The East Carolinian, July 27, 1994






Sports
Maryland "Hart"broken
ECU Athletic Director Dave
Hart, Jr. declines opportunity V
to be a candidate for the t
same position at Maryland. 4�
Story on page 7.
1 �'
Today
Tomorrow
Lifestyle
The Client'
Susan Sarandon and
Tommy Lee Jones star in
the latest John Grisham
novel to be made into a
motion picture. Review
on page 5.
The East Carolinian
VoI.69No33&r)
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, July 27,1994
8 Pages
Motor company
comes to G'ville
By Jason Williams
News Editor
Graduates of ECU just re-
ceived another local option in
the hunt for that ever elusive
job: ASMO Co. Ltd. The Japa-
nese-based manufacturer of
small motors announced yes-
terday it will be opening a plant
in Greenville's industrial park.
In a signing ceremony
held Tuesday morning at
Mendenhall Student Center,
ASMO President Kazuhide
Naruki signed land purchase
contracts and discussed reasons
for choosing Greenville for the
facility.
"The motto under which
ASMO operates is 'Quality
First Naruki said. "It is ap-
parent to us that Greenville and
Pitt County share our motto as
demonstrated by the quality of
your development, your indus-
trial community, your educa-
tional and medical facilities and,
most certainly, your people.
"WeatASMObelievethat
this state and this particular
community share our commit-
ment to quality. East Carolina
University is a good example of
your ability to create reality
from vision. You worked hard
for the simple teachers college
that grew into a major univer-
sity, that parented a medical
school
Gov. Jim Hunt attended
the ceremony as well. He
praised ASMO for being a
"good corporate citizen and
said the company will be able
to help the Greenville area in
many ways.
"This new manufacturing
facility will mean 320 new jobs
by 1998 for Greenville and other
eastern North Carolina com-
munities Hunt said. "It will
mean an investment of roughly
$40 million to our state's
economy
ASMO will initially em-
ploy 110 people when it com-
mences operations in October
1995. The company will build a
160,000 square-footbuildingon
its 20 acres of land in the Pitt
County Indigreen Corporate
Park. ASMO will use the build-
ing for its manufacturing, ware-
housing and distribution op-
erations.
ASMO Greenville of
North Carolina will be the third
operations plant the company
has opened up in the state.
ASMO North Carolina Inc.
opened in Statesville in 1989
and Automotive Motors of
Thomasville, Inc. was commis-
sioned in June, 1994.
The Pitt County Develop-
ment Commission was instru-
mental in bringing ASMO to
Greenville. Larkin Little is chair
of the commission.
"ASMO's reputation for
outstanding management, a
high quality product and con-
stant striving for excellence is
known throughout the world
Larkin said.
Also giving speeches at the
press conference were Green-
ville Mayor Nancy Jenkins,
Chair of the County Board of
Commissioners Ed Bright and
Chair of the Pitt-Greenville
Chamber Dave McRae.
ASMO makes and sells
motors that run systems such as
windshield wipers and power
windows. Customers include
Ford, Honda, Mazda and
Toyota, both in the U.S. as well
as Japan and Europe.
Eastern N.C. helps
out flood victims
Photo by Richard Lewi
Eastern North Carolina residents lend a helping hand to Georgian
flood victims during a recent donation drive held at Winn-Dixie.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
Eastern North Carolinians
turned out at the Winn-Dixie
marketplace on Saturday, July
16, to support Georgian flood
victims, accumulating at least
$35,000 worth of supplies.
Robert Lewis, an ECU stu-
dent and member of Sigma Phi
Epsiion fraternity, originated the
project because, like like millions
of Americans, he saw on the dev-
astation caused by floods in
Georgia, Florida and Alabama.
Lewis decided it was up to him
to get eastern North Carolina
moving to help those in need.
"I figured no one else in
eastern North Carolina was do-
ing this and someone should
help out Lewis said.
After Lewis began pub-
licizing the campaign to radio
and news stations across the
state, other towns and cities
began following suit and set-
ting up their own donation sta-
tions.
"We estimated $35,000 in
total supplies Lewis said. "It
could make it the largest phi-
lanthropy project at ECU
This is, however, merely a
guess as Lewis said that the
Interfraternity Council (LFC)
does not keep records of
philanthrophy projects.
Lewis said the campaign
See DRIVE page 2
future
"100 Black Men of Atlanta" program held last week
By Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
ECU hosted participants of
the "100 Black Men of Atlanta"
program last week on campus.
Though the program's title is
"100 Black Men women also
participate in the program. The
participants included three fe-
male and five male high school
students.
"This is the first year they
visited ECU said Dr. Brian
Haynes, director of Minority Af-
fairs. "It is one of the stronger
programs in the country
The program is based in
Atlanta, Georgia, and is funded
through corporate sponsorship.
Haynes said ECU is the
first predominately white uni-
versity to host a group of stu-
dents from the program.
"We hope the program will
be an annual program at ECU
Haynes said.
He said that the program's
mission is to improve the qual-
ity of life for the African-Ameri-
can community through the
long standard of self-help. One
way the program accomplishes
its mission is by exposing the
students to such environments
as the ECU campus and college
atmosphere.
On campus the program
was organized by Haynes and
Dr. Julius Mallette, an associate
professor at the ECU School of
Medicine.
"Students were given an
orientation to the campus, they
ate in the cafeteria, and stayed
in a residence hall Haynes
said.
Haynes also said that the
students participated in the
"Ropes" course, which is a high
adventure course intended to
build group cohesiveness and
teamwork.
Peer mentors Lydia Will-
iams and Tara Cox also helped
the students adjust to the cam-
pus. Williams thought the pro-
gram had a very positive out-
come.
"I think it was successful
because the students enjoyed
themselves Williams said.
"The program accomplished its
goals
Also, students discussed
many problems in the African-
American communities of At-
lanta.
"They came to discuss and
to look at some possible solu-
tions to the problems in the
black community Williams
said.
Williams said some of
the problems covered during
the week included violence,
teen pregnancy and unem-
ployment.
"Supposedly, they are
going back to implement
some of those solutions Wil-
liams said.
The students were in-
vited to ECU in hopes of pos-
sible enrollment.
"Many of these students
are the brightest and the best
of Atlanta Haynes said.
"Bringing the brightest and
the best to campus, that's
what it was all about. Schol-
arship. To recruit students
Students design solar-powered automobile
(CPS) � Imagine a vehicle
that can travel from Chicago to
Milwaukee powered only by the
sun. How about a car that
switches to environmentally
friendly battery power when it
travels on congested city
interstates? What if an automo-
bile logged 10,000 miles between
trips to the gas station?
Fueled by brain power and
hard work, student engineers are
building prototype vehicles that
accomplish many of these things
today. But whatever moves these
college engineering students, it
is certainly not their fathers'
Oldsmobiles.
Instead, the student-built
autos recently showcased in
competitions across the nation
use cutting-edge alternatives to
today's gasoline-powered inter-
nal combustion engine.
At Drexel University in
Philadelphia, seven engineering
students designed and built a
three-wheel, solar-powered ve-
hicle, the SunDragon IV, to com-
pete in this year's American Tour
de Sol, a 300-mile race from New
York City to Philadelphia for so-
lar-powered vehicles.
The SunDragon, which was
built for the monster-sized price
tag of 75,000 dollars, weighs 550
pounds and is 19 feet long, 3.3
feet high and 6.5 feet wide. Its
solar panel alone is eight square
meters. The vehicle, which runs
on a ten horsepower engine, can
travel approximately 180 miles
at 40 miles per hour on a full
charge.
In late May, the students'
efforts paid off as they easily
won the racing event, finishing
almost seven hours ahead of
their nearest competitor.
Building the SunDragon
was entirely a student project,
done outside the classroom on
the students' own time. Pablo
Corbella, an electrical and com-
puter engineering major, says he
found the making of SunDragon
to be a challenge. "We are our
own bosses with this project
he says. "You have to be totally
self-motivated
One motivating force for
student engineers may be future
employment. With Congress
pushing the U.S. car manufac-
turers to develop cleaner-run-
ning alternatives to today's ve-
hicles, engineers who can come
up with a better way to fuel a car
than by gasoline power alone
may be on the road to a rocket-
paced career in Detroit.
In fact, hybrid electric ve-
hicles � vehicles that combine
both electric motors and inter-
nal combustion engines�could
compose a small percentage of
all cars chugging along the
interstates within the next sev-
eral years. In a hybrid electric
vehicle (HEV), a microproces-
sor smoothly switches systems
to electrical power when the car
travels in populated areas, re-
ducing undesirable airborne
emissions.
In June, more than 40 col-
lege teams took the 1994 Hybrid
Electric Vehicle Challenge,
bringing rebuilt Saturns, Ford
Escorts and their own one-of-a-
kind HEV creations to Lawrence
Technological University in
Southfield, Mich. Sponsored by
the U.S. Department of Energy,
National Resources-Canada, the
Society of Automotive Engineers
and Saturn Corporation, the
event marked the culmination
of more than a year of planning,
designing, building and testing
for the student creators of these
HEVs.
Lawrence Tech's car,
dubbed Response HI, was typi-
cal of those HEVs in the "ground-
up" category. Response HI is part
Geo Storm, part Chrysler Neon,
part Ford Probe and part Geo
Metro, along with an assortment
of other unique components. It
was put together in the school's
vehicle dynamics lab.
"This competition gives
student engineers real world op-
portunities to design, build and
See CAR page 2
HELP SAVE LIVES!
The American Red Crass Blood Services
needs volunteers to transport blood from
Bloodmobile sites. Trips can take from 4 to
7 hrs. Vehicles, gas and training are
provided. Please help. Call Helene Cestone
at 758-U30. You can make a difference!
Teach
me!
35 high
school
students
participated
in "The
Technology
Adventures
Program"
headed by
L i I I a
Holsey and
Ken Volk.
Photo by
Leslie Petty
- ii-n. -





2 The East Carolinian
July 27, 1994
July 14
Leo Jenkins Cancer Center � A staff member reported
missing a box of coffee, creamer and an orthopedic support
pillow.
July 18
Power Plant � A staff member reported the wall around the
fuel tank area at the Power Plant had been spraypainted.
North of Wendy's � A student reported that an unknown male
exposed himself to her.
Jarvis Hall�A student was issued a campus appearance ticket
for disorderly conduct and damage to property. Another stu-
dent was issued a campus appearance ticket for disorderly
- conduct. The two students were involved in an argument and
� one hit and broke a pane of glass in a door in Jarvis Hall.
Aycock Hall � A counselor in Aycock reported a male entered
Aycock Hall without authorization. The male had left the area
prior to the officer's arrival.
July 20
Rawl Annex � A staff member reported the larceny of a
" photograph and posters from an office.
South of Brewster � An officer assisted a disturbed student.
July 21
Fifth and Reade � Two non-students were arrested for being
in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia in the
parking lot. They were also charged with obstructing and
delaying of justice.
Third and Reade � A non-student was arrested for a misde-
meanor assault with a deadly weapon.
July 22
South of Christenbury Gym � A student reported that a
suspicious male followed her to her vehicle parked in the small
commuter parking lot. The area was searched with negative
t "results.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from official ECU
Public Safety crime reports.
CAR
Con't
from
pagel
test HEVs says Charles
Schwartz, the faculty advisor to
the Lawrence Tech team.
Meanwhile, if some Cali-
fornia students' ideas about the
car of the future ever evolve into
a vehicle for the mass market,
motorists can expect fewer trips
to the gas station.
Recently student engineers
showcased their advanced fuel-
saving vehicles during the 11th
annual West Coast Supermileage
Competition. The competition
was held June 13 at the Highway
Patrol's test track in Bryte, Calif.
For the competition, stu-
dents designed and built aerody-
namic, lightweight vehicles that
run on small four-cylinder en-
gines. They then took their cre-
ations for three laps around the
1.735-mile track. While students
certainly didn't break any ground
speed records (participants usu-
ally travel at speeds of about 15
miles per hour), they did get re-
markably good gas mileage.
The University of Califor-
nia-Santa Barbara's vehicle,
Scone, which took first place in
the iso-octane fuel division, trav-
els an astonishing 1,358.72 miles
per gallon. Iso-octane fuel is simi-
lar to gasoline consumers buy,
only cleaner, with no additives.
Meanwhile, the Rush Mo-
bile, California State University-
Northridge's entry, logs 1,019.51
miles per gallon. The vehicle won
the M85 division, which included
cars using a blend of 85 percent
methanol and 15 percent gaso-
line.
"This contest is about theo-
ries for fuel-eificiency becoming
reality says Karen Hudson of
the California State Automobile
Association, a sponsor of the
event. "We want to accelerate new
technologies which might some-
day be used to improve the fuel
economy of consumer vehicles
209 E. 5th St.
Greenville, NC
ATTIC
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear Live Music"
1987�198819891990199119921993
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
The
CoMedY
Thursday 28
Pat Godwin
LeeLorren
$1.50 Highballs � $1.50 Tallboys
CHICO S FOR
A FREE PASS
fTM
FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
99c HIGHBALLS
99c MEMBERSHIPS � 99c 32oz DRAFT
Stow
Friday 29
BRUCE FRYE
&�
v fit THE LONELY
Saturday 30
RIDER BAND
THEAMHEURS
Rockin Reggae"
$2.00 32oz. Draft
raiDAY AUGUST 12
STILL RAIN
SATURDAY 13
SILVER WINGS
JHURSDAYUJ
Jelly Roll fir
THEREFLECTORS
VcdAug5
All Female Comedy Zone
Leslie Norris & Christy Evans
FRIDAY 19
SEX. LOVE. & MONEY
Cd Release PartyHI
SATURDAY 20
MOTHER NATURE
TUESDAY 23
WRDU LIVE REMOTE
311
&
BRUCE FRYE
1
EuM .h �. .� -
OR TICKET.
(Because It's Buckle Up Or Pay Up)
m me uuiital tO the
Results from July 18-July 24.1994Click It or Ticket"
During the first six months of "Click It
vented and more than $51 million in r
County
Information provided by the NCDOT Governor's Highway Safely Program
hs of "Click It or Ticket 45 lives were saved, 320 disabling injuries were pre-
i51 million in health care and other costs were saved to North Carolinians.
Of DrlV WhL N� MiSd' Qt�l-� F�"
JL Seat while Whlle Oper. s��d Drug f0'9" ��-
f' Belt Intox Ucense Lfcm Viol Veh,c- �ves
points mtox-Rauded LOTBB �' afrsL
Wake
1,320 39 41
49
201
Johnston
33
89
22 28
30
Wilson
17
44 20
21
166
Pitt
14
156
13 23
Beaufort
10
19
11
14
50
Washington
12
Tyrrell
7
2
Dare
24
63
15
48
TEC
congratulates
professor
Herb Carlton
on his many,
many years
of service to
the Political
Science Dept.
Have a happy
retirement
and keep on
hiking.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00-4:00
DRIVE
Con't
from
pagel
was such a success that it contin-
ued to the following dav (Sun-
day).
"Sunday, I went to Winn-
Dixie and people had dropped
off a bunch of stuff he said.
"We collected all day Saturday
and unexpectedly all day Sun-
day. The truck was filled to ca-
pacity
Bottled water, cleaning
supplies, baby diapers and non-
perishables were collected to be
sent to Georgia. The supplies
were loaded into a truck, spon-
sored bv Overnite Transporta-
tion Company, which delivered
the donations to Albany, Geor-
gia.
"I would like to give a spe-
cial thanks to WCZB 103.7 and
also to WTND, Thunder 99.5 ra-
dio stations Lewis said. He also
mentioned the great support
from WITN 7, WNCT 9, CNN
News, Danny Lewis, Joe and
Mike Lewis from The Shop�
maker of fine cabinets and
millvvork in Bellarthur and the
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority.
"I would Lke to thank ev-
eryone in eastern North Caro-
lina who helped out Lewis said
"It couldn't have been done with-
out them
&

GET THE
MEDICAL
SCHOLARSHIP
YOU NEED.
If you're a medical stu-
dent, you have enough on
your mind. Today's Air Force
offers a scholarship program that
can greatly reduce your financial
burden. Participation is based on
competitive selection. Get more
information with no obligation.
Call
LSAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
TOLL FREE
1-800-423-LSAF
INCLUDES PARTS AND LABOR!
(Excludes Service Specials and Accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.
ican not oe used with other coupons)
CHRYSLER "PlymoutH Dodge
MERCURY
LINCOLN
East Carolina
Auto & Thick Center
Lincoln Mercurs � Chrysler Plymouth Dtvlgc
MEMORIAL DRIVE � GREENVILLE, NC
355-3333
g J1-800-849-3355 '
ires 1-15-95





The East Carolinian
July 27, 1994
Opinion
Page 3
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
By Laura Wright
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Akxa Thompson, Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders, Typesetter
Lisa Seasons, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Caroima reserves the right to editorreject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Ayeock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Cninb Nguyen, Systems Manager
Cap rule restricts personal freedoms I
Here in America, we usually feel secure in
our basic liberties. For themostpart,noone tries to
limit our rights. However,as Jefferson saidetemal
vigilance is the price of liberty. We at The East
Carolinian have discovered a potential threat to
freedom.
As an editor recently learned from personal
experience, at the East Carolina Bowl on Red
Banks Road, patrons are not allowed to wear
baseball caps backwards on the premises. While
we support the right of individual property owners
to make their own rules for their property, in this
case this rule is just plain foolish
There is apparently no justification for the
manager having this rule. When pressed for a
reason, he saidthere was "no logic to it. It's just a
dress code
Dress codes are usually used to provide a
sense of decorum and class to an establishment.
Anyone who has every been to a bowling alley
knows that these things are definitely lacking
from such locations. Any establishment which
allows (or even encourages by selling) drinking
beer, smoking cigarettes and wearing tacky clothes
(bowling shirts and shoes) has very little right to
complain that someone is lacking in class. The
essence of bowling is that itlacks class. What other
sport allows its participants to drink beer and eat
hot dogs between events? Just imagine, for
examp1 rroyAikmanjoggingbacktothesidelines
after tossing a touchdown pass, picking up the
brew and dog he had set down to go out onto the
field.
Since many members of the older generation
dislike the wearing of baseball caps backwards,
we can only assume that this rule is a result of
some sort of prejudice against the younger crowd.
While it is true that the youth of the world
frequently cause problems, the solution to this
problem is not to send them out into the world to
fend for themselves. Giving them a fairly safe
environment in which to have fun, like a bowling
alley, is surely a much better solution than to
leave them to their own devices.
Unfortunately, other than Mendenhall
Student Center, this is the only place in Greenville
to bowl. So, if, like us, you think that this is an
extremely stupid rule, your options are very
limited.
Tennis, anyone?
By Jason Williams
Departing thoughts on state of journalism and world
As I sit among the piles of
clothes, boxes of books and
mounds of junk and junque
that constitute all of my
earthly belongings (that is,
those earthly belongings that
do not currently reside with
my parents in Florida), I take
a moment to reflect on the
past four years, and especially
my two-year tenure at The
East Carolinian. I have never
been one to wax eloquent
about my own life, or the past,
so I'll just say a few words
about journalism in general
and TEC in particular.
Journalists, the press, the
mass media or whatever you,
the public, wish to call us, are
an easy target. Being in the
public eye, we get more than
our share of criticism from
damn near everyone out
there. Most of the time, I come
down on the side of the press.
We are called the liberal
media by conservatives, many
of whom blame us for
society's downfall. Well, to
begin with, I don't buy the
argument that society is
degenerating the least bit, and
furthermore, I think we are
progressing, on the whole,
and much better off than folks
50 years ago.
At any rate, journalists
probably show their own
biases in their work, and
many, probably a majority, of
people in the profession lean
to the left politically. My own
theory as to why this is so, is
that journalism attracts an
open-minded, more
intelligent, liberal sort of
person, much the way
banking attracts people with
a more conservative mindset.
This is not bad; people have
to be something. It's just that
more of the people in
journalism happen to be
something that conservatives
detest.
To say that the liberal
media influences politics is
ludicrous, however. If the left
controls the media, how did
Richard Nixon, Ronald
Reagan and George Bush get
their messages out? And what
explains Rush Limbaugh, G.
Gordon Liddy, Pat Buchanan,
William Safire, James
Kirkpatrick, et cetera, et
cetera?
The other side complains
almost as vigorously that one
must adopt a conservative
bent in order to appear on
television, in the newspaper,
or on the radio. That is to say,
no one can supersede
accepted norms through these
mediums without being
reprimanded (as in the case
of Madonna on Letterman) or
censored.
Likewise, President
Clinton recently lashed out at
his critics on T.V. and one
columnist has gone so far as
to say Clinton has received
the most unfair press in
presidential history. I highly
doubt that one. One, more
dubious, example: a paper
partisan toward John Adams
once printed that his rival in
the election of 1800, Thomas
Jefferson, would ban Bibles,
and send out troops to
confiscate them. Now that's
being mean.
People also criticize
newspapers for printing only
bad news. Well, folks, what is
news? Is a boy scout stopping to
help an old lady cross the street
newsworthy? Should TEC
feature on its front page a
fraternity raising money for
charity?
We had a nice debate
about what was most
important to our readers, and
what, as a consequence,
should appear on the front
page. I argued against
anything other than "real"
news on the front, primarily
because I have something
against popular culture. As
alert readers will notice,
everything that appears after
the news section � opinion,
lifestyle and sports � deals
with popular culture. And
pop culture is trivial,
worthless and stupid.
I have another theory that
says the only things that are
really worth press coverage
are politics and large natural
disasters. That leaves out a
lot of areas � crime (sorry
O.J.), good deeds, sports and
culture to name a few � but it
also encompasses a lot of
territory. Watch what appears
on the hallowed pages of TEC
next year and judge for
yourself.
Speaking of our paper �
your paper � whatever is
accomplished in the following
year will have to be done
without me. This is my final
edition, so to speak, and I
must say, I'll sure miss this
place when I'm gone. But first:
I would like to thank Jeff
Becker, who gave me a
chance, and who forgot more
about journalism than I'll ever
know; Beth Shimmel for
giving me great stories, Karen
Hassell, who let me do my
own thing and Maureen Rich,
with whom I often disagree,
but for whom I have the
greatest respect.
Blair Skinner and Gregory
Dickens must have been two of
the finest managing editors the
paper has ever known, and I have
confidence that Mo will follow
nicely in their footsteps. I am
quite certain, also, that Stephanie
Lassiter will become an
accomplished news editor as
well.
Finally, I would like to
thank Brian Hall, on whose
page I appear. He is without a
doubt the most thoughtful
conservative you'll ever meet.
By this I mean he puts thought
into his argument, not that he
has a heart or anything.
Everyone knows conservatives
don't have hearts.
Trip to amusement park provokes ponderings,
I went to Atlanta last week to cost of Six Flags admission. It mile walk to the car, me with a
visit a friend. The drive took about
eight hours and I went alone, so, to
keep myself occupied, I counted
billboards for South of the Border.
As much as I hate that place, those
billboards gave me something to look
at
I had a great time in Atlanta,
with the exception of the day that
I went to Six Flags Over Georgia. I
stood in hour-long lines for rides
behind hyperactive, hormonally-
charged 14-year-olds and got to
ride a total of four rides. It must
have been National Church Youth
Group Day beca use everyone was
wearing T-shirts with logos like
"Jesus is the answer (what was
the question again?) "God'sgym
and "His pain, your gain" on them.
Basically, I hate amusement
parks. I can't stand the crowds,
but my friend assured me that
since it was a Tuesday, there
wouldn't be a crowd. Even though
I knew better (it is technically
impossible for someone who
loathes crowds the way that I do to
be lucky enough to avoid mem), I
agreed to go. Besides, I had won
$27 from two lottery tickets. I found
this hard to believe since these two
tickets were the only two tickets I
had ever owned. On the first one,
I won $2 which covered me price of
the lottery tickets. On the second
one, I won $25, which covered the
K�&
wms
mm
All letters, in order to be considered for
dtt 250 words, and contain your tiam
daytime phone number. Send tbese to:
Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,

be typed, ur-
a working
Hot, The East
fnville, N.C 27858-4353.
seemed like a sign.
So we went. First, we had to
park about two miles away,
because part of the parking lot
was roped off for repairs (hey, it
was kind of like being on the
campus of ECU). Second, it was
half price day for all Kroger
employees. Third, it was about 98
degrees.
We rode the log flume and got
wet, we played those stupid ring
toss games mat no one ever wins,
we rode a couple of roller coasters.
I hyperventilated. It was really
embarrassing too; I nearly passed
out. Hyperventilating made me
feel somewhat old and very
uncool. I am not the savvy roller
coaster riding fool that I once was.
It could have been worse I
suppose. I could've thrown up.
We ate pretzels, frozen
lemonade and funnel cakes. My
friend, Jamey, won a huge inflatable
baseball bat after the woman at the
"guess your ageweight" game
guessed thathewas38.He'sactualry
26 and he informed me that no one
ever guesses correctly. I started to
wonder how many times he'd been
to this place, how many inflatable
baseball bats he had collected, and I
felt a bit uneasy. We gave the bat
away to a little kid in an "Ask Jesus"
T-shirt
Four hours later, on our two
sunburn, blisters on my feet, a
stomach ache and a bad attitude,
and Jamey apologizing profusely, it
started raining. Then it started
pouring. Then it started to thunder
and lightning. By the time we made
it to the car, we were both soaked
and afraid for our lives.
I don't understand the appeal of
amusement parks � to me, there is
nothing amusing about them. People
goand spend money on junk, they ride
a few rides, they stand in long lines.
These things could be accomplished
easily enough without contributing to
some theme park tycoon's bank
account
After we leftSixFlags,I thought
about all of the revenue generated
by those youth group members,
lottery ticket winners and general
thrill seekers that could have gone to
hdpAdanta'sever-presenthomeless
population. Most people claim that
they don't have time to give blood,
but they'll stand in line for an hour
for a minute-long roller coaster ride.
The day wasn't an entire loss,
however. I bought one of those
disposable cameras and took lots of
pictures of people'sbutts.Wehad to
amuse ourselves somehow, and the
rides weren't doing it for us. I spent
the rest of my vacation away from
crowded places, but that's kind of
hard to do in Atlanta. Have a great
rest of the summer.
By Patrick Hinson
Surfing trips brings sadness of parting
The multiple colors of scenery
and surroundings on the Outer
Banks rrKJvedsmoothly by our caras
wedrovedown the longand narrow
two-lane highway north, back
towards Nags Head and then home.
The high dunes on one side of the
road stood lone sentinel between us
and the water line of the Atlantic,
and green dunesgrass blew softly
with the small and intermittent gusts
of on-shore wind. The car windows
were down, and the warm and
humid air was blowing in, heavy
with salt and with that all-too-
familiar smell that tells you you're
close to the ocean.
A friend and I had spent the
day looking for waves all the way
down the Outer Banks and finding
nothing. The surf was completely
flat everywhere we looked. We had
hoped that the high pressure front
that had been sitting on top of us all
month had finally lifted, butit didn't
seem to have happened, as
everythingwas still hot and flatand
there was no real wind or swell to
bring waves. We had gambled with
the ocean and, as often happens, it
seemed we had lost again, but we
were determined to keep driving
until wefound something. Anything.
Finally, at the Hatteras
lighthouse, there were waves,
although small ones. We stood on
the dunes looking down at them for
a while before deciding to go out
Once we were out in the
waterhowever, they seemed to pick
up, and we had a satisfying session,
which, as any surfer will tell you, is
enough to be thankful for. The
lighthouse stood guard above us, its
black and white tower looking
lonesome and weather beaten and
old, but still strong and stubborn
enough tostandafewhundred more
years ifweweretogiveitthe chance.
The lighthouse holds a tenacious
grasp on a small and diminishing
sand dune sticking out in the water
pastme rest erf the shore!ine,holding
on for all its worth, but perhaps
slowly losing its land rights battle
with nature. The lighthouse, I think,
represents a good example of our
hold on the banks themselves;
isolatedandruled morebynatureand
the seasons than anything else. We
cling stubbornly to our place on the
wild, always fighting and sacrificing
to prove that we can keep it
When thesurfingwas finished
and itwas time to start home, the sun
was nearly setting, butitstiil burned
white-hot and intense in the sky,
blinding us at times as we drove
toward it and them dimming and
outlining the clouds with a burning
ring of fire as it went down behind
them. My friend and I had done
most of our talking on the way there,
and now sat mostly in silence, just
taking in the familiar scenery as if for
the first time, although we'd seen it
hundreds of times before. I watched
the sea birds standing in the shallow
tidal poolsof the marshes, and flying
overhead to unknown destinations.
White spits of sand out past the
shoreline were quickly sinking
beneath the rising tide, and the blue
watersof theriversand of the sound,
as we got closer to home, began
changing to a darker, softer color as
die sun set and it was nice just to be
able tositback and watchaday come
to a close like that realizing how
seldom I actually take the time to do
it.
It was most likely the last time
my friend and I would surf together,
as he is leaving soon for a school in
the North and will be there for the
next few years. Men perhaps find it
harder to say the things we'd like to
say to each other, and saying good-
bye toaclose friend is as hard a thing
as there is to do anyway. I think we
both understood that, and neither of
us expected it from the other. It was
nice enough, and in a very strange
way, appropriate, thatwe did itlike
this, with this one last time out in the
waves,and then the longdrivehome
and into night
The closing of the day and the
easy drive back of course made me
realize once again how I will always
fail to take advantage of each day as
I should, to see it and experience it
and feel it as it should be felt No
matter what the weather, a single
day is a special thing, regardless of
rowdesensitizedwe'vebecome,and
so is a true friend. Is it possible to live
each day likeifsourlastas they say?
Probably not butas often as we can,
I think we should try. There doesn't
seem to be any way we can always
do it, but if we can just try to
remember sometimes, well, maybe
this quick life will slow down a bit
Well be able to realize a few more
things, more important dungs, than
work or deadlines, about life and
aboutourselves,aboutour short time
here on this earth and about the gift
of being able not only to experience
it, but to share it with those around
us.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor,
Jason Williams doesn't know anything about
the Arab-Israeli conflict. His article represents
reactionary political ignorance and poor rhetoric
at its finest. The poor Arab countries who massed
at Israel's border in 1967 had every intention of
making peace with the tiny Jewish State. He blows
his entire argument with the following statement:
"Immediately after the partition of the land into
Jewish and Palestinian states, Israel and Jordan
seized the Palestinian land. . Jordan was the
state he spoke of ii the 60 Minutes" fed babble.
Most Palestinians have Jordanian passports.
Who has been killing the Palestinians all
these years, young wag? The Jordanians in Black
September 1970.1 know it was before you were
born, but if you write about it, you should know
something. The Syrians in 1975 killed half a million
Arabs. Why didn't the Israelis just give back the
Golan to Assad in Syria? Well, each year on the
anniversary of the 1973 Yom Kippur War (when
the Arabs attacked Israel again!), Assad spoke of
his fascist desire for a Greater Syria, one that
included Israel and Lebanon as only a small part
of its territory. Assad makes Saddam Hussein
�i�i iiig.i ; '�"��: ����' i �.�� �11
look likea pussycat. Then, Mr. Williams introduces
some bull (in his last paragraph, something I
know his rhetoric teacher told him never to do)
about the money Israel borrowed and is paying
back to the U.S. on time. Egypt and many other
countries owe the U.S. similar numbers, but they
just aren't paying it back. Israel is the only
democracy in the Middle East and the U.S. profits
from that on many levels, including the Israelis'
advanced agricultural, technological, and Military
Intelligence knowledge.
In his conclusion, Williams states that "they
didn't need to negotiate; they had guns And, the
Arabs had their Soviet made guns. Now that they
are lacking Russian spare parts, the Isr4aelis and
the Syrians are talking. Mr. Williams knows
nothing about the role of the Super Posers nor oil
politics. He probably just watches too much
television and Rush Limberger sic.
It is usually best to discourse on something
you know just a little bit about, Mr. Williams.
Adam B. Schonbrun
English Department
Director of Hillel, the Jewish Students
Organization





jiiTiiniir" iiiiirrii-j
Page 4
-The East Carolinian-
Classifieds
July 27, 1994
Annou ncem en ts
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 becii �jom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
for apartment 12 block from
Art Bldg 3 blocks from down-
town, 2 blocks from Supermar-
ket. Starting in August. Call 757-
1947.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3
bedroom at 206 East 12th Street,
for450-495; Near University,
Call 757-3191.
1-4 BEDROOM HOMES,
Condo's, Duplexes, and Apart-
ments for rent.190.00 up! Short
term lease available! Finders 321-
6708. Small Fee. Near Campus,
rentals available now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING
SERVICE! Need a roommate, list
your ad free. To get a list of all
the people looking a roommate -
321-6708. Smau Fee!
HOUSEMATE WANTED, $
145.00 monthly, 14 utilities,
cable, phone, etc. Pets OK. Large
back yard, Quiet neighborhood.
Available immediately. Call 752-
5405.
ROOMMATE WANTED to
share a 2 story, 2 bedroom, 11
2 bath apartment for fall. Rent is
$ 190.00 and 1 2 utilities. Access
to pool and laundry facilities.
Located on ECU bus route. Call
Jenna at 328-7888 or Heidi at
(919) 233-1748. Can move in be-
ginning of August.
APT. FOR RENT. 1 bedroom,
kitchen, bath, 6 blocks from ECU.
$ 175.00 per month, includes wa-
ter. Available August 1. Call 355-
1399, leave message.
CAMPUS AREA 1 bedroom du-
plex160.00 or 1 bedroom fur-
nished apartment250.00. Walk
to campus. Call 752-1375
Homelocators.
HOUSE FOR RENT 2 bedroom
house475.00 pets OK, or 3 bed-
room house600.00 others too
Call 752-1375 Homelocators.
DORM BLUES Check it out 1
bedroom250.00 or 3 bedroom
duplex450.00 call 752-1375
Homelocators.
CHEAP! CHEAP! 1 bedroom $
150.00 2 miles to campus or utili-
ties paid 1 bedroom duplex $
295.00 2 blocks to campus call
752-1375 Homelocators.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED TO
SHARE affordable 3 bedroom
house. 3 blocks from campus,
deposit 13 of rent and utili-
ties required. Available August
1. 830-9442, leave message.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
FALL to share 3 bedroom house
located in a quiet neighborhood
near the hospital. Must be a seri-
ous student and non-smoker. $
260 rent per month includes utili-
ties and cable TV. If interested,
call Harold after 4:00 p.m. at 830-
5160.
HOUSEMATE WANTED.145
month, 14 utilities, cable,
phone, etc. Pets OK. Large back
yard, quiet neighborhood. Avail-
able immediately. Call 752-5405
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365,
Ext. P-3712.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Danc-
ers, Escorts, Massuers. Earn BIG bucks
in the cleanest club in North Caro-
lina, must be 18 years old. Playmates
Adult Entertainment. 919-747-7686.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT - make up to2,000-4,000
mo. teaching basic conversational
English abroad. Japan, Taiwan, and
S. Korea. Many employers provide
room Ic board other benefits. No
teaching background or Asian lan-
guages required. For more informa-
tion call: (206) 632-1146, ext J5362.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN
SALES. Earn good money with flex-
ible hours and gain valuable busi-
ness experience. Call Bonnie at 355-
7700 for information and possible
interview.
STUDENT TO WORK IN LOCAL
LAW OFFICE approximately 30-40
hours per week doing marketing for
the firm. An interest in going to law
school beneficial. Send resume to PO
Drawer 5026, Greenville, NC 27835.
ECU TRANSIT is now hiring for Fall
1994 semester. Looking for depend-
able bus drivers. Good driving record
a must! NC class "B" C.D.L. with
passenger endorsement and no air
brake restriction is needed. Will help
get license if needed. Interested per-
sons apply in the Transit Office, 258
Mendenhall, MonThurs 1 p.m4
p.m. Must be an ECU student. For
more information, call 328-4724.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT - Fishing Industry. Earn up to
$ 3,000-$ 6,000 per month. Room
and board! Transportation! Male or
Female. No experience necessary. Call
(206) 545-4155, ext. A5362.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING - Earn up
to2,000 monthly on Cruise Ships
or Land-Tour companies. Seasonal &
Full-time employment available. No
experience necessary. For info, call 1-
206-634-0468, ext. C5362.
ENTHUSIASTIC SALESPEOPLE to
operate cart in shopping mall in
Greenville, Wilson or Rocky Mount.
Call the Globetrotter in Raleigh (919)
782-5450, to arrange interview.
ENJOY WORKING WITH THE
FASHIONS YOU LOVE TO WEAR!
Brody's is accepting applications for
additional sales and customer ser-
vice representatives. Individuals
must have excellent communication
and organization skills. Flexible part-
time schedules to fit most needs. In-
terviews held each Monday and
Thursday, 1-4 p.m Brody's, The
Plaza.
WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR
THE REMAINDER OF SUMMER?
Brody's is accepting applications for
ReceivingWarehouse associates. In-
dividuals must: Be used to hard
workhave flexible schedulebe
available to work similar hours in the
fall semester. Excellent work hours
with occasional weekend hours. In-
terview Monday and Thursday, 1-4
p.m Brody's, The Plaza.
NOW HIRING, ECU RECRE-
ATIONAL SERVICES is hiring the
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-Wheelers, Motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DEA. Nationwide auction
listingsavailablenow.Call 1-8004364363,
Ext. C-5999.
WASHING MACHINE must sell! Good
shape,75.00. Call 752-5405.
GET RELIEF FROM PMSPMT prob-
lems. Amazing, safe, natural, easy. Call
919-355-8112 for two minute recorded
message.
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, dk wood
base, full motion,100.00. Glassbrass
table w4 wicker chairs,35.00. Wicker
glass coffee table,30.00. (919) 782-2106,
after 5.
COUCH, CHAIR, LAMP, DINETTE
SET- all for only275.00 O.B.O Great
condition! Moving - mustsell -Call Nicole
3214866.
BEAUTIFUL PUPPIES- Rottweiler and
Lab mix.25.00 to cover vet expenses.
Ready, 72294, call 830-9442, leave mes-
sage.
FOR SALE STEREO JVC. 6 Disc CD
Player and JVC Receiver, 2 Jensen 12"
Speakers, Bought '91. Sell all for300
OBO Call 752-7465.
MOVING SALE! EVERYTHING
MUSTGO Dorm Refridgerator, $35.00;
Infinity Speakers, $40.00; Toaster Oven, $
10.00; Hot Plate,10.00. Call Cynthia at
328-7846. Reasonable offers will be con-
sidered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resume
Secretarial work. Specializing in
Resume composition w cover-letters
stored on disk, term papers, thesis,
legal transcriptions, general typing
and other secretarial duties. Word
Perfect or Microsoft Word for Win-
dows software. Call today (8A-5P-
752-9959) (Evenings 527-9133).
NCTAN-NORTH CAROLINA
AND TIDEWATER AREA
NATURISTS now being organized
to promote coastal recreation. For
more information, send1.00 and
S ASE to NCT AN, PO Box 88, Pantego,
NC 27860.
Announcements
EMPLOY!
OPPORTUNITIES.
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are
interested in becoming
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS to individuals in
wheelchairs. Also, READERS
AND TUTORS are needed. Past
experience is desired but not
required. If interested, contact:
Office for Disability Support
Services Brewster A-116 or A-
114 Telephone: (919) 757-6952
TITTOR TRAINING
WORKSHOP.
Literacy volunteers will hold a
three day workshop to teach
volunteers how to become
reading tutors. The workshop
will be held on July 14, 15, and
16th, during daytime hours. Call
Literacy Volunteers at 752-0439
for the workshop schedule,
meeting place, and additional
information. One in every four
adults in Pitt County cannot read
the directions on a medicine
bottle or a child's note from
school. You can change the life of
one of these adults by giving
them the power of reading. Call
752-0439 for more details.
j
Heroes Are Here Too
116 E. 5th Street
757-0948
Comics and Sportscards
j 10 OFF wCoupon
expires 8-31-94
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
CASH
FOR YOUR USED,
� m ft
II
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a
month, 6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
I.T. or Tommy Williams
756-781 S758-7436
NAUT1CA
&
POLO
WEALSCW4NT:
NICE T SHOTS &
StICOTS
Studkni SwapShoi1
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN.DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER

CRUNCH TIME
FALL'S A'COMIN' AND WE NEED MORE CARTOONISTS IN ORDER TO
HAVE A FULL PAGE OF PIRATE COMICS.
SO IF CRANKING OUT A TIER OR TWO A WEEK SOUNDS GOOD TO
YOU, HERE'S THE POOP ON WHATCHA GOTTA DO.
1) HAVE READY: 2 FINISHED, I SAY FINISHED, 8" x 13" SAMPLES OF
YOUR STRIP ON HEAVY PAPER IN HEAVY, BLACK INK. IF THERE IS ANY
CONFUSION, READ NUMBER ONE OVER AGAIN.
2) FILL OUT AN APPLICATION AT THE EAST CAROLINIAN. SPECIFY
"CARTOONIST" ON APPLICATION. LEAVE YOUR PHONE NUMBER.
3) DON'T YANK MY CHAIN! WE WANT TO PRINT ORIGINAL IDEAS BY
ARTISTS WHO ARE WILLING TO WORK TO GET PAID AND PUBLISHED.
HURRY AND DO ALL OF THE ABOVE AND YOU'LL GET PRINTED IN THE
MAMMOTH WELCOME BACK ISSUE ON AUG. 24TH.
OET 8DCW.P�wnTM�. � ftl JAO A OeAL WP
-TZieO To kiu. rte
crje Avo you ier
Au. THE CODA'S CO
Cco7 I �'
HOW SHtCLP I
KU0W? I C-oTTA
DEAL WITH TWJ
P�eft Mew AvO
I Got Qiu JoPAf.
GET REAL.X
HovR ISoJI
COT PEOPLE
AluTJLATeO
,WO KlLUrO
F&R W& eGO.
I'hglaO ,
THAT AJIT i
wamt vt
WWR BUCKET I
of A ISoSi REHlND
AiVD DO Soi�rTHIW&
&.I.E. AAflSe HELP
out US PEOPLE wi-Kj
7NOso,nAP71ul i LEFT ALOJE
r wrrH THE KuitJS tF &40DY-O
AwO N'Cti WORDS,WHICH Hf Cau't
IGNORE. HP twoWS 0001-0 WAS
WR0W6 IN HM ETMODSAwDTO
p.EP4'l?Hi,M wMJD LEAD To riot
CACAMrH.YFT WHAT Pi HE IP WOT
OAOOY-O'l AIDE ?
lYfS.W'f's wcROJ HAVE lPFTA
Uark 8o7 Wot ewovuH.So,
Wrtini ateFT shake
MAvt To t-l v� WITH HHJ
JaiticWS A"0 UHEES
tolV START THIS UP
AAw. w Ov AwO i'uc
u:e TYu VE' powCR. I j.
Jo 6W?M YW to-APuDCXE.
3ut not JTlRKeD.





mmmtmmmm umm
�-� urn � Mimtmmmmm-
The East Carolinian
July 27, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5
Troupe brings wartime play to ECU theatre
Photo Courtesy of ECU Summer Theatre
The ECU Summer Theatre presented 'Biloxi Blues a wartime story filled with depictions of an Army
boot camp in Biloxi, Mississippi, in 1943's sweltering heat.
By Brian Hall
Staff Witer
With all the hoopla recently
surrounding the 50th anniversary
of the Normandy invasion in par-
ticular and World War II in gen-
eral, it seems only appropriate that
the ECU Summer Theatre would
conclude its 35th anniversary sea-
son with Neil Simon's "Biloxi
Blues which continues the fic-
tional autobiography of Eugene
Morris Jerome begun in the movie
Brighton Beach Memoirs. Like all
Simon plays, "Biloxi Blues" is a
very human comedy, and was per-
formed nearly flawlessly last week
on the stage of McGinnis Audito-
rium.
The play really has no plot in
the normal sense. It is more a series
of humorous sketches tied together
by the reoccurring characters. What
it does have, and in abundance, are
laughs. The humor comes from
nearly everywhere. There are jokes
about everything from army food
to masturbation; from fellatio to
Agatha Christie (and these two in
the same joke, when a character
makes up a Christie title � Death
by Fellatio).
The glue which holds the play
together is Eugene, played by Kevin
Varner. While he is the main char-
acter, Eugene really participates in
very little of the action, serving
mostly as a chorus to observe and
comment on the actions of others.
He even refuses todefend the other
Jewish character, Arnold Epstein,
when Epstein is verbally abused
with anti-Semitic comments from
their barracks mates. Varner por-
trays the earnest and naive Eugene
very effectively, perfectly deliver-
ing his hilarious observations with
a straight delivery, and with his
comments to the audience, almost
making them feel that they are in-
cluded in the story.
The true star of the show, how-
ever, is Ed Markowitz as Arnold.
He perfectly portrays the effemi-
nate, free-thinking intellectual, to-
tally out of place in the Army. The
one consistent storyline is the on-
going battle between Arnold and
the drill sergeant, Sgt. Toomey.
Arnold resents the dehumanizing
aspects of basic training which are
necessary to create an effective
and cohesive team of soldiers.
Toomey wants to make Arnold a
good soldier, and Arnold wants
to retain his independence. This
conflict continues throughoutthe
play, concluding in a potentially
dramatic confrontation.
Unfortunately, it remains
only potential, as the actor por-
traying Sgt. Toomey (John
Shearin) was unable to bring the
same ability to his role that
Markowitz did. In playing this
grizzled veteran, Shearin seems
to be capable of only one emotion
and volume level (very loud).
While this stereotype of the drill
sergeant is very effective in the
comedic aspects of the play, it
fails terribly in the dramatic as-
pects.
The supporting cast is uni-
formly excellent, providing many
hilarious moments. The other sol-
diers can best be summed up by
looking at their answers to the
question, "How would you spend
your last week, if you knew that
See BLUES page 6
GrishanV
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The newest JohnGrishamnovel
to be turned into a Hollywood pic-
ture is The Client, starring Susan
Sarandon and Tommy Lee Jones.
The Client tells the tale of 11-
year-old Mark Sway (played by
promising newcomer Brad Renfro)
who witnesses the suicide of Romey
Clifford, a Memphis lawyer for the
mob, who has gotten himself in-
volved too deeply with one of his
clients. Mark tries to stop Romey
from poisoning himself with carbon
monoxide but Romey catches Mark
and drags him in the car with him.
Romey tells Mark the location of a
dead Louisiana senator before Mark
escapes and Romey shoots himself.
Fearing for his safety and the
safety of his mother (Mary-Louise
Parker) and brother (David Speck)
Mark sets out to enlist the aide of an
attorney. He stumbles into the law
office of Reggie Love (Sarandon), an
inexperienced but savvy lawyer
whose egregious divorce settlement,
which left her without visitation
rights to her two children, compels
her to take Mark's case and provide
him with the maternal support she
can no longer offer her children.
Mark is doggedly pursued for
questioning by Roy Foltrigg (Jones),
a US. attorney who has political
aspirations. Reverend Roy, so called
because of his penchant for citing
biblical verses, badly wants to locate
the body of the senator to help his
public image.
The Client centers on the rela-
tionship between Mark and Reggie
and when it does it succeeds. But
too much of the story relies on the
happenings of the mob, who also
want to see how much the boy
knows. This constant intercutting
slows down the progression of the
film and eventually undermines it.
Joel Schumacher has always di-
rected second rate films that lack
focus, like Si. Elmo's Fire, The Lost
Boys, and, most recently, Falling
Down. The Client, though glossier
and classier than his earlier work,
continues the trend. Schumacher
inserts scenes that unknowingly in-
terrupt the entire flow of the film,
like one ridiculously contrived se-
quence that has Reggie looking for
a notebook in the garage when she
finds her son's baseball mitt. Tears
fill her eyes and the viewer's heart is
supposed to swell on cue with com-
passion for her. But Reggie wascom-
passionate enough before this need-
iess scene and by inserting it
Schumacher insults the viewer's in-
telligence.
The acting in The Client saves
the film. Sarandon is a Hollywood
woman who dares to look her age
(47), yet also dares to show how
beautifully sexy older women can
be. Sarandon gives Reggie the right
amount of softness to accent her
savvy and grit.
Tommy Lee Jones redeems
himself after his unnecessarily
hammy performance in the
summer's Blown Away. His Rever-
end Roy is a throwback to his role in
The Fugitive (for which he won an
Academy Award). Roy is brash,
bold and bulJ-headed, but beneath
this tough exterior beats the heart of
a compassionate man whose liveli-
hood prevents him from display-
ing his emotion.
The rest of the cast also shines,
including Ossie Davis in a hilarious
turn as a judge and Will Patton as a
local cop who constantly tries to
frighten Mark into a confession.
The Client ranks up there with
The Firm and well ahead of 77k Peli-
can Brief, but like both these films it
lacks permanence. During the film
one may get caught up in the tale
and really care about the characters,
but once the lights come on the film
is already beginning to do a fast
fade in the memory. I have yet to
want to see a film based on
Grisham's work a second time; the
films provide only superficial en-
tertainment that would yield no
further pleasure upon repeated
viewing.
Like the two Grisham works
before it, The Client is good but far
from great.
On a scale of one to ten, The
Client rates a seven.
Roddn'
Me!
Classic rock
legend
Steve Miller
performed
at Walnut
Creek
Saturday.
Photo by
Leslie Petty
True Zjestums out to be
a trued
� c:irM
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Arnold Schwarzenegger's
newest film, True Lies, reunites
the actor with director James
Cameron. Schwarzenegger's
greatest success has been when
he has teamed with Cameron.
Cameron vaulted
Schwarzenegger into
superstardom with a starring role
in The Terminator, then together
they made the largest grossing
picture of both their careers when
they created Terminator II.
Cameron's previous work,
which also includes Aliens and
The Abyss, has garnered him a
place as one of the most success-
ful directors working in Holly-
wood today. Cameron has always
relied on great special effects and
an all-out assault on the senses to
create some of the best action ever
filmed for the silver screen.
With the reported $120 mil-
lion spent on the making of True
Lies one would expect that the
film rivals Terminator U for spe-
cial effects. Instead what True Lies
delivers is fifteen minutes of tame
James Bond-style action in the
beginning, a chase involving a
motorcycle and a horse in the
middle, and a blowout finale in-
volving helicopters and jets.
Those three scenes account for
maybe fifty minutes of film time
which is only one-third of the
movie.
The rest of True I tes lazily
unfolds at a lethargic pace. To try
to compensate for the lull,
Cameron includes plenty of hu-
mor in the film.
Most of the humor in True
Lies comes from Tom Arnold's
character Gibb. Gibb and Harry
Tasker (Schwarzenegger) work
for the Omega Section of the Fed-
eral Government in an effort to
make the world safe from terror-
ists. The main hook of the story is
that Harry's wife Helen (Jamie
Lee Curtis) does not know that he
is a spy. She thinks her husband
sells computers.
True Lies plays on Helen's ig-
norance and thus is more a com-
edy than an action film telling
him that just because Last Action
Hero failed at the box office he
could not assume that all his ac-
tion comedies would do so.
Schwarzenegger may have had
the right idea, though. The com-
edy in True Lies is funny, and
sometimes downright hilarious,
but the film cries out to be an
action film with some comedy
sprinkled in, not the other way
around.
One of the main problems
with True Lies is that Cameron
lacks a sense of timing in the film.
He drags scenes on far too long
and plays out some jokes way too
often. One plot element involv-
ing a used car salesman named
Simon (Bill Paxton) is initially
funny then becomes tedious. An
erotic dance done by Helen seems
to go on forever and an interroga-
tion scene involving Helen
needed to be trimmed by several
See LIES page 6
CDReviews- CD Revi
CD Review
tp$
Take Your Chances
Worth A Try
JlJlJJHighly Recommended!
Deconstruction
Self-Titled

Why is it that so much of the
music that's come out in the last
few months has been so long and
boring? I mean, if you're not into
seven-minute guitar drones, this
has been kind of a lean summer
for new music. Did the Ramones
teach us nothing? Get into the
song, say what you have to say,
and for God's � ke get out before
people get bored. I have nothing
against musical exploration, but
if you let it go over five minutes,
at least make sure you're explor-
ing something interesting. Too
many bands are simply rehash-
ing the same three chords.
The latest entry in this tire-
some trend is the self-titled debut
album from Deconstruction.
Formed by Eric Avery and Dave
Navarro, former members of de-
funct alternative rock power-
house Jane's Addiction,
Deconstruction has some inter-
esting things to say. They just
don't say them very well.
The main problem here is tim-
ing. Bass player and vocalist
Avery has written some intrigu-
ing songs, based around life in
modern media-blitzed America.
In "One for example, Avery dis-
cusses how television has created
a global community, centered
around our one God, "the only
window in the house the only
window that matters television.
His delivery of the lyrics, how-
ever, is strung out so slowly over
Navarro's surprisingly sluggish
guitar work that you don't care
anymore by the time he gets to
the point.
The best example of this phe-
nomenon is the seven-minute te-
dious guitar extravaganza
"America Arguably the best
track on the album, this rune starts
off with the interesting compari-
son, "I was America this morn-
ing It then takes you on a drive
past an overturned truck. "Isaw
a fireman Avery sings, "with
hands filled with frightened
bloody Mexican faceI rolled by
eating my Egg McMuffin and I
didn't care Getting fatter and
-5
� '�'��
uncaring, I was America .
Gripping stuff, at least wh�v
you get it all in one shot. Unfofc
tunately, it takes about threes
minutes to get the above lines;
out. Hampered by Avery'sslug
gish delivery and the two sepa
rate (and relatively uninterest-
ing) guitar solos, the song is.
ruined.
Clocking in at a bloated 72 �
minutes, Deconstruction features
few songs that are under sbt ,
minutes, and that's just too long
to listen to stuff like this It
would be different if the album" �
offered a variety of sound, or if ;
the music actually went some-
where. But Deconstruction plods
along at the same pace through-
out, with mushy guitars that
start to sound far too familiar
about four songs in.
I read once that, back in the
early days of Jane's Addiction
Jane's frontman Perry Ferrell
broke Dave Navarro of playing
in the blues tradition and forced
him to constantly push himself
and experiment. If that's the
case, Deconstruction could use
somebody like Ferrell now to
give them a swift kick in the ass.
� Mark
Brett





6 The East Carolinian
July 27, 1994
Chapel Hill bands
search for fame
LIES
Continued from page 5
� CHAPEL HILL, N.C.(AP) �
Stpott spells his name with two
Vs, but he doesn't pronounce it
that way.
"The second T is silent he
says.
The name � short for Stacy
l4iilpott � sounds less bizarre
vfhen compared with some oth-
ers on the rock scene in this col-
lege town. With bands named Evil
V? iener, Superchunk and Archers
of Loaf, no one bats an eye at
Spott.
Spott works at Merge
Records, an independent record
campany operating in a nonde-
s�ript brick building in nearby
Cjriboro. Merge is owned by two
members of Superchunk, one of
trie most successful bands to
sjjring up here.
Chapel Hill offers three ne-
cessities for a fertile rock scene: a
club that allows unknown bands
ut perform, a
rqcord store
that sells their
music and a ra-
dio station that
plays it.
Now if the
bands can just
get a handle on
this name
thing.
Take
Superchunk as
an example. A
former drummer, Chuck Garri-
son, was accidentally listed in the
phone book as Chunk Garrison.
So he gave the name Chunk to the
group. But another group had laid
claim to that name. So the band
become Superchunk.
Garrison now plays with
three other groups, including
Small 23, formerly Small. That
group also changed its name be-
cause another band already had
it.
Some good advice for new
rock bands:
" With the one-word, one-syl-
lable thing, there's probably al-
ready somebody with that name
says Steve Akin, 29, a former band
member who now works at
Schoolkids Records.
A band called June has
avoided such problems. A few of
the other local bands made sure,
coming up with such long names
as Squirrel Nut Zipper, Chicken
Wire Gang, Southern Culture on
the Skids and What Peggy Wants.
These bands and others are
part of the burgeoning rock scene
here that has some asking if it will
be the next Seattle, home of
grunge rock bands such as Nir-
vana and Pearl Jam.
The answer from those in-
volved is no, and they don't want
to be. It's the big record compa-
nies who are hoping they can tap
another Seattle by promoting
moneymaking bands.
For a lot of Chapel Hill bands,
money isn't everything.
Superchunk has had offers
from major labels, but turned
them down to stay with Merge,
which is owned by band mem-
bers Mac McCaughan and Laura
Ballance.
The group has sold about
35,000 copies of its latest CD,
"Foolish It's the band's fifth CD,
and it earned a mere pittance com-
pared to the millions some groups
make off their
releases.
"That's a
whole differ-
ent level that
we've chosen
not to be a
part of said
McCaughan,
26. "As long
as we can
make the
records that
we want to
make and put them out ourselves
and not have to answer to any-
body and still make a living at it,
then we're happy doing that
Superchunk has rejected ma-
jor labels because the group wants
to maintain control.
"Once someone starts putting
lots of money into a record, it
becomes their record, and they
expect something out of you
said McCaughan, who sings and
plays guitar.
So fame is OK, but not a re-
quirement. Talent isn't even a re-
quirement here.
"There's developed over the
years a culture that says that if
you and three of your friends get
together and bang on some in-
struments, somebody will let you
play says Bill Burton, a local
entertainment lawyer who's also
involved with WXYC, the Uni-
versity of North Carolina's radio
station.
This acceptance allows bands
to improve and flourish, he says.
So fame is CK,
but not a
requirement.
Talent isn't even
a requirement
here.
minutes.
Essentially, True Lies needed
an editor with a sharp pair of
scissors to excise much of the
needles film footage. Several well
placed snips could easily have
brought the running time of True
Lies to under two hours which
would have made the film much
easier to recommend.
Cameron seems to think that
every film he makes needs to ex-
ceed two hours in order to be
considered a serious work of art.
But True Lies is such an inconse-
quential story with such shallow
characters that the excessive
length only serves to make the
viewer painfully aware of how
hard Cameron is trying to con-
vince the audience (and maybe
himself) that True Lies merits such
a prodigious length.
Finding inconsistencies
within the plot would be as easy
as finding peanuts in a can of
mixed nuts. Cameron's script uses
plot devices at random without
any thought as to how they might
tie into the story.
The head of Omega Section
(Charleston Heston) appears in
the first few scenes and then is
never seen again.
Harry rescues Helen by heli-
copter from a car that is out of
control but why Helen does not
just move the dead driver and
step on the brake is never ex-
plained.
One of the most blatant in-
consistencies occurs because
Cameron obviously felt that a real
action film has to have a torture
scene. Harry is to be interrogated
to find information yet it is clear
that Harry has nothing new he
could tell the terrorists. What is
BLUES
worse is that only a few hours
ago the terrorists tried to assas-
sinate him yet for some reason
they now want to talk to him. In
addition to this, the island where
Harry is to be tortured is set to be
blown up so the interrogator
would die thus making any in-
formation he gets from Harry
useless. The real torture in the
scene is having to watch it.
Once again this summer a
large scale, big budget film like
True Lies has been overshadowed
by the brilliance of a much
smaller, less expensive (only $30
million) film called Speed.
True Lies should have served
notice that Schwarzenegger had
rebounded from the negative
press of Last Action Hero. Instead
it serves notice that
Schwarzenegger pictures are no
longer a sure bet for quality en-
tertainment.
Neither are James Cameron
pictures a sure bet either. Though
Terminator II performed well at
the box office, its artistic merits
are dubious. It was much more
concerned with making a state-
ment about world peace than tell-
ing a great story. The Abyss held
together as a work of art until the
last twenty minutes and that fail-
ure can be directly attributed to
Cameron since he wrote the
screenplay.
Cameron needs to rekindle
the fire that raised The Termina-
tor and Aliens to such artistic
heights. The dark, apocalyptic
world he created transfixed the
viewer. Now he settles for dull
action, cheap thrills, and politi-
cal messages.
On a scale of one to ten, True
Lies rates a six.
Continued from page 5
you were going to die?" Roy
Selridge (Eric Cross) would make
love to the richest seven women on
Earth. Joseph Wykowski (David J.
Berberian) would make love to the
queen of England (the current
queen's mother). Don Carney
would perform five shows a day,
singing in Carnegie Hall to 4,000
women who were crazy about him,
then sign a record contract. James
Hennesey (David Denson) would
go home.
Hennesey provides some of the
few dramatic moments, as when he
helps end the racism against Jews
by revealing that he is half Black.
The character is also involved the
only tension, when one of the sol-
diers is caught engaging in a homo-
TAKE A BREAK
at
Mexican Restaurant
2?
sexual act with a soldier from an-
other barracks. Everyone suspects
Arnold, especially since it had
been revealed that Eugene had
written in his journal that he sus-
pected that Arnold was gay. It
turns out that Hennesey is the one
who was guilty. The shock of hav-
ing him leave draws the remain-
ing soldiers closer together.
The female characters seem
to exist mainly to allow Eugene to
meet two of his goals. A visit to
Rowena (Kate Finlayson), the lo-
cal prostitute (though only on
weekends, so one of the charac-
ters claims she is only "semi-pro-
fessional"), allows Eugene to lose
his virginity, as well as providing
the opportunity for numerous
jokes about sex by Eugene's
friends. Daisy Hannigan (Alecia
B. Hillis) gives Eugene a "good
girl" to fall in love with. Eugene
meets her at a USO dance, and
soon discovers a common interest
in literature. She also provides fod-
der for jokes about interracial ro-
mance.
Of course, in a Neil Simon
play, the whole purpose of every
character is to provide fodder for
jokes. His plays are not the place
to look for new and incisive in-
sights on the human condition.
He just provides simple, humor-
ous entertainment. This is just
what the East Carolina Summer
Theatre provided last week.
TEC needs some
intelligent young
wags to write for
the Opinion
Page. Apply!
Yes, You!
Brand New For '94
YLfvylOyP at Kingston Place
1 & 2 BEDROOM2 BATH APARTMENTS AVAILABLE IN JULY
POOL � CLUBHOUSE � PRIVATE LAUNDRY � FREE CABLE AND
WATER � PRIVATE BALCONIES � FULLY CARPETED � CENTRAL
AIR & HEAT � DISHWASHERS & DISPOSALS � BLINDS �
WASHERDRYER CONNECTIONS AND RATALS � ECU BUS .
CALL 758-7575 OR VISIT OUR ONSITE OFFICE 2-5:00 P.M. MON-FRI
LOCATED ON KINGSTON CIRCLE OFF GREENVILLE BLVD BETWEEN 10TH AND 14TH STREETS
PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY PRO MANAGEMENT OF GREENVILLE
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water �Sewer "Cable "Draperies
�Self-cleaning Oven �Frost-free Refrigerator
�WasherDryer Connections �Utility Room
�Patio with Fence �Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks -Walk-in Closets
featuring
�Swimming Pool �Basketball Court
�Tennis Court �Laundry Facilities
located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease "Security Deposit
GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN
FIVE MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
752-0277 Equal Housing Opportcfnity
HET
.1 Adult
Entertainment
jf Center
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm
CASH PRIZE
'Contestants need to call & register in advance. Must arrive by 800
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
h-
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
lMC��"�'ir 5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ava,
SUN. SCREWDRIVERS $2.25
BLOOPYMARYS $2.25
12 PRICE WINGS
MON. 12 PRICE PITCHERS DRAFT
.95 MUGS
12 PRICE NACHOS
TUES. SANGRIAS $1.25
12 PRICE PIZZAS
AWED. MEXICAN IMPORTS $1.25
12 PRICE POPPERS
THURS. LIME MARGARITAS $2.50
12 PRICE CHIP DIP
AFTER 9 P.M. DINE IN ONLY
ALL ABC PERMITS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE PH. 757-1666
COMEDY ZONE PASS
WPURCHASE OF AN ENTREE
EVERY WED. FROM 5-9 P.M.
(behind John's Convenient Man)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
I tell
We're Back from New
York &- Our Fall Designs
2ire on the way. Felp
BIT'S make room
�vpapap :��





�� � � �
The East Carolinian
July 27. 1994
Sports
Page 7
Hart denies
Maryland offer
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
The ECU athletic program
might have gained one of its
biggest victories of 1994 when
ECU Athletic Director Dave
Hart declined the offer to com-
pete for the Athletic direcor po-
sition at the University of Mary-
land.
"I was contacted by the
University of Marlyand regard-
ing their search for a director of
athletics Hart said in a state-
ment released Friday. "I made
it clear that my focus needed to
remain on what we are trying
to accomplish at East Carolina
and, therefore, I was not inter-
ested in pursuing the job at the
University of Marlyand
Hart could not be reached
for additional comments be-
cause he is on vacation.
Over the past month,
Hart's name was mentioned as
a candidate among two others.
Athletic Director Kevin White
of Tulane and Debbie Yow of
St. Louis
Maryland's former Ath-
letic Director, Andy Geiger, left
in April to enter the position at
Ohio State.
According to The News and
Observer, Hart and White, serv-
ing as consultants, met last
Wednesday with the Maryland
search committee and will join
Yow on a referral list to be sent
to Maryland president William
Kirwan. Yow visited with the
search committee last week.
ECU Chancellor Dr. Rich-
ard Eakin said that Hart was
never a candidtate. Instead,
Eakin explained that Hart met
several weeks ago, not last
Dave Hart
Wednesday, as only a consult-
ant for ways to improve the $6
million debt at Maryland and
successful ways to hire a new
athletic director.
Geiger, who was hired by
the Terps to replace Dick Dull
in 1990, visited Maryland as a
consultant to the search com-
mittee before his appointment
to the job was announced a few
days later. Ironically, Hart also
was a Terps candidate in 1990,
according to the newspaper.
Hart has been at ECU since
1987 and has moved the ECU
program up the ladder of suc-
cess.
Hart's name has been men-
tioned to conference commit-
tees and other schools over the
years, but he has been dedi-
cated to the ECU program.
"Dave Hart is an extremely
talented athletic director
Eakin said. "I value very much
the working relationship we
have. I believe he has caused
our athletic program to ad-
vance significantly under his
leadership. I look forward to
continuing our fine working
relationship
Dreams really come
true for U.S. players
(AP) � Don Nelson will open
'with a short lineup from his USA
Dream Team II squad in its first
international exhibition.
And to no one's surprise, Larry
Johnson and Alonzo Mourning of
the Charlotte Hornets are among
thestartingfive when the U.S. team
plays here tonight against the Ger-
man National Team.
"I'm not stupid Nelson said
Monday, laughing about his selec-
tion of the hometown players for
thegameatCharlotteColiseum. "I
know where we're playing
Nelson's lineup includes the
6-foot-7 Johnson and 6-foot-10
Mourning along with 6-foot-l
Kevin Johnson, 6-foot-7 Reggie
Miller and 6-foot-6 Dan Majerle.
Nelson said he'll use different
combinations of players in the ex-
hibition, much like he's expected
to do next month when the team
plays in the World Championships
in Toronto.
"We have a deep roster he
said.
The squad arrived in Charlotte
on Monday after several days of
drills in Chicago. Dominique
Wilkins, who announced his sign-
ing with the Celtics during the
camp, flew to Boston for a physical
before coming to Charlotte. He ar-
rived midway through practice,
changed clothes and joined the
workout.
Wilkins, who's never played
by international rules before, says
he's not worried about the trap-
ezoidal free-throw lane nor the
quick style of play.
"We're ready for it said
Wilkins who should get a lot of
playing time despite nursing an
ankle injury. "It doesn't matter
whetherifsinternational or Ameri-
can rules. We're going to be ready
to play no matter what. Our goal is
to go out there and just kick butt
Nelson said the team is ready
though some of the camp was spent
getting some of his players physi-
cally prepared.
"We set the tone early in train-
See DREAM page 8
Winners pull through in Intramurals
(RS) � As the second summer
session is winding to a close, intra-
mural sportsplayoffactionhasbeen
heating up. Softball playoffs con-
cluded with "The Economics Soci-
ety" and"Summer's Finest" win-
ning championships in the Co-Rec
and Men's divisions, respectively.
"The Economics Society" gained a
measure of revenge by defeating
"Summer'sFinest"(Co-Recversion)
11-10 in the final. The two teams
met in the first summer session
championship as well, with
"Summer's Finest" taking a one-
run victory. Lester Zeager, Scott
Mozingo and Jamie Price provided
the offense in a six-run second in-
ning, whichcarried "The Economic
Society "Summer's Finest" made
alatecomebackthatfelljustshortas
KariClevelandandJayBryanthead-
lined the offense in the final
inningEconomics Society"
reached the finals viaaplay-in game
with the "Fun Team" by capturing
a 9-5 victory. Kelly Hurdle and Jen-
nifer Hooker each scored once and
reached base in all three at-bats for
the Economics crewThe Fun
Team" was led by Randy Odom,
who scored twice in the loss.
In the Men's division, the men
of "Summer's Finest" redeemed
themselves from the Co-Rec loss by
beatingthe "PenthousePlayers" 23-
12 Frank Beck and Todd Thigpen
ledabalancedattackfor "Summer's
Finest" by scoring three runs each.
"Penthouse" was led by Rob
Chapman and Neil Dickinson, who
also scored three times each. They
reached the finals by winning an 18-
12 slugfest against the Crushes. Ja-
son Morris, Don Jacobs and Eric
Maas provided the hot bats for
"Penthouse" while Travis Bunch,
Chris Montgomery and BradFrench
eachscoredtwiceforthe"Crusties
"Summer'sFinest"tookamoresur-
Photo by Leslie Petty
"Economics Society" pulled out a win in the second session finals meeting over "Summer's Finest"
11-10. Both games were decided by one run in the Co-Rec. division.
prising path to the finals as they
blasted pre-tourney favorites "U
Lose I"114-3, behind the efforts of
Brent Murphy, who had three hits,
and homers from Mark Holley and
Todd Thigpen. "U Lose II"
struggled mightily as Jay Bryant,
Mike Kehoe and Scott Leonard
scored the only runs for this usually
high-powered attack.
Basketball in Christenbury
Gym has also moved to the finals as
playoff action has thrust defending
champs "The Longf ellows" against
"The Crushes" in the champion-
ship. "The Longfellows" reached
the finals with a pair of wins against
"De Mala Muerte" 48-31 and the
"Fat Cats" 42-29, while the Crushes
defeated "Solomon's Wisemen Re-
turn" 59-32,and "No Where toRun"
40-37. "TheLongfellows"relyonthe
long-distance shooting of EricFoley,
Todd Moser and Neil Torrey, com-
bined with the workmanlike efforts
of Andy Whisnant "The Crusties"
three-manattackrevolvesaround the
ballhandling and passing of Shan-
non Cowan and the offense of Jacob
Jonesand BradFrench The "FatCats"
lost their first game of the summer
after taking the 5-on-5 title first ses-
sion and running through their pre-
vious 3-on-3 games undefeated.
Brazil players refuse duties
At tlt i.i. l��i i.liii.j .i .i . .
(AP) � They left the United
States as World Cup champions,
saints in cleats, symbols of hope in
a country bled by official waste
and corruption.
Aday after coming home, they
were tax cheats, shameless smug-
glers, symbols of selfishness and
greed.
Theplayersandstaff of Brazil's
national soccer team went from
idols to scoundrels last Wednes-
day by refusing to pay $1 million of
customs duhes on personal items
bought in the United States during
the World Cup.
The dispute spiked the eupho-
ria that swept across this soccer-
crazed country and triggered a
scandal that muddied the presi-
dent, the finance minister and the
head of the Brazilian Soccer Con-
federation.
The nation's tax chief quit in
disgust the day after President
Itamar Franco overruled his order
and told customs officials at Rio's
international airport to wave
through all excess luggage on the
team plane.
All 17.4 tons of it.
"Nobody can be above the
law said Osires Lopes Filho, who
resigned as federal revenue secre-
tary. "Everyone, not only the
middle class and the poor, must
pay taxes
The debacle touched off a na-
tionwide debate on ethics in Brazil,
a country where authoritarianism,
nepotism and paternalism form a
recipe for sharp social and eco-
nomic inequalities.
"What a sad spectacle said
the newsweekly Veja, in a cover
story htled "The Star Smugglers
"The team missed a great
chance to show us thateven heroes
must comply with obligations and
laws every Brazilian must follow
the magazine said in an editorial.
Signs of trouble began to ap-
pear the day after the World Cup
final when the Varig DC-10 carry-
ing the 97-member delegahon was
delayed for four hours in Los An-
geles because of excessive weight.
After marathon parades in
Recife and Brasilia, the delegahon
arrived in Rio close to midnight
Tuesday for a four-hour hcker-tape
parade for an estimated 1 million
fans.
Brazilian law permits citizens
to bring up to $500 worth of items
purchased abroad into the country
duty free.
That's why customs officials
got suspicious when five, 30-foot-
long moving trucks rolled up to
drive the team's luggage to the
hotel.
The unloading took time.
Among other things were 18 tele-
vision sets, computers, refrigera-
tors, fax machines, laser printers,
microwave ovens, gymnastics
equipment, a barbecue grill, dish-
washers and even a leather horse
saddle.
Customs officials estimated
that defenders Jorginhoand Branco
brought back a combined total of
$8,800 in electronics and
housewares. Coach Carlos Alberto
Parreira had $5,000 worth of com-
puter and TV equipment.
All in all, about $1 million in
duhes had to be paid.
Lopes Filho ordered the bag-
gage held and inspected. An hour
of ranting and raving went on be-
tween the delegahon and the air-
port customs officials.
Ricardo Teixeira, the confed-
eration president, called the stars
down from the fire truck that would
escort them through Rio. They re-
moved the merit medals awarded
at the presidential palace and
threatened to boycott the parade.
"We didn't smuggle any-
thing said scoring ace Rpmario.
"We represented Brazil before 2
billion people around the world. If
they don't release my luggage, I'm
giving back my medal. "�
It was midnight. In any other
country the victory parade might
have been postponed until morn-
ing. But in the land where soccer is
almost a religion, a call came from
the presidential palace.
The order from Finance Minis-
ter Rubens Ricupero: Let the bag-
gage through, uninspected. Let the
party go on.

Easy
does
it!
Just
because
summer
school is
coming to
an end,
don't get
lazy, stay in
shape.
File
Photo
Strange describes Open
(AP) � The U.S. Open does
strange things to people.
Every hmesomeonewadesdeep
into par-denial at one of these events,
every time a golfer goes where no
golfer has gone before, the poor soul
winds up where the rankest hackers
goall the time: tosomewatering hole,
for a few stiff drinks and a lot of
commiseration.
Presumably, that's where Helen
Alfredsson washeadedSunday after
stepping off the 18th green at the Old
Course at Indianwood Golf and
Country Club. It was there mat she .
missed one more short par putt for a
77, a regrettably fitting conclusion to
one of the most remarkable collapses
the sport has ever seen.
"There are no words for some-
thing like this she said, "for when
tilings turn around for no apparent
reason
'Turned around though is
much too gentle a description for
what actually happened.
Alfredsson started the champi-
onship with an 8-under-par 63�by
two shots the best round ever posted
in a women's major�and came back
Friday with a 69 to claim another
Open record. After carding consecu-
tive birdies at Nos. 5, 6 and 7 on
Saturday, she was at 13-under, float-
ing in the most rarefied air any US.
Open competitor, man or woman,
has ever known.
Over the next 18 holes, from the
eighth tee Saturday to the eighth tee
Sunday, Alfredsson used 85 strokes,
SeeOPEN page 8

Four-person volleyball play-
offs will be conducted this week
with championships crowned by
the end of the session. Top teams
and players include Sam Pasour,
Crystal Tedder and Eddie Coble
of No Fear, Fred Allen Trueblood,
Mark Copeland and Jamie Bliz-
zard of tiie Beer Huggers and Price
Whitfield, Marty Hurst and
Adolfo Wittgreen of Carriage
House Best. A full schedule of
exciting intramurals await the
ECU community for the fall se-
mester. For further information,
contact David Gaskins or Kari
Cleveland at 328-6387.
Mitchell
sets stage
for the future
(AP) � The "Green Ma-
chine" felt like a money ma-
chine after winning the men's
100 meters at the Goodwill
Games. Now,he wants to cash
in.
"I feel like a million dol-
lars Dennis Mitchell said
after beating a marquee field
that included Leroy Burrell
and Carl Lewis. "I wish I had
a million dollars
Mitchell might not col-
lect that right away, but he's
certainly in a strong position
to demand big money for ap-
pearing at lucrative Grand
Prix meetsinEuropethissum-
mer.
"Zurich and Cologne will
be bigger races than this he
said. "There is a lot of money
walking around in the 100
meters this year, and I want to
get a big piece of it
Mitchell's coach, John
Smith, said he will see to it
that the 28-year-old sprinter
is well rewarded by big meet
promoters.
"When an athlete is run-
ning well, they want him
Smith said. "Dennis is run-
ning extremely well. He's a
streak runner, and he's catch-
ing fire now
Originally, Mitchell
wasn'teveninvitedbyGood-
will Games organizers. He
was asked to compete only
after Britain's Linford
Christie, the Olympic and
world champion, withdrew
because of ahamstringinjury.
"They signed everybody
but him Smith said of
Mitchell. "He was angry. It
was a disgrace. They couldn't
run the race without him
Mitchell, known as the
"Green Machine" for his
green running outfits and
shoes, led from start to finish
to win his first major champi-
See GAMES page 8
5fe





.jm� �� mi 1.IMIWM
8 The East Carolinian
July 27, 1994
GAMES
Cont'd from page 7
onship race in 10.07 seconds. The
relatively slow time was due to a
strong headwind.
Leroy Burrell, who set the world
record of 9.85 earlier this month,
finished wi th a surge to take second
in 10.11. jon Drummond was third
in 10.12 and Carl Lewis fourth in
10.23.
Mitchell finally shook his third-
place tag. He had won plenty of
bronze medals, including at the 1992
Olympics and the 1991 and 1993
World Championships.
Now, he can lay a legitimate
claim to being the world's best
sprinter.
"I want to live up to the tradi-
tion of a cocky sprinter and say I
am Mitchell said.
Ukraine's Sergei Bubka may no
longer be able to say he's the world's
best pole vaulter. In a major upset,
the world record-holder finished
third behind two Russians.
Gwen Torrence completed a
sweep of the women's sprints, win-
ning the 200 meters in a Games'
record 22.09, and Jackie Joyner-
Kersee, the world record-holder in
the heptathlon and seeking her third
straight Goodwill title, built a 109-
point lead after four events.
The final three heptathlon
events�the long jump, javelin and
800 meters�were scheduled for to-
day.
Other key events included the
men's mile, f ea turing world record-
holder Noureddine Morceli of Al-
DREAM
geria, and the long jump with woT-ld
record-holder Mike Powell. Lewis
pulled out the long jump, saying he
did not w ant tocompete on consecu-
tive days at this stage of the season.
In beach volleyball, Karolyn
Kirby and Liz Masakayan of the
United States were paired in the fi-
nal against Monica Rodrigues and
Adriana Samuel of Brazil. In the
men's final, the U.S. team of Jeff
Williams and Carlos Briceno was up
against Norway's Jan Kvalhein and
Bjoem Naaseide.
The U.S. basketball team got
back on ta"ck after Sunday's 77-75
loss to Russia, beatingChina 99-80 to
set up a semifinal matchup today
against unbeaten Italy. Puerto Rico
will play Russia in the other game.
Cont'd from page 7
ing camp that it was a no-nonsense
training camp Coach Don Nelson
said. "Some of them needed the
conditioning, some didn't, but we
all went through it together. Now
we have about 80 percent of the
things in that we want and we're
ready to play our first exhibition
game
The Dream Team's intensity
showed Monday. When Mourn-
ing fumbled a pass out of bounds,
he kicked a courtside chair. But
that's the way everyone is taking
this quest.
"Itgot hot outthereafew times,
but we respect each other's game
said Seattle forward Shawn Kemp.
Mourning has been matched
against Orlando's Shaquille
O'Neal in practice, and is glad to
have the 7-foot-l, 301-pounder on
his side for a change. He fended
off questions about playing
against him in the NBA.
"We're a team now he said.
"We have time to talk about that
during the season
Kemp already is looking past
the upcoming exhibitions to play-
ing in an international tourna-
ment.
� 1 and 2 Bedrooms
AZALEA GARDENS
Clean and Quiet, one bedroom
furnished apartments. $240 a month,
6 month lease.
ALSO
UNIVERSITY APARTMENTS
2899-2901 East 5th Street
�Located near ECU
�ECU Bus Service
�On-Site Laundry
"Special Student Leases"
also
MOBILE HOME RENTALS
J.T. or Tommy Williams
756-7815758-7436
KINSTON INDIANS
ECU SPECIAL
THIRSTY THURSDAY
750 for all 12 oz. beverages
$1.00
admission'
wth this coupon �
1-800-3345467
-vs-
Q2QQ prince William Cannons
IWWW 7pm
H Prince William Cannons
7pm
E33E1 Lynchburg Red Sox
EQD 7pm
H2�9 Lynchburg Red Sex
EDO 7pm
Ujiyjl Lynchburg Red Sox
E&B 7pm
�Idl Lynchburg Red Sox
Wmwm. 7pm
Tuition Up?
Grades Down?

Which way do you go now? Move forward.
Enroll at Wake Technical Community College
this fall and move in the right direction:
Low tuiuon (less than $2.20 a day for N.C. residents)
�? Open-door admissions
Small classes
" On-campus learning laboratories
"? College transfer agreements with state universities
-? Flexible schedules (day and evening classes)
�? Co-op work experience
-? More than SO programs
- Diploma and certificate vocational programs
Call Admissions Today!
(919) 662-3500
Wake Tech:
The Smart Choice.
9101 Fayeiteville Road (Hwy. 401 S.) � Raleigh, N.C.
"When it comes game time and
you put that uniform on and you
go out for battle, that's when it hits
you he said. "We haven't gotten
there yet. When the fourth of Au-
gust comes, then I'll be more ex-
cited
Nelson downplayed compari-
sons to the U.S. team that won the
Olympic gold medal in 1992, but
acknowledged that a defeat would
be a surprise.
'To be honest with you, no-
body should be tough for this
bunch'hesaid. "Weshould domi-
nate whatever division we're in
OLSON'S
Trivia Quiz
Q. Can you
name the
pitcher who
has won the
mostCy
Young
Awards?
jnoi ifliM eigdiap
-eilMd JQ uotpep evais "V
The price
Will Change
Your Course
If you love goit but dorr; hove o tremendous
amount of extra cash to spend on playing, try
us!
Indian Traits, located In Gnfton, trie soutnern-
most town in Pitt County, Is a public 18-nole
course that offers ECU students with o valid ID
odiscountof Sl.OOotr weekdaysana $2.00oft
weekends.
For public golf ond ECU. we're doing our oest
to change your course.
�GMIon's Great 18"
919-524-5485
Jf
OPEN
Cont'd from
page 7
losing 14 to par in every way imag-
inable.
On those occasions when she
didn't find the rough off the tee, she
hitapproach shots thatcouldn'tfind
the ocean from the beach. She left at
least one bunker shot Sunday on the
beach for good measure, and even
when she finally reached the greens,
Alfredssonbutcheredmore3and4-
footers than some slaughterhouses
attempt in a single afternoon
That was the most painful part
of the spectacle: watching her putt.
Twice, Alfredsson needed 3 strokes
frominsidefivefeet;thesecondrime,
it became necessary after stabbing
her firstattempt 12 feet past thehole.
"I can't explain where it came
from Alfredsson said, as though
the hand she wound up playing
actually belonged to someone else.
"Sometimes this game really tests
the patience
And never moreso than in the
J has i
PHARMACISTS.
V�
Today's Air Force
has a prescription for a
rewarding future. Serve
your country while you serve
your career and enjoy:
� great pay and benefits
� normal working hours
� complete medical and dental
care
� 30 days vacation with pay per
year
Find out how to qualify as an Air
Force pharmacist. Call
USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
TOLL FREE
1-800-423-USAF
Open
WED
WiWiWiWiWi
WEEKEND WflRM-UP
A spOTSp.d N"5nT 58 Drafts w
$1 NIGHT r
FREE COVER TILL 10:00 PM
18 & OVER
EVERY THURSDAY
Featuring
SCOTT MUB-UER
FREE COVER TILL 9:00 PM
Come into any club entrance
Thursday and then feel free to roam from club to club!
FREE MEMBERSHIPS
BLOCK PARTY f
Dollar Nite J
All Bars
DANCe- BtUJARDS- ROCK ft' R0U
DOWNTOWN
rkrrVkrirmrL
The Greenville Aquarium
& Pet Supply
When you want the best for your pet"
DOG DAYS OF SUMMER SALE !
FRIDAY JULY 29 - THURSDAY AUGUST 4
COLLARS AND LEASHES 20 OFF
FISH AND ANIMAL SPECIALS
AND MUCH MORE!
CCV4E CHECK CUT CUR NEW BABY PCT KELLY PICS
Located at University Center on 14th &: Charles Blvd.
Open Mon-Fri 11-8; Sat 10-8; & Sunday 1-6
Phone 757-0056 or 1-800-849-Tank
AMEX
SA





Title
The East Carolinian, July 27, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 27, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1020
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy