The East Carolinian, June 29, 1994






-J"�
Sports
Just Peachy
ECU & NCSU could resume their football
rivalry in the next couple of years in
Charlotte, N.C. See story on page 7.
The Cast Carolinian would
like to wish an exciting and
responsible 4th of July to �CU
students, faculty and staff.
Lifestyle
PuttirT on The Ritz
Toad the Wet Sprocket delivered a dose
of their unique sound to an energized
crowd at Raleigh's Ritz last Saturday
night. Story on page 5.
is
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 34 D6Jgrj3 Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 29,1993
8 Pages
Violent storms rip through eastern N.C.
Photo by Leslie Patty
Tornadoes and thunderstorms swept across Greenville and surrounding
counties Monday. Above, Greenville residents observe damage to a
Fifth St. lawn. Upper left, an historic Grifton home is despoiled.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
Eastern North Carolina
farmers may have received a dose
of much-needed rain, but they
also received a yard full of tree
limbs as violent storms swept
through the eastern portion of
the state Monday morning.
Tornadoes were reported to
have touched down in southeast-
ern Craven County, according to
a report in The Daily Reflector. Dr.
George Harrell, associate vice
chancellor for business affairs at
ECU, said that the ECU campus
suffered minor damage, mostly
to trees.
"We lost the top of a fairly
sizable tree near Reade Circle
Harrell said. "We also lost a
couple of Bradford Pear trees near
Mendenhall Student Center. Un-
fortunately, both of those trees
hit vehicles
Harrell said there was an
abundance of tree limbs strewn
across campus and that members
of the Facilities Services staff
would prioritize the clean-up,
beginning with clearing streets
and walkways.
"There were literally truck-
loads of small limbs Harrell
said.
While Pitt County survived
the storm relatively unscathed,
surrounding counties suffered
substantial damage. A historic
house, located in Grifton, was
partially demolished when a
large tree fell onto it.
"The house is at least 200
years old said Verna Lassiter,
whose family owns the house.
"We don't know exactly how old
the house is because the records
were destroyed in a fire
Members of Lassiter's fam-
ily and neighbors spent Monday
afternoon clearing the yard of
fallen limbs. Later, the tree was
removed from the house.
"The house will have to be
restored said Michael Lassiter.
"It will need a new roof and
rafters, as well as major repair to
the porch. It's a shame that such
an historic house was damaged
from its original state
The roof on the old railroad
depot located on Queen Street in
Grifton also was damaged. Old
oak trees cluttered McCrae Street
until town workers were able to
clear the roads.
The majority of the damage
from the storm occurred in Lenior
County, primarily in Kinston.
One man was reported dead af-
ter the storm swept through
Kinston around 8:45 a.m. Clifton
Holloway, 67, was killed by im-
pact when the second story of his
apartment complex, located at
211 Vance Street, collapsed on
him.
Greg Smith, Kinston deputy
fire chief said the fire department
responded to the call from Vance
Street. A tree had fallen onto the
structure. Holloway was later dis-
covered trapped, but had no vi-
T-shirt logo and sales questioned
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
While ECU officials try des-
perately to void the university's
reputation as a party school, one
student is trying to see that the
reputation is preserved.
On June 12, Pitt County Com-
munity School's Director, Alice
Keene restricted ECU junior Saed
Hamad from selling T-shirts bear-
ing the logo "ECU�NumberOne
Party School in the Nation The
shirts made no reference to the
Boys & Girls Club, to the United
Way or to the fraternity, although
all three of these clubs were sup-
posedly going to benefit with di-
rectly or indirectly from the sale of
the shirts.
Although Hamad acquired
a permit to sell the shirts on the
campus of Eppes Middle School
located next to ECU campus. Dean
of Students Ronald Speier said
Hamad was told that soliciting is
not allowed on ECU's campus, and
furthermore that Speier did not
approve of the image the shirts
would portray.
Hamad first went to Dean
Speier to ask for permission to sell
the T-shirts.
"The first words that came
out of his mouth were 'No
Hamad said.
When Speier came to Eppes
on Sunday afternoon, Hamad said
Speier told him to leave, but
Hamad told him he did not have to
leave because he had a legal per-
mit to sell his shirts on the pre-
mises.
"(Speier felt it was his duty
to go on the other side of the fence
Hamad said. "It was defamation
of character of Dean Speier's part
Hamad said he felt like Speier
did not like what was printed on
the T-shirts. Speier did not hesitate
in saying that in fact, he did not
like the logo on the T-shirts.
"I have real problems with
fraternities promoting ECU as a
party school Speier said. "We
don't need the fraternities to pro-
mote us in a negative way
Instead, Hamad decided to
sell the shirts on the Eppes prop-
erty which is only separated from
ECU by a chain-link fence. Hamad
said Speier told him he was fol-
lowing the rules, but it was a thin,
gray line.
"I was on the other side of
the fence selling the shirts Hamad
said. "It was totally legal
After discussing the venture
with Dean Speier, Hamad re-
quested a permit from Keene.
Hamad told Keene that the pro-
ceeds from the sales would go to
the United Way, as well as to fund
Hamad's social fraternity, Sigma
Phi Epsilon. Keene granted the
permit to Hamad, but later revoked
it.
"It was revoked because
when the student came in to give
me the information, I felt like he
did not give me all of the informa-
tion said Keene.
Speier said he discussed the
situation with Keene. After their
discussion Keene called David
Bailey, executive director of the
United Way. Bailey informed
Keene that he had never heard of
Hamad or his fund-raising efforts.
Hamad later said that it was the
Pitt County Boys & Girls Club who
would be gaining from the pro-
ceeds of the T-shirts sales, not the
Pitt County United Way.
Bailey told The East Carolin-
ian that the United Way of Pitt
County raises money locally and
allocates the funds to 33 organiza-
tions across the county. The Boys
& Girls Club is one of the organiza-
tions that benefits from the efforts
of the United Way. Again, Bailey
said that he had never heard of
Hamad.
"I didn't even know the
person's name Bailey said. "No
one has contacted us about selling
MS Bike Tour to begin and end in Greenville
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
An expected 800 cyclists will
pedal for a purpose in the 6th
annual MS 150 Bike Tour, Sept.
24-25, to benefit the National
Multiple Sclerosis Society. The
tour, beginning and ending in
Greenville, will benefit more than
1,200 people with multiple sclero-
sis and their families in eastern
North Carolina.
The MS 150 is a fully-catered,
two-day cycling event geared to-
ward cyclists of 11 abilities. The
tour will take cyclists on a 150-
mile ride through eastern North
Carolina, with an overnight stay
at Camp Sea Gull on Minnesott
Beach, where the Neuse River
joins the Pamlico Sound.
Participants are expected to
solicit pledges from volunteers to
satisfy the minimum pledge
amount of $150. Registration for
the event is $25. While there is no
deadline to register, Sylvia
Hasinger, development coordina-
tor of the eastern North Carolina
chapter of the National Multiple
Sclerosis Society, said participants
should enter now in order to have
time to raise pledges.
"There are tons of different
ways to raise money Hasinger
said You can start by asking your
family and friends, your busi-
nesses Many businesses will
give matching funds
The MS 150 will provide
stocked rest stops, all meals, sup-
port vehicles and mechanical,
medical and communications
support. The tour also includes
entertainment and recreational ac-
tivities at the overnight stay and a
finish-line celebration in Green-
ville.
She said approximately 650
cyclists and 200 volunteers raised
$200,000 in last year's event. She
expects an even greater turnout
for this year's tour.
Hasinger said most of the
money raised in events such as
this go toward helping people
with the disease.
"Sixty percent of the money
raised goes to fund services such
as educational material, counsel-
ing, support groups and equip-
ment rental loans for people in
this area who have MS she said.
"The remaining 40 percent goes
to our national office to go toward
research. A lot of this money
comes back to us in eastern North
Carolina, to Duke University, to
ECU and to N.C. State
MS is a neurological disease
that strikes the central nervous
system of young adults. Its symp-
toms range from numbness to
blurred vision to complete paraly-
sis. Its cause and cure are un-
known, and an effective treatment
remains elusive.
The MS Society reports that
over 200 new cases are reported
each week in the U.S. There are
approximately one third of a mil-
lion people already diagnosed
with the disease.
The National MS Societv,
founded in 1946, supports MS re-
search and provides health-re-
lated services for those with the
tal signs.
Smith said the northwest
corner, of the four unit apartment
building, had totally collapsed,
but the people of the other corner
were safe. Smith said the effort to
free Holloway and the remaining
tenants took until noon.
"It was a lean-to collapse
Smith said.
Smith said after the body of
Holloway was located, the mem-
bers of the fire department worked
to locate other victims.
"We concentrated our ef-
forts on digging from the top
down to locate other victims on
the second floor Smith said.
Just after the storm hit, the
department started receiving calls
which were handled on a priority
basis. The department immedi-
ately received five calls, but could
Photo by Stephanie Lassiter
only respond to three of them.
The other two calls were later
handled when the department
received mutual aid. The two
calls which were not immedi-
ately handled were not life-
threatening situations.
He said the department
responded to 14 alarms in a six-
hour period.
"One lady was trapped in
an elevator in a high rise Smith
said. The department's rescue
attempts were waylaid by fur-
ther storm threats.
"We received calls that
tornadoes were around us he
said. "That forced us on two
occasions to remove people
from the structure and back to
their apparatus. That also be-
came a problem and delayed
the operation
Sobriety Week kicks
off for July Fourth
By Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
Due to efforts of the organi-
zation Mothers Against Drunk
Driving (MADD), Gov. Jim Hunt
declared June 28 - July 5 to be
North Carolina's "National So-
briety Checkpoint Week
Nationwide Insurance com-
pany has sponsored the program
for the past three years.
MADD credits the sobriety
checkpoints for decreasing Driv-
ing While Impaired (DWI) arrests
and alcohol-related traffic fatali-
ties.
"The true benefit of sobriety
checkpoints cannot be measured
soiely by the number of arrests,
because a major part of their value
is deterring drunk drivers and
promoting safety belt use, which
is your best protection against in-
jury in an alcohol-related crash
said Kim D. Baker, executive di-
rector of MADD-NC.
Studies show that sobriety
checkpoints are one of the most
effective to curve the drunk
driving problem. In 1990, the
U.S. Supreme Court ruled to
allow the police departments'
use of sobriety checkpoints.
The week, including the
Fourth of July weekend, was
chosen because it is one of the
most dangerous holidays of the
year for people traveling on
North Carolina highways. Dur-
ing this week, law enforcement
officers will be looking out for
drunk driving offenders.
MADD and Nationwide Insur-
ance Company are donating 35
new breathe analyzers. These
analyzer units are built from
the newest technology.
Usually, the ECU police
department takes part in Na-
tional Sobriety Week, but not
this year.
Walt Myer, who works in
the public relations division of
the ECU police department, said
that because of the departure of
See SOBRIETY page 2
For Your Information
Beginning on July 1
�Campus phone and fax
prefixes will change from 757
and 931 to 328.
�Joyner Library will close until
July 5 for renovations.





1
2 The East Carolinian
June 29, 1994
SOBRIETY
Continued from page 1
June 20
East of Clement � A student reported larceny of a bicycle.
June 21
Location unknown �A student was served a criminal summons
for a worthless check.
North of Flanagan�A staff member reported water gushing out
of the ground.
Location unknown � A non-student was arrested for underage
possession of a malt beverage.
June 22
North of Greene�A non-student was arrested for driving with
his license revoked and was issued a state citation for an expired
inspection sticker.
Out-Patient Center�A staff member reported that a patient had
been locked out of the building.
Aycock Hall � An officer assisted the Greenville Rescue Squad
with a member of the Cheerleading Camp who was having chest
pains.
June 23
East of Umstead � A non-student reported that his bicycle was
taken from a construction area.
College Hill�A student reported larceny of a wallet from the big
lot at College Hill.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from official ECU Public
Safety Crime Reports.
Sergeant Keith Knox, former
Crime Prevention Officer, the pub-
lic relations division is in transi-
tion and there are no activities
planned for the week.
"MADD has not contacted
us Myer said. "And with the
transition that we are currently in,
we don't have anything planned
Don Gregory, a
T-SHIRTS
telecommunicator for the ECU
police department, said the crime
prevention office has not been
filled.
Also, the Greenville police
department does not have plans
for the MADD program.
I'm not aware that we have
any plans for National Sobriety
Week said Sergeant Doug Jack-
son, an officer on the police force.
"I haven't been told about it at
all
Cindy Lamb helped found
MADD and now serves as the Li-
censed Beverage Education Advi-
sor for the National Beer Whole-
salers Association. She offered tips
to hosts on having safe Fourth of
July weekend celebrations.
The tips for the hosts in-
clude setting the mood of the
party by being a model to guests
and drinking slowly or moder-
ately, providing or being the
designated driver for the night,
serving no alcoholic beverages
to any of the underage guests,
and being responsible for the
safety and welfare of guests.
Continued from page 1
BIKE TOUR
Continued from page 1
T-shirts that I am aware of
Bailey also said that it would
not be logical for the United Way to
associate itself with the image the
T-shirts were portraying. He said
that, in the past, groups like the
United Way have had problems
with professional fundraisers tak-
ing advantage of unsuspecting in-
dividuals.
Speier said he was misled
about the purpose of the
fundraising event and that from
the onset he had been doubtful.
"I was told that this was a
fraternity fund-raiser and that a
percentage was going to the United
Way Speier said.
Speier informed Hamad that
according to the student handbook,
solicitation is not allowed on the
campus of ECU. Located on page
33 of the Student Handbook, under
"Canvassing, Peddling, and Solic-
iting on Campus is a subsection
entitled "Sales and Solicitation
Activities on East Carolina Univer-
sity Campus The rule reads:
"Only university registered orga-
nizations (departments, clubs, com-
mittees, etc.) will be allowed to sell
articles on the campus of East Caro-
lina University. These organiza-
tions may sell provided there is not
conflict with university-operated
or contracted sales Section E of
the regulation reads: "The resi-
dence hall councils may have T-
shirts designed and printed with
their respective hall logo by any
agency deemed appropriate. These
shirts may be sold only to the resi-
dents of the respective residence
hall. Profits shall be placed in the
residence hall budget
Speier said Hamad told him
the proceeds would go to the
United Way and to his fraternity.
"As far as I am concerned,
the sponsorship of the fraternity
was a cover-up Speier said.
"There was misrepresentation of
the truth, both to me and Pitt
County Community Schools
Speier also questioned the
fraternity having a fundraiser in
the summer, as well as Hamad's
intentions.
"How many fraternities are
fundraising right now?" Speier
said. "He never followed what I
told him he could or could not
do
Speier also said the Presi-
dent of Sigma Phi Epsilon, Chris
Bender, told Speier that he be-
lieved Hamad was selling the T-
shirts partially for personal gain.
Bender told The East Carolinian that
he did not tell Speier that and that
the proceeds were to go to the
Boys & Girls Club and also to the
fraternity.
"As far as things are going
here, Hamad is not profiting at
all Bender said. "The purpose is
to raise funds for the Boys & Girls
Club. He (Hamad) is in no way
getting any personal gain
Bender also said the major-
ity of the funds would be going to
build a deck on the Sigma Phi
Epsilon house.
Kirk Dominick, executive
director of the Boys & Girls Club,
said Hamad contacted him a long
time ago regarding his
fundraising project.
"They are raising money
for us and they are going to do-
nate the funds to the Boys &
Girls club Dominick said.
"That's our understanding. The
fraternity started this a long time
ago
Dominick said he had not
received any funds thus far.
"We do not permit any in-
dividual to solicit on campus for
personal gain Speier said. "We
also do not permit organizations
to sell shirts because we are then
in competition with outside
groups
Brand New For '94
disease through its 144 chapters in
all 50 states. Eastern North
Carolina's chapter, chartered in
1969, covers a 36-county area.
Sponsors of the MS 150 in-
clude: Bicycling Institute of
America, Bicycling Magazine,
Hardee's, Grisanti's, Fin Halsa,
Pepsi, Harris Teeter, WRAL FM,
The Independent, Lilley Martin Pro-
duce, REI, Comfort Inn, Hampton
Inn, Volvo, 10-K and Eastern NC
Bike Shops.
Anyone interested in riding,
volunteering or pledging support
for the MS 150 and information
about MS and the National MS
Society Li general, should call the
Eastern N.C. chapter at (919) 781-
0676.
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� �
June 29, 1994
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 3
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Marcla Sanders, Typesetter
Lisa Sessoms, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Stephanie Smith, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit orreject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hlnson,i4�J. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Independence Day reminds us of progress J
Independence Day usually conjures up two
images to most people: freedom and fireworks.
Happily, now these two have something in
common, as we in North Carolina can finally
enjoy using fireworks to celebrate our nation's
birthday, while at the same time taking the
responsibility for safety that goes along with
this freedom. If it seems as though fireworks
have nothing to do with the advancement of
personal freedom, then stick around, all will be
made clear.
As we are all aware, this July 4th will be the
218th anniversary of the adoption of the Decla-
ration of Independence by the Continental Con-
gress. (The actual signing of the document took
place a few days later.) This marked the first
formal break of the American colonies from
their parent country of Great Britain. The colo-
nies revolted against the tyranny and oppres-
sion of the government of George III. At least,
that is how it used to be taught.
Now, as we are in our multicultural, revi-
sionist mode, many point out the many flaws of
the Founding Fathers. Instead of portraying
them as demi-gods as they used to be, some now
revile them as racist, sexist and genocidal. An
even smaller number will then go on to use this
as proof that the whole basis of our contry is
flawed.
It is true that the men who established our
nation had many faults, some of which could
even be construed in the above manner. For
example, at the same time that Jefferson wrote a
scathing indictment of the British treatment of
slaves (which the Congress made him remove),
he owned slaves, though he did say that he had
already committed himself to freeing them. The
very fact that we can say "Founding Fathers"
(though it is increasingly being replaced with
some non-sexist term) points out the facts that
women were not granted their proper political
power until much later.
All that having been said, however, it
should not be forgotten, even as we look back
with the advantage of 2020 hindsight, that
these men in Congress created not simply an
European nation without Fat George; they laid
the foundation for the nation which provides
the greatest individual liberty of any nation in
history for all its citizens. While we rightly view
the southern members of Congress with the
most disdain, for their odious practice of sla-
very, when these men helped establish a nation
based on the premise "that all men are created
equal they began the too long road to not only
emancipation, but also the day when everyone
will be judge on the "content of character" and
not race or sex.
This should be the point of learning Ameri-
can history. The true lesson of our past is not that
we are now, or have ever been, a perfect coun-
try, but that the course of our history is to
progress, in fits and starts, towards the goal of
perfect freedom. So, enjoy this Independence
Day, and exercise your new right to blow things
up. And always remember when you do, that
that sparkler or Roman Candle represents a day
when we can all live in peace and harmony.
By Laura Wright
Society still imposes stiff penalties on gays
A good friend in Atlanta keeps
a-king me to write an editorial
about lesbian and gay related
Issues. 1 keep telling him that I'll
get around to it, but somehow, I
haven't been able to come up with
Siny new insight on the ever
jpresent, and controversial, topic
jof homosexuality. For example,
'we now know that AIDS is not
strictly a homosexual issue, and
any further discussion of gays and
lesbians in the military would be
extraneous at this point. I used to
be interested in the
research that took
place regarding the
genetic
predisposition of
homosexuality, but
"then I decided that
�4t really does not
'matter if a person's
"genes define sexual
.orientation, or
-whether social
influences are theBBHHIBBB
deciding factor.
j So, since this past week
marked the anniversary of the gay
rights movement in America, I
v decided that it was time to discuss
a few things about straight
1 America's relationship to, fears
about, and curiosity regarding
homosexuality.
J I wish to state up front that,
�for all practical purposes, I am
heterosexual. The only reason that
21 am even bothering to divulge my
orientation is that I want to make
�'tit clear that not only is it possible
' to be straight and a feminist �
� sometimes I think mat lesbianism
,and feminism are assumed to be
the same thing�but also because
SI want to make it clear that it is
I possible to be straight and
ssupportive of the lesbian and gay
culture.
I watched "Larry King Live"
several weeks ago, and the
discussion was about whether or
not homosexuality is a curable
psychological disorder. Two
psychiatrists, one male, straight
and white, and one female, lesbian
and white, discussed their feelings
about the issue. The male doctor
said that he had successfully cured
homosexuals, by treating
homosexuality as a neurosis. The
female doctor said that such
treatment
Maybe homosexu-
ality is the next stage
in evolution; it could
be a way we might
save ourselves from
eventual starvation.
could be
psychologically
damaging,
because
homosexuality
is not an illness
that requires
treatment.
Both
doctors
obviously were
working from
their own sets of
nMHHMBHB biases. The man,
because he
represents the dominant culture
(male, white, successful), feels
more threatened by
homosexuality than the woman,
who is female and, therefore, not a
member of the dominant
patriarchy. She's also a lesbian, so
her experience with
homosexuality is first hand.
The male doctor � we'll call
him M � claimed that
homosexuals actively sought his
assistance, because they were
miserable and wanted to change.
He also argued thathomosexuality
is unnatural, by virtue of the fact
that sexual unions between same
sex partners do not contribute to
the gene pool. Homosexuals, he
claimed, are committing
"intergenerational suicide
O. K M. Whatever. First of
7
2IU0T-T
OatnDuw) B� Tneun� M�M SarmcM
Photo courtesy of College Press Service
By Patrick Hinson
Human behavior constant throughout history
Well, we're almost in the
middle of the summer; hard to
believe it's slipped by so fast, and
it's too hot to talk any trash about
what's wrong with the world, or
with EastCarolinathesedays. That
seems to be the only purpose of
the Opinion page, but it really
shouldn't be. There's a lot of good
things going on in the world, too,
and a lot of good people. We're
not all terrible. I find myself
wondering sometimes how some
people can be so terrible, so
heartless, bu 11 guess that's just the
other half of the human being, the
other half of what makes the world
go around.
I sat with some friends in a
restaurant last night, and listened
in on a discussion about a class
that they had taken, Sociology of
Deviant Behavior. They told me
about how deviant behavior is a
necessary part of any society;
without it, society could not
function because it would be
unbalanced.
In other words, there has to
be evil in order for there to be
good in our world. Yeah, yeah, I
know this takes us all back to those
horrible memories of Philosophy
1000 class, but it was a strange
concept to take in.
It seems the more I learn
about the human being, the more
I find how little we actually know
about ourselves, and why we do
the things we do. For instance, if
you've ever taken the Psychology
of Learning, or Psychology of
Personality, you may find that all
we really "know" about what we
do is just theory. We can't seem to
pinpoint any real physical factors
(not yet, at least) that map out why
we think the way we do, or the
origins Of our actions. All the big
psychological theoriesarejustthat;
just improvable theories, guesses
about why we behave the way we
do. And doctors don't really heal,
do they? They really just facilitate
the process of healing, and stand
back, hoping that it occurs.
Sometimes it seems the most
effective way to really study
human behavior, in order to
predict its actions, is to look at
history, because we seem destined
to repeat ourselves again and
again.
The human being seems to
act in cycles. I remember looking
at a history test question that
asked'Since the beginning of
civilization, the one human trait
that has changed or varied the
least over time is and I got the
answer wrong. The answer was
"violence Think about it, a trait
as primitive and animalistic as
violence, and we really haven't
changed very much at all in that
department, have we? I saw a
videotape the other day, a
documentary aboutthe Holocaust.
all, homosexuals often feel
miserable, because they have been
indoctrinated to feel guilty and
ashamed. Furthermore, society
enacts some pretty serious
penalties upon people who
disobey its unwritten rules. The
threat of physical violence is
constant in the life of an out of the
closet homosexual. The pressure
to change is overwhelming.
As for the unnaturalness of
homosexuality, anything that
occurs in nature is natural.
Homosexuality occurs in nature
(notonly in human beings either!),
so it follows that homosexuality is
natural. And finally, who cares if a
group of people isn't reproducing?
The world is overcrowded as it is.
Maybe homosexuality is the next
stage in evolution; it could be a
way we might saveourselves from
eventual starvation.
The strictdelineationof male
female gender roles is
accompanied by severe penalties
if we step outside of what is
considered appropriate behavior.
Men are punished more severely
than women (hence gay bashing),
since the gender role that they
violate by being gay is that of the
dominant patriarchy. Male
homosexuality is perceived as a
serious threat to the status quo.
Lesbians are better tolerated by
the straight culture, simply
because they are already part of a
subordinate culture. Homosexual
women do not pose a threat to
heterosexual men, so the reaction
to them is less violent.
Personally, I think
homosexuality is a matter of
degrees. We're probably all
bisexual, but our enculturation
processes deny us any morally
acceptable expression of bisexual
behavior.
I find it so hard to imagine the
murder of six million people. It's
pretty incomprehensible, and yet
it really did happen. In that same
time frame almost twenty million
Russians lost their lives to the same
people, although we hear very
little about that. (There's a lot that
history forgets to tell us.) It doesn't
really matter who did it, it's just
sad that it happened, and that it
continues to happen, sad that we
are capable of such things to each
other.
I do like to think that there's
always the next generation,
though; maybe well be the ones
to get it right. The odds are against
us, however. Even the previous
generation is against us,
constantly, what with all the
"generation X" crap they keep
heaping upon us. I hate that stupid
tide. I think we should get rid of it.
They seem to be trying to
make us out to be unimportant,
just simple pawns in the game of
life, like they were, incapable of
fixing the mess that world is in. I
disagree. I think the world is a
good place, or at least it can be,
and that people are not bom bad.
I think we should try to think more
optimistically, try to be a little more
creative. We're expected to get rid
of our imaginations as we get
older. I say don't do it. A creative
imagination can change the world,
and so can we.
By Jason Williams
Alcohol advertising ruins sports and holidays
Having recently viewed a
number of sporting events on
television and opened my mail
here at The East Carolinian, I have
arrived at the unfortunate
conclusion that advertising
(accompanied by alcohol) is taking
over America. Let me explain.
I watched the final quarter of
the final game of the NBA Finals
the other night, just to see who
would win. I don't like the NBA;
never have. It's too fast, the players
are too good, and unlike college
hoops, there is almost no strategy
to the game. Butmostof all, Idon't
like the NBA for what it has
become � a marketer's dream.
Sometimes I think the league exists
only in order to sell ugly; fake
jerseys with someone's name on
the back, and tacky baseball hats.
But on this night, it wasn't the
league's image that got me, or even
the players shamelessly
promoting some sports drink ("Be
like Mike�Strike out every other
at-bat"). No, this time it was the
commercials. Or at least the
pseudo-commercials.
Pseudo-commercials are the
annoying little promotions that
appear on the actual TV show �
the logos in the corner of the screen,
the announcer saying "This game
is brought to you by No-Stink
deodorant et cetera. Lots of
sports telecasts have them now,
and I'm fairly used to them and
seldom object
In the waning minutes of the
NBA Finals, however, Marv
Albert's voice booms out, "Here's
another Genuine Moment brought
to you by Miller Genuine Draft I
almost puked. A genuine
moment? (It was a routine slam
dunk, for goodness sake.) Brought
to you by MGD? Gatorade, maybe.
PowerAde perhaps. ("Twenty
percent more carbs than
Gatorade" � What the hell are
"carbs?") But certainly not an
alcoholic beverage.
Not that I have anything
against alcoholic beverages; I
don't. (I don't particularly care for
MGD, though) But I ask you, how
high could Hakeem Olajuwon
jump to slam a ball after knocking
down a few beers? How accurate
would Sam Cassell's three-point
shots be with a good buzz?
And then there is my mail. I
get all sorts of mail, from all sorts
of places, most wanting publicity
for one thing or another. Seldom
does the sender desire publicity
for a product, however. One alert
reader (to borrow from Dave
Barry) sent me a press release from
a Greenville company that
distributesalcoholicbeverages. To
protect the innocent, let's just call
this company, Jefferys Beer & Wine
located at 1997 Greene Street.
Well, like most Americans,
Jefferys is planning to celebrate
Independence Day. Unlike many
folks who take that opportunity
(and the day off) to have a few
drinks, Jefferys remembers the
actual reason for the holiday �
the Founders.
After enlightening us that
"manyoftheFramers'ideaswere
fermented in America's taverns
and claiming, quite incorrectly,
that Thomas Jefferson wrote most
of the Declaration of Independence
in a bar, Jefferys' press release
implores us to "celebrate
America's independence in much
the same way as those who started
the holiday did: enjoying a cold
beer
Now, I guess this is no worse
than the folks with bad wigs and
terrible accents who dress up like
Washington and Lincoln to sell
furniture on President's Day; and
to be fair, Jefferys concluded the
release with a message to drink
responsibly and "Know when to
say when but that's not the point.
Thomas Jefferson did drink;
he is called "America's first wine
connoisseur and he made his
own hard cider at Monticello. But
he didn't write those immortal
words known as the Declaration
in order that "two centuries later,
men and women in Greenville
could have a beer. Nor did he
make beer commercials.
The Fourth of July � now
there's a Miller Genuine Moment.
All letters. In order to beleonslderedjor publication; must be typed
under 250 words? and contain your name class; rankmajbr and a
working daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to the Editor
?v The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg. � ECUGreenyllle, N.Cr
� �i I
27858-4353.







TheEastCarolinian
Page 4
At"
1
FEMALEROOMMATENEEDED:
responsible, non-smoker for own
room in apartment close to campus.
$ 245month and 12 utilities. Call
anytime 758-9373.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
FALL to share 3 bedroom house
located in a quiet neighborhood near
the hospital. Must be a serious stu-
dent and non-smoker.260.00 rent
month includes utilities and cable
TV. If interested call Harold after 4:00
p.m. at 830-5160.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
apartment 1 2block from Art Bldg
3 blocks from downtown, 2 blocks
from Supermarket. Starting in Au-
gust. Call 757-1947.
ROOMMATENEEDED: Preferred
Male Student to share a two bed-
room and two bathroom mobile
home at Greystone Mobile Home
Park. Only$175.00and l2utilities.
If interested, call Scott Tanner at 321-
0404.
3 BEDROOMHOUSEFORRENT:
302 Lewis Street, 5 minute walking
distance from ECU campus, off street
parking, garage, fenced yard, central
AC, house fans, kitchen appliances,
hookups, no pets, 1 year lease, $
675.00 deposit. Available July 1. Call
(910)7164875.
FEMALE NON-SMOKER to share
2 BR, 15 Bath, townhouse, 5 miles
from campus. Available 81. $
250.00month. Call 321-1933.
GRAD STUDENT WANTED to
share large house (3 minutes from
campus) for the summer. Contact
Mike at 752-3635.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: prefer-
ably male, responsible, neat, non-
smoker for own bedroom in
Eastbrook Apts.185.00 per month,
plus 12 utilities and phone. Call
Andiat 830-5250.
Classifieds
June 29, 1994
m -pfSf
m
-m-vim
WALK TO CAMPUS. 1 bedroom
duplex160.00 or 1 bedroom
fuunished apartment250.00. Walk
to campus. Call 752-1375.
Homelocators.
CHECK IT OUT! 3 bedroom house $
600.00 or huge 4bedroom townhouse
25 baths, $800.00 near campus! Call
752-1375. Homelocators.
PETS OK! 1 bedroom house255.00
or 2 bedroom house325.00, pets ok!
Call 752-1375. Homelocators.
DUPLEX FOR RENT! 2 bedroom $
350.00 or 3 bedroom duplex500.00
call 752-1375. Homelocators.
WANTEDFEMALEROOMMATE
to share two bedroom apartment
starting August 1st, one block from
ECU Campus. Call Angje, (910) 654-
4297.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
ASAP Dogwood Hollow Apts. Close
tocampus,225monthand l2utili-
ties. Own bedroom, own bath. Neat
and non-smoker. Call 752-9633.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IN AU-
GUST. preferrablyanon-smoker,and
semi-serious student for a 2 bedroom
2 bath duplex on WyndhamCr. close
to campus. Call 830-0309.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for Summer. Private room, near cam-
pus.175.00month plus 13 utili-
ties. Call Bess or Karen at 355-9562.
ROOMMATENEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY. Male or female, graduate or
professional. Own room, pool, tennis
courts,quiet165.00monthplusl
3 utilities. 752-5533.
ROOMMATENEEDEDFORFALL
to share 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath
townhouse at Sheraton Village. $
200.00 1 3 utilities. Available July8.
Contact Victoria at 355-1861.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits. Call
1-800-436-4365,
Ext. P-3712.
SUMMER RESORT JOBS- Earn
to12hr. plus tips. Locations in-
clude: Hawaii, Florida, Rocky
Mountains, Alaska, New England,
etc. For details call: 1-800-807-5950
ext. R5362.
LADIES WANTED: Models, Danc-
ers, Escorts, Massuers. Earn BIG
bucks in the cleanest club in North
Carolina, must be 18 years old. Play-
mates Adult Entertainment. 919-
747-7686.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT - make up to2,000-4,000
mo. teaching basic conversational
English abroad, japan, Taiwan,
and S. Korea. Many employers pro-
vide room & board other benefits.
No teaching background or Asian
languages required. For more in-
formation call: (206) 632-1146, ext.
J5362.
STUDENT WITH STRONG
BACK NEEDED to help move fur-
niture and appliances this week-
end. Pay negotiable. 321-0018, leave
message.
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFI-
DENTIAL, PROFESSIONAL Re-
sumeSecretarial work. Specializ-
ing in Resume composition w
cover-letters stored on disk, term
papers, thesis, legal transcriptions,
general typing and other secretarial
duties. Word Perfect or Microsoft
Word for Windows software. Call
today (8A-5P-752-9959) (Evenings
527-9133).
l
Sale
mmmmm.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-Wheelers,
Motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Nationwide auction listings avail-
able now. Call 1-800-436-4363, Ext.
C-5999.
ECU STUDENT POTTERY &
CRAFT SALE, 210 South Pitt St
downtown, take a left at Post Office
onto Pitt St it's the yellow house on
the right. Hours- Friday, 1:00 - 6:00,
Saturday, 7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
FOR SALE: '86 FORD ESCORT 5
speed, power steering, break, rare
window defroster, AC (needs
freon), 106 K miles,1200.00, nego-
tiable, 752-9125, leave message.
IBM SOFTWARE & GAMES FOR
SALE. Call 830-8970 for more infor-
mation. Ask for Kevin.
FOR SALE: 210" Orion speakers in
custom made box.250.00 O.B.O.
Call Scott at 752-1933.
MACINTOSH CLASSIC COM-
PUTER, like new, great for word
processing and graphics,500.00,
call 757-4678 or 752-8564 after 5:00
p.m.
Heroes Are Here Too'
116 E. 5th Street
757-0948
Comics and Sportscards
n
f
J
10 OFF wCoupon1
expires 8-31-94
Announcements
WHAT MAJOR? WHAT CA-
REER? HOW DO I DECIDE?
A five session workshop is being
offered by the Counseling Center to
help you answer these questions.
Take assessment instruments, leam
career research skills, and find out
how personality affects carr t choice.
Summer Session II workshops be-
gin the week of Julv 4. Limited En-
rollment. Call 757-6661.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNI-
TIES.
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are inter-
ested in becoming PERSONAL
CARE ATTENDANTS to individu-
als in wheelchairs. Also, READERS
AND TUTORS are needed. Past ex-
perience is desired but not required.
If interested, contact: Office for Dis-
ability Support Services Brewster
A-116 or A-114 Telephone: (919)
757-6952
TREASURE CHESTS AVAIL-
ABLE
The 1993-94 Treasure Chests are
here! Be sure to pick up your FREE
video yearbook. Available at the
Student Store, The East Carolinian,
Joyner Library, Mendenhall and the
Media Board office in the Student
Publications Building.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY H1LFIGER
NAUTICA
&
&
WE ALSO WANT:
SHI TSMITSV
SHOCTS
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
s& A
"VA
�?fc
Your recommended weekly allowance of cartoons
tffMNEM NOW IK
SHOW
We want cartoonists. We need cartoonists. We pay cartoonists.
If you want to be published in Greenville's only forum with original strips by
students, lissen up!
To apply, you must bring to our offices two finished 8" x 13" (two tiers
worth) samples of your proposed strip (lettering, inks, the whole taco) on
cardstock paper in heavy black ink. That's right, we are demanding. But if
your work is good, you'll run every week in Pirate Comics.
See Stephanie Smith, staff illustrator, for further information.
We're on the second floor of the student publication building.
And we're waiting.
U





����f �
The East Carolinian
June 29, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5
Toad the Wet Sprocket invades Raleigh club
By Brian Olson
Staff Writer
One glance at the band Toad
the Wet Sprocket may trigger
many questions. How can a half-
midget play the drums? What
about the small skinny guy with
hardly any hair singing those
emotional lyrics? And by the way.
What does "Toad the Wet
Sprocket" mean anyway?
The origination of the name
of the band's name remains ques-
tionable (jokingly, the band has
said the name came from what
women yell when they are having
an orgasm), but Saturday night at
the Ritz in Raleigh, N.C this four-
man band played like there was
no tomorrow.
After spending two years on
the road and putting out their
third album Fear, Toad has just
put out a new album, Dulcinea,
and is on the road again. This
time, however, the group is draw-
ing bigger crowds and arenas.
Saturday, Toad piayed 23
songs in the swel tering heat to the
delight of about 2,000 fans.
"The show went good, I liked
it'said lead singer Glen Phillips.
i actually like the heat. The crowd
made me feel like I was working
good
The band played a variety of
songs from their first three albums
(Bread and Circus, Pale and Fear),
but placed much of the emphasis
on Dulcinea with 10 songs. Phillips
pumped out his crisp lyrics to the
delight of the screaming crowd.
Photo Courtesy of Sony Mustc
Sony recording artists Toad the Wet Sprocket performed a stellar show at the Ritz Saturday night. The group is promoting its new album Dulcinea and is currently touring clubs.
He started with "Is It For Me?"
from the Fear album, and then
slowed it down for awhile with
the fourth song, "Before You Were
Bom also from Fear.
Toad, especially Phillips, have
been publicly emotional and
aware of moral wrongdoings with
our society. "Before you were
Bom" lyrics follow that of an un-
wanted child-birth, with the child
growing up without a proper fam-
ily environment. In past shows,
Glen has commented about abor-
tion and rape, but this time he
held back.
"Hold Her Down" is another
emotional song for theseven-year-
ECU offers Summer
theatre entertainment
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
ECU kicks off its summer
theatre season with two com-
edies in July, "I Hate Hamlet"
and "Biloxi Blues The plays
are affordable alternatives for
the general public and students
and may offer some unex-
pected turns for those who at-
tend the play. According to
Gary Faircloth, the general
manager in the Theatre depart-
ment, one of the plays wiM be
quite different from what the-
atre-goers might expect.
"We want to emphasize 'I
Hate' in "I Hate Hamlet
Faircloth said. "Te play has
nothing to do with
Shakespeare; it's strictly a com-
edy.
"This comedy is about a
out-of-work TV star who has
been signed to play Hamlet in
Central Park Faircloth said.
This unemployed star doesn't
really want the role, but he's
forced to accept it because of
financial obligations. By luck,
he's placed in the same apart-
ment John Barrymore stayed
in when he played the part
sixty-five years before. The
ghost of Barrymore ends up
tutoring the young actor
through the role.
The production will in-
clude Rex Hays as John
Barrymore. Hays is an ac-
claimed New York actor who
played in the original Broad-
way casts of "Grand Hotel
"Women of the Year" and
"Evita
"I Hate Hamlet" was writ-
ten by Paul Rudnick, who also
created the screenplay for
"Adams' Family Values It
opens on Tuesday July 5, and
will play through July 9.
The Tony-award-winning
comedy "Biloxi Blues" will end
the summer season. "Biloxi
Blues written by Neil Simon
is a semi-autobiographical ac-
count of Simon's days in the
Army.
Director John Shearin plays
a stringent southern drill
seargent who works with a
group of northern recruits.
Shearin has been a regular cast
member of such television
shows as "Hunter" and "The
Young and the Restless The
play will be shown July 19-23.
Each play begins at 8:00
p.m and 2:00 p.m. matinees
will be shown on Wednes-
day and Saturday. Tickets
are $17.50 for individuals,
$12.50 for senior citizens, and
$7.50 for children 12 and
under. Faircloth pointed out
that students who get to the
play 15 minutes before the
performance get in for
children's admission.
The ECU
Summer Theatre
is gearing up for
summer shows,
including "I
Hate Hamlet"
and "Biloxi
Blues The
theatre will
bring national
acting and
writing talent to
the Greenville
cultural scene.
Photo by
LMli Patty
old Santa Monica band. This song
deals with rape and how wrong it
is and how degrading it is to
women. While in the past, he has
made comments regarding Mike
Tyson's rape charge, on-stage he
kept all comments to himself.
However, after the show, he ex-
pressed how he felt on the current
O.J. Simpson murder charges.
"I'm much more concerned
about his ex-wife than him, thank
you Phillips said. "It's depress-
ing people can't get much help.
Seems like if you mess up, it
doesn't deal very well with men-
tal instability or anger
Another emotional incident
occurred between the encores. Af-
ter drummer Randy Guss poured
bottles of water on a hot crowd,
he simply said, "God bless us,
bless us everyone
Phillips needed a breather
later in the show, and passed along
the vocals to Dean Dinning with
'Nanci Dinning sings two songs
on the new album Dulcinea.
"This is the first time I have
seen Toad said Stuart Barnes of
New Bern, N.C. "I have all their
CD's and they sound evt i better
in concert. By far, this is the best
sounding group I have ever seen
live. They are a symbol for other
bands to follow
Such praise should not come
as a surprise to Toad. They have
recorded their first two and the
latest albums in a live studio set-
ting.
"We wanted to do it
Dulcinea) more live Guss said.
"We wanted to actually avoid the
kind of Fearway of doingit, which
was one thing at a time, very
layered, very analyzed. We
wanted to be more spontaneous
in this one
Toad is not an artificial band,
its members are laid back and
down to earth. They're still in
touch with the young people and
they care a lot about what goes
on in life. Just pop in any of
their songs for proof.
Toad is back on its bus trail
around the country and they
plan to tour for about a year or
so, ana then return to the stu-
dio.
"The reason we do this is
still the same as always Guss
said. "It is not a creative out-
look for us, it is not meant as a
way to be popular. It's not
about all the people here or
whether they will be here to-
morrow or whatever, it's about
music and that's why we do
it
And they sure do it well.
Rock legends plug in at Walnut Creek
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Crosby, Stills and Nash, folk
rock legends famous for their in-
tricate harmonies and poignant
lyrics, performed at Walnut Creek
Amphitheater Saturday night. Af-
ter past shows dominated by
acoustic sets, the concert surprised
many as itwasalmost entirely elec-
tric
The show opened with "Love
the One You're With and the
group presented a version more
complex than the original. It was
longer, and had more instrumen-
tal interludes.
One of the most impressive
aspects of the concert was that they
played older songs, but featured
more developed versions of each
song. These versions were surpris-
ingly tight, given their difficulty.
Stills and Crosby looked ex-
tremely weathereJ, theyearshave
obviously punished the two. For-
tunately, age didn't effect their
enthusiasm or their intensity.
Theconcert was designed such
that each artist was able to display
his own individual talents. The
personalities in the trio are so
strong and so different, that it's
hard to showcase each performer.
If one artist did dominate the
show, however, it was Stills. He
played incredible lead guitar,
manufacturing solos that seemed
to last for hours. Almost every song
played was designed around him,
and he was rarely singing. Stills
proved that he's definitely more
fitted for the electric scene.
Graham Nash led the few
acoustic songs played. He sang
such songs as "Amerakesh Ex-
press" and "Unequal Love a song
which will be on the group's up-
coming album. Most importantly,
it looked like Nash was doing his
usual job of keeping the band or-
ganized. He did most of the speak-
ing between songs. Nash was in
the middle of the three, and was
continuously talking to Crosby and
Stills.
David Crosby's most impres-
sive moments were when he sang
lead in "Deja Vu" and "Long Time
Gone Both performances were
very powerful and inspired. He
showed that nis voice has retained
much of its strength and passion
through the years.
One of me supporting band's
members, Ethan Jones showed in-
credible versatility, as he played
drums, bongos and lead and
rhythm guitar.
At one point between sets
Crosby said; "We do have a favor-
ite band then paused for a short
time while the crowd wondered
who they were going to pay trib-
ute to. Then they covered "In My
Life" by the Beatles, a totally un-
expect�d move.
The show reached a climax
during the encore, when they
played "Southern Cross A very
responsive crowd prompted the
group to extend the song to al-
most twice its regular length.
The atmosphere among the
audience was very light and
friendly, perhaps because the
crowd was dominated by the
baby boomer generation.
The band also reflected this
warm feeling, as the three joked
and hugged after the show. This
kind of harmony hasn't always
existed in the group. In the past,
there was a lot of tension be-
tween Stills and Crosby, but luck-
ily that seemed to no longer exist.
The incredible vocals in the band
were not the only tiling in perfect
harmony Saturday night.
Uh .no
Take Your Chances
JW Worth A Try
JJw Highly Recommended
Hoodlum Empire
Looooking GoooodI
��
Ever found this disc you really
liked, by this group you'd never
heard of before? Ever really wanted
toshare your admiration wi tin some-
body,only todiscover thatyou were
apparently the only person on Earth
who'd heard it? Frustrating, isn't it?
Of course, if you're a high-powered
East Carolin ion reviewer like me, you
can just write about the disc and
influence the masses to go out and
buy it.
That said, you should all go out
immediately and purchaseLooootog
GoooodI by Hoodlum Empire. If s a
bouncy ska-rap-beach-punk ex-
travaganza! It's a romp through the
modern-pop-culture-media-land-
scape lifestylewealllead! If swacky!
If s weird! It's by some guys from
Oakland, and I'm driven to push it
on the unsuspecting populace mer-
cilessly until Hoodlum Empire has
more fans than God!
Seriously, though, this is good
stuff. Hoodlum Empire takes beats
from ska (itself a mixture of polka,
reggae and big band sounds) and
60s beach music, then filters them
through distorted guitars and a
snarling punk rock attitude that
could kill several large animals.
Combining this musical diversity
with surprising amounts of intelli-
gence and wit, looooking GoooodI is
probably my favorite album so far
this year.
Theopeningtrack, "What Does
It Take to Get on Your Show Jenny
Jones?" isa media satire. If sa bouncy
ska tune about a guy who'll make
up any story to get on the Jenny
Jones daytime talk show: "I'm like
See HOODLUM page 6
Catherine
Sleepy
Let's get it straight right at the
beginning: This is a band called
"Catherine they have nothing to
do with the Catherine Wheel.
"Sleepy" is the new 5 song EP from
these Chicago natives. They re-
ceived help from Billy Corgan of
the ever-growing and all-encom-
passing Smashing Pumpkins, he
and the band co-produced the al-
bum. Kerry Brown, the drummer,
is to marry Pumpkin's bassist
D'Arcy sometime soon. So
Catherine has three things in
common with thePumpkins, and
you may say to yourself, "I'll bet
that they are heavily influenced
by them old Pumpkins And
you are right, but the influence is
not a totally negative thing.
The band members follow
the idea of "you wrote it, you
sing it which explains the su btle
differences in the vocals of the
songs. Catherine is a three guitar
band with each guitarist playing
some complementary style in
contrast to the others. One guitar
lays down the chordal harmony
while the rest are busy mangling
their own in the tradition of Sonic
Youth. It's quite a lovely experi-
ence for those lover of distor-
tion out there. The drummer is
quite adeptatpoundingoutthose
tribal rhythms and there is even
a keyboard player, yet another
strange twist on the power gui-
tar band idea.
There are only five songs on
Sleepy, each one is a lovely struc-
tured mess. The EP opens with
"Idiot a song that begins "Hey
See CATHERINE page 6
i





aBummmtmmmm
6 The East Carolinian
June 29. 1994
HOODLUM
Continued from page 5
Michael lackson - I've got vitiligo
But since I'm white - Yo, nobody
knows These bizarre ramblings
are delivered by Hoodlum Empire
frontman Rob La Rock in a rap style
that meshes seamlessly into the
song's ska rhythms.
Also seamless is the transition
from the bouncy tunes to the an-
gry stuff like "I'm in a Snit" and
"Hey Fuck You Guys songs preg-
nant with heavy guitars and
growly voices. Brimming over
with bad attitude, these tracks
change the tone without breaking
the album's flow. Somehow noth-
ing seems out of place here, as the
band shifts subject matter and
tempoeffortlessly in lightning-fast
transitions.
For example, scattered be-
tween all the attitude and smart-
ass satire, the band gives us sev-
eral slice-of-life songs that have a
vulnerable quality. There's 'Try-
ing to be Alone about the per-
sonal need for solitude weighed
against the financial need to have
roommates.
We even get songs of broken
love, like the blisteringly funny
"Postmodern Romance which
discusses the difficulty of falling in
love in a modern world that ana-
lyzes every feeling and intention
until nothing has any real meaning.
"I told you I loved you Rob La
Rock sings, "But you laughed and
explained tome That I'm guilty of
buying into The consumer cul-
ture lies I see And that I was
duped into the myth of love That
they feed us daily on TV
But alongside this painfully
nasty bit of social commentary, we
also get the more light-hearted
"Cynthia Johnson's Clothes This
one'sabouta "one-night stand that
turned into a lost weekend end-
ing with our hero offering to have
his lover's clothes dry-cleaned and
his efforts to get her to pick them up
so he can see her again. This gem of
a track offers some really amazing
vocals and a bouncy sha backbeat.
Also thrown into the mix is
"The Jester's Gestures an attack
on late-night TV self-help gurus.
There's also "Dead Samaritan a
gritty punk screamer about the pos-
sibly lethal consequences of stop-
ping to help people in distress at
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pittman Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:00-4:00
night.
Looooking Gooood! is a formi-
dable, if not lethal, little album, and
I hope it sells millions upon millions
of copies. Hoodlum Empire is also
my vote for 1994's Best Band You
Never Heard. They beat ska giants
theMighty Mighty Bosstonesattheir
own game here, and that's no easy
feat. What more can I say? Looooking
Gooood! deserves to be in your record
collection. Buy it. Now.
� Mark
Brett
Hey lifestyle
writers!
Cull me.
I miss you
uud have no
social life!
No meeting
this week but
keep in
touch.
-Warren
CATHERINE
Continued from page 5
Motherfucker and proceeds to
bash some poor lovesick slob who
can'tlet goof the past. Not exactly
a candidate for Top 40, but very
well done. "Insect Tree" is a slow,
noisy jam with some synthesized
drumming, truly elegant and sin-
ister.
Probably the best song on the
EP is the title track "Sleepy It
starts out with some mellow
acoustic guitar strumming and
suddenly out of nowhere this se-
verely distorted guitar thrashing
starts to take over the song. The
singing, melody and structure of
the song soon go out the window
and then it becomes some weird
amalgam of feedback and amps
pushed to their limits. The me-
lodic part of the song only lasts
about three minutes, the remain-
ing seven are noise in the tradition
of My Bloody Valentine and Sonic
Youth. It is truly a triumph of west-
ern culture to make noise into
music, think about it.
To sum up the whole thing, I
think Catherine is a great band
and may reach a descent amount
of success on the college charts,
but I doubt they will be as ac-
cepted as the Pumpkins. They
are just a bit too abrasive. Look
for their second EP to be due out
this fall.
� Kris
Hoffier
DAN'S
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L
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phone 355-6050
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Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
vour utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Saturday 2
OPENED FOR PHISH AT WALNUTCREEK
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At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" application
from room 211 in the Off-Campus Housing
Office, Whichard Building or at Greenville
Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of
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Option B: Deposit Required
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The service charge oj' $20.00 for electric and
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Greenville
Utilities





� ' i' in
The East Carolinian
June 29, 1994
Dream match
could happen
at Wimbledon
(AP)�Lori McNeil and
Zina Garrison Jackson grew
up together, tennis prodi-
gies the same age on the
playgrounds of Houston,
nurtured by a coach who
had a dream: One day they
would meet in the final of
Wimbledon.
Six days after McNeil
knocked off defending
champion and No. 1 seed
Steffi Graf in the opening
round, Garrison Jackson
joined her lifelong friend in
the quarterfinals, upsetting
No. 2 Arantxa Sanchez
Vicario, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3, Mon-
day.
Nothing would please
them more than to fulfill that
fantasy of their childhood
coach, John Wilkerson.
"John used to talk about
it a lot Garrison Jackson,
30, said. "It is really weird.
I can remember actually the
first time we came over here
and John used to say to us
his dream was for Lori and
me to be in the finals, and
then for him to just sit back
and relax for the first time
in his life and not worry
about who wins. I think we
both thought about it
A finalist in 1990, Garri-
son Jackson lost in the fourth
round the past two years.
"Zina is such an emo-
tional person Wilkerson
said. "This was so impor-
tant for her. She really
wanted it. There were peri-
ods in this match when she
could have cpllapsed. But
she didn't. She stayed the
aggressor
McNeil and Garrison
Jackson created Wimbledon
history, for the first time
eliminating the top two
women's seeds before the
quarters.
"I'm really happy with
the way I'm hanging in there
and fighting hard said
McNeil, 30, a 7-6 (7-4), 7-6
(7-4) victor over Florencia
Labat. "I always believed
that I did have the talent,
and I believed that I worked
hard. I just believe if you
continue to work hard in
anything that you do, and
you have talent, things will
go your way at some point
They joined the largest
contingent of American
women in the quarters since
1985, five players that in-
clude the oldest woman in
the draw, 37-year-old
Martina Navratilova, and
the youngest, 18-year-old
Lindsay Davenport, who
overpowered Gabriela
Sabatini, 6-1, 6-3.The other
quarterfinalists are Larisa
Neiland, who plays McNeil
on Tuesday; Conchita
Martinez, who plays Dav-
enport; and Jana Novotna,
who plays Navratilova. Gar-
rison Jackson plays fellow
American Gigi Fernandez.
Three American men
reached the quarters � de-
fending champ and No. 1
Pete Sampras, No. 6 Todd
Martin and No. 10 Michael
Chang.
Sampras beat Daniel
Vacek 6-4,6-1, 7-6 (7-5) and
meets Chang on Wednes-
day. Chang beat French
Open champion Sergi
Bruguera 6-4, 7-6 (9-7), 6-0.
Martin thumped Andre
Agassi in the fifth set to win
6-3, 7-5, 6-7 (7-0), 4-6, 6-1.
"Do I feel like the man
who shot Bambi?" Martin
said. "In my eyes, there
aren't too many similarities
between Andre and Bambi.
Some friends of mine in col-
lege called me Thumper.
No, I think I'm the guy who
overcame quite a bit out
there and was fortunate
See TENNIS page 8
Sports
Page 7
Greenville hosts stars
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
The 10th annual Michael Jor-
dan Celebrity Golf Classic took
place Sunday at the Brook Valley
Country Club inGreenville, N.C
even without the star himself,
Michael Jordan.
The Wilmington, N.C na-
tive is still playing AA baseball
for the Birmingham Barons, but
the show went on successfully
without the former basketball
star.
The 18-hole tournament
brought out some famous celeb-
rities. Among the famous ath-
letes on hand were UNC's Jerry
Stackhouse, former Dallas Cow-
boy Ed "Too Tall" Jones, the
Knicks' Charles Oakley and
former ECU football stars Robert
Jones and Jeff Blake. Soap opera
stars Kassie Wesley, Michael O'
Leary (All My Children) and
Grant Aleksander also partici-
pated.
"It's definitely a good cause
said former North Pitt High
School student and now Minne-
sota Viking Ashley Sheppard. "I
enjoy it every year. Coming out
here and having a good time is
just great
Fortunately, with all the ex-
citement surrounding the stars
and following them down the
fairways, people did seem to re-
member the idea of what the tour-
nament was all about. Its pur-
pose is to benefit the children of
the Ronald McDonald House in
North Carolina.
"He (Jordan) did a lot of
things for me in the past and I am
always open to him, "said his
former Chicago Bull teammate
Oakley. "I always have the time
to come to this type of event to
give something back and be real
positive to the kids. It is impor-
tant to show them that if you
work hard and put effort into it,
anything can happen in life
While many of the celebrities
were not steady golfers, they all
seemed to have a lot of fun. From
the hacks on the driving range to
balls in. the water on the 18th
Photo by Cliff HolliaThe Daily Reflector
Ashley Shepperd, linebacker on the Minnesota Vikings, chooses which
club to hit on Sunday. Shepperd attended the local North Pitt H.S.
hole, the golfers could be seen
laughing and joking around with
one another.
"Hopefully, I got about three
or four more (of those 300-yard
drives) said former Kinston,
N.C UNC basketball player
Jerry Stackhouse after being
teased about his erratic shots on
the driving range. "It's all luck
today, so I'm just trying to come
out and have a little fun
The five-some combination
of football star Billy Joe Dupree,
Jerry Boyd, Duff Harris, Bill
Reedy and John Snipes won the
best-ball tournament with a score
of 58 on the par 71 course. They
edged out John Callahan, Kelly
Barnhill, Steve Moore, Steve
Klocke and Dave Steed by just
one stroke.
The tournament also in-
cluded many events for the chil-
dren. The tournament had a com-
edy show with a gorilla who
could hit some amazing golf
shots. Little play areas were also
set aside from the course and next
to a jazz band.
The tournament still at-
tracted as many people as last
year, even without Jordan, and
served "to a tee" its purpose of
raising money for the Ronald
McDonald House.
1994 NBA Draft Preview
First 15 of 27 first round picks and possibilities (barring no trades). The draft takes place tonight.
1. Milwaukee
2. Dallas
3. Detroit
4. Minnesota
5. Washington
6. Philadelphia
7. L.A. Clippers
8. Sacramento
9. Boston
10. L. A. Lakers
11. Seattle
12. Miami �
13. Denver
14. N.J.
15. Indiana
Glen Robinson-Purdue
Jason Kidd- Cal.
Grant Hill- Duke
Donyeli Marshail-UConn
Sharone Wright-Clemson
Juwan Howard-Michigan
Clifford Rozier-Louisville
Eric Montross-UNC
Yinka Dare-George Washington
Dontonio Wingf ield-Cin.
Lamond Murray-Cal.
Jalen Rose-Michigan
Khalid Reeves-Arizona
Lawrence Funderburke-Ohio St.
Michael Smith-Providence
Irates finish as National Champions
By Sean Jordan
Guest Writer
Back in late March, the Irates,
ECU's men's frisbee team, be-
gan their quest for the collegiate
National Title. On Memorial Day
weekend, the Irates traveled to
Baton Rouge, La to participate
in the College Nationals, known
as the three most grueling days
of Ultimate.
With their potent mixture of
aging veteran experience and
young raw talent, the Irates were
able to outperform the nation's
other top 11 teams, bringing
home their first National Cham-
pionship.
The Irates first made their
presence felt in March at the fifth
annual College Easterns, a tour-
nament they had never won. The
Irates swept the tournament,
beating Santa Cruz 10-7 in the
Photo nu Leslie �"
Irate Curtis Finnel dives across the
semis and Df.ing .uai year's
National Champs, UNC-W, 10-5
in the finals.
The Irates then breezed
through the tournaments needed
to qualify for Nationals. The
N.C.Va. Sectionals, which were
Pirates, Wolfpack
re-rival possible
(AP) � ECU and North
Carolina State could resume
their football rivalry at the new
stadium being constructed to
house the Carolina Panthers,
The Charlotte Observer reported
last week.
Representatives of both
schools, the Panthers and
Raycom Sports, said there have
been preliminary discussions
and more formal talks are ex-
pected before the end of the
summer. A regionally televised
game could be held at the sta-
dium as soon as 1996, the year
the stadium opens.
"Playing East Carolina in
Charlotte is an interesting con-
cept for us, if it can work out
with both of our institutional
scheduling needs and require-
ments N.C. State athletic di-
rector Todd Turner told the
newspaper. "I've had some in-
formal conversations with
some of our alumni and friends
in the Charlotte area who feel
playing East Carolina there
would be very successful and
well supported Turner said.
Mark Richardson, director
of business operations for the
Panthers, said he has informally
discussed the possibility of hav-
ing college football games at
the stadium with several area
schools, including N.C. State
and ECU.
Richardson said he had
talked with Turner and ECU
associate athletic director
Charlie Carr, but he called
those talks more generic than
specific.
Raycom executive vice
president Ken Haines said an
ECU-N.C. State matchup is
one of several being explored
for regional television.
"We're talking to all the
schools you could imagine that
would appeal to the Charlotte
area Haines said.
The Pirates and the
Wolfpack last played each
other in the Peach Bowl on
New Year's Day 1992. It was
hailed as one of the greatest
college football games ever
involving schools from North
Carolina. Before a sellout
crowd of nearly 60,000, East
Carolina rallied from a 17-
point deficit in the final eight
minutes to win 37-34 and fin-
ish the season ranked ninth
nationally.
Regular-season meetings
between the schools ended in
1987 after ECU's 32-14 victory
in Raleigh. An estimated 2,000
Pirate fans stormed the field
at Carter-Finley Stadium,
causing property damage and
injuries. Before the rivalry was
halted, six of the 10 largest
crowds in Carter-Finley his-
tory had gathered for that
game.
File Photo
Clayton Driver was on the 1992 ECU Peach Bowl team when they
came from behind in the fourth quarter to beat N.C. State, 37-34.
Polecats pull away
(RS) � The Intramural
Sports calendar concluded for
the first summer session with
the nen's Softball title game be-
tween the "Greenville Polecats"
and "U Lose II These two teams
had both completed the regular
season undefeated and were fac-
ing each other for the first time.
"The Greenville Polecats"
erased an early five-run deficit
to capture a
"U Lose II" team consisted of
Melton, Stu Sealey, David:
Parker, Eddie Coble, Scott,
Leonard, Jay Bryant, Mike.
Kehoe, Steve Lovett, Allen,
Smith, James Braswell and Sam
Pasouf.
The second summer
session features a number of;
exciting events for participants,
ECU students, faculty and staff
to enjoy. In;
line and helps lead ECU to victory.
played at ECU, proved to be an
easy victory for the Irates, as
they again beat UNC-W, 17-7.
Next, the Irates travelled to
the Mid-Atlantic Regionals held
See IRATES page 8
19-12 vie- '
tory behind
the offense
of Romel
Racosasand
Rodney
Young, who
each scored
four times.
After trail-
ing for the
first two in-
nings, the
"Polecats"
exploded
for nine
runs in the
hird i nning, then tacked on four
more runs in the fourth. "U Lose
scored eight runs in the first
. inir.g, hut fell .ipart after this
r�oin. .N.att Melton led the of-
nsi ve attack for "U Lose scor-
ing twice and hitting a home run.
Members of the champion-
ship "Greenville Polecats" in-
cluded Tony Piercy, Rich Moro,
Donnie Batts, Carl Rouse, Brian
Holmes, Darren Cayton and
Bobby Clifton. The runner-up
Wiffleball play
will be governed
by rules of the
United States
Perforated Plrstic
Baseball
Associatio
(USPPBA
Softball
many of the
teams from'
the first ses-
sion will go
fora second
chance at
the title. A
number of
promises
have been
made as,
once again,
Randy
Odomindi-
cates that
"��' the new
and improved "Fur Team" will
be the team to beat in the Co
Rec division.
Meanwhile, the "Econom-
ics Society led by summer IM
veteran John Whitehead, seeks
a rematch with first session
champion "Summer's Finest
Stiff competition is expected
from many of the 5-on-5 play-
ers from the first session as they

See REC SPORTS page 8
I





wumMmmumm
8 The East Carolinian
June 29, 1994
1994 World Cup Schedule
REC SPORTS
Continued from page 7
Wed. June 29
Thurs. June 30
Sat. July 2
Sun. July 3
Mon. July 4
Tues. July 5
Sat. July 9
Sun. July 10
Wed. July 13
Sat. July 16
Sun. July 17
Morocco vs. Netherlands
Belgium vs. Saudi Arabia
Argentina vs. Bulgaria
Greece vs. Nigeria
Game4:lCvs.3A,BorF
Game 6:2c vs. 2A
Game2:2Fvs.2B
Gamel:lAvs.3C,DorE
Game 7: IF vs. IE
Game 8: lBvs.3A,CorD
Game 5: ID vs. 3B, E or F
Game 3: IE vs. 2D
Game C: 5 winner vs. 6 winner
Game D: 7 winner vs. 8 winner
Game B: 3 winner vs. 4 winner
Game A: 1 winner vs. 4 winner
Winner B vs. Winner A
Winner A vs. Winner D
Third Place Game
FINAL-Winner BC vs. AD
E�12:25
A�3:55
E�7:25
E-I2:25am
A�1:00
E�4:25
A�1:00
E�4:25
A�noon
E�3:25
E�12:55
E-4:25
A�noon
A�3:30
E�11:55 am
A�3:30
E�3:55
E�7:25
E�3:25
A�3:30
KEY: E- ESPN, A- ABC. All games live except where noted. All times EDT.
Compiled by Dave Pond
scramble to reorganize and form
the best possible 3-on-3 basket-
ball teams. An outlook on the
season including top teams and
players will be published in next
week's column.
Also upcoming in the sec-
ond summer session is four-per-
son volleyball, wiffleball and
putt putt golf. Volleyball will be
held weeknights in Christenbury
Gym and is open to men's,
women's, and co-rec teams. The
registration meeting for inter-
ested teams and players will be
held on Wednesday, July 6, at
4pm.
Wiffleball is a rapidly grow-
ing sport at ECU, first introduced
last fall. Play will be governed
IRATES
by rules of the United States
Perforated Plastic Baseball As-
sociation (USPPBA), and pitch-
ing may be either fast-pitch or
slow-pitch. Five players are
needed to compose a team.
Games will be held at the
Greenville Fun Park on US
Highway 264. There will be an
optional information meeting
on Tuesday, July 12, at 4:00 pm.
All registrationinforma-
tion meetings will be con-
ducted in Biology North, room
106. For further information on
intramural sports offerings,
please contact David Gaskins
or Kari Cleveland at 757-6387
for details or stop by 204
Christenbury Gymnasium.
Continued from page 7
TENNIS
Continued from page 7
at Leigh University, in Pa. The
tournament turned into another
Cakewalk for the Irates, as they
overwhelmed the University of
Penn. 21-5 in the finals.
After a strong showing at
Regionals, the Irates travelled
down to Cajun Country, enter-
ing Nationals as the second seed
behind Stanford. On the first day
of pool play, the Irates finished
2-0, beating Kansas 17-4, and
Cornell 17-15.
The following day, the de-
termined Irates seemed to have
had more trouble with the sti-
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZZA
Daily
Lunch Special
ALFREDO!
SPORTS
2 Slices 1
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OPiH DAILY
FOR LUNCH
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fling Louisiana heat than in con-
tinuing their domination of play.
They cruised through day two by
beating Santa Barbara 17-12, Wis-
consin 17-4 and Texas 17-5.
As day three began, only four
teams were left to battle it out for
the National Championship. The
semis began with the winners of
each pool, Stanford and ECU,
playing Santa Barbara and
Carlton College, respectively.
The top two seeds advanced eas-
ily and set up the much awaited
final.
The Irates came out very
business-like and snatched a 4-
0 lead, and with the patented
"Cell-block D the Irates never
relinquished the lead and went
on to outlast Stanford 20-17.
The trophies were awarded
after the finals. The Spirit
Award went to Stanford, The
Golden Dooger Award to Santa
Barbara and finally the Irates
received the hard-earned
Championship trophy.
enough to have a few people on
my side
Martin next plays Wayne
Ferreira, a 6-3, 6-7 (7-2), 6-4, 6-3
victor over Jonas Bjorkman.
"He just dictates every
chance he gets Agassi said of
Martin. "He'll take control of
the point. He serves big and has
incredible reach, and if the ball
is anywhere in his wheelhouse
it's going to come back pretty
hard
In the other men's matches,
Christian Bergstrom beat Bryan
Shelton, 3-6,6-3,3-6,6-3,10-8 to
set up a quarterfinal match
against three-time champion
Boris Becker or Andrei
Medvedev, whose match was
suspended by darkness at 1-1 in
the fifth set. Guy Forget beat
Britain's Jeremy Bates, 2-6, 6-1,
6-3, 6-1, to play No. 4 Goran
Ivanisevic, a 7-6 (7-3), 7-6 (8-6),
4-6, 6-2 winner against
Alexander Volkov.
Navratilova took apart Hel-
ena Sukova, 6-1, 6-2, and has
now reached at least the quar-
ters for the 20th consecutive year.
Standing in Navratilova's
wav is Jana Novotna, who won
their semifinal match in straight
sets last year. Novotna beat
Naoko Sawamatsu, 6-3, 6-3, in
the fourth round.
"I'm sure I'll be thinking
about what happened last
year said Navratilova. "I'm
not sure I even played her since
then. It's going to be tactical as
well as emotional, but I think
the emotional part I'm pretty
much on top of. I need to be
more clear about how to play
her
"I felt pretty confident
Davenport said. "It's hard for
the other person to attack and
to come in, or to really get me
on the run. If I could keep her
deep behind the court and hit
my shots, I would be OK. About
halfway through practice yes-
terday, I really started to get
the feel of hitting the ball and
coming in and really moving
through my shots, which I
hadn't been doing in a little
while. All of a sudden I just felt
really good again yesterday
that I was going to come in and
play aggressive
SUMMER' 'si�'
J
III I 4 lt� II
MIIMllVSM'S.
tclllks.
vliii Is. i HH U
IIIM 4 114 III trill.
tiiiiittM ii Village
HA.il. 1C-6
Thurs 10-8
We have vm I Sandals.
7S� ios�
KINST
ECU SPECIAL
THIRSTY THURSDAY
75c for al! 12 oz. beverages
� ����� �
$1.00
ADMISSION!
wth this coupon �
1-800-3345467
INDIANS
-v$-
Salem Buccaneers
7pm
ECffl Salem Buccaneers
BSD 3pm
QSQ1 Salem Buccaneers
Q3Q 7pm
Fireworks After The Game
WJJlLM Frederick Keys
IDH 7pm
THUR
JU17
FM
JUL8
Frederick Keys
7pm
Frederick Keys
7pm
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
NOTICE
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
TELEPHONE NUMBER CHANGE
"WE ARE CHANGING TO SERVE YOU BETTER"
PHONE NUMBER CHANGE
931 TO 328
757 TO 328
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S EAST CAMPUS IS SCHEDULED TO CHANGE THE
TELEPHONE PREFIX (1ST 3 NUMBERS) FROM 931 FOR THE RESIDENT HALLS
AND 757 FOR THE STAFF AND FACULTY TO 328. ONLY THE PREFIX WILL BE CHANGED.
THE LAST FOUR DIGITS OF THE TELEPHONE NUMBERS WILL REMAIN THE SAME.
THIS CHANGE IS SCHEDULED TO OCCUR ON JULY 1,1994 TO C0INCIDEWITH THE
PUBLICATION OF THE NEW TELEPHONE DIRECTORY.
VOICE INTERUPT WILL BE PLACED ON THE OLD 931 & 757 TELEPHONE 'S
ADVISING CALLERS OF THE NUMBER CHANGE WITH THE ANNOUNCEMENT;
"THE NUMBER YOU HAVE DIALED (757-XXXX OR 931-XXXX) HAS BEEN CHANGED T0328-XXXX
VOICE INTERUPT WILL REMAIN IN PLACE UNTIL OCTOBER 1,1995 AT WHICH TIME THE VOICE
INTERUPT WILL BE DROPPED k THE CHANGE PROCESS WILL BE COMPLETE.
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CALL CAMPUS OPERATOR AT
757-6131
WilJlJWilJJlJ
Sports '
Pad
Sports Pad
WED
NIGHT
$1 NIGHT
Sharley's
50 Drafts
Sharky's Only - Busch
$1 Domestics
$3 Cover for All
$1.50 HIGHBALLS
FREE COVER TILL 10:00 PM
18 & OVER
EVERY THURSDAY
BLOCK PfiRTY
FREE COVER TILL 9:00 PM
Come into any club entrance
Thursday and then feel free to roam from club to club!
FREE MEMBERSHIPS
Dollar Nite
All Bars
MNC�- BILLIARDS- ROCK N' ROLL
DOWNTOWN
rVLrVLrLrLrLrLrrrL
�a





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Title
The East Carolinian, June 29, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 29, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1016
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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