The East Carolinian, September 8, 1994






Sports
Pirate football kicks off
TEC's End Zone makes its debut
today!
Seepage 15.
�"Rra
Lifestyle
The Color of Night'
Our reviewers say that The Color of Night
is the worst film he's seen this year. For
the sordid details, see the review on
page 9.
Today
iati
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 42
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 8,1994
18 Pages
I-Tech professor murdered at Darrvlfs
3v Drew Hatlin
By Drew Gatlin
Staff Wrtier
Students and faculty spent the past
week xii varying sta tes of shock over the
Sept. 1 shooting death of Dr. David
Leonard GobesKi, formerly an assistant
professor of Industrial Technology
(ITEC) at ECU. A memorial service
washeld on campus Wednesday night
for Gobeski.
Gobeski was fatally shot by 55-
year-old Robert Martin Mattingly of
Greenville, at Darryl's restaurant on
Tenth Street, across from campus. Green-
ville Police are still investigating the
motive of the incident.
"It's something you don't expect
said Dr. Elmer Poe, chairman of the
industrial technology department, of the
sudden loss of his colleague. "And I
think everyone, to an extent, is still in a
state of shock � you just expect to see
Dave walk in and say, 'Hey, how's it
going today?
"Dave was a very complex indi-
vidual brilliant said Dr. Darryl Davis,
dean of the School of Industry and Tech-
nology. "He was prone to work late
And he had extremely strong moral
convictions � he was driven to do the
right thing
"He was always safety conscious
said Jenny Simpkins, departmental sec-
retary.
Earlier during the summer,
Gobeski had given her a small canister
of pepper spray for personal protection,
because she worked unusual hours over
the summer which required her to be in
the basement by herself at times.
The note which Gobeski attached
to the gift read, "Jenny � be careful
handling this. Keep available in desk.
Be sure you know well how to use this
before (hopefully never) you have to
use it.�Dave G Simpkins still has the
plastic packaging in which the canister
came, plus the "sticky-pad" note which
Gobeski left on it, which she intends to
keep as a reminder of him.
For a man like Gobeski who was
so driven by a sense of personal and
professional safety, it was a cruel coin-
cidence that he would be fatally shot
during leisure hours.
The incident occurred last Thurs-
day at about 9:15 p.m. inside Darryl's
restaurant. In reports confirmed by Green-
ville Police Public Information Officer
William Harris, Mattingly was at the dart
board in Darryl's before making his way
to the bar, sitting beside Gobeski.
At some point, according to Harris,
Mattingly allegedly turned and pulled
the gun on Gobeski, shooting him once in
the stomach area. Mattinglyfled the scene
into the parking lot of the restaurant, and
Gobeski followed.
After wrestling the gun away from
Mattingly, Gobeski returned the gun to
the front door of the restaurant just before
collapsing. Gobeski was pronounced
dead on arrival at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
. Mattingly, meanwhile, was appre-
hended in the parking lot by employees
and patrons of the restaurant, as the Green-
ville Police arrived on the scene. Police
reports said that Mattingly was arrested
and charged with assault with a deadly
weapon inflicting serious injury with in-
SeeGOBESKIpage5
David Gobeski,
department, was
Photo courtesy of Industrail Technology Department
a professor from the Industrial Technology
killed last Thursday night at Darryl's restaurant.
Professor receives distinguished honor
Photo Courtesy of News Bureau
By Susan Schwartz
Staff Writer
On August 22,1994, at the fall
convocation, Stanley R. Riggs, pro-
fessor of geology at ECU received
the first College of Arts and Sci-
ences Distinguished Professor
Award.
"The College of Arts and Sci-
ences Distinguished Professor
Award is the most prestigious
award given by the College of Arts
and Sciences said Dean Keats
Sparrow.
"We are terribly proud be-
cause this award recognizes pro-
fessors for their lifetime achieve-
ments Sparrow said. "Dr. Riggs
is a world-class scholar in the field
of offshore phosphates. He is a
superb mentor to students and a
great servant of the university
The College of Arts and Sci-
ences Distinguished Professor
Award recognizes a professor
whose career expresses a commit-
ment to knowledge and academic
life as demonstrated by outstand-
ing teaching and advising, research
and creative productivity, and pro-
fessional service.
"The College of Arts and Sci-
Dr. Stan Riggs(left), Geology professor, receives the first
College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor Award from
Dean Keats Sparrow(right).The award was presented August 22.
Exchange students share experiences
ences Distinguished Professor Award
is a lifetime award Sparrow said. "It
is not merely a one-time recognition;
Dr. Riggs will carry this title for the
remainder of his career
Special honors are bestowed
upon the recipient including a cash
award, a framed certificate and spe-
cial support for research, conferences,
presentations or other discipline-re-
lated activity. A public lecture is also
given in honor of the Distinguished
Professor. The lecture features an
eminent authority in the winner's
teaching and research performing
field. The lecture in Dr. Rigg honor
will be given later this year, and the
lecturer has yet to be announced.
"This award, which is so richly
deserved by Dr. Riggs, also reflects
well on the department in the sense
that we were able to provide an envi-
ronment conducive to his accomplish-
ments said Dr. Scott Snvder. chair-
person of the geology department.
In 1984, Dr. Riggs was awarded
the Oliver Max Gardner Award, which
is given by the UNC Board of Gover-
nors. The award recognizes faculty
members for their incredible contri-
butions to others.
Pirate Points
still debated
By Jon Cawley
See RIGGS page 4
i.
By Tambra Zion
Assistant News Editor
From the far away continent of
Australia to just across state lines, last
semester's exchange students met on
Aug. 29, in the International House to
share their experiences.
Several students attended the gath-
ering that spanned over two hours. Some
students did not return to ECU, opting
instead for another semester in ex-
change. One student even stayed in Ar-
gentina to get married.
Gad McAllister is glad to be home,
but misses her exchange country of Aus-
tralia.
"After about three days, I said,
'O.K I'm over America now, I'm ready
to go back McAllister said. She is hop-
ing to take another exchange to Ireland.
Jim Boyle also went down under.
He said he had a great time and com-
mented that there really are a lot of
kangaroos.
"Heaps of kangaroos Boyle said.
"In the state I lived in, there are 22
million kangaroos. There are only 18
million people in the whole country
Adam Saad, James Caldwell and
Susan Branch went to England. They
said England is very different from
America, with the exception of a high
crime rate. Saad said Americans are
looked down upon in England, while
Mcallister and Boyle said Australians
love American accents.
Caldwell said that going out was
not always as convenient as a trip down-
town at ECU.
"There, bars are not as close to-
gether. It's kind of a walk to go just
about anywhere Caldwell said.
Both Caldwell and Saad agreed
that the weather was "drizzly" and the
clubs played too much techno music.
Susan Branch enjoyed her trip to En-
gland, but now wants to travel to Ger-
many.
"That might be pretty hard,
though, considering I don't know Ger-
man Branch said.
Dan Metzel went to Costa Rica.
He enjoyed being able to choose his
own climate thanks to the high moun-
tains and tropical weather Costa Rica
offers.
"We have exchanges both
through the national student exchange
and international as well said Lind '
McGowan, co-coordinator of the even t.
Yes, ECU students traveled ac ross
this vast country to explore schools in
New Jersey, Utah, Idaho, Colorado,
Hawaii and many more. Connie
Shipman went on a semester excha n e
to South Carolina State University
"I know it was only across the
state line Shipman said. "I had a re- !
ally good time. It was convenient In
case I needed to get home, there was no j
problem
In fact, Shipman's exchange did
not put her any farther away from her I
mom and dad than ECU does. She en-
joyed the experience and is thinking
about attending graduate school at her
exchange university. Her ultimate goal
is to travel to France, and she is hoping
for the opportunity to travel there while
pursuing her graduate degree.
SGA helps
students
Loans offered by SGA
By Andy Turner

Students sometimes find
themselves a little short of funds
when it comes to buying books
or paying the huge phone bill
they somehow built up. The Stu-
dent Government Association
(SGA) loan program may be able
to help.
"The SGA loan program al-
lows students to borrow up to
$50 once a semester explained
Michael Carnes, SGA treasurer.
"The program is for students that
need emergency money for a bill
or a book. Students have one
month to pay the money back
and there is a $2 surcharge. If
See LOAN page 5
Staff Writer
Tne ECU administration is feeling the
heat. The implementation of the PiratePoints
card has been followed by controversy, an-
gering and confusing students along the way.
When the card began use, the Univer-
sity Book Exchange (U.B.E.) complained,
claiming the debit card is unfairly taking
away their business.
The Pirate Point program began as a
pilot several years ago, and ran for two years
without a limit or UBE's approval but was
then limited to $50 on purchases using the
card when UBE voiced concern that thev
would be harmed, said Richard Brown, Vice
Chancellor for Business Affairs.
The concern over the card was not
limited to UBE at first, which led to the limit,
BroATi s.id.
"There is a need to co-exist; it's not
good for controversy to create hard feelings
between the campus and community he
said. "Specifically the $50 serves to preclude
the possibility of students buying all their
books at the Student Store
Broun said meatirninistration did not
int) for i-hsh i. ients to be inconvenienced.
"We didn't want students to stand in
lini-s,and would t �ave refunded tl icii mune.
Students might not havebeenawareof
the refund policy because "the timing was
not the best, because the administration
waited for UBE to make a decision about the
card, so people didn't have enough notifica-
tion Brown said.
InapreiousarticlewrittenbyT?je East
Carolinian, UBE owner Don Edwards said in
response to Brown's claim that including
outside merchants is illegal, "other universi-
ties, such as Florida State University and the
University of North Carolina have similar
systems,andstudentsatUNC are allowed to
purchase Domino's pizza with the card
Brown said he does not know why
UBE has continued to make that statement.
"The use of Domino's is a sub-contract
through food services and Domino's, not the
University Brown said ECU has chosen not
to enter into contracts.
An advisory opinion of the North Caro-
lina Attorney General's office, released by
Ben Irons, ECU'sattomey,confirmsBrown's
statement that inprogram is illegal in North
Carolina.
'Debit card purchases made at a pri-
vate business must be presented to the uni-
versity for payment. The university must
then debit thestudent'saccount,creditoneof
See POINTSpage 3





-2 The East Carolinian
September 8, 1994
Joyner Library suffers water damage
By Drew Gatlin
Hepatitis a scare at Indiana State University
Officials in the Indiana Department of Health confirmed that
an employee of Burger King, located in the student commons at ISU,
did have hepatitis A. The employee did not work in a high risk area and
is no longer infected. In order to insure safety, 80 other employees are
being tested.
Awards given to N.C. State faculty
Seven faculty members at N.C. State received national awards
for excellence in agricultural education from the National Association
of Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA). Seven is the largest
number of winners ever to walk away from a single university. The
awards were given in Texas, at the NACTA annual conference.
Do you prefer sugar, cream or urine in your coffee?
A local factory worker near Missouri University was video-
taped with a hidden camera urinating into a pot of coffee. After Richard
Poe noticed an unusual flavor in his morning Java, he hid the camera
and captured his coworker in action urinating into the coffee pot and
replacing the pot onto the burner. The videotape has been turned over
to police.
Historically significant pomo flicks at Cornell
Most academics will tell you that anything is worth collecting
in the name of research. So when someone offered to obtain 100
"historically important" erotic films for Cornell University, school
officials jumped at the chance. The videos will be kept in Cornell's
Human Sexuality Collection, an assemblage of materials that serves as
a resource of cultural and political examples of sexuality in society.
Currently, researchers at the university are compiling an expansive list
of films to cover topics such as gay relationships, misogyny, fetishes,
masochism and a variety of other sexual conducts and attitudes.
Pygmy mammoth discovered
When Dr. Thomas Rockwell took a graduate student out to
Santa Rosa Island off the coast of Southern California to study rock
formations, he figured they would be looking at fairly common miner-
als. What he found was the once-in-a-lifetime discovery of a pygmy
mammoth skeleton at Channel Islands National Park. The mammoth's
remains are estimated to be between 25 thousand and 75 thousand
years old. The mammoth's shoulder blade, skull, vertebral column and
pelvis were all exposed. If the planned excavation brings up all of the
remains, it will be the first complete pygmy mammoth skeleton ever
assembled.
Compiled by Tambra Zion. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Staff Writer
Advanced planning on the part
of the staff at the Joyner Memorial
Library prevented any serious losses
during some unexpected flooding
Aug. 28th on the first floor. A well-
implemented "disaster plan plus a
new invention which assisted in
pulling water out of soaked pages,
kept the damages to mere water
stains in some volumes and docu-
ments.
The problem began, said Dr.
George Harrell, when construction
efforts on the Joyner Library addi-
tions collapsed a drain which af-
fected the library. Harrell, the assis-
tant vice chancellor for business af-
fairs. The drain could not handle the
substantial showers of Aug. 26-27,
and water backed upthrougha floor
on the first floor. There are holes in
the floor from where pipes moved
from one floor to another allowed
the wa ter to leak through to the low-
est point.
The damage was discovered
by a worker at about 8 p.m. Sunday
evening, Aug. 28. Dr. Ken Marks,
director of Academic Library Ser-
vices. Maury York, Director of the
NorthCarolina Collection, and other
library "disaster" workers soon took
over the mess.
"We had about six people on
hand thatnight, and our first job was
to remove the debris and the furni-
ture, then begin the recovery pro-
cess Marks said.
According to Dr. Marks, work-
ers entered the office to find that rain
Greenville,NC
758-5521
Pager: 757-5627
24 Hour Service In 10 Minutes or Less
Discreet & Confidential
Services
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These are upcoming
Adventure Programs
offered by ECU
Recreational
Services.
You'll discover the ins-and-outs of windsurfing along
the beautiful North Carolina coast. All costs include
equipment, food, and instruction.
Date. Saturday, September 17
Location: Nags Head. N.C.
Cost: $30 students; $35 non-students
Instructors: Rob Spurgeon & Duane Tucker
Grab a friend and take an adventure in the Pisgah
National Forest along Steele Creek. Slip and slide
down Steele Creeks natural water slide into six
pools of crystal clear mountain water. Break out
your swim gear and join this funny sunny
weekend. A mandatory pre-trip meeting will be
held Wednesday, September 14 at 6:00 j
Date: September 16-18
Location: Pisgah National Forest
Cost: $40 students; $45 non-students
instructors: Dori "Dare Me" Quinlan and Charles
"The Snake" Dent
ill
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iUUAAAUAAAAUAi
re p'ognmi
KZHO'lC I
This 3 hour workshop will
introduce you to the fastest
growing activity on campus.
Belaying, knots and rock
movement will be covered.
Date: Thursday, September 22
Location: ECU Climbing Tower
Cost: $5 students;
$5 non-students
instructors: Steve Goodwin, Liam
Doran. & Dori Quinlan
5 tui ewl4 rviA
Spend up to 3 hours walking and
sometimes racing your steed
down sandy beaches. You'll get
to explore tidal pools and sand
dunes. A mandatory pre-trip
meeting will be held Wednesday,
September 21.
Date: Saturday, September 24
Location: Cedar Island, N.C.
Cost: $50 students;
$55 non-students
Instructors: Catherine Hawley
Register now for any Adventure trip, workshop,
or private workshop offered throughout the
semester. You must be registered before
attending any scheduled pre-trip meeting.
STOP BY THE ROC IN 117CHRISTENBURY GYM FOR AN ADVENTURE PROGRAM GUIDE. OR CALL 328-6911
had soaked the ceiling tiles which
had broken and fallen on desks,
tables, computer equipment and
various volumes and documents.
They initially encountered as much
asa 14-inch of water standing inat
least two comers of the office.
Workers stayed at the scene
until past midnight before thesitua-
tion was under control, though
things were not termed "back to
normal"until mid-day Tuesday that
week.
"Wewereluckytohavecaught
it Sunday evening Mark said. "If
we hadn't begun recovery when we
did,wecouldhavelostagreatdeal
All of the documents were
successfully recovered, althoughno
rare or critical items were at stake.
"They were all second cop-
ies York said, explaining that for
everythingwhich was soaked, there
was at least one good copy still on
the shelves.
The books and documents
were in the North Carolina Collec-
tions office being catalogued and
prepared for storage, where they
would join some75,000otherdupli-
cate items which North Carolina
Collections alone has in storage.
A special sheet can be placed
between two wet pages, which will
speed up the drying process, York
said. The material is similar to the
long sheets of plastic which tobacco
farmers put over their crops.
"The fact that Joyner Library
hasaDisasterPreparednessManual
and a disaster committee really
played an importantrole in making
sure that we were able to recover
from this disaster York said. "We
weren't just down here flounder-
ing. We knew what we had to do,
and people were aware of their re-
sponsibilities
Few may actually know the
significance of the North Carolina
Collection.
"It's a collection of printed
material dealing strictly with the
state of North Carolina, both his-
torical material and current infor-
mation York said.
In addition to the predict-
able assemblage of books, the sec-
tion can boast as an official reposi-
tory for state government docu-
ments on microfiche.
"This provides really won-
derful current information about
the state tha t we would have never
gotten otherwise York said.
The North Carolina Periodi-
cals Indexwasdevelopedby York's
staff to catalog the 40 to 45 periodi-
cal titles which deal strictly with
N.C. issues. A database has been
See LEAK page 3
SSF
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? Help the ECU campus and the Greenville community through
various service projects.
? Meet others who share an interest in helping people.
? Become a leader and develop friendship.
YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND OUR INTEREST MEETING:
WHERE: 221 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
WHEN: WEDNESDAY, SEITEMBER 14 AT 8:00pm.
Tor More Information (Phase Contact: 9kaiher Roberts 830-5538
Leave College 'With More Than Just A 'Degree 11
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Monday - Saturday
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Banquet Facilities Available
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September 8, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
POINTS
Continued from page 1
its accounts and facilitate pavment
to the merchant. These i ircum-
stances present a very substantial
argument that the university is ac-
cepting deposits as a business and
is thereby engaged in banking
which it may not lawfully do said
the Attorney General's office.
Brown does not feel the Pi-
rate Points program is unfair to
UBE.
"Students can go wherever
thev want he said. "The Pro-
gram is purely a service, because
parents ask for it. Some parents
want to ensure that the money is
spent on books
Brown said the administra-
tion also wanted ECU to be com-
petitive with UNC schools who
have similar systems.
I NC Chapel I till uses what
they call the UNC I card. The card
functions as a student ID, it can also
lock and unlock residence halls,
check books out of the library, func-
tion as a meal card, and can be used
in vending machines and laundry
rooms in the residence halls and for
any purchases on campus, said
Carolyn Elfland, associate vice
chancellor for business affairs at
UNC.
Elfland reports that the UNC
program is successful and although
UNC also follows the Attorney
General's report prohibiting use
outside campus, there have been
-ftp!
PRESENTS:
WL MUCH
no complaints by merchants.
UNC also views their pro-
gram as a service, in that it "helps
budget money and is less labor in-
tensive while holding cos tsdown
said Elfland.
Florida State University also
has a successful program similar to
ECU'S and L'NC's, however,
Florida law allows outside mer-
chants to use the debit system also,
said Ann Bass, Director of the FSU
Card Center.
The FSL card is primarily an
IDcard and is connected toa bank,
activated by student deposits. Stu-
dents may pay tuition and buy
books with the card, as well as use
it in businesses off campus, said
Bass.
The card "works like a credit
card, except you have to have
money in it said Bass. "The pro-
gram also includes an MCI plan
with competitive rates and a vend-
ing stripe to be used with coin-
operated machines with a dis-
count
Students may also use the
card at A rMmachineswithPlusor
Honor, even in cities involved in
the foreign exchange pn tgram such
as Florence, Italy and London, En-
gland. When a student makes a
withdrawal it costs S.7 if it is the
student's bank and SI if another
bank, said Bass
All validating of card use is
done electronically, and students
can find out what they have paid or
owe the university (whether their
financial aid has come in) and can
also receive an unof fieia I tra nscript,
as well as pick up football coupons
and participate in intramurals,said
Bass.
"FSU leads the nation in t ard
technology and conducts seminars
to help other universities imple-
ment programs said Bass.
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According to Bass, the card is
designed to make life easier for
students, reduce cash handling on
campus and reduce administrative
costs by not haying to hire extra
employees, torexampleduring fee
payment periods.
Studentscan pay fees through
the card, which helps students be-
cause tuition cannot be paid Using
a credit card in Florida while elimi-
nating lines. In the spring the uni-
versity will process financial aid
money using the card, said Bass.
"ThestudentsloveitBass
said. "Its guaranteed money be-
cause every purchase requires
money, eliminating overdraws
and bounced checks. Every mer-
chant must be approved and the
university has final approval
"Students are very positive
about the system, and the adminis-
tration is 100 percent supportive.
Faculty and staff also have cards
which will be used as keys to some
departments said Bass.
Other than gliches such as a
damaged strip facilitating theneed
to replace some cards, there have
beenlittleornoproblems,said Bass.
I C A If Cont. from
page 2
created and put on-line with the
library computer system (under
"Gopher").
The North Carolina Collec-
tions section also carries an exten-
sive topical Clippings file and Ver-
tical file, drawn from the Raleigh
Nra's&Ot'scri'trandtheGreenviJle
Daily Reflector on articles about the
state i if North Carolina. A database
in this area is in the making, and
should be available online soon.
A map collection also resides
on the first floor, featuring a full set
of maps from the U.S. Geological
Survey, plus historical maps of
North Carolina. Recently, the col-
lection even acquired offshore maps
to assist those in underwater ar-
chaeology off the coast of North
Carolina.
" Wha t we're trying to do is to
develop the North Carolina Collec-
tion into a repository that has a lot of
unique material pertaining to east-
em North Carolina that might not
be in other repositories, like UNC-
Chapel Hill or Duke University
York said. "We do want to serve the
people of eastern North Carolina, as
well as our own patrons
Like a good neighbor,
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Fat-Free
Pastry 20-oz.
ASSORTED VARIETES
Tombstone 12
Pizzas
i99t
17-17.5-OZ.
PREMIUM
Dole
Bananas
Pound
39





4 The East Carolinian
September 8, 1994
Fine dining offered
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
ECU opened a full-service res-
taurant on campus, on Aug. 24,
1994, in addition to the cafeterias
and snack shopsalreadyavailable.
The Sweetheart's lunch time
dining room is located in the new
Todd Dining Hall buikrng, but it
isan entirely separate entity from
the cafeteria.
"We wanted something dif-
ferent that ECU hasn't seen be-
fore said Dining Services Mar-
keting Director David Bailey. "It is
a full-service restaurant where you
are greeted by a hostess and taken
care of by a wait staff
Last year, ECU offered a simi-
lar program called Buffet Dining
in the basement of Mendenhall,
but it was a cash-only operation,
open just for faculty and staff.
Sweetheart's is open to students as
well as faculty and staff, and de-
clining balance accounts are ac-
cepted in addition to cash.
� Sweetheart's features a full
btjrffet as well as other menu items.
There are four different salads and
afullselectionofhotandcoldsand-
wiches to choose from. Foralighter
lunch, there is also a soup and
salad bar. Beverages come with
complimentary refills and the des-
serts are baked fresh daily. And, best
ofaU,everythingisreasonablypriced.
"We tried to keep the menu
imaginative and healthy so that we
could offer things that aren't avail-
able elsewhere in Greenville said
Sweetheart's manager and chef Jen-
nifer Behr. "We offer a daily seafood
special as well as a soup and quiche
of the day
Sweetheart's is even decorated
to give off the restaurant feel, com-
plete with tablecloths and pictur-
esque views. "It's nicer than thecafes.
Ithasa real restaurantatmosphere
Bailey said. "The setup is working
out very well
Therestaurantisnamedinhonor
of Clauda Pennock "Sweetheart"
Todd, wifeof Dr. Richard Todd, late
professoremeritusofhistoryatECU.
Accordingto Dr. Jim Westmoreland,
director of CareerServicesand close
friend to Mrs. Todd said Mrs.
Todd was "pleasantly surprised to
have the restaurant name chosen in
her honor. She was very impressed
with the building and loved the at-
mosphere
Sweetheart's is open Monday
through Friday, from 11:30 a.m. un-
til 2:00 p.m. and is closed on school
holidays. And for those who want
the restaurant feel without the res-
taurant, the staff is happy to prepare
most menu items for take-out.
RIGGS
Continued from page 1
He has written more than 80
peer-reviewed publications, includ-
ing a 1984 featured cover article in
Science, which is perhaps one of the
most well-respected science jour-
nals in the world.
In addition, Dr. Riggs has
served as co-director for the Inter-
national Geologic Correlation
Projecton Phosphorites. This posi-
tion led to the publication of a series
of monographs which ha ve become
the cornerstone of phosphorite re-
search in scientific literature.
At ECU, Dr. Riggs teaches
courses at all levels from introduc-
tory courses to graduate-level
courses, and he constantly receives
outstanding evaluations by his stu-
dents.
"There are almost 400 faculty
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TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
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coupon expires September 31,1994
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members in the College of Arts and
Sciences Sparrow said. "And all
of us are very pleased at being able
to recognize Dr. Riggs with the
award for his many contributions
to the university and the student
body
Campus Eye-Deals
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Walk-ins Welcome
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For a limited time. Certain restrictions may apply.
SPECTACULAR SAVINGS
FREE BAUSCH & LOMB
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free checking. Stop by your local Wachovia branch to set up a hassle-free College Account. After all,
there's more to life than banking.
jpCHOVIA





September 8, 1994
The East Carolinian 5
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U.S.D.A. GRADE "A"
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Only .We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal rood btampj
GOBESKI
tent to kill, with no bond set.
Mattingly is being held in Central
Prison in Raleigh under a suicide
watch, awaiting his next court date
on Sept. 23 in Pitt County District
Court.
Both Darryl's and the ECU
faculty issued statements the day
after the shooting. The statement
from Brian Blum, general manager
of the restaurant, read (in part):
"Darryl's and its employees
extend their deepest sympathy to
the family of Da ve Gobeski Noth-
ing like this has ever happened at
Darryl's before. There was simply
no warning, and no way for us to
know that something of this nature
was about to occur
Davis issued this statement
for the students:
The University Commu-
nity mourns this tragic loss which
is indicative of the escalating vio-
lence in our society. Dave will be
remembered for his commitment
to teaching, strong moral fiber, in-
tellect, keen sense of humor, and
compassion
By definition, Dr. David
Leonard Gobeski was an assistant
professor, coming to the industrial
technology department in 1989,
after earning his Doctorate of In-
dustrial Technology from the Uni-
versity of Northern Iowa. His spe-
cial focus was occupational safety,
and typically half of his teaching
load dealt with this specialty. On
campus, Gobeski was the advisor
for the campus chapter of SME
(Society of Manufacturing Engi-
neers), and an honoree of the na-
tional ITEC fraternity, Epsilon Pi
Tau.
Poe, gave a little more back-
ground about Dr. Gobeski.
"Dave had a real sense of
humor Poe said. "You know, 'Let
me tell you this joke I heard over
the weekend
"He could get into a routine
like any stand-up comic Davis
said. "When you think about it,
though, he never used a joke or
punch line with an expletive
never used a racially or socially
incorrect' joke. His humor was
'PC' politically correct
Earlier this week, Dr. Russ
Federman, director of ECU's Men-
tal Health Services, led a group
session in which students discussed
their grief and anger over the loss.
Some of the students who knew
Gobeski best, came to sort out their
feelings about the sudden changes;
classes to which they had looked
forward to under Gobeski's guid-
ance were now being taught by
another faculty member�a daily
reminder of Gobeski's absence.
Realizing most ECU students
barely knew Gobeski, the students
of the counseling session were glad
to share their memories of him.
The day after the shooting,
many of the ITEC faculty and stu-
dents heard the news for the first
time. For 22-year-old ITEC major
Todd Matthews, he came to class
early and found out verbally.
"When I heard, I ran to the
office Matthews said. "I was in
denial
Continued form page 1
LOAN
Cont. from
pagel
"All day Friday, I had the
door open to the hallway said
Poe, referring to a door in his office.
It normally stayed shut, while visi-
tors to his office usually came
through the secretary's office. "Stu-
dents would come in and say, 'Is it
true?
"I had come in early to do an
assignment sad John DuBose, a
26-year-old ITEC student, "and I
saw the Sept. 2 Greenville Daily
Reflector and I said, 'Oh my God
and started shaking I couldn't do
my assignment, it hit so hard. I
don'tknow I don't know what to
think
Moving through the rest of
that first day, Poe said, "I met with
the two classes that Dr. Gobeski
had on Friday, and there were stu-
dents just crying in class. It's
hard to believe this kind of thing
has happened, it's hard to believe
ifshappened to someone wc know,
it's hard to believe it's happened
today. I've had a half a dozen
faculty membersoffer to help how-
ever they could
On the details reported of the
shooting,bothfaculty and students
alike had reactions to Gobeski's
choice of action.
"It sounds just like Dave
Poe said, "if in fact he did wrestle
the gun away from this fellow, it's
very characteristic of Daveto think,
'What can I do to insure the safety
of other people, to help other
people'�and that was the kind of
guy that Dave was, really
"He was a good judge of
mentality said 23-year-old Steve
Davis, another ITEC student.
"What causes a person to
hurt when you lose someone?"
Steve Davis asked. "I asked my-
selfWhy am I hurting?'I wanted
his respect. I respected him, and
he respected me and now that's
gone
"I remember last spring
Poe recalled, "when he had an
advisee who had the death of a
daughter in the family. 1 know
thatwhen Dave learned of that,he
went the extra measure�in terms
of finding out the student's sched-
ule, and contacting all of the
student's professors dealing with
the student, even within the first
couple of days of the incident hap-
pening. That was pretty typical
Dave cared about his students
Gobeski's former students
were full of anecdotes about his
style and philosophy of teaching.
Matthews was challenged by
Gobeski's oft-repeated statement,
"I can learn as much from you, as
you can learn from me Norman
Dunn, a 48-year-old student, ap-
preciated his quote, "Only when
you get older in life do you under-
stand the value of integrity Dunn
said.
"He had a strong faith said
27-year-old Michael Cozzarin. "I
think he was an extremely private
guy, an extremely lonely guy. He
had so much to give for him to
be stolen away, it's unfair. His
death was such a selfless act�to
pay such an extreme price is as-
tounding
they don't pay it back their files"
are tagged
Carnes added that stu' -
dents do face penalties if they
do not pay back their loans "
swithin the designated period.
"If they don't pay back the
loan after a month, there is a 20
percent late fee and eventually,
the case will be sent to an attor-
ney Carnes said.
Money used to provide stu- �
dents with these loans actually
comes from the students them
selves.
Monev for the loans
comes from student fees that go-
to SGA funds Carnes said
Extra money for the funds have
been set aside and any money
made from the loans is put bade �
into the program
To borrow money, a stu
dent must have a valid identifi
cation card with a current active -1
ity sticker. Carnes assures stuJ'
dents that no one will be turned
down for a loan.
Students are not allowed
to pay back in installments.
Money must be paid back at the
same time within a period of "�
one month, and must always be1 -
paid back within a month eveii
in the case of holidays or vaca-
tions.
Carnes estimates that 30 to
40 percent of students will use
the program while at ECU. He
believes that the ECU SGA is
the only universtity SGA in
North Carolina to offer a loan
program. There is also a medi-
cal loan program where students
can borrow up to $150, he said.
The majority of borrowers
do pay the money back, and on
time. There are very few cases
where students have not paid
back money.
'99.8 percent of the people
pay Carnes said Most prob-
lems come from students who
leave fhe university
Carnes feels the loan pro-
gram has been successful and
has given students somewhere
to get money for emergencies.
It gives students a help
ing hand, most college students
financially live below the pov-
erty line Carnes said. "It gives
them something to fall back on.
Students should also be
aware that in cases of extreme
emergencies the department of
Financial Aid has the Sarah
Clement Emergency Program.
This program is only for sudden
emergencies such as a costly ill
ness near the time tuition is due.
Anyone interested in fur-
ther information about the SGA
loan program can called the SGA
at 328-4720.
News Tip?
Call
328-6366
Bash
with
Mother Nature
Thurs. Sept 8 � 7-11 pm
Under The Big Tent
rain or shine
$3 cover
$1 draft beer�or buy a Darryl's Mug for $2
and set It refWed all night and every
Monday night for Just $1.
:
:
800 E. Tenth St. � 752-1907
Across from ECU � Maior Crerjjf rrk Welcome
J


I i � i
�Mtau
toK-v





Page 6
M
The East Carolinian �
Opinion
September 8, 1994
�ft&s&w
. Stephanie Lasslter, News Editor
- Tarn bra Zion, Asst. News Editor
. "Mark Brett, Lifestyle Editor
,0f Kris Hoffler,U�. Lifestyle Editor
"�fi ' SVarren Sunnier. Sports Editor
88 Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
fcm W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Gi Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Thomas Brobst, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Jon Cawley, Typesetter
Lisa Sessoms, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Celeste Wilson, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst Layout Manager
Sean McLaughlin, Creative Director
Randal) Rnzzell, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
-masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
" "words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
rjQor more information, call (919) 328-6366.
More transportation alternatives needed I
No matter how much we may dislike it, the
fact remains that parking at ECU is going to
jmain a problem for some time to come. And,
. though we may complain about the causes, for
?tiie most part students are glad that the library
'Sbe'ing expanded and that a new Rec Center is
beint built.
'J" However, since it is obviously the
JUnniersity's goal to reduce the number of cars
'on.cpmpus, it would seem logical for them to
jrande adequate alternatives to driving to
.crnfms.
"he major alternative to driving, namely
tg, has also becomemore difficult this year,
students have chosen this method of
Spoliation than ever before. Unfortunately,
ilteans that all too often every possible space
ff'securing one's bike has been taken. In the
stration's defense, there havebeen several
bike racks installed around campus in the
last few years. This expansion has failed to keep
up with the proliferation of bikes on campus,
though.
This situation is especially bad on the eastern
end of campus, near Brewster, Christenbury
and the Howell Science Complex. Trying to find
a place to lock one's bike at any time after the
early morning is nearly impossible.
Admittedly, the university does provide a
fairly extensive bus service. However, due to
the decrease in parking this year, ridership has
increased dramatically. The result has been
crowded buses and frequent delays. Surely this
situation calls for an expansion of the present
system.
The university has a good plan in trying to
eliminate cars from campus as much as possible.
All that is needed to make such a plan a reality
is a further expansion of the already existing
services.
MAP OF THE NEW SILVER BUS ROUTE
MAP KEY
tBU5 STOP
� BUS DIRECT ION
U.S. should take hand of Cold War enemies
t Military forces from the
United States and theformerUSSR
recently cooperated in a joint
(raining exercise in Russia. A lot
of Russian citizens turned out to
protest the event. They perhaps
saw irasa form of selling out to the
United States, and felt that two
flormej" enemies of the magnitude
that we were should never again
worktogether for any common
purpose.
� "Maybe they even thought we
were over there to spy on them, as
if thitis not possible without our
afctuflifcy being there. Whatever the
case�think it was a good thing,
and ftppe that it will be the start of
a betfcer relationship between our
two nations.
I was not really around for the
Gold War. I was too young, like
most everyone here, to really
understand what it all meant and
what was going on. The cold and
simple message seemed to be that
fee Russians were the evil enemy.
NoW I better understand why we
felt the way we did. The Russians
were for communist expansion,
and ;we were against it. They
vyanjed to expand the Soviet
temBories much like the Germans
in" World War II, by force and
akgressionifandwhennecessary.
Tneypossessed nuclear weaponry
and a military strength that was
neck and neck with our own, and
atj times even more powerful. They
wprea very formidableopponent-
td-be and we did not like each
ofrter in the least. But let us get one
thing straight; those d ays are over,
aijd We should work to make sure
Jiat we never have to go back to
iving and feeling that way.
'ranoia sucks.
The Soviet Union has
crumbled under the rule of
communism, and the people there
arebarelyholdingon. Many of the
Russian people live in poverty,
and the Russian military machine
is sittingidleand rusting all across
the continent, except where it is
being used to quell riots. The first,
bold and tenacious step they have
taken toward an democratic
system has been like the first step
of a baby; wobbly, unsure and
confusing. Many of them feel they
should go back to the old ways, to
the relative security of
communism and military rule. I
understand why they feel this way,
and I probably might too if I was
one of them. Many of them
probably like us even less now,
afraid that we are ready to
capitalize on their misfortune,
which is how we may make it
seem sometimes by our words,
actions, and lack of economic aid.
We seem to say "let our old enemy
slowly die on its own
The further Russia slips into
poverty the more drastic steps they
may take to keep their headsabove
water. There has recently been a
big a scare over rumors that
Russian scientists are smuggling
plutonium out of the region and
selling it to third world nations
and terrorists. Wejust cannot have
that, and any step other than
economic and other forms of aid
to Russia to keep this from
happening will be seen as
aggression. Think about it; instead
of blowing a big hole in the World
TradeCenter, some sick idiots put
an atomic bomb in the middle of
New York City or D.C. and
detonate it. Can you imagine that?
Who would we blame after
somethinglike that,and how could
�w - �
Federal war on drugs threatens basic freedoms
For years now law
enforcement officials in our country
have been fighting a losing war
against individualswhousecertain
drugs. Undaunted by this failure,
the government continues to
theorize that they can end the d ru g
problem with their ineffective
measures. As theory rudely
crashes into reality again and
again, the police assert that they
require more arbitrary powers to
catch "druggies At our expense,
police have essentially been given
carte blanche to execute their war
on illicit substances.
The Fourth Amendment
supposedly protects citizens from
arbitrary search and seizure by
government agents. Except in
emergency situations, the
amendment requires officials to
obtainasearchwarrantdescribing
the exact places to be scrutinized
before invading an American's
privacy. Using the drug war as an
excuse, police at all levels � local
through federal �have managed
toskirtaround Fourth Amendment
safeguards. Police justify their
actions through lists that vaguely
describe characteristics of drug
carriers � drug courier profiles.
The latter allow authorities to claim
"reasonable suspicion thus
permitting them to stop and search
anyone matching the criteria on
their lists. While they vary from
state to state, what constitutes a
drug courier profile may surprise
you: drivers exceeding the speed
limit; drivers paying scrupulous
attention to traffic laws; vehicles
with tissues in the rear window
(this points to a possible cocaine
user); pillow and blankets in the
rear of a car (this may be indicative
of drug runners in a hurry);
Grateful Dead stickers on car
bumpers; vehicles carrying empty
McDonald's cartons.
In other words, just about
everyone on the road is subject to
warrantless searches. For those
who fly, drug profiles assert that
law officers should be wary of
those who debark first � they
probably are drug smugglers.
Another report contends that cops
should be watchful for those who
exit the plane last. And still another
maintains that those who hide
amongst the crowd may be
suspect. When such ridiculous
logic wasemployed at the Buffalo,
N.Y airport in 1989,600hundred
people were detained by federal
authorities � 590 of whom were
innocent.
If you believe that a man's
home is his castle, you are
mistaken. Prosecution of the drug
war has allowed police to ignore
the requirement that police knock
and announce their intentions
before entering a home. Often a
tip from a phone call is all the
police need to act. Galvanized by
By Steven A. Hill
an informant that drugs were in
Manuel Ramirez's home, police
stormed his domicile in January,
1993at2a.m.Bytheendoftheraid,
Ramirez was dead as well as one
police officer. No illicit substances
were discovered in the house. In
anothertragicefforttowinthedrug
war, police in Gutherie, Okla
utilized an ax to break down the
door of a local resident's home in
1991. Swiftly entering the residence,
police adroitly handcuffed and
kicked the man in the presence of
his daughters and wife. After
figuring out that they were at the
wrongaddress,thepolicedeparted
without so much as an apology.
So do the ends justify the
means? Should we surrender our
personal liberties in the name of
the drug war? Allowing the police
to do whatever they please moves
America one step closer to
becoming an oppressive police
state. What separates America
from other nations is the belief in
personal freedom as manifested
in our Bill of Rights.
A free country requires its
citizenry to be vigilant in
safeguarding liberty. If you are
alarmed, as I am, that violations to
out rights such as these occur on a
daily basis, do something abouti t.
Get involved and work toward
preserving freedom. This can be
accomplished by knowing and
exercising your rights.
u?
By Patrick Hinson
we recover and retaliate?
Forming a new alliance, both
economically and militarily,
would be a precedent, yes, but a
very positive one. If successful,
perhaps it would even be a new
starttoward establishing what we
have been trying to call "world
order" for years now. Together,
the American and Russian
militaries would be an unbeatable
force for policing the world's
troubled spots. Now, I am not
talking about imperialism. I am
talkingaboutsquashingthose little
parasites in Somalia and Haiti,
Bosnia and Africa, and the other
nations that are using people's
lives, millions of them, and their
fear, for their own personal gain.
The wars of tomorrow will be low-
scale, guerrilla wars that will defy
past tactics. Terrorism is the face
of fear for tomorrow, and we could
beat those forces of evil by joining
with the Russians. They need our
help now, and if we do not give it
to them, and work together with
them, perhaps sacrificing a bit on
our part at first, they will get it
from someone else and they will
remember us when the time
comes.
A new brotherhood with the
former Soviet Union would be a
wonderful thing, I think. A lot of
people bristle at the thought of
American intervention in other
nations, but I haveone thing to tell
them: Go see the Holocaust
Museum in D.C, and see if that
does not change your mind. We
could have stopped that long
before we did, and the blood of
thousandsof those people,and all
the people tha t we have the power
to help but refuse to do so, is on
our hands.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
I wasappalledbyyourarticle, "ECU Uses Unfair
BusinessPractices September 1 and would suggest
that if you are going to publish a newspaper, you
should do your research.
The Pirate Points plan was created by the
University as a service to the student body. When the
card was first implemented, UBE approached the
University about becoming a merchant participant.
The University welcomed the idea and sought
approval from the State Attorney General's office. It
wasdetermined that allowing private vendors would
put the University in violation of state banking
regulations.
Unhappy with the Attorney General's decision,
the management of UBE began a campaign to
discredit the University and its administration in an
attempt to have the card removed.
The $50 limit on purchaseson The Pirate Points
was agreed upon by University officials because
UBE organized a campaign to have a law passed
which would have eliminated the debit card from
all state universities. This bill was to be introduced
at the very end of this last legislative session when
legislators were attempting to adjourn.
Considering the timing, the legislation might have
been passed without full knowledge of the
implications for the students and the University
system. UBE agreed to cease their efforts, when the
University agreed to the $50 limit. If the University
had not agreed to the limit, then we would not have
a debit card for any purpose.
Regardless of the above, some facts the student
body should know. Prior to 1989, The StudentStores
created enough revenue to cover their overhead.
Since 1989, The Student Stores has reduced its
overhead throughstaff reductions and modernization
from 31 percent of their gross sales to 14 percent.
During the same time, The StudentStores has given
to the University over $1 million to be used for
scholarships. In fact, less that one month ago, the
University received $300,000 from The Student Stores
for the General Academic Scholarship Fund, $20,000
for scholarshi ps to The ECU School of Medicine and
$25,000 to provide scholarships to female athletes
participating in non revenue-producing sports.
On, as an aid e, the sales from the Pirate Points are
approximately 6 percent of The Student Stores'gross
sales.
Lyman W. Blanchard
, Senior
Elementary Education
To the Editor:
In responding to Brian Hall's editorial (August
30), I would like to relate an experience I had on
September 1st in Raleigh. As my fiance and I returned
to our car outside a shopping mall, we were
confronted by an angry Pro-Life supporter. The man
began the exchange by calling my fiance an "idiot
and claimed that our bumper sticker ("Doing My
Part to Piss Off the Religious Right") offended his
religiousbeliefs(hisbumperstickerread "I VotePro-
Life").Heapologizedforhisoutburstbutdemanded
that we apologize for our beliefs. When we refused,
he claimed that despite "30 years of drinking and
raisingCaine" he would enjoy eternal salvation while
we would suffer the fires of eternal damnation. It
must be comforting to receive forgiveness from Jesus
Christ while at the same time passing judgment on
your fellow man. For myself, I struggle daily to be a
good Christian and overcome my prejudices.
Conservatives like Rush Limbaugh, Jerry Falwell
and Pat Robertson would have you believe that this
country is morally loose and controlled by liberals.
This is false. On the contrary, the citizens of this
nation are increasingly conservative and intolerant
of others, regardless of gender, race or faith. It is
important to remember that in the controversial
debate over abortion, the so-called Pro-Life
movement fired the first shot (in the back). Their
willingness to murder their opponents, combined
with the unwillingness of people like Brian Hall to
denounce them without reservation (linking
increased violence to Clinton's election is weak at
best)hasmade the United States less democratic and
more dangerous.
Tim Payne
Alumni � History





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Cartoonist Meeeting
Aunt Stephanie wonts you.
Come, children.
All official cartoonists be here
at 6:00 on Thursday,
September 15.
Attendance is mandatory!
(No-shows will be mode into stew.)





x
TheEastCarolinian
September8,1994
t
For Rent
�:S
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
IT. or Tommy Williams
756-78157S8-7436
.ROOMMATES NEEDEDFORFALL
:oto share 3 bedroom house located in a
� quiet neighborhood near the hospital.
.jilust be a serious student and non-
smoker. $260 rent per month includes
futilities and cable TV. If interested, call
'Harold after 4:00 p.m. at 830-5160.
'MALE STUDENT ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share a 2 bedroom and 2
.bbathroom mobile home at Greystone
Mobile Home Park. Only $175 and 1
, 2utilities. If interested callScottat321-
0404. Non-Smoker preferred.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY fully furnished apt. 2 bdrm at
Plantation. Mature female, non-
smoker. No pets. Pay 12 rent and
Ibills. Call ASAP. Jennifer 355-3167lv.
'tmessage.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
.�170 rent, close to campus call Laura
757-0312.
OGRADU ATE STUDENT looking for
5$wo female roommates to split the rent
I on a house 2 blocks from ECU cam-
pus. WasherDryer. Fenced in yard.
?250mo. Pleasecall 830-1957 for more
f
GLASS TOPDINING TABLE w 6
chairs-$225 obo. Washerdryer $100
for both. Call Holly 752-2126
12 STRING GUIT AROscarSchmidt.
Mint condition. $200. 752-1373 ask
for Bruce.
POTs FOR SALE- ECU Student Pot-
tery and Craft sale, Sat. 9:00- 7:00,
Downtown 3rd and Pitt Street. Look
for the Yellow house with the yellow
Pot sign.
TAYLOR- KING SOFA for sale,
multi-color earth tone shades, $100
355-6873 leave message
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
Classifieds
For Sale
AR RIVER- need male roommate to
fill fourth room. Room has a fireplace
and a great view of the river. $100
deposit, $160 rent, 14 utilities and
phone. Call Kevin or Larry at 758-6701
3 ROOMMATES NEEDED ASAP to
share 4 bedroom house near campus.
1 4 rent 1 4 utilities. Call 757-2664,
ROOMMATE NEEDED SUMMIT
STREET- Male upperclassman
wanted to share small but nice 2 bed-
room house. Dishwasher, disposal,
fenced backyard etc. $217.50
modeposit. Mustbeeasy togetalong
with. 758-8608
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
open minded, easy going- for nice 2
bedroom apt. Off loth st. by Oct. 1 or
sooner! Call Kris 758-1479
EEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. in Tar River. Pay
1 2rent, 1 2 utilities. Call Christina at
328-73
For Sale
Hou's Fabric Si fine Vorn
756-2030
Accepting applications for PT help.
Knowledge of sewing
and fibers is essential.
AND WATCHERS: Welcome back to
ECU! Sports supplements at major dis-
count prices: Met-Rx, Creatine, Vanadyl
Sulfate, Cybergenics, Cybertrim, Super
Fat Burners,SuperChromoplex, Weight
gain powders (all), Amino acids, Hot
Stuff, Herbs, Multi-Vitamins, and many
more! Call Brad today at 830-2128 for
more info.
FOR SALE: 76 Dodge Asper runs good
but needs alternator wire, asking $300.
Call 756-9983 ask for Mike
GEO TRACKER '91 LSI, Metallic blue
with Black top: AC, stereo, cruise con-
trol. Great fun! $9,100 or best offer. Call
752-5816 after 5pm.
TWO 1 YEAR MEMBERSHIPS to the
club for women only. $29.50 per month.
Call 752-6094
COLUMBIAN BOA CONSTRICTOR
Approximately nine months old, very
docile. Comes withaquarium, heat rock,
and bowl. $175. Call 830-9528. Ask for
Jami.
BUY-SELL-CONSIGN. Used sporting
goods equipment. HeGyms, weights,
in-lineskates, bicycies. Call Sports Source
at 355-8050.
12' JON BOAT with 9.9 Envirrude out-
board. Runs great. Perfect for the pond
or the Sound. Good for duck hunting.
$950 neg. 752-4447
TAKING THE GRE? You need the Of-
ficial Software for Practicing to take the
GRE, General Test, No. 7 (IBM), pro-
duced by ETS, Excellent Price, no ship-
ping and no wait. Call Today! $55 neg,
946-3637or 1-800-446-8429 x 303, ask for
Ms. Mason.
KING SIZE SOFT SIDE WATERBED
dual heaters, 2 independant waveless
sections, padded matteras cover, frame
and all other accessories. $300 355-7004
Help Wanted
to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young
people ages 5-15, in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00 pm
until 7:00 pm with some night
and weekend coaching. This pro-
gram will run from September to
mid-November. Salary ratesstart
at $4.25 per hour. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James of
Michael Daly at 830-4550 after
2:00pm.
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mailing
Brochures! SpareFull-time. Set
own hours! Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 HillandaleRd 1B-295,
Durham, NC 27705.
SALES-PART-TIMEFULL-
TIME Beauty International has
i Heroes Are Here Too i
116 E. 5th Street !
757-0948
Comics and Sportscards J
10 OFF w Coupom
expires 10-31-94 I
CHAR-GRILL
golden
corral
Positions Available:
Cooks
Lineservers
?Bakers
Full and Part Time Shifts
Apply M-F 2-4pm
Golden Corral
Greenville Blvd. 7561412
315 E lOth-Street
P.O. Bo�-3797
Greenville NC 27836 1797
GtH.l! P' -c- 1" Wot
SUNNY SIDE OYSTER BAR
Open September 30
Willinmston, N.C. 792-3416
WE EVEN CARD OYSTERS!
DEB O R AH
YOU REALLY GO OUT ON A LIMB
FOR US! THANKS FOR THE HELP AND
THE PSYCHIATRIC
COUNSELING. TAKE
THE REST OF THE
WEEK OFF, STARTING
TOMORROW AT 5
MARKETING INTERNSHIP
Northwestern Mutual Life infor-
mational meeting Sept. 13 3:30pm
rm 1026General Classroom build-
ing Call Susan 355-7700
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn up
to $1000 plus a week escorting in
theGreenvillearea with a liscensed
agency. Also need one part time
receptionist at $7 ph. Must be 18,
dependable and have own phone
and transportation. Call Diamonds
or Emerald City Escorts at 758-
0896 or 757-3477
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIPS! Sell 8 trips and go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City!
Great resume experience! 1-800-
678-6386!
NATIONAL WHOLESALE
ELECTRONICS COMPANY
seeks campus sales represenative;
Gain valuable experience plus sub-
stantial earning potential. Call 1-
800-345-CAVE.
WANTED America's fastest
growing travel company now seek-
ing individuals promoting trips to
Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, Florida,
Padre, Barbados The easiest way
�BLT-�TUQVEQ�
For a first-class fast-start business
opportunity with a lop-rated
international cosmetic corporation.
� NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
� ADVANCE AT YOl'R OWN RATE
� SET YOUR OWN HOURS
� BE YOUR OWN BOSS
For more information call:
IR4iWI
(9191 746-2888 (Ayden)
to free travel, fantastic pay. Call
Sunsplash Tours 1-800-426-7710
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS Pitt
County Memorial Hospital is seek-
ing qualified individuals to teach
aerobic classes through its em-
ployee recreation and wellness
department. Persons will contract
to teach on a part-time basis. Inter-
t
Services Offered
PARTY OVER HERE! HevGreeks
and othersocial groups. Your party
isn't pump'n until Mobile Music
Productions disc jockey servicear-
ri ves. MMP provides the music you
want to hear when you want to
hear it. Experienced D.Js with the
widest varietyof music. Call Lee�
758-4644 early for booking.
NEED TYPING? Campus secre-
tary provides p rofessional, fast ser-
vice, (stored on Macintosh disks)
Low rates. 15 yrs. experience with
student papers. 355-3611 after 5pm
or leave message.
PROFESSIONAL CARPET
CLEANING- priced right for stu-
dents- call 752-8163 and leave mes-
LOST AND FOUND
LOST - black lab with multi-col-
ored collar. Has Max on dog tag.If
found please call 757-87 24 Ask for
Pat. Leave message
PERSON I.S
Personals
on Thurs. Sept. 8 at 4:30pm in
Room 1012, GCB. Come voice
your opinion about the parking
crisis. For more info. Call Matt at
328-9709.
LOST Black lab mix with multi-
colored collar, has Max on dog
tag. If found, please call 757-
8724, leave message
NEEDED: Intermediate to ad-
vanced tennis partners. I can
play anytime, call 355-8783 ask
for Pat. Leave message.
ATTENTIONALL STRANG-
ERS prepare for the time of
your life. Alpha Delta Pi
stranger mixer is Fri. night.
We're startin' early so don't
be late. The Alphas and sis-
ters just can't wait
BETA UPSILONS- Hope
Thurs. night was a night to
remember at the Rock
Springs Equestrian center.
There will be many more
Grab-a-Dates to come. But
maybe next time we'll ride
the horses! Lovethe sistersof
Alpha Xi Delta
JAMAKIN' ME SICKUe Tiki
Hut, Palm trees Bob Marley
What a surprise But it was
SigmaPhiEpsilonindisguise!
Oh what a night filled with
trips to the swing. What a
groovy time with our pref
night fling! So sad the cel-
ebration had to end. But HEY
MON- no worries! We'll do it
again Love the sisters and
pledges of Alpha Xi Delta.
ASHLEY BARNES:Thanks a
million for ajob well done in
directing rush this year. It all
paid off! Good luck Crissy
Boswell with the new Beta
Upsilon pledge class! Love
Alpha Xi Delta sisters.
JEN GRUBBS- You did a
great job with rush! We are
all very proud of you! Love
your Sigma Sisters
Paged
Personals
Call fordirectionsorif you
need a ride. 752-0573
CONGRATULATIONS '
TO TRESSA on your en-
gagement and Catherine
for getting your lavalier.
We love you! Your sisters
of Alpha Delta Pi
ALPHA DELTA PI AND :
LAMBDA CHI It's always
a good time but Pref night
'94 was one of a kind!
Thingsstartedoutniceand
slow but before long the
fun did flow. The camera-
man and DJ knew the
crowd was ready to go. All
thePI'sdoagree-theCHOP
house is the place to be.
Thanks again for a won-
derful night. Love (he sis-
ters and Alphas of Alpha
Delta Pi.
Help Wanted
FALL YOUTH SOCCER COACHES;
The Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches for the fall
youth soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soccer
skills and have the ability and patience
positions open on campus, extra dol-
lars or full-time income. Call Kim 910-
353-9684.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Dancers,
Escorts, Masseuars. Earn BIG BUCKS
in the cleanest club in North Carolina.
Must be 18 Years Old. PLAYMATES
Adult Entertainment. 919-747-7686.
THE EAST CAROLINA
COMMUNICATIONS SO-
CIETY will hold its first
meeting of the year on
Thurs. Sept. 8th at 5:00pm
inGCB1026
STOPP! Students Tired of
Parking Problems will be
holding it's first meeting
CONGRATULATIONS to
the new members of Sigma
Sigma Sigma: Emily Archer,
Gayle Beaney, Paige Bull, Jill
Bullock, Lauren Flanagen,
Chrissy Fredrick, Rebecca
Gunn, Jill Jackson, Kelye
Jacobs, Lee Jordan, Kristina
Lacy, Mary Linville, Holly
Majette, Joanna Matish, An-
drea Milbourer, Holly
Minges, Mary Ellen Nygaard,
Raegen O'Meara, Tiffany
Seamans, Debbie Sheets,
LorieTew,JJThompson,Amy
Tucker, and Niki Woolard.
We are so glad you came our
way! Love the sisters
ECU FEMALES: Tonight at
8:00youcanstop wandering
and find out for yourself
about PI Delta. There will be
a pre-rush Ice-Cream social.
CONGRATULATIONS
TO THE ALPHAS OF AL-
PHA DELTA PI: Kelly
Anderson, Stephanie
Barczack, Katherine
Budrow, Betsy Carter,
Dana Estes, Tania Hemby,
Jennifer Holland, Jennifer
Hollaway, � Harper
Holscher, Brook j Hunter,
Tish Johnson, Lis& Jones,
Beth McDonald, Susan
McLin, Niki Noreri, Andrea
Porterfield, Carolin Ross,
Ashley Smith, Julie Tan-
ner, Holly Thrilkell, Kiki
Waters, Jennifer Ward,
Nicole Williford,andNeely
York! Ya'llaredoingagreat
job. Love the sisters of Al-
pha Delta Pi
CONGRATULATIONS to
Julie, Karen and Jennifer
on the adoption to your
new families. We love you.
Your sisters of Alpha Phi.
PHI KAPPA TAU- Thank
you for the wild trip from
hell to heaven last Friday
night. We had an awesome
time and hope to party
with you all soon. Love the
sisters of Alpha Phi
DELTA SIGMA PHI-We
are looking forward to an
awesome time tonight. ;v1
Love the Alpha Phis.

ATTENTION ALE
GREEKSOrder of Omega .
is sponsoring the first an-
nual field day for the boys
andgirlsclubonMon. Sept.
12 from 4-6 on the mall.
Come show your support
and get Greek Week II off
with a bang!
am
SIG EP- Kinston will never
be quite the same Hope
you all had as great a time
as we did! Love, Chi Omega
a
Announcements
SPFCIALOLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County Special
Olympics is looking for coaches in
the following sports: basketball,
skills, swimming, powerlifting,
rollerskating, bowling, equestrian,
and soccer. No experience necessary.
A soccer coaches'tra ini ng school wil 1
be held on Saturday, Sept. 17 from
9:00 am-4 pm for all interested in
volunteering for soccer. For more
info contact Mark or Connie at 830-
4551.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STU-
DENT CENTER
On Monday, September 12, the New-
man Catholic Student Center will
start its program entitled "Beauty
and Belief: An In-Depth look at Ca-
tholicism This program is an ir
quiryprogrn; I � rstiio:ntwis
ingtoleam. earxutCatholicism.
ItisalsoforCatholicswhomaywant
to make their CONFIRMATION or
First Communion Theprogramwill
begin at 7:30pm. For further details,
please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at the Center,
953 E. 10th St 757-1991.
AMERICA RED CROSS
The Bloodmobile will beat Mendenhall
Student Center on Monday and Tues-
day,Sept. 12and 13 from Noon to 6pm.
All types are desperately needed. Col-
lection goal is 150pintseach day. This is
sponsored by Aerospace Studies.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORKSHOP
Seniors and graduatestudentscomplet-
ing their degree in December or May
who need help in developing or refin-
ing their interview skills are invited to
attend one of the following workshops:
Sept. 13 or 22 at 3:00pm in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room 14. Sponsored
by Career Services, the workshops are
also open to students applying for in-
ttiriships or co-op experiences.
PHI SIGMA PI NATIONAL
HONOR FRATERNITY
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity
will have its Smoker on Sept. 12 at
7:00pm in GCB 1031. All students with
32-96 credit hours and a GPA of at least
3.3 are welcomed. If unable to attend
and still interested please call Donna
Botz at 752-3906.
ZETA PHI BETA
Zeta Phi Beta is sponsoring an informal
socia 1 on Thursday September 8 in room
248 Mendenhall Student Center. Come
and find oat what, Zeta Phi Beta is all
about. See you there
WOMFN'S LACROSSE CLUB
Had a good summer? Hope so. Season
is soom under way. There has been a lot
of changes. New officers, ideas and at-
titudes. For new players we will be in
touch. For old players, I would like to
hearfrom you. Calf me, 757-0814, Kathy.
ECU LACROSSE CLUB
The LAX Team will be holding a meet-
ing for returning players and anyone
interested on Sept. 14 at 5:00 in
Christenbury Room 102, or call Troy
Plavec at 758-8685.
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Gamma Sigma Sigma, a National Ser-
vice Sorority, will be holding their fall
cha rterings, September 6,7 and 8 from
7pm to 9pm in the Mendenhall Multi-
purpose room. Come meet the sisters
and find out what
ship" is all about.
"Service in Friend-
STOPP
Students Tired of Parking Problems
will be holding its first meeting Thurs-
day September 8th at 4:30pm in Room
1012, GCB. Come voice your opinion
about the parking crisis. For more info
call Matt at 328-9709.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
Attention to all active members of
Chi Alpha Omega! We will have
our first general meeting on Sep-
tember 8th at 7pm in GCB 1020. If
there is a conflict please call iether
Keith Webb at 355-7527 or Evon
Graham at 328-7759. (Rush is ten-
tatively set for Sept. 13th thru 15th
r
1
L
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
� All ads must be pre-paid�
Announcements
Any organization may use the
Announcements Section of The East
Carolinian to list activities and events
open to the public two times free of charge.
Due to the limited amount of space, The
East Carolinian cannot guarantee the
publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisments may be
cancelled before 10a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
For more
information call
328-6366.
u





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77ie �as� Carolinian
September8, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 9
Steely Dan disappoints at Walnut Creek
Steely Dan core members Donald Fagen and
studio musicians. When they formed their own
left unknown, to name it after a sex toy in
Photo Courtesy of Steely Dan
began their careers as
Walter Becker
group they decided, for reasons
a William S. Burroughs novel.
best
By Warren Sumner
Sports Editor
Steely Dan is a hard band to
classify. The Donald Fagen-led out-
fit has long walked the line between
jazz and rock, sometimes blurring
that line and sometimes drawing its
own. They appeal to a diverse audi-
ence of all ages and musical afflu-
ence, and ha ve established a reputa-
tion for leading the industry with
their musicianship.
Steely Dan once again showed
their world class musicianship at
their Aug. 30 show at the Walnut
Creek Amphitheatre. Fagen andhis
partner, Walter Becker, hired the
biggest guns in the industry to back
them up. The most notable "gun"
was drummer Dennis Chambers,
who was charged with bringing the
complex feels of the Dan records to
life.
The band, whichincluded three
saxophones, two guitarists, a pia-
nist, three backup singers, a bassist
and the thunderous Chambers
shouldhaveroared through theDan
material with relative ease, but they
didn't.
Perhaps my perspective was a
little off because I had waited in a 45-
minute traffic jam before arriving to
the band's fourth number, "Hey 19
but several of my friends who at
tended the show and avoided the
traffic made remarks to confirm my
feelings.
The energy of "Hey 19quickly
dropped when the group continued
on with "Silent Stranger While ev-
ery note on this song was immacu-
late, it lacked an energy and connec-
tion with the crowd that I expected. I
later found out from my friends that
thebandhadfaced similar difficulties
with the songs I had missed: "Aja
"Reeling in the Years" and '7osie
The band seemed to rebound
wim'Teg"andfinanyseemedtomake
a connection with the Walnut Creek
constituency as Chambers' pound-
ing groovebroughtthem to their feet
"Babylon Sisters" allowed for the
band's backup singers to enter the
forefront pleading for the crowd to
"shake it" during the song's chorus
and a driving "BlackFriday" took the
band to intermission.
The band seemed to save their
bestmaterialforrhesecondsetasrhey
avoided the chemistry problems that
plagued their firstset. Arelaxed "Dea-
Drop
in the
Bucket
By Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
f "A Drop in the Bucket" is
just what it claims to be: a
very tiny drop in the great
screaming bucket of Ameri-
can media opinion. Take it as
you will.
Ever thought much about
how our favorite tunes reach
our ears through the radio
airwaves? I'm not talking
aboutthe scientific hoodoo of
radio transmission, although
that is a nifty topic (thank
you, Nicola Tesla). No, I'm
talking about the business of
music and radio, and the
- weird system music goes
through before we ever even
get to hear it.
I won't go into the
lengthy process bands go
through trying to get booked
to a record label. That story is
an epic in and of itself, and
my space here is limited. But
as for the record companies
themselves, there are basi-
cally two types: independent,
or "indie labels and major
labels, large companies like
Columbia or Warner Broth-
ers. Major labels have a lot of
money and clout and can get
their artists played on the ra-
dio and, more importantly
these days, on MTV (radio
for the eyes, bubblegum for
the brain).
Indie labels are smaller
outfits with little money and
less clout, sort of the guerilla
fighters of the music indus-
try, oidie labels are usually
local, or regional, booking
bands from a certain area on
the map. Merge Records, for
instance, is based in Raleigh
and books mostly North
Carolina bands, such as local
favorites Picasso Trigger and
Archers of Loaf. A larger ind ip
label, Mammoth Records,
also based in North Carolina,
is expanding rapidly. Other
indies of various sizes include
Seattle's Sub Pop, New York's
Shimmy Disc and Washing-
ton-DC-based Dischord.
Not having the influence
See BUCKET page 11
Color of Night receives lowest rating
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
As a critic, I love to use superlatives. I have
vet to use "worst film I have seen this year" to
label a piece of cinematic trash but Color ofNight
allows the use of this superlative description
because if a worse, more useless film has been
made in 1994,1 have yet to see it.
Color of Night stars Bruce Willis as Bill
Kappa, a psychologist psychoanalyst (his way
of describing himself in the film, not mine) who
becomes enmeshed in finding the killer of his
friend, Bob Moore (Scott Bakula).
As Color of Night begins Kappa watches a
patient of his jump from a window toher bloody
death many stories below. As Kappa watches
her blood cover the pavement he becomes
colorblind. The bright red fluid that spreads
around his patient's body becomes a gray fluid
before his eyes. Her death, combined with his
psychosomatic colorblindness, convinces Kappa
to take a vacation in LA. with his friend Moore.
When Kappa arrives he goes to Moore's office
to find a group therapy session beginning. (Why
Moore did not tell Kappa that he would be busy
when he arrived is not explained.) The five mem-
bers of the gioup each have their own psychologi-
cal woes. Sandra Doreo (Lesley Ann Warren) has
nymphomaniac tendencies and therefore cannot
sustain a relationship; Buck (Lance Henriksen) still
has not recovered from the death of his wife and
daughter, Clark (Brad Douriff) is an obsessive-
compulsive lawyer who has lost because of his
neurosis. Also in the group are Casey (Kevin J.),
who only goes to sessions because his father pays
for them and Richie, who has a gender identity
complex, and whose therapy is part of his parole
requirements.
When Moore is brutally killed each of the five
members of the group become suspects and
Kappa must take over the group to try to
determine which one killed Moore.
rhe wounded healer is an old concept
givennooriginalmeaningsin this film. Kappa's
problems overwhelm him yet he feels com-
pelled to take over the group of neurotics to try
to help them. Neither Kappa's problems nor
anyone'sinthegroupbecomesthefocusofrhfi
film. Instead each problem is presented for no
purpose other than to superficially label the
characters. Indoingthis labeling, Color ofNight
stereotypes the characters instead of giving
them any real depth.
Director Richard Rush has been making
films off and on since the 60's, but none of
them has hadmuchsuccess. Color ofNight will
do nothing to change that pattern. Rush di-
SeeNIGHTpagelO
con Blues" lulled the crowd into
satisfaction and Fagan and Becker
began to show their prolific
songwriting in this set, with soft)
offerings from both of them in-
cluded after the intermission. "My
Old School" allowed Becker and
his Swedish backup guitarist to
blaze through the tune's solo lines
and the rhythm section provided a
strong puke for the saxopHones to
play their syncopated "hits
"Kid Charlemagne" followed
soon after and quickly proved toe
the highlight of the showChanV-
bers shined on this number as He
laid down the tune's solid funk
groove. A few numbers later, the
bandexited thestage tothunderous
applause.
The band left Walnut Creek
after their encore, which included
"FM" and "Home at Last and
travelled to yet another qty and
another concert � t;�
This date, early on their tour,
probably didn'tshowSteelyDanat
rheirbest,butdid show that even at
90 they're better than average.
Butknowingwhattheyarecapable
of left me a little disappointed with
what I saw.
Coming
Attractions
Appearing soon for your
edification and .
amusement:
Thursday, Sept. 8
i
Lightnin' Wells
at Mendenhall
(blues)
i
Movie: Woodstock �
on the campus mall
(music documentary)
FREE!
Egypt and Uncle Mingo
at the Attic
(funk)
i Pathetic jJ Lame JJJ Pretty Good Jyflir Brilliant
Hoodoo Gurus
Crank
ii
I didn't know what alternative
charts were when the Hoodoi Gurus
released their first album, Stondige
Romeos, in the early '80s. Then in 1985
they released Mars Needs Guitars and
impressed me even more with their
rock-a-billy surf music sound. Now,
overadecade later, they have released
their sixth album Crank on the Zoo
Entertainment label.
Theband opted fora change from
their lastfew albums and let someone
outside theband produce. EdStasium,
producer for Living Color and The
Smithereens, lent a hand in the pro-
duction of Crank and it shows. The
songs, excluding the ballads, have a
harder edge, which is probably a di-
rect influenceof the harder bands that
are popular right now.
Guitarist and co-founding n .em-
ber Brad Shepherd said, "Sound wise
this record is probably most represen-
tame of our live show. When we get
onstage wecreateanextraenergy that
often gets lost in the stud io. But Ed (the
producer) had a very strongemp.i thy
for what we do, and with his help we
camemuchcloser tocapturing the live
sound with this record
The sound on this album is a little
harder, but still it falls short of being
anything really abrasive. So they
turned the volume and distortion on
their guitars up a little and say a few
cuss words. That really doesn't make
them any more disturbing. And they
are not a disturbing band, so why try
and be one?
The first track, "The Right Time
is a good example of the Gurus trying
to take on an attitude that doesn't
really fitthem. The track is loaded with
strong rhythm guitars and some al-
most laughable lyrics. "Baby watch
your step We might have to mess
you up! Just get out of our way, now
You might live longer that way
They can't be serious.
Vicki Peterson, former Bangles
guitarist, lends her vocals to an admit-
tedly one-dimensional lovesongTou
Open My Eyes It is such a standard
song it hurts. Verse, chorus, verse,
solo, verse, chorus. Then the very next
song, "Hypocrite uses the same gui-
tar riffs from "Louie, Louie" for most
of the song and then jumps into an
almost punk-type stomp for the cho-
rus. Nice try.
Crank has a nice variety of songs:
a few rock numbers, a few aimost-
grunge tracks and some ballads. It's
good tosee that the band is still around,
but 1 think thev are moving in the
wrong direction. They have made an
attempt to give the band a harder
edge, but they aren't cut out for that
brand of noise.
� Kris
Hoffler
Rusted Root
When I Woke
0 0 0
The group Rusted Root has
just released their impressive 1994
debut CD, When I Woke. The CD
features 13 rhythmic tracks from
some talented musicians. The CD
cover gives a long list of the in-
struments used by the group.
Here are some of the more un-
usual instruments that should
give you an idea of what this
group sounds like: congas, talk-
ing drum, myriad hand percus-
sion, pennywrustle, marimba and
on-and-off-planet energies fin-
ishes off the list. All these instru-
ments, plus lead vocalist Michael
Glabicki combine to make a
reggae-rock sound that is very
unique.
Theband'sfirstCD.Crat'Swn,
was released in 1992 and has sold
over 20,000 copies nationwide.
Mercury Records producer Bill
Bottrell, who has produced
records by Tom Petty and Shery i
Crow, got together to make When
I Woke.
The new CD has been de-
scribed as a "collection of aggres-
sive, acoustic, body moving
musicmagical in its intensity
and power I would not go as far
as magical, but this is definitely
an enlightening set of songs on
this CD.
Many of he songs sound like
Native American songs that have
been modernized with harmonic
voices and instruments. "Cruel
Sun" is the best example of this
rhythm with eight minutes of
trance-like music.
The band says they have a
blend of African, Middle Eastern
and Latin American influences
from tribal bands, and you really
get a feel of that in the song "Cruel
Sun " The lyrics scream out, "Let
it rain and protect us from the
cruel sun" with tribal sounds
backing it up.
The CD also gets into body-
moving music with songs like
"The Cat Turned Blue" and "Ec-
stasy This is when the reggae
sound comes out that will have
you up and dancing.
Rusted Root also mixed in
some slowly wonderful songs, in-
cluding a powerful tune called
"Beautiful People
When the band plays live,
they say they play to "increas-
ingly large and beautiful groups
of people
Tue band's live shows sup-
posedly turn into special events
with the band's hypnotic rhythms
and jams.
� Steve
Griffin
i
.
.4
Friday, Sept. 9
Breed 13 and
Charlie's on Acid
atO'Rock's
(alternative)
I

Movie: Jimi Hendrix -
at Hendrix Theatre
(musk documentary),
FREE! ;
The Amateurs
at the Attic
(reggae)
j
FlyinMice
at the Cat's Cradle
in Chapel Hill a
(roots rock)
Saturday, Sept. 10
i
i
Chairmen of the Board;
at the Attic
(beach music)
Movie: Alice's Restaurant
at Hendrix Theatre
(comedydrama)
FREE!
The Cocktails and Spatula
at the Cat's Cradle p
in Chapel Hill
(alternative)
Sunday, Sept. 11
Movie Hair
at Hendrix Theatre
(musical) b
Festival New Orleans
at Walnut Creek
. �
t





10 The East Carolinian
September8, 1994
NIGHT
ndedrtess
i student. He
��� ky camera angles for no
iike Jionmg Kappa'ssui-
�atient beam underneath.
had to film through glass to
. iow the blood spreading out, yet
the victim was on the pavement.
The - ed no purpose. Rush
�vestingprops in
a sta tue of a monkey
id! and a window
� th mne square panes so
that the image seen through the
j re i nine times. Both
eena tobesym-
,i'�. bi � all I uld see was that
symbolized a pot.r director's
Be attempttoaddartisticig-
oeto hispitifully ineptfilm.
acting in Color of Night
ingecl from terrible to horrible.
Warren and Ruben Blades,
ho plays a police lieutenant in-
f Vailing, are terrible
lv � s '� larch deserves spe-
c ial recognition for exceeding all
. - of bad acting, She acts
. ibly.
March plays Rose, a seduc-
tress who fedls for Kappa. March
.� to have been hired solely
-he was willing to spend
screen time scantily
"sjotfred ornude. She looks like she
�i - tryi ng so hard to emote but can-
kot quite get the idea of acting.
JWorking as a waitress may soon
Se he only 6 inn of employment.
5 guess a positive note about her
�horrible performance is that she
makes Sharon Stone's performance
in Basic Instinct look like an Acad-
emv Award winner.
The preposterous story only
adds to the embarrassment in this
film. The relationship between
Kappa and Rose has as much believ-
ability as a Penthouse forum letter.
The sex between the two occurs only
to sell Color of Night as an erotic
picture. Perhaps after looking at the
script the filmmakers realized they
had to add sex to sell the film. But the
sex occurs without any relationship
being developed and has no rhyme
or reason to it. Kappa's search for the
killer is equally ludicrous. His inves-
tigation turns up very few clues other
than that the film-makers were trying
to stretch a thin plot. Perhaps the
writers needed to get a clue that their
aerisive, disconnected film should
never have been made.
Icannot remember a film I have
hated worse than Color of Night.
EvenWillis'lastacuonfilm,Sfnfa!g
Distance, looks good by compari-
son. Not one shred of Color of Night
deserves praise. I hated every aspect
of the film. No excuses can be given
as to why a film this bad was ever
made. Hopefully the studio execu-
Continued from page 9
rives who okayed this film will be
seeing on their ledgers what Bill
Kappa could not� red (and lots of
it). On a scale of one to ten, Color of
Night rates a one.
ifr2���LCQ'lt�
�?
Carolina un
THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
wishes to announce
Classes for CONFIRMATION will begin
Monday, September 12
Time: 7:30 pm
Place: Newman Center 953 E. 10.th St.
(2 houses from the Fletcher Music Building)
For Further details, call Fr. Paul
at the Center, 757-1991
I
I
I
�I
I
I
I
!
I
I
I
I
1
1
ECU STUDENTS!
THIS IS YOUR CAMPUS, AND
YOUR CAMPUS NEWSPAPER.
GET INVOLVED.
WE CANT READ YOUR MINDS, SO GET IN
HERE AND MAKE SURE WE PUT IN WHAT
YOU WANT TO SEE. WRITE FOR US, TYPE
FOR US, EDIT FOR US, TAKE PICTURES FOR
US. BUT WHATEVER YOU DO, LET US KNOW
HOW WE'RE DOING.
Check out Opinion pageforaddress, PhajeJ �
1
1
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1
1

P
1
I
1
I
1
1
1
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September8, 1994
The East Carolinian 11
BUCKET
Continued from page 9
to get their records played on MTV
or radio, indie labels rely on a dif-
ferent system than major labels.
Which brings us to commercial
radio, non-commercial radio and
the differences between the two.
A commercial radio station is
a business, out to make money for
the owners. To that end, they sell
advertising time to other busi-
nesses (hence the designation,
"commercial"). Commercial radio
worries a lot about what's popu-
lar, the logic being that if they play
popular music, more people will
listen to their station, more adver-
tisers will buy air-time from them,
and they'll make more money.
How do they find out what's
popular? They check Top 40 mu-
sic charts, do weird and arcane
demographic surveys and gener-
ally try to find music that will ap-
peal to the largest number of
people.
And, of course, thev get mu-
sic from major label record com-
panies. Major labels think pretty
much the same way as commer-
cial radio, afterall, so it only makes
sense that anything on a major
label would be popular, or have
the potential to be popular.
Faulty logic there? Perhaps.
The current popularity of alterna-
tive music is due to some people a t
the major labels realizing tha t there
was money to be made. So thev
TAKE A
COFFEE BREAK!
For variety, freshness and quality, visit us soon.
Starting Tuesday, September 6th
we will be open until 11:00
Gourmet Coffees & Teas 'Baked Goods
�Lunch & Breakfast Items
Coffee is our business and your pleasure.
7:00a.m. - 11:00p.m. MonFri.
8:00a.m. - 11:00p.m. Sat.
830-5282
Charles Blvd. Shoppes
Greenville, NC.
booked some alternative bands
and sold radio and MTV on those
bands. MTV and radio, of course,
pushed it to us and now Trent
Reznor of Nine Inch Nails is a teen
idol, self-loathing and all. So, in
this way, the major labels influ-
ence Top 40 music and dictate
what's popular. After all, if people
never hear certain bands, they're
unlikelv to buy their music.
This is simplv capitalism at
work, and capitalism is a way of
life in America,afterall. But there's
little art in capitalism, and music is
an art form (ideally, at least). And
that's where non-commercial ra-
dio comes in.
Non-commercial radio is
funded from outside sources, and
therefore doesn't have to worry
about what'spopular. So National
Public Radio can play classica 1 mu-
sic and jazz and Scottish High-
lands bagpipe concertos if they
want, because it's art. And college
radio can play underground mu-
sic from the cutting edge and the
lunatic tringe of our society, be-
cause that, too, is art.
Where does college radio get
this underground music? From
indie record labels who, like col-
lege radio, are willing to give the
crazies and freaks and artists a
voice. The indies don't plav it safe,
and neither should college radio.
College radio can play music that
was recorded in somebody's ga-
rage. They can play alternative
rock, they can play reggae, they
can plav rap, heavy metal,
hardcore punk, industrial and
house music. They can plav jazz,
too, and Christian rock, and New
Age and the blues.
Any and all music that com-
mercial radio ignores is the do-
main of college radio. And that's
as it should be.
Flyin' Mice soar
tin
Cellar
Thursda
BLKLNI CONTEST
Sponsored by LocalMotion Hawaii
$1.00 everything
Ladies FREE
Guys $3.00
For more info, about contest call 752-4668
Frida
Jack Brown
Unplu:
By Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
Aaron Oliva (bass) describes
Hvm'Miceas"funkyblue-grassshit
Music reviewers often refer to their
sound as "Chapel Hillbilly Either
way the label fits. This past Thursday
night Flyin' Mice brought their amal-
gamated sound to Greenville's own
Peasant's Cafe.
Thesegentlemen havebeen kick-
ing tunes around these parts since
their formation in 1989. They released
their debutalbum in 1991, So Hi Drive,
and 1994 has seen their newest and
most mature release to date, Brighter
Day. Their Greenville appearance is
justoneof many stopson their travels
up and down the East Coast in sup-
port of their latest release. The band
said that their reception has been
good both in and out of the Tarheel
state.
Even though the crowd was
small, the people that did come to see
theshowseemed tobeenjoying them-
selves. Whirlingdenishesabounded.
In fact, by the end of the show most of
the crowd had joined in on the Dead-
head shuffle that bands of this style
inspire. Which is not to say that th:
a Dead-type band; the influence
there, but there are too manv othei
forces at work in their music ti
them with such a limiting iabel
The Mice probably fall in the cat-
egory of "roots" music, but they ma v
quickly outgrow this label. Theii
unique brand of music is a plus to
their already impressive live perfor-
mances. They run amuck with im
provisations on originals and cove; .
You will never hear the same shut �
twice. The diverse backgrounds of
themembersof the group help toad'1
to the unique blend that makes u-
their sound. Their most prominent
influences are jazz and blues, but y n:
can also hear bluegrass, folk and tl vs.
driing rhythms of funk in their hy-
brid sound.
Theband sees their hometown of
Chapel Hill as being a possible center
for new music in the future. The area
has certainly produced its share i if
bands and is probably the most hap-
pening music town in the Southeast
Flyin' Mice may be too hun.ble to
admit it, but they may be the break-
through band that everyone is wait-
ing on.
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Get a clue about
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Complete the "Division Scramble
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I






The East Carolinian
September8 1994
Sports
Page13
Irates reflect on national championship
Photo by Leslie Petty
The Irates, ECU's Ultimate Frisbee Club Team, became national champions at
the end of last season after a hard-fought battle with Stanford University.
By Warren Sumner
Sports Editor
New and returning students
may not be aware that ECU has a
resident national championship
sports team. This summer, the
Irates,ECU'sUltimateFrisbeepow-
erhouse, siezed the Collegiate Na-
tional Championship in a tourna-
ment held in Baton Rouge, La.
The Irates had already won the
College Eastern tourney, defeating
regional rival UNC-Wilmington in
the final, 10-5. The team then de-
feated the Seahawks again to win
theNCSCSectionalsheldatECU.
The Irates then made a trek to
the Mid-Atlantic Regionals held at
Leigh University where they deci-
mated the field, defeating Penn in
the finals, 21-5.
The ECU squad then travelled
south to the Louisiana bayou land,
where they entered the field as the
second" seed behind favorite
Stanford in the 12-team champion-
ships. The Irates' opponents began
to fall rapidly as programs from
Kansas,Comell,Santa Barbara, Wis-
consin, and Texas were all badly
victimized by the Irates' high-pow-
ered assault.
The final showdown with
Stanford, however, proved to be
closer than the matches that had
taken the team to that point.
The Irates cameout to a 4-0 lead
with a controlled offensive attack
and their patented "Cell-block" de-
fense. TheStanfordteamraiedhow-
everbringingthefmalouteomeclose,
butthelratesnever relinquished the
lead in their route to the champion-
ship. The Irates accepted the Cham-
pionship trophy aftertheir 20-17vic-
tory, a win that stands in the memo-
ries of the players on die squad
"(Winning the championship)
was great said Bill Romberger, a
member of the Irates. "We all rushed
the field to celebrate .it made all the
yearsspenttryingforitworthwhile
Romberger said mat the Irates
are busy rebuilding the program,
after several players have lost their
eligibility or have left to gradua-
tion. He said that the team has
recruited a number of talented
young players to try to fill the shoes
of those that departed, but that the
team has their work cut out for
them.
"I think we can come along
fine, but it's going to be a lot of
work he said. "It's going to be
tough riding the coattails of our
national championship. We'rejust
going to have to stick with our
commitment and try to come back
and do it again
Romberger said that the vic-
tory in Baton eRouge was made
especially sweet by the fact that
manyofthelrates'opponentswere
varsity clubs,andmuchbettersup-
ported financially by their respec-
tive schools. The Irates, a Recre-
ational Services club sport, does
See IRATES page 14
Hester prepares for '94 backup duties
By Eric Bartels
Staff Writer
Since plenty of sportswriters
and odds-makers are predicting
another hopeless season for East
Carolina, one would wonder how
the football team feels about their
skeptics' predictions.
As last year's "relief pitcher"
for Marcus Crandell, Chris Hester
played a valiant role in East
Carolina's offensive attack, finish-
ing the famous Central Florida
game and then starting three more
games until he was knocked out of
action with a broken thumb. Many
of East Carolina's fans wonder how
last year's team will rebound com-
ing off an unfortunate 2-9 season.
In an interview with TEC's Eric
Bartels, we will find out how the
1994 Pirate football team looks
through the eyes of number 8, as
well as find out about the man who
backs up Marcus Crandell.
TEC: "Tell me Chris, where did
you grow up?"
Chris Hester: "I grew up in a
place called Lenox, Georgia, right
around Valdosta. At fourteen, I
moved to Conyers, Georgia which is
twenty miles outside of Atlanta
TEC: "What was high school
football like in Georgia? How is it
different from college?"
CH: "In Georgia, football is
pretty competitive. All football is
physical. Football in college is a big
leap. Mentally, in college you have
to know ten times more than any-
thing you thought you would have
to know
TEC: "What are some of yourhob-
bies and interests?"
CH: "I like to lift weights, read,
play baseball, and I l;ove to watch
football on TV
TEC: "What are your favorite col-
lege and professional teams?"
CH: "Besides East Carolina, the
Georgia Bulldogs. I like the Kansas
City Chiefs, too
TEC: "Who do you admire in
sports?"
CH: "Ron Gant, who used to play
for the Atlanta Braves. I had a chance
to meet him, and he is a perfect role
model for young guys today
TEC: "How does East Carolina's
football team look right now?"
CH: "We have a lot of athletes,
and finally, it is time. Last year, we
had a lot of freshman running around
not knowing what we were doing. More
than half of the team, and probably
close to all of the team that is coming
back, has a little experience
TEC: "Is the offense easy to learn?"
CH: "It's not real easy to learn, it's
sophisticated. I believe I have the great-
est teacher in the country right now,
and he makes it easy. He knows how to
teach the offense, he's been around it
forever
TEC: "Could Coach Logan be an
offensiv e coordinator in the NFL?"
CH: "Definitely, without a doubt
TEC: "Do you have personal goals
for the season?"
CH: "My only personal goal, basi-
See HESTERpage 15
Photo Courtesy of ECU Sports Information
Chris Hester enters his sophomore
campaign as Coach Logan's 2 quarterback.
Rice sets NFL
mark
scoring
(AF)�Themanwhoserecord
it was had a few nice things to say
about the man who took it away.
No surprise there, since Jim
Brownis thoughtful by nature and
he had 29 years to get ready. But it
wassome of theotherthings Brown
said thatprovideaunique perspec-
tive on how special Jerry Rice is.
And willbe for some time to come.
"Everybody is talking about
what Jerry did. Butforme Brown
said Tuesday night from his Los
Angeleshomethat'salmostmiss-
ing the point.
"You've now got a guy that's
scoredmoretouchdownsthanany-
body and he's still got what �
three,four,five,rnaybemore years
left? Look at it that way, and what
he'sdc;rig,morethanjustbreaking
records, is setting a standard.
"The time to consider what
he'sdonewon'tbeuntilheendsup
with however many touchdowns
he'sgoingtoget Between thenand
now he added. "What people
shouldappreciateishow Jerry Rice
gets it done
That seems simple enough.
Tumor. theTV and locate No. 80 in
theSanFranciscouniform. See Jerry
run. See Jerry catch. See Jerry de-
posittheballinendzone. If youhad
thesetonMondaynightyouwould
have seen him manage the feat
three times while the 49ers humili-
ated theLos Angeles Raiders44-14.
On the first one, Rice covered
69 yards after slipping past two
defensivebackstoflagdownalong
heave from Steve Young. On the
second, he ran 23 yards on a re-
verse. On the final one, a 38-yard
score thatgaveRiceatotal of 127for
his career, he came back a step to
steal Young's underthrown pass
and leave yet another defender
grasping at air.
Ask any of the guys he beat
Harley and Gonzalez adjust to ECU
whether they appreciated how Rice
was getting it done and they didn't
riesitate:Speed,strength,guile, tough-
ness and desire. And a quarterback
who has bom the touch and the time
to get him the ball, first Joe Montana
and then Young.
Rice could tell you those things
himself,anddoes,often.Hedidagain
Mondaynight,evenrememberingto
thank Harry Sydney, the since-de-
parted teammate who in 1987 be-
came the only running back to ever
throw him aTD.
But if s not quite that simple.
"The thing is, if he weren't so
talented, you'd all be calling him a
blue-collar guy because he works so
hardatit Young toldreporters after
the game. "There aren't enough of
thesekindsofguysdoiriggreatthings,
showing how to do them. He did this
on work
That is Brown's point exactly.
IfbeingfootbaH'saU-time touch-
down-maker was a marker on his
road map to somewhere else, Rice
kept it to himself for a long time.
He didn't begin talking about
Brown's record until the start of last
season, and it wasn't until then that
people noticed he was in reach de-
spite touching the ball only about a
third as often. And what they also
noticed was that even with Montana
gone, Rice'space,as well as thatof the
49ers, hardly slowed.
"That's another thing thafsbeing
overlooked Brownsaid. "Somegreat
piayers can perform on an individual
level, but not in the context of a great
tearnRiceplayedwifhJoeMontanafor
years. He's played with John Taylor
andYoungandsomeothereforawhile.
'Trdnkofhowrnanygreatplayers
he's been around, how much of that
greatnesshe'sdaimeclfOThimselfand
hesaicL'hownwiytirnesthey'vewon.
ThatmightbethererorcmererrYembers
most of all
(AT) � Chewing tobacco,
southern accents and barbeque are
justa few things that Dan Gonzalez
and Scott Harley, both of Nep-
tune, N.J are adjusting to at ECU.
"It's just like a laid-back
lifestyle Harley said.
"Everybody's nice here: In New
Jersey, if you speak to certain
people, they're like 'Aw, get outta
here but everybody speaks to you
here. It's nice and quiet
Gonzalez,ared-shirt freshman
quarterback, and Harley, a fresh-
man running back, played high
school football together for Coach
Jon Amabile of the Neptune Scar-
let Fliers.
The duo was an awsome of-
fensive combination. Not only did
they set individual state records,
they were 11-1 in 1992 and went to
the state finals. When they step
back and remember, they both
agree that going to the finals was
their biggest moment.
Onanindividualbasis,Harley's
name will forever be notched in the
N J. high school record books. He is
the all-time New Jersey career rush-
ing leader and was selected the top
player in N.J. by the USA Today. In
1993, he was a Heisman high school
all-star (one of 10) by The New York
Daily News and Downtown Ath-
letic Club. In his four-year stay at
Neptune, he rushed for 4,953 yards
on 651 carries and 76 touchdowns.
"He kind of took the ball a lot
out of my hands, but it was OK as
longaswewerewinning'Gonzalez
said. "I really didn't have any prob-
lems with it, Scott's a great running
back. In New Jersey, he pretty much
dominated everybody we played.
There wasn't a team, I don't think,
that could stop him. As far as his
whole career went, it was like that
for the four years he was there
The 6-foot-3, 205-pound im-
proving quarterback also had
great statistics on the field, but his
off the field accomplishments re-
ally represent himself. Gonzalez,
an elementary education major,
won the Edward J. Boustein Aca-
demic Scholorship award, the
Garden State Academic Award,
landed on thehonor roll lastspring
and is a member of the 1994 Foot-
ball Academic Leadership Team.
"Last year was a big differ-
ence as for football is concerned
with me Gonzalez said. "I've
never been around a program
where football took up every sec-
ond of the day that you have free,
beside what you've got left for
school. There's not much time
during the season for anything
else but football and school
Since Gonzalez already has
one year under his belt, he has
been a huge help to Harley, who
admits that he is already a little
homesick. Harley credits his good
friend, since they have played
SeeHARLEYpsge14
���1�-
X- Country kicks off season
Greenville, N.C � The 1994
Cross Country season opened Sat-
urday for the ECU Pirates. Teams
from UNC Wilmington, Coastal
Carolina and Campbell joined the
Pirates for the innaugual race.
For the women, ECU's Tara
and Dava Rhodes captured third
place in a combined time of 34:18 in
the relay format. Winning the event
from Coastal Carolina was Fresh-
man Catherin Conder and Senior
Valentine Stumph. Their time of
32:45 pleased Coastal Carolina
coach Allen Connie. "I am very sat-
isfied with the performance and the
times. This was good early compe-
tition and the top six finishes were
faster than last year's winners
In second place, for the women,
were the duo of Shannon
Williamson and Heather Fenton
from UNC Wilmington. Fentonand
Williamson finished with a time of
33:49.
mthemen'scorn petition, UNC
Wilmington dominated the meet,
sweeping the first three team posi-
tions. Thomas Couglin and team-
mate Frank Gagliano won the relay
with a time of 38:37. Teammates Jeff
Tiegs and Scott Hove placed second
nine seconds off of the pace, with a
time of 38:46.
UNCW Coach Jim Sprecker
said, "We worked very hard this
summer inconditioningandwealso
set high goals for this team. The team
is very young, with half of the run- ECU 22
ners being freshmen UNCW 6
For the Pirates, Feshman CC9
Michael Marini and Senior Sean UNCW 6
Connolly had the best ECU team Camp. 10
finish. They were 11th overall, with Camp. 19
a time of 40:50. ECU Women'scoach
Charles "Choo" Justice said, "Over- Women
all, our girls ran well. We will im- ECU 14
proveastheyearprogresses.UNCW UNCW 10
improved tremendously, and we CC8
have our work cut out for us. For the UNCW 8
men, the freshmen ran well and the Camp. 10
team has also shown great improve- Camp. 18
ment"
Team Results:
Men: 1. UNC Wilmington Z
Coastal Carolina 3. Campbell 4. East
Carolina
Wumsn: l.UNC Wilmington2.
Coastal Carolina 3. East Carolina 4.
Campbell
Dual Meet Scores (lower num-
ber donotes winner):
Men
ECU 16 ECU 11
UNCW 6
�C6
CC16
Cam. 13,
Coach
arrested;
for drugs
(AP) � The high school
football coach at High, Point
Andrews resigned Thursday,
after being arrested this week
on a marijuana charge.
TJhe resignation of Louis
Craig Gill, 41, was effective at
the close of the school day
Thursday, accordinjg to
Guilford County school offi-
cials.
Gill was arrested Tuesday
night after being seen sitting in
a truck outside Southwest
MkidfeSdwoLHewascharged
with possession of marijuana
and delaying and obstructing
justice.
One erf Gill's former stu-
dents, 22-year-old Christy En-
gland, was in the truck with
him and also facesdrug charges.
Assistant coaches will lead
the Andrews team in Friday
ECU 11 ECU 8
UNCW 7
CC10
CC13
Camp. 13
BiiCurts,GuiB8K:ounty
�crtfxAaftIetfcctie
'�&m.coacft wffl bechosen next
titee, ��'� �,
Gill, who taught at the
school since 1977,dedinedcom-
ment Thursday.
I
1m





-
14 The East Carolinian
September8, 1994
PARLEY
Cont. from
page 13
football together since they were
kids. Other ECU backs Junior
Smith and Jerris McPhail have also
helped the freshman feel at home.
The two players are living a
dream of playing college foot-
ball, but what a bigger moment in
their lives it would be if they could
line up together again, in a purple
and gold uniform.
"That would be a shot back
p the high school days, but know
, its pretty much whoever is in
there, we have to get the job done
Gonzalez said. "You can't take
the time to look at it, but it would
baa lot of fun
C Harley had a great high
school career and expectations are
high. With Junior Smith entering
Sfifc senior season, Harley could
tsefc more playing time down the
Cjj&d. Gonzalez says the two
�"cks' running styles are similiar,
with all the cuts and moves they
use, but their size and speed sets
them apart. Smith is only 5'6" 180
lb but has explosive speed, while
Harley isabiggerbackat5'll" 194
lb.
"I think Scott was attracted to
Smith and saw that maybe, down
the road, he could be the guy with
a lot of hard work head coach
Steve Logan said. "I think we got a
good back mere and he's got a lot
of developing to do, but he's sure
got some instincts. "Over the past
years, ECU recruiting has reached
higher levels. They have gone north
and now have recruited six players
from N.J four in Pennsylvania,
and three in N.Y. and Marlyand.
"Danny was one of the first
guys we cracked the Jersey area
with Logan said. "I think as time
goes on. New Jersey is going to be
a big, big, place for us
HESTER
Continued from page 13
IRATES
Cont. from
page 13
if you always dreamed
of being a highly-paid,
high-profile sports-
writer, drop by the TEC
office, located in the
Student Pubs. Bldg
and chat with Warren
or Dave.
cally you can call it a team goal, is
if I'm needed, do whatever it takes
to win. 1 just want to win, I'm tired
of losing If I have a job in a role for
us to win-ITl just go and do it, but
if I have to stand on the sideline
and support my team-I'll do that
TEC: "Explain what it was like
to fill in for Marcus last season
CH: "It was different. I have
never been in that situation before.
All I could do was just go out and
do what I had learned the whole
time I was watching Marcus do it
in practice
TEC: "Could you describe last
season's Central Florida game, af-
ter Marcus Crandell got injured?
When you went in the game, what
were you thinking? Were you ner-
vous, excited?"
CH: "I was not nervous, this is
what I've practiced for ever since
i'vebeenhere. Myjob was if Marcus
Crandell went down, go in and do
the job. My stomach hurt the whole
game-I felt bad, because I saw all
the hard work he put into the year
thrown right out, and it disgusted
me. All the guys were hysterical
and didn't know what was going
on. I came in and tried to calm the
guys down. I said, 'We'll see how
Marcus is after the game, but we've
got a job to do and that's win the
game, so let's win this game for
Marcus
TEC: "Is there any other posi-
tion you would want to play other
than quarterback?"
CH: "I wouldn't want to play
any other position. I came here to
be a quarterback, and I want to be
a quarterback
TEC: "How would you de-
scribe your playing style?"
CH: "Basically, a pocket
passer. I don't have the best feet
in the world, but if you give me
time in the pocket, I can usually
do what ever needs to be done
TEC: "Do you think that since
you started in three games last
season, including a game at na-
tionally-ranked Washington, that
you should have the starting
quarterback position?"
CH: "Coach Logan realizes
that Marcus was a better quarter-
back coming out of the spring.
He obviously saw things that he
didn't see in me or Perez
(Mattison) or any of the other
guys. If it's my role to be a backup
the whole time I'm here-if that's
what it's called for me to do, I'll
do it. I'm not worried about who
is starting, because I know who's
starting is the best person in
there
TEC: "What are practices like
for the reserve quarterbacks?"
CH: "It's a stand back and
learn process. You get your reps.
The main part is that you stand
back and watch other guys doing
it, and picture in your head what
it would be like if you were doing
it
TEC: "Do you think that for
East Carolina to become a major
college powerhouse in football,
like that of a Michigan or Miami,
we should play teams in the Top
25, other than 1-AA Central
Florida?"
CH: "We play pretty tough
teams. Central Florida in 1-AA is
number one. Obviously, next year
they are moving up to 1-A. They
get all the transfers from Florida
State and Florida, so they're no
cake walk either
TEC: "Could you give me your
predictions for this season?"
CH: "I don't like to predict. How-
ever, I want to be reasonable, but
I want to be confident. Either 7-4
or 8-3
not enjoy that level of funding.
"Our athletic department
puts a lot of money into football
and we're not in that situation
here Rombergersaid. "Pat Cox,
our Athletic director at Rec Ser-
vices, did a great job helping us
out.
"Ultimate doesn't get a lot of
recognition, but anyone who saw
us play can tell you how fast-
paced the action is and how excit-
ing it is to watch
Romberger said he feels Ulti-
mate frisbee will eventually grow
into a major varsity sport around
the nation, but the average athlete
won't make it in the sport. He said
it takes a special kind of athlete to
play Ultimate.
"It's pretty hard-core he
said. "Youshouldn'ttryitif you're
not ready to give up someblood
Sk THE GALLEY
IS OPEN!
�M
iSNinis2
NEWLY
RENOVATED!
MARK A. WARD
ATTORNEY AT LAW
NC BAR CERTIFIED
State Criminal Law Specialist
24 Hour Message Service
209 Evans Street
Adjacent to the Greenville Courthouse
B 752-7529
Rig screen TV.
HOURS
MONDfll - THURSDAY 800 AM -11:30 PM (FRIDAY UNTIL 9 PM)
MTURDAY 12 NOON 9 00 PM SUNDAY 12 NOON - 11:30 PM
;
.�j


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w





The East Carolinian
September8, 1994
A new Sports supplement printed here and appearing as tabloids for each home game.
Here's what you get:
� CURRENT opponent analysis and � TIMELY comments from
statistics, including injuries, suspensions coaching staffs (ECU and
and interviews with opposing) and in-depth analysis of
opposing coaches strategies and game statistics
� UPDATED facts about ECU bowl and � IN-DEPTH player profiles that
conference situations will show reactions to how the
� INTENSE coverage of campus and season is progressing and the
local events relevant to ECU athletics and current psyche of the team
ECU football
ECU Pirates
vs. DUKE
Blue Devils
Wallace Wade Stadium
September 10,1994
Page 15
Fast Facts
Location: Duke University
(Durham, NC)
Nickname: Blue Devils
Home Field: Wallace Wade
Stadium (33,941)
Kickoff: 7 p.m.
Head Coach: Fred Goldsmith
(26-38-1 career, 1-0 Duke)
Key Players (1994 stats):
QB Spence Fisher
(15-24,197 yards, 2 TD)
RB Robert Baldwin
(33 art, 238 yards, 4 TD)
LB John Zuanich
(13 tackles, 1.5 sacks)
P John Krueger
(2 punts, 44.5 yd average)
Notes:
� Over 25 of Baldwin's
career rushing yards came last
week against Maryland, and he's
played at Duke for three seasons.
� in the 1990s, the Blue
Devils are just 10-12 at Wallace
Wade Stadium.
� Duke has won 17
straight non-conference games at
home, dating back to 1983.
� Duke leads their series
with ECU 3-2, and won the last
meeting, a 45-21 Blue Devil vie
tory over the Pirates in 1992.
� A capacity crowd of over
33,000 is expected for Saturday's
contest in Durham.
Compiled By Dave Pond
Duke attempts to answer questions
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports
Editor
The Duke Blue Devils are com-
ing off of their horrific 3-8 record of a
season ago. However, new head
coach Fred Goldsmith and his 'Dev-
ils came out strong last Saturday,
destroying the Maryland Terrapins
49-16. Although the victory was wel-
comed in Durham, many questions
still surround the Blue Devils�pri-
marily"thefluke factor" inlastweek's
win.
Last timeECU and Dukemet(in
'92), the Pirates were at the wrong
end of a 45-14 shellacking in Wallace
Wade Stadium, which both teams
remember well.
Duke amassed 521 yardsof total
offense in their home opener a week
ago, much more productive than
their '93 average (379.8 total yards).
Senior fullback Robert Baldwin set a
Duke rushing record with238 ground
yards last week, leading the charge.
He will be given the ball many times
against ECU, who (unlike the Terps)
have the ability and talent to stop the
run.
Asexpected,SpenceFishergave
Duke a quality performance against
Maryland, going 15 of 24 for 197
yards and two touchdowns. How-
ever, he never had to show much
beyond scrimmage-level intesity and
arm strength against the Terps, and
will be strongly tested by Daren Hart
and the rest of the Pirate secondary.
"I picked Duke to win that game,
and winitbig said ECU head coach
Steve Logan. "That'sexactly whathap-
pened
Fisher spread out his passes, and
the team responded well. Tight ends
Bill Khayat and John Farqhar com-
bined for 85 receiving yards, while
Baldwin had 5 receptions for 39yards.
Farqhar suffered a small pneumthorax
�an accumulation of air or gas in the
chestdue to injury�against UM and
is questionable for Saturday's
matchup. Fellow tight end Gerald
Ford broke a thumb, but will play in a
cast due to Farqhar's injury.
Aswellastheoffenseplayedand
the final score looked, the Blue Devil
defense failed to answer any major
concerns last weekend. UM quarter-
back Scott Milanovich was 20-31 for
230 yards and a TD, balancing his
passes equally between four receiv-
ers. However, he was sacked three
times. If the Pirates' hogs can give
Marcus Crandell time in the pocket,
he should have a good degree of suc-
cess on Saturday-
Duke limited the Terps to just 43
yards rushing, but they acheived this
against, well, a rather talentless run-
ning attack�one whose longest run
was 11 yards. Junior John Zuanich
led the Blue Deil defense with 13
tackles and 1.5 sacks.
Another expected area of consis-
tency was the kicking game. Main-
stay punter John Krueger's two punts
averaged 44.5 yards. However, the
special team'sdefense wasshredded
on returns, as the Terps returned 8
kickoffs an average of 39 yards each.
Once again, a facet of the game con-
sidered as a Pirate strength.
It boils down to three things.
One, ECU is a better team than the
Terps. Two, the Blue Devils that took
the field against Maryland played
much worse than the scoreboard in-
dicated. And finally, Baldwin isn't
going to acheive his success of a week
ago. The Pirates allowed just 159
ground yards per game last season,
so his work will definitely be cut out
for him.
Look fora high-scoringshootout
of a football gameonSaturday. Duke
virtually loses its home-field advan-
tage, since the stadium should be
half-filled with Pirates who will make
rheshorttrek to Durham. All inalLan
entertaining way to kick off a season,
for ECU players and fans alike.
Saturday's matchup
Smith against the
Photo Courtesy of buks '� SID
with Duke will put ECls Junior
Devil's Robert Baldwin.
Pirates ready for opener
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
With the coming of autumn,
Greenville sports fanatics will turn
theirattention towards the ECU foot-
ball program. Led by head coach
Steve Logan, the Pirates are under
the microscopes of football fans after
suffering through a disasterous 2-9
season in 1993. Logan, entering his
third season, will be expected to pro-
duce this year and lead the Pirates
back to respectability.
In order to achieve this feat,
Logan has been forced to adapt to a
great number of changes, particu-
larly on the defensive side of the
field. Logan had to replace the de-
parted Larry Coyer who left ECU for
the New York Jets after serving one
season as defensive coordinator for
the Pirates. Paul Jette emigrated to
Greenville from Texas Christian
University to take over where Coyer
left off.
DEFENSE-Secondarv
With the arrival of Jette, the Pi-
rates adopt a more secondary-ori-
ented defensive philosophy that will
hopefully put a stop to opponents
bringing air assaults to the Ficklen
skies like those that befuddled the
Pirate defense last season. Chuck
Pagano, the outside linebacker coach
from last season, will assist Jette in
bolstering the Pirate secondary.
Jette will need that assistance as
he will field a young corp of defen-
sive backs that are probably feeling
the most pressure of any group of
players on the team.
Daren Hart, an All-South Inde-
pendent selection and a second-team
Freshman All-American, will start at
strong safety. Twin brother David is
locked in a battle with fellow sopho-
more Dwight Henry for the free safety
position.
Hank Cooper returns to the de-
fense at right cornerback and is
thought of by the Pirate coaches as
the best open-field tackier on the
squad.
Emmanuel McDaniel is the
probable starter at the left comer
and coaches will expect a lot from
him.
These players and their back-
ups must improve significantly if
the Pirate defense is to finish in the
Top 30, a goal Steve Logan has set for
the squad.
DEFENSE-Linebackers
This group of players was a
high point in the Pirate defense last
year and was a considerable factor
in the Pirates' success against the
run.
If the linebackers perform like
last season they could make yard-
age a difficult thing to come by.
Willie Brookins could be a force
to be reckoned with at outside line-
backer.
A lot will be expected from this
senior and junior Morris Foremanat
this position.
Junior Mark Libiano will pro-
See PIRATEpage 17
Logan ready to unleash secret weapon
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
the
Imagine playing in
shadow of a player 5-foot-6.
Jerris McPhail, one-half of the
J-Crew" running back duo of
head coach Steve Logan's Pirate
football team, is comfortable be-
ing the secret weapon in the ECU
offensive attack. Playing back-up
to Ail-American candidate Junior
Smith is a role that he does not take
lightly.
"Right now, teams are going
into games just concentrating on
Junior, which makes it a lot easier
for me McPhail said. "That's a
motivational factor for me, because
I want to take the ball and show
them what I can do also
It's very probable that McPhail
won't be much of a secret weapon
for much longer, especially to the
teams he wreaked havoc on last
year. Possibly the best athlete on
the football team, thisClinton, N.C.
native led all Pirate receivers with
34 catches for 410 yards, while
primarily playing as a running
back.
Last year, while playing in his
sophomore season, McPhail's 56-
yard catch against Louisiana Tech
I
in the fourth quarter was the game
winner for the Pirates. He runs the
40-yard dash in 4.38 seconds, and
possesses a 37-inch vertical leap.
But McPhail still does not let his
athleticism go to his head.
"When I step on the field, I
don't really think about me being
the fastest person there McPhail
said. "Last year, more than any-
thing, I was trying to think about
assignments on the field. This year,
it could be totally different, because
I'm going to know most of my as-
signments and I won't just be going
through the motions
McPhail's assignments last sea-
son were numerous. Not only was
he called in to run the ball, but he
was used by Coach Logan in the
receiver position frequently be-
cause of his speed.
"McPhail will be some receiver,
and more running back this sea-
son. It will be about the reverse of
what he was last year Logan said.
"Last year he was a lot of receiver
and a little bit of running back.
After a lot of film study of last
season, we had about 47 dropped
passes. I think Jerris had about 20 of
them. We came to the conclusion
See MCPHAIL page 18
McPhail
among Pirate
S.TARs on
and off field.
By Jennifer Hunt
Staff Writer
Photo Courtesy of ECU Sports Infromatlon
Junior Jerris McPhail has proven to be a valuable asset
to Coach Logan after his transfer from Mount Olive.
ECU football is not only
about hitting the field and
outscoring opponents.
It is also about the play-
ers' attitudes toward each
other off the field that makes
the difference between suc-
cess and failure.
In the fall, 18 Pirate
gridders will make up the
Football Academic Leader-
ship Team, also known as
S.T.A.R. (Students Taking
Academic Responsibility).
Halfback Jerris McPhail
will be among the players on
ECU's leadership team, serv-
ing as a role model and "big
brother" to incoming fresh-
men and transfers.
McPhail is looking for-
ward to his role in the pro-
gram.
See ST. A JR. page 18
Foreman in
charge of 94
Pirate defense
By A. Wilson
Staff Writer
Outside linebacker: the
first thing that comes to mind,
big plays. Interceptions, sacks,
big hits, tackles for loss. Great
players like Lawrence Taylor,
Derrick Thomas, and Wilber
Marshall. It is definitely a posi-
tion tailor made for an impact
player who makes the big play
consistently. East Carolina has
an outside linebacker and while
he may not be a big name yet, he
definitely makes a big impact on
the Pirate defense. His name is
Morris Foreman.
Foreman isn't the biggest
linebacker (6-1 223) but he gets
the job done with great quick-
ness, anticipation, smarts, and a
hard-hitting style. He seems to
have a special awareness as to
where the play is going before
the ball is snapped. This comes
from a lot of film study of his
opponents and more importantly
and outstanding football back-
ground at Farmville Central HS.
Back in high school Fore-
man was the center of attention
in both football and basketball,
earning four letters in both. In
football, he was All-State twice
and was named State Player of
the Year in two publications'
(Daily Reflector and Wilson Daily
Times). After a post graduate year
at Fork Union Military Academy
Foreman chose ECU over some
heavy recruiting competition ;
Michigan, North Carolina, and
NC State.
Upon arrival at ECU in
1992 he played safety, lettering
as a true freshman and making
29 total tackles and starting two
games. More impressive was the
athletic ability he showed return-
ing kickoffs (11 returns for a 28.7
avg) and taking a few snaps on
offense. At the time Foreman
weighed about 200 lbs but with a
lot of time spent in the weight
room and natural maturation, he
outgrew the position and became
See FOREMAN page 17





16 The East Carolinian
September8, 1994
lime, experience might
do it for Wake Forest
own
ECU line
By Warren Sumner
(AP) � Rebuilding a foot-
ball team takes time, says Wake
forest coach Jim Caldwell, who
; believes there won't be an easy
" game on the schedule this sea-
son.
The Demon Deacons, who
lost their opener last weekend at
Vanderbilt 35-14, play at home
against Division I-AA Appala-
chian State on Saturday.
"Every game is going to be a
challenge for us Caldwell said
Tuesday at his weekly news con-
ference. "Appalachian is no ex-
ception. Somebody will have to
fet me know when we're not an
Underdog
The loss to Vanderbilt con-
tinued a trend of second-half col-
lapses by the Deacons, who lost
their last five games in 1993.
Wake Forest led at halftime in
five of its past six games. The
Deacons were outscored 32-0 in
the second half by the Commo-
dbres.
" The Deacons have plenty of
stamina, but need to get tougher,
Caldwell said, noting that work-
ing on toughness comes with a
price.
' "You practice a bit tougher
rather than work on finesse he
explained. "You pound them
during the course of the week,
and you're going to end up with
some injuries. If you don't pound
them during the course of the
week, you play soft on game day
Running back John Lewis
broke his left ankle against
Vanderbilt and is out for the sea-
son. Offensive lineman Chris
Gaskell is out indefinitely with a
sprained right knee.
Other injuries forced
Caldwell to play nine true fresh-
men and seven redshirt freshmen
against Vanderbilt.
The Demon Deacons have
won two in a row against the
Mountaineers, but ASU defeated
Wake Forest in 1991 at Groves
Stadium.
The Mountaineers started 1-7
last season but won their final
three games. ASU, playing in its
opener, has 15 starters returning,
including running back Chip
Hooks.
Hooks has led the team in
rushing each of the past three sea-
sons and finished with 919 yards
last season.
Caldwell, in his second sea-
son as Wake Forest's coach, isn't
about to change his longterm
plans for rebuilding his team.
"You'll never see me panic
said Caldwell, who was an assis-
tant coach while programs were
rebuilt at Louisville and Colorado.
"I've been in this situation before.
"I'm not the kind of guy that
will make drastic changes he
said. "The only things that are
instant are coffee and tea
Staff Writer
Offensive linemen tradition-
ally receive little to no credit for
their accomplishments. They toil
in anonymity while flashier team-
mates benefit from their hard
work. One ECU offensive line-
man is hard to ignore for several
reasons, not the least of which is
his size.
Ron Suddith stands 6-2 and
weighs in at 297 pounds. A Mi-
ami, Florida, native, he emerged
last season as a dominant force at
right tackle. As a redshirt fresh-
man, Suddith did not allow a
single sack despite facing stiff
competition (Syracuse, Washing-
ton, South Carolina, Va. Tech,
etc.). Suddith bench presses 415
pounds, second best on the squad,
but it is a combination of strength,
foot work, technique and attitude
that makes him stand out.
Surprisingly, Ronnie credits
another sport with laying the
foundation for his gridiron suc-
cess: Wrestling. He lettered three
years and had a 60-5 record, win-
ing the Greater Miami District
Wrestling Championship, and
finished second in the state tour-
nament as a senior. "It helped
me to develop coordination, con-
ditioning, discipline and mental
focus Suddith said. "Wrestling
is a one-on-one sport, unlike foot-
ball where your have ten other
guys. You really have to concen-
trate in order to be successful
On the field, Suddith lettered
three times and was twice named
to the All-Dade County team. As
a senior, he made All-State and
was selected for the prestigious
Florida North-South All-Star
Game. This resulted in becom-
ing highly sought-after by sev-
eral schools, taking official visits
to Miami, Florida, Tennessee,
Auburn, and Central Florida.
What gave ECU secondary coach
Chuck Pagano the chance to sign
Suddith was his patience in wait-
ing for Suddith to fulfill his aca-
demic requirements.
"I feel I made the right deci-
sion by coming to ECU Suddith
said, looking back on the recruit-
ing experience. "ECU waited on
my test scores and that really
showed me that they were defi-
nitely interested in me playing
football. I can honestly say that I
don't have any regrets about my
decision. ECU is definitely on the
verge of becoming a powerhouse
in the next few years
Suddith sets high individual
goals wanting to become a con-
sensus Ail-American and even-
tually play in the NFL. Several
publications think that these
goals are not far from his reach.
lindy's ACC Football staff
writer John Hadley named his to
Tomorrow's Stars in its 1994 an-
nual, and the Sporting News Col-
lege Football Yearbook named him
to its All-Underexposed team.
A.J. Carr of the Raleigh News &
Observer also feels that Ronnie is
a definite all-star candidate.
"We hope to achieve another
thousand yard rushing season for
Junior Smith and protect
Marcus Crandell form injury
Suddith said about unit and team
goals. "If we can do that, then I
feel we should have a great shot
at going to the Liberty Bowl
Suddith still feels that he could
improve his conditioning, tech-
nique and run-blocking and
credits Line coach Jeff
Jagodzinski with helping him be-
come the player he is.
We closed the interview with
a few general questions. When
asked how he likes blocking for
Smith he replied: "Junior is the
type of back you really like block-
ing for.
He runs hard, follows blocks
well and always makes positive
yardage The toughest player
he says that he has had to play
against was former Cincinnati
linebacker Nate Dingle, because
of his combination of speed and
strength.
His hobbies and interests
center on video games, espe-
cially BUI Walsh's College Foot-
ball and Super Tecmo Bowl.
Looking towards the Duke
game,
Ronnie had this to say:
"Duke looks like a very good
team, and it will be a good test
for us in our first game
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September 8, 1994
The East Carolinian 17
PIRATE
Continued from page 15
vide a solid middle at inside line-
backer. Libiano will be an on-field
leader for the defense with his great
nose for being around the football
BJ. Crane will also be a factor at the
"mike" linebacker.
DEFENSE-Line
Line coach Cliff Yoshida will
field the biggest defensive line ECU
has had in manv years when the
Pirates take the field against Duke
on Sept. 10. Walter Scott returns to
action after sitting out last season
with a knee injury.
The tackle will provide valu-
able experience and size to the line.
John Kra wczyk, a senior will start at
nose tackle and Ls quick and strong.
Lorenzo West drew the lot of filling
the shoes of Bernard Carter at de-
fensiveend. Thesophomore racked
up seven tackles in the Pirates' con-
test against Kentucky.
OFFENSE-Line'
Offensive line coach Jeff
Jagodmski fields the most experi-
enced groupof plaverson the team.
Three seniors and two sophomores
are likely starters. Senior Terry
Tilghman will anchor the line at cen-
ter after returning from a medical
redshirt year.
Tilghman fell to a shoulder in-
jury in the Pirates' game against
Washington and will be the leader
for the Line. At right tackle, next to
Tilghman will be 292-lb. RonSuddith.
Kevin Wiggins will man one of the
guard slots, and Ken Carroll will
start at left tackle.
OFFENSE - Running Backs
A small stick of dynamite makes
a lot of noise. So does 5-foot-6
Heisman Trophy candidate Junior
Smith. The senior needs just 348 yards
to become ECU'S all-time leading
rusher and is back for the new season
as the NCAA's second leading re-
turning rusher.
Halfback Jerris McPhail will see
plenty of action as well. Last season,
McPhail did his damage primarily
as a receiver, where he had 34 catches
for 410 yards and four touchdowns.
Juniors Derrick Batson and Eric
Blanton will also be seen in the Pirate
ii ii i ii ii A ii ii a
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backfield in 1994, along with fresh-
man John Peacock and senior Damon
Wilson. All-around speed is a big
plus in the Pirate running game.
OFFENSE t Wide receivers
New receivers coach Doug Mar-
tin has a relatively fresh batch of
wideouts to work with, and the
buzzword here is "potential Two
redshirt freshman have been given
startingnods�flanker Jason Nichols
and split end Linwood DeBrew.
Nichols will be pushed hard by
JUCO transfer Ben Fossey and sopho-
more Mitch Galloway, while sopho-
more Allen Williams looks to regain
his starting position from DeBrew.
Although they are listed as backups,
these three will see plenty of action
for Coach Logan and staff.
OFFENSE - Quarterbacks
Marcus Crandell is back at full
strength after suffering a season-end -
ing leg injury in Week 2 of last sea-
son. He is loaded with potential, but
only has one-and-a-half games of
college football under his belt. How-
ever, this is Crandell's third year in
the program and he knows it well.
ChrisHesterstarted three games
after Crandell was injured, but suf-
fered a broken thumb against South
Carolina and missed the last six
games of the season. He will be wait-
ing in the wings if Crandell should
falter or be injured.
SPECIAL TEAMS
Chad Holcomb returns for his
sophomore season, and will handle
the placekicking duties for the Pi-
Thursdav
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rates. Last year, Holcomb made 8 of
13 field goals, and coaches say that he
has improved can his accuracy dur-
ing the offseason.
Freshman Matt Levineenters the
1994 campaign as the punter. He has
had a great fall after averaging 45.1
yards per kick during high school.
Ed Crabtree will back up Levine.
Last year Crabtree started against
Cincinnati in the season finale, aver-
aging 39.8 yards on five punts.
Sophomore Brian Williams will
handle all snaps for field goals and
extra points this season.
Galloway and Nichols, both Pi-
rates wideouts, will handle punt and
kick returns in '94. Last year. Gallo-
way averaged 21.8 yards per kickoff
returns, tops on the team.
ANALYSIS
All in all, Coach Logan has
brought Pirate football into a brand-
new phase.
Last year, ECU had too many
people hurt and were too young and
too inexperienced to compete week
in and week out against a tough
schedule
Now, everybody's healthy, and
the memory of that 2-9 season is
branded in each players' mind.
Coach Logan and Iris staff will
have the Pirates poised and ready to
play with confidence each Saturday,
and since virtually every game on
the schedule is a toss-up, shouts of
"We Believe might echo through
the stands of Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium.
MO
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an outside linebacker.
Last season Foreman
started eight games at "Willie" or
weakside linebacker. He has a lot
of responsibilities' as far as run
support, pass coverage, and blitz-
ing the quarterback. Foreman took
to his new position very well ring-
ing up 71 tackles with 45 solos. He
averaged nearly 9 tackles per
game. Tackles are important, but
big plays are what Foreman is
becoming know for. He had
plenty of them with four tackles
for loss, 1 sack, two fumble recov-
eries, and two interceptions. His
unique background as a quarter-
back and a safety allows him to
pick up quickly on offensive game
plans especially the passing game,
a definite advantage for an out-
side linebacker. Unfortunately,
this potentially great season at his
new position was cut short by a
broken thumb, forcing him to miss
the last three games.
With a year under his belt
and a strong showing in spring
practice Foreman is gaining the
confidence in new ECU Defen-
sive Coordinator, Paul Jette. He
was quoted in Lindy's ACC Foot-
ball Preview commenting on
Foreman's importance to the Pi-
rate defensive scheme; "Morris is
a guy with a great feel for the
game, has natural instincts, is a
play maker. He's an integral part
of what we do
This confidence and added
strength and speed developed in
the offseason should propel him
towards a big season and hopefull
keep him injury free. Foreman can
bench press 330 lbs and runs a 4.7
in the 40 yd. dash. He definitely
seems intent on taking his game
to a new level. He said this about
the his expectations for the new
season; "The defense feels it has
something to prove this year. I
enjoy being in the middle of the
action. I can play the run and the
pass now. It's not as one-dimen-
sional
One-dimensional is defi-
nitely not the word to describe
Foreman or HM All-American
teammate Mark Libiano, and
soph, standout B.j. Crane. The trio
should compose the strength of
the defense. For ECU to play well
and go to the Liberty Bowl it will
take another great season from all
three of them. Morris Foreman is
starting to make a name for him-
self and with another strong
showing combined with a win-
ning season for the Pirates, All-
American recognition may very
well be within his grasp.
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Missing
pro bowler
found in
cheap hotel
(AP) � Former Pro Bowl
guard Carlton Haselrig of the
Pittsburgh Steelers appeared
to be in good health and good
spirits when he was located
in a budget motel, police said.
Haselrig was found Tues-
day in a motel in suburban
Kennedy Township after po-
lice were tipped that he was
staying there. His wife, Sarah
Haselrig of Monroeville, had
asked for help in finding her
husband.
He agreed to meet with
his wife after he was discov-
ered, police said.
Haselrig, a former NCAA
wrestling champion, left the
Steelers' training camp Aug.
15 without explanation. He
was later placed on the re-
serve-left camp list and can-
not be reactivated this sea-
son.
Until Tuesday, the last
previous time Haselrig was
seden was Aug. 18, when po-
lice, a bartender and bar pa-
trons said Haselrig punched
out the window of his vehicle
after locking his keys in the
car in East Liverpool, Ohio.
Coach Bill Cowher said
Tuesday he hasn't seen
Haselrig since the Steelers-
Raiders exhibition on Aug. 13.
Haselrig d .n't play because
of a wrist injury, but he
watched the game from the
Steelers' sideline.
"It's sad Cowher said
"I hope he's healthy and he
gets reunited with his family
and Carlton can get all of his
problems worked out
By leaving camp, Haselrig
walked away from a contract
that would have paid him
more than 5800,000 this sea-
son. �
Haselrig, 28, was a three-
time NCAA Division I and
three-time Division I heavy-
weight wrestling champion at
University of Pittsburgh-
Johnstown, which does not
have a football team. But after
an impressive tryout, the
Steelers made him a 12th-
round pick in the 1989 draft.
Haselrig made the Pro
- Bowl in 1992, just two years
after his conversion from a
defensive lineman.
But Haselrig twice spent"
time in drug and alcohol treat-
ment centers last year, includ-
ing a four-week stay during
the regular season. After
Haselrig skipped the Steelers'
entire offseason conditioning
program last winter, they
signed free agent Todd Kalis
as a possible replacement.
Cowher wouldn't say if
the Steelers would consider
taking Haselrig back if he gets
his life together.
"That's too far down the
road he said.
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18 The East Carolinian
September8, 1994
MCPHAIL
Continued from page 15
that he's a talent that we need to
exploit,and we're going to hand the
kid the football and just say go
This move is well received by
McPhail.
"Sometimes lastyear, Ifeltthat
a couple games I'd go through a
whole game getting one carry, and
then catching two passes he said.
"I wouldn't say that was wrong on
coach Logan's part, but I just feel
that I can help the team a lot more
if I have the ball in my hands. I
really prefer the hand-off because
its a guarantee that you got the
ball
The fact that McPhail is as
multi-talented as he is provides
ECU football withyetanotherposi-
tive asset in helping the program
rebuild.
"If we don't give up the big
plays this year, I think we will win a
majority of our games McPhail
said. "Rightnow on defense, I think
we have one of the best front lines in
the nation, along with a pretty good
set of linebackers . We just need to
work on our secondary.
"On offense, I think our receiv-
ers need to catch the ball, and we
need to protect the ball he said. "I
think we have a lot more intensity
because everybody is looking for-
ward to a bowl
"Right now, we should work
towards building a good program
to get the respect that we deserve
McPhail said. "For instance, in the
Heisman race, you got players that
are coming from schools with big
names, then we got Junior Smith.
Well I think Junior is just as good as
any of those guys, but since he's at
East Carolina, that's not helping us.
Sowejustgottoputournameout
Like everybody else involved
in the ECU football program,
McPhail feels going to the Liberty
Bowl is a great way to get that done.
"We're looking forward to win-
ning 11 games, but things are much
more in perspective now. Now we
can win six games, and as long as we
beat out the other teams in the race
for the Liberty Bowl, we can go to
the Liberty Bowl
S.T.A.R.
Continued from page 15
MUCH. MUCH MURE IN STURE FUR 'U4
HIDDEH CLOSET, INC.
Now aaaer mw ownarslip ami miiimmiL
�eS
MtmMtaa dM high
1. Burchi
tan
2.
3.
and
121
is
S
Cine by aatf check Ht ear arteaa ea all the aew liens we have stocked for
Fall aaa ear clearance Hens. We have last resolve ear first Ma statement
ef �S. ee cease ay see see as at
"The new players will look
at us as good players who work
hard both in and out of the class-
room. They will see that they can
succeed,too.
McPhail wants to pursue a
career in Criminal Justice, possi-
bly in corrections or as a proba-
tion officer "to keep younger kids
straight
"The players on the leader-
ship team were selected based
on their leadership qualities both
on and off of the field and their
commitment to graduation said
Pam Overton, ECU's assistant
athletic director for student de-
velopment.
Last season was McPhail's
first season with ECU after trans-
ferring from Mount Olive and
Wake Forest.
He was excited about play-
ing ECU football after one year
of sitting out because of the trans-
fer. McPhail views last season as
a learning experience.
"I was very nervous to play
my first college football game
starting against Syracuse he
said.
"In high school, I only lost a
total of five games in four years,
then at ECU I lost five in five
weeks. Last year was a learning
experience
McPhail has two more sea-
sons of eligibility after this one.
However, the 1994 season will be
Junior Smith's last. Therefore, the
expectations and pressure to take
over could rise for him in the
future.
"There will be no pressure
on me he said. "Fans will try,
but I'm just going to go out and
play my role. However, it
Smith's departure will be like
losing a close friend and brother
McPhail also believes .that
joining a conference is in ECU's
best interest.
The Pirates have spent this
past summer trying to join either
the Metro, the Midwest or a su-
per conference.
McPhail believes that with-
out ECU in a conference, the
players suffer.
"They receive no publicity,
which hurts the potential of our
gifted players McPhail said. "It
doesn' t ma tter to me, which con-
ference as long as we are in one
McPhail is ready for the
'94 season opener at Duke. "I
feel totally different this season
compared to last season he said.
"This season is like a revenge
season, and I'm aware of what
can happen on the field. Last
year, I was intimidated by Syra-
cuse and other teams. We're just
as good as anybody that can stand
upon the field
ant varsity
OB I
enCl
arista
I. lac.
Sanaa t.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S
STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR A
DAY-STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
FOR THE 1994-95 TERM
RESPONSIBILITIES: Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
QUALIFICATIONS: � Full time Student
� Resides Off Campus
� Independent
.J

DEADLINE TO APPLY: WEDNESDAY, SEPT If
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT
UNION OFFICE - ROOM 236 MENDENHALL
HTONIGHTH
EVERY THURSDAY
BLOCK PARTY
FREE COVER TILL 9:00PM
DOLLAR NITE
AM Bars
MNCi- 8fLUARD$ ROCK H ROU
Sports
Pat
Sports Pad
DOWNTOWN
18 & OVER
Sharky's
Come into any club entrance Thursdy and
feel free to roam from club to club!
FREE MEMBERSHIPS
THURSDAY SEPT 8th
SCOTT MUELLER
FRIDAY SEPT. 9th
SCOTT MUELLER
SATURDAY SEPT. 10th
SCOTT MUELLER





Title
The East Carolinian, September 8, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 08, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1024
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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