The East Carolinian, August 24, 1994






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Satire Rages
Eakin pays off squirrels
Chancellor Richard Eaklin admits
to diverting funds to radical
left-wing terrorists known as the
Purple Thursdays. See page 16
for satirical details.
The East Carolinian
welcomes back
students, faculty
end staff.
Tiis.sifrt'ris
Buy, sell and trade
Looking for a job? Need a roomate?
Wanna sell your mountain bike or
that worn out fouton? Put it on
The East Carolinian classifieds
page. Check out page 13.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 39
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, August 24,1994
44 Pages
SGA experiences a successful summer
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
SGA President Ian Eastman
and his newly appointed cabinet
probably do not feel like they had
much of a summer, as they were
busy at work helping the univer-
sity.
Early in the summer,
Eastman told The East Carolinian
that he had several primary goals
for the summer. The hard work of
the SGA members paid off as ev-
ery goal was achieved.
"We accomplished every-
thing that we wanted to during the
summer Eastman said.
Students will no longer have
to worry abou t ho w they a re going
to pay their tuition bills which al-
ways seem to come at the wrong
time of the month. Now, students
can pay their bills, including room
and board if applicable, in install-
ments spread out over the year.
Unfortunately, it may be too late in
coming for some students.
"The tuition payment plan
will be going into effect in the fall
of '95 Eastman said.
The SGA executive staff trav-
eled to UNC-Wilmington Aug. 18
and 19 to discuss the pros and cons
of the system with university offi-
cials. UNC-W currently employs
the payment plan.
Another project which
Eastman says is almost accom-
plished, is the establishment of a
24-hour study hall during exam
periods. Students will be able to
study in areas such as Mendenhall
all night long. At the time of the
interview, Eastman said he was
waiting to talk to Director of Din-
ing Services Frank Salamon, to dis-
cuss food services during the study
hall.
For the night owls of the uni-
versity, SGA is trying to expand
the hours of the library past the
current midnight closing time.
"We are currently in the pro-
cess of seeing if we can extend the
library's hours until somewhere
around 3 a.m Eastman said.
Additionally, Eastman says
he hopes that the hours of the com-
puter labs in General Classroom
and Austin will also be extended.
Eastman and university offi-
cials such as Chancellor Eakin and
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Busi-
ness Affairs George Harrell met at
night to make a walking tour of the
See SGA page 12
M
1994 SGA CABI
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
CO-CHIEF OF STAFF
CO-CHIEF OF STAFF
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
4 Positions remain unfilled.
IAN EASTMAN i
SHEILA BOSWELL
DAVID REID
CHRIS MUNLEY
DEAN BROWN
SGA office�328-4726
Dining services revised
By Stephanie Lassiter
Photo by Leslie Petty
Todd Dining Hall, located on College Hill, opened June 6. Situated in a scenic wooded area, Todd
features a pavilion style seating arrangement, exclusive seating and banquet facilities.
Public Safety cracking down
News Editor
College Hill residents recently
lost their grassy knoll, sunbathing
haven and tennis courts, but the
exchange may ha ve been worth the
sacrifice. Todd Dining Hall, a state-
of-the-art dining facility, opened its
doors on June 6, after a 19-month
construction period.
During a luncheon held for
members of the press, Frank
Salamon, director of Dining Ser-
vices, led the group of reporters
and distinguished university offi-
cials around the 35,400-square-foot
facility.
"You decide what you want
to eat and where you want to go
he said.
Todd opened just in time for
orientation, as well as both summer
sessions, and so far there have only
been positive responses from both
students and parents, Salamon said.
"Todd HaU will allow us to
Teri Howell
Staff Writer
have an expanded variety of food
with different stations in the ser-
vice court that specialize in their
own unique menu Salamon said
during an interview.
The new dining hall provides
a rotating circle of foods that in-
cludes a delicatessen, where sand-
wiches of choice can be made, a
pasta section that serves fresh hot
pasta, and a grilling area that spe-
cializes in burgers and other fast
f ood i terns. There is also a self-serv-
ing area with soups and salads,
breads and bagels, frozen yogurt,
ice cream and a wide choice of bev-
erages.
"I like the new hall because
there is no tray activity or messy
beverage problems Salamon said.
"The dining space is truly dedi-
cated to dining and this complete
separation of food from the dining
area is very beneficial
The layout of the dining
hall is in a circular fashion, there-
fore there is noconfusionbetween
tray drop-off and the food-serv-
ing areas.
Todd Hall, which was cre-
ated to complement the older
structures on campus is located
in a wooded area, upon College
Hill. The building iscomposed of
brick and glass, with a red roof
tiles, copper gutters and window
trim.
"We have created what I'm
calling a 'modified food court'
concept Salamon said at a re-
cent press luncheon held in the
facility.
Todd seats 650 people
throughout the eight or nine dif-
ferent seating areas, including
booths, private tables and an
atrium area surrounded on three
sides by trees.
"In the private spaces
See DINING page 11
By Maureen Rich
Managing Editor
ECU'S Public Safety de-
partment wants students, faculty
and staff to know and under-
stand just what the department
is here to do. With expanding
patrol units and new faces in the
department, Public Safety's ca-
pabilities are rapidly growing,
but they need the cooperation
and consideration of the cam-
pus community.
"Our responsibility here is
to maintain a safe and pleasant
environment in which to learn
said Director and Chief of Pub-
lic safety Teresa Crocker. "We
are here to enforce the laws of
the state of North Carolina as
well as the policies and sanc-
tions of the university
Police officers in the Public
Safety department have the
power to arrest, and are trained
in basic law enforcement, just
like any police officers in North
Carolina, Crocker said.
Public Safety operates 24
hours a day, and is made up of
officers on foot patrol, bike pa-
trol and in vehicles. The officers
have assigned zones, and there
are usually at least four, but usu-
ally five, officers on duty at one
time for the whole campus.
"We've just hired six new
officers and we'll probably be
hiring more in the fall Crocker
said. Right now, Public Safety is
looking for reserves officers �
students, either undergraduate
See PUBLIC SAFETY page 10
jfc- MINE DK THE '908 HOW IT IS AFFECTING ECU
Information Provided bv ECU Public Safety Graph bv SteDranie Lassiter
CRIME1990199119921993
Aggravated Assault12161511
Drug Possession23183137 ,
DWI45482657
Murder0000
Rape0000
Robbery1603
Weapons5181827

IP w 1 ail B�iEakin speaks! Chancellor Eakin addresses a group of reporters during the first annual "Media Day" held in Todd Dining Hall. Bruce Flye, facilities services director, outlined future construction plans. Photo by Leslie Petty

GVille survives a long and eventful summer
By Teri Howell
Staff Writer
For those students who were
able to get away this summer,
maybe to the beach, some far-off
exotic location or even home, they
missed the excitement of Green-
ville in the summer. Graduates par-
ticipated in the annual commence-
ment, buildings were renovated
and violent storms raged across
eastern North Carolina. Although
it was a hot and humid summer, it
was not a dull one.
May 18 � Approximately
2,100 ECU graduates marched
across theFicklenstadium field clad
in black robes. Bubbles floated
through the air as Daniel Schorr, a
well known journalist, gave the
commencement speech on the years
he devoted to journalism.
May 25 � Umstead and Slay
residence halls began renovations,
incl uding new plumbing, electrical
wiring and hall carpeting. All rooms
will have air conditioning, and new
desks and beds. Emmanuele
Amaro, director of Housing, said
that in the future the two buildings
will be connected, but until then
they remain separated by a court-
yard.
June 1 � On May 6, ECU
Board of Trustees approved a $97
increase in student fees. The in-
crease includes $40 for the Minges
Coliseum renovation, $35 for ath-
letic programs, $16 will go towards
Rec center staffing and programs,
$4 to transit services and $1 to both
the fine arts program and the Stu-
dent Fund Acting Office (SFAO).
June8�Newly elected SGA
president Ian Eastman was busy
this summer making plans for a
prtxiuctiveupcomingyearatECU.
Eastman hopes to set up funds for a
tutorial service, the Student Sup-
port Service, as well as beginning a
payment plan that will allow stu-
dents to pay their tuition every few
months. Eastman says he is looking
to better ECU's reputation.
June 15 � NCSU is renovat-
ingCarter-Finley as ECU renovates
Mingescoliseum, however, thecity
of RaleighWake County and the
Student Aid Foundation are pro-
viding the funds necessary for a
23,000 seat complex near Carter-
Finley. The NCSU arena will total
around $70 million, while the
Minges renovation project will cost
$11.4 million, with $8.9 million
stemming from student fees.
June 22�The medical school
at rCU received a grant funded by
th Robert Wood Johnson Founda-
tion (RVVJ) which could allow the
student health center to provide
quicker and more efficient service
to students. RVVJ pledged ECU's
medical school a total of $1.35 mil-
lion for the first three-year-phase.
ECU also hopes to persuade more
graduates to practice medicine A
certain undeserved areas.
June 29�Tornadoes touched
down on southeastern Craven
County, while the major damage
was reported in Lenoir County, near
Kinston. Clifton Holloway, 67, was
killed during the storm when the
See SUMMER page 11
Long lines,
new rules
await
students
By Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Every institution must
establish rules to run effec-
tively. ECU is no exception,
which can be seen in changes
made to parking, dropadd
procedures and dorm visi-
tation policies.
This fall, parking is
more difficult than usual
because of the lack of park-
ing spaces on campus. This
situation is probably even
more difficult for freshmen
who are learning the cam-
pus for the first time.
"Parking will be very
critical in the fall said Pat
Gertz, director of Parking
and Traffic Services.
All ECU parking and
traffic rules have been en-
forced since the first day stu-
dents moved into the dorms,
and freshmen and commut-
ing students have especially
needed to use the shuttle
buses.
Freslimen with valid
parking permits are allowed
to park in the following three
locations: the Fourth and
Reade Street lot which has
120 spaces, the Third and
Reade Street lot which has
350 spaces, and the Curry
See RULES page 9





�jtfi'wMMliPurrtMi'ii �'����
2 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
ECU awaits the end of construction and repairs
August 12
Fifth and Reade Streets � A non-student was transported
from the Fifth and Reade Street lot to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital and found to be suffering from a concussion and
possible internal injuries after being assaulted by several
subjects. Suspects eluded Greenville Police.
Fifth and Reade Streets � A non-student was arrested in the
Fifth and Reade lot for refusing to leave ECU property when
officers were attempting to disperse a crowd.
August 13
Ficklen Stadium � A spectator at the high school football
games in Ficklen Stadium reported the larceny of her purse
from Ficklen Stadium.
August 14
Fifth and Reade Streets � A non-student was arrested for
driving while intoxicated in the Fifth and Reade Streets park-
ing lot.
East Tenth Street � A non-student was arrested for driving
while intoxicated on East Tenth Street.
August 15
Brody Building�A staff member reported the larceny of his
parking decal from an office at the Brody Building.
Brody Building � A non-student was arrested for second
degree trespassing at the Brody Building.
August 17
White Hall�A worker for Terry Hoor Designs who had been
drinking wanted to sleep in White Hall. The worker was told
to leave the building.
Belk Hall�A resident of Belk Hall reported the breaking and
entering of his unlocked room. The student's wallet was taken
from the room.
August 18
Student Publications Building � An East Carolinian staff
member reported the larceny of advertisements by a former
employee. The case is under further investigation.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from official ECU
Public Safety records.
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
While ECU alumni and
friends are generously donating
money to the Shared Visions cam-
paign, North Carolina taxpayers
are helping renovate the re-
nowned Carolina Inn in Chapel
Hill.
Recently, the Carolina Inn
has shut its doors to renovate and
expand its facilities, while ECU is
continuing to raise money inde-
pendently for upgrades in current
structures, such as Joy ner Library,
the Leo Jenkins Cancer Center and
a Diabetes Center.
These renovations are just a
part of the Capital Improvement
Projects currently taking place at
ECU. At the First Annual Media
Day, held July 27 in Todd Dining
Hall, Director of Facilities Plan-
ning Bruce Flye addressed the
group of reporters, photographers
and media specialists on the cur-
rent status of projects, such as the
library expansion.
Todd Dining Hall, a $6 mil-
lion project, was completed in the
spring and opened on June 6. Todd
seats over 600 diners and it situ-
ated on College Hill which houses
2,400 students in five residence
halls. Todd Dining Hall was
named for the late Richard Cecil
Todd and his wife Clauda Pennock
Todd. Dr. Todd retired in 1977
after 27 years as a history profes-
sor. Additionally, the Todds pro-
vided ECU with schlorships, fel-
lowships and financial aid pro-
grams, as well as a $lmillion en-
dowment.
Special multi-purpose
rooms in Todd will host athletic
teams and other special functions.
The dining hall is self-supporting,
proceeds from the sale of food will
pay for the facility's cost.
The Joyner Library expan-
sion began in early May, with a
groundbreaking ceremony May 6.
The project includes an addition
of 164,000 square feet, as well as
modifications to the pre-existing
structure. The entire project bill
totals $30 million and will take
three and a half years to complete.
The addition will be completed in
two years.
The funds used for the Joyner
additions and renovations were
awarded from a bond referendum
voted on in November. Once com-
pleted, the front of Joyner, which
will be moved to the Tenth Street
side, will be a gateway with a so-
phisticated water sculpture.
During renovation, there
will be a "move-in" period where
library services are shifted from
one location to another. Gradu-
ally, the books and other library
components will find their way to
the new portion of the library and
to the renovated sectors.
According to Chancellor
Eakin, the architects of various
campus projects are aiming to pre-
serve the current architecture.
"We believe that some of the
oldest architecture at East Caro-
lina University is some of the best
architecture Eakin said during
the Media Day.
Another major portion of the
Capital Improvements Projects is
the Student Recreation Center,
which began in November and
should be completed in Decem-
ber of 1995. The 150,000 square
feet facility will house indoor and
outdoor pools, six basketball
courts, tennis courts and a state-
of-the-art weight training center.
The Rec Center will be lo-
cated on three and a half acres
west of Mendenhall. The total bill
for the Rec center is $17,976,200.
ECU Alumni have been re-
ceiving donation cards to pledge
money for the Cupola project. The
old cupola from the old Austin
Building will be recreated to twice
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its original size and placed out-
side the Rec center. According to
Flye, this is a gift project funded
by donations. Donors who give a
high enough sum of money can
have a brick with an inscription
placed in the cupola.
Although Minges Coliseum
appears to be "gutted-out reno-
vations are expected to be com-
pleted by the opening basketball
game.
"We are terribly excited
about the new programs we are
putting in place Eakin said.
The Minges renovations,
which totaled $11,400,000, were
partially funded from the state.
Other money came from private
donations and student fees. After
completion, William's arena will
be totally reconfigured, adding
1,500 seats, as well as air condi-
tioning and a new playing floor.
"Minges is no longer under
de-struction Flye said. "Now it
is under construction. It will be a
first-class facility
Slay and Umstead residence
halls, built in the 50s, will also be
receiving a much needed face-lift.
The barracks-type facility will be-
come a much more accommodat-
ing setting with air-conditioning.
The project will cost $6 million
and should be completed by next
May. The two buildings will be
joined by a 10,000 square foot ac-
tivities building.
"Another project that you
can not see is the $13 million
fiber optics project Flye said.
The first phase of the
project, which began in the
spring, is mostly complete. The
system will provide a completely
new network for voice, data and
video. As a result, telephone pre-
fixes on camp us have all changed
to 328 (ECU).
College students need to
eat; therefore, the Wright Place
is due for an expansion. A sun-
lit space with accommodations
for 100 will be added, as well as
a grill and a student outdoor
plaza. The current asphalt drive
in front of the Wright Place will
be replaced with a sidewalk-type
paving with no vehicle access.
Other campus projects in-
clude the Life Sciences Expan-
sion, which will contain addi-
tional space for animals, and a
research facility. After additional
funds are received, further de-
signing will continue. The ex-
pansion will cost $12 million.
The Brody Clinics are also
being renovated to provide a pa-
tient-friendly atmosphere for
outpatients. The clinic renova-
tions will cost a little over $2
million, and should be com-
pleted late this year.
Other small projects bring
the constructionrenovation
project total to $120 million.
REMINDER
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August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Career Services aims to help ease the pain of job hunting
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
Four years may seem like
an eternity when entering col-
lege as a freshman, but as many
people have found out, time
runs out quickly, especially
when the end result is joining
the work force. Starting your
career exploration early can help
ease the anxiety when gradua-
tion approaches and the finan-
cial aid bill collectors come
knocking on doors.
Career Services, located in
Bloxton House, is designed to
"facilitate career development
for students and alumni by pro-
viding career-related educa-
tional opportunities and ser-
vices says their brochure.
Bloxton House is located next to
Greene Hall, across from
Mendenhall. During their senior
year, students may register with
career services, and are encour-
aged to attend seminars on re-
sume' writing and interviewing
skills. Once Career Services has
received the necessary informa-
tion from the student, the
student's resume's and creden-
tials are given to employers
upon request.
It may seem as though the
service is basic, but when deal-
ing with nearly 400 employers,
things can begin to get confused,
crowded and cramped. Within
the next year, the Career Ser-
vices office will be relocated to
the old Human Resources House
at 701 E. Fifth Street. Currently,
members of the Career Services
staff are working to make infor-
mation more accessible to both
the student and the employer
who may seek knowledge.
Many students believe
they have plenty of time to waste
before they need to go to Career
Services. According to Dr. James
Westmoreland, director of Ca-
reer Services, career exploration
should begin as soon as the stu-
dent enters college.
"We want freshmen to ex-
plore career possibilities as early
as possible he said.
During a student's first
year, they should demonstrate
good academic performance,
Westmoreland said. Once a
student's GPA begins to drop, it
is difficult to bring it back up. It
is easy to lay in bed and not get
up for class, especially when
mom is not hovering over the
bed, but Career Services encour-
ages students to go to class. If
missing a class is necessary, they
advise letting the professor
know in advance. This shows
the professor that the student
actually cares about the class.
Career services also urges
student to get out and meet
people. In the long run, know-
ing people can really be benefi-
cial to a person's professional
career.
"The networking will al-
low job possibilities
Westmoreland said.
During a student's second
year they should begin to choose
majors. This is an ideal time to
learn about potential majors and
find out what is out there,
Westmoreland said. Maybe the
career a student thinks is their
ideal, is not. By joining campus
committees, organizations and
clubs, the student can meet more
people, make more friends and
have more contacts.
According to the four-year
plan suggested by Career Ser-
vices, a sophmos feet are
firmly planted in ECU soil, so
they are probably ready for a
part-time job. Having a job will
even help the parents who are
probably paying the bills. Stop
by the Cooperative Education
(Co-Op) in General Classroom
2300 to learn more about find-
ing a job suitable for your needs
and time schedule.
Once in the junior year, the
student has probably chosen a
major, has some work experi-
ence and is beginning to con-
sider "real job" possibilities. The
student should find out about
clubs that are related to their
major, such as American Mar-
keting Association (AMA) or the
Society for Technical Commu-
nication (STC).
Now that the student has
gotten those dreaded courses,
like Algebra and Biology, out of
the way, they should begin to
enjoy their courses by choosing
courses that interest them, says
the plan. The student will begin
to realize that they can actually
appreciate their professors and
they may want to register for
other courses taught by the same
professor. Research career op-
portunities by discussing career
potentials with alumni in your
department and others in the
field you are studying. Also,
keep track of work experience,
honors and activities and pos-
sible references. Continue to
seek work experience through
Co-Op.
"The opportunity to have
students think about their ca-
reer objectives is critical in their
educational development
Westmoreland said.
September 1 of the
student's senior year, if they are
graduating in December, May
or during the summer, or last
year, is D-day for registering
with Career Services. Addition-
ally, graduate students in their
last year should register at this
time. Although the student can
register at any time during the
year, Westmoreland highly rec-
ommends registering as soon as
possible. Contact Career Ser-
vices to find out when registra-
tion seminars will be held. These
sessions are also announced in
The East Carolinian in the classi-
fied section.
"There are companies who
come in the fall, who don't come
back in the spring hp Sc Id.
Attend a registration ses-
sion to pick up reference forms
and other related information.
After the registration, students
should give ten copies of their
resume to career services to send
to potential employers. The stu-
dent is given three reference
forms whicn should be given to
a person who will give an hon-
est and good recommendation.
The reference forms are either
Confidential or Non-Confiden-
tial. Career Services recom-
mends that students mark the
form Confidential, in which case
the student would not be al-
lowed to see the form. This
shows the reference writer that
the student trusts their judg-
ment and that if they can not
give a good reference they will
tell the student so. Additionally,
this shows employers that the
student feels confident enough
about themself that they do not
need to see the reference form.
If you do not think someone will
give you a positive reference,
do not ask them. The student is
responsible for being certain
that adequate resumes stay on
file at Career Services.
Once registered with Ca-
reer Services, the student will
receive Job Guide, a monthly
newsletter announcing job
openings, interview sessions
and other related information.
Students are also encouraged to
attend resume writing work-
shops to help make their re-
sumes stand-out and contain
pertinent information. Inter-
viewing skills workshops are
also available.
Within the Career Services
office are resource rooms con-
taining information on compa-
nies, government agencies and
other potential employers. Stu-
dents can stop by and look
Photo by Leslie Petty
Career Services is currently located in Bloxton House, across
from Mendenhall and beside Greene residence hall. Within the
year, the office location will change to 701 E. Fifth Street.
through this information.
SIGI-Plus, a computer sys-
tem has been set up to help stu-
dents in the career search. Stu-
dents should schedule a time to
use SIGI through Career Ser-
vices.
"There is a computerSIGI
which one can use to explore
career options and salaries that
one might expect
Westmoreland said.
Orientation sessions will
be held August 30 and 31 at
3:00 p.m. in Mendenhall room
244 and September 1 at 5:00
p.m. in Jenkins Art Building
Auditorium. Students in their
senior year or graduate stu-
dents who will be graduating
in December, May or the sum-
mer are encouraged to attend.
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do than worry about banking. Our College Account includes use of Wachovia ATMs at no charge
and the Wachovia Banking Card with Visa Check (it looks like a credit card but works like a check).
Other features include your own credit card, a savings account, overdraft protection, and get this,
free checking. Stop by your local Wachovia branch to set up a hassle-free College Account. After all,
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4 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
ECU Transit
alleviates
headaches
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
Who needs the hassle of
standing in line at Parking and
Traffic Services, in the boiling
August heat and humidity, to
pay $75 for a sticker that will
get you nothing but a head-
ache every day you drive to
campus and realize that some-
one else beat you to the last
spot? The solution is simple.
Save vour money and ride the
bus; it's free.
With six buses operat-
ing in the Greenville area,
Transit Manager Ryland
Walters believes that the bus
is the way to go.
We are trying to push
the commuter students, who
live locally, to ride the bus
this year Walters said.
This method is free and
it is convenient. The buses
leave campus on the half-hour
from 7:20 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.
There are four bus lines:
brown, gold, purple and the
newest silver line. The gold
lijie runs until 9:00 p.m. each
night, serving the Plaza, Har-
ris Teeter and apartment com-
plexes located in the Plaza
region.
Currently 24 apartment
complexes throughout Green-
ville are being served by the
Transit service. ECU Transit
Operations and Recreational
Services will be working to-
gether to post announcements
and flyers around apartment
communities to inform com-
muters of the bus services.
"It's hard to get in touch
with the students when we
aren't actually in school
� Walters said.
Walters said temporary
bus stop signs will be posted
to let riders know of pick-up
locations. Additionally, the
Greenville streets have been
marked to let the drivers know
where the stops are.
Booths will be set up
around campus during the
first week of school, where
students can pick up informa-
tion on the transit services
such as exact pick-up times
and stop locations.
In the past, the bus ser-
vices have only been avail-
able for students, as the ser-
vices are funded by student
fees. This year, Walters said
that thanks to a small stipend
given to Transit Operations,
the bus service will now be
open to the entire university
community.
"Faculty and staff are
now eligible to ride our
buses he said.
Walters also encouraged
students to purchase a Lim-
ited parking sticker for $30.
The Limited sticker allows the
person to park at the Minges
lot until 4 p.m. and in Univer-
sity registered spaces after 4
p.m. By parking at Minges,
students can take the shuttle
service to campus and avoid
the congestion of typical "on-
campus" parking.
"Commuter shuttle is
going to play a big role this
year Walters said.
In the past, the Minges
lot has been designated for
freshmen, but the freshmen
lot has been relocated to Al-
lied Health to add additional
spaces for commuters. Fresh-
men do not need to worry,
however, because they will
not have to walk from Allied
Health.
"We are extending our
freshmen shuttle service
Walters said.
The commuter shuttle is
available from 7:30 a.m. until
5:30 p.m. It leaves the Minges
parking lot every 10 minutes
until 2:00 p.m. and every 20
minutes thereafter. The
shuttle drops students off at
Christenbury Gym. Two of the
six buses run by the Transit
Service are used for the shuttle
See TRANSIT page 11
Charities help kids IJlilililililililili
V
By Andy Turner
Staff Writer
Th&Ronald McDonald House
and Ronald McDonald Children's
Charities are both organizations that
strive to helpchildren and their fami-
lies; however, the two organizations
remain different in several aspects.
"In a year, over 550 fami-
lies stay at the House in Greenville
said Stephanie Barnard, public rela-
tions director for the Ronald
McDonald House in Greenville,
which opened in 1987.
"The Ronald McDonald
House was formed in 1973 when a
football player named Fred Hill
learned that his daughter had leuke-
mia shesaid. "Henoticed the need
for places for families to stay when
their children were in the hospitaLso
he proposed the idea of building a
house to McDonald's restaurants.
"McDonald's agreed to fund the
house if thev used the McDonald's
name,andthefirsthousewasstarted
in Philadelphia
There are now over 150
Houses around the world. In North
Carolina, houses are located in
Chapel Hill,Durham, Greenville and
Winston-Salem.
"Funding for the houses
come from three sources Barnard
said. "McDonald's supplies 10 per-
cent, room fees supply 10 percent
and the community provides the
3
s
houses with 80 percent of funding
Additional funding comes
from the Luminary Project at Christ-
mas and the Michael Jordan Celeb-
rity Golf Classic, held in the spring.
"There is a $10 room fee,
but some people are not able to pay,
but we never turn anybody away
Barnard said. "Our primary goal is
to provide a home away from home
for seriously ill children
Ronald McDonald
Children's Charities is connected
with the Ronald McDonald House,
but focuses on different programs.
Children Charities was
founded in 1984 in memory of
McDonald's founder Ray Kroc. The
Children's Charities organization
focuses on three main areas: health
care and medical research, educa-
tion and the arts, and civic and social
services.
The organization helps the
Ronald McDonald House wi th fund-
ing, but does not own or operate any
of the houses.
Donations to the Ronald
McDonald House can be sent to
Ronald McDonald House of East-
ern North Carolina, 549 Moye Blvd,
Greenville, North Carolina27858.
"Volunteers are always
needed and students make excellent
volunteers Barnard said.
.Anyone interested in volun-
teering can call Stephanie Barnard at
(919)830-0062.
1
Thursday
Saturday
Tuesday
752-5855 1 10 E. 4th St Downtown
(COME ON IN, THE ALE IS JUST FINE)
Some Great Band,
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MJg N'te (NO MUG, NO BEER)
If it ain't got a handle, It ain't a mug
On Tap: Pete's Wicked Ale, Warsteiner, Bass Ale, Killians Red
and Good Ole Bud
Confucious Say: If you're gonna steal a tip jar you should
A) Make sure the two people behind you don't see you.
B)Look straight over your head al the camera that's caught your ignorant butt on film.
You have until 5:00 pm Aug 25th to come clean, before we contact your parents
( yes we have your nameyour advisers, and last but not least, the police. Love Peasants
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USE IT EVERY TIME YOU MAKE A LONG DISTANCE COLLECT CALL.





August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 5
Cops patrol on bikes
s
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
It seems as though the good
ol' days those before technology,
have returned, as ECU Public Safety
officials have now begun patrolling
on bicycles rather than patrol cars.
Nearly a year has passed since
the patrol officers first took to cam-
pus on two wheels rather than four
last September. Their impact has
been so well received that more
have been hired. Currently, there
are three full-time bicycling patrol
officers, but two more will begin
work in the next several months.
"The bike is just another tool
in police work said Johnnie
U mphlet, one of the bicyclin g squad
members and an ECU alumnus.
Umphlet is joined by Rich
Davis and Brian Powell to comprise
the squad which patrols the cam-
pus on a 24-hour-a-day basis. Cur-
rently, the men patrol the campus
on two shifts 7a.m. until 7p.m. and
7p.m. until7a.m. Soon theshift will
run from 10 a.m. until 4 a.m.
"The 7-7 shift is what every-
one works Davis said. "When we
.have enough coverage of people,
we'll go to 10-4
The squad is equipped with
Trek 8000 bikes with Rock Shocks
on the front, 21 gears, 20-Watt Cat
lights and saddle bags for carrying
various paraphernalia. The tires are
larger than those on ordinary road
and racing bikes, which contributes
to their effectiveness on the terrain.
Each bike cost about $1,200.
Two of the bikes were purchased by
SGA, the other two were bought
using Public Safety budget funds.
Besidesbeingfar lessexpensive than
a patrol car, the bikes have low
maintenance costs and no fuel cost.
So far the bikes have only required
a total of $25 in repair costs.
While the bikes are equipped
with the standard U-bolt locks, the
patrol officers often rely on their
handcuffs to secure their modes of
transportation. Davis says when he
uses the handcuffs as a means of
security, he does not stray far from
his bike.
The cops are responsible for
patrolling the portion of campus
between Allied Health and the
Reade Street property.
"The benefits I've seen is that
I am able to pa trol where no one else
can Davis said. "I can get out and
see and hear things. It's also good
for meeting people
Davis said he would like to
See BIKES page 12
Pain relieverFever reducer
Wcn0US: For the temporary
�w aches and pains associr"
rcmori cold, headache, toot
�a. aches, backache, for the
,mJcr,tls' for the pain of .�,
LramPs, and for reduction of fever.
, Photo Courtesy of Public Safety
flich Davis (left) and Johnnie Umphlet (right) are two of ECU'S
finesrwho are now taking to the streets of campus on bicycles.
SUMMER'S OVER.
Thank goodness there's Advil.� Advanced medicine for pain�
Pick up your free sample at ECU Student Stores.
While supplies las during book rush Advil contains iDuprofen Use only as directed C1994 Whitehall Laboratories. Madson.NJ
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ell
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-� m '
6 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
rfMa
Bald Eagles make a healthy return
By Patrick Hinson
Staff Writer
A classic American symbol is
making a brave recovery in the
skies above our nation, as the
American bald eagle is on its way
back from the brink of extinction in
the U.S.
The eagle's recovery is a ray
ofbrighthopeinanotherwisebleak
atmosphere of declining ecosys-
tems and disappearing animals in
the U.S, and the National Wildlife
Federation is celebrating theeagle's
fight for recovery and recent surges
in population by reclassifying the
animal while continuing to keep a
close eye on its future progress.
"They nest every year, and
the nest can have one to three ea-
glets Irwin said.
This past fourth of July week-
end, America's largest conserva-
tion group, the National Wildlife
Federation, founded in 1936, re-
classified the American bald eagle
from the "endangered" list to
"threatened" in 45 of the lower 48
states. Threatened, endangered
and animals on the brink of extinc-
tion are listed under the Endan-
gered Species Act by the National
Wildlife Federation.
Before the 1800s it was specu-
lated that at least 250,000 nesting
pairs of bald eagles resided in the
lower 48 states of the United States,
and were so common in North
America thatCongressadopted the
bird as our national symbol. How-
ever, by the turn of the next cen-
tury there was a marked decline in
eagle populations, and by the
middle of this century the eagle
populations reached all-time lows.
In 1964, a survey found that the
eagle population had diminished
drastically, with fewer than 500
nesting pairs in all of the lower 48
states, while still rapidly declining.
Causes of the massive eagle
decimation in this country were
varied, with the eagle being as-
saulted from many fronts.
"Human activities can dis-
turb the nesting process so that
breeding may not occur every year,
as it should said Jim Irwin, the
National Wildlife Federation En-
dangered Species Media Consult-
ant.
By the mid 1900s, toxic levels
of pollution in the air and water in
our country were causing massive
deaths in eagles and in the foods
they eat to survive. Contaminants
in the food chain, most notably
DDT, which softens and destroys
the eagle's eggs, were known to be
largely responsible for ecosystem
damage arid eagle deaths. Human
development encroached on eagle
Hey
Freshmen
Remember when you
were here for orientation
and thought'how cool it-
uld be to work for The
L.ast Carolinian News
Department7 Well good
news, were hiring. Call
328-6366 or stop by the
Student Pubs. Bldg.
across from the library and
ask for Stephanie Lassiter.
nesting areas all over the nation,
destroying their homes, whileelec-
trocution from fences and power
lines, poisoning of the eagles
through rodent and fish poison-
ing, and illegal hunting were also
rampant contributing causes of the
eagles loss of survival.
America finally began to take
an interest in saving the eagles by
the early 1980s. Through the ban-
ning of DDT, more severe penal-
ties for illegal hunting, volunteers
working all across the country and
the National Wildlife Federation's
hard work, the eagle has finally
begun to be seen again in the skies
above America.
Bald eagle populations have
increased every year since 1986. At
last count there were nearly 7,500
bald eagles nesting in pairs in the
U.S and many more juvenile
eagles havebeen spotted from coast
to coast than in previous years. The
National Wildlife Federation sup-
ports the reclassificationoftheeagle
everywhere in the United States
except the Southwest, where the
dry climate and human develop-
ment are still pressuring the eagles'
survival.
Eagles are familial animals
and depend on each other for their
survival, especially early in their
lives.
Although eagles may seem
reclusive birds, they usually have
only one mate in their lifetime, and
are fierce protectors of their young.
"Eagles mate for life, but the
male and female usually go their
separate ways during the year
said National Wildlife Federation
senior sdentistSteveTorbit. "They
probably pair-bond for life, but if
one mate dies they try to reestab-
lish mating
Adult plumage is usually the
key to other eagles that they are
sexually mature.
"Eagles are not sexually ma-
ture until they are four or five
years old Torbit said. Reaching
sexual maturity is critical for their
survival and for the survival of
their species.
Wild eagles can be seen
in many areas of the United
States and North Carolina. The
bald eagle is easily distinguish-
able by the white feathers of its
head over the usually dark
brown or black feathers cover-
ing the body. With a little luck,
and the continued participa-
tion and empathy of those who
care about keeping oar na-
tional symbol in the sky, the
proud and majestic bald eagle
will continue to keep the up-
per hand in its hard fight for
survival.
DAPPER
DAN'S
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Now here's why AT&T's and MCFs basic rates start off about
the same. Then, with Friends and Family, MCI advertises 20
off your long distance calls, but�here's the catch�only if
they're to MCI users who are also on your calling circle list. Truth
is, two-thirds of most Friends and Family members' calls aren't
to those selected people. So the average discount you end up
seeing on your bill is only 6 Not the 20 you expected.
AT&T True USA� Savings is a whole lot simpler Spe$d $25
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So take a good look at the chart (you can ask a math: major
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61994TO





frt � .
ifii�iil�tl H - � t
.rit.G"
HfetH
JH RALEIGH (AP) � Environ-
j i mental groups called for the ouster
Bgi �tof a high-level state administrator
fW Wednesday, Aug. 17, saying he is
ni ;$utting deadlines ahead of safety
!�; tfi the rush to build a radioactive
jjo tyaste repository in WakeCounty.
u a.l. Delivering a symbolic "pink
, MSiip opponents of a proposed
radioactive waste site in Wake
County said John MacMillan
should step down because of an-
gry comments he made to state
regulators at a meeting last month.
"He's a state employee and
his job is to protect the people of
the state, not the interests of the
nuclear power industry said Tim
Warren, a Durham resident who
heads a statewide advocacy group
called the N.C. Waste Awareness
Network.
MacMillan, though, said he
has no plans to resign as executive
director of the N.C. Low-Level
Radioactive Waste Management
Authority. Several members of the
authority also defended him at a
meeting Wednesday.
August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 7
State News
SPINDALE, N.C. (AP)�An
83-year-old Spindale woman was
found dead in her home early
Wednesday, Aug. 17, the victim
of multiple stabbing and slash
wounds, including one to the
throat, inflicted during a foiled
break-in, authorities said.
Georgia Hamrick was found
dead by her upstairs tenant about
8:30 a.m. Wednesday, according
to a Spindale Police Department
spokesman.
Police believe Hamrick, a
lifelong Spindale resident, was
killed sometime late Monday by a
burglar trying to steal a safe in her
bedroom, according to a police
spokesman.
Police had no suspects
Wednesday, but said their inves-
tigation is continuing.
REIDSVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
Area residents turned in 82 guns
and received $4,100 from the city
council and police department in
the town's first gun buyback.
Police organized the
buyback after the June shooting death of 14-
year-old Larry Jermaine Moore in Reidsville.
The shooting was followed within 30 minutes
by a suicide committed with a gun.
Two 15-year-old boys are charged with
Moore's murder. Both carried stolen handguns,
said Police Chief James Festerman.
"Guns like this used to raise eyebrows
said Reidsville Crime Prevention Officer John
Harris. "Now, picking up one of these is a
nightly occurrence for an officer in this city
Wendy and Teri,
thanks for all the
great work over
the summer!
IATT0II
IStoSI

i
Mfierever ytm �c
whatever the weather
we have the nerfect
outfit!
fe
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CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME TO THE STUDENTS
Welcome to the 1994-95 academic year at East Carolina University! Whether
you are joining us as a freshman directly from high school graduation, as a
transfer student who has spent time on the home front or in the work force,
or as a returning student, I know that East Carolina University will provide
you with many valuable opportunities this year.
We trust your experiences will provide a solid basis for your future personal
success and build a foundation upon which you can continually feel the stir
of campus pride.
The campus is robust with construction projects that will greatly improve our
quality of life. Please be patient with the inconveniences that these projects
may cause and remember the substantial benefits our new buildings will
bring.
Please do not hesitate to use the many services available to you at ECU. I
encourage you to direct any questions you any have to your advisor, residence
hall coordinator, or other university official.
Best wishes for a successful academic year!
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
ew JLii(
Wistian
F
e
eMowsoip
k
Come Join Us As We
Kick Off the Semester
Thursday Night, August 25th at 7pm
In the General Classroom Building
Room 1017
Friday Night, August 26th
Pizza Party
Everyone is Welcome
NEWS ABOUT MIGRAINE
-ii ��'�"&fet-jfc$
Important Information
for Sufferers
� Can you trigger a migraine attack with
a glass of red wine or a chocolate bar?
� Are migraines inherited?
� Are there effective treatment programs
for migraine?
If you or someone you know suffers from migraines, help is available.
You don't have to cope on your own. Come and learn about migraines�
what they are, what triggers them, and how to treat them. Migraine doesn't
have to mean missing out on life.
Speaker:
Date & Time:
Place:
Daniel Lee MD
August 29, 7pm
ECU Student Health
Infirmary, Main Campus
IMX570R0C
For more information, contact:
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March 1994





8 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
On-campus housing upgraded
By Stephanie Lassiter
News Editor
Some students can not wait to
get out of the dorms and into apart-
ments of their own, but thanks to
recent renovations, dorm life may
be a step up from some off-campus
housing.
During the summer, fiber op-
tics and Cablevision have been in-
stalled across campus. Residence
hall residents will now have
Cablevision complete with HBO 1,
2and3.Adcutionally,increased tele-
phone services have been granted
with the new fiber optics system.
The best thing about the whole deal
is that it comes free with room and
board expenses.
The fiber optics lines and the
Cablevision lines were laid at the
same time to a void additional work.
"Thatwasonemajorproject
said Emanuele Amaro, director of
Housing. "All the buildings have
been wired for Cable TV
White Hall will have a dra-
matically differentinterior look this
year, as it has been modified to
accommodate singles. The dorm
willnow feature four halls of men
andfivehallsof women, all insingle
rooms.
Carpet, fresh paint, refrigera-
tors and microwaves have been
added to the rooms. New paint was
added after the older paint contin-
ued to peel away from the walls.
One bed was removed from each
room to allow more space for the
occupant.
The price of the single rooms
in White Hall is $2,385 for the entire
year. A comparable room, with a
roommate, is $1,590 for the year.
Air-Kronditioned rooms, such as
those inCotten, Fleming and Jarvis,
are $1,850 per year for a room with
a roommate, or $2,775 for a single
room.
According to Amaro, more
women wereinterested in the single
rooms in White; therefore, there are
more female floors than male floors.
"We opened it to every re-
turning student Amarosaid. "We
did it by the market
Jones Hall also received some
much-needed attention this year.
New carpet, beds, desks and chairs
have been added.
"Jones Hall has been redone
this summer Amaro said. "The
whole building has been up-
graded
Another parking lot was
closed due to the renovations of
Slay and Umstead, which will not
be available for occupancy until nex t
fall, but Amaro said that construc-
tion is on schedule. Asbestos was
removed from the rooms.
The entire building was gut-
ted out for total reconstruction to
the interior. The interior will be
brand new and will be air-condi-
tioned. New carpet and mov-
able furniture have been added.
To be more accessible to
students, University Housing has
opened two community service
areas in Fletcher, to serve Cen tra 1
and West campus, and one in
Avcock to serve the College Hill
community.
The former Resident Edu-
cation office in Fletcher has
merged with University Hous-
ing. Currently, Resident Educa-
tion is located on the first floor of
Jones, but eventually both Uni-
versity Housing and Resident
Education will move into the
basement of Jones.
Five of the eight resident ha 11s
on campus have been converted to
the "Master-Key" plan. This sys-
tem helps administrators keep track
of keys and provides security for
residents.
"It provides more security for
the buildings Amaro said.
The Department of Housing
received a grant from the federal
government for energy conserva-
tion. The grant was a 5050 grant,
which means the government gave
$250,000 and the university gave
$250,000. Light bulbs were changed
to fluorescent lighting and thermo-
statcontrols were centralized tocon-
trol wings, rather than entire build-
ings. Shower heads were replaced
to add more air and to reduce the
amount of water dispersed.
Amaro said other smaller
projects were completed over the
summer.
White residence
hall, formerly an
all-female dorm,
has been
converted to a
co-ed dorm with
all single rooms.
Students living
in White can now
take advantage
of free
refrigerators
and
microwaves.
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August 24, 1994
riffHMaHHMMHMMfl
The East Carolinian 9
RULES
Continued from page 1
Court at the School of Allied Health
lot which has 500 spaces. Shuttle
buses run in these areas from 7:20
a m. to 5:30 p.m departing every 10
minutes.
Also, commuting students can
use the shuttle service.
"If you get to campus at 9:00
a.m you will not have parking
Gertz said.
The former freshmen parking
lot, Minges, is now a commuter
parking lot. The shuttle service op-
erates on the same 10 minute cycle
as the freshmen lots.
Gertz said Lhat students must
park in their respective parking
spaces at all times, Monday through
Friday. However, on the weekends,
from Friday at 5:00 p.m. to Sunday
at 8:00 p.m students with stickers,
including freshmen, can park any-
where on campus.
"This is because many people
golhome or of f campus Gertz said.
Valid parking permits can be
bought at the Parking and Traffic
Services Office on Tenth Street next
to McDonald's. The permits, which
have been on sale since the sum-
mer, cost $70.00, and a limited per-
mit, is available for $30.00.
In addition to parking
changes, students are still getting
use to the new drop policy that was
recently adopted.
"The new policy went into
effect in the fall of 1993 said Dor-
othy Muller, dean and academic
transition program director of Un-
dergraduate Studies.
The policy assigned the num-
ber of drops a student is allowed,
according to his or her year in school.
Freshmen are assigned four drops,
sophomores three drops, juniors
two drops, and seniors one drop.
"Freshmen can use a drop. If
he doesn't use a drop as a freshman,
as a sophomore he has four drops. If
a freshman drops two classes, he
has only two left Muller scid.
Basically, students have only
four chances to drop a class during
their entire undergraduate career.
Muller said the policy was
started because the university
wanted to get students to commit to
classes.
"We had situations where stu-
dents dropped to not get a 'C
Muller said.
Muller also said that some stu-
dents would continually sign up for
classes, blocking other students
from taking high-demand courses
such as speech, only to drop the
course later.
Muller said thatunder the new
policy, the dropadd period has
been extended from two days to the
first full week of class.
"Students can go to one class
meeting, look at the syllabus, and
see if the class is for them Muller
said. "Also, on the sixth day, a
student on a waiting list can add a
class but not dropadd
The policy seems to have had
a positive effect.
"Students earned more hours
than the year before Muller said.
"The number of'D's' and 'F's' didn't
change, and GPA's for classes went
up
As for dorm life, visitation
rules are changing slightly. Students
are allowed visitors of the opposite
sex in their rooms, but only during
specific time periods.
"Curfew now starts at 10:00
a.m. instead of 12:00 p.m said
Janet Johnson, assistant director of
Resident Education.
Johnson said that the curfews
affect all the dorms. During the
week, Monday through Thursday,
visitors are allowed in the rooms
from 10:00 to 1:00 a.m. During the
weekend, visitors are allowed from
10:00a.m. to 2:00a. m. Students must
escort their guests through the
dorms throughout the building.
A few exceptions are in cer-
tain areas that are used by every-
one, such as laundry rooms and
vending machine rooms.
"In those areas the time limits
are set by the dorm hall council
Johnson said. "It is particular to
each building
Johnson said that though the
visitation policy will be enforced,
failure to comply is not considered
a major violation and any punish-
ment will be handled by the Dean of
Students, Ronald Speier.
NEWS WRITERS
Staff meeting Thursday at 5:30 p.m.
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10 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
PUBLIC SAFETY
Continued from page 1
or graduate, who are interested
in helping protect the campus.
"We're looking for good
moral character said Assistant
Director of Public Safety John
Taylor. "Our students reserves
work patrolling the campus and
at special events, like football
games
The department is also
looking for a director to head the
student reserves and act as a
liason between the department
and the reserves.
"Preferably someone with
good organizational skills Tay-
lor said.
' Applicants need to have at
least a 2.0 grade point average,
but their major is irrelevant.
An expanded staff will al-
low Public Safety to reach more
sydents on a daily basis, Crocker
She hopes to get away from
ing a reactive department by
Shading off problems on cam-
pus before they create danger-
ous situations. One method the
department is using to improve
relations with students is diver-
sity training.
The North Carolina Depart-
ment of Human Relations plans
to hold diversity training ses-
sions in November and Decem-
ber of the fall semester and Janu-
ary of the spring semester. This
is being sponsored in part by Pitt
Community College.
The North Carolina Justice
Academy also offers a diversity
training class for law enforce-
ment, which a member of ECU's
Public Safety will attend during
August.
"Officers will also be at-
tending some EEO training, as
well as some training at Wilson
Tech in diversity issues Crocker
said.
While not all officers will
attend this, someone from each
zone will be represented at the
training session, Crocker said.
Crocker is optimistic about
the upcoming school year, and
feels that Public Safety has, over-
all, a positive relationship with
the campus community.
"I think a lot of times stu-
dents are intimidated by a uni-
form, and the one thing that we
want is to have a relationship
with the students where we are
able to talk with them, and if
they have problems, that they
feel like they can talk to us she
said.
"They can ask questions,
and a lot of times I think they
don't ask questions because
they're afraid of what the answer
might be We want to have a
working relationship
Crocker said many students
take their personal safety for
granted, and neglect certain mea-
suies to protect both themselves
and their property. "Walking
alone at night, walking back from
the bars � there are a lot of people
moving around in that area. It's
easy to ask for a ride she said.
There are currently 29 blue
light emergency phones located
throughout campus which stu-
dents should use if they need help.
There are also 16 elevator phones.
"There are still spots of dark-
ness, but this campus is really
well-lit, and they are maintained
Crocker said.
She wants students to un-
derstand that the department re-
alizes that students are not all
criminals.
"We're not here to put ev-
ery student who comes to ECU in
jail she said. "We're here to
make sure that this environment
is safe, and when things happen
that people should be put in jail
because of their behavior, then
these are things we have to do
Crocker said one of the most
important things students shou Id
remember is that it is against the
law to have weapons on campus.
"We have enough weapons
just passing through (with non-
students) without our own stu-
dents possessing weapons she
said.
She cited a case in early Au-
gust when a non-student was seen
trying to break into a house on
Fourth and Reade Streets. Stu-
dents who saw the man yelled at
him, and he opened fire on them
with his weapon.
Two Public Safety officers
apprehended him near the Willis
building soon after, and no one
was injured.
Public Safety is not able to
be at every student's beck and
call in some circumstances, how-
ever. Whereas previously the de-
partment would respond to calls
where a car had died and needed
a jump start, students must
now find someone else, al-
though they can come to the
Public Safety department and
check out jumper cables.
Crocker said the liability ex-
pense simply became too great.
She offers a solution to
another student catastrophe,
however. She sympathizes wih
students over the current park-
ing situation � which she de-
scribed as "terrible"�and sug-
gests students use the Transit
System made available by the
university.
She also reminds stu-
dents that Parking and Traffic
Services are a separate depart-
ment headed by Director Pat
Gertz, and they should bring
all parking tickets, etc to the
proper building.
" We are at 609 East Tenth
St she emphasized. "They are
at 305 East Tenth St
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-�
August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 11
TRANSIT
Continued from page 4
service.
The Pirate Ride will once
again be available this year on
Sunday through Thursday from
8:00 p.m. until 12:15 a.m. The Pi-
rate Ride serves main campus and
College Hill. Permanent signs
have been placed on campus in
well-lit areas, to inform riders of
pick-up locations.
"We are waiting to hear from
SGA on their funding to run Pi-
rate Ride on Friday and Saturday
nights Walters said.
If SGA funds the additional
Pirate Ride services, the extended
hours will be Thursdays until 2:30
a.m. and Friday and Saturday
nights from 12:00 a.m. until 2:30
Parking and Traffic Services
will provide bus shelters at Minges
and Allied Health in the event of
unfavorable weather. Eventually,
a permanent shelter will be built
onto the side of the Rec center.
"SGA is talking about put-
ting a shelter outside of
Mendenhall to replace the shelter
destroyed for the Rec center
Walters said.
Walters encourages students
to ride the bus for economical rea-
sons, as well as to avoid potential
headaches.
"Just try riding the bus he
said. "Our dependability factor
has increased a lot
SUMMER
Continued from page 1
second stcry of his apartment com-
plex fell on him. An historical house
in Grifton County was badly dam-
aged by the storm. Pitt County
battled heavy raindrops.
July 13�Large crowds gath-
ered to see Michael Jordan for the
three Carolina Mudca ts games held
in Zebulon. Devoted fans made a
mad dash towards right field
(Jordan's position) as the gates
opened at 6:05 p.m. Jordan has a
batting average of .195, but that
Saturday's attendance was higher
than the previous season high of
8,277.
July 20�Dr. Tinsley Eugene
Yarbrough, a political science pro-
fessor at ECU, was named to tem-
porarily fill theposition of vice-chan-
cellor for academic affairs.
Yarbrough has been a member of
ECU's faculty since 1967, and will
be holding the position until the
permanent person has been hired.
Yarbrough has written several
books that ha ve been recognized by
suchorganizat ns as the American
Bar Association. Yarbrough's
classes will be taught by a tempo-
rary faculty member.
July 27 � ASMO Co. Ltd a
Japanese-based manufacturer of
small motors, announced plans to
open a plant in Greenville's indus-
trial park. Governor Hunt attended
the signing ceremony held in
Mendenhall. The opening of this
company will ensure 320 new jobs
in the Greenville area by 1998.
DINING
Continued from page 1
we've created an exclusive dining
space Salamon said "The archi-
tects created what they call the pa-
vilion scheme
Salamon said that all meal
plans have stayed the same and can
be used at all the dining locations.
According to Salamon, Todd
Dining Hall will not be he only
"hot dining spot" on campus this
fall. Other campus dining facili-
ties, such as Mendenhall and the
Galley, are going through some
beneficial changes before fall ses-
sion starts.
Jones Dining Hall is now
closed and the Galley is undergo-
ing a facelift so it can operate more
like the Spot in Mendenhall.
"TheGalley will open up with
a smoother flow of customers as
well as a second cashier station to
alleviate the terrible crowd
buildup Salamon said. "In the
next few years, the Galley will
move over to Jones to be a fast
food complex, with a food court
concept
Mendenhall will be ex-
panding its menu offerings and
making changes so that entering
and exiting will be easier, he said.
Salamon is very optimistic
about Todd and the other up-
coming renovations and changes.
"Hopefully more students
on the Hill will eat at Todd, since
it is more convenient said
Salamon. "This will make
Mendenhall less crowded, but
all students should eat a t the new
dining hall. It is definitely a treat
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12 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
MESSAGE FROM THE CAMPUS POLICE
Werjome! As DirectorChief of the ECU Police Department, I want to take this opportunity to let
each of you know that our department is responsible for maintaining a safe and secure
environment in which to live and learn. A college campus is a unique community with its own
special problems and we want you to know that we are responsive to the needs of our
academic community.
Our office is located at 609 East Tenth Street and our emergency telephone number is 757-
6150 (You may call 816-2246 while at the School of Medicine). You will also find many
emergency (bluelight) telephones located throughout campus which dial directly to our
department. You may use the emergency telephones at any time to call for assistance.
Our staff is made up of thirty-five sworn police officers. We patrol the campus twenty-four hours
a day throughout the year. Officers of the department are charged with the responsibility of
protecting life and property, preventing, detecting and investigating crime on campus and
�providing essential services to the University community,
the pressures and needs of students, faculty, and staff.
SGA
Continued from page 1
The officers are trained to understand
L Our patrol division is made up of uniformed officers who patrol the campus on bicycle, foot, and
. vehicle. The investigative division is made up of highly trained officers who specialize in
. criminal investigation. The crime prevention office provides security programs, resident hall
lectures, and media relations for the department. Our training officer provides in service training
. required by the state as well as specialized training. The department also hires students who
work as student patrol officers. They work during the evening hours and act as "eyes and ears"
. for the department.
While a student at East Carolina University, please do not become a victim of crime. If you live
in a residence hall, lock your doors and windows when you leave. Never leave exterior doors
propped open for any reason. Don't lend your key to anyone. You should make sure that
' valuables are secured and marked with your driver's license number. In your travels, you
' should always be aware of your surroundings. Never walk alone at night. Plan your route in
: advance using well lit streets. Don't take shortcuts if it means walking alone in unlighted or
�untraveled areas. Let your roommate know when and where you are going and when you
� expect to return. Notify our office if you are a victim of a crime or if you witness one.
� -I hope that you will take time to talk with our officers during the semester. Remember that no
I campus is a sanctuary from crime. Prevention is the most effective means of fighting crime.
Teresa Crocker
DirectorChief
328-6617
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see the image of Public Safety offi-
cials improved. By getting in touch
with the students, the patrol offic-
ers can educate them on the dan-
gersof alcohol abuse,rape and other
potential dangers often familiar to
college campuses.
"Most people presume that
all we do is parking, but our depart-
ment is working on getting a better
image through community polic-
ing Davis said.
Umphlet agrees with Davis
that bicycling on campus is a great
way to get involved with students
and the university community.
"The students can also iden-
tify with us because they ride bikes,
too Umphlet said.
Davis hopes that eventually
students will realize that Public
Safety officials are on campus to
help students avoid crime and po-
tentially dangerous situations, not
simply to write parking tickets.
"I'd like to try to help with the
perception of our department he
said.
campus to determine potential dan-
ger spots. Eastman said the group
agreed on 16 areas which needed
additional lighting. Areas included
the wooded area by Bloxton House,
between Mendenhall and Joyner
Library and near the Jenkins Axt
Building.
Eastman said projects like the
lighting project are bringing the
students and the faculty together
to build a positive foundation.
"We have now opened the
communication lines between the
SGA Executive Council and the
faculty he said.
The SGA is also working to
bring some excitement to ECU with
a potential concert in the spring.
"SGA and the Student Union
are joining forces to bring a large
concert in either Minges or Ficklen
in the late spring Eastman said.
"We are laying the groundwork
for that right now
Eastman will continue to
work with the athletics department
on the project.
"Athletics are cooperating
with us to the fullest extent he
said.
For students who seem to
enjoy school so much they will not
graduate, there may be some bad
news in the near future. Eastman
said that Senate Bill 27, Section 89
has been passed in the General
Assembly. The bill will place a 25
percent increase on tuition rates
for students with over 140 hours.
Eastman said that students who
are working on double majors are
going to be punished along with
the students who make a career
out of going to college.
The bill will affect 16 univer-
sity system schools across the state.
SGA members from all of the
schools met at a conference for the
Association of Student Govern-
ments (UNC-ASG) todiscuss strat-
egies for adding an amendment to
the bill. Former SGA President
Keith Dyer is the president of the
UNC-ASG. Eastman said the
amendment the group was discuss-
ing adding would benefit students
with a certain GPA. Should a stu-
dent have a predetermined GPA
or higher, the would be exempt for
the increase.
"We went to a UNC-ASG
conference for all 16 universities
he said. "We started to lay the
groundwork on how we are going
to oppose this the bill
The SGA has also been meet-
ing with the Athletics department
to discuss tailgating and student
ticket information for the upcom-
ing football season. All students
will now have to enter in two gates
designated for students only on
the intramural field side of Dowdy-
Ficklen stadium. One of the gates
will have 10 turnstiles, while the
other will have four. The previous
student gate only had two turn-
stiles.
Eastman said the athletics
department is encouraging stu-
dents to tailgate at the bottom of
College Hill. He feels that students
will be separated from the other
fans if they tailgate somewhere
other than the designated tailgat-
ing fields. This year, group seating,
will be allowed. Last year the group
seating privilege was removed as a
result of a fight largely made up of
students.
The SGA, the Student Union,
the Interfraternity Council and the
Residence Hall Association will
sponsor the first "Saber Slash"
on the mall on Friday, Sept. 23. It
will be held in the evening and
will be similar to Barefoot on the
Mall. Three bands will entertain
the group. Eastman said it is a
positive way to bring groups to-
gether.
Eastman looks forward to
naming the remainder of his cabi-
net and to kicking off the fall
semester.
"I am eagerly anticipating
the input from former SGA mem-
bers and from students in the
fall he said.
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I





M
August 24, 1994
Opinion Page Supplement
Amodest proposal to solve foreign policy woes
DotntxmO t� TnOun M�Oi� !
O
U
o
Take advantage of opportunities ECU provides
s,
Sometimes opportunity
knocks, sometimes it doesn't. As
a matter of fact, most times it
doesn't. A lot of times it knocks
and you just aren't home at the
time. Or maybe you are ana just
aren't listening, but you don't
get too many chances in life to
really make it here, to be
successful. I mean, think about
what it took just for you to get
where you are now, here at East
Carolina. Sure, you should
probably be at Harvard, right?
You're reading the wrong
article.
What did it take you to get
here? You had to make the grades
to get in, didn't you? You had to
come up with the money
somewhere, whether through
financial aid, like myself, or
through your parents, or the
service, or jobs. You had to more
or less decide that this was where
you wanted to go to school, as
opposed to your other options,
right? At least a few things went
into getting you here, even if you
did stumble in at the last minute.
Believe it or not, they don't just
let everyone in, and whether you
just flipped a coin or worked and
sweated it out for years in high
school, you still made the final
call, and that counts for
something. This brings me to my
point: You made decisions and
took advantage of opportunities
to get here, and for your reward
you have now opened the door
to a new world of future
opportunities which you may
have no idea about quite yet.
East Carolina is a good
school � a good choice � for a
lot of reasons. Believe me, I
didn't know if I'd ever feel that
way, but I do now, and hopefully
the new freshmen will some day,
too. This is a place where a
student, any student in any
chosen major, can make a
difference. It may seem like a
huge place to the new people
now, but this is a place where
you really can get to know the
faculty, as well as the students,
where you can excel in the
classroom and have your name
and face become known by those
around you as someone special
as easily as you can get wasted
and make a fool of yourself
downtown. The cool thing here
is that it's completely up to you.
You can make a difference, and
not for them either, for yourself.
Or you can just drink and smoke
and play your way through your
four or five years here, and shut
the door behind" you on your
way out. Grab a job at Taco Bell
afterwards.
Don't feel bad if you have
no idea what it is you want from
college or what to major in, much
less from life. You're supposed
to feel that way. You're supposed
to feel confused at this point in
your life. Just don't waste that
confusion. We've been given a
By Patrick Hinson
wonderful opportunity to design
our own futures here, an
opportunity to avoid just
working some cruddy job for the
rest of our lives. Here we can
plan to do what we want to do, to
enjoy doing it, excel doing it.
Don't feel bad if you don't know
what it is yet. That's a perfectly
natural feeling. I didn't know
what I wanted for the longest
time, and I came very close to
quitting because of that, more
than once, as many of you might
too. But I stayed with it. I
explored what was around me. I
kicked around ideas and dreams
and reality until things just
seemed to fall together, which
they will, if you just stay with it,
stay interested, stay hopeful.
There is an answer out there, you
just need to figure out the right
way to ask the question. You may
have to spend a little time on
your own, thinking about what
you want to do here, what you
want to do with your life. You
may not get it right the first or
second or fifth time, but you'll
never really get it wrong if you
just keep asking.
Explore your options here.
Think about what it is you want
to do with your time here, and
for a career later. Pretty soon it
will come to you. Pretty soon
you'll realize that you really do
control your own fate, and that
opportunity hasn't forgotten yet
where you live.
As we are all made aware
of every night on the news, our
world is greatly troubled. Large
portions of our globe are racked
with civil strife, famine, human
rights abuses and general
turmoil. Many of us wish that
we could do something about
these horrific problems. We
wish that we might do
something to alleviate the
suffering in the Third World,
but we feel as thought we
cannot. However, there is a
rather simple solution, which I
humbly submit for your
thoughtful consideration.
The obvious problem is a
lack of stability, brought on by a
lack of focus and leadership in
our post-Cold War world. With
the end of the communist threat,
America has turned increasingly
inward, as the Russians
frantically try to put their own
house in order.
My modest proposal to
solve this problem is a return to
that which worked in the past.
For it is by looking to the past
that we may find answers to our
current troubles. In sum, what I
propose is a return to
imperialism, unilaterally if need
be, but hopefully with the
support of our European allies.
Now, no doubt, many will
object to this idea, believing the
concept is unfair. Perhaps there
is some merit to this charge.
However, we Americans will
have to learn to bear a little extra
burden, unfair as it may be, to
help our brethren in distress. It
is our Christian duty.
Some may believe that our
already troubled economy will
not be able to handle the strain
ing applications! fofNewsSports
Ke Student Pubs Building hear Joynei
bi?good writers, so come� ohjdbwn today.
of such expensive adventures.
However, surely any such
expenditures will be more than
made up for by the new
business opportunities, which
will present themselves in our
new colonies. Moreover, if, as I
suspect, our European allies
have become too weak and
effete to participate, then
America will have a unique
advantage heading into the next
century.
While the term
imperialism is now used only
pejoratively, I feel that after due
consideration, such a plan
cannot fail to garner
overwhelming popular support.
We all know of the Republicans
enthusiasm for foreign
adventures. On the Democrat
side, the administration is
already considering a watered
down version of this same plan,
as we contemplate an invasion
of Haiti. Such an action is
vociferously supported by the
Congressional Black Caucus.
While the president claims
American troops would be
hastily withdrawn, the very fact
that we are considering
interfering in the internal affairs
of another country proves that
we really still believe that
America should rule the world.
Perhaps our "New Democrat"
president could overcome
objectionsby labeling this "New
Imperialism
This proposal will also
have the happy result of easily
refuting the pitiful arguments
against intervention. No more
will opponents of action be able
to ask, "What is America's vital
interest in Haiti?" (or whatever
By Brian Hall
nation in which we are currently
considering intervention.) Our
vital interest will be that we need
to take over, for the benefit of
not only the citizens of the new;
colony, who have obviously 1
proven themselves incapable of i
self-government, but also for the :
furtherance of the American i
Dream. No longer will the;
plaintive lament of: "When will;
our boys be coming home?" be
effective. For this will be met by '
the stout reply, "They are never ;
coming home
The final benefit of this
plan would be to motivate those
native leaders who are
governing troubled areas. These
men would now have a solid
reason to unite with their'
domestic enemies. Together,
perhaps they could solve their!
nation's problems, making i
American intervention;
unnecessary. Just image;
discussions between various
factions in South Africa, Israel;
or Rwanda if the United States
adopts such a policy. Overnight,
they would find creative ways
to solve their problems, in a
misguided attempt to avoid
annexation.
Surely no one could
oppose such a policy. Our world ;
would be safer and America
more prosperous. Those living
in third world countries would !
have human rights and i
democracy, as well as the free j
market, forced upon them
without the tediousness of;
convincing them of the validity
of these ideas. Surely even those
natives killed by our invasion
forces would willingly give their ;
lives for such an eventuality.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Critics who deride the effectiveness of
condoms in combating the spread of sexually
transmitted diseases (STDs) including AIDS are
overlooking the importance of consistent and
correct use.
Minimizing the potential efficacy of condoms
may be a self-fufilling sic prophesy, because
condoms may be used less consistently by those
who do not believe them to be effective.
A recent study cited in the April, 1993, issue
of the American Journal ofPublic Health found that
only 20 percent of sexually active couples used
condoms, but even among these couples, condom
use was inconsistent: Only one in five who
reported condom use said they were used at last
intercourse.
Consistent and correct use promise sic to
greatly improve the effectiveness of condoms in
preventing the spread of STDs. Such use has
already been shown to greatly improve pregnancy
prevention rates. Although typical pregnancy
rates for couples who use condoms are as high as �
10 to 20 percent, rates are estimated to be as low '
as two percent for couples who use condoms
correctly and consistently.
A March 1989 Consumer Reports article "Can
You Rely on Condoms?" reports examination of
stretched latex condoms by an electron microscope
showed "no pores" and an effective intact barrier
which "won't even let water � one of the tiniest
of molecules � filter through j.
, The U.S. Food and Drug Administrat&ri;
(FDA) which does extensive quality control;
inspection and testing of condoms reported fh aj
September 1990 FDA Consumer article "Latex.
Condoms Lessen Risks of STDs" that, "condomsS
affords good protection for vaginal and oral sex
but warned against the risk of breakage during
anal sex.
Jim Senyszyn
Highland Park, NJ
To the Editor:
The consequences of civil war in Rwanda are
very tragic. Many here in America probably think
that the solution to the problem is a good ol'
democratic government. We rationalize that since it
worked for us and "solved" all our problems then it
should work for them too.
Thosecf you who worship thedemocratic system
should consider this form of government is only
"good" as long as the people in the country are
"good
For example, the USA prospered up until about
the early decades of this century. But since about the
1960's, we have started running up huge debts as our
morals have descended into the gutter.
We now accept adultery and scandal at the
highest levels. Wethinkhomosexuality and feminism
is okay. Millions of unborn children have been
butchered for the convenience of not having to
support them. It would seem mat the only real evil
people left in this country are racists and those who
actually take the Bible literally. ; - J
Now, the only government mat will work and;
last forever is the soon coming Kingdom of God. It is J
a world-ruling Government that is not a humanly;
flawed government of the people, by the people, for �
the people, but rather a government of God, by God,�
for man to create a Utopian environment that will be I
conducive to fulfilling man's ultimate potential of"
becoming a member of the God Family � the;
Kingdom of God.
This Kingdom, this Government to end all other "
governments will never be at the mercy of sin, but ef
its increase there shall be no end and it will last
forever and ever.
WAKE UP, AMERICA! Worship God, and not
some form of government that will eventually go the
way of ancient Romebecause of the sins of its citizens!
Again, I say, WAKE UP! RETURN TO GOD
BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE!
Donald Raymond Wheatly
Grifton, NC �
lif
. ECU.commu
tiie'Editor. All lelfeV
iufmust be!typed; u
ndei
iicaaons:BlgffECi
027858-4353
a
�� -





���: 14
The East Carolinian �
Opinion
August 24, 1994
Stcpanff T,asslter, News Editor
1 � v 'ion, As.rf. Vewj Editor
' Mark lirett, Lifestyle Editor
Kris Huffier, Awr Lifestyle Editor
Warren Sumner, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
�Vf. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Mike O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Bu t Ay cockCeleste Wilson, Layout Managers
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Sean McLaughlin, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
X HAVE TO END
THS LETTER NOu).�
HAVE VxJRiTER's CRANVPj
PROK UAND-COPVlMGr,
W1 TEXTBOOKS OMTC
TOU-ET PAPER AT
THE BOOKSTORE.
U)RTIN6 IS SMOD&ED.
'I'M ALL CRIED OJT.
HAP Tt ASK. A
FRIENP To Po iT
.POR ME.
SIGNING OFfNOu)
TO GO CUT THIS
EVENING'S
DiNNE.? oar op
AN OLP MAGAZINE
UJiTrA JUST THE R16HT
SEASON i NGpApgfc
CAN 8E TJSSTV.
Servi rig the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
cassibeac editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
' -Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, 77k East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
;�� ��
I
- r :
f f of TEC committed to serving students I
Remember the scene in Citizen Kane when
M Charles Foster Kane takes over the New York
. Inquirer? His first act is to issue a declaration
ol purpose for his front page, which he has
reset eight different times before going to
print. He writes of speaking for the man
without a voice � the average schmoe � and
' - sets out to bust the trusts and schemes of big
-business. Charles Kane had a definite agenda
� fet his new newspaper.
When I took the office of general manager,
.?�jl had, and still have, one concern: how to
.�� make sure you read The East Carolinian. We
n- d?r?nt wrtat y�u want to read and more of you
�rvyill pick up a copy on Tuesdays and
'Thursdays. You write to us to tell us what you
think and we respond. With increased
' "readership come more patrons willing to
advertise to reach that audience.
The advertising department's happy, the
'�' Editorial department's happy, you're happy,
vi the patrons are happy. Hey, we'll all be
t wearing big happy hats.
And this is where, hopefully, all that starts.
ii Since the largest percentage Qf readers are
,� jBtudents, and since the staff of TEC is made
. ,yp entirely of students, the interests of those
i who spend their money and efforts at ECU are
"paramount. And the diverse tastes of the
"student body are reflected in our staff, as well.
What interests you interests us. That's how
the majority of what's printed is selected.
Would we, the staff, want to read about it?
' And what isn't in TEC that we do want to
read?
That in mind, the editorial staff, a brand
spanking new set of desk editors, has
established a list of "what's in, what's out" for
each section of the paper. Our news
department has been keeping in closer contact
with SGA and Public Safety to ensure better
coverage of what's being proposed and
instituted concerning you or your money.
The Lifestyle department is expanding an
already diverse scope to even better cover the
after-hours and leisure options available to
the ECU community, and the Sports desk
looks to bring solid reporting for the teams
that get national coverage and those that tend
to go unnoticed (track, swimming, rugby, etc.).
The Opinion page(s) still will offer the best
of student perspectives, and plans are in the
works for the return of Campus Forum and
Spectrum, wherein students and faculty will
be offered space for more detailed arguments
than the 250-word limit on Letters to the Editor
will allow. We're bringing back the popular
"Clearly Labeled Satire Page" when space
permits. Pirate Comics (possibly the best
college comics page on the East Coast) will
continue to bring you the best original student
work Special issues are planned for events
and concerns that students and faculty may
wish to be made more aware about.
So welcome or welcome back to East
Carolina University and The East Carolinian.
Have a good year and drop us a line to let us
know how we're doing.
Assault weapon ban restricts personal freedom
I favor measures to stem what
r.seema like a growing crime
problem in our nation; however,
I have a big problem with
5 � President Clinton and his cohorts
� t "vwflo believe that the situation can
��be ameliorated by passing more
.�tand more laws encroaching on
. our inalienable right to keep and
bear arms.
My definition of gun control
is hitting what you are aiming at.
This is what 13-year-old Jarrod
Miner did when an intruder
-forcibly entered his home. While
Jarrod's parents were out running
errands, the boy was keeping an
eye on his three younger brothers.
Instead of becoming a victim, the
boy fought back. Jarrod
�� incapacitated the trespasser by
shootinghimwithhisfather's357
, j Magnum � just as he had been
�3rfa"ught. A more realistic
'eonsequence of what proposed
' �"gun control" will do can be
- �exemplified in the following
' '� story: Fearing for her life from
t her estranged spouse, Bonnie
, Etmasri of Wisconsin attempted
to buy a firearm for protection,
br�t a 48-hour waiting period
� Sf precluded her from making the
purchase. The next day, she and
t her two children were murdered
by her husband. So much for the
j j-gnn restrictions. Those who wish
lu repeal the Second Amendment
' are hesitant to admit that guns
are very effective defensive
weapons. As a matter of fact,
approximately 7,000 times each
year, guns are successfully
employed for self-protection.
cr�a Yearly figures show that gun-
bearing Americans kill 2,000-
' 3000 lawbreakers, while the
police terminate three times less
(undoubtedly choosing to house
id feed criminals for a few
"f
years). Eighty-three percent of
cases where the victim has a
handgun end with the culprit
fleeing or giving up. Now that is
effective crime control.
People who trust the police
for personal safety are confused.
Let's face it, we cannot rely on the
police for constant, individual
protection. A shining example of
this is the Korean-American shop
owners who with assault rifles
successfully defended their stores
from riotous crowds during the
L.A. uprising. When things got
tight, the police ran, and the
people were left to their own
devices. The police in our country
are not omnipotent forces
(thankfully). This is confirmed in
a 1984 survey where 94 per cent
of respondents asserted that the
police were too slow in their
responses. Consider this:
criminals take a victim's weapon
less the 1 per cent of the time,
while police are shot with their
own guns 10 per cent of the time.
I do believe that the police are a
needed asset in our society, but
they do not replace self-reliance
in crime fighting.
In the name of crime control,
a bill was proposed recently that
banned certain assault weapons.
Surely these weapons must
account for a large amount of
violent crime. They do not. In
1992, more people were beaten to
death (1,114) than were killed by
rifles of any sort (698). A recent
FBI report stated that rifles
accounted for only 4 per cent of
all homicides, and from 1980-
1990, not one police officer was
killed with an Uzi or Ak-47. In
New York, not a single police
officer had been killed by an
assault rifle in ten years, but the
state prohibited those firearms in
By Stephen Hill
1992. When New Jersey banned
assault weapons in 1990, the
Trenton deputy police chief
testified mat these weapons were
used in 026 of 1 per cent of
crimes in N.J. This means my
officers are more likely to confront
an escaped tiger from the local
zoo than to confront an assault
rifle " This goes to show that
perceived fact is sometimes
greater that actual fact. If these
weapons account for a tiny
portion of the crime problem, why
were they banned?
We must understand that if
we enact legislation banning
firearms, only law abiding citizens
will obey those rules. Who
honestly believes that a hardened
criminal will not be able to find a
gun to commit his or her crime?
Or what is going to prevent
criminals from making crude, but
effective, firearms with materials
mat can be easily obained at the
nearest hardware store? It is not a
difficult process. As a matter of
fact, one-fifth of all firearms
confiscated by police in
Washington, D.Carehomemade.
So, if a criminal confronts you with
his homemade shotgun, who will
be the loser? Americans cannot
relyonthegovemmentfor'round-
the-clock safety. We could
arrange for perpetual protection
by vastly increasing our police
forces and by outlawing private
firearm ownership, thus creating
a police state (a la China, Nazi
Germany, and the Soviet Union).
Now this may sound strange to
some of you, but I believe in the
Bill of Rights. The proposal to
ban assault weapons is ridiculous.
It will not relieve the crime
dilemma in the least, but the ban
will infringe on our right to keep
and bear arms.
Nv
N
NICE.
NICE.
INSPIRING GUILT IN A PARENT
College gives chance for personal reflection
By Patrick Hinson
When we're growing up,
we're taughtwhatseemlikesimple
lessons about what's right and
wrong, what to do and what not to
do in life. We accept these lessons,
often from our family, at face value,
and even though we may not be
realizing it at the time, we file them
away in our memories for later use,
for reference. Soon, after many
years, these lessons have become
the very core of our social being.
They are what we often have in
place of true experience to use for
reference and decision making, for
judgment, and we tend to like
making quick judgments, and to
agree with the mass opinion. The
lines in our early lives are clearly
drawn for us, and as we get older
we often have no choice but to
follow these same lines into the
real world, and into the experiences
that eventually must change us.
Often, when we come to
college, we have already
determined our standards for
social behavior. Unfortunately,
high schools don't teach us much
about racism, sexism, or about
having an open mind about the
people we will encounter in our
lives. In high school, we hang
with the cliques of people who
are just like us, or who we'd like
to be like. We most often have
nothing to do with those people
who are the ieast bit different
from us, whether by race or
handicap or sexual preference.
So we come to college with what
we feel is a good idea of what is
right and what isn't, who's cool
and who's not. The best part
about all this is that now,
suddenly, we are forced lo deal
with what we've been avoiaig
all this time, and what many of
our parents hoped to keep from
us the real story. Finally we're
forced to start thinking for
ourselves, to start making
judgments through experience
and through intelligent
observation. We're forced to use
our own heads for a change, and
it isn't always easy.
First, we should all realize,
by looking at both history and the
present, at what's going on
around us here on this campus
and in places all around the world,
that ignorance breedshatred. We
don't like what we don't
understand, and the natural
reaction is to fight that feeling, or
to ignore it. We don't really
understand why black and white
people often don't get along and
so we just jump on either side. We
don't understand why people
have different sexual preferences
than our own and so we just see
them as wrong. We don't
understand the person in the
wheelchair, or the one using sign
language, or the one tapping
down the sidewalk with a cane
and so we avoid them. That's the
easy way out.
Listen, it often takes a long
time to unlearn some of the beliefs
our parents, or our history, or the
culture we were raised in has
taught us, but we need to think
for ourselves, to decide for
ourselves. In places all around
the world people are massacring
their neighbors simply because
they are different from them,
because they're black or white,
because they're from one tribe
or another, because they're of a
different religion. It's ridiculous
that these things become
grounds for murder, for
genocide, to some people, and
yet they have, and they still do.
Obviously, we must be better
than that, right? No. It's not that
easy. We must make ourselves
better than that. We must leam.
We must see with our own eyes,
and judge for ourselves what
we feel is right or wrong.
If you hate some group of
people, the chances are you have
a friend who is a member of that
group, even though you may not
know it. Will you face that person
and tell them how you feel about
their people? Can you do that? If
everyone feels one way about
something, should you believe
them just because they do? Are
you that much of a coward?
Think for yourself. See for
yourself. It's one thing to look at
the people you would oppress
from a distance, buts it's another
to be able to look yourself in the
face in the mirror and know what
you feel is right.
Oliver North not solution for political woes
One of the worst things about
subscribing to any magazine is
the fact that your name
immediately gets put on a million
mailing lists. And if it happens to
be a political journal, then you can
count on getting political junk
mail, without a doubt, the worst
kind. Since I have a subscription
to National Review, the leading
conservative political journal, my
name is now on the mailing list of
every conservative organization.
Whenever some conservative
organization needs some cash,
they come to me, hat irt hand. The
worst ones are the letters that I
receive from William F. Buckley
himself, publisher of National
Review, asking me to subscribe to
his magazine.
So, I was not really surprised
when I received a letter recently
from Oliver North begging for
money for his Senate campaign in
Virginia. I hope for his sake thathe
is not holding his breath waiting.
It will be a cold day in Greenville
before this rascal gets any money
from me.
I have never been able to figure
out what it is that makes most of
us conservatives like this guy so
much. Sure, he is a military
veteran, which is an admirable
thing. Like most Americans at the
time, I thought it was nice to see
someone tell those fat, pompous
members of Congress off. His
political views are the usual
conservative boilerplate. Other
than that, what does he have?
It is precisely because of his
relationship with Congress that I
dislike him so. Unfortunately,
despite the contempt which most
individual members of Congress
deserve, Congress as a body
deserves our respect, which
includes obeying the laws which
it passes.
Surely Col. North, asa military
man, should have realized the
importance of a chain-of-
command. It is not up to a
lieutenant colonel in the Marines
to make foreign policy decisions
for the United States. Moreover, if
your commander, even if he is the
President of the United States,
gives you an illegal order, then
your obligation is not to obey it,
but to report it.
Yet Col. North freely admits
that he tried to mislead Congress
when asked about attempts to
circumvent the Boland
Amendment. Whatever one feels
about that particular law, the
whole point of living in a
representative democracy is that
the legislature gets to make the
laws. If one really believes that a
particular law is unconstitutional,
as Col. North claims, then there
are legal avenues to challenge it.
Oliver North is a perfect
example of what conservatives al 1
claim to hate so much about our
legal system: a man who was saved
from conviction by a legal
technicality. We must be consistent
in our beliefs on this point. We
must admit that legally Col. North
is an innocent man. However, we
know in our hearts and minds
from his own words that he is
guilty of both intentionally
By Brian Hall
attempting to mislead the people's
duly elected representatives and
willfully breaking the law. Lying
to Congress is not an acceptable
solution to foreign policy
problems. It is difficult not to
admire his chutzpah, if nothing
else. On the cover of the fund
raising letter which he sent out, he
has a photo of himself in uniform,
lying to Congress. As my brother �v'
would so indelicately say, you
have to wonder how this guy can
walk.
Now, Col. North is trying to
portray himself as a true patriot
and the solution to our political
problems. By attempting to wrap
himself in the flag, he just might
succeed in getting himself elected
to the Senate. Not that this would
mean the end of our republic.
While the election of Norm to the
Senatewould mean that the voters
of Virginia would be sending a
horse's ass to the Senate, looking
at his Democrat opponent,
incumbent Charles Robb,
whomever they choose the
number of horse's asses in the
Senate will not increase.
If conservatives truly dislike
our president because of his
numerous character flaws, then
they must apply the same
reasoning to North. Oliver Norm
is the perfect example of the old
maxim that "patriotism is the last
refuge of a scoundrel While it is
tempting to believe that North
would make the Senate a more
interesting place, we can really do
without another dishonest, self-
serving pol. c
L





LinnMimiwn���� -wwr.
���n ��
TheEastCarolinian
August 24. 1994
Classifieds
Page 15
�1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
�FREE AUGUST RENT
"Special Student Leases"
also MOBILE HOME RENTALS
).T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815 .758-7436
FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted for apartment 12
block from Art Bldg 3 blocks
from downtown, 2 blocks
from Supermarket. Starting
in August. Call 757-1947.
1-4 BEDROOM HOMES,
Condo's, Duplexes, and
Apartments for rent.190.00
upIShorttermleaseavailable!
Finders 321-6708. Small Fee.
Near Campus, rentals avail-
able now!
NEW ROOMMATE LIST-
ING SERVICE Need a room-
mate, list your ad free. To get
a list of all the people looking
a roommate - 321-6708. Small
Fee!
ROOMMATES NEEDED
FOR FALL to share 3 bed-
room house located in a quiet
neighborhood near the hos-
pital. Must be a serious stu-
dent and non-smoker.260
rent per month includes utili-
tiesand cable TV. If interested
call Harold after 4:00 p.m. a
830-5160.
YOU WANT SOMETHING
DIFFERENT? 1 bedroom loft
apartment $165.00 or 1 bed-
room apartment $225.00 call
7 5 2-1375
HOMELOCATORS.
IMMEDIATE 2 bedroom
duplex $350.00 pets ok, or 2
bedroom house $420.00 call
7 5 2-1375
HOMELOCATORS.
CALL TODAY! 3 bedroom
duplex $425.00 or 3 bedroom
house $575.00 call 752-1375
HOMELOCATORS.
MALE OR FEMALE GRAD
STUDENT wanted to share
very nice 2 bedroom
townhouse in Courtney
Square. $220month plus 12
utilities. Big room, quiet com-
munity, 1 mile from campus.
Please call Natalie at 919-240-
1875leave message( is in
Atlantic Beach).
NEED FEMALE NON-
SMOKING ROOMMATE to
sbare3bdr. house close to cam-
pus. AC, washer, fireplce, ca-
thedral ceilings. No animals
(we have 1 cat already) must
love music and music type
people. This is a very cool place
and requires a special person.
$200 month plus 13 utilities.
Give us a call 758-7993.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED nonsmoker to live
in a 2-bedroom in Wilson
Acres. Will have own bed-
room. Rent $175.00 utilities.
Call 830-5360.
chair, file cabinet, bookcase,
trash can, lamp, etc.? Stop by
BUSINESS EQUIPMENT
RENTAL AND SALES at 601
Reade Circle and make us an
offer on our pre-owned inven-
tory. 752-8585 for further info.
TREK 700 HYBRID BIKE-18
speed Grip shift, like new, lock
andcomputer,$225.00ph. 355-
5836 Leave message or call p.m.
I1
Heroes Are Here Too
116 E. 5th Street
757-0948
Comics and Sportscards
10 OFF w Coupon
expires 8 31-94
HerosAre
Here Too
1 x 2
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
COMPLETE LIVING
ROOM SET-wood framesofa,
coffee table, 2 each-end tables,
lamps, chairs $350 �BO also
combination entertainment
centershelf unit adjustable
$50 OBO 321-2555.
STEREO SPEAKERS $100;
Samsonite hardside train case
(dark grey) $50; brown eelskin
pocketbook-never used, $60;
sheet sets-one king, two
doubles, $15 each. Call 752-
943,8:30 a.m8:30 p.m.
1976 VW BEETLE. Fuel Injec-
tion. New Paint, Metallic Grey
with Black Trim. Runs and
Looks great. $2500.00 NEGO-
TIABLE. Contact 758-2264 Late
afternoon or evening.
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
OFFER Do you need a desk,
CHAR-GRILL
ut t?ir Tmiiitl.
MANAGERS
LINE COOKS
CASHIERS
315 E. 10th Street
P.O. Box 3797
Greenville. NC 27836 1797-
Grflrtt PhCP to Wotl
TYPING Let a PROFES-
SIONAL type your thesis, dis-
sertation, term paper, etc. Mail
merge your resume with cover
letters to potential employers.
Reasonable rates. Call 946-
1175.
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFI-
DENTIAL, PROFESSIONAL
ResumeSecretarial work.
Specializing in Resume com-
position wcover-letters
stored on disk, term papers,
thesis, legal transcriptions, gen-
eral typing and other secre-
tarial duties. Work Perfect or
MicroSoft Word for Windows
software. Call today (8A-5P-
752-9959) (Evenings 527-9133).
NCTAN-North Carolina and
Tidewater Area Naturists now
beingorganizedtopromotecoastal
recreation For more information,
send$landSASEtoNCTAN,PO
Box88,pantego, NC 27860.
NO EXPERIENCE NECES-
SARY-Recreational Services is
hiring marketingpublic rela-
tionsassistantsforfall'94.Conact
JeannetteRothat328-6387and
or complete an application in
204 Christenbury Gymnasium.
8-10 hours a week. Mostly after-
noon and evenings.
HELPWANTED-Recreational
Services is hiring a number of
students for the following Flag
Football Officials-meet 830 at
9:00pm in Brewster C-103; Co-
RecVoUeyballOfficials-meet9
6 at 9:00pm in Brewster C-103;
AdaptedReaeationAssistants-
previous experience with dis-
abled population preferred; In-
tramural Sports Supervisors-
$425hr Computer Research
ssistant-strongbackgroundin
computerskilsessential-$435
hr. Complete an application in
204 Christenbury Gym or call
David Gaskins at 328-6387.
FALL YOUTH SOCCER
COACHES; The Greenville
Reoeaticm&ParksDerjartment
is recruiting for 12 to 16 part-
time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and pa-
tience to work with youth. Ap-
plicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-15, in soc-
cer fundamentals. Hours are
from3:00pm until 7:00pm with
somenightandweekendcoach-
ing. This program will run from
September to mid-November.
Salary rates start at $425 per
hour. For more information,
please call BenJamesofMichael
Daly at 8304550 after 200pm
$10-$400UP WEEKLY, Mail-
ingBrochures!SpareFul-time.
Set own hours! Rush self-ad-
dressedstampedenvelope:Pub-
lishers(GI) 1821 HillandaleRd
1B-295, Durham, NC 27705.
ATTENTION STUDENTS:
Earn extra cash stuffing enve-
lopesathome. Allmaterialspro-
vided. Send SASE to Central
Distributors PO BOx 10075, KS
66051. Immediate response.
LIMITED APPLICATION
spaceavailable.ES.E.EscortSer-
vices. Lucrative income avail-
able call 321-8252, leave mes-
sage.
ECU STUDENTS-WEL-
COME BACK! Brady's and
Brady's for Men are accepting
applications for additional part-
time sales and customer service
associates. We offer flexible
schedules to fit most needs, sal-
ary, and a dothing discount If
you would enjoy working with
Eastern North Carolina's Fash-
ion leader, we invite you to ap-
ply. Interviews held each Mon-
day and Thurday, 1-4 pm,
Brady's The Plaza.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT
DEVELOPMENT, DEPART-
MENTOFATHLETICS,isnow
acceptingapplicationsfortutors.
Arrrinimum25GPAisrequired
Please call 3284673 for more in-
formation
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble Products at
home. Call ToU Free 1-80O467-
5566 Ext 5920.
BABYSITTERS NEEDED;
Community Bible study, a
Women's interdenominational
BibkStudy,meetingatOakmont
BaptistChuith,Thursdaymom-
ings, 9fl0 am to 1130 am needs
several young women to work
in our nursery area to provide
patient,fovingcaretoouryoung-
estpartidpants-Churchnursery
experienoepreferred,references
requested Must provide own
transportation and be able to
makecomnutmentthroughEte-
cember 8. Call Mrs. Baker, class
coordinator, 355-8368 or Mrs.
StanselL 7560842.
CHILD CARE NEEDEDCol-
lege Student needed to care for
young children Wednesday
mornings 9:45-1154 atSt James
United Methodist Church. Call
. churchofficeat752-6154Salary
negotiable.
WANTED.Femateforpart-time
work-$5.00 per hr. Light house-
work,yardwork,cutgrass,weed
borders,flowerbeds,etcCaIl756-
2496.
ADORABLE 2172 YEAROLD
needs late afternoon babysitter.
Mustbeverydependable,anon-
smoker, and have own trans-
portation. Child, devdopment
early childhood majors, and first
aidCPRtiainingpreferred.Call
752-9243,8:30 am-&30 pm.
SALES-PART-TIMEFULL-
TIME Beauty International has
positions open oncampus,extra
dollars or full-time income. Call
Kim 910-353-9684.
NEEDED; Driver with truck to
Manhattan, Call SarahatX6220.
SriTER NEEDED- Fall and
Spring Semesters, 2 or 4 after-
noons per week. 3pm-
6pm(approx) to care for our
daughters, 9 and 11. Need re-
sponsiblepersonwithcarwhois
willing to do some light house-
work. Flexible hours and com-
petitive pay. Contact Alan or
Ann Schreier Tell328-6452 or
355-3667.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 1-8004364365 Ext P-3712
LADIES WANTED: Models,
Dancers, Escorts, Masseuars.
EarnBIG BUCKS in the deanest
dub in North Carolina. Must be
18 Years Old. PLAYMATES
Adult Entertainment 919-747-
7686.
INTERNATIONAL EM-
PLOYMENT-Make up to
$2,000-$4,000mo. teaching
basic conversational Enlish
abroad Japan, Taiwan, and S.
Korea.Manyemptoyersprovide
room & board other benefits.
No teaching background or
Asian lnaguages required For
moreinformationcall: (206)632-
1146extJ5362
INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE
IN SALES- Earn good money
withfiexiblehoursand gain valu-
able business experience. Call
Bonnie at 355-7700 for informa-
tion and possible interview.
NOW HIRING- ECU Recre-
ational Services is hiring the fol-
lowing for fall 1994.5 marketing
assistant&no experience neces-
sary. 2 writers to cover depart-
mental activities. 2 photogra-
phers wifhexperience in black
white photography and film
printing, developing. Call
Jeannette Roth at 6387 to set up
an interview.
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
TheGreenville-HttCountySpe-
cial Olympics is looking for
coaches in the following sports:
basketball, skills, swimming,
powerlifting, rollerskating,
bowling, equestrian, and soc-
cer.Noexperiencenecessary. A
soccer coaches' training school
will be hdd on Saturday, Sept
17 from 9O0 am-4 pm for all
interested in volunteering for
soccer. For more info contact
Mark or Connie at 8304551.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worship
with them. Sunday Masses:
1130 am ad 830 pm Wednes-
day: 530 pm (followed by a
fellowhip meal). The Newman
Center is located at 953 E. 10th
Street, two houses from the
Flethcher Music Building. For
more information, please call
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
HONOR BOARD MEM-
BERS
If you served last summer on the
Honor Board and are interested
in serving again this year please
visit Karen Boyd at the Dean of
Students Office, 209 Whichard,
328-6824,assoonasyoupossibly
can this week. We are trying to
finalize our list for 94-95.
STUDENT EXCHANGE-
STUDY ABROAD
England, Netherlands, Hawaii,
California, these are a few places
someofyourpeerswillbe this fall
because they came by the office
last semester! There is still time to
consider a student exchange or
study abroad expereince for
spring semester and plentty of
time for next fall! If you are inter-
ested in study sites which are
available, please contact Interna-
tional Programs, 328-6769 for
details on how you can psy ECU
tuitionand study at another loca-
tion! Doitsoon while sites are still
available! Where will you watch
the sun rise in the spring????
SENIORS AND GRADU-
ATE STUDENTS
Allseniorsandgraduatestudents
who will be graduating in De-
cember '94, May '95, or Summer
'95 are encouraged to attend Ori-
entation at Career Services to
become registered. Now is the
time to start your career search.
Orientation Sessions will be hdd
August 30 at 3:00 pm in
Mendenhall 244, August 31 at
3:00 pm in Mendenhall 244 and
September 1 at 5:00pm in the Art
Auditorium.
SECOND EAST CAROLINA
BASS & SUNFISH FISHING
TOURNAMENT
Seine Beach, August 27, 1994,
Grimesland, NC: 6:30 am to 400
piru Entry Fee $30.00 per boat,
Opento: AllECUStaff &Faculty,
Families and Friends. For more
information contact Ron Smith:
ECUMainCampusHome746-
2533 or Grady WTutehurst:
Brody Building Home 742-
1030.
EMPLOYMENT OPPOR-
TUNITIES.
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are in-
terested in becoming PER-
SONALCAREATTENDANTS
to individuals in whedchairs.
Also,READERSANDTUTORS
are needed Past experience is
desired but not required If inter-
estedcontact Office for Dis-
ability Support Services
Brewster A-116 or A-114
Tdepnbne: (919) 757-6952
OSHA SESSION
A session on OSHA's Top 25
most frequent violations will be
offered by the Center for Ap-
plied Technology at East Caro-
lina University on August 31
from 11:00am to 130pm. This
workshop will offer tips helpful
in identifying and correcting
common general industry
OSHA compliance violations.
Cost is $39.00 and indudes all
materials and lunch. For more
information contact
Announcements
25vodsarless

StudEnts
Ncri-Studs'its
Ryh additional word
$2.00
$3.00
$0.05
MM.1 ads rrust be pre-paid�
Ay organization may use the Armource-
nHts Sadden cf The East Carolinian to list
activities ardeverts qpan to the public two
tines fraeofchaigs. Qetot�BlJnidedaTCirt
of space, The fflst Carolinian caret guaran-
tee riep�iic3ticnof amxrrHnerts.
Center fc Applied Technology
East Carolina University
Willis Building
300 East First St
Greenville, NC 27858
or phone (919) 328-6708.
TREASURE CHESTS
AVAILABLE!
The 1993-94TreasureChestsare
here! Be sure to pick up your
FRFJivideoyearbookAvailable
at the Student Store, The East
Carolinian, Joyner Library,
Mendenhall and the Media
Board office in the Student Pub-
lications Building.
Displayed
$5.50pa:irrh:
Displayed advertisments may be
canaelledbetbre 10a jn. the day prior
topublicaticn; hrwever, rr refunds
wLUbegivHi.
D9adlines
Friday 4 p.m. fcr Tuesday'sedition.
Iuesdcy4p.m. far Trijrrsdsy'sBdirJ.cn
Far more
irrfmreticncRll
757-6366.





The Clearly Labeled
Page 16
Satire Pagps
August 24, 1994
Chancellor Eakin acknowledges illicit squirrel payments
Staff Reports
Chancellor Eakin faces severe
penalties following his recent
confession to ECU'S Board of
Trustees thathedid, in fact, divert
funds to campus contra squirrels,
specifically to the radical, terrorist,
left-wing group known as The
Purple Thursdays.
Under tnjense interrogation,
Eakin broke down and admitted
to the parrel of trustees that,
following, the razing of his
residence, his wife forced him to
establish ties with the radical
squirrel organization.
"We � I mean, she made me
start talking to them. She said since
we had to get rid of the house to
build that parking deck, we better
be nice to fee squirrels, since
everybody,knows they have so
much power here at ECU
Eakin previously denied all
charges of involvement with the
squirrels.
"I am not a crook he insisted
in earlier interrogation
proceedings.
Eakin's confession came after
one board member said pointedly,
"I want to know how much the
chancellor knew, and when he
knew it
"I regret all my squirrely
involvements Eakin sobbed
during his confession.
"Those squirrels seemed so
cute and fluffy at first. I knew they
were no good, but they had such
big plans for me. I was going to be
their Chief Human
Representative. You know � all
theacoms meand the missuscould
want, and that type of thing
Me Stuff-a-lot, the
spokessquirrel for The Purple
Thursdays, issued a statement
from the garbage can outside of
Joyner Library.
"We reject Chancellor Eakin
as our human representative, and
all that he stands for. We've always
thought that his cheeks just
weren't chubby enough to really
be a part of our group. Besides,he
has a dog at home mat won't quit
chasing us around Stuff-a-lot
said.
The Board of Trustees plans
to meet on August 24, in front of
The Student Stores. They will
randomly poll students as to the
best punishment for Eakin.
"I think he should have to
scrounge around this campus
eating leftover pizza crusts just
like the rest of us, for a change
said Me-Run-Up-Tree-and-Get-
Height-Sickness-Quite-Often, a
member of the Purple Thursdays.
The terrorist squirrel
organization reportedly has
plotted for years to take over the
campus. They can frequently be
seen scrambling up trees and
scampering in a schizophrenic
fashion away from passers-by.
During the summer of 1993,
two math professors were taken
hostage by the group in an effort
to turn the Austin buiding into
their headquarters. This effort
was fruitless (or acornless), when
students refused to post the
demanded ransom.
"Actually, we'd really like
to see that building used for
better purposes said Student
Government Association
President Ian Eastman. "I mean,
we all hate math, and all those
professors wanna do over there
is flunk us, so, yeah, let them
have the building. Heck, let them
have all those professors, too.
Yeah, and this old math book
that I couldn't sell back, too! Give
'em that
The radical squirrels have
continued to terrorize the
campus community over the
years. A recent bike patrol set up
by ECU's Public Safety resulted
in several attacked ankles and
missing bike helmets. It appears
that the bike helmets maintain
the ideal temperature in which
to store acorns.
The Purple Thursdays'latest
endeavor, receiving illegal funds
from Chancellor Eakin, is
probably only the beginning of
new ventures in their plight to
take over the campus.
A sorrowful wail of "They
just seemed so cute could be
heard from the interrogation
room last week. Board members
deny that Eakin completely
broke down, but witnesses say
he went through three boxes of
Kleenex.
If you have any information
leading to the arrests of squirrels
known to have associated with
Eakin and his cohorts, please call
Squirrel Stoppers at 555-0000.
Remember, they want just your
information and not your name.
Chancellor Eakin in happier days, competing at
the National Spelling Bee earlier this year.
New policy on refugees Congressional leaders resolve all problems
Staff Reports
Faced with an immigration
emergency from Cuba and an
ongoing crisis in Haiti, the Clinton
adminstistration today announced
a new, comprehensive Carribean
policy. ,
The Coast Guard will continue
to pick up both. Cuban and Haitian
refugees. However, instead of
either interning the refugees, or
returning th.em to their respective
countries, Cubans will now be
taken to Haiti, and Haitians will
be taken to Cuba.
Mortimer J. Buckley, a State
Department spokesperson,
justified the change as "a new,
progressivestep in refugee policy.
TheseCubansjustwanttogetaway
from the oppressive regime of
Fidel Castro What better place to
do that than under the oppressive
government, in Haiti? One thing
And Haitians no longer need fear
that their:political enemies will be
after them. n Cuba they will be
completely safe from such
people ,
According to another source,
the Clinton administration has
high hopes for this policy. If
successful, it may use a similar
idea in other trouble spots, perhaps
sending Rwandians to Iraq in
exchange for Kurds.
The new policy has been
enthusiastically received by all
parties so far. Republicans, who
were threatening to take the lead
in immigration policy, have
wholeheartedly endorsed this
new plan.
"It is about time that our
president did something,
anything, decisive said Haley
Barbour, chairperson of the
Republican National Committee
(RNC). "These immigrants were
threatening to take over our
beautiful country. We would all
be a lot better off if all these
foreigners would just go home
Senate Minority Leader Bob
Dole (R-Kan.) also expressed
cautious support for the plan. "I
hope that this is not just another
case of this president trying to
win a few cheap votes for the
upcoming election. If it is, we
republicans will just have to
obstruct this, too. The last thing
that we would want is for the
voters to get the idea that this
administration is capable of
accomplishing anything
Former independent
presidential candidate Ross
Perot also supports this new
policy. "See now, this is just sad.
It just amazes me that it took this
human catastrophe to finally get
this administration moving on
this. Besides, we all know that
these Cubans were all members
of hit squads sent here by Fidel
Castro to kill me and my world-
class family. It's time toclean out
the barn, get under the hood and
get this country going again
No tranlation for Perot's remarks
was available.
Staff Reports
In a turn of events described
by insiders and pundits alike as
"stunning federally-mediated
talks between baseball owners
and players have resulted in an
agreement and an end to weeks
of a strike. What makes the
agreenent so "startling as
player union leader Don Fehr
called it, is that it somehow
melded with committee
compromise talks involving
proponents and opponents of
both the Clinton health care and
crime bills. The result is a massive
piece of legislation thatcoversall
three points of debate.
"What we have here is a
historic mandate from those
involved in the talks President
Clinton said. "It proves not only
that Congress is willing to give
the people of this great country
guaranteed health care and safety
on the streets, but also seven
months of baseball
The new bill, called the
CHuBBie Plan (an acronym for
crime, health and baseball and a
jab at the president's recent
weight gain) by White House
aides, ends months of rhetoric
and partisan squabbling both on
Capitol Hill and in ballparks
across America.
"I was trying to convince the
democrats how their crime bill
was hogwash, " minority whip
Newt Gingrich said. "Next thing
I know, we're voting on a salary
cap. It's disgraceful! If anyone's
salaries should be raised, it's those
of Congress
The new law incorporates
heavily-debated measures as a
way to enforce the other areas
covered by the bill. Subsidized
health care, for example, would
be covered by the pay not
collected by ball players as they
were on strike. The 10-day strike
would allow the government to
collect approximately $4 million
from the owners. Also, prison
chain gangs would be responsible
for guaranteeing the owners pay
up.
"With the chain gangs out of
the jails, more room will be
available for the larger prison
influx Department of Justice
Chief Janet Reno said. "This keeps
the construction of new jails from
being a necessity and money will
be saved.
"We're depending on the
owners to not be punctual on their
payments. Hopefully, the sight of
30orange-dad felons will facilitate
their cooperation. But if they do
pay up, the gangs will be used in
place of animals in medical
research. If the mortality rate for
humans is the same for test
animals, trust me: There will be
more room in prisons
The CHuBBie bill also makes
it illegal for players to fake
injuries in order to preserve their
batting percentages. Doing so
would incur fines reflective of
their yearly salaries. For some
marquee players, they could
cover plans for entire states with
low-populations The money
would then go to either help
pay for crime or health care
concerns.
In a move interim
commissioner Bud Selig calls
"cynical and pessimistic players
will have to take jobs in either law
enforcement or the health care
profession in he event of another
strike. A possible scenario is
popular players such as Ken
Griffey Jr. and Tony Gwynn
becoming law officers on regular
beats to promote a good image of
authority to young adults, who
make the highest demographic
percentage of both criminals and
baseball fans.
Also, pitchers with good
records of saves will be required
to work in emergency rooms.
Oakland reliever Dennis
Eckersley has already signed on
to work at Johns Hopkins in the
off-season.
In a move that drew some
criticism, both Dwight Gooden
and Steve Howe, who have
suffered through highly-
publicized struggles with
controlled substances, have
already repeatedly asked to work
in pharmaceuticals if their
services are needed.
But many players were
critical at the idea of an enforced
career switch in the event of
another strike.
"What, they expectme to work
for a living?" asked new Giants
acquisition Darryl Strawberry.
'And how much do cops and
nurses earn a year? Screw that.
Don't be surprised if Idon'tshow
up for training for those jobs
either The last comment alluded
to Strawberry's reputation for
skipping practice in the
preseason.
Whether money or time taken
from the players would go to
health or crime plans will be
decided in a seven-game baseball
series played by members of
Congress made up of the
dominant party in control of the
Senate.
"Well, it's a good thing I'm a
republican Senator Bob Dole
said. "With this bum right hand,
I'd have to sit out When
reminded of the success of one-
handed pitcher Jim Abbott of the
New York Yankees, Dole
responded: "What's your point?"
Senate majority leader
George Mitchell had yet to
recover from the success of his
version of Clinton's health care
bill being successfully passed
virtually unscathed.
"Man, Mitchell said.
"Who'd've thunk? All I got to say
is if it wasn't for the outside
pressure to get basball up again,
we might still be arguing over
insurance plans for
months. Thank God the American
people have their priorities in
order
Elvis death hoax proven in Vegas Aromatic new course offered to
incoming N.C. State freshmen
Staff Reports
Elvis Presley's body was
officially declared dead by two
private and three federal coroners
last week in Las Vegas, where it's
said the singer has been hiding out
since his falsified death in the early
1970's. Readers of national tabloid
magazines -have finally been
vinidicated in their claims over the
years of ha ving seen the King, from
McDonald's in small Montana
towns to the Wal Marts in Reno
Nevada to the fish stores off
Nantucket Island.
Found next to the King was a
National Enquirer newspaper with
a front-page story of hisdaughter's
wedding to pop singer Michael
Jackson. The paper seemed to have
been crumpled and squeezed very
tightly before Presley keeled over.
Official cause of death was ruled a
coronary, possibly brought on by
the news of the wedding. "Well,
the king is finally dead this time
and I don't blame him said
Martha Jane Knowitall. "I wouldn't
want to hang around and watch
my daughter marry that idiot
either. I mean, is he a boy or is he a
girl There was no comment on
the death from either Presley's
daughter or Jackson. Mr. Jackson
was just stated as saying, "All mis
hype is ridiculous. I love Lisa Marie,
she's just like a sister, and I just
want to get my hands on those
sweet little kids others, and, uh, be
a good father teeheehee! She can
have all the money she wants. I got
plenty. Oh-heee
Noted by the coroners was
the look of sheer horror and disgust
on the death face of Presley, his
hand clutching his heart and his
teeth tightly clenched. Presley had
successfully avoided being spotted
by the media by gaining well over
three hundred pounds, and it took
a hydraulic forklift to move the
body to the county morgue. Said
Las Vegas coroner Dr. Bob Slop,
"He's dead for sure now, and I
don't really blame 'em. 1 wouldn't
want to be around to see this mess
either
Staff Reports
A new course will be of-
fered this fall to all incoming
freshmen at NC State: Flatu-
lence 101, or the Art of the Fart.
The new course will be offered
as part of the orientation to the
NCSU program, to help all in-
coming freshmen feel more
comfortable as they enter the
college atmosphere.
"It's such a huge part of
everyday life, much less his-
tory said Dr. Bill Pantsburner,
chairman of the orientation
committee. "After all, unbe-
knownst to most students, some
of the most significant people
in history have been real
fartblossoms. Napoleon was a
notorious gas-passer. He could
fart at will, with an empty stom-
ach and on the march, and he
commanded the same disci-
pline from his troops. Attilla
the Hun could empty an entire
room with one deadly blow.
Julius Ceasar's last word was
actually, safety and then he
farted, as if to spite his murder-
ers. And Joan of Arc, she took
several of her executioners with
her at the last minute of her life,
when she farted and fanned her
own flames across the town
square
Besides studying the his-
torical significance of flatu-
lence, students will study the
seven major American farts: the
fizz, fuzz, fizzy-fuzz, the poot,
tally-poot, tear-ass, and the rat-
tler. Professor Joan Brown
Skidmarke will also teach the
science of flatuiant fragrance,
as well as the nutritional as-
pects of developing flatuiant
behavior. Such aspects as audi-
ology, tone, timing, and proper
release will be discussed, and
students wiil be encouraged to
develop patterns of flatulence
to take with them into the real
world.
"Let's face it says Dr.
Dave Cheekflapper, "what re-
ally gets you in with the top
people in a company these days
is how well you can crank one
off at the right moment. Re-
sumes and work experience
count for something, sure, but
what they really like is some-
one who isn't afraid to let one
go"
An honors flatu lence class
will even go as far as teaching
flatulence ignition, or the light-
ing of farts, but students are
told at the beginning of this
course that the university is not
to be held liable for any per-
sonal injury or fire-damage to
clothing. Both the social and
psychological aspects of flatu-
lence will be discussed as well
in these courses, such as covert
flatulence, flatulence while
maintaining an intimate rela-
tionship, and the psychological
release of proper flatulence.
The new freshmen course
will be an elective and will be
offered as a choice of either Flat
1010 or Algebra 1065, and is
said to be backed up into 1996
already.
'��






wammmwarn -� i "
August 24, 1994
Page 17
ine eieariy Lapeiea
Satire Pages
La Pew charged with
sexual harrasment
.
Staff Reports
Cartoon aficionados and
legal experts are battling over
the fate of one of
entertainment's most
recognizable icons. On Friday,
Aug. 13, cartoon legend Pepe
Le Pew was charged with
stalking and assault and
slapped with a sexual
harassment lawsuit by what he
calls a "sad and lonely
creature
The creature in question is
Tabitha "Tabby" Cat, of Des
Moines, Iowa. Cat claims that
while on a vacation in Paris in
July, Pew repeatedly followed
V�er and amorously manhandled
Eat against her constant
protests.
"It was a nightmare, " Cat
said in a phone interview.
"Everything was fine until the
third week I was in France.
That's when that masher started
hitting on me
According to Cat, Pew
began leering and harassing her
after she took some pictures of
the renovation of the Sacr6
Coeur.
"It's the weirdest thing
Cat said. "It was one of those
days. First, I lose my i.d. Then I
nearly get hit with a can of paint
that fell of the scaffolding when
I was taking pictures. Next
thing I know, there's laughing
boy all randy and rarin' to go
Pew, infamous for his
romantic escapades both in his
native France and on the
Warner Brothers' studio lot in
California, makes no excuse for
what he calls "uncontrollable
animal lust" for Cat.
"I saw her outside Paris, "
Pew said. "Her eyes, her fur, her
je ne sais quoi. I was spellbound,
a slave to her considerable wiles.
This is love, no?
"What can I do? I am ze lover
of beautiful women. Can I be
expected to change my stripes?"
Pew commented that while
this is hardly the first time he
has been denied in his attempts
at "making beautiful moosic
togezzer this is the first legal
action taken against him.
"I've been slapped many
times but never before with a
lawsuit. Those staples, they
sting
The case is expected to go
to court next spring and Pew
has been ordered to take cold
showers by Circuit Court Judge
Elmer J. Fudd.

Pew expresses
his dismay as he
is accused of
s e x u a 1
harassment,
assault and
stalking: "What
can I do? I am ze
lover of beautiful
women.
ti
:jNew anti-proliferation
'program launched
Miss Manners polite
for proper etiquette
ly surrenders war
and refined taste
:
�t
cStaff Reports
-��! Trying to capitalize on a rare
foreign policy victory, the
! Clinton State Department today
"���'announced that it will expand a
program begun with North
Korea earlier this month. In an
agreement which help lessen
tensions between the two
countries, the U.S. agreed to pay
$5 billion to North Korea, in
exchange for promises that at
some point North Korea will
allow inspections of their nuclear
facilities.
Now, the ad ministration has
announced mat it is expanding
this idea toother nations. Among
the first nations to recieve aid
from the program, in exchange
for promising not to develop
nuclear weapons, are Monaco,
Luxembourg and Samoa.
According to a State Department
official, this policy will
immediately make the world a
much safer place by helping to
eliminate these dangerous
threats to peace.
In a related development, the
Clinton administration
announced that it is beginning a
similar program to pay street
gangs for promising not
developing nuclear weapons.
The new program has already
been taken advantage of by two
of Los Angeles' most notorious
,the Crips and the Bloods.
� 'W mk0m

.
4
:
jj�n-i '
Dear Miss Manners,
I worry about you. Though
your quest to educate is
noble, I fear you've done all
you can do here. You are by
no means a failure. Yet,
sometimes I fear our country
is too far from reform for the
likes of you. You're a lady
with a queenly bearing. You
have fragile sensibilities, as
do I. You are but one of a
handful of Americans
remaining who still care
about manners. As a kindred
spirit Miss Manners, I
suggest you run away! Flee.
Go as far away as possible
and never look back. Go some
place where people
everywhere will be nice,
respectful and well-
intentioned. Your work here
is done.
I wish you a fond adieu.
� A faithful reader in
Greenville, N.C.
P.S. Where have all the
manners gone?
Gentle reader,
The day has come when
Miss Manners embraces a
reader's advice and lets it guide
her. She abandons all reasonable
second thoughts. She cannot see
straight for the tears that cloud
her vision. She is throwing in
the hankie and all the chamomile
teas in Charleston cannot
comfort her. Where have all the
manners gone? Where good
manners go when they die.
Miss Manners makes no
claim that her efforts have gone
unrecognized � that would be
unfair. Miss Manners does not
claim to embody perfection.
That would be rude�and, most
likely, untrue.
It is not a bad day that can
taint Miss Manners' eternally
optimistic spirit. It is a
horrifying epiphany that may
crash in at any moment of one's
life. Miss Manners began her day
with a troll into her favorite
used-book shop, only to find the
spines of her so-called best seller
piling up next to the tattered
remains of a dozen copies of I'm
OK, You 're OK. She was instantly
mowed down by readers who,
in their exuberance, endeavored
to "find themselves" amid the
self-help; customers who
remained unaware of life
existing outside their own
bodies. She came to the
conclusion that there was indeed
a direct connection between the
waxing of the "self-esteem
"the self-validation" manuals
and the waning of etiquette
books.
Miss Manners, still with a
spark of ingenuous hope, is
hard-pressed to assume a
human being cannot possibly
have the energy to be
considerate to both herself and
another person simultaneously.
Miss Manners sits on the beach
in her high-necked gown and
grandmother's own cameo,
pondering new aspirations �
to become shark food or to get
philosophical. She watches the
sand run through her fingers like
so many unlearned lessons and
wonders: Do people everywhere
believe that to like oneself is to
hate everyone else? That being
considerate is weak and will
force one a few notches below
plankton on the food chain?That
following a few simple etiquette
rules will destroy the
abandonment by which one
plans to live one's life?
Somewhere in the world of
self-help literature, the meaning
is lost in the translation of a
desperate reader. "I deserve the
best" need not translate, "If I
don't get the best, I don't owe a
'thank you
"I am a good and worthy
person; I shouldn't apologize for
my beliefs usually becomes a
warped version of I need not
excuse myself for any sort of
behavior, no matter how boorish
it may be to another
The suggestion to list one's
positive features is a suggestion
to do so in private. It cannot
mean, "The world needs to
know immediately how lucky it
is to have me gracing it, as I do,
with my brilliance
Miss Manners recalls the
days of the proffered arm, of
finger bowls at dinner . . . the
days of letter-writing, of busy-
signals . . . when weeping was
an activity reserved for one's
self, one's hankie and one's cat,
and not a nationally televised
affair and weeps.
She still prefers the Golden
Silence to Muzak. And in the
Golden Silence, when, after the
neighbors have been asked
nicely to quiet down, and Miss
Manners thinks she can make
out the strains to Vivaldi's
"Spring" concerto from her
phonograph she hears another
sound. Is it the thump of Emily
Post turning over in her grave?
No. It is the sound of Miss
Manners' heart � quietly,
� j

r � ��

� � �
� i .
unobtrusively, as politely as 7 '�
� -
f
.v:
possible � breaking
Miss Manners has enjoyed
responding to your concerns.
Concerns ranging from, "Is it
OK to use indigo ink to respond
to thank-you notes?" to "What
is the least-abrasive way to
confront a roommate whom
you've witnessed lacing your
coffee with arsenic. I can't stand
scenes, what do you suggest?"
She cannot stay, however.
She will pack her dusty-rose
mules, a quill pen, and her
grandmother's own cameo, and
board the plane to Japan. She'll
hold close to her bosom a framed
picture of her heroine, Eleanor
Roosevelt.
She will hope that the
gentleman seated next to her on
the plane will not read over her;
shoulder, and will refrain front -�
asking too many questions.

Surgeon General sparks new controversy on ECU campus
Staff Reports
New protests have arisen
on campus, nearly a month
after the visit of Surgeon
General Joycelyn Elders.
Elders was on campus to
speak at the ECU School of
Medicine commencement. At
that time, approximately 50
people protested her stand
against the tobacco
industry.Now, it has been
revealed that while on
campus, the Surgeon General
also engageG in one of her
other controversial pursuits.
Long noted for her strong
support of sex education and
condom distribution in the
early grades, it has now been
learned that Elders
distributed free condoms to
campus squirrels. Elders
claimed studies which have
shown that the population of
squirrels on campus has
exploded in recent years as
justification for her actions.
According to Elders, squirrell
condoms should help prevent
the many unplanned
pregnancies on the ECU
campus. She also claimed that
condoms can help stop the
spread fo such dangerous
sexually transmitted diseases
as sciurilis, squirrelorrhea, as
well as the deadly NUTS
virus.
"We must make every
squirrel a planned and
wanted squirrwl Elders sad.
"We've allowed young male
squirrels to go around and
donate sperm. We need to
offer hope to these young
rosents
Many groups are upset by
Elder's plan. Lobbyists for the
hunters of the nation, the
American Rifle Fanatics
(ARF), fear the plan will leave
no helpless little nimals
upon which their members to
use their assault rifles.
Chester Holinuts, Bishop of
the Mall in the Rodent
Catholic Church, also
vigorously opposes this
policy. "I vigorously oppose
this policy the bishop said.
Speaker for the ECU Squirrel
Foundation, Hike Nuts, could
not be reached for comment.
Also fighting the policy is
the ECU administration,
which feels that giving the
condoms away will prevent
the proposed installation of
condom vending machines in
campus trees.
However, in the end, the
whole debate may turn out to
be merely academic (possibly
the first academic event ever
at ECU). With all the new
construction, most campus
squirrels have been forced to
find homes elsewhere,
thereby bringing an end to
any population surplus.
Z'&

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'
Mutt. X�
�k V

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E&� jfm. 4

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Campus resident tries his complimentary Squirrelstyle condom on a fry.
Do not try this at home.





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HHHHHIi
18 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendnx, Jams Jopiin,
The Rolling Stones, The Supremes, The Beach
Boys Their music filled the airwayes and pro-
vided the soundtrack to one of the most turbulent
decades in American history. Barry Drake's excit-
ing Multi-Media presentation, featuring musical
selections, celebrates the music of the 60"$, Join
us in the fun! As the Beatles sang "A splendid time
is guaranteed for air
East Carolina University
Hendrix Theatre
Mendenhall Student Center
Wednesday,
September 7th, 1994
8:00 p.m.
FREE AND OPEN to the public
SPONSORED BY:
THE LECTURE COMMITTEE
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24th
: - AND
'THURSDAY, AUGUST 25th
11:30 A.M 1:00 P.M.
TODD DINING HALL
& MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
ALL ITEMS GO
FOR
ONE CENT
with the"
hursday, October
8:00 p.m.
Wnqht Auditorium
FOR MORE INFORMATION,
CALL THE SU HOTLINE AT
328-6004.
SuTtday,
November 20th
8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Tickets ore onSAlE at the Central ticket Office
t inMendenhaltStudentCentet EostCarolinaUnivefSity
We Accept Masteicord and Visa'
I Foe Infomiotion call 1 800 f CU ARTS (328 2787) oi 328-4788
w;tti
WRDtJ's
and
HEY YOU
WANNA SEE WHAT
STUDENT UNION IS UP TO?
COME TO THE RECEPTION
6:30 - 7:30 P.M.
IN GREAT ROOM 3.
(RIGHT BEFORE THE SPENCERS)
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED
FOR ALL THOSE WHO ATTEND.
student unionSPECIAL EVENTS
COMMITTEE resents
76e Sfietcen&
MAGIC
90's
8:00 P.M. MONDAY, AUGUST 29,1994
HENDRIX THEATRE-MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
(FREE OF CHARGE)
a
Uw I '
Nov. 3-5TBA
Nov, 10-12TBA
Nov. 18-19TBA
5 TheNouveauNawWave S
Nov, 30"La Femme Nikitc R
Dec. 1"Cyrano deBergerac" PG
Dec. 2"Madame Bovary' NR
I Dec. 3"Three Men and a Cradle" PG-13
j Dec. 4Too Beautiful for You" R
All Films start at 8.00 D-TTI. and are FREE
to Students, Faculty, & Staff (one GUEST allowed)
with valid ECU I.D.
GET YOUR FALL FILM SCHEDULE CARD
AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
3rd Ann'
SEPTEMBER 23rd.
PLASH
7-11 P.M.
FEATURING THESE BANDS
�"� FUEGO BELAMA
KNOCK DOWN SMILING
PURPLE SCHOOLBUS
BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE SU POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
THIS EVENT WILL BE HELD ON THE MALL.
m





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August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 19
PHOEBE
BY STEPHANIE SMITH NICK 0'TIME
BY GREGORY DICKENS
WELCOME ABOARP, PH068E.ANP BEFORE
GIVE YOU THE 06LIGEP TOUR THERE ARE
A FEW THIN&S rp LIKE TO POINT OUT. WE
ARETHE IMPORT, NATURE-AWARE,ANP
GLOR1HEP-SOUL-FOOP CENTER OF
rWE ARE THE ELITE.
THEREFORE WE EXPECT
A CERTAINATTITUPE"
AMONG OUR EMPLOYEES.
CAUTIOUS. ALOOF. YET,
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WANTS VMAT THE CUSTOMER
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WE AM? ACCESSIBLE
with a'little practice, yoo'u-
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overload. the raspberry coffee,1
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musicthe awnin&s.thepcttfry.
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20 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
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�U �





The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 21
LOLLAPALOOZA '94
Photo by Leslie Petty
Here we see Billy Corgan of Loilapalooza headliners
Smashing Pumpkins looking moody for his many fans.
By Kris Hoffler
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
In 1991, former Jane's Addiction
and current Porno for Pyros lead
singer Perry Farrell created the
Loilapalooza festival, a traveling
showcase of alternative music. In
1992, Ferrell created a company to
produce Loilapalooza, which is re-
sponsible for the currently existing
organization. They have expanded
the nonmusical activities, known as
the Mindfield, to a more interactive
scope. It has now grown from the
carnival-type tiling of the fi rst year to
include things like computer interac-
tive attractioas and the Forum tent.
However, the music is probably
still the main attraction; it is diverse
and on the cutting edge of many
different styles. Some may argue that
they are notreally on thecurting edge
because of certain degrees of com-
merdalsuccessthatsomeofthebands
have attained. However, if the acts
weren't commercially iable, no one
would buy a ticket. Sort of a "Catch-
22" deal I think. Who's to say who
sold out?
This year's line up was certainly
diverse, probably more so than the
previous two years. There were two
punk bands, two rap, two rock, one
funk and one that can'tbe explained.
Then there was the second stage.
There were five bands on the
second stage, but I only saw three
because of complications that are re-
ally too convoluted to explain. The
Charlie Hunter Trio was the first to
reach my ear. They are a little "jazz-
punk" outfit that cranks out an unor-
thodox but groovy sound. The sec-
ond stage also hosted a rap act, the
trio from Brooklyn, Fu-Schnickens.
Their wide rangeof verbal techniques
and heavy base had thewholecrowd
bouncing around.
Stereolab was probably the best
of the second stage acts. Their mix-
ture of pop melodies with distorted
tweaks and squawks is strangely
pleasing to the ear. The fact that these
bands are "underground" added to
theenjovmait,especially to those who
dislike overproduction. If indepen-
dent, or " indie labels are your thing,
the second stage was the place to be.
Blast Off Country Style and
Lambchop were the two bands I
missed, much to my dismay.
In contrast, there were the spar-
kling sets, light show and commer-
ciallv viablebandsofthecenterstage.
I missed the first two acts, Green Day
and L7, because of the previously
mentioned complications. My
Loilapalooza partner said, "Well, we
missed the tv o punk acts. We may as
well go home He had a good point,
but we stuck it out anyway.
The third band was Nick Cave
and the Bad Seeds. Oneof their roadies
and a member of L7 sang lead vocals
on three songs, including the punk
classic "I Wanna be Your Dog be-
fore Nick Cave came out. I don't
know if it was planned or not, but
Nickdidn'tseem to mind. When Nick
took the helm, some really dark and
syrupy music resulted. The Bad Seeds
set was a powerful swagger through
the underside of life, with all the bru-
tal and harsh beauty that the group
could muster. It is something that
must be seen to be understood.
A Tribe Called Quest was the
next to take the stage. Their set was
sparse, only a DJ, a backdrop and
Phife and Q-Tip with mics in hand.
Most of their songs were taken from
their latestalbum, which is laced with
a more hard-edged style than their
previously jazzy albums. Their set
was short, less than 45 minutes, but
the bass-heavy grooves had much of
thecrowdontheirfeet. It was still a bit
too hot, however, and not everyone
was intoxicated enough to give the
appropriate response.
Riding the wave of success of
their latest and most successful al-
bum to date, Last Splash, The Breed-
ers were the next to play. The ampli-
fiers were piled high on their gold
lame stage props, and Kim Deal liad
donned a red t-shirt with the word
grunge written across the front in
magic marker � it seemed like a
special occasion. The Breeders didn't
talk much, they just said thanks at the
end of a song and played another.
They drew material from all of their
past three releases, but most came
from Last Splash. "Safari" turned out
to be quite a powerful live song, as
was most of their set. One drawback
was that they did play "Cannonball
which I have heard one too many
times to enjoy anymore. Exit The
Breeders. Enter Clinton.
George Clinton and the P-Funk
A Drop
in the
Bucket
By Mark Brett
Lifestyle Editor
This column is just wlwt it
claims to be: a very tiny drop in
the great screaming bucket of
American media opinion. Take it
as you will.
Loilapalooza: something or
someone striking or exceptional.
There's a story behind that
definition, and it's printed in
faded green ink on the rear of
a battered t-shirt I bought at
the original Loilapalooza fes-
tival in 1991. Now, that was
one hell of a day at Walnut
Creek Amphitheatre.
Loilapalooza founder Perry
Ferrell saw the festival as a
cultural event, and tnat first
year it was indeed a cultural
event.
Nose-ringed lesbians
were kissing on the festival
lawn. Mohawked punkers
and their funeral-shroud-
draped goth chick girlfriends
shopped for bongs and com-
bat boots along the pavilion.
White metal-heads cavorted
with Black gangsta rap fans in
a mosh pit the size of a jumbo
jet. It was a celebration of the
underground youth culture,
and it was a rousing success.
On thatday, I saw lotsof inter-
esting hair, had a few stimu-
lating conversations, and con-
tributed to the success of the
only money-making concert
tour of 1991.
That's right, kids �
Loilapalooza made money.
Lots of money. Because of
this, the music business mo-
guls, the same people who
spent most of the '80s burying
alternative music under an
avalanche of Bon Jovi hair
bands, stuck their grubby mitts
into the pie. They attempted
to analyze the appeal of alter-
native music and apparently
decided it was mostly dirty
flannel and mumbling. They
marketed the image and
See BUCKET page 29
Melissa Etheridge satisfies at the Creek
By Warren Sumner
Sports Editor
Grammy-award winning artist Mel-
issa Etheridge delighted a packed Walnut
Creek Amphitheatre July 30, combining
her unique style of songwriting with an
energetic stage show. Etheridge and her
three backing musicians tore through over
20 songs from her four-album catalog, play-
ing every song with an intense passion
that one would normally only expect from
a select few musical legends.
As a member of Etheridge's diverse
audience, I was blessed with great weather,
as the sun emerged from the rainy Tri-
angle skies only a couple of hours before
the performance. By the grace of God, I
was lucky enough to get a cute date for
the show (thanks, Lori) and the review
seats I was given were the best I had
ever gotten for a concert. My mood
was already good, but Etheridge's ar-
rival made it even better.
Etheridgearrivedonthestagesim-
ply enough, strutting towards the mi-
crophone wearing a smile and holding
an acoustic guitar. With her arms out-
stretched towards her c ring audi-
ence she immediately started the intro
to the biggest hit of her career thus far,
the top-10 hit "Come to My Window"
off of her latest album Yes 1 Am. This
was a bold move, to start with her
See ETHERIDGE page 29
Photo Courtesy of Island Records
Melissa Etheridge played to a packed and
satisfied house at Walnut Creek this summer.
Sir Mix-a-Lot
Chief Boot Knocka
JJ
Sir Mix-a-Lot is cool for many
reasons. He did a song with
Mudhoney. He's not afraid to tell the
world he likes big butts. He's from
Seattle. He's on the same record label
withSlayer,DanzigandohnnyCash.
He has a goatee and is just simply a
good guy. On top of all that, he has
just released a new CD entitled Chief
Boot Kiiocka.
This is probably Mix-a-Lot's most
mature album to date, as he takes on
a wider range of subjects. Take the
lyrics from "What's Real for ex-
ample. "Umma focus on my real en-
emy. Well if I'm pimpin' then who's
my ho? He's in DC livin' a big
white housebro. Changes his name
every four years Then, in the vvrv
next song you can hear, "I like my
girls nastv Amazingly enough, he
says both with the same intensity.
Chief Boot Kiuxka is totally com-
puter made. Mix-A-Lot has the thing
inaroomin his house. You can tell that
thiswasnotputtogetherinthenormal
D method. Most of the background
beats are computer generated loops,
he abandons the normal method of
sampeling beats from the past. The
surreal and outrageous effects made
by the computer are piled high atop
each other in the music. It makes a
cleaner and more serious sound than
any of his previous work
The opening track, "Sleepin' Wit
My Fonk is a collaborative effort
writtenbySirMix-a-Lot,r3cxitsyCollins
and GeorgeClinton. As you may guess,
it is a funky little number in an old
school kind of way. Flea, from the Red
Hot Chili Peppers, plays the guest
bass spot, adding to the list of names
that helped make this one song and
influenced the album th roughout. Mix-
a-Lot keeps good company.
The songs on this release range in
stvlefrom funk tobass-heavy raptoan
upbeat techno tempo. Sir Mix-a-I ot
has broken into new ground with his
latest release, and it is the nature of rap
music to seek new ground. He stays
true to the game and puts out some
quality music wi th this new release, so
check it out.
� Kris
Hoffler
Julian Cope
Autogeddon
JJJ
British rock-n-roll eccentric
Julian Cope just released a very
strange solo effort ti tied Autogeddon.
Cope is a veteran of the late 70's
English rock scene, and much of the
70's influence still exists on his latest
release. Autogeddon is a predomi-
nantly acoustic alternative album
with a few spacy instrumental
mixed in.
I istening to the album, I get the
feeling tha t Cope is trying to be philo-
sophical, but the references that he is
making are not very easy to grasp.
Cope points out the evils that he
thinks are associated with automo-
biles. In the liner notes, he tells a
storv about finding that his car had
exploded the day alter Christmas
The first two songs,
"Autogeddon Blues" and
"Madmax are very easy to listen
to. They are both acoustic songs, and
they get progressively louder. I found
myself adjusting the volume fre-
quently while listening to this al-
bum.
The third cut, "Don't Call Me
Mark Chapman is also acoustic. It
sounds kind of interesting at first,
but then it starts getting quieter until
the music fades out entirely and you
are just left withCope talking through
the last minute of the song.
Through the next two songs, "I
Gotta Walk" and "Ain't No Gettin'
Round Gettin' Round Cope starts
experimenting a little too much.
These twosongsare the hardest driv-
ing electric tracks on the album. In "1
Gotta Walk" Cope totally changes
his voice, and you really cannnot
understand a thing that he says.
"Ain't No Gettin' Round Gettin'
Round" just scunds like a bunch of
unorganized noise. It has no obvi-
ous focus. This is definitely a part of
the album to fast forward through.
The rest of the album contains
mostly instrumentals. They sound
kind of interestingat times, butnoth-
ing 1 would listen to intentionally. I
felt like the album ended after the
third song. There was nothing really
worth listening to after "Don't Call
Me Mark Chapman
� Daniel
Willis
All-Stars have two main purposes:
1) to put a glide in your stride and a
dip in your hip and bring you on
board the mother ship; 2) to free
your mind so your ass will follow.
Clinton (like Nick Cave) is some-
thing that must be seen to be under-
stood. At one time there were at
least 20 people on stage, each play-
ing an instrument, singing or danc-
ing. The mass of instruments and
people on stage cranked out some
ofthefunkieststuff this sideof James
Brown. The All-Stars rocked the
house with standards like "Atomic
Dog" and newer songs off their
latestalbum"HeyManSmellMy
Finger To the eye they were like
chaos theory in action and to theear,
pure funk.
1 he Beastie Boys took the stage
just as the sun was going down.
Their set consisted of two things:
punk and rap, and they shifted back
and forth between these two styles
with relative ease. Their set started
the first real pitof theday,especially
when they cranked ou t some of the
harder punk tunes like "Tough
Guy It was refreshing to see that
after years of success they still man-
age to act like they just got out of
high school; their energy was re-
lentless. Thev ended with " Rhymin'
and Stealin off their first major
album License to 01, and exited with
the crowd still worked up into a
frenzy.
Next up was the last band and
See LOLLAPALOOZA page 29
Coming
Attractions
Appearing soon for your
edification and amusetnent:
Wednesday, Aug. 24
Mike Mulvaney on ECU
campus 11:30-1:00 p.m.
(same time Thursday)
Tltursday, August 25
Dillon Fence with Five-
Eight at the Attic
(alternative)
Bottom Lion at the Cat's
Cradle in Carrboro
reggae)
"Naked Gun 3313" at
Hendrix Theatre
(movie comedy)
FREE!
Runs through
Saturday
Friday, August 26
Fountain of Youth at
O'Rock's
(funkrapreggae)
Gibb Droll with 7
Feathers at the Attic
(roofs rock)
June at the Cat's Cradle
in Carrboro
(alternative)
Saturday, August 27
Purple Schoolbus at the
Attic (roofs rock)
Unsound at O'Rock's
(heavy metal)
Cloud Nine at Peasant's
Cafe (roots rock)
Great American Blues
Festival at Walnut Creek
in Raleigh
(Featuring: B.B. King,
Little Feat, Dr. John, and
Alligator All-Star Band)
Monday, August 29
The Spencers at Hendrix
Theatre (magic)
FREE!
SOU p.m.
-





22 The East Carolinian
August 24. 1994
Ford chooses another quality film role
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
1 Harrison Ford has become
drre of the few actors whose films
always display some amount of
artistic integrity. Usually one cites
directors, or possibly screen-
writers, as the artistic component
of a given film that serves as a
barometer of the film's quality.
Actors can emote perfectly in a
shoddy story and the film will be
shoddy despite the actor's best
attempts to overcome the flaws.
A Jack Nicholson film may pique
more interest than a 'ilm starring
lesser-known players, but the in-
tegrity of the film remains a co-
nundrum until the film is viewed.
' Harrison Ford has now been
acting for over 20 years and has
established the simple fact that
he does not choose poor films in
which to star. Ford's private life
has remained remarkably private
� he leaves his home in Wyo-
ming only a few times a year to
make a film � but enough has
been learned of this quietly as-
sured man to know that he only
�selects films which attain a cer-
tain, level of quality.
'Bruce Willis often talks about
I they'crap shoot" of choosing roles,
�but his claim that luck determines
'what will make a good film de-
nies the fact that most films need
J to have some earmarks of quality
; before production ever begins.
I Ford has a keen sense for choos-
I ing roles as evidenced by the re-
� markable commercial and criti-
-cal success of most of his films.
; Even the lesser-known films like
; Regarding Henry and Frantic sat-
! isfy the viewer.
Ford's latest selection is an
adaptation of the Tom Clancy
; hovel Clear and Present Danger.
:Ford reprises the role of Jack
:feyan, which he assumed in Pa-
triot Games after Alec Baldwin
" (who played Ryan in The Hunt for
-Red October) was replaced. True
to form, Ford has selected a ve-
�"fiide that is suited to his talents
.nd which has quality people as-
:pociated with it.
5 In Clear and Present Danger,
Ryan must take over as acting
deputy director of the CIA when
i; Admiral James Greer (marvel-
5 Jusly portrayed again by James
h 2Earl Jones) becomes ill. Ryan finds
� 3iimself enmeshed in a private
� 3war the United States is fighting
� against the Colombian drug car-
Z el. As the ads for Clear and Present
ganger rightly proclaim: "Truth
Steeds a soldier Ryan finds his
? 3oyalties tested when he learns of
� 3the covert operations being un-
Z lertaken by the government un-
S jler the auspices of national secu-
j 5ity. The title itself comes from
? "the president of the United States
"himself (played with deliberate
�J befuddlement combined with a
�ZCralty wile by Donald Moffat),
;Iwho says that the "drug cartels
:3�fesent a clear and present dan-
Igelr to lhe national security of the
l United States
�: � '� Clear and Present Danger has
I Jeen criticized for its lethargic
; I 3ace, but when reading these cri-
;j piques I wonder if critics have
Welcome Back
Students
succumbed to the same mental-
ity that most movie producers
have, which is to view the audi-
ence with little respect. So many
films are filled with explosions,
killings, chases and fights that a
high quality film with a deliber-
ate pace no longer warrants com-
mendation. I wonder if Alfred
Hitchcock would be viewed as a
master in today's cinematic mi-
lieu since most of his films unfold
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at a deliberate pace meant to en-
gage all the viewer's attention.
Clear and Present Danger takes
nearly two and a half hours to tell
its tale and never once does it lag.
Though explosions do not occur
frequently, the ones that do affect
the viewer because of the fierce-
ness and brutality associated with
them.
The story takes place in three
areas: the government, of which
Ryan is a part, the drug lords in
Colombia, and the covert team
led by Clark (Willem Defoe) sent
into Colombia to wage war
against the drug lords. Each of
the three stories intrigue the
viewer and keep his mental
wheels turning to understand
who is who and what they are
doing. The characters weave in
and out of the three stories and
keep the viewer on his mental
toes to follow the plot twists.
One of the nice attributes of
Clear and Present Danger is that the
world is not danger of being blown
up nor is a country in danger of
beginning World War III. Instead
the plot revolves around a drug
cartel, and the government inter-
cedes to try to thwart the drug
trade. Like Patriot Games before it,
Clear and Present Danger maxi-
mizes its effect by minimizing the
scale of the story. Some may read
the film as a condemnation of the
U.S. government, but the story it-
self is really just a tight-knit tale of
espionage that happens, in this
case, to involve the presidency
of the United States.
Clear and Present Danger de-
serves to be seen and it deserves
more praise than has been doled
out by the press. A stellar cast,
quality direction by Phillip
Noyce and a strong adaptation
of Clancy's work (although the
author was displeased with the
result) combine to make Clear
and Present Danger one of the
summer's best films.
On a scale of one to ten, Clear
and Present Danger rates an eight.
"Simplify, simplify"
Henry David Thoreau
"Hey that's not a bad idea
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TTiiiilWiffi
August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 23
Hey, You! Yeah, you!
Don't put this paper
down until you've
checked out our super-
cool photo feature on
pages 30 & 31!
Jackson packs 'em in at the Creek
NOW TWO CAN DINE FOR JUST $15
Choose from these delicious entrees:
8 oz Tenyaki Top Sirloin Darryl's Chicken & Pasta
Lasagna Cajun Fried Shrimp Grilled Polynesian Chicken.
Includes your choice of coffee, tea or fountain drink.
Monday - Thursday 4 p.m. till Closing.
Oter gooa tor a I'mited time �lv93 GiloertRobmson, inc
By Martin Newton
Staff Writer
It's 8:15 p.m. and I finally ar-
rive at my seat. Not the one I just
got up from, but the one that's
listed on my ticket stub. The
booming sounds of Hip Hopster
M.C. Lyte and crew warm up the
anxious crowd as last-minute
stragglers enter the pavilion from
the torrential late-July rain. I'm
seated next to this perky blond
named Tiffany who is telling her
friend that the venue is at or near
capacity. She smells like Molson
Ice.
Anyone familiar with the
Walnut Creek Amphitheater
should remember the enormous
lawn that makes a half moon
around the rear of the venue. Well,
just before M.C. Lyte closes her
set with her hit song "Rough-
neck I notice that not one blade
of grass can be seen on the lawn.
This should give some indication
as to how many people attended
the concert despite the rain.
The time is now 9:10 p.m. and
the excitement rises as the rest-
less crowd shouts "Janet! Janet!
Janet As the curtain rises to
thunderous applause, Janet's
stark silhouette is seen on all six
of the amphitheater's screens. As
the pyrotechnic smoke clears, a
large box m
drops from
the ceiling,
and Janet ap-
pears on top
of it. The ex-
citement of
the crowd
reaches an-
other level.
Janet
Jackson is an
actress,
songwriter,
singer and
superstar
who majesti- �������������i
cally combines those attributes
with multi-million dollar stage
settings, world-class dancers and
pyrotechnics that include explo-
sions, sparkles and shooting
flames. This all adds up to one of
Just before M. C.
Lyte closes her
set I notice that
not one blade of
grass can be
seen on the
lawn.
the most exciting concerts I have
ever attended.
Janet opened with the tune
"If I Was Your Girlfriend Dur-
ing this set she strutted across the
stage with a body that looks as if
she works out 24 hours a day. The
songs "What
Have You
Done for Me
Lately" and
"Nasty" fol-
lowed.
A couple
of the more
noticeable
twists found
at a Janet
Jackson con-
cert are the
skits and
stage acting
going on
����������i while she
sings.
Also amazing are the number
of costume changes made by
Janet, the dancers and the rest of
the people on stage with little or
no break in the action.
Janet performed material,
from her last three albums, in-
cluding the "Rhythm Nation
set, which coincided with crisp,
flashy dance moves and those
black uniforms seen in the
video.
Several ballads were also
performed. Among these:
"Something You Should
Know where Janet found a
volunteer from the audience to
come up on stage while she
sang to him, and "Again
where Janet sat alone on stage
and cried near the end of the
song. Needless to say, the
crowd became fully involved.
At various other points
during the show Janet and her
dancers influenced the crowd
to sing or dance along. This,
too, was met with a harmonic
ous response.
From the light show to the
sound system to Janet's versa-
tile abilities, the show was defi-
nitely world class. If one word
could describe it all, I would
have to say unreall
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24 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
Migraine, anyone
�a
Migraine headaches affect mil-
lionsof peopleevery day. More than
18 million Americans seek medical
advice for headache problems, mak-
ing headaches a top ten reason for
visiting the doctor. Migraine head-
aches can be described as a more
severe or intense headache than nor-
mal, usually affecting one side
ofthehead.Inmanycases
this pain is accompa-
nied by nausea and
vomiting.
College stu- Sr
dentsmaybeprone
tomigrainesdueto
the many factors j
thatprecipitatethese r
headaches. For ex-
ample, stress, altered
sleeping patterns, alcohol, food,
allergies, light andor sound sensi-
tivity, allergies, hypoglycemia, oral
contraceptives and other drugs can
all contribute to the onset of a mi-
graine headache. It has also been
determined that more females get
migraines than males.
Migraines can be classified into
anumberof differentcategories. The
classic migraine, or migraine with aura
(the visual or the neurological distur-
bance that people may experience
approximately thirty minutes prior
to an attack) is characterized by neu-
rologic symptoms related to visual
and sensory systems. The common
migraine, or migraine without aura,
often occurs more fre-
quentlyandlastslonger
than the classic mi-
graine. One com-
mon way this mi-
i graine occurs is
fc upon awakening.
More complicated
migraines, includ-
ing basilar,
optnalmoplegjc, famil-
ial hemiplegic and reti-
nal migraines, occur on rare
occasions.
To coincide with the many cat-
egories of migraine headaches, there
are also a number of different treat-
ments for migraines. Analgesics
anti-inflammatory drugs such as as-
pirin, ibuprofen, acetaminophen
(Tylenol) and other over-the-counter
medications have been used to treat
f By Heather Zophy
� Student Health Services
mild to moderate migraines. While
these drugs are designed to relieve
pain, overuse of analgesics has been
known to actually cause headaches.
Other tvpes of abortive therapy in-
clude Ergot Alkaloids, used to treat
moderately severe migraine head-
aches, and Sumatriptan, used as an
acute treatment for moderately se-
vere classic and common migraines.
Prophylactic therapy may be
prescribed for those individuals who
experience migraines two or more
times a month which do not respond
to abortive therapy. Methysergide,
Beta-Adrenergic Blockers, Tricyclic
Antidepressants, Calcium Channe!
Blockers and Nonsteroidal Anti-In-
flammatory Drugs are examples of
prophylactic treatments, and they
may be accompanied by side affects.
Migraines can be a very disrup-
tive disorder, and they pose many
questions for headache sufferers. To
Ieam more about migraines, please
attend the one-hour session on mi-
graine headaches Monday, Aug. 29.
The session will be held at ECU Stu-
dent Health Center in the lobby area
at 7:00 p.m and admission is free.
Quayle questions press
By Brian Hall
Opinion Editor
During his four years in office,
Dan Quay le suffered the slings and
arrows of an overwhelmingly nega-
tive press corps, as well as the re-
lentless jokes of late night comedi-
ans. Now, in what is surely only the
first shot in an attempted come-
back, Quayle has prod uced his ver-
sion of the Bush presidency and his
role therein, Standing Firm (Harper
Collins).
To many, including Dan
Quayle, the coverage of the former
vice-president proved just how bi-
ased the media is against conserva-
tives. A large portion of this mem-
oir is devoted to the relationship
between Quayle and the press. In
fact, after reading this account, one
might think that the political oppo-
sition to the Bush administration
was not the Democratic Party, but
the American press. No member of
the Democratic Congressional
Leadership is mentioned more than
once or twice. If it is his intention to
run in 1996, one must wonder if
this book is intended to help him
win the general election, or simply
the nomination. Of course, in the
primaries, his only opposition
would be the press, his public per-
ception as an idiot, and other Re-
publicans.
According to Quayle, the fault
for his bad relationship with the
press belongs to the 1988 Bush cam-
paign staff, specifically Stu Spen-
cer and Joe Canzeri, his assigned
"handlers and James Baker. Spen-
cer and Canzeri are blamed for both
imposing a style of campaigning
not suitable to Quayle's style, and
for leaking information to the press
(in an attempt to make themselves
look better) about how difficult a
job thev were given. Baker is blamed
for not being supportive of the
president's choice for running
mate. Beinga realistic politician,
Quayle is quite ready to forgive
Baker for this. What this heady
politician is not ready to forgive
Baker for is his lack of prepara-
tion, a mortal political sin.
This lack of preparation
showed throughout the 1988
election, beginning at the con-
vention in New Orleans. Before
the surprise pick for vice-presi-
dent was announced, Baker had
assured Quayle that the press
would be given all necessary in-
formation about him. Instead,
the press was left to fend for
itself. Quayle believes that this
did two things. First, it unneces-
sarily' aggravated the press, by
leaving them unprepared for
See QUAYLE page 28
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To the Mighty Zombie
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Thursday 5:00.
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New Zombies
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From ECU, Take Charles St. 1 mile to ASAP
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"PARADE APPLICATIONS, CANDIDATE APPLICATIONS, AND ALL-ACTIVITIES APPLICATIONS
DEADLINES ARE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1994. YeOTS of
THURSDAY October 13, 1994 Homecoming Representative ElectionsCampus
8am - 5pmBelk Allied Health
8am - 5pmCollege Hill
8am - 5pmECU Student Stores
8am - 5pmECU School of Medicine
9am - 6pmMendenhall Student Center
WEDNESDAY October 26, 1994 "Noon Day Tunes" 11:30am - 1 pm
ECU Student Stores - Featuring Melanie Sparks
Banner Contest Judging - ECU Student Stores
THURSDAY October 27, 1994 "Noon Day Tunes" 11:30am - 1pm rT?T n rfT C
Mendenhall Student Center-Featuring Melanie Sparks HAlvb-U V loHJlN j
"An Evening With MARSH A WARFIELD (comedian)"
ConcertWright Auditorium 8 PM 10PM
For Ticket Information, call ECU Central Ticket Office at 757-4788
FRIDAY October 28, 1994 PIRATEFEST, The Mall, 5:30pm - 7pm
SATURDAY October 29, 1994 HOMECOMING PARADE - 10am - 11am
HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME 2:00 PM
UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI BEARCATS VS ECU PIRATES
HOMECOMING COURT ANNOUNCEMENT,
HALFTIME
WINNING THE SPIRIT CUP
The Spirit Cup is presented to the organization which presents the most spirit and most closely follows the theme
KS festivities. Each organization will be awarded points for participation m all events dunng
tSe ZecoS week. ?he group with the highest number of points will win the Spoirit Cup. It ,s not necessary to
enter all events to win, but more participation in events increase the poss.b.hty of winning.
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 328 4711
Leo Sebastian J. Marshall





mmtmmmmimmum
August 25, 1994
The East Carolinian 25
Could it happen to anybody?
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
One would be hard-pressed to
find a more engaging romantic
comedy this summer than It Could
Happen to You, starring Nicholas
Cage, Bridget Fonda and Rosie
Perez, and directed by Andrew
Bergman. Charming, delightful and
stupendous aptly describe this film.
It Could Happen to You tellsstory
of an honest, hard-working police-
man named Charlie Lang (Cage).
Charlie works and lives in Queens
and is completely content with his
work and his home. Charlie's wife
Muriel (Perez) longs for a better life
with a house outside of Queens
and thus Muriel faithfully plays
thelottery to make her dreams come
true.
Charlie buys Muriel a lottery
ticket one week and then does not
have enough change to tip his wait-
ress Yvonne (Fonda) at a corner
coffee shop. Charlie offers to give
Yvonne his lottery ticket as a tip,
but Yvonne refuses because all her
luck has been bad (Yvonne is de-
clared bankrupt earlier in the film).
Not to be put off, Charlie promises
to split any winnings from the lot-
tery ticket and even if he does not
win he vows to return the next day
with a proper tip.
Yvonne tells Charlie that she
expects to never see him again, but
Charlie shows up the next day to
split his winnings. Charlie and
Muriel have won $4 million in the
New York State lottery, and now
Charlie feels obligated to give $2
million to Yvonne, much to the con-
sternation of Muriel.
The rest of It Could Happen to
You entails the changes that the
three main characters experience
due to their newly acquired wealth.
Muriel schemes to make more
money, Charlie donates a large
portion of it and Yvonne splurges
with some good groceries.
Nicholas Cage once again
proves his versatility as an actor.
He exudes charm. Following so
closely on the footsteps of Guarding
Tess, Cage seems to be poised to
becomeamajorstar. Being asked to
star in such a wonderful role must
felcome Students!
Immanuel Baptist Church
Let us be your church home
away from home.
Sunday School 9:45
Worship 11:00
College Choir,
Family Night Dinners,
and other activities.
Call 758-1240
for more information
1101 S. Elm St.
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WELCOME
BACK STUDENTS
Old-fashioned
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Yogurt &
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I
I
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I
I
I
I
-I
give Cage a great deal of confi-
dence. Charlie Lang is the type of
character that Car)' Grant could
have played and Cage's perfor-
mance justifies that comparison.
Bridget Fonda has managed to
keep working despite some ill-ad-
vised film choices. In It Coidd Hap-
pen to You, she perfectly portrays
the struggling waitress whose heart
beats with a strong compassion for
humankind.
Rosie Perez, though intensely
unlikable in this film, does her job
well. She seems to relish the role
even though she knows her charac-
ter is destined to be hated.
Though the cast does a marvel-
ous job, the genuine warmth and
good spirit with which It Could Hap-
pen to You is told can be attributed
almost solely to Andrew Bergman.
Bergman most recently wrote and
directed Honeymoon in Vegas, an-
other charming story of love with
healthy dollops of humor scooped
in. Bergman, who also directed and
wrote The Freshman, handles both
chores in It Could Happen to You. He
has crafted a genuinely entertain-
ing and heartwarming fairy tale
that offers the simple pleasures that
recent films seem to have forgot-
ten.
Bergman has incredible fun cre-
ating methods for Charlie to find
philanthropic ways to spend the
lottery money. At one point, Charlie
and Yvonne announce to the sub-
way riders that the fare home that
night is on them. Charlie also takes
the kids from his neighborhood to
Yankee Stadium for a day.
Charlie's magnanimous deeds
are reflected by the generosity of
Bergman to share this film with his
audience. It Could Happen to You
soars on the wings of positive feel-
ings and warm humor. The film
will leave its audience smiling
broadly and wishing the good feel-
ings elicited by the film could last a
long time.
On a scale of one to ten, It CouId
Happen to You rates an eight.
Rock museum expects controversy
The director of a S90-million
shrine to rock 'n' roll music to open
next year in Cleveland figures his
involvement in an obscenity trial
helped him land the job.
He is Dennis Barrie, 47, an out-
spokendefenderof First Amendment
rights and a devotee of rock, which he
claims has changed the world.
"They say the fall of the Berlin
Wall was because of the arms
buildup Barrie says. "That's non-
sense. It was because of Western cul-
ture seeping over the wall and creat-
ing expectation levels and rock had a
big part to do with that
Barrie was head of the Contem-
porary Arts Center in Cincinnati in
1990whenacontroversy erupted over
anexhibitionofphotographsby Rob-
ert Mapplethorpe depicting homo-
sexual acts.
Indicted on obscenity charges,
Barrie was acquitted in a jury trial.
Two years later he resigned from the
museum and started his own com-
pany to develop traveling art exhibi-
tions.
Now Barrieisdirectorof the Rock
andRollHallofFameandMuseumin
Cleveland, housed in a building de-
signedbyarchitectI.M.Peiandsched-
uled to open on Labor Day, 1995.
Had it not been, for the
Mapplethorpe flap, Barrie says, the
rock museum wouldn't have heard
of him.
"Rock 'n' roll has often been the
subject of First Amendment battles
he says. "Rock music is always under
attack. I think that was very relevant
for a lot of the decision-makers who
chose me for the job.
"M you really look back at its
history, you know it has always been
controversial. The music that now
seems nostalgic was considered dan-
gerous stuff when it came out. Elvis
Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Rich-
ard, were considered dangerous by
parents. Lyrics were controversial.
Rap and heavy metal are still rebel-
lionand themusicof younger people,
hard for older generations to deal
with"
The rock shrine, Barrie says, "is
such an exciting project it lured me
back into the museum world.
"I think popular culture hasbeen
one of the most powerful forces of the
last 40 or 50 years and it has acceler-
ated in the last 20 years. It's the most
accessibleofall popular cultural forms.
All you need is a radio or a cassette
player. Rock is 60 percent of all the
music sold in the world, probably
higher in the United States
Bairie'scalendarlists48rockcon-
certs he hopes to attend this summer.
"We try to get bands to come
down to the construction site he
says. "Pink Hoyd came down. They
were blown away by the scale and
scope of it. They're going to give us
some of their stage props
Other acquisitions include Jim
Morrison's Cub Scout uniform, Jimi
Hendrix's handwritten lyrics to
"Purple Haze" and one of Keith
Moon's high-school report cards
which said he was "doing miserably
in everything except music apprecia-
tWL"
"The museum wants to portray
rock 'n' roll and its impact on society
in an honest way Barrie says. "That
means we won't skirt over the
controversies. We want to deal
with how it affected our political
and social structure and racial re-
lationships
The Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame began holding banquets in
1983 to honor people whocontrith
uted to the music. An annual an-
nouncementthatthemuseumwill
open the following year had be-
come a joke at the banquets.
Cleveland was chosen for the
museum site in 1986, principally
because of the willingness of the
city, Cuyahoga County and the .
state of Ohio to raise money for it .
Moneyalsocamefromtherecord- �
ing industry.
"Cleveland disc jockey Alan.
Freed popularized rhephraserock-
'n' roll Barrie says. "He played
themusic. Butthe main reason for
the museum's location is that the,
city pursued the project with a
vengeance. Civic leaders really,
wanted it, for tourism. They orga-
nized a campaign, got popular
support and found the money
See MUSEUM page 29
The Word is OUT!
BOOK
WAREHOUSE
3525 S. Memorial Drive 355-5758
WELCOME
BACK
COLLEGE
STUDENTS

:��
Roses would like you
to get to know usWe invite
you to visit us and use this
10 off discount certificate on
your first total purchase of the
school year.
Detatch coupon here I iDetatch coupon here
r
-
it
WELCOME BACK TO COLLEGE
11
THIS CERTIFICATE
ENTITLES BEARER TO
10 OFF
YOUR TOTAL
PURCHASE
Good at any Roses store until 10194. Does not include layaway purchase or payment.
Discount does not apply toward purchase of alcoholic beverages or tobacco products.
I

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26 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
Photo Courtesy of Silvertone Records
Blues guitar legend B.B. King will be playing this
Saturday at the Hardee's Walnut Creek Amphitheatre as
part of the Great American Blues Festival. Imagine, if
you will, relaxing on the lawn to B.Bs soothing songs
of evil women, booze-soaked poverty and the sad funk
that is the blues. Also appearing at Walnut Creek this
Saturday as part of the Blues Festival will be '70s blues
rock champion Dr. John, the legendary Little Feat and
the Alligator All-Star Band.
Would you like to be a member of an
award winning team? If the answer is yes,
EXPRESSIONS is the organization for you.
Expressions has been awarded:
� First Place - American Scholastic Press Association
� Most Improved Medium - The East Carolinian
� Most Outstanding Medium Student Media Board
� Five Marks of Distinction
Excellence in special audience
Magazine journalism - Associated College Press
We are looking for committed young men
and women who aren't afraid of a
challenge. Our expectations are high.
We are not just a student publication.
The following positions are available in
the academic year 1994-1995.
� Advertising and Circulation Director
� Copy Editor s
� Typesetter
� Staff Writers (2)
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28 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
QUAYLE
Continued from page 24
commenting intelligently on the
new candidate's career and life. Sec-
ond, lack of knowledge created an
atmosphere where the wildest ru-
mors were accepted as fact.
Quayle spends much of the
book trying to debunk these ru-
mors, many of which are still circu-
lated as fact today. An example is
the widely held belief that Quayle
had been extremely wealthy his
entire life. In fact, while his grand-
father did amass an immense for-
tune in the newspaper business, he
did not believe in inherited wealth,
and left his children only small
amounts. Adding to this miscon-
ception is Quayle's full name, James
DanforthQuayle. While this sounds
like an upper class name (so much
so that many reporters insisted on
putting a IH after it, even long after
the election), in fact, it is in honor of
a friend of his father, James
Danforth, who was killed in the
Second World War.
Clearly, much of the coverage
of Quayle in 1988 was completely
unfair. The media fell over them-
selves following false leads, sug-
psring that Quayle had used un-
due influence to get into the Na-
tibnaKiuard during Vietnam, that
he had plagiarized while in college
and that he had a long time drug
problem. Just how unfair the ques-
tioning became can be seen in the
vice-presidential debate. Three
times he was asked what he would
do if he became president. On the
surface this might seem a fair ques-
tion to put to a young politician
with limited political experience.
However, two Democrats who ran
for their party's nomination that
same year, Al Gore and Dick
Gephardt, and who were both
elected to Congress for the first time
the same year as Quayle, were not
put through the same scrutiny.
The press' obsession with
Quayle continued after the elec-
tion, as they were constantly on the
lookout for gaffes. Quayle believes
that the press by this time had in-
vested so much time and effort into
the caricature that they had drawn
that they looked for justifications
for this image. While visiting
American Samoa, Quayle, noticing
that there were many children in
attendance, innocently made a com-
ment that there were a bunch of
"happy campers" at a rally. Some-
how the press decided that the fact
that Quayle mispronounced the
name of de Tocqueville was fur-
ther proof of hisstupidity. Perhaps
the worst case of all is the still wide
spread belief that Quayle once said,
after touring Latin America, that
he wished that he had studied Latin
more in school. In fact, this was a
Quayle joke, told by Rep. Claudine
Schneider in 1989 at a Belgian em-
bassy function. It has been reported
as fact ever since.
Quayle makes a fairly strong
case that he was a fair vice-presi-
dent. The second job is a strange
position, and has unusual require-
ments. A veep must provide pri va te
counsel in policy debates. He must
then provide unequivocal public
support for whatever the
aclrninistration'spositioneventually
is. A perfect example of this is the
infamousbudget deal of 1990 which
might have cost Bush the re-elec-
tion. Quayle vociferously opposed
the deal administration meetings,
but once made, he became one of
the loudest proponents of the plan.
In his only official duty, as president
of the Senate, Quayle relates that he
frequently called on Tom Harkin,
since he knew that the senator's in-
temperate rhetoric would winmore
votes for the Republican side than
any impassioned speech for a mea-
sure. He represented America on
foreign visits without any embar-
rassing gaffes.
Quayle claims that the foremost
requirement for a vice-president is
loyalty, and he certainly displays
this characteristic. The closest
Quayle comes to criticizing his old
boss, George Bush, is that he was
too kind, too forgiving for his own
good. Bush was "the kind of man I
would aspire to be myself, and
would want my sons to emulate
Bush was greatly disturbed by
people not getting along. He did not
want fights within the administra-
tion. This certainly rings true. Bush
seemed to be the consummate com-
promiser, having no firm beliefs of
his own, especially in domestic af-
fairs.
Quayle, without a doubt, has
much better political instincts and
cared more about the success of the
Bushpresidency than the president.
Bush did best when he followed the
advice of his vice-president, as in
the Gulf War, and worst when he
went against Quayle's advice, like
the 1990 budget deal.
Dan Quayle could only have
two possible motives for writing
this book. One would be to try to get
his side of the story of the Bush
presidency, and his role therein, out
to the public in an attempt to rescue
something of his public image. If
this was his motivation, then he has
made an excellent first step. Most
people by now realize that it would
be impossible for Quayle to be the
drooling idiot that he has been made
out to be. If, on the other hand, this
book is merely the first shot in a
campaign for president in 19, then
he has much further to go. While the
book undoubtedly will help his pub-
lic image, it only will not, nor should
it, answer all the questions that the
American people have about his
abilities and intelligence. While not
terribly well written, the book is
worth picking up, if for no other
reason than so you can make up
your mind, instead of relying on the
news to do your thinking for you.
"Can't shake
hands with
boxing gloves.
With whips
and chains,
don't ever
make love
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(pre-sell-out)
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WTt ��������� ��





August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 29:
ETHERIDGE
biggest "gunbut Etheridge pulled
it off, as the song was only a pre-
lude for what was to come. "No
Souvenirs" from Brave and Crazy
followed and Etheridge teased her
crowd with a slower, but still rock-
ing version.
Etheridge greeted her crowd
after this song immediately bring-
ing the farthest fan on the Pa vilion's
lawn into her intimate stage show.
In just seven minutes, Etheridge
turned an audience of thousands
into the attentive equivalent of a
nightclub crowd. Etheridge jumped
into "If I Only Wanted To from
Yes I Am, and brought the house
down withher intertwined version
of "Don't You Need" and "Similar
Features" from her self-titled de-
but. "Resist" and "Yes I Am" fol-
lowedfromher latestrelease, work-
ing the crowd into a frenzied roar.
Etheridge then made her bold-
est move of the night as a lamp-
light descended from the ceiling
and hung over the performer's
head. Etheridge brought the audi-
ence into her world of eight years
ago, when the singer was playing
back-alley bars around her home-
town ofKansas using only anacous-
tic guitar and a microphone. She
kicked off an acoustic version of
"Ain't It Heavy" off Never Enough
that brought the audience singing
Continued from page 21
the chorus with Etheridge at the
top of their lungs. Etheridge, witha
chuckle, asked the audience,
"Where were you eight years ago?"
"Occasionally" and "You Can
Sleep While I Drive" heralded the
return of the band for the highlight
of the show "Chrome-Plated
Heart Drummer David Byer
played an incredible solo, at one
point striking his sticks on
Etheridge's and Guitarist John
Shank's acoustic guitar. "Silent
Legacy" followed by "American
Girl" and "I'm the Only One"
brought the audience to its feet,
and "2001" and "Must Be Crazy
For Me" got the crowd dancing on
them.
Etheridge left the stage to her
firsthit, "Somebody BringMeSome
Water returning for an encore
with "Like the Way IDo Etheridge
returned for a second time with
'Talking to My Angel bidding
her goodbyes to the crowd. She
exited the show just as she had
entered it, smiling and heading off
the stage with her guitar in tow.
She, with the help of her band, had
putonanintenselypassionateshow
and delivered her fans their
money's worth. One day Melissa
Etheridge will join the ranks of the
legends, and it will be because of
nights like July 30.
MUSEUM
Cont. frompage25
Other cdtiesjusttalkedaboutmoney
The building is going up in a
$300-million complex in downtown
Cleveland on Lake Erie, its tower ris-
ing out of the water. The area is being
developed with a science center,
aquarium, amphitheater and parks.
"Our mission istotell the story of
rock 'n' roll Barrie says. "We're try-
ing to pay attention to all different
scenes and streams of rock and make
sure we represent as many key fig-
ures and movements as possible.
"We've got lots on rhythm 'n'
blues and blues. Rapcontinuesalong
tradition in black vocal groups and
speaking forms.
"Wewanttomakepeopleaware
that the streams come together and
split and come together again. Coun-
try music sounds more like rock to-
LOLLAPALOOZA cont mm&
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THE ORDINARY, THE EXTRAORDINARY,
THE UNUSUAL AND UNIQUE
missed the substance. In other
words, they got the nose rings, but
left the lesbians kissing in the grass.
And now "alternative" isn't very
alternative to anything.
So you can thank Lollapalooza
for your Pearl Jam, your'70s-Retro
Time-Warp Fashions, your "Alter-
native Nation" running the same
seven idiot videos in drooling rota-
tion, your Generation-X-
Twentysomething-Slacker media
image, your Kurt Cobain Suicide
Hotline, your Grunge Culture, your
recycled Black Sabbath riffs, your
Green Day watered-down punk re-
vivaLandallyour other emptyhusks
dredged up from the underground
and put on parade for the experts to
rip off and misinterpret.
I've been to every Lollapalooza
(this year was the fourth), and I've
day than a lot of rock does
One circular room in the mu-
seum willhaveavideohistory of rock
music on one side and a video of
simultaneous world events on the
other side.
'There'Uteanothersectionabout
how reck affected hair dress and self-
image Barrie says. "So much was
influenced by the look and style of
rock musicians.
"Some think it'll be a kind of
Disney World attraction While it is
going tobe very exciting and fun tobe
fhere,ifsasubstantivemuseum,with
archives and a library.
Amongmyoldfriendsfromthe
museum world, 90 percent think this
is an exciting job.
"They're all closet rockers any-
way
Continued from page 21
noticed fewer and fewer interesting
peopleeveryyear. Lotsof myfriends
have stopped going. I myself have
vowed after the last two shows to
never go again. Why? Part of it is
the bands. Every year the line-up
gets less and less progressive. In-
stead of influencing the scene,
Lollapalooza hasbecome influenced
by it
But the real reason is that
Lollapalooza has become just an-
other concert. Somewhere in there,
Lollapalooza stopped being a cul-
tural event, a festival celebrating the
underground, and became an ex-
cuse to get stupid drunk, pass out
from heat exhaustion, and wonder
out loud why Aerosmith wasn't in-
vited (all of whichl witnessed atthis
year's show). That's not striking, or
exceptional; that's pathetic.
headlining act for Lollapalooza,
Smashing Pumpkins. Singer Billy
Corganquietly stepped up to the mic,
plugged his guitar in, and said, "We
are the sad band
Then theband jumped right into
"Cherub Rock Their live sound is
nottheclean, produced, technical wiz-
ardryoftheiralbums;itisrawandjust
flat out rocks. I really didn't expect
them to be that good in an arena
setting,buttheyprovedmewrong.In
fart, it seems that they are perfect for
this type of show. Their music is mat
much grander on the larger scale.
Oneofthemorememorable tunes
was "I Am One from their debut
album Gish. They drew the song out
to at least 15 minutes. Slowing the
tempo down in the middle of the
song,Corganwentoffonalittlenihil-
ist tirade about how we all have emp-
tiness as the basic unit of our lives.
Mostof thesongsfheyselected'
to play were the harder ones; how-
ever, the ballad "Disarm" was one
of the few slower gems. I'm a little
biased, but this was the best act of
the day, Top 40 or not. Their talent
as musicians is unquestionable as
weUasfheuabilitytoputononehelJ
of a show.
Well,anotherLollapaloozahas,
come and gone, and all we have to
show for it are dirty Doc Martins
and $30 T-shirts. Musically, this'
year's festival was a grand and di-
verse success. The Mindfield is a
psychedelic-cyber-circus that
proves to be a lot of fun. Despite all
that, there seems to be something
vital missing.
Whatever. See you next year
maybe.
�� i.i
R. Cherry Stokes
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30 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
llapalooza
Montage
Ah, the sights, sounds, and smells of the
Lollapalooza Festival. Maybe we can't
give you the latter two of those
attributes, but we're delivering the goods
on the visuals!
Photos, clockwise from top left:
Q-Tip of A Tribe Called Quest sweats it out in the hot late-afternoon sun;A
lively fan of alternative music enjoys his afternoon at the Lollapalooza
festival (money well-spent, son!); Ad-Rock of the Beastie Boys prepares to
take a flying leap across the stage;MCA, also of the Beasties, takes a
moment to pause in quiet introspection; L7 playing one of the few hard-
driving sets of the day (they're punks�what did you expect?).
All Photos by Leslie Petty
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August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 31
Coming Attractions
Photo Feature
Pictured here is a spate of
Coming Attractions: mu-
sic, movies and enter-
tainment that will be
coming your way soon:
Top left: Bruce Willis and
Jane March steam up the
screen in The Color of
Night. This sexy film ini-
tially received the contro-
versial NC-17 rating for
its graphic love scenes.
Top right: Five-Eight, a
pop-punk band from
Athens, Georgia, will be
opening for Dillon Fence
at the Attic on Thursday.
Bottom right: Don't be
afraid; it's just Gallagher.
He'll be appearing on
campus later this sem-
ester.
Bottom left: It's those
fun-loving guys from
Photo courtesy Taang! records Upside-Down ClOSS.
They're not coming, but
wouldn't we be afraid if
they were?
Photo courtesy Gallagher
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o out and play"
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held during the afternoon and evening hours.
Fitness Centers operate throughout the
day. Adventure trips are offered every week-
end. Special events are happening sporadi-
cally throughout each semester calendar.
Get Involved. Meet new friends. Socialize,
have Fun.
How to Enjoy These Facilities
1. These are the Hours of
Operation for the Drop-In
Recreation facilities.
2. Choose what facility you
want to use.
3. Take your valid ECU l.D.
4. Give your l.D. to our at-
tendant.
5. Work Out!
Christenbury Swimming Pool
Mon. - Fri 6-30am-&:00am
MonFri 11:30am-1:30pm
MonThurs 3:00pm-630pm
Friday 3:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday 12noon-5:OOpm
Sunday - 1:00pm-5O0pm
� Christenbu.y Gymnasium
Mon.Wed.Fri12noon-1:OOpm
Mon.& Wed3:00pm-6:30pm'
B Tues. & Thurs4:00pm -6:30pm
� Friday3:00pm-6:00pm
" Saturday12noon-5:OOpm
' Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
How to Play Intramural Sports
1. This is the schedule of
programs for August &
September.
2. Pick the activities you
want to play.
3. Go to the meeting listed
on the daytimelocation
shown. Or, turn in your
team roster by the dead-
lines indicated.
4. Our staff will tell you
what to do from there.
5. Ask questions if you
have them!
ACTIVITIES OFFERED
August 1994
629 �10am �NFLECU Pick'em begins CG 104
630 �5pm �Flag Football Registration Mtg. Bio 103
630 �9pm � Flag Football Official's Meeting BC 103
631 �5pm -Outdoor 3-on-3 Bball Deadline CG 204
September 1994
96 �5pm �Co-Rec Volleyball Registration
96 �9pm �Co-Rec Volleyball Officials Mtg.
96 �5pm � Sand Volleyball deadline
913 �5pm �Wiffleball Tourney Registration
921 � 3-6pm� Frisbee Golf Singles Tourney
921 �5pm 'Tennis Singles Entry Deadline
927 �5pm �Co-Rec Basketball Meeting
TBA �0cear Spray Table Top football
Bio 103
K 103
CG 204
Bio 103
Disc Crs
CG 204
Bio 103
TBA
Volleyball each Wed. at 5:00pm
Minges Swimming Pool
Mon.Wed.Fri 7:30pm-9:00pm
Tues. & Thurs 6:00pm-8:00pm
Sunday 2:00pm-5:00pm
Aycock Weight Room
The Pipeline Pumphouses
MonThurs 1:00pm-8:00pm
Friday 1:00pm-5:00pm
Sunday 1:00pm-5:00pm
Christenbury Weight Room
MonThurs 6:30am-9:00pm
Friday 6:30am-6:00pm
Saturday 12noon-5:OOpm
Sunday � 1:00pm-5:00pm
Look for October, November, December programs in upcoming
edition? of The East Carolinian.
How to Register for a Fitness Class
Registration Pates
August 30 - September 9
October 17 - 27
Cost per Session
$10.00Students
Session Pates
September 6 - October 14
October 26 - December 6
Cost per Prop-in Class
$5.00 for 5 classesStudents
$20.00FacultyStaffSpouse $10.00FacultyStaffSpouse
Choose from Aerobics, STEP, Low impact, Hi-Lo, Funk, Funk Step, Sport Moves,
Outdoor Athlete, Aquarobics. Hi-Lo STEP. Power STEP, and Toning. Pick up a
class schedule with times, days, location and instructor information in 204
Christenbury Gym and register from 9:O0am-5:00pm.
1. These are the dates you can
register.
2. Take your l.D. and $$ to 204
Christenbury Gym.
3. There, you can pick up the
class schedule. Select a class.
4. Our staff will tell you what to
do from there.
5. Go early the classes fill up
quickly!
Garrett Weight Room
MonThurs
Friday
Sunday
Equipment Check Out
(115 Christenbury Gym)
noon-&:OOpm
noon-5:OOpm
1:00pm -5:00pm
MonThurs
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
10:00am-9:00pm
10:00am-6:30pm
12:00am-5:30pm
,1:00pm-5:30pm
How to Start
a Fitness
Program
Your first step should be a
F1TNES5 F1ZZICLE
FREE to all ECU students, the
Fitness Fizzicles Program assesses
body composition, cardiovascular
endurance, muscular strength and
endurance.flexibility.and blood pres-
sure. Results help in formulating a
personalized plan for improving and
maintaining optimal fitness. Ap-
pointments and wellness Informa-
tion may be obtained In the itness
Assessment Center, 107A CG, dur-
ing posted hours. A nominal fee of
$15 is charged for faculty and staff.

How to Find Adventure
CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
I
SERVICES
1. These are the dates of
our Adventure Trips &
Workshops.
2. Select your adventure.
3. Stop by the Recre-
ational Outdoor Center
(The ROC.) and pick up
the Adventure Program
Guide.
4. You MUST pre-register.
So bring year l.D. and SS.
5. The outdoor staff will
tell you what to do from
there.
Registration for all adventure trips and workshops begin
623. Pre-registration prior to Pre-Trip Meeting required.
THE R.O.C.
Hours of Operation
Mon. & Fri. 11:30-1:30pm & 3:00-6:00pm
Tues, & Thurs. 3:00-6:00pm
Sat. & Sun. Closed
A complete equipment and rental fee listing, information regarding
outdoor resources as well as trip planning assistance is also
available at the ROC durirg operational hours.
If you have a question, call us at 326-6367.
BIDING
Outer Banks Bike Trip
Mtn Bike Maintenance
Swan Quarter Bike Trip
CLIMBING
Climbing I
Rock Climbing II
Climbing III
BACKPACKING
Camping Workshop
Backpacking Workshop
Medoc Mountain Day Hike
Weekend Backpacking Trip
Hammock's Beach Campng
Fall Break Hiking
Winter Backpacking Trip
WINDSURFING
Windsurf Workshop
HORSEBACK RIDING
Beach Horseback Riding
CANOEING
Goose Creek Day Trip
Sate.
92 - 95
104 - 25
1026 - 30
91; 922; 106
102; 1015
99-11; 107-9
99; 107
91b; 105
910
916 - 16
101 & 2
1020 - 24
1111 - 13
917
924
925
Location
Outer Banks, NC
Bicycle Post
Swan Quarter, NC
Climb Tower
Roxboro, NC
Table Rock, NC
ECU Ropes Course
Four C's
Rocky Mt, NC
Steele Creek, NIC
Bear Island, NC
Pisgah Forest
Stone Mountain
Nags Head. NC
Cedar eand, NC
Goose Creek, NC
Workshop and Trip Costs vary per activity. For more specific details
stop by the Recreational Outdoor Center ROC) room 117 Christenbury Gym.
Or pick up ar Adventure Froqram Guide in 204 Christenbury Gymnasium.





The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
Sports
Page 33
Logan set to take charge of 1994 Pirate team
Photo by Leslie Petty
Pirate Coach Steve Logan enters his third year as head coach of the
ECU football program. Logan hopes to avoid the bad luck of 1993.
Crandell back under
center for Pirates
By Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
Sophomore quarterback
Marcus Crandell is once again
the great hope of ECU's foot-
ball future. He knows this feel-
ing well, as he debuted last sea-
son trying to step from the
shadow of the departed
Michael Anderson. In his first
game against the powerhouse
Syracuse Orangemen, Crandell
plaved well, drawing rave re-
views from Pirate fans and na-
tional broadcasters for his poise
and patience. The Pirates lost
the game, but could smile with
the knowledge that they were
building for the future. With
this young Crandell under cen-
ter, there would be a chance at
a successful season.
Then, on one fateful play
in the Pirates' next meeting
against Central Florida,
Crandell was flattened by the
Knights' Emil Ekiyor, dislocat-
ing his ankle and removing him
from the Pirates' lineup. The
hope now deflated, the Pirates
suffered through a 2-9, injury-
plagued season and were
forced to look for 1994 and
Crandell's return.
Once again under the mi-
croscope, Crandell sat down
with TEC's Brian Paiz for a re-
cap of the nightmare of last
season, and to discuss his
dreams for this one.
TEC "What are your ex-
pectations of this season com-
ing up?"
MC: "I'm going to try and
pick up where I left off in the
Syracuse game. Try to improve
in all aspects of my game
TEC: "How far do you
think ECU can go this year?"
MC: "Barring injuries we
can go as far as we can take it.
But I'm always looking for a
perfect season
TEC: "How do the new re-
ceivers affect your passing
game?"
MC: "Adjusting to their
speed and getting the rhythm
and timing down is the hardest
part
TEC "Do you feel a lot of
pressure coming into this sea-
son
MC: "I try not to think
about it too much. I just try to
stay focused and do my job on
the football field
TEC: "Having to give Jun-
ior Smith the ball a lot, does
that affect your passing as far
as not getting enough
throws?"
MC: "No that doesn't af-
fect me at all. Although we are
going to pass, I'll be trying to
give Junior the ball as much as
possible. He's the main player
in our offense and he is going
to win games for us in the fu-
ture
TEC: "You open up with
Duke on September 10. The
last time ECU played Duke we
got embarrassed. Is there a re-
venge factor this year?"
MC: "I think this year we
are going to try and redeem
ourselves. If we go to Duke
and play well it will prove that
we can play with ACC teams
TEC: "Do you get com-
pared to Jeff Blake a lot?"
MC: "I've been compared
to him many times. I try not to
let itget into my head. It makes
me feel good though, seeing
that Jeff Blake is in the NFL
TEC: "How did you come
back mentally from your in-
jury you suffered last year?"
MC: "All I did was think
about how hard I had worked
to get to that point, and I just
tried to put everything into
perspective
TEC: "How much do you
think ECU's football program
will be affected if they get into
a football conference?"
MC: "I think it will send
ECU's football program to new
heights. I think the '94 season
will set the tone to show if we
can play with the higher level
of talent
TEC: "Did you almost
change your mind to come to
ECU after Bill Lewis left?"
MC: "No, not at all. One of
the main reasons I came to
ECU was because of Steve
See CRANDELL page 41
By Warren Sumner
Sports Editor
ECU football coach Steve Logan
is, if nothing else, a resilient man. The
past vear has been a turbulent time
for Logan, as his football team suf-
fered through an injurv-plagued 1993
campaign that saw his hopes for a
successful season rum around 180
degrees; along with his starting
quarterback's foot.
The sickening blow to Marcus
Crandell in lastseason'ssecondgame
would be enough to drive most
coachesstark-ravingmad,but Logan
quietly and painfully endured tine
loss while trying to keep focused on
the remainder of the year. Now, Logan
lias the prom ise of a new year to keep
him focused, along with the pressure
of winning football games.
The coach took time away from
the team 'sstrenuous three-a-day prac-
tice schedule to sit and talk with 77t'
Enst Carolinian about that promising
future and how he endured the pain-
ful past.
TEC: "SoCoach, how have three-
a-days been going?"
Steve Logan: "They've been go-
ing good, we've dodged the rain,
miraculouslywe've gotten all the
practices in and the kids are healthy
and in really good shape. (Strenghth
and Conditioning Coach) Jeff
Connors did a great job with the kids
in the off-season so we'll put on the
pads (Friday, Aug. 19) and get to
work on real football. The practices
liavejustbeen geared to installing the
schemes for the new players and tech-
nique work
TEC: "How would you assess
the condition of your returning play-
ers?"
SL: "Outstanding. See, we had
almost our whole team in summer
school and we onlv had three kids
here because they had to get eligible,
an improvement from three years
ago when we had 25 so conse-
quently we had about 50 kids work-
ing with Coach Connors so they were
rcxrk hard when they showed up for
practices
TEC: "Has the defensive staff
change affected the team much?"
SL: "Not really. I think Larry
(Coyer, the departed defensive coor-
dinator) came in and built a base and
Paul (Jette) has really been the perfect
personality to come inI really think
he's going to take us to the next level.
We've talked to our (defense) about
reaching the Top 30, that's a goal that
I have set for them. We've gone from
103 to45and I think vve'vegotenough
nucleus to go up another 15 slots,
depending if we can improve on our
secondary
TEC: "In press conferences you
liave talked very excitedly about the
size of the defensive line
SL We'renotr'eep in thedefen-
sive line, but we've got a 275-lb, 3-
technique (DT) in Walter Scott, a 275-
Ib. noseguard in John Krawczyk, a
238-lb. rushing linebacker in Willie
Brookinsall those kids are 15 lbs.
heavier. Again, that's a tribute to Jeff
Connors. Mark Libiano's 235, Mo
Foreman's 235. We look better and
we haven't lost any speed. In fact, I
think we've gained a little
TEC: "Coach Jette seems to be
more oriented to the secondary than
Coyer was
SL: "Yeah, his expertise is more
towards that back end, plus I've
moved Chuck Pagano back there,
Chuckbrings an enthusiasm, he'sgot
them fired up back there. We've got
Emmanuel McDaniel back at
comerback, and If Emmanuel's go-
ing to do it, it'll be this year. Hank
Cooper is back in the saddle, he's
come back plus we've got some
freshman and we're waiting to see if
anyone's going to step up. The sec-
ondary is still a focus of attention but
we feel pretty good with the way
things are going
TEC: "Talking to Jette, it seems
the emphasis will be put on turnover
ratios and scoring defense
SL: "Exactly, and that is some-
thing that Paul has done well wher-
ever he has been Offensively, we
have todoabetter job in taking careof
the ball, I think if we do that it'll help
out our defensive unitI think to be
successful here at ECU we need to
develop a more conservative offen-
sive approach than we've had in years
past. We'll still throw the ball long
and havesuccess, therebut it's time to
revamp our scheme a little
TEC: "So we can look for a
more ball-control oriented offense
this season?"
SL: "Well, lastyearJuniorSmith
ran the ball an average of 25 times a
game. Given what happened with
his numbers last year, I would be a
fool not to give him the ball as much
this year
7EC: "You've got some big
players blocking for him
SL: "Certainly, with Damon
Wilson in our backfield and Jerris
McPhail at half, I thinkjuniorcould
be up foranotheroutstandingyear.
John Peacock has also been a pleas-
ant surprise; he could see a fair
share of playing time
TEC: "Do you think that the
fact thatECU is not oneof your "big
football schools" will affect Junior
Smith's chances at a Heisman tro-
nhi' r rihpr nost-season awards?"
SL: "Well.letmeputitlikethis.
Ever since the 1991 season, we here
at East Carolina, in this staff, have
walked around with a chip on our
shoulder. Thatyearwehad the best
linebacker in college football and
the Lombardi award was given to
anotherplayer from another school.
We were told quite pointedly by the
committee that our guy would not
win because it wouldn't look pres-
tigious enough to give that award
SeeLOGANpace43
MLB veteran still strong
By Dave Pond
Photo by Dave Pond
Brett Butler, an 18-year veteran of professional
baseball, attended the LA Dodgers'summer camp.
Assistant Sports Editor
In his 13th major league season, Los An-
geles Dodgers centerfielder Brett Butler has
become one of the most respected players in
the big leagues, both on and off of the field.
Butler was bom in L.A. and lived there
until he was twelve, when his family moved
to Illinois. Prior to his graduation in 1975, he
became a four-sport letterman at Libertyville
(III.) High School, earning recognition in base-
ball, football, wrestling and cross-country.
"I had a strong mother and a Marine
father Butler said. "They installed good,
strong Christian virtues in me
After high school, Butler attended South-
eastern Oklahoma State, where he was named
twice an All-American and graduated with a
degree in Education in 1979, when he was
signed by Braves scout Bobby Mavis.
In 1979, Butler began his professional
career with the Braves, and his talent and
determination quickly moved him through
four lower-level minor league stops, landing
him in Richmond (AAA) to start the '81
season.
Butler became the Internationl League
MVP in 1981, batting .335 with 83 runs
scored and 103 walks, ideal statistics for a
young lead-off hitter. His accomplishments
earned him an August call-up to the parent
Braves. Butler became the Braves lead-off
man and centerfielder in 1982, and after a
brief demotion to Richmond, was in the
majors to stay.
Butler stayed with the Braves until af-
ter the '83 season, when he was traded to
Cleveland with Brook Jacoby to complete
an earlier deal. During his four-year stay
with the Indians, Butler batted .288 with
164 SBs, good enough to earn him a free-
agent contract with the San Francisco Gi-
ants.
As Butler took his talents to Candle-
stick Park, fans, writers and other players
began to see just how talented the Giants
new centerfielder was. During 1988, his
first season with the Giants, Butler col-
lected his 1,000th career hit off Fernando
SeeBUTLERpage42
Ritz brings exciting boxing action to NC club scene
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
"Let's get ready to rumble
Ring announcer Michael
Buffer's trademark announcement
electrified the Ritz crowd prior totlie
main event
On the evening of Aug. 17th,
"The 10th Rumble at the Ritz" took
place in Raleigh before a near-capac-
ity crowd at the Ritz Theater. The
main event was to feature former
heavyweightchampion LeonSpinks
against South Carolina's Eddie
Curry. However, Spinks sprained
an ankle training for the fight, and
the main event had the World Box-
ing Association's 6 contender
Harold Warren (28-6) earning a 10-
round unanimous decision over
Shawn Thornton (11-5) in a classic
welterweight matchup.
The two fighters were competi-
tive throughout the fight, with most
()f Warren's, the shorter of the fight-
ers, punches directed towards
Thornton's body, while Thornton
chose his opponent's head as his
primary target Thornton opened up
comfortably and was the aggressor
through the first few rounds. The
more experienced Warren chose to
feel out his opponent and slowly
increased his dictation of the fight.
In the fourth round, both fight-
ers landed clean crisp shots, but
neithersuccumbedlohisopponent's
power. The toe-to-toe battle contin-
ued throughout the middle rounds,
as Warren slowly became the ag-
gressor and continued to step up the
intensity of the fight.
In the late rounds, both fighters
continued to land good shots, but to
no avail: In the 10th round, Warren
landed a hard right that stunned
Thornton, who responded with a
flurry that backed Warren into a
corner. In the last minute of the fight,
both fighters returned to their game
plans, with Thornton jabbing to the
body.
However, the best fight of the
evening came on the undercard. In
the junior middleweight division,
Reggie Strickland (46-17) earned a
hard-fought fifth-round TKO vic-
tory over Richie White (15-7-2). The
two fighters stood their ground in an
action-packed matchup, trading
knockdowns in the third round (con-
sequentially, the best round of the
night). The fight was stopped when,
after a powerful flurry from
the towel, stopping the fight at 1:03
of Round 5.
Also on the uppercard, Patrick
"Pretty Boy" Washington upped
his record to 6-0 over 49-year-old
Vietnam vet Jimmy Stariin, who
dropped to 2-3.
Roy "TheSnake" Simpson (11-
14) overpowered a shorter and
lighter TravisGregory (5-1), hand-
ing the former Olympian his first
defeat ina four-round majontyde-
head and Warren hooking to the Srtiekland, White's comer thrtw inSee BOXING page 38
BkaBMMGetting
9 3rT3BfiBHRF9P?-J?"R Efw. HHkA-1 � WttFr�pB?SReady!
L ' j?Z jfciiRrcThe Pirate
VhwHa j �JHb�v Jmk � .mwm�� Bt'lJfootball team works
Wllmhii tftnrVr1 mVhard in
three-a-day
ifAn ' atipractices to
prepare for their 1994 campaign. Photo by Leslie Petty






34 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
libiano builds Pirate defense
: By WarrGn Sumner , mmmmmm
Sports Editor
: One day Mark Libiano wants to
'� build houses. Great big ones. Ever
; since he was a kid, he has watched
; their construction with wonder-
: ment, fascinated by the work that
: went into their building. It led him
to be an Industrial Tech major, and
has given him a dream to realize
; after football.
: In his own way, Libiano has
: been building a house for the past
I two years. With the help of his peers,
- he has laid a strong foundation for
" Ihis structure, tempering its girders
; through tests of fire. The house is
: not finished yet, but with each pass-
: ing day it grows stronger, bigger
jind more elaborate. Libiano is re-
' building the house of the Pirate de-
fense and he is confident in its
I completion.
Junior linebacker Mark Libiano
: also knows a thing or two about
confidence on the football field. He
�has to. At his position, he can not
afford the luxury of hesitation. He
J has to make a decision in a split-
l second, make an attempt at a play
I -and pray like hell he has done the
' tight thing. Fortunately for Libiano,
: more often than not, his prayers are
; answered.
I- In 1993, as a sophomore, Libiano
I led the team in tackles, despite only
playing in nine games. The Easton,
Pa native averaged nearly 13 stops
- a contest and was an on-field leader
; on the Pirate defensive front despite
ius relative youth. While short on
academic class standing, Libiano has
la great deal of experience after be-
'thg "thrown into the fire" in the
; Pirates' 1992 campaign. He and de-
;fensive teammate Morris Foreman
Iwere the only two true freshmen to
�meet the challenge of playing that
�year due to injuries in the Pirate
linebacking corp.
; - Now Libiano and the Pirate de-
fense have a new challenge to meet
as the football program has seen the
See LIBIANO page 42
CONCERT SERIES
YOU'VE GOT TO BE THEREEi
Photo by Leslie Petty
Junior Mark Libiano will be a major factor in the 1994 Pirate defense.
As a sophomore, the linebacker led ECU in tackles last year.
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VICTOR HUDSON





August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 35
Hart working for future of ECU
EAST CAROLINA
COINS & PAWN
INSTANT CASH LOANS
WE BUY GOLD & SILVER
All Transactions Strictly Confidential
0322
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MasterCard.
9-6 M-F
9-5 SAT
By Warren Sumner
Sports Editor
Dave Hart Jr ECU's director of
Athletics, has to meet many criteria
for his job. He has to have organiza-
tional skills, the ability to make tough
decisions and integrity to run his
program. But one quality that is im-
portant for Hart is patience.
It is common knowledge that
ECU is not exactly high on the totem
pole of athletic budgets. ECU is a
proverbial small fish in the big pond
of Division I athletic programs. Hart
and his administration are forced to
work harder for fundraising, obtain-
ing conference affiliations and pub-
lic relations in order to improve the
program on the national level.
This hard workhasbroughtHart
respect on this level, and he has been
courted to lea ve ECU by a number of
bigger-name schools, most recently
Maryland. Hart has decided to stay
with the Pirates to see through some
of the renovations he has brought
about in his tenure. He makes no
suggestions that the decisionhe made
was an easy one, however.
"Sure, when opportunities arise
you have to look at them Hart said.
"It would be not telling the truth to
say it wasn't a tough decision I've
been here for 12 years, so I don't feel
that I have to defend my loyalty to
ECU. I have never sought another
job, I have always been approached.
Yes, the situation (at Maryland) war-
ranted a hard look, but I still feel
extremely excited about the commit-
ment we've made here at ECU
Hart said that one major factor
in his decision to stay is the prospect
of conference affiliation with the
Metroconferenceforthefootball pro-
gram. He said that the process of
ECU's possible entry into the confer-
ence is being slowed at the presiden-
tial level by the institutions currently
in the fold of the affiliation.
"Quite candidly, there has been
See HART page 36
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36 The East Carolinian
August 2'
HART
Cont. from
page 35
loupdateon tl
UNC starts controversy over player honors criteria
forab
ewe �
he five univ
prot
currenth outot pocket Hiieottnem
have left thecountrv tor a time. Hith
the resumpbon of the school term and
return to their respecti. e institu-
tions, maybe we can look tor some
progress some time in Septemb
i fctober
hanged i
d our mshtu
don and our athletics program in a
md positive light; basi
: e done all we can do
Hart said that there are several
facto positive and negative.
d pla in the confers
decision to add ECU. I le lists the weak
economic and exposure capability in
i a asa significant hurdle toover-
come, but tee-Is that the expansions
currently manifesting on the campus
�ill help the school's chances tremen-
dously.
"There are currently SI 20 million
in facility improvements taking place
orpiannedtoT . eak, Hartsaid.
"Thatisasigni unitmentAnd
anytime you are the pursuer rather
than the pursued, you need to oo the
best job vou can in promoting the best
image possible.
Right now. one ot the subjects be-
ing pursued by Hart and the program
is the resumption i it an annual footba 11
game with N.C State. The two teams
ended their contract afterthe 1987 sea-
son alter a so-called "not" bv ECU
fans. The teams' last meeting was in
'he 1991-2 season at the Teach Bowl in
tlanta, where EC U defeated the
Wolfpack in a come-from-behind vic-
tory. The meeting was a tremendous
financial success, prompting tans to
renewal of the series.
Hart is excited about the prospect
of that resumption, but wants it done
under the right circumstartc es
"We have begun again with for-
mal conversations with N.C. State.
There isn't a doubt in my mind that the
N.C. State vs ECU matchup could be
the biggest game in North Carolina.
We would certainly love to see that
happen, but not at any cost
1 lart said the program is consid-
ering a proposal that the two teams
meet in Charlotte e ery yeai but the
priority would be the establishment ot
a home and home" series with the
Ac C team.
e are very interested in plac-
ing in Charlotte, but that does not
preclude our interest in playing in
Greenv iile he said "Our proposal is
that by the time the game would be
placed, we would have a stadium sied
to accommodate 50,000, so there would
be no viable argument for them not to
play here
1 lart is optimistic about EC L's
athletic future, and says he has cause
to be Hart said that some proposals
made tor the program 11 years ago
have become realities and that they
ed just as impossible to meet as
ines set for the program now.
"You have to realize that we've
only had a Division I-A comprehen-
sports program since the early
�s, - in themid60swehadabudget
ot 5160,000. Football games with Wil-
liam & Marc and Fast Tennesseebtate
were big games back then. We have
grown tremendously and have made
great strides in manv areas We have a
comprehensive non-revenue spurts
program, vith lmter-collegiatesports
is we are very proud of. We have
enhanced women's sports. All these
goals have been tough and are ongo-
ing. But we've cornea long way
Hartsaid he is particularly grate-
ful towards the EC U student bode for
providing the level of support they
have shown during his tenure.
I uin't name another student
body in the nation that shows the
doc during
tba i . ��; n As long as I
hen the students have been
that way, and it's ust great Nov
I to get the students just is sup-
of basketball
how our apprei i
itudents for that support when
renovati
eti I the � ' . ta its section
: the � lit beforsl .dents e
are going to try to go through IK
� � � the other student gi
� � ; I i get the stu-
dents i nit in �
bers at Kena
st hool's all t
didn't make
The jer
school's gn
one glaring
displayed �
cade of the
Amos I
ate
itplav
See N.C. cage 40
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STILL ON SUMMER VACATION.
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10:00 a.m5:OQ p.m.





�tfsaafiaa'Tiiiiiriii. �jb ai m
i �-�, �
August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 37
NASCAR brings in big money
BROOKLYN, Mich. (AP) �
Things may finally be looking up for
snakebit Bobby Allison
AlKscri,wnosefamilyhasendured
tragedy on and off the racetrack in
recentyearsalsohasstruggled tokeep
his.unsponsored NASCAR Winston
CupteamaikatsiiKethebeginriingof
the 1994 season.
That changed Friday, with the
announcement that Straight Arrow-
Mane TnI Tail, which first went on
Allison's Ford Thunderbird two races
ago at Indianapolis, has signed on as
the.team's prinriple sponsor through
the!1996 season. The driver is former
Daytana 500 winner Derrike Cope�
Allison's third this reason.
� No financial details were an-
nounced, but it is widely known that
Allson had previously turned down
several sponsorships that he believed
wotild not have provided enough
mcfieytorunacompetitiveoperatiarL
I Straight Arrow started out mak-
ingjproducts for horse grooming, but
developed a line for humans after
wotnenbeganbuyingtheproductsfor
themselves.
� Allison, whoseownHallof Fame
racing career ended witha nearly-fatal
crash in 1988 at Pocono, said, "This is
a real blessing All of us are exdted
about the future
Roger Dunavant, president of
Straight Arrow, said, "Being a fan of
NASCAR Winston Cup, and particu-
larly Bobby Allison, we looked at the
NASCARdemographicsand dedded
this was a good match. We wanted to
do this right and first class, so we
dedded to go with a first-class, highly
respected gentleman � Bobby
Allison
�Jeff Gordon'sfavorite car will be
under him this weekend in the GM
Qxxi wench Dealers 400atMchigan
IntemationalSpeedway.Alotofteams
name their cars, and this one is called
"Booger
Thafs the DuPont Chevrolet Lu-
mina that the 23-year-old Gordon
drove to victory in the Brickyard 400,
the richest race in NASCAR historv,
two weeks ago at Indianapolis Motor
Speedway.
"We ran a different car at Michi-
gan last time, and it was OK, but it
wasn't great said Gordon, who fin-
ished 12thintheJuneraceatMIS. "We
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think Booger will be better. You can
build twoidentical cars and one will be
a little bit different.
"We took Brooker (the winning
car at Charlotte in May) to Michigan
lasttime,butBrookerapparentlyisjust
a Charlotte car Gordon added.
Ray Evemham, Gordon's crew
chief, said Booger is the car in which
Gordon made his Winston Cup debut
atAtlantaintiiel992seasonfinale,and
also was the car in whidi the youngster
won his first pole lastOctober atChar-
lotte.
'Thatcarispartofhistoiynow,but
we've got some more racing to do with
itbeforeifsreadyforthe (Indianapolis)
museumEvemhamsaidL"Everypiece
thatcameoffthatcar from Indianapolis
wasputasideand itllbe restored to 100-
percent original condition to go to the
museum (after the season)
�Roush Racing got some good
news thi? week, while Phoenix Racing
received some bad news.
TheFarnilyChannelre-uppedwith
Roush in a multi-year sponsorship for
the Fords driven by Ted Musgrave,
whileCountryTirne Lemonade Flavor
ririkMix,wruchthisseasonhasspon-
sored the Chevrolets driven for James
Finch by Jeff Purvis, announced it will
wilhdrawitsbackingfollowingtheOct
30 Phoenix race.
No details of the Family Channel-
Roush agreement were disclosed, but
John Damoose,senior vice president of
marketing and corporate communica-
tions for the cable channel, said, "We

feeloursponsorshipofTedMusgrave's
No. 16 Ford Thunderbird is an integral
part of our marketing.
"With NASCAR's board appeal
andfamily-orientedvalues,wehaveall
the ingredients to provide the most
unique and effective opportunity for
our advertisers
Country Time has been involved
asaNASCARteamsponsorsince 1988,
butJoelHenry,thecompany'sprodurt
manager,saidUnfortunately,ourcur-
rent marketing objectives, combined
witha constrained budget, prevents us
fromadequatelyfundingacompetitive
racing team in 1995
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���l �-���
38 The East Carolinian
August 24, 1994
Florida tops AP poll
(AP) The Florida Gators, No. 3
in their own state for the past de-
cade�are now No. 1 in the nation.
- Long overshadowed by Florida
State and Miami, the Gators are the
preseason pick as college football's
top team in the Associated Press
poll
We're certainly honored
coach Steve Spurrier said. "Being
No;l is very special to me, my play-
ers 3nd all Gator fans. Florida edged
Nofre Dame bv two points, the nar-
rowest margin since the preseason
poliibegan in 1950. The Gators re-
ceived 15 first-place votes and 1,416
from a nationwide media panel,
while the Irish got 13 first-place votes
and 1,414 points.
Spurrier, whose team won a
school-record 11 games last season,
said he's not worried about the pres-
sure that comes from being No. 1.
"I'm glad I'm No. 1 sometime in
my life said Spurrier, a Heisman-
trophy winning quarterback at
Florida in 1966. "It'sbetterthannever
being No. 1
See POLL page 40
"Prime Time" shopping for brand new NFL home
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AZALEA GARDENS
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6 month lease.
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MERCURY
LINCOLN
DA VIE, Fla. (AP)� Free agent
Deion Sanders strode to the micro-
phone at the Miami Dolphins train-
ing camp Saturday and wasted no
time answering the big question.
"First I'd like to announce that
I've come to terms with, uh the
Miami Hooters said the two-sport
star, flashing his multimillion-dol-
lar grin as the room full of reporters
broke up in laughter.
Prime Time was in fine form.
The versatiledefensiveback and
kick returner made the latest stop
on his grand tour of the NFL to land
the best contract and a trip to the
Super bowl at the same time. He
was accompanied by his good
friend, the rap star Hammer.
Sanders got a tour of training
camp, met with Coach Don Shula
and quarterback Dan Marino. He
also was going to the Dolphins game
with Tampa Bay Saturday night.
Dolphins officials were not im-
mediately avaiable Saturday to talk
about Sanders 15-minute talk with
Shula. But Shula said earlier this
weekhe admires Sanders'talentand
might want to offer a multi-year
contract, depending on Sanders
� Cont. from
BOXING Page 33
cision.
Bobo Hicks (13-12) used his
southpaw style and a fifth-round
flurry to gain a six-round unanimous
decision over Tony Suswau (6-2).
Super middleweight Yusef
Robinson (1-0) won his professional
debut with a unspectacular four-
round unanimous decision over
Ahmad Ali (1-2).
Flamboyant middleweight
Franklin "X" Edmunson (5-0-1) and
James Mason (7-5-1) showed more
talk than fight, resulting in a sloppy
majority drawbetween the twofight-
ers.
Also in attendance was former
heavyweight champion James
"Bonecrusher" Smith, whoprovided
comrnentar'forWKFT-TV40,which
covered the fights.
plans and interest in Miami.
Sanders said a decision is down
the road � literally.
He stops in Kansas City Mon-
day, followed by Atlanta and New
Orleans next week. More visits are
planed the following week. The na-
tive of Fort Myers has expressed
interest in the San Francisco 49ers,
the Dallas Cowboys, the Atlanta
Falcons, Philadephia Eagles and
Kansas City Chiefs.
Sanders wants to hear how
teams think they will perform this
year. Some teams like Miami and
San Francisco, where Sanders vis-
ited last week, would have to let
people go to fit Sanders in under the
salary cap.
"Winning the Super Bowl is
number one said the former At-
lanta Falcons star and strike-idled
Cincinnati Reds center fielder. "I'm
tired of personal accomplishments.
I've had enough of them to enjoy the
rest of my life.
"You could cross a lot of teams
out that don't have the chemistry or
personnel to win the Super Bowl
he said.
Asked if he was considering
plavmg at Horida's other team, the
Buccaneers, Sanders said: "No,defi-
nitely not. That's what I mean by
being realistic
The versatile athlete said he
wants to play both defense and of-
fense as well as returning kicks.
"1 don't want to come off the
field he said. "I want to earn every
penny I make
He said if the Reds play again
this year after the strike and go to the
a
World Series, he might only play
eight NFL games-but that would be
a "worst-case scenario His agent,
Eugene Parker says Sanders could
be available for up to 13 games and
planned to talk to Dolphins offi-
cials.
The former Florida State star
said his meeting with Shula went
well.
"He looked me right in the eye. He
was honest with me said Sanders.
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you your choice of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same savings or a ralncheck which
will entitle you to purchase the advertised Item at the advertised price within 30 days. Only one vendor
coupon will be accepted per Item purchased.
COPYRIGHT 1994- THE KROGER CO. ITEMS AND PRICES COOD SUNDAY. AUG. 21 THROUGH SATUR-
DAY. AUG. 27. 1994 IN GREENVILLE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO
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Will Be Having A "Samplef est
Thursday, Friday A
Saturday, Aug. 25,
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Stop in And Sample Some Of The Following:
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-�� T





40 The East Carolinian
August 24. 1994
TEAM
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS TOP 25
PRE-SEASON POLL
1993 RECORD
POLL POINTS '93 RANK
rlorida11-2-0
lotre Dame11-1-0
rtorida St.12-1-0
vJebraska11-1-0
Michigan8-4-0
vliami9-3-0
Arizona10-2-0
Colorado8-3-1
nn St.10-2-0
Yisconsin10-1-1
Auburn11-0-0
Alabama9-3-1
Tennessee9-2-1
JCLA8-4-0
Texas A&M10-2-0
Oklahoma9-3-0
Southern Cal8-5-0
Texas5-5-1
Morth Carolina10-3-0
3hio St.10-1-1
Ilinois5-6-0
4rginia Tech9-3-0
Washington7-4-0
iVest Virginia11-1-0
3l$mson9-3-0
1,416
1,414
1,407
1,398
1,283
1,190
1,070
1,057
1,012
932
924
923
793
661
603
560
557
527
526
320
249
235
181
121
113
5
2
1
3
21
15
10
16
8
6
4
14
12
18
9
17
POLL
Cont. from
page 38
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Although Florida is the largest
university in the state, Florida State
and Miami have been more promi-
nent in football.
Miami has won four national
championships since 1983 and com-
piled the best record in the country
over that span. Florida State has fin-
ished in the top four for seven straight
years, culminating with its first na-
tional title last season.
Now, Florida is ranked ahead of
both teams. Florida State is No. 3 in
the preseason poll, and Mia mi is No.
6.
"I can assure our Gator fans that
we will do everything possible to
hold this ranking as long as we can
said defensive end Kevin Carter. "I
can't wait to play our opening game
(against New Mexico State) on Sept.
3 and hear our 84,000 fans screaming
'We're No. 1
It's only the second time Florida
has been ranked No. 1. The Gators
topped the poll for one week in 1985
before losing to Georgia 24-3.
However, it's the fifth consecu-
tive year that a team from the Sun-
shine State has been No. 1 in the
preseason poll. Miami got the nod in
1990 and '92, while Florida State was
the pick in '91 and '93.
Twelve starters return from last
year's Florida team, which pounded
previously unbeaten West Virginia
41-7 in the Sugar Bowl.
Notre Dame, which finished
No. 2 last season, is starting in the
same spot this season. That's one
space ahead of Florida State, which
won the 1993 national title even
though the Seminoles lost to the
Irish and both teams finished with
one loss.
N.C.
Continued from page 36
"We have been talking for a
couple of years about trying to
find an appropriate way to ac-
knowledge some of the players
that have historically meant a lot
to Carolina football Swofford
said. "This is what we ultimately
came up with after a great deal of
discussion
The most recent North Caro-
lina football players to have their
jerseys retired were Charlie
"Choo-Choo" Justice and Art
Weiner, who played in the late
1940s.
Now, a player must be a na-
tional player of the year io have
his number retired at North Caro-
lina � which means winning the
Heisman Trophy in football.
Swofford said he didn't know
how long that policy has been in
place, but said the Athletic Coun-
cil voted unanimously this spring
not to change it.
"We may never have a
Heisman winner. Alabama has
never had a Heisman winner
Swofford said. "(Lawrence Tay-
lor) is a prime example of doing
what we are doing here. This is a
way to permanently and promi-
nently honor those individuals
without retiring their numbers.
That's an extremely high stan-
dard we have for retiring a num-
ber
The following players, and
their numbers, will be honored at
the stadium:
� George Barclay (99), a
guard and linebacker from 1932-
34. His number has been retired.
� Andy Bershak (59), a two-
way end from 1935-37. His num-
ber has been retired.
� Bill Sutherland (46), a block-
ing back on the 1946 Sugar Bowl
team who died in an auto accident
after his freshman season. His
number has been retired.
� Charlie Justice (22), argu-
ably the most famous and popu-
lar athlete in state history. Twice
runner-up for the Heisman Tro-
phy as a single-wing tailback,
punter and kick returner from
1946-49. His number has been re-
tired.
� Art Weiner (50), a two-way
end from 1946-49. The nation's
leading receiver as a senior. Also a
member of the NFL Hall of Fame.
His number has been retired.
� Danny Talbott (10), 1965
ACC player of the year as a quar-
terback.
� Don McCauley (23), two-
time ACC player of the year as a
running back. Consensus All-
American in 1970.
� Ron Rusnak (62), consen-
sus Ail-American in 1972 as an
offensive guard.
� Ken Huff (68), consensus
All-American in 1974 as an of-
fensive guard.
� Mike Voight (44), two-
time ACC player of the year as a
tailback from 1973-1976.
School's all-time scoring leader
with 254 points.
� Dee Hardison (71), con-
sensus All-American in 1977 as
a defensive tackle.
� Lawrence Taylor (98), re-
garded as the best player of all-
time at his position. Consensus
All-American and ACC player
of the year in 1980 at outside
linebacker.
� William Fuller (95), con-
sensus All-American as defen-
sive lineman in 1983.
� Ethan Horton (12), ACC
player of the year in 1984 as a
tailback.
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August 24. 1994
The East Carolinian 4t:
CRANDELL
Logan because he was a great
quaterback coach. I think the
coaching change was good for
me.
TEC: "I remember last year
in the Syracuse game, Mike
Gotfried from ESPN was say-
ing a lot of good things about
you. Hope do you take compli-
ments toward yourself?"
MC: "I look at it two ways.
First I try to build upon it. Sec-
ond of all I try not to let it get to
my head and just try to stay
focused and get my job done
TEC: "How was your fam-
ily life at home?"
MC: "My family life was
great. I think the biggest influ-
ence in my life was my sister
Latricia. She practically raised
me when I was young
TEC: "What other schools
recruited you?"
MC: "South Carolina,
North Carolina, N.C. State and
Clemson, but ECU was the only
school that wanted me as a
quaterback
TEC: "When you hear
ECU's football program not
getting the respect that it
should, how does that make
you feel?"
MC: "I think the 1991-92
season set the tone for us to
start gaining respect. The last
two years haven't helped us,
but we are looking foward to
Continued from page 33
gaining the respect that we de-
serve
TEC: "How do you think
Coach Logan handles the team?"
MC: "He's a disciplinarian.
He handles the team very well.
Coach Logan is not always with
the players off the field holding
their hand telling them what to
do and what not to do. The play-
ers have to take some responsi-
bility for themselves
TEC: "How are you going to
feel this year when you play Cen-
tral Florida and have to face the
guy who broke your leg?"
MC: "There's no hard feel-
ings. Even if he's not on my mind
he's going to be on the fan's
mind
TEC: "Say ECU goes 9-2 this
season. Do you think that ECU
deserves a bowl bid?"
MC: "I think we do. We'll
have to play well against teams
like Auburn and Virginia Tech.
We'll have to prove that we are
capable of playing with high
level competition
TEC: "When you wake up
September 24, the morning be-
fore you face Syracuse in the
home opener, what is Marcus
Crandell going to be thinking?"
MC: "Revenge! I believe we
should have beaten them last
year. We had the opportunity to
win and we let it slip away
TEC: "Do you feel any
pressure from your back-ups?"
MC: "I always feel pres-
sure. I never feel comfortable
enough to just sit back and feel
that my job is secure
TEC: "What do you think
you will be doing in ten
years?"
MC: "Hopefully playing
football or I just hope I have a
good job
TEC: "What would be the
best way to end your career?"
MC: "A National Champi-
onship and a Heisman Tro-
phy
TEC: "How do football and
basketball players at ECU get
along?"
MC: "Before I came here I
heard there was some tension,
but since I've been here we get
along good
TEC: "What are your feel-
ings on the O.J. Simpson case?"
MC: "I looked up to O.J. as
a role model. I look at it now
like I really don't want to be-
lieve it. It is just very hard to
understand
TEC: "Do you think col-
lege players should be paid?"
MC: "Yes. I think we do a
lot for the University. We can't
have jobs during the season.
We have to have some spend-
ing money
TEC: "What do you say to
people who say the football
players on this campus "got it
made"?"
MC: "That's totally wrong,
they don't know what we go
through everyday
TEC: "Give me an average
Marcus Crandell day during
the season?"
MC: "I have classes till
about 12:00. Then we have
meetings. Then we have prac-
tice. Then we eat dinner. Then
we have to study. It's defi-
nitely a full day
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42 The East Carolinian
LIBIANO
August 24, 1994
Continued from page 34
entrance of yet another defensive
coordinator in Paul Jette. While the
overall scheme of the Pira te defense
will remain the same as the one
instilled by the NFL-bound Larry
Coyer, there is a new coaching style
to adjust to. But according to Libiano,
the transition between staffs has
been a relatively easy one.
"We picked it up just like that
said Libiano, snapping his fingers.
"There is basically no difference in
the overall scheme. Of course there
are adjustments to be made coming
from a different coach. He might
' call a blitz at a different time or have
; a few different plays, but it hasn't
! been a hard system for us to learn
Libiano said that he is prepared
� to continue his leadership role this
I year under the new system and felt
j that the experience he gained last
; season has been extremely valuable
in his development into a first-rate
linebacker.
"Last year was an exploratory
time for me he said. "The team
was trying new things and getting a
lot of experience through the sea-
son. Now I feel like I know a lot
more about what I'm supposed to
do as a player
Libiano said he understands
that he is looked on as a leader and
plans to help his less-experienced
teammates however he can, but also
feels that there is no substitute for
game experience like he has obtained
in the past two years.
"You really can't replace that
on-field experience Libiano said.
"The only way to (learn to read
defenses) is to just get reps in all the
time. It's great to see players like BJ
(Crane, a sophomore and a fellow
linebacker) get that chance
Libiano said that he is extremely
excited about getting the opportu-
nity to play at Duke on Sept. 10. A
sidelines spectator for thel992game
in Durham, Libiano watched his
team be destroyed by the Blue Dev-
ils in a 45-14 romp. He said the Duke
players taunted the Pirates and gave
him many memories to motivate
him for this year's contest.
"I was supposed to play that
game, but didn't get to with the way
things turned out Libiano said. "I
think that the way Duke handled
the game was pretty bad I took it
personally. I feel like if our team was
ahead by that much thatcoach Logan
would put in our third string. It
showed no class on their part. This
year it's going to be a little differ-
ent
Libiano said he is confident in
the Pirate defense's chance to make
an impact this year, after the tre-
mendousstrides they madelastyear
in their run defense.
"We've got a lot of confidence
this year he said. "We've learned a
lot and we have all the talent in the
world. We have a different perspec-
tive about making big plays and I
think that we could do really well
Anyone inter-
ested in writing
for TEC sports
please call
Warren Sumner
or Dave Pond at
757-6366.
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BUTLER
' Valenzuela, and led the league in
; runs scored with 109.
Butler finished his term with
: the Giants in 1990, when he batted
: .309 and � in an astonishing 732
; plate appearances � did not hit
into a double play, tying a major-
: league record. In May, Butler be-
ij came only the fourth big-leaguer in
history to swipe 150 bases in each
league.
On Dec. 15,1990, the Dodgers
� receivedanearlyChristmaspresent
; when Butler agreed to a four-year
! deal. He took over centerfield and
! earned his first All-Star appearance
in 1991, batting .296, and for the
-second time in his career Butler
finished the season without mak-
ing an error.
Butler has continued onhis con-
sistent pace, batting .304 over the
past three-and-a-half seasons with
Los Angeles. Prior to the on-going
strike, Butler is batting .312 with 8
HR and 24 SB, leading the Dodgers
: into National League West conten-
tion.
"You could sum this team up
�in one word � 'if Butler said. "If
� everything falls into place, we can
win it all. We've got offense and
solid pitching. Our defense has been
a sore spot the last couple of sea-
sons, but it looks like we've im-
proved on that aspect, as well
Of f the field, Butler is one of the
greatest role models in the athletic
jvorld. He regularly does charity
work and is a member of the Leu-
kemia Society, the National Sports
Committee and 65 Roses in Los
Angeles.
Butler is married and has four
children. He is raising them the
same way that he was raised, with
a strong Christian backbone, so
that they too can become role mod-
els for others, whether they are in
the spotlight or not.
As Butler is a free agent after
the '94 season, the Dodgers have
Continued from page 33
some decisions to make about
their popular centerfielder. Con-
sequently, at thirty-seven-years
old, Butler also has some impor-
tant decisions to make, but as of
now, retirement is far away.
"I just love to play the
game Butler said. "When the
boyish attitiude is gone, then I
will be too
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Mwiiiiiiiiiiiwrai
�niiaMniiwni-iiiTi
August 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 43
LOGAN
Continued from page 33
to East Carolina.
Our runningback currently
at East Carolina is the number two
returningbackinthenatioalwouldn't
trade Junior Smith for any player in
the nation
TEC: "You have to be relieved
rha vou've got Crandell back under
center. Hashecomeall the wayback?"
SL: "Yes, Marc has played well.
He'spickingthingsupinscrimmages
and moving around at where he was
before the injury he was actually
timed at around a hundredth of a
secondfaster in the40meters than last
year,so he hasn'tlostanything there
TEC: "Was he gunshy at the be-
ginning of the spring?"
SL: "Not at all, which in the con-
text of whathappened ispretty amaz-
ing. He wore an air cast (a light sup-
port) at the beginning of spring prac-
tices. I told him Tou take that off
whenever you feel ready, it has to be
your decision to make I think he
wore it for two practices and then it
was gone, and he was out there run-
ning around and being creative like
this time last year
TEC: "Coach, looking back, can
youreflect on your feelingsatthe time
of the injury?"
SL "Well, obviously it was the
worst day of my professional life. I
sincerely hope I never have to go
through anything that bad or worse
again Itwasterrible,notonlybecause
of what it did to him, which was bad
enough but because, and I can say
this now where I couldn't back then,
because I knew what it would do to
us
TEC: "So you expected the result
of last season as soon as you saw
Crandell go down? The two wins
SL "I knew that they would be
very hard to come by. Which is to say
nothing againstPerez (Mattison),but
we've just got to have a quarterback
that can audible. In our system, the
quarterback is required to check al-
most every play at the line, and he just
wasn't ready for that
TEC: "Do you thinkMattison will
be better for going through last year,
even though the way the season
turned out?"
SL: "No doubt. I've talked to
Perez and we've decided that we're
going to redshirt him, probably this
year. He's a talent, he just needs to sit
out that year he should have gotten
last year
TEC: "Coach in talking to one of
the members of the Academic Coun-
selingdepartment,Ihaveheardalotof
greatthingsaboutMarcus'workinme
classroom. Do you put extra pressure
on him to succeed?"
SL "I suppose I do. Thaf s just
something I have always done at East
Carolina, I hold my quarterbacks to a
Mgherstandardmanmyotherplayers
Thatisbecauselbelievethatposition
sets the tone for the rest of the football
team
TEC: "In light of last season,
Marcus'injuryandtheresultingrecord,
do you view this year as a new season
or just a continuation of what you
planned to do last year?"
SL "I think that you just have to
lookatlastseasonaswhatitreallywas,
an aberration I don't care what pro-
gramyouaretalkingabout,theywould
have been devastated by the injuries
wesuffered lastyear,and thatincludes
your Alabamas or your Florida States.
To lose our top two quarterbacks and
throw a true freshman out there was a
disaster
TEC: "But I guess you know that
no ma tterwhatthe reasons, whenever
you have a 2-9 season you're going to
have people screaming for your head
on a platter
SL: "Well, thaf s true I suppose,
butwedidaswellaswecouldbutBear
Bryant couldn't have done any differ-
ent with what we had to work with"
TEC: "How did last season affect
you?"
SL "Tobeperfecfly honestitwore
off nearly all the insulation on my
nerve endings. It was an incredibly
emotional period of time for me, and
one thatwashardtodeal with Wehad
a similar situation at Mississippi State
and it was a 'Mutiny on the Bounty'
situation We got to a point where we
lost three games inarowandeveryone
panicked. Wehadninecoaches scatter
in nine different directions and every-
one was trying to cover their own
fanny.Irefusedtoletthathappenhere.
No one on my coaching staff, includ-
ingmyself,wasallowedtocry publicly
aboutthesituationlminkwehandled
the situation pretty well
TEC: "So, how did you keep so
balanced?"
SL: (After pausing for a few sec-
onds) "Well, it's really kind of, ?nd I
don't say this too often, if s not some-
thing thatl wear onmysleeve,butyou
asked so 111 tell you. At the age of 21,1
made a spiritual commitment that I
use in these situations. That's what
hdpskeepmebalancedandhashelped
me tremendously
TEC: "Coach once again you're
going into a season where you are
underdogs in a lot of games. Do you
think mere'sachance thatanyone will
lookatyoucomingoffa2-9seasonand
take ECU lightly?"
SL "I don't think so, I think that
our opponents will take us very seri-
ously
TEC: "ItseemsthatECUseems to
schedule big competition year after
year. Some argue that the program
should scheduleeasier competition to
get more wins, and others say that this
is tiie only way you can get better.
Moreoftenthannotwhenyouplaybig
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is your take?"
SL "I just think thatif we're going
to play Auburn, why not play 'em
every year. If we play Qemson, hey
great, let's play 'em every year. That
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knowwhattheyexpect.Likelastyear's
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TEC Presents
Till
?
2 No. 2
iiMjld's
September 28. 1995
I v iviis (irecnville
Fast V acts
Travis Darden
( had I lolcolmb
ECU waits for Conference I S.V
8 pages
ECU vs. West Virginia
ir
Game day
Saturday, September 30, 1995





September 28,1995
The End Zone
Pirates Try To Make History
Brian Paiz
End Zone Editor
ECU will be trying to make history
on Saturday when the West Virginia
Mountaineers visit Oowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium for a noon kickoff. The Mountain-
eers lead the overall series between the
schools 8-0, including a 30-10 victory
over ECU the last time WVU visited
Greenville, back in 1988.
The Mountaineers bring a 2-2 record
into Saturday's contest after defeating
Kent last Saturday in Morgantown 45-6.
WVU's two losses this season have come
to Big Ten foe Purdue and the number
17 ranked Maryland Terrapins.
Quarterback Chad Johnson leads the
Mountaineers offense. Johnson passed
for 1,863 yards as a sophomore, and is
the top returning starter in the Big East.
The Junior from Peterstown, WV has al-
ready thrown for 912 yards this season
including a 390 yard outing against
Purdue. Johnston's backup is Michigan
transfer Eric Boykin, who has also seen
playing time in recent games. WVU Head
Coach Don Nehlen, who is the schools
all time winningest coach, has confidence
in both of his quarterbacks.
"I believe were as solid at quarter-
back, as we've been in quite some time
Nehlen said.
Senior Robert Walker leads the run-
Stephanie
Lassiter
Editor-in-Chief
Brian Paiz
Editor
Celeste Wilson
Production
Manager
Brad Oldham
Asst. Editor
Amanda Ross
Writer
ning attack for the Mountaineers. Two
years ago Walker set a single season
rushing record at WVU with 1, 250 yards.
This season, however, WVU has distrib-
uted the ball more evenly as running back
Jimmy Garner has rushed 45 times for
199 yards through four games.
The fullback position for this Moun-
taineer team belongs to 6 foot 3 245
pound Kantroy Barber. The Florida na-
tive has rushed for 138 yards this sea-
son, and ECU coach Steve Logan knows
his potential.
He's a big, strong guy who just
comes right at you said Logan.
When you look at the wide receiver
position, you look no farther than
Rashaan Vanterpool for the Mountain-
eers. Vanterpool totaled 1, 613 all-pur-
pose yards last season, and so far in the
'95 campaign Vanterpool has 17 recep-
tions for 326 yards. Against Kent last
week, Vanterpool had 223 all-purpose
yards.
Tight End Lovett Purnell is also con-
tributing to the Mountaineer offense. The
6-3 238 pound senior has 20 receptions
for 305 yards.
"Lovett is net physically bulky, like
an old prototype tight end said Nehlen.
"He's more athletic, smooth and agile
Purnell has also been much improved on
his blocking.
When you look to the defensive side
of the ball for WVU, the man who sticks
out is Ail-American Aaron Beasley.
Beasley led the NCAA last season with
10 interceptions last season. He also
contributed with 57 tackles and 15 pass
deflections. This season Beasley has two
interceptions, one in which he ran back
for a touchdown against Maryland.
"I wouldn't trade him for anybody
in the world said Nehlen.
Also in the secondary is junior Vann
Photos Courtesy of ECU SID
Marcus Crandell (left),
will be trying to avoid
interceptions on
Saturday when he
faces Ail-American
Cornerback Aaron
Beasley.(Right)
Washington, a two year starter at free
safety. Washington has 31 tackles in '95.
Junior defensive end Canute Curtis
is another imposing force for WVU. He
had two sacks against Kent, and is just
one shy of being seventh on WVU's all-
time sack list. John Browning is another
leader on the Mountaineer defense. He
returned to the lineup last Saturday
against Kent, after serving a three game
suspension for contacting a sports gent.
Browning came back in style as he re-
corded six tackles and one sack. Middle
linebacker J. T. Thomas was WVU's lead-
ing tackier a year ago, and he has not
let up this season as he leads the team
once again with 39 tackles.
On special teams, WVU lost All-
American punter Todd Sauerbrun to
graduation, and Brian West has stepped
in to fill that position. Placekicker Bryan
Bauman is 4-7 on the year, including a
43 yarder.
Analysis:
ECU and West Virginia matchup well.
Both have good young quarterbacks, and
big play receivers. The Mountaineers
could have an edge in the running game,
with Walker and Barber. On the defen-
sive side of the ball, ECU and West Vir-
ginia have two of the best linebackers in
the nation in Mark Libiano and J.T Tho-
mas. Marcus Crandell will have to look
out for Beasley, who is a fundamentally
sound cornerback. Overall, if the Pirates
can sustain a running game, they could
make history and get their first win over
West Virginia.
'pcut0?
Location. - Morgantown,
WV
founded- 1892
"Enrollment - 22,500
Head Coach. - Don Nehlen
Kickname- Mountaineers
Colors - Blue and Gold
Stadium - Mountaineer
Field (63,500)
Conference - Big East
Conference
"Record 2-2
ECU vs WVU
WVU leads 8-0
1988
1992
WVU 30
ECU 10
WVU 41
ECU 28
tfotes: WVU is 17-7 all time
versus schools from North
Carolina.





The End Zone
September 28,1995
Darden Making impact As Freshman
Brad Oldham
Asst. End Zone Editor
Few defensive players have ever
stepped into this ECU program as true
freshman and made the kinds of impact
that Travis Darden has made in his first
four games as a Pirate.
Ask Head Coach Steve Logan if any
players have impacted the defense so
much early on since he's been here, and
only one other player comes to mind.
"As far as coming in here and step-
ping up and making this type of impact
on the defense, the only player I can
compare him to is Lorenzo West Logan
said in a phone interview on Monday.
Darden hasn't just opened some
eyes in his four games as a Pirate; he's
throwing buckets of cold water in
people's faces, making opposing
coaches stop in their tracks as to where
this kid came from.
"I talked to Illinois head coach Lou
Tepper after the game on Saturday
Logan said. "And he was asking me
where in the world did I find this guy!
He really wore that Illinois center out
in that game, and that was a big-time
center
Since arriving at ECU this past sum-
mer, the freshman nose guard out of
Keiford, NC has provided everything the
Pirates have needed up the middle. Nose
guard is actually the third and likely fi-
nal position for Darden, who was
shuffled around from Inside to outside
linebacker in the preseason.
"It's cool playing nose guard
Darden said. "I really didn't see any-
body aggressively going after the posi-
tion like I knew I could, and I just re-
ally felt that the middle is where I was
needed most. Besides, there's Aaron
Black at outside linebacker, and he's a
very solid player
Logan is convinced that nose guard
will be Darden's home from now on.
"He's learning the position very
well Logan said. "When he's at nose
guard, he's just that much closer to the
ball, so he's got a better chance to re-
ally get in the action
"I'm aggressive, and I think that's
what really drives me at this position
Darden said.
So far his aggressiveness at nose
guard has paid off in two-fold. He's sec-
ond on the team behind safety Daren
Hart in tackles for a loss with three,
he's forced a fumble and recovered two,
more than anybody else on the Pirate
defense.
The 6 foot 3, 252 pound product
of Bertie High School was extremely im-
pressed with Illinois sensation Simeon
Rice last week while watching him on
the sidelines.
"He's the best. No question
Darden said. As far as the best offense
Darden has seen in his early stint as a
Pirate, the Tennessee Volunteers stand
out amongst the rest.
"They were just so experienced
Darden said.
The one player who Darden really
looks up to and who took him under
his wing from the start is senior de-
fensive tackle Walter Scott.
"I lived with Walter over the sum-
mer and he really helped me out a lot
Darden said. "He works so hard, and
that's what I like. I want to be around
n
rnoto Courtesy of ECU SID
Travis Darden, a local product out of Bertie High School, attended
Hargrave Military Academy last season, and is adjusting to the
noseguard position, after moving from the linebacker position.
people like him because he's serious
about what he does. He means busi-
ness, and that's what's going to make
him NFL material
"Walter helped out Travis a lot
early on Logan said. "They work very
good together. We were really trying
to find the right spot for Travis at the
start, and he had never played nose
guard before. I think Walter helped him
become more familiar with the posi-
tion
So keep your eyes peeled for
Darden, Pirate fans. You won't have
to look too hard though. With the ef-
fects of Darden as bright as they have
been this early on, he should be an
easy player to spot for some time.
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September 28,1995
The End Zone
Holcoimb Attempts To Prove Cititics Wrong
Amanda Ross
End Zone Writer
For place-kicker Chad Holcomb,
1995 should be a very interesting sea-
son. The 6-foot-2 junior from Smyrna,
Ga. has a lot of skeptics he would like
to silence.
Coming off the
1994 season,
Holcomb connected
for just six of 13
field goals, and 26
of 27 extra points.
Many people criti-
cized the fact his
percentage of field
goals was low. How-
ever, just two weeks
ago against Central
Michigan, he had his best day connect-
ing for three of four field goals. His per-
formance against Central Michigan matched
half of his total from '94.
What everyone might not know is
why Hoicomb's performance was not
quite up to what it should have been
last season. A pulled groin muscle and
hip flexor muscle hindered his ability,
but he is now nursing them back and is
"All I wanted to
do was to get the
ball up high and
not line drive it
� Chad Holcomb, place-
kicker
ready to go.
"I'm more consistent this year, and
I feel that my confidence in myself and
Coach Logan's confidence in me has
been restored from last year, especially
with this Central Michigan game
Holcomb said.
Holcomb was drawn to the ECU foot-
ball team for two reasons. First, senior
CB Hank Cooper went
to the same high
school as Holcomb and
told him how much he
liked playing here at
ECU. The factor of
having a former team-
mate from high school
greatly influenced his
decision. The other
reason ECU was in
Hoicomb's sight was
because Logan was willing to offer him
a full scholarship and a starting posi-
tion. Georgia Southern, the other school
recruiting him, was not so eager to give
him that starting position right away.
The discovery of this junior place-
kicker is somewhat of an ironic story.
One of Logan's former coaches, Bob
Babbitt now at Pitt, was recruiting an-
other player from Hoicomb's high
Show four Pirate Pride!
Lets fill Dowdy-Fkklcn Stadium with a sea
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Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Chad Holcoimb, now in his junior season, tries to get back tohis
succesful start as a freshman.
school. Coach Babbitt happened to
mention that they were looking for a
kicker. Hoicomb's coach told Babbitt
about Holcomb and things progressed
from there. Eventually, the original
player Babbitt came to recruit received
no scholarship and Holcomb came away
with a scholarship as a place-kicker for
East Carolina.
Holcomb knew that the kicking style
Logan was looking for was something
he could deliver. That style consisted
of getting the ball up high and still hav-
ing the distance to get it down the field.
Two essential things a kicker must be
consistent in doing all the time.
Hoicomb's very first collegiate
game was against Syracuse on ESPN,
where he had to open up the game with
a kickoff.
"All I wanted to do was to get the
ball up high and not line drive it
Along with that first game came a lot
of nerves. "I was very nervous for that
first game. Anybody will lie to you if
they say they don't get nervous. I still
get jitters before i go out there
When asked about his role model,
Holcomb says it is his younger brother
Brandon. This 13-year-old has had a
lot of influence of him.
"I see myself when I watch him
play he said. "It's fun going to the
games and being able to help him out
afterwards
He enjoys giving pointers to his
younger brother. This is something he
never received not having ar� older
brother himself, and living only with his
mother while growing up. Holcomb be-
lieves Brandon will come along a lot
faster than he himself did and is eager
to see him progress.
So what does the future hold foi
Holcomb? He sees himself either coach-
ing or becoming a physical trainer. But
football is not totally out of the picture.
"I'm going to definitely try to take
my kicking career as far as I can, and
after that think seriously about other
jobs
But for right now, Holcomb is just
going to continue kicking for the Pi-
rates. His numbers so far are improv-
ing and so is his confidence level. If he
continues to progress, the criticism that
surrounded him after last season will
hopefully be silenced.
"Our confidence on the field is
back. I don't know what the fans are
still saying; I guess they will just have
to wait and see
��





The End Zone
September 28,1995
Johnston set to lead the Mountaineers
Brit Fryer
WVU Daily Anthaeum
The Mountaineer offense has
gained valuable experience in quarter-
back Chad Johnston, and is ready to
make a move at the Big
East title.
" I really work
hard at it Johnston
said. "I try do every-
thing I can for each
opponent, but some-
times 1 have t remind
myself to make good
decisions and not al-
ways look for the big
play
Johnston, a 6-foot-
3, 210 pound junior
and native of Peters-
burg, W.Va is the top returning quar-
terback in the Big East.
"Chad is our quarterback said
head coach Don Nehlen. "We take his
bad days and move on because he is
solid
"Iteeiiw .about the quar-
terback position Nehlen said. "There's
nothing worse than a coach who doesn't
know who is quarterback is
Johnson won the starting job over
Eric Boykin last year at midseason to
help lead the Mountaineers to strong
finish, going 6-1 in their last seven
games en route to a Carquest Bowl bid.
"He just got better for us Nehlen
said. "He started out badly, but never
lost his confidence. We have two good
quarterbacks. Both
kids have matured
physically and men
tally
Last season,
Johnston threw for
1,863 yards, com-
pleting 124 passes
on 242 attempts.
Johnston also had
16 touchdowns and
only seven intercep-
tions in 1994.
Johnston's best
game was a year
ago against Pitt, where he threw for 396
yards and four touchdowns.
Along with being an excellent stu-
dent, one of Johnston's greatest at-
tributes is his intelligence on the field.
"Chad is a great quarterback said
tight end Lovett Purnell. "It's evident
now that his confidence is at a new level.
The biggest thing is his intelligence
Johnson is expected to call his own
plays from scrimmage this season.
'There's nothing
worse than a
coach who
doesn't know
who is
quarterback is
� Don Nehlen, head coach
Cheerleaders
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Every Saturday, you can always see the Pirate Cheerleaders
supporting the ECU football team.
" I look at the de-
fensive front and the cov-
erage and find what is
best for us Johnston
said. "We've got a lot of
guys back and they know
what they're doing
The offensive
backfield and Johnston
have a great deal of con-
fidence in each other.
"I have total confi-
dence in Chad said
tailback Robert Walker.
He's gotten better from
last year. He knows what
plays to call when
Johnston also has
confidence in Walker and
depends on his tailback
to take pressure off the
passing attack.
" I think if we run
the ball it's going to help
our passing game
Johnston said. "With
Walker and Gary out in
the defensive secondary,
that gives us an advan-
tage
THURSDAY! PIRATE
TALK ON WZMB-FM 913
7p.m. Join Brian & Brad
Photo Courtesy of WVU SID
Chad Johnston's step-brother Travis
Jackson, plays basketball at V. Tech.
Hey Hey E.C!
Photo Courtesy of ECU SID
Pirate fans are ready for ECU'S footbali team to return home after
having three of their first four games on the road.
'





September 28,1995
The End Zone
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Ward Sporo Medicine Building � Greenville, NC 2858-1353 � Phone; 9193JS-4530
Dear ECU Students:
I said this after the Central Michigan game and I want to say it againI am proud
of the loyal ECU students and fans who filled Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium in the rain
for the Central Michigan game. There is no better fan than a loyal ECU fan! If
you were in the stands that day, take pride in your effort. You're a loyal ECU fan.
With your support filling the stands every game, we are on the way to taking this
program to where it has never been before. Your next opportunity to make a strong
statement is this weekend when your Pirates play Big East Conference Member
West Virginia. This gaie will be on regional television. West Virginia is bringing
a big and vocal contingent to this game. If we are to have the best chance to win,
Dowdy-Ficklen will have to be full and loud with ECU students and tans.
Please remember this game kicks off at 12:00 noon. Let's build on the
traditionsfollow the band up college hill, be in your seats early and get loud for
the team entrance, and on third down plays for the opposing team stand up and get
loud.
I want to reiterate this is your team and your school! Take pride in the purple and
gold, fill the stands, display good sportsmanship to our visitors, and be responsible
in your actions before, during and after the game.
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium is our house. Let's fill the stadium 30 minutes before the
game with ECU students and fans and cheer your Pirates through to the final horn.
Get Loud and Be Proud!
Sincerely
Steve Logan
Head Football Coach
ttaje Pi Lambda Phi t�
Supports
Pirate Football and
Cheerleading
TTAl
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((
"Pi9yta4ticttoi&
Brian Paiz
End Zone Editor
ECU 28
WVU 21
"I am a West Virginia native, but I bleed Purple and
Gold now! Go Pirates
Brad Oldham
End Zone Asst. Editor
ECU 23
WVU 20
"Biggest home game of the season for the Pirates.
A sell-out is a must"
Mike Hamrick ECU 27
ECU Athletic Director WVU 24
"It'll be a very physical game, but our speed and
quickness will prevail
Stephanie Lassiter
TEC Editor-in-Chief
"This week the Pirate offense and defense get it
together and produce a home game victory
Brian Bailey
Sports Director WNCT
"Pirates pull away in second half to take win
ECU 31
WVU 17
Head Foreman
ECU 24
WVU 17
Dr. Richard R. Eakin ECU 21
ECU Chancellor WVU 10
"The Pirates beat the Mountaineers for the first
time in history
Photo by GARRtTT KILUAN
Morris Foreman, a Farmville NC, native is attracting many pro
scouts with his play thus far this season.





The End Zone
September 28,1995
As ECU Waits,
Conference USA
Gets Rolling
Brad Oldham
Asst. End Zone Editor
The St. Jude Liberty Bowl joined forces
with the Big East Conference last week in
a move that will greatly expand the expo-
sure provided on the annual football game
in Memphis.
Once Conference USA gets everything
organized and on track in 1996, its cham-
pion will travel to the bowl to face any of
the remaining Big East teams from the
fourth seed and lower.
"This is a tremendous partnership
bringing a Big East -� �
This is a
tremendous
partnership
power and Confer-
ence USA's cham-
pion to Memphis
said Steve Ehrhart,
managing partner of , ,
the St. Jude Liberty bringing a Dig E,aSt by most people when
This conference looks to be the per-
fect fit for East Carolina, who won the Lib-
erty Bowl alliance championship last sea-
son, and is in full gear so far this season
to repeat the accomplishment.
The 1995 game will be played on
December 30th, and will be televised on
ESPN. This year's opponent will be cho-
sen by the St. Jude Liberty Bowl commit-
tee.
So far the Liberty Bowl race has been
tight, with some early upsets against non-
coalition opponents.
" The Pirates have their hands full so
far, especially on the road, but pulled off a
key victory over Syracuse
that put them in the thick
of the pack with a 2-2
record.
Cincinnati, a team
that is usually looked over
power and
Conference USA's
champion to
Memphis
� Steve Ehrhart, managing
partner of the St. Jude
Liberty Bowl
Bowl, at a press con-
ference at the
Crowne Plaza Hotel
on September 20.
This puts an
early spotlight on the
nation's newest Divi-
sion l-A conference.
So far the confer-
ence is made up. of
current Liberty Bowl
alliance schools such as Cincinnati, Mem-
phis, Southern Mississippi and Tulane.
Other schools in the new conference in-
clude Houston and Louisville.
"We view the St. Jude Liberty Bowl as
the culmination, the crown jewel of our
season said Conference USA Commis-
sioner Michael Slive.
There's already early speculation by
Conference USA teams as to whom they
might have to face from the mighty Big
East leftovers once they make it to the Lib-
erty Bowl. In years past, Big East schools
such as Miami, Syracuse, Virginia Tech and
Boston College have fallen in the upper
echelon of the conference. This would make
schools such as Pittsburgh, Rutgers,
Temple and West Virginia look like early
candidates for the bowl.
"We are looking forward to having the
opportunity to play the Conference USA
champion Big East Commissioner Michael
Tranghese said.
�MBHi
scanning the coalition,
pulled off a huge upset
aginst Big East member
Virginia Tech, shutting
them out, 16-0. At 1-2 so
far this season, Cincinnati
must get some more big
wins to stay in the race.
Another team having
early success to some
people's surprise is
Tulane, who begins the season 2-1.
On the other hand, a team that has
slipped early on a Liberty Bowl favorite is
Memphis, which currently has a record of
1-3 against some tough competition such
as Michigan and Arkansas.
A lot of focus is being put on the Oc-
tober 28th ECU - Southern Miss, game in
Hattiesburg. This late-season contest could
likely hold the determining factor on what
team will represent the Liberty Bowl Coa-
lition in Memphis.
Another highlight of the weekend this
year is the Basketball Challenge. On Thurs-
day, December 28, Memphis, of Confer
ence USA, will host Temple at The Pyra-
mid.
"Conference USA is looking forward
to working on a year-round basis wit the
St. Jude Liberty Bowl said Dr. V. Lane
Rawlins, president of the University of
Mempis and chair of Conference USA's
Board of Directors.
Liberty Bowl Alliance
Tulane 2-1
East Carolina
2-2
Southern Miss
2-2
L8BERTY
BOWl
Memphis 1-3
� ?
?
Cincinnati 1-2
This week's games
WVU at East Carolina
Tulane at Southern Miss
Toledo at Cincinnati
Louisville at Memphis
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1





8
September 28,1995
The End Zone
Lineups
East Carolina
QB
FB
HB
FL
SE
TE
LT
L.G
C
RG
RT
DT
NG
DT
OLB
5
23
82
1
80
90
77
59
63
64
67
96
95
45
7
WLB81
MLB51
OLB94
RCB21
FS30
SS22
LCB3
Offense
Marcus Crandell
Jerris McPhail
Mitchell Galloway
Jason Nichols
Larry Shannon
Scott Richards
Charles Boothe
Jamie Gray
Kevin Wiggins
Lamont Burns
Shane McPherson
W. Virginia
Defense
Defense
Walter Scott
Travis Darden
Lorenzo West
Morris Foreman
Mark Libiano
Marvin Burke
Travis Darden
David Hart
Dwight Henry
Daren Hart
Emmanuel McDaniel
Canute Curtis
John Browning
Henry Slay
Kevin Landolt
J.T. Thomas
Elige Longino
Bernard Russ
Aaron Beasley
Charles Fisher
Vann Washington
Charles Emanuel
Offense
Rashaan Vanterpool
Jon DeLong
Scott Bailey
Derrick Bell
Buddy Hager
Bryan Washington
Lovett Purnell
Chad Johnston
Robert Walker
Kantroy Barber
David Saunders
6-2250Jr.
6-4275Sr.
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6-2270Fr.
6-2235Sr.
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5-9195Sr.
6-1185Fr.
6-1200Jr.
6-0195Jr.
5-11185Jr.
6-5275Sr.
6-3285Sr.
6-2275Sr.
6-4280Sr.
6-6295Jr.
6-3238Sr.
6-3210Jr.
5-11200Sr
6-3245Sr.
6-2205Fr
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 24, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 24, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1021
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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