, educa-
tional and alternative recreation
center that will cater to the needs
of the community Best said.
Movewood will provide
services for both the young and
the elderlv. Social activities'will
be arranged for senior citizens in
the afternoons. A full-length bas-
ketball court, play ground equip-
ment, pool table, Pingpong table,
video games and a safe haven
room that will serve as a TV
lounge area will be provided for
the voungsters.
"Just meeting the needs of
the communitv' will be the biggest
reward Best said.
Educational and economic
services will also be provided.
There will be a multi purpose room
featuring computer learning and
skills. A program promoting self-
employment through "home-ec"
classes is also being arranged.
Members will be encouraged
to develop culinary skills and gain
employment through catering and
other means.
Boy scouts, girl scouts, cub
scouts and 4-H groups will also
benefit from the center.
Some people may have mis-
conceptions about a community
center being built in the
Movewood district. Why place a
center in an area that has a history
of drug problems and general
crime?
Best stated that until two or
three years ago, that would have
been a legitimate response. The
area has changed a great deal since
then and Best and Boyd have re-
ceived nothing but enthusiasm
and support from the community.
Best hopes that the opening of the
community center will help dis-
pel the rumors
MED
Cont. from
page 2
CARE
Cont. from
page 2
trogen replacement therapy may
be used.
"Estrogen is given to post-
menopausal women to replace
lost estrogen said Dr. Fiona
Cook of the Section of Endocri-
nology. "Estrogen is the most
effective and safe treatment to
prevent osteoporosis at this
time
The grant . as enabled the
School of Medicine to purchase a
bone densitometer. The bone
densitometer aids in the screen-
ing for osteoporosis by measur-
ing bone mass.
The procedure for using the
bone densitometer only lasts for
about four minutes. The patient's
forearm is placed in a water bath,
and a sec" is made using a very
low dose X-ray.
"The bone densitometer is
a small portable machine allow-
ing more people to be reached
Cook said. "We take the bone
and see patients and talk to them
about osteoporosis.
"Also, we council them on
things they can do to keep their
bones strong. It is very impor-
tant to detect the problem early
Patients who have insur-
ance, Medicaid or Medicare will
be billed for the screening pro-
cess. However, people without
any form of insurance are not
required to pay for the screening
process.
Cook said that a lot of
women have been using the pro-
gram and local doctors have
helped by providing their ser-
vices.
"It has been well received
she said. "It's been quite busy.
We have tried to be good about
working with local physicians
Cook feels that the program
has been successful and is help-
ing to provide care for many
people.
"I am pleased with it Cook
said. "I really think we are pro-
viding care for people who
would not normally get it
The clinics are being con-
ducted in Greene and Onslow
counties. Clinics are provided in
Greenville at the Osteoporosis
Clinic at the ECU Outpatient
Center.
NEW
Cont. from
pagel
gathers general information about
facultv and staff members such as
how long they have worked for
the university, their ethnic group,
their family income and whether
or not they have children or adult
family members who are depen-
dent upon them for care.
Section Two asks respon-
dents to rate the family care ser-
vices that are important to them
on a scale of I to 5, with 1 being
Very Important and 5 being Least
Important. Some of the services it
considers are child day care,
afterschool care, and adult day
care.
Section Three addresses only
families with children under 15
years of age and assesses their
needs regarding the type of care
families use now, how much they
spend and can afford to spend on
child care and what difficulties
families face in arranging for child
care.
Section Four gathers infor-
mation to assess the needs of fami-
lies who have elderly relatives in
their care.
At the present time, ECU
does not provide dependent care
services for families of faculty and
staff members. According to
Lyons-Hines, about the closest
thing to dependent care services
that ECU does have is the Child
Development Center through the
School of Human Environmental
Sciences. The Center provides a
pre-school for education, training
and research. The facilities are lim-
ited , however. The Center has very
limited space and is not readily-
able to handle the needs of the
entire ECU faculty and staff.
Lyons-Hines said that she
was encouraged by the number of
responses to the survey that have
been received so far, and she en-
courages faculty and staff to fill
out the survey and return it. Com-
pleted surveys can be sent by cam-
pus mail to: �
Dr. Ken Wilson, Regional De-
velopment Institute, Willis Build-
ing.
Responding to the survey will
greatly assist the sub-committee of
the Committee on the Status of
Women in improving the working
environment of the university.
sion. He said that the purpose of
the fellowship is to help in ad-
vancing the training of educa-
tional administration and lead-
ership.
"These women have an as-
piration to become school admin-
istrators in Russia said
Hastings. "They are all very
happy here and are very appre-
ciative of ECU and the commu-
nity as a whole
Valentina Kushnarenko
said their classes are different
than those of other ECU students.
"We do not listen to lec-
tures or write down what the
professor says. Instead, we have
conversations with the profes-
sor, a kind of dialogue�we feel
we are equal with the teacher
Hastings said all the stu-
dents were screened and ac-
cepted for the fellowship along
and an estimated 80 students
were enrolled in other United
States universities. These six
women have diplomas as well as
extensive English language train-
ing. The women took classes in
August and are continuing their
language classes until December
to ensure there is no slippage,
said Hastings.
Marina Kudritskaya said
she hopes for the best and be-
lieves the information learned
here will help all six women to
gain promising results.
"It is better to look at sec-
ondary schools with our own
eyes Kudritskaya said.
Both Valentina and Marina
said they cannot believe they are
here in America, and they thank
the American people, teachers
and professors for making this
fellowship experience a good and
memorable one.
"The country is rich and
multicolored � there are colors
everywhere, said Kudritskaya.
"The professors are so kind and
warm and Dr. Hastings, he is like
the all father
Thesix Russian schoolteach-
ers are living in Ringgold Towers
until their fellowship program is
complete, and Hastings said they
are looking forward to doing well
in their class requirements as will
as making new friendships.
Photo by Leslie Petty
The Army's HUMVEE utility vehicle was on display outside of The Student Stores
last month. The purpose of the display was to recruit students for Army ROTC.
The craft, which was provided by the 514th MP Co. in Greenville, has the 4-
wheel abilities to negotiate in adverse weather conditions such as mudslides
and snow. The craft was instrumental in the victory over Iraq in 1990-91.
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4 The East Carolinian
September
WRITE c� i CANADA
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Page 6
The East Carolinian
Opinion
September 15. 1994
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
'iErmt
'Mi
recycled
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Stephanie Lassiter, News Editor
Tambra Zlon, Asst. News Editor
Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
Kris Hoffler, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Warren Sumner, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to editor reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 328-6366.
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randall Rozzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Changes for gameday may be beneficial
People usually dislike change. We get
comfortable doing things a certain way.
At any suggestion of changing our ways,
the first instinct is to dig in our heels and
fight back.
However, it doesn't have to be this
way. Change can be good, even healthy.
In this spirit of keeping an open mind
and trying new things, let's consider the
new program for attending football games.
First, due to all the needed construction
at Minges Coliseum, students will now
enter through new gates at the north end
of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. No problem
here. Surely no one was really attached to
enter the stadium any particular way.
Second, because of the loss of parking
due to construction, the administration is
now encouraging students to park and
tailgate at the bottom of College Hill
instead of out by Charles Boulevard. This
actually fits in well with the first change.
It's only a short walk from College Hill to
the stadium. Moreover, if one is coming
this way, then the new gates are in the
most convenient place.
Sure, this change seems the most
drastic. It may seem as if the
administration is just trying to shunt us
off out of the way (and out of sight).
However, compromises are going to have
to be made. We want all the benefits the
new construction is going to bring to our
school. If we can live with the parking
situation on campus this year, then surely
we can live with this.
Third, group seating will be
continuing through the plan
implemented last year after the Syracuse
game. Groups of 25 or more will still be
able to get tickets on Mondays of game
weeks. Tickets will still be in the same
section. However, unlike previous
years, seats will not be reserved. Again,
not a big problem. It seemed to work
fairly well last year, why not try it again?
Last, professional ushers have been
hired to help control seating. From now
on, fans must sit in their assigned
section. Sure, it may seem like junior
high all over again, but if it will help to
alleviate tensions on Saturday
afternoons, then it will be a great idea.
Overall these changes seem to be
good ideas. It may be that they will not
work out as planned. However, we
should be willing to give them a decent
chance before we reject them.
Whatever we do, let's not allow these
new rules or anything else stop us from
getting out and supporting our Pirates.
This year began with bright hopes
and the team showed signs against Duke
of fulfilling all our expectations.
Moreover, since the first home game
will be against Syracuse, let's bury all
those bad memories of fan misbehavior
from last year's game. Let's show The
News & Observer, and everyone else,
that not only do we know how to have a
good time, but that we also have the
- classiest fans.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
As a proud graduate of ECU and long time
member of the Pirate Club, I was disgusted with the
"Reputation of rowdiness article that appeared in
The News & Observer last Saturday.
There are primarily two reasons for my disgust.
First, the writer after stating that "they (ECU) are not
the only ones who get rowdy goes on to trash our
great university throughout rheentire article. Second,
and most depressing, five current ECU students
were duped into becoming willing accomplices.
Maybe these five loose cannons are just naive or
immature or both. They were certainly not perceptive
enough to know they were being used � set up by a
rookie intern writer, who just happens to currently
attend another university located in Chapel Hill.
Their ill-advised, insipid, boneheaded comments
enabled the writer to accomplish his objective. And
that is to perpetuate the myth that East Carolina
University is merely a "party school" attended by a
bunch of un-motivated, mediocre students that could
not get into Carolina.
I, for one, resent the implication. Nothing in this
article says what ECU is really all about. Too many
have worked too hard for too long for this to be the
epitaph at ECU.
Students, take this advice form somebody old
enough to be your daddy. You, and you alone, must
decide how you want to be perceived. Do not let
your competition do it for you. Once you leave ECU
and enter the cruel world, you will compete for a job
head to head with graduates from State, Carolina,
Wake Forest, Duke and other good colleges and
universities.
It is said mat actions speak louder than words.
Unfortunately, thewordsspokenby the "brain-dead
five" have harmed the students, faculty,
administration, alumni and friends of this great
university. It is time now for responsible students
who really care about East Carolina University and
their won personal future to take control and set the
record straight.
W. Scott McKinnon
Class of 1965
Unneeded pressures imposed by clocks
By Patrick Hinson
I saw a special on television
the other night (it mu st have been
National Geographic or
something) that focused on the
natives who live in the Amazon
rain forest. A reporter was asking
one of them if he had ever seen a
wristwatch and if he knew what
its purpose was. The jungle man
only smiled and looked at the
reporter's watch and shook his
head, not �
knowing what
in the world
this alien object
was.
The
reporter asked
thenativehow
his people
figured the
time out in the
jungle, where
the canopy of
Our watches
and our clocks
rule our lives,
from the very
beginning to
the very end.
get used to eating monkey.
If only I could sling off this
damned wristwatch of mine and
dash out into the wild, screaming
like a banshee and trailing articles
of clothing behind me as I go. I
would skip into the jungle, a free
man at last.
Think for a minute about
what the wristwatch represents:
a prison of sorts. Our watches
� ard clocks
rule our
lives, from
the very
beginning to
the very end.
You
probably
will not even
get a four
o'clock
funeral if
you want
trees overhead makes it nearly
impossible to see the sun. The
native smiled again and said that
was easy. They just watched for
the slant of the sun's rays coming
in through the rain forest's ceiling
of trees, and judged the time of
day by the degree of the light's
slant. �
Watching this, I could not
help but sit there and wish I was
that guy, an innocent native
bushman. I wish I could live my
life in that manner. It probably
would not be all that bad to run
around the jungle naked every
day, just as long as those huge
mosquitoes used a little common
courtesy when choosing landing
sites. I could shoot blow darts
and climb trees, go to those big
village cocoa parties and dodge
bulldozers. I could probably even
one, because someone will be
scheduled to ship out ahead of
you.
Every day of my life is lived
by the clock, by the hour, by the
minute. At this very minute, as a
matter of fact, I am typing like a
madman to make deadline on this
article, and that is just one of the
many things I will need to do
today, this week, this month, this
year.
You're probably reading this
(if anyone actually is!) on your
break. You probably have a
hundred things to do today
yourself. Don't be late! (Don't you
hate when you come into a class
late and everybody looks up at
you? "Leper! Death to you, late
one) Even when we have fun
we are on the clock. We have got
to do it on certain nights and in a
certain amount of time. You get
the point.
Take away my wristwatch
and I had be reduced to a mental
waffle in less than two hours. I
am one of those people who never
hasanything completely together,
and although I suppose I am
ashamed of that, I probably
should not be. It is my own little
form of protest in this "repressive
society" of ours. Even at my best,
I am always a little behind
schedule (bu 11 will probably skip
that little rid -bi t of information at
job interviews). I will probably
die ten years too early because of
it.
I know, I know, we are all the
same. You all sit up late into the
night typing those dreaded
papers, just hating yourself from
the pits of hell for waiting until
the last minute. But do not forget
that lights are burning all over
this campus. We are all the same,
ruled by the clock, yet doing our
natural best (and maybeitissome
sort of primeval, subconscious
reaction) to protest being ruled
by that never-ending ticker of life.
I give two thumbs up to that
little brown bushman. He will
have to live my dream for me, I
guess. I am destined for a job
somewhere out there in (yeah, I
hate to say it) the real world, some
day. Still, if for no other reason
(although there are countless
others), we should leave the rain
forests alone because there
actually are people like that out
there living in them, people who
do not even know what a
wristwatch is, or what it is for,
and could givea damn either way.
Monkey, anyone?
To the Editor:
I was very disappointed to read Steve Politi's
editorialization which the Raleigh News & Observer
attempted to pass as legitimate journalism in the
Saturday, Sept. 10, 1994, sports section. What was
proported to be a sports related article on the Duke v.
ECU football game evolved into a nearly one-half
page biting piece, full of half-truths and innuendo,
on the impertinent nature of the ECU community.
As a professional, it isdifficult enough tohaveto
defend ECU at every turn. Whenever I must travel on
business, I frequently engage in dialogue such as,
"So, you're getting your MBA at ECU, I'll bet you
never have time to study with all that partying you
do down there Or, "ECU! What are you doin
gettin' a Masters degree in beer drinkin' and girl
chasin'?" Or. "Hey everybody, we got us an ECU
graduate, whoowee, now we can really party with a
professional But the comment that I have yet to
devise a polite retort for, "I always thought you'd be
smart enough to go to Carolina! How come you're
going to ECU?"
When quotations by ECU students such as those
printed in The News & Observer, are read across the
state, it only reinforces the undeserved reputation
hanging onECUlikeaballand chain. I takeo task the
fraternity president who allegedly state, "We don;t
have a great reputation for academics. We have to be
proud of something Later,this same student
reportedly referred to a fist fight in the stands at
Ficklen Stadium last year as "pretty cool Such
comments are the fodder that fuels the anti-ECU
press in North Carolina. It is going to take many
press releases about research at the School of
Medicine, grants received by faculty, successful sports
programs and distinguished alumni toovercome the
bad press generated by those quoted in the N&O.
As for Mr. Politi, I would encourage him to get
lus facts straight in the future. Yes, on Sept. 5,1987,
some ECU fans did swarm the field at N C State's
Carter-Finley Stadium. I know, because I was there.
I also saw an awful lot of N.C State students, and
fans of undistinguishable allegiance on the field that
rainy night in Raleigh. Rain so hard that it stung your
eyes at times as you tried to watch the night game
under the mercury lights. I remember one of the
well-mannered N.C. State fan's shout to a group of
us, "Go back to Greenville you bunch of rednecks
When the mayhem started, everyone poured onto
that field. Mr. Politi would like folks to believe that
NCSU fans sat politely in their seats as a bunch of
beer crazed yahoos did irreparable damage to state
property. I would be willing to guess that the Rolling
Stones did more damage last week than ECU fans
did seven years ago.
And, Mr. Politi, if you are going to quote a source
have the courtesy to spell their name correctly.
Repeated ly, Dean of Students Dr. Ronald Speier was
referred to as Donald Spear. Dr. Speier was cast as
some sort of Dean Vernon Wormer, snooping around
fraternity parties and placing them on "double-
secret probation, compounding the image of
Greenville as a town where every spring the trees are
filled with toilet paper, and every Halloween the
toilets explode.
ECU has a great deal to be proud of and I hope that
one day, as I am writing my credentials for a
professionafconference, someone will happen to be
impressed with the fact that I am an ECU graduate.
James E. Hickmon
Graduate
Business Administration
To the Editor:
I am sick of constantly having to defend the
reputation of this school. This past summer I was
talking with someone who attends UNC. When I told
her that I attend ECU, she laughed and said ECU was
a joke.
I feel I can hold my own with anyone from any
their school in the state, but my accomplishments
probably won'tbetakenasseriouslybecauselattended
a "party school Therefore, it sickens me when
studentsdo things toperpetuateECU'sbad reputation.
Whether you like it or not, we are under a
microscope at this university. Guys like Steve Politi of
The News & Observer are just waiting for something
negative to happen so they can dump on ECU and
laugh with their buddies who went to Carolina or
Duke. So remember, everywhere you go you are
representing East Carolina.
Reporters aren't going to write about the School
of Education being voted 1 in the country, or the
School of Medicine being 1 in primary care. They are
going to write about students getting drunk and
fighting at football games.
I've always felt that there are plenty of intelligent
people at ECU, and you can leam just as much here as
you can anywhere else. But unfortunately, a lot of
people don't feel that way. And students who get in
fights at football gamesand make ignorant statements
to news reporters don't help the situation.
Mitch Phillips
Senior
Environmental Health
The East Carolinian welcomes all Letters to the Editor.
However, all letters, in order to be considered for
publication, must be typed, under 250 words, and
contain your name, class rank, major and a working
daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to
the Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications
Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C, 27858-4353.





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TheEastCarolinian
Page 7
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September 15, 1994
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ALE STUDENT ROOMMATE
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY $180 rent, 12 utili-
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brand new. Call Jamee 321-5779 after 5
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fcEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
ASAP. Tar River. Private room$161.25
�onth 1 (A utilities and phone. $100
'deposit required. Call 752-5428.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY to share 2 bedroom
apt. $170 rent, pay 1 2 exp. no pets close
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FfiMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
ASAP: to share new 3 bedroom 2 12
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Call Kami 830-6848.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for new 2 bed-
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utilities. Contact Todd at 321-8668 after
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GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS-
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TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT! Brookhill
apartments. 2 bedroom, 11 2 bath, fire-
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Available Sept. 15th. Michelle or Jenny
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AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
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Major Credit Cards Only
MENDENHALL
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ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
ANDWATCHERS:Sportssupplements
at major discount prices: Met-Rx, Creat-
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TAKING THE GRE? You need the Offi-
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dual heaters, 2 independant waveless
sections, padded matteras cover, frame
and all other accessories. $300 355-7004
TALL DORM REFRIGERATOR for
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MUST SELL 9 piece oak bedroom suite
please call 752-4921
TREK 800 MOUNTAIN BIKE w
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$250 328-7080
1994 SUZUKI RF600R like new, 1300 mi.
2 helmets, $5000, 752-8645
MOUNTAIN BIKE GARY FISHER
RANGITOTO 15.5" frame with shocks.
Excellentcondition. Paid $720 asking $540
includes helmet, u-lock, seat lock, car
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ONE BLACK BRA FOR CHRYSLER
LEBARON: models '9092, and one
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3826
FOR SALE: Brother 2X-50 word proces-
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KILLER CAMERA GEAR FOR SALE! I
can't afford to list it all! I have so much
gear! Call Richard after 5pm @ 752-8577
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ATTN: ALL ECU ORGANIZATIONS
Pelican Building Center of Greenville
has Purple and Gold Spray Paint for all
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tall x 5 ft. wide actual movie theatre
cardboard stand-up. 758-9769.
& prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Jamaica,
Panama City! Great resume experience!
1-800-678-6386!
WANTED America's fastest growing
travel company now seeking individuals
promoting trips to Jamaica, Cancun, Ba-
hamas, Horida, Padre, Barbados. Theeasi-
est way to free travel, fantastic pay. Call
Sunsplash Tours 1-80O426-7710
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS Pitt County
Memorial Hospital is seeking qualified
individuals to teach aerobic classes
through its employee recreation and
wellness department. Persons will con-
tract to teach on a part-time basis. Inter-
ested candidates should contact Ms Scot-
tie Gaskins between 8am-4:30pm at (919)
816-5958. Pitt County Memorial Hospital
SPRING BREAK '95- Sell trips, earn cash
& go free Student Travel Services is now-
hiring campus represenatives. Lowest
rates to Jamaica, Cancun, Daytona and
Panama City Beach. Call 1-800-648849
WANTED: First and second year stu-
dents to fill leadership positions. Call 830-
2284 or 753-5284
ENJOY WORKING WITH THE
CLOTHING YOU LOVE TO WEAR.
Brody's is accepting applications for part-
time sales associates in such areas as Jun-
iorMissy Sportswear. Flexible schedul-
ing options to fit most needs: 10am-2pm,
12pm-9pm, or 6pm-9pm. All retail posi-
tions include weekends. Clothing dis-
count. Interviews held each Mon. and
Thurs l-4pm, Brody's, The Plaza
BRODY'S FOR MEN. Eastern North
Carolina's fashion leader, is accepting
applications for part-time sales associates.
We offer clothing discount flexible sched-
uling options: 10am- 2pm, 12pm-9pm, or
6pm-9pm. All retail positions include
weekends. Interviews held each Mon. and
Thurs. l-4pm, Brody's The Plaza
SITTER NEEDED: Ladies luncheon
group needs reliable nursery workers
10am- 2pm third Tues. each month,$4.30
hour. Church nursery experience, trans-
portation and references required. Call
756-1043.
AGRICULTURAL RETAIL OUTLET
Merchandiser position. This is a part-
time position (up to30 hours per week).
The job requires customer service skills,
pricing merchandise, stocking shelves,
and other duties as directed. Previous
retail background helpful. Applications
may be obtained at Agri-Supply, Rt. 5
264 Ext Greenville. No phone calls.
EOE
DISTRIBUTORS WANTED: Earn ex-
tra money in your spare time. Work
your own hours selling some of the
hottest products on the market today-
self defense products. Great for
fundraisers. Contact MikeCarey at 830-
5577
HOUSEKEEPER: Energetic and depend-
able; 4 days a week, 8:30am-1:30pm, must
have own transportation; moderate
housekeeping chores, no child care; must
be honest and self-motivated; attractive
compensation; references required. Call
Mrs. Langley at 752-2000 for info.
EARN $500 OR MORE WEEKLY stuff-
ing envelopes at home. Send long SASE
to: Country Living Shoppers, Dept. S32,
PO Box 1779, Denham Springs, LA 70727.
BABYSITTER NEEDED- to care for 2
small children 2 or 3 day a week. Ap-
proximately 4 miles from campus. Trans-
portation needed. References required. If
interested, please call 355-5067.
PART-TIME POSITION- Adult enter-
tainment agency seeking physically fit
attractive female applicants. Must have
own transportation and be between the
ages of 18-25. Call 1-800-848-6282 to set
up an interview.
BABYSITTER NEEDED in my home
for 2 girls. 12-5:30 Tues. and Thurs. For
more info contact Gene at 757-3837
COUPLE SEEKS PHOTOGRAPHER
forDecemberWedding.Musthaveown
equipment and samples of previous
work. Call 757-3059 between 6-9pm.
Ask for Brian
Em
Personals
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull-time. Set own hours!
Rush self-addressed stamped envelope:
Publishers (GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd 1B-
295, Durham, NC 27705.
SALES-PART-TIMEFULL-TIME
Beauty International has positions open
on campus, extra dollars or full-time in-
come. Call Kim 910-353-9684.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Dancers,
Escorts, Masseuars. Eam'BIG BUCKS in
the cleanest club in North Carolina. Must
be 18 Years Old. PLAYMATES Adult En-
tertainment. 919-747-7686.
ATTENTION LADIES: Eam up to $1000
plus a week escorting in the Greenville
area with a liscensed agency. Also need
one part time receptionist at $7 ph. Must
be 18, dependable and have own phone
and transportation. Call Diamonds or
Emerald City Escorts at 758-0896 or 757-
3477 �
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
DESIRE RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL
to sit with children after school. 2:30-5:30,
Tues. and Thurs. Call 756-0417 before
9:00pm.
FUNDRAISING choose from 3 differ-
ent fundraisers lasting either 3 or 7 days.
No investment. Earn $$$ for your group
plus personal cash bonuses for your-
self. Call 1-800-932-0528, ext 65
SUBWAY is now accepting applications
for all stores in Greenville. All hrs. avail-
able, seeking clean, very dependable
individuals. Apply in any location,
please no phone calls.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE toCen-
tral Distributors PO Box 10075, Olathe
KS 66051. Immediate response.
RESPONSIBLE BABYSITTER
NEEDED for 6 month old in my home,
8:30-11:30am 3 daysweek; days may
vary. 756-8262
Jm
CHILD CARE
.OPTIONS
"Helping p.irpnls of Pill Counly 10 locale
quality dnld enre and aiding providers in
improving te current care ollered
Are you satisfied with your
current child care
arrangement? Are you
liaving problems finding
child care that meets your
specific needs? Let us
help!
(919) 758-0455
600 E. 11th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
BELLY DANCE! for women 8-80 years
young. Dance exercise to keep you fit.
Tues. at 5:30. Call 355-5150. Starts Sept.
20.
LADIES: BORED7LONELY? Let me
cheer you up and share those special
times. Let's see how fun this life can be.
LettersCorrespondence to: Hawk,PO
Box 8663, Greenville, NC 27835
CARTER LAWRANCE: Happy 21st
Hope you have a great day. Love- R K

Greek Personals
PI LAM: The brothersof Pi Lambda Phi
would like to cordially invite all ECU
men to our rush starting Sept. 20 at
7:00pm. For more info, call 752-9476
Come join the fastest growing frater-
nity at ECU.
CHI OMEGA The Duke game was a
long strange trip, we left old Matty,
sipped on some dickel, licked on pop
sickels. Thanks to all the wonder Chi
Omega who came. We'll remember
your red tongue, JF, dance party USA,
JT, great arm, Bo. Thanks Matt Hedrick
for an excellent time. Pikes!
ALPHA XI DELTA. We enjoyed the
pre-downtownlast Thurs. night. Pikes!
THE BROTHERS OF PHI BETA
SIGMA would like to congratulate
our fraternity brother Jerry Rice on
becoming the NFL's all time leading
TD scorer GOM AB. Our cause speeds
on it's way!
DELTA CHI thanks Theta Chi, ADPi,
and ZT A for the quad social last Thurs.
We had a great time
DELTA CHI invites all greeks and
non-greeks to big Splash on Fri. at 2:00
for Greek Week Mud Football.
DELTA ZET A: We would like to thank
you for a great time last Wed. We look
forward to our pre-downtown in Oct.
The brothers of Sig Tau.
TO THE NEW MEMBERS OF
SIGMA- She is a person who cares,
someone who is always there for you-
sheisyourbigsis,and tonight you will
find out who she is! Get ready for a
night full of surprises! Love the sisters
THANKS SCOTTG AGAIN. You will
always be our Greek God! You repre-
sented us well! Love the sisters
pledges of Alpha Xi Delta
DELTA SIG. Thank you for such a
wonderful time Thurs. night. Love the
Alpha Phis.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY MONICA
SWEET Get ready for tonight. You 're
getting crazy and rockin at Chicos.
Love your Alpha Phi sisters.
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late all the new pledge class officers
President Lori Wall, Vice Pres. Melissa
Godwin, RecordingSec. Gina Hughes,
Treasurer Tiffany Norton,Social Chair
Barbara Gile, Activities Asst. Anne
Newton, Panhellenic Rep. Sherrul
Nanney, Panhellenic Delegate Renee
Wheeler, Song Chairman Stephanie
Barfield, Philanthropy Natasha
Sweezy, Historian Jenny Robinson,
Scrapbook Brie Garni, Sister's Party
Abbey Bates, Fundraisers Jessica
Hogan Bolgiano good job guys! We
love you
PHI KAPPA PSI Brothers welcome
our new members: Daryl Austin, Gary
Bennett, Randy Currin, Chris Dozier,
Steve Lewis, Tim Muller, Micah
Retzlaff, Ben Smith, Rya Upchurch,
Jed Watson and all of those still to
come. Make the most of your college
life, rush Phi Psi
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
members of Zeta Tau Alpha: Brandi
Baker, Rosalyn Beckermen, Monica
Benton, Jessica Bissette, Toni Daleo,
Vanessa Farmer, Brandi Foster, Medow
Hensley, Gina Herring, Jennifer
Hudson, Rachel Jones, Karen Jurgens,
Catherine Niles and Becky Weeks.
We're looking forward to the Big sis
Lil sis Hunt this week�hope you are
too! Love, thesistersof Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS to Ronda
Sortino for SGA. We love you � the
sisters and new members of Zeta Tau,
Alpha
Announcements
SHOAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics is looking for coaches in the
following sports: basketball, skills,
swimming, powerlifting,
rQllerskating,bowling,equestrian,and
soccer. No experience necessary. A
soccer coaches' training school will be
held on Saturday, Sept. 17 from 9:00
am-4 pm for all interested in volun-
teering for soccer. For more info con-
tact Mark or Connie at 830-4551.
CHRISTIAN STUDY GROUP
arisriaiiSrudyGroup meets biweekly
to discuss Acceptance of Homosexu-
ality and the Bible. For more info and
meeting place: 758-8619 or 830-2080.
GAIA (MOTHEREARTH)
Your world is calling you for help in
promoting a sustainable environ-
ment. Please come to the charter
meeting Thurs. Sept. 15 at 6:30pm
BN102HowellBldg.

yisil VFRSITY STUDENT MAR-
SHALS
Any student interested in serving as a
University Marshall for the 1994 Fall
Commencement may obtain an appli-
cation from Room A-12 Minges. Stu-
dent must be classified as a junior by
the end of Spring semester 1994 and
have a 3.0 academic average to be eli-
gible. Return completed application to
Carol-Ann Tucker, Advisor, A-12
Minges by October 1,1994. For more
information call 328-4661.
SPFFCH- LANGUAGE AND
AUDITORY PATHOLOGY
(SLAP) will be providing the speech
andhearingscreeningforstudentswho
are fulfilling requirements for admis-
sion to Upper Division on September
19,20, and 21,1994 from 5:00-6:00pm
each day. These are the only screening
dates during the fall semester. The
screening will be conducted in the Belk
Annex(ECU Speech and Hearing
Clinic) located next to the Belk
Bldg.(Schoolof Allied Health Sciences),
near the intersection of Charles ST and
the 264 By-pass. No appointment is
needed�Please do not call their office
for an appointment, waiting isoutside
the clinic waiting room. Sign in begins
at 4:50pm Screenings are conducted
on a first come, first serve basis
PICASO
PIC ASO, the Pitt County AIDS Service
Organization, is interested in starting a
HIV AIDS support group. Anyone in-
terested please call Bily at 830-1660
INTRODUCTION TO MEDITA-
TION
A short course of instruction in medita-
tion techniques and philosophy will
meet 7:30-9:00, Monday, September 19,
in the Unitarian-Universalist Church,
131 Oakmont Drive (across street from
theGreenvilleAthleticClub).Thecourse
will continue on the next Monday
evening(Sept. 26). All are invited. Bring
a cushion for sitting and wear comfort-
able clothing. The instruction is spon-
sored by the Buddhist Meditation and
Study Group of ECU.
Frn sfHOOl OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Thurs, Sept. 15�Michael K. Rokker,
saxophone, Senior Recital (AJ Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00pm, Free, Sept. 18 Anna
Kindley, trumpet, Senior Recital (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall,7:00pm Free) Mon
Sept. 19Faculty Recital, Louise Toppin,
soprano and John B. O'Brien, piano(AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm, Free.
BACKPACKING RECRE-
ATIONAL SERVICES
Take a weekend backpacking trip to
Pisgah National Forest. There you will
be able to slip and slide down Steele
Creek's natural waterslideinto six pools
of crystal clear water. Guaranteed to be
a weedend of fun and adventure. Call
328-6387 or stop by Christenbury Gym
room 204 for more information. This
awesome trip is sponsored by Recre-
ational Services.
TFNNIS S1MG1BS TOURNA-
MENT
If you've been practicing your tennis
this summer, come out to the Tennis
Singles Tournament with Intramural
Sports. The entry deadline is 5:00pm on
September 21. You can sign up in
Christenbury Gym room 204 or call
Recreational Services at 328-6387. We
want to see that swing.
rpiRFF C-OIF SINGLES
TOURNAMENT
Isn'titabouttimeforabreakfromallof
that studying? On Wednesday, Sep-
tember 21 at 3:00pm, take a break and
come ut to the Frisbee Golf Course for
the Frisbee Golf Singles Tournament.
Join us for a round of frisbee fun, spon-
sored by Recreational Services. For
more information on how to sign up
call 328-6387 or stop by Christenbury
Gym room 204.
�All ads must be pre-paid
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
Announcements
Deadlines
Any organization mayuse the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to
list activitiesandevents open tothe public
two times free of charge. Due to the
limited amount of space, The East Carc-
liniancanrxrtguaranteethepublicationof
announcements.
Displayed advertisments may be
cancelled before 10a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
For more
information call
328-6366.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursdays Edition





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BY STEPHANIE SMITH
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NO annual FEE,
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MEMBER rnXU "fWOfw





I -
The East Carolinian
September 15, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 10
Comic books minus spandex
Superman and Spider- Man joined by the likes of Cerebus and Buddy Bradley
By Mark Brett
Artwork Courtesy of DC Comics
Shade the Changing Man experiences surreal pain,
courtesy of the vicious passions of mature comics.
Lifestyle Editor
Remember comic books? Sure
you do. Superman battling Lex
Luthor for the safety of Metropo-
lis? Spider-Man duking it out with
Doctor Octopus, while Aunt May
lies at death's door? Archie,
Jughead, and Veronica? The Fan-
tastic Four? Shazam? Mr.
Mxyzptlk?
Well, forget all that. Sure, all
those childhood favorites are still
out there; the days of sleek muscle-
men wrapped in spandex fanta-
sies are far from over. But that's not
whatwe'retalkingabouthere. No,
there's a new breed of comic book
that has little to do with super-
heroes and their bombastic world.
. These are comics for a more
mature audience. After a few false
starts over the last decade, this
"adult" comics movement seems
to have finally taken hold. A vari-
ety of titles are currently being
published that appeal to people
other than the traditional super-
hero reader.
"I've seen an increase in read-
ers outside my regular customers
said Eddie Sutton, manager of He-
roes Are Here Too, a local comics
specialty shop. "It's not a huge
increase, but I definitely have
people who come in here just to get
mature readers stuff
"The mature titles have defi-
nitely brought people in who
wouldn't normally read comics
said Charles Lawrence, manager
of the Nostalgia Newsstand. Both
men expressed enthusiasm for the
mature comics movement.
The following is a sampling of
titles currently available to inter-
ested readers.
Sandman, written NeilGaiman
and drawn by a various artists.
This title is the most popular, and
arguably the best, of the mature
comics. Now in its sixth year of
publication, Sandman is about
Morpheus, the master of dreams,
and the people whose lives he af-
fects. Or, perhaps most accurately,
it's about mankind and the death
of myth. And the title character
looks like an emaciated version of
Cure singer Robert Smith!
Cerebus, by Dave Sim and
Gerhard. Started in 1977 as a Conan
parody, Cerebus has since become
a study of human relationships.
Politics, economics, love, religion,
and sex roles have all come under
close scrutiny in the pages of
COMING
ATTRACTIONS
m
Appearing soon for your
edification and amusement:
Tliursday, Sept. 15
Fighting Gravity (formerly
Boy-O-Boy)
at the Attic
(ska)
Movie: What's Eating Gilbert
Grape?
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedy-drama)
Runs through Saturday
FREE!
River Runt Spook Boaters
at Berkeley Cafe
in Raleigh
(deadhead)
Friday, Sept. 16
Sex Police and Psycho Sonic
Cindy
at the Attic
(funkalternative) .
Henry Acrobat and
Burmonter
atO'Rock's
(alternative)
River Runt Spook Floaters
at Peasant's Cafe
(deadliead)
Saturday, Sept. 17
Unchained
at O'Rock's
(heaiy)
Rolley Gray and Sunfire
at the Attic
(reggae)
James Taylor
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Sunday, Sept. 18
James Taylor
at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
Tuesday, Sepi. 20
Eek-a-Mouse
at the Attic
h Pathetic
pj) Lame
jjJ Pretty Good
jfrJtttl Brilliant
Fretblanket
Junkfuel
i
England's New Music Express
said Fretblanket's "Twisted" (their
first single) was the perfect pop
song. "It sends shivers down my
spine. I wanna hear that again and
then steal the tape said one re-
viewer. I'm afraid I will have to
disagree. Yes, it does send shivers
down my spine because it is the
perfect pop song; however, shivers
are not always a good sign. In this
case, it is an indication of the sheer
mediocrity of this perfect pop song.
In 1991, the foursome that
makes up Fretblanket began creat-
ing their brand of guitar-driven
rock. Soon after their conception
they released two four-song EP's to
rave reviews by the British press,
who christened them as a new
movement of home grown guitar
combos. 1994 has seen the release
of their first full length album,
junkfuel, on Polygram records.
Their sound is reminiscent of
Social Distortion's recent releac s,
minus the gut-felt and truly gritty
noise that S.D. is known for.
Fretblanket has jumped on the
power chord bandwagon, but they
just don't cut it. In comparison to
the angst-ridden and anger-driven
rock that's coming out of the good
old USA these days, these guys
sound watered down. Maybe if
they came and lived over here for a
while they could gain enough frus-
tration to reach the levels they as-
pire to.
Their first single, "Twisted
has the standard pop subject mat-
ter of taking off your clothes and
being free. Free from what, innova-
tion? The song is painfully predict-
able in sound and structure. I'm
trying to be nice, but each song
contains the same predictability.
"Junkfuelled the title track, is
no exception to this. Almost every
song follows the same pattern and
tempo, so just commenting on one
song is a blanket statement about
the whole album. I'm not just say-
ing this to save myself some writ-
ing, this band is simply that boring.
If the day should come that
you are feeling very run-of-the-
mill this may be the album to pick
up. It may help you identify with
someone. They may have stirred
up some interest in their home-
land, but then again you can't be-
lieve everything you read on the
record company'sbiography sheet.
After all, they are trying to pro-
mote the band. Did I mention that
they were bland?
� Kris
Hoffler
Maori artist comes to ECU
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Contemporary Maori artist
Darcy Nicholas from New
Zealand is visiting the ECU cam-
pus the week of Sept. 14-20. He
will present a slide lecture en-
titled "From the Tribal identity to
Global Expression" on Sept. 15 at
7:00 in the Mendenhall Great
Room.
Nicholas's artwork will also
be on display in the Mendenhall
Gallery Sept. 17-24. The exhibit
wil) include paintings, bone carv-
ings, wooden masks and selected
passages.
Maori looks to his direct
background for inspiration with
his artwork.
"My paintings are about iden-
tity, the ancestral lines that con-
nect me with the universe
Nicholas said. "The faces in my
paintings are a reminder of the
great spiritual strength that made
us warriors of the land and the
sea
Nicholas, born in 1945, was
raised in Taranaki, New Zealand,
a tightly-knit Maori tribal com-
munity. A great deal of
Nicholas's influence came from
his mother.
"My mother seemed to have
so much inner strength and dig-
nity that she reminded me of
hills and mountains he said. "I
have seen this same quality
amongst many of our older Maori
women on tribal maraes
In 1974, Nicholas moved to
Australia for a short period of
time. He said this was the time
when he realized the value of his
Maori culture.
"When I lived briefly in Aus-
tralia I began to fully understand
the personal bond that I had with
my own country Nicholas said.
"I was so desperately homesick
Later that year, he returned
to New Zealand to paint full time
and open a gallery in the Lower
Hutt.
In 1981,Nicholasbecamedi-
rector of the Wellington Arts
Centre. He received a Fulbright
Scholarship to observe contem-
Cerebus, an amazing feat when you
consider that the title character is a
four-foot-tall talking aardvark.
Shade, the Changing Man, by
Pete Milligan and Chris Bachalo.
Based on a character created in the
'70s by Steve Ditko (who also cre-
ated Spider-Man), this modem ver-
sion of Shade is a surreal reading
experience. In this book's four-year
run, Shade has had three different
bodies (one female) and at least
two personalities.
The centerpiece of the series,
however, is the bisexual love tri-
angle that Milligan is continually
developing between Shade, his
girlfriend Kathy and her girlfriend
Lenny. This relationship contin-
ues, despite the fact that Kathy
died in a recent issue.
Eightball, by Dan Clowes. Not
for the meek! Eightball is a darkly
cynical look at American society
through the eyes of Clowes, the
man who hates everybody! At
turns ridiculous, surreal and dis-
turbing, Eightball is always funny.
It helps to be in a bad mood when
you read it, however; this is vi-
cious stuff.
The Maxx, by Sam Keith and
William Messner-Loebs.TieMa.v.t
is that rarest of things, a thought-
porary Native American and Af-
rican American art in the United
States.
People may forget their past,
but Nicholas tries to discourage
this notion.
In an interview with the
Wellington Central Regional Arts
Centre, Nicholas said: "We're all
Ii v ing ancestors.
"I'm an ancestor, ancestors
who are now part of the land
have made me what I am.
"So everything you are today
is what has been handed down
from your ancestors
Nicholas has a deep admira-
tion for his Maori culture, but he is
well aware of his people's short-
comings.
"My paintings scare many of
our people he said. "I think it's
because they have forgotten what
many of our traditional carvings
are all about.
"They forgot that nothing
dies in the Maori world. Things
merely move through different
dimensions
provoking, well-written super-
hero comic. Featuring imagina-
tive artwork and discussions of
feminist social theory, The Maxx
is the story of a homeless eccen-
tric (our hero), his social worker
and a sorcererserial rapist
named Mr. Gone. It's Dr. Suess
on steroids! It's Freud on Pez! It's
going to be a "Liquid Television"
cartoon, and it's just really hard
to explain.
Hate,by Peter Bagge. Featur-
ing perhaps the most distinctive
art in comics today, Hate is the
story of Buddy Bradley: beer-
guzzling, flannel-wearing,
twenty-something misanthrope
from Seattle. It's also possibly
the most accurate portrayal of
"Generation X" yet seen in any
medium (that's notsaying much,
I realize, but this one's good!
Trust me!).
Only a handful of what's
available has been listed here,
but it's a good starting point.
Most retailers are more than
happy to point new readers in
the right direction, however, so
be willing to ask questions. Plow-
ing through the super-hero stuff
is difficult at first, but usually
worth the effort.
Music to breed by
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
Friday night the boys of
Breed 13 took center stage at
CRockefeller's's. A local favor-
ite for a couple of years now,
Breed 13 pleased their fans at
this, their first show of the new
semester.
Charlie's on Acid, a
Wilmington-based group,
opened the show at around
11:45 p.m. Their sound was
abrasive and definitely not for
the meek. While they were play-
ing, people filed in and seemed
to be impressed with Breed 13's
predecessor. Many were pleas-
antly surprised with the
Charlie's on Acid set, especially
considering how much their
sound clashed with the head-
liners many of them turned out
to see.
At 12:45 p.m those head-
liners took the stage and the
crowd was treated to a poetic
version of "One Last Cross-
over Brad Rice, singer and
primary song writer for Breed
13, began by reading a poem
that led into a distinctly dreamy-
jam. The tune drifted on, and
the energy level in the club con-
tinued to rise.
The highlight of the evening
was "Wakefield Blue a new
song in the Breed 13 reper-
toire. "Every time we play it,
it's different said Rice. "The
song is about isolation that
changes and is dependent on
our moods
Clay Kent, drums, is a vi-
tal and very impressive part
of the ensemble. His "ear"
seems to lead the band
through difficult transitions
and melody shifts.
Jason Nunn, lead guitar,
andLeeHylton,bass,have their
share of moments too. Their
skills have sharpened tremen-
dously in the past year and add
aprecisiontotheband'ssound.
Breed 13 closed their set
with an oldie, "Dreams of a
Semi-Permeable Slug A fa-
miliar tune to all Breed 13 fans,
this one was a real crowd-
pleaser.
This week, the band will
be heading into the studio to
record a new seven inch ep
which is scheduled to be re-
leased in late October.
As for other future plans
for Breed 13�who knows?
They have three qualities that
could send them on the road
to success: talent, charisma,
and, most important of all,
good performances.
Writing abounds in Gray
Folios, calligraphy on display
BV Dciniel WilliS ingoftheWomen'sSrudioWork-
shop in Rosendale, New York.
The books and folios in the ex-
hibit address such issues as reli-
gion, humor, and femiiiist issues.
The Women's Studio Work-
shop is the largest publisher of
hand-printed books in the coun-
try. Selected artists are awarded
grants each year to publish their
works in the Workshop's
printmaking, photography, and
papermaking studios.
�" Books p ublished
bv Women's Studio
Workshop are fea-
tured in museums
such as the Museum
of Modern Art, Met-
ropolitan Museum,
and the Museum of
- Fine .Art in Boston.
The Women's Studio
Workshop Twenty Years ex-
hibit, and The Art of Chinese
Calligraphy exhibit are fea-
tured Mondav through Satur-
day from 10:00 AM until 5:00
PM, and until 8:00 PM on
Thursday night.
All exhibits are open to the
public with no admission fee
Staff Writer
Two notable exhibits are on
display attheGray Art Gallery this
month: The Art of Chinese Callig-
raphy,and Women'sStudio Work-
shop: Twenty Years.
The Art of Chinese Calligra-
phy is a display of 30 pieces of
contemporary calligraphy by five
major Chinese artists. Today, cal-
ligraphy is considered one of the
highest forms of art in
China.
Calligraphy uses
the written language as
a means of visual ex-
pression. A single char-
acter, a single stroke, or
a single dot can reflect a
calligrapher's talentand
&
insight. A person doesn't have to
be Chinese, or be familiar with Chi-
nese customs to appreciate the
beauty of ancient calligraphy.
The Women's Studio Work-
shop: Twenty Years will feature
over eighty hand-printed books
and folios from various artists. The
exhibit is being held in honor of the
twentieth anniversary of the found -





HHNMBHHl
HHWHHH
f f 77i�? Easf Carolinian
September 15, 1994
Mystery Science Theatre still popular
R. Cherry Stokes
Attorney at Law
General Practice
Familv Law-Traffic Offenses-Divorce-Criminal
Drunk Driving-LandlordTennant
FREE INITIAL BRIEF CONSULTATION
! w rap ST 2Ba22QQ
EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. (AP) �
Joel has jumped ship. But a year after
the deadpan host of "Mystery Science
Theater 3000" escaped orbital exile, the
cast of the cult TV favorite continues to
lampoon the worst movies Hollywood
� mavbe even the universe � has to
offer. Hercules, Gamera the Hying
Turtle, teen-agestranglers and grass-
hoppers the size of a Mack truck are
all grist for the MST mill.
Joel Hodgson created the inno-
vative show, which debuted on a
TwinQties UHF station in 1988. The
Friends of Sheppard Memorial Library
BOOK SALE
Great Selection of Used Books
Thursday, Sept. 15, 6-8 p.m.
(Preview sale for Friends only)
Friday & Saturday, Sept. 16 & 17,9 a.m8 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 18,1-6 p.m.
(Bag Day�$3 per grocery bag of books)
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(across from Town Common)
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preparation and course review, we cover tests from the 5j5j5j�;
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(Ask about our boxer shorts offer, too.) Details at: J"
ECU Student Stores
NOW GET
A GRAND SLAM
FOR JUST
C 1994 Denny Ir
5 AM TIL 10 AT NIGHT
THE ORIGINAL
ryy �� . � :�
As if Injury's Original Grand Slam
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premise had Hodgson and his robot
pals stranded in the Satellite of Love,
forced by mad scientists to watch
cheesy movies. Hodgson, the bird-
like Crow and gumball-headed Tom
Servo retaliated by subjecting movies
like "Viking Women and the Sea Ser-
pent" to nonstop heckling.
MST3K (as fans know it)
achievedanationwideaudience, then,
last October, during the show's fifth
season, Hodgson left. He planned to
return as a writer and director but
instead severed ties with the show.
Since leaving the show he has moved
to Los Angeles. His manager said
Hodgson has developed a proposed
TV sketch show called "The X Box"
thaf s being pitched to studios.
Hodgson, 34, was replaced as
host by Michael J. Nelson, the show's
chief writer. Some fans decried the
change, but Nelson, after 29 episodes
in a green jumpsuit, believes he's
accepted. "Anything short of being
pilloried is a good reaction hesaid.
Producer Jim Mallon said
MST3K writers, who churn out
about 700 quips per episode, prac-
tice a sweet form of sa tire�gentle,
but with an edge. "They're fun
people to hang around. They're by
and large positive in their outlook
Mallon said.
Best Brains is looking at devel-
oping two new shows � one that
would recycle historic footage and a
comedy like "Northern Exposure"
but "more ambitious Mallon said.
MST3Kalso isstill winningcriti-
cal plaudits. The show won a
Peabody Award this year and was
nominated for the CableACE and
Emmy awards. With more than 120
shows taped, the show grows in
popularity.
Jlie East Carolinian wishes the
Pirate football team good luck and
happy hunting in Veteran Stadium
this weekend.
Have Your Film Developed at
Jack Rabbit One Hour Photo
and Select one of three
great offers.
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2 Great Tacos for $.99
�WITH PURCHASE OF A MEDIUM DRINK
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A NATIONAL HONOR
& SERVICE SOCIETY
There will be an informative meeting for
perspective new members on Tuesday,
September 20th at 4:30 in the
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room.
If you have a 3.0 GPA or better you meet
the initial requirement to join.
If you have any questions:
Call Rob Gluckman at 757-2658
or Lisa Ezzell at 328-7938





�MMMMMMMM
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September 15, 1994
The East Carolinian 12
Aladdin!
Aladdin and the
Magic Lamp, a
musical drama,
will open the
ECU Family
Fare Series of
live per-
formances Oct.
8.
Photo Courtesy of ECU
FRANKIE ATKINSON
Greenville,NC
758-5521
Pager: 757-5627
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Jlhl.HiMri �.�.�!����.
m�mmmmmmim
The East Carolinian
September 15, 1994
Sports
Page 14
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
Second-yearTemple(l-0)head
coach RonDickinsonled his squad
toa32-7victory over Akronin their
first game of 1994 After a week off,
theOwls will roll outthe red carpet
to host ECU Saturday in Philadel-
phia, Pa.
Dickersonhas471ettermenre-
turningfromlastseason,whileonly
losing one starter on each side of
the ball. The problem is, that they
were terriblelastseason, and could
easily duplicate the feat of a sub-
.500 season
After whipping Akron, the
Owlshaveanothermust-wingame
against the Pirates,seeingrhatrhey
Prognosticators
Dave Pond�ECU21
TEC Sports Editor ECU 34 TU 16
"Improved offense last weeks'
defense big victory
Brad Oldham� ECU 3
WZMB Sports Director, TEC Asst
Sports Editor ECU 20 TU 17
"Pirate defense continues to
play on fire. Offense still working
out the kinks
Warren Sumner�ECU 7
Our dearly departed TEC Sports
Editor ECU 24TU 17
"Crandall and offense get on
track
Chris Justice �ECU14
WCTI-TV12 Sports Director
ECU23TU9
"Pirate's defense is for real, and
Pirate's offense is really close to
being for real
Brian Bailey � ECU 10
WNCT-TV9 Sports Director
ECU 30 TU 16
"Junior breaks loose
Phil Wertz � ECU4
WITN -TV 7Sports Director
ECU 17 TU 13
"The key is Marcus Crandall He
needs to be poised and in control.
The defense will take care of itself
TEC GUEST PICKER
Bobby Denning - ECU 4
Furniture Entrepeneur ECU 24
TU20
"We will meet or beat anybody's
prices! Where's Bobby?
Whoomp, here's my pick
must face Perm State, Va. Tech, Mi-
ami, and West Virginia in weeks to
come. USA Today's Jeff Sagarin
ranked the Owls' schedule 30th-
toughest in the nation.
East Carolina leads the all-time
series by a 6-3 count, with Temple
taking the last meeting 30-27 inl990
at Veterans Stadium. Overall, the
Owls are 1-3 against the Pirates at
theVet,andhavelostelevenstraight
home games.
Owl quarterback Henry Burris
(15-25,178 yards, 2TDs vs. Akron),
will be fiercely tested by the Pirate
secondary. Hespreadhispassesbe-
tween five different receivers, and
will need to work much in the same
fashion again to find success.
"We're really pleased with
Henry andhisperformance said
TempkheadccacriKonEHckerson
"He's a hard worker, a leader and
just a tremendous young man
He will be joined in the Owl
backfield by TB Danny Davis and
FBs Sidney Morse and Raphiel
Mack,whocombinedforl81rush-
ingyardsagainstAkrontwoweeks
ago.
Burris' mainreceiversagainst
the Pirates will be junior Marc
Baxter (60, 190) , tight end P.J.
Ccokandhisrunningbacks. Morse
led all Temple receivers with 5
catches and 44 yards against Ak-
ron.
For the Pirates, Marcus
Crandell will lead the charge into
rheGtyofBrotherly Love. Against
Photo by Harold Wise
The ECU defensive unit celebrates a big hit against Duke last Saturday. The Pirates
have been praised in the North Carolina media for playing solid defense in Durham
the Blue Devils, Crandell was 17-39
with 3 LNTs, but should improve
against Temple. Junior Smith hopes
to better last week's tally of 69 rush-
ing yards as well.
ThePiratesexperimentedwitha
somewhat-new line during practice
this week. C Terry Tilghman moved
backtorightguard,DerrickLeaphart
played center and Charles Boothe
moved into the left guard slot
Jason Nichols and Mitchell Gal-
loway will be back after good first-
game performances as ECU
wideouts. Galloway was the Pirates'
leading receiver last week witha 16.3
average, and Nichols accounted for
the only Pirate TD with a 34-yard
aerial to -Mien Williams off of a re-
verse.
" Marcus Crandell is a tremen-
dous technician who throws the ball
well Dickerson said. "They have
talent in the backfield and receivers
that can catchThey will do a lot of
things thatwewould consider tricks
On defense, TEC Player of the
WeekBJ.CranewiUfiUhisunebacker
slotafterbeinginonl7tacklesagainst
Duke. He leads a defense that col-
lected three interceptions and a
fumble last week.
"We'llgouptoPhiladelphia and
hit them like they've never been hit
before Crane said. "If I was Temple
I'd be scaredI fear no man or of-
fense, and I definitely don't fear
Temple
"Their defense can flat out run
Dickersonsaid. "They'll come at you
and gather after tackles and chant
and cheer. They play well together
Want defense? Go "West young man
Player of the Week
By A. Wilson
Staff Writer
Ia)ienzoWestisk�kingfbrbig-
ger and better things in 1994 West,
a 6-3, 245 pounder from Atlanta,
Ga's Decatur HS is used to success,
and that is why last season's 2-9
record and his total of 18 tackles
were so disappointing to him.
In high school, West was
Atlanta's defensive MVP and was
selected to the All-State team. He
made 150 tackles,100 solos fromhis
inside linebacker position for
Decatur'sregionalchampions.This
led to a lot of recruiting attention
making West one of the Pirate's top
recruits from the 1993 class.
"I considered Ga. Tech, South
Carolina and Qemson. Clemson
was probably my top choice, but
they were undergoing a coaching
change and that made me appre-
hensive about going there West
said.
Why ECU over some bigger
schools in bigger cities. "I needed a
change from the city and Greenville
seemed like a nice place for that
change he said.
As for getting 1994 off to a
good start. West made 10 tackles in
the opener against Duke, also
knocking down two of Spence
Fischer's passes, putting constant
pressure on the quarterback with a
strong passrush that he was able to
maintain for the whole ball game.
This represents quite a change
from last season where he had to
adjust to a position change from
inside linebacker to rush end.
"Well, it is a change from high
school and coming to ECU and
playinganew position Westsaid.
"Last season was a learning experi-
ence with me in the role as student
and Bernard Carter as teacher. I
enjoy rushing the quarterback.
There is no better feeling than hit-
ting the most-prized player on the
offense
West has made a great deal of
improvement over the last year,
and he attributes this to a combina-
tion of several factors: (1) the deci-
sion to stay in Greenville over the
summer and work with strength
coach Jeff Connors (2) defensive
linecoachCliffYoshida'spatience
and tutoring (3) learning from
older teammates' examples, and
(4) former defensive coordinator
Larry Coyer giving him confi-
dence at a time when West was
unsure of himself.
"Coach Connors has played
a vital role in us playing hard all
game West said. "We couldn't
ask for a better strength coach.
Coach Yoshida has really im-
proved my technique in pla -ng
against bigger players. He's been
very patient in helping me learn
from my mistakes to become a
better player
"I do miss Coach Coyer be-
cause he was the first guy who
made me believe in myself he
said. "He really cared about me
on the field, and I could never
forget that. Our new defensive
coordinator, Paut Jette, is a really
nice guy and a down-to-earth per-
son, so it's been a smooth transi-
tion"
Speaking of self-improve-
ment, West knows that he has a
way to go before being the best
that he can be.
"Basically, knowing the
game better, getting bigger and
improving my speed and
strength will help me to become
a complete player
Lorenzo West gives football
a lot of credit for making him a
betterperson. He is very involved
with community relations.
"Me and my roommate (Pi-
rate LB) B. J. Crane talk to kids in
the area by going into the schools
and trying to set a good example
and give them advice about stay-
ing in school and saying 'no' to
drugs he said.
One change noticable about
West was a new jersey number,
from 1 to 45. A new number defi-
nitely signals change and West
and the Pirate coaching staff are
hopeful that it will bring about a
big season and make people for-
get about the struggle of last sea-
son.
West has studied a lotof film
this week of the Temple offense
See WEST page 16
ATTENTION
Syracuse game tickets
can be purchased next
week as follows:
Monday: Group day
Tues-Thurs: Student
ID tickets with half-
price tickets as
supplies last.
Pick-up locations:
Athletic Ticket Office
8 a.m5 p.m.
Mendenhall
11 a.m6 p.m.
Henry adds speed to Pirate secondary
By A.Wilson
Staff Writer
Safety, by definition,
means security, impregnabil-
ity, a safeguard. In football, a
safety serves several purposes,
including defensive signal
caller, pass coverage and run
support.
Most importantly, the
safety is the last line of defense
between the line of scrimmage
and the end zone.
The ideal person to put
back there is someone who can
run fast enough to cut off op-
posing ball carriers and who
has enough recovery speed to
make up for his teammate's
mistakes and prevent long runs
and passes. Fortunately, ECU
is blessed with Dwight Henry,
a free safety who has speed to
burn.
Henry hails from Ft. Lau-
derdale, Florida's Plantation
High School, deep in the hot-
bed that is Florida high school
football.
Every year blue-chip ath-
letes come out of the hot Florida
sun to matriculate at big-time
football schools all over the coun-
try.
Tliis type of stiff competi-
tion is what breeds top athletes,
especially at the skill positions.
The weather allows for year-long
training in outdoor sports like
track and field and football.
Henry thrived in this com-
petitive atmosphere, winning
the state championship in the
400 meters, and he made the AU-
Blowhard County team in his
senior year while rushing for
over 800 yards.
He showed his versatility by
playing free safety, cornerback,
running back, wide receiver, and
kick returner. This blend of
speed and versatility that at-
tracted college recruiters and,
ultimately, brought Henry to
ECU.
Unlike most of ECU's foot-
ball players, Dwight Henry par-
ticipates in two sports. Last year,
during his freshman season, he
lettered in both football and
track.
He enjoyed a great deal of
success in both starting seven
games and finishing with 41
total tackles, including 29 so-
los.
He also made one tackle
for a loss and deflected two
passes. In track, he won the 400
meters at the Colonial Athletic
Association Championships
with a record time of 46.97 and
ran the anchor leg for ECU's
champion-IC4A 4X100 and
4X400 relay teams.
"Track really helps me to
develop speed and endur-
ance he said. "Running short
distances helps me cover a lot
of ground in a short period of
time
Henry is a social work ma-
jor and wants to eventually
work with counseling young-
sters in a boy's club setting, so
time management and hard
work on his studies is essential
for him to balance two sports
as well as his academics.
"Football is time-consum-
ing, and track is not. When-
ever I was behind during foot-
ball season, I could make up
for it in track season
Henry made an impressive
debut against the Blue Devils,
collecting six tackles and
knocking down two passes,
but most impressive was his
touchdown saving tackle on
Duke split end Jon Jensen who
was off to the races after a 75-
yard completion before being
caught from behind by the
sophomore safety.
See HENRY page 16
B.J. Crane
SoIL, LB, 6-1, 222
Crane made a huge impact
during preseason practices, and
brought it to the field last Satur-
day.
"Playing someday on Sunday
afternoons in the NFL motivates
me like nothing else. I want to
play on the next level and be a
role model for youngsters not
only in Greenville and Atlanta
where Crane grew up hut across
ihe nation
The College Park. Ga. native
led all ECU defenders with 17
tacklesagainst Duke, and was key
in limiting stopping the Blue
Devil running game.
"We will go into Veterans
Stadium and administer punish-
ment from the first to the last
snap he said. "When the game is
over they will say ECU hits like
no other team in the country
Going,
going,
gone!
MLB
owners
canceled
the
season
yesterday,
on the
34th day
of the
strike.
Photo by
Dave Pond






15 The East Carolinian
September 15, 1994
REDUCED PRICES
BUY ONE 13 OZ. PKG
THOMAS
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AND GET ONE
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(EVERY MONDAY IN THE
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THIS MONDAY
DILLON FENCE
LIZ PHAIR
POP WILL EAT ITSELF
DANZIG
PET SHOP BOYS
GOATS
10 OFF ALL USED
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
758-5026
Soccer gets new look
By Jody Jones
Staff Writer
Soccer is taking a new look at
ECU this season. The Lady Pirates
are taking the field this fall for the
first time ever. The new womens'
program brings new challenges,
new piayers, and a new coach to
East Carolina University.
The head coaching vacancy
belongs to Scootie Carey, who also
coaches the men's squad. With
him being occupied with the mens'
program, a lot of the responsibil tv
will fall on the shoulders of new
assistant coach Killete Gilligan.
She is originally from Dublin, Ire-
land, where she played ontheeigh-
teen-and-under national team.
Coach Gilligan comes to ECU
from Methodist College in Fay-
etteville , where she was a three-
time All-American. Although she
helped out leading junior high and
high school soccer programs, this
is her first actual coaching job.
The I ady Pirates art- led on
the field by junior college trans-
fers Leigh Biggerman, Robyn
DesPasqaule and Stacy Schott.
The three played at Essex Com-
munity College, where they won
a national championship.
Although they are a young
and inexperienced team, Coach
Gilligan feels that the Lady Pi-
rates know what it takes to com-
pete at a Division 1-A level, stat-
ing that "this is a building pro-
cess that will come with time
Womens' soccer has finally
arrived at ECU and has a lot of
potential.
The Lady Pirates have just
six home games this season, in-
cluding three with CAA oppo-
nents. Coach Gilligan is looking
to the community for support as
the team makes its initial run
through Division l-A competi-
tion.
OKF
QICF
OrCF
BECOME A MEMBER OF ONE OF THE
NATIONS BEST FRATERNITIES
KW
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PHI KAPPA PSI
TAKE THE CHANCE TO MAKE THE MOST OF
COLLEGE LIFE
SCHOLARS, ATHLETES AND GENTLEMEN.
IF YOUR SERIOUS ABOUT SCHOOL AND WANT TO MAKE
THE MOST OF YOUR COLLEGE CAREER, COME SEE US!
Rush Will Be At The AOO House
(Located at Billmore & Johnston si. in Iron ot Fleming Hall)
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
830-9536 ASK FOR WOODY or 830-8837 ASK FOR TRISTAN
OKH'
OCT
d)(vjJiMlt,
CQMedi
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Wed 21st
Sal Pascarella &
Roger Blazic
iTiTIl
752-7303
Starting Sept 5th
Mon Night Football
on a 15ft TV.
? 6 smal' screens)
209 E. 5th St
Greenville, NC
Undefeated. Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear Live Music
1987-1988-1989 1991 � 1992-1993-1994
GREENVILLE TIMES READER'S POLL
THURSDAY
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99c Highballs
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THURSDAY 15th
HARRIS TEETER .THE BEST IS WHAT WE'RE All ABOUT
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99c Highballs � 99c MEMBERSHIPS � 99C 32oz. DRAFT
Friday 16th
B. SEX POLICE
special guest
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Saturday 17th
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fers We Gladly Accept Federal Fooa Stamps
Monday 19th
Monday Night Football
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Tuesday 20th
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ALTERNATIVE REGGAE
(Advance Tickets only $6)
Tickets on SALE NOW!
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$2.00 S





w�-
September 15, 1994
The East Carolinian 16
WEST
Cont. from
page 14
and noticed that they tip their plays
off b their tackles leaning in the
direction the ball is going.
He said they have a big offen-
sive line but lack agility. He is confi-
dent that thev can run past them and
make big plays. He gave the follow-
ing prediction for the game:
It will be a very exciting game,
and the defense will be a major factor
scoring points this week he said. "I
promise vou it will be a happy plane
ride from Philadelphia
HENRY
Continued fro m page 14
"First of all I knew I had to
catch him before he scored and as
soon as I caught it and started
running down the sideline
Henrv said. "I knew I could catch
up to him
Henry runs a 4.36 in the 40
this season, comparable to NFL
defensive backs.
"I have a tendency to rely too
heavilv on my speed he said. "I
need to work on my anticipation
and be a little more aggressive.
As a unit we haven't changed
much of anything except for dis-
guising our coverages better and
breaking on the ball better
Henry gives a lot of credit to
secondary coach Chuck Pagano
who formerly coached defensive
backs at Miami and was defen-
sive coordinator at UNLV.
"We couldn't ask for a better
coach he said. "1 feel he is the
best change our secondary could
possibly go through, and I have
definitely seen a dramatic im-
provement in the unit since he
has started coaching us
Henry said that two things
motivate him on Saturday after-
noons � Coach Pagano's pre-
game speeches and knowing his
girlfriend Christine is in the stands
cheering for him.
Look for big things in the fu-
ture from this young Pirate DB who
should be a fixture at the free safety
position for the next three years.
iUUlJlJlililJlilJ
(peasant s Cafc5
(A TRADITION SINCE LATE SEPTEMBER) W
752-5855 1 10 E. 4th St Downtown
Thursday
�riday
Buue Miffcue
(Come out early)
Spook TToale
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
Pittraan Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
IT'S HAPPENING NOW!
warn y

m bultta
Rush dates are September 19-22.
Come join us at 9 pm in Belk Hall
basement Monday and 8 pm on Tuesday-
evening. Wednesday and Thursday
locations will be announced.
For more information or for rides
please call:
752-0573 or 328-4235
Hope to see you there!
(They are from far, far away)
Saturda
urday U
(It's gonna be really, really weird)
Sunday
95t Molson
Tuesday
MUQMTe Wi
(Warsteiner, Bass Ale, Petes. Killians, & Bud)
Coming Sept. 24 it's our birthday party with
Rasta Rafiki. Look for next we?k's ads.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
S CASH $
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY HILFIGER
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POLO
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J. CREW
ALEXANDER JULIAN
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LEVI
ETC.
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN.DRIVETO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
Adult
Entertainment
f Center
"Greenville's
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TUESDAYS
-Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
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; Contestants neeJ to call & register m advance. Must arrive by 800
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Sijyer Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
yDancers wanted$
Yrn rin HrtMirp. Hirhilar tmtin.

ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
gas Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dlcklnaon Av.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
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Sports �
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FREE MEMBERSHIPS
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SATURDAY SEPT. 17th
BIVENS BROTHERS





1994-1995 iBiffliiiF
Welcome to the William E. Laupus
Health Sciences Ubraryl!
The Health Sciences Library located
in the Brody Medical Sciences Building on ECU's
West Campus, serves as the primary information
center for students, faculty and staff in the
Division of Health Sciences and the School of
Social Work. The library, established in 1969,
was created to serve the fledgling School of
Health Affairs. As the timeline below shows, the
library has grown from a one-person operation
in an old cafeteria to a modern information
facility, with 13 professional librarians and 26.5
support staff members. September 1, 1994,
marks the 25th anniversary of the Health
Sciences Library. Some highlights in our history
include:
1969 Health Affairs Library established.
Dr. Jo Ann Bell hired as director. The
library, located in an old cafeteria,
consisted of twelve tons of donated
books on a steam table and one
professional librarian
1970 Moved to the Biology Building
1972 Moved to the Belk Building. Collection:
12, 683 volumes. 3 librarians and 1
support staff
1978 Library purchased its first microcomputer,
a Radio Shack TRS80
1980 Name changed to Health Sciences Library
1981 Moved to present location in the Brody
Building. Collection: 162,899 volumes.
13 librarians (Director, Assoc. Director,
6.5 Public Service, 4.5 Technical Service),
18 support staff
1984 LS2000 Integrated Library System
installed and all library functions
automated
1985 Microcomputer lab established in
Audiovisuals Department with 6 IBM pcs
and 3 Apple lies
1987 Funeral held for the Card Catalog, which
was being removed
1988 Second floor renovated to enlarge journal
stacks and create an expanded Micro-
computer Lab. Collection: 241.079
volumes. 12 librarians (Director, 7 Public
Service, 4 Technical Service). 23 support
staff
1992 Local Medline network installed;
database available to clients in-house and
by dial-access
1992 All library employees have a desktop pc
and are linked to each other and to
remote information resources by a local
area network
1993 Library named for Dr. William E. Laupus,
a former Dean of the School of Medicine
1993 Marquis Integrated Library System
installed to replace LS2000
1994 First floor reference area remodeled.
Collection: 296,280 volumes.
13 librarians (Director, 10 Public Service,
2 Technical Service) 26.5 support staff
Health Sciences Library Departments
Library Hours
Regular Academic Year
Sunday 12:00 noon - 12:00 midnight
Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 12:00 midnight
Friday 7:30 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Reference Librarian on Duty
Sunday 12:00 noon - 10:00 pm
Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 10:00 pm
Friday 7:30 am - 6:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Summer Hours
Sunday 12:00 noon - 11:00 pm
Monday - Thursday 7:30 am - 11:00 pm
Friday 7:30 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
The library s hours will vary slightly during
holidays; call 816-2222 for information. During
Fall and Spring semester breaks, hours of
operation remain unchanged.
Department
Supervisor
Phone
Administration
JoAnn Bell. M.L.S M.B.A Ph.D. 816-2212
Audiovisuals and Informatics
Susie Speer. M.S.L.S M.S.E.H.
816-2232
Cataloging- Acquisitions
Margaret Stangohr. M.L.S M.S. 816-224
Circulation
Elizabeth Winstead. M.L.S M.P.A. 816-2222
Education
Tracv Powell. MLS. M.A.
816-2212
Outreach
Evangeline Norfleet
816-22-t2
Reference
Susie Speer. M.S.L.S M.S.E.H.
816-2258
Serials
Melissa Nasea. M.L.S MBA.
816-2234
Function
- oversees library's function as a unit of the university
- oversees budget, policies and procedures for the library
- handles personnel matters for the library
- acquires, maintains, and circulates audiovisual materials
- operates the computer lab
- provides assistance and consultation in using a variety of computer-based applicatioas
orders, processes, and organizes materials purchased by the library'
- oversees circulation of library materials
- provides courier service on east and west campuses
- provides document delivery services including fax. interlibrary loan, and photocopy services
- operates a reserve collection for course suppon
- provides library materials to off-campus students
- oversees educational activities for the library
- provides consultation services on library education and curriculum support
provides information services to health professionals throughout eastern North Carolina
- provides assistance in using information resources by phone and in the library
- conducts library educational activities
- provides innovative assistance in meeting information needs of library clients
- acquires, processes, and maintains journals purchased by the library





HSL
First Floor
Quick Reference
Guide to the
Library
Where is it?
Circulation1st floor
Reserves1st floor
Medline and other
databases1st floor
Current journals1st floor
Reference books1st floor
Audiovisuals and
Informatics2nd floor
Microcomputer Lab2nd fkxir
Bound journals2nd floor
Books2nd floor
Quiet study areas2nd floor
Where do 1 call?
General Information816-2222
Renew books, checkon fines816-2222
Hardware softwarequestions816-2232
Find out if the libranowns
specific items816-2258
Request purchase ofa book816-2221
Request purchase ofi journal816-223-1
Reference assistance,816-2258
!l
o$r
1!
US'
Book Stacks;
3LS5
Storage
2LS2
Storage
2LS0
J
librarian
2l�
VI
in.
Audonual 0K
2.46
Ontne Cabtoj
J
U
A Grout
Study
2.45
AV Group
Study
2LU
AV Group
Study
a.43
AV Group
Study
2.42
AV Group
Study
2L41
AV Group
Study
2.40
AV Group
Study
239
AV Grot,
Study
218
Lab AV Group
I Supervisor I S61.
2J0 2J3S
-1
234 I
a
Oars Room
2.33
Journal Slacks
Group
Study
2.30
Group
Study
2.0?
Sejliiy
act
sa�r
2ua
- an 3lat
Group
Study
2L28
Stairs
Group
Study
2L2S
HSL
Second
Floor
L





National Library of
Medicine (N1M)
Classification
Preclinical Sciences
Circulation Policies
QSHuman Anatomy-
QTPhysiology
QUBiochemistry
QPharmacology
QWMicrobiologyImmunology
QXParasitology
QYClinical Pathology
QZPathology
Medicine and Related Subjects
wMedical Profession
WAPublic Health
CTiPractice of Medicine
wcInfectious Diseases
w 100Deficiency- Diseases
WD 200Metabolic Diseases
WD 300Diseases of Allergy
WD 400Animal Poisoning
WD 500Plant Poisoning
WD 600Diseases by Physical Agents
WD 700Aviation and Space Medicine
WEMusculoskeletal System
WFRespiratory System
WGCardiovascular System
WHHemic and Lymphatic-
Systems
WlGastrointestinal System
WJUrogenital System
WKEndocrine System
WLNervous System
W'MPsychiatry
WNR ideology
WOSurgery
WPGynecology
WQObstetrics
WRDermatology
"SPediatrics
WTGeriatrics. Chronic Disease
"lDentistry. Oral Surgerv
wvOtorhinoiaryngoiogy
W"Ophthalmology
w:Hospitals
VYNursing
wzHistory- of Medicine
Responsibilities of the Client
Client must present library card with appropriate identification each time to
borrow or renew items. Items must be brought to either the Circulation or Audio-
visual and Informatics Desk for checkout andor renewal. Clients are responsible
for all uses of their card. Clients are responsible for all fines and fees accrued
on their card. Faculty clients must provide written permission for another person
to borrow materials with their card. It is the responsibility of the client to notify
the Circulation Department if their library card is lost or stolen. It is also the
responsibility of the client to inform the library of any address changes
Incorrect address information is not grounds for waiving fines or fees.
Borrowing Privileges
North Carolina residents 16 years of age and older may receive an area resident
library card for use in the Health Sciences Litany. Loan periods are:
Books all clients, except Faculty until end of current semester
Books Faculty until end of Spring Semester each year
Journals Faculty only 3 days
Audiovisuals all clients. 7 days
Renewals
An item may be renewed if another client does not have a hold on it. Itei may-
be brought in to the Circulation or Audiovisuals and Informatics Desk for renewal.
Phone renewals are allowed for 5 items or less.
Holds and Recalls
Items checked out by another client may be recalled. Forms are available in a
variety of locations through out the library- to recall an item. A letter is mailed to
the client that has the item checked out stating that the item is due in one yveek.
The client who has the item is given a minimum of two yveeks to use the item.
Once the material has been returned to the library- and is available, it yvill be held
at the Circulation Desk for one week. Items not checked out by the requesting
client within 7 days will lie reshelved. Clients are responsible for returning
recalled items even if they are not in the geographic vicinity.
Overdue Notices
An overdue notice is sent to the client if the item is not returned within 10 days of
the due date. A second overdue notice is mailed for items not returned within 6
yveeks. The second notice contains a bill for the item.
Fines
Fines are charged for overdue books at the rate of $1.00 per item per day. Fines
may be paid in cash or check. Five dollars is the maximum overdue find for each
item. Fines may be paid at the Circulation or Audiovisuals and Informatics Desk.
Suspension of Privileges
Library privileges are suspended for clients yvith overdue books or unpaid fines.
Student university records yvill be tagged online prior to registration for students
with overdue books or fines.
Lost and Damaged Books
Books that are lost or returned to the library damaged are charged to the client.
The client is charged the list price plus a $15.00 processing fee. The list price for
lost bx)ks is refundable if the lxxk is later returned in usable condition. Clients
are responsible for all damages to materials. Damaged lx:oks are a danger to
other books in the collection.
Lockers
Lockers are availabl in the library Locker applications are accepted until the first
day of classes for the current semester. Locker assignments are made within one
week of the application deadline. Locker keys are due at the end of the current
semester.
Document
Delivery Services
Table of Contents
The Health Sciences Library- provides
copies of tables of contents for current
journal issues. Faculty who subscribe
to this service receive a copy of the
table of contents for the journals they
have identified. Copies can ie faxed
directly or delivered within 24 hours
of the receipt of the journal by the
library
Automatic Journal Loan
Faculty may also request titles to be
automatically routed to their offices.
These titles are routed after they have
been in the library 30 days. The
combined total of the journals received
through automatic journal loan and the
table of contents service may not
exceed 30.
Photocopying
The Circulation staff yvill photocopy
materials for faculty medical residents,
and third- and fourth-year medical
students. Photocopies done by library
staff are 15 cents per page. Requests
are accepted by telephone, mail, fax or
yvalk-in. Materials are routinely-
delivered within 2-4 hours of the
request The library's request forms
must l"e used in order to comply with
copyright laws.
Delivery- Service to lovner Library
The Health Sciences Library provides
courier service betyveen this campus
and Joyner Library- Materials from any
campus library- may lx. delivered to or
returned to any library location for
your convenience.
Interlibrary Loan
Items not available at the Health
Sciences Library- (or Joyner Library).
may be borrowed through interlibrary
loan. There is minimum charge of
$6.00 per item, and delivery takes an
average of ten days. Electronic mail
and or telefacsimile can be used for
rush requests.





"ttm riiiTr:aa
Computerized Databases
available at the Health Sciences Library
Microcomputer
Laboratory
The Health Sciences Lforaty at East Carolina Univercity has computerized databases that are available for information searching in the subject areas of health
and medicine, alhed health and nursing, social work, funding and grants, statistics, drugs, and general reference.
HEALTHMEDKAL DATABASES
MEDIJNE: A biomedica. database produced by the National Library of Medicine. Its print counterparts are Index Medians, International Nursing
index, and Index to Dental Literature. Coverage is 1966 to the present. Internationa, in scope and updated monthly, this database includes citations
to journal articles, editorials, and letters to the editor from over 3,600 journals.
ONAHL; A nursing and allied health database produced by CINAHL Information Systems. ,ts print counterpart is Cumulative Index to Nursing and
Allied Health Luerature. Coverage is 1983 to the present. Updated monthly, i, includes citations to journal articles, the publications of the American
Nurses Assentation and the National League for Nursing, nursing dissertations, selected conference proceedings, standards of professional practice and
beginning in 1992, educational software in nursing.
PsycINPO: A database covering all areas of psychology and related fields produced by the American Psychological Association (APA) Its print
counterpart is derived from Psychological Abstracts. Coverage is 1984 to the present. Internationa, in scope and updated monthly, this database
includes bibliographic citations to technical reports, dissertations, over 1400 periodicals, and other sources.
HAP Health and Psychological Instruments is produced by Behavioral Measurement Database Services. It includes citations to descriptions of
information on instruments of use in assessing the health and behavior of infants, children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly. It also includes title
author, publKtion resource, development date, publication date, subjects, description, and reliability factor of the cited instrument
The library's microcomputer laboratory provides
a variety of hardware and software in a
networked environment.
Health Reference Center: A
Updated monthly, it includes full-text coverage to 100 titles on health, fitness
consumer health oriented database produced by Information Access Company. Coverage is for three rolling
years.
nutrition and medicine as well as indexing to citations in over 150 titles.
Pediatrics: A database containing the full text for the journal Pediatrics. HSL has only volumes 75 to 90 in this database.
SAM-CD: A database containing the full text of Scientific American Medicine produced by Scientific American, Inc. Coverage is the current year
Updated quarterly, it provides coverage of developments in clinical medicine.
SOCIAL WORK
Social Work Abstract A database including all aspects of social work and social policy produced by the National Association of Social Workers Its
pnnt counterpart is Social Work Research and Abstracts. Coverage is 1977 to the present, .nternational in scope and updated quarterly it includes
citations ,o purnal articles and doctoral dissertations. ,t also contains The Register of Clinical Social Workers, lists of registered din.ca. .social workers
including the type of practice, and educational and employment background.
FUNDINGGRANTS
SPIN: A database of funding opportunities (federal nonfederal, and corporate Updated weekly, it also provides information about fellowships
postdoctoral opportunities, development and education curriculum projects, sabbatical and publication support.
STATISTICS
CanT C"Ia: " " �inin� to N��h
CDC WonaerPO An online database of public health and epidemiological information created by .nforma.ion Resources Management Office Centers
wkTZ�rTt Vh't000 us pub,it Heai,h service Departmem �f Heaith and Human A"id-f� �
Weekly Report can be downloaded from this database.
DRUGS
MfcronHorCCISCComputerizedCUnlcallnfonnaUonSvsten A drug database for PCMH and ECU professionals. Updated quarterly i,
contains reliable and current information on toxicology, drug therapy, and acute care.
GENERAL REFERENCE
New York Public Library Desk Reference An electronic version of the Nm York Public Library D� Heference. With no updates � jndudes
most frequently sought facts from the New York Public Library.
World Atlas: A database that combines maps with international information. Published in 1991. it has no updates.
Hours:
Monday-Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
7:30am-10:45pm
7:30am-8:45pm
9:00am-8:45pm
12:00pm-10:45pm
Hardware:
August 1, 1994
30 PCs
10 Macintoshes
5 multimedia workstations
Expected by December, 1994
30 PCs
15 Macintoshes
20 multimedia workstations
Software: Includes, but is not limited to
WordPerfect
Excel
Harvard Graphics
dBASE
150 Computer-assLsted programs in basic
and clinical sciences, nutrition, and basic
skills
19 interactive videoCD-ROM programs
Instruction:
Basic assistance with the software we provide is
available at all hours the lab is open.
In-depth instruction in the software we provide
is available to individuals by appointment.
Classes are taught to groups of 3 or more by
appointment or at the request of a faculty
member. Classes are available in a wide range
of areas, including WordPerfect. Hard Disk
Management, DOS, and Using the Internet.
Services:
Several services are available to clients in the
microcomputer laboratory.
Printing: Clients may print out all documents on
a laser printer, up to 50 pages. Only one final
copy of any document is allowed.
Scanning: The lab houses a Hewlett Packard
Scanjet Hex. Clients may scan text or graphics
into a digital form to be used by WordPerfect or
in another application The scanner scans in
monochrome or color.
Color printing: A color printer is available for
output from any of the software programs which
support it. There is a per page charge for color
printing.
E mail: Students, faculty and staff in the Division
of Health Sciences and the School of Social Work
may obtain a password for Internet mail
through the Microcomputer Laboratory.
Internet Students, faculty and staff in the
Division of Health Sciences and the Schxl of
Social Work may obtain a password lor Internet
access through the Microcomputer Lalxratory
This will allow them access to FTP sites,
gophers, and mosaics.





Title
The East Carolinian, September 15, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 15, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1026
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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