The East Carolinian, June 15, 1994







�. � ��: ��

Sports
The Heat Is On!
As first summer session winds
down, so does intramural
basketball and softball. See
story on page 7.
Lifestyle
Kindread Soul to Phunk Attic
Kindread Soul, one of
Columbia, South Carolina's
hottest new bands, will
deliver their fusion of
reggae and "phunk" at the
Attic this Saturday. Page 5. j

!
Today
Tomorrow

The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 32333
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 15,1994
8 Pages
NCSU beats ECU in fundraising
Jason Williams
News Editor
While ECU students ante up
$40 more in new student fees for
the renovation of Minges Coli-
seum, students at N.C. State will
get a new basketball arena free of
charge. The State of North Caro-
lina, the City of RaleighWake
Countvand the Student Aid Foun-
dation are providing the funds
for a 23,000 seat complex to be
built near Carter-Finley Stadium.
Seventv dollars out of the
total of S793 in student fees will
go toward the renovation of
Minges, said Dave Bishop, comp-
troller at ECU. The Board of Gov-
ernors approved an increase of
$97 in student fees, of which $40
will go to Minges.
Bishop said the project will
cost SI 1.4 million in all, with S8.9
million coming from student fees.
The remaining $2.5 million will
come from the state.
"The $8.9 million will be
funded by a bond sale that took
place at the Board of Governors
meeting last week Bishop said.
"The money will be paid back
over the period of 15 years to the
tune of about $1 million a year.
Through the work of our Board of
Trustees, we were able to get the
state to kick in some of the money
NCSU's arena will cost an
estimated $70 million and is part
of a joint venture between the
state, the city and the university,
said Kenny Forrest, NCSU's fa-
cilities director. "It's going to be a
multipurpose facility along the
same design as the Charlotte Coli-
seum he said.
Soldiers'
crypt
found
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
ECU faculty members re-
cently joined a team of scientists
and humanists who uncovered
a crypt of Confederate soldiers.
The crypt, located in New Bern,
was opened bv Public Works on
April 15.
John Patterson, a mem-
ber of the ECU Communication
department, led the group.
Eventually, the research from
the investigations may be used
in an article in theNorf; Carolina
Literary Review (NCLR).
"We are very interested in
what's found out from it said
Alex Albright, editor of NCLR.
"It's an ongoing project
The crypt is 60 feet long
and contains bodies of soldiers
who were killed in the Battle of
New Bern, N.C. on March 14,
1862. A stone monument was
dedicated in 1885 to the Confed-
erate dead. Four slate slabs, each
weighing a ton, seal the tomb.
Patsy Collier, a secretary
in the English department, was
a member of the team. Collier
said the skeletons did not look
like she had expected.
"It was very interesting �
a little eerie at first when getting
used to seeing the skeletons
Collier said. "The skeletons were
not white, they were a clay- look-
ing color. We had to go down a
12-foot ladder
See DIG page 2
Photo by Harold Wise
This is a picture of Minges Coliseum in the middle of construction. If ECU had to rely on state funds for this
construction project, what you see here is as far as it would get.
"The city and the county
have given us a third, the state
will give us a third and the uni-
versity will come up with a third
Forrest said.
He said as far as he knew,
student fees were not going to
fund the construction project.
"The burden of coming up
with our third will fall on the Stu-
dent Aid Foundation Forrest
said. "We are still waiting on the
state to come up with their third,
and I believe the city and county
are getting a lot of their money
from the hotelrestaurant tax
The structure, which will
replace Reynolds Coliseum as
home to NCSU's basketball team,
should be completed by mid-Oc-
tober, Forrest said. State will also
renovate Carter-FinJey Stadium
at a later date.
Charles Bloom, ECU'S
Sports Information Director, said
the Minges construction is on
schedule and the renovation will
improve the racility.
"They're working on it ev-
ery day Bloom said. "The build-
ing is looking like a complete shell.
They are taking everything out
and putting all new stuff back in
Bloom said the new coli-
seum will gain 1,000 seats, for a
total of 7,500 theater-type seats, a
new scoreboard, new flooring,
new locker rooms, a new conces-
sion area, a new pressroom, addi-
tional restrooms and air condi-
tioning. "The entire building will
take on a modern look
Legislators to convene at ECU
Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
During the next four weeks,
the ECU Rural Education Institute
will operate the 1994 Eastern Leg-
islators' School for Youth Leader-
ship Development Program for 292
junior and senior high school stu-
dents.
"Students from the eastern
51 counties in North Carolina were
invited to attend said Katee
Tully, director of the ECU Legisla-
tors' program, "and were nomi-
nated by their school systems as
students who demonstrated lead-
ership potential
Eighth and ninth grade stu-
dents will attend the program for
two weeks from June 19 to July 1.
Rising tenth, eleventh, and twelfth
grade students will attend the sec-
ond session from July 3 to Julv 15.
The students will reside in
Greene Residence Hall and will
have their workshop classes in the
General Classroom Building. All
of the students' expenses, except
transportation to and from cam-
pus, will be paid for by scholar-
ships funded by the North Caro-
lina General Assembly.
Tully said in 1986 the leader-
ship program was started by key
eastern North Carolina legislators
such as Ed Warren, who was a
N.C. State Representative at the
time and is now a N.C. State Sena-
tor and Howard Chapin, now a
retired N.C. State Representative.
Locally CharlesCoble, ECU's dean
of the School of Education, also
pushed for the program. This will
be the program's ninth year.
The program was started be-
cause "the feeling was that we
needed to cultivate leadership in
rural counties of North Carolina
and we needed to start the process
with young people Tully said.
"The idea is that the students will
return to their communities and
schools as agents for change
The program caters to rural
students who do not have the op-
portunities to be involved with the
gifted and talented programs in
their respective schools.
"Confident and strong lead-
ers are not necessarily tied into
academic performance Tully
said. "Rural students didn't have
the opportunities. The idea is to do
programming for them and make
more broad based leadership de-
velopment
During the two-week ses-
sions, students learn by using the
fundamental strategies of coopera-
tiveteam-oriented learning.
"Thisyear'sprogram is based
on the book by Stephen R. Covev,
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
People Tully said. Among the
seven habits are "Be pro active"
and "Put First things First
Tullv said that the program
includes special events such as the
See LEGISLATURE page 2
First orientation
began Sunday
d Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
Monday night, Dean of
Students Ronald Speier and
SGA President Ian Eastman
addressed incoming fresh-
men on similar issues, yet
each took a different ap-
proach warning the future
students about the draw-
backs of partying.
The first of five orien-
tation sessions opened Sun-
day to a group of nearly 450
students. The students spent
Monday being tested in
mathematics and English
writing skills, and other op-
tional subjects. Some of these
students will place out of
Algebra 1065, others will be
required to take a math lab
prior to taking Algebra.
Later Monday night,
the students gathered in
Mendenhall for a welcom-
ing address by Al Matthews,
vice chancellor for student
life.
"This is an important
meeting for you because we
are going to talk about prior
warnings Matthews said.
"What this does is take away
from the 1 did not know'
when the time comes
Matthews discussed
civility in relation to the
students. He said the new
students have the right of
access to the university,
as well as responsibility
to the university.
"ECU has very little
tolerance for the abuse of
alcohol Matthews said.
"Possession of weapons
is not tolerated. Some of
vou are sexually active. It
is not the role of the uni-
versity to judge
Matthews also en-
couraged men to be cau-
tious of situations that
could result in date rape
accusations. He ended his
speech by introducing
SGA President Ian
Eastman.
Eastman also wel-
comed the new students
to ECU and spoke on the
advantages and disad-
vantages of partying.
Eastman cited his own
academic career as an ex-
ample that excessive par-
tying can lead to a quick
declination of their GPAs.
"Your main objec-
tive when coming to ECU
See ORIENTATION page 2
Photo by Leslie Petty
Incoming freshmen have descended on campus for the first
of six orientations. Don't they look excited?
Federal judge rules Exxon may be liable for damages in Valdez oil spill
ANCHORAGE, Alaska
(AP) � A federal jury has opened
the way for victims of the Exxon
Valdez disaster to seek $15 billion
in punitive damages from Exxon
Corp. and skipper Joseph
Hazel wood, ruling that their reck-
lessness led to the nation's worst
oil sl .11.
he more than 10,000 fisher-
men, Alaska natives and prop-
erty owners who are suing claim
that Hazelwood was drunk the
night of the spill and that Exxon
had known about his drinking for
years and left him in command
anyway.
The jury deliberated for
more than four davs before find-
ing recklessness a necessary step
in the plaintiffs' attempt to collect
punitive damages for the 11-mil-
lion-gallon spill that blackened
Prince William Sound in 1989. The
jury also said Monday that
Hazelwood acted negligently.
The 12 jurors will decide
how much to award in damages
during the next phase of the case,
expected to begin next month.
"It's my fervent hope the
punitives are set at a level that
wil'notbejustadropinthebucket
for Exxon said Dome
Hawxhurst, executive director of
the 300-member Cordova District
Fishermen United. "Exxon effec-
tively ruined our community, and
I don't want to see that happen to
other communities
Theplaintiffsareseeking$15
billion in punitive damages and
about $1.5 billion in compensa-
tory damages. Punitive damages
are meant to punish and deter
wrongdoing. Compensatory
damages cover actual losses.
"Exxon still thinks it's above
the law said Brian O'Neill, the
plaintiffs' lawyer. "You need to
take a substantial bite out of their
b utt before you can change them
He and his legal team swept
each other up in a silent, tearful
hug after hearing the verdict.
Exxon stock fell $2,625 after
the verdict, closing at $59.50.
Hazelwood refused to an-
swer questions. One of his law-
yers, Thomas Russo, said the
former tanker captain will keep
trving to clear his name.
At Exxon's Texas headquar-
ters, Chairman Lee Raymond
apologized to the victims and said
the company has been punished
enough. The compart) has said
the spill has cost it more than $3
billion.
The plaintiffs contest that
total, saying it includes legal, pub-
lic relations and other expenses
not directly tied to the cleanup.
Defense lawyers admitted
1 lazelwood had a tew drinks be-
fore sailing, but said alcohol had
nothing to do w ith the wreck. In
1990, he was found innocent of
operating his ship under the in-
fluence of alcohol, but was con-
victed of the negligent discharge
of oil.
The defense blamed the
grounding on third mate Greg
c ousins.savmg he railed tocarry
out i simple turn Hazelwood
ordered before leaving the
tanker's bridge to tend to other
business. Cousins was at a loss
to explain why he failed to ex-
ecute the turn.
Russo and Exxon lawyer
Patrick I ynch s.iui an appeal is
possible, but it can't ho tiled until
tiio entire trial i over.






2 The East Carolinian
June 15,1994
June 6
Willis Building � A staff member reported damage to one of
the north windows of the Willis Building.
Christenbury Gym � A student reported the attempted break-
ing and entering of a locker in the men's locker room in
Christenbury Gym.
June 7
Flanagan Sylvan Amphitheater � An officer discovered an
intoxicated subject passed out in the Flanagan Sylvan Amphi-
theater. It was discovered that the Pitt County Sheriff's Depart-
ment had warrants on this subject.
Whichard �A Housekeeping supervisor reported the acciden-
tal breaking of a window in a door in the Whichard Building.
Allied Health �Officers responded to the area of Allied Health
after a report of a woman screaming at Stratford Arms Apart-
ments.
June 8
Outpatient Center � An employee reported three potted
plants on the west side of the Outpatient Center were creating
a traffic hazard.
Print Shop � An officer responded to the Print Shop to assist
with an injured employee.
College Hill Drive � A student reported the breaking and
entering of his vehicle parked in the big commuter parking lot
on College Hill Drive. A cassette recorder and headphones were
taken from the vehicle.
June 10
Spilman � A non-student was stopped east of Spilman for
speeding. The non-student was arrested for being in possession
of a loaded handgun.
June 11
Bunting Field �An officer discovered damage to a post in the
shot-put area of Bunting Field.
June 12
Eppes Middle School �Students were selling T-shirts at Eppes
Compiled by Stephanie Lasstter. Taken from official ECU
Public Safety crime reports.
U.S. gains support in Korean dispute
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) �
The United States, South Korea and
Japan � the prime backers of sanc-
tions against North Korea over its
nuclear program�all voiced strong
concern yesterday over the North's
announcement it would pull out of
the U.N. nuclear watchdog group.
The North's plan to quit the
International Atomic Energy
Agencv, announced by the North's
official news agency late Monday,
would make it virtually impossible
to check whether North Korea is
complying with an international
nuclear arms-control pact it signed
in 1985.
President Clinton told Japa-
nese Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata
DIG
by telephone yesterday that the
North's move, if confirmed, would
make the situation much more seri-
ous, Japan's foreign ministry said.
The IAEA, based in Vienna,
said yesterday that North Korea
had not officially communicated its
intention to withdraw from the 120-
member organization.
Agency spokesman David
Kyd said the two IAEA inspectors
at the North's main nuclear com-
plex at Yongbyon had not been
asked to leave.
Top South Korean security of-
ficials met in emergency session for
two hours yesterday to discuss the
North's announcement, which
heightened tensions on the Korean
Continued from page 1
peninsula. The Koreas' 2 million
troops are already on high alert.
After the meeting, Deputy
Prime Minister Lee Hong-koo said
the North's move would only
strengthen international resolve to
seek U.N. sanctions, a process he
predicted would take two or three
weeks.
South Korean Foreign Minis-
ter Han Sung-joo said the prospects
for dialogue with the North had
diminished.
"We have now run into a criti-
cal juncture where decisive and firm
measures are necessary he said.
Did you know
that
Henuningway
wrote for TEC?
You can, too.
Come down to
the Student
Pubs Bldg. and
talk to Jason or
Stephanie.
Collier said the dig lasted from
7:30a.m. until noon on April 15. She
said a Tryon Palace historian who
accompanied the group told the
group tales about the time period
and about the New Bern area.
The crypt has been opened
approximately once a year, since
1975, to moderate conditions.
Besides nearly 60 skeletons
which lie in the tomb, there are also
burtons, oyster shells, shoe parts,
coffin handles and a child's marble.
"Despite the obvious vandal-
ism, the skeletons are in remark-
ably good condition said David
Phelps, an anthropologv professor
at ECU.
Other team members were
John Byrd (Anthropology), Bertie
Fearing and Seiina Pate (English),
David Dennard (History) and Arts
and Sciences Dean Keats Sparrow.
A forensic pathologist, a physician
and an Episcopal clergyman also
joined the group.
LEGISLATURE
Continued from page 1
Global Dinner, which allows stu-
dents to encounter what people eat
in the Third World. The students
also promise to fast until the next
day. Another event is the Chal-
lenge Days, which are outdoor ac-
tivities that will develop thinking
and communication skills, team
work building, and creativity.
During the first week of the
program, the students will leam
and work on skills like the seven
habits, then in the second week
they will apply the skills to a group
project. This year the group project
topic will be "Designing Safe
ORIENTATION
School
"I'm looking forward to
having fun, meeting a lot of
people, and enjoying myself
said Sean Mode, a rising eighth
grader at J.R. Whitfield.
The program tries to de-
velop diverse young people into
future North Carolina leaders.
"I think that leadership in
North Carolina is important and
we have such a large sector
Tully said. "And if meaningful
change is going to come to the
state, it has to come from all di-
mensions, urban and rural
Continued from page 1
is to get your degree and gradu-
ate Eastman said.
Eastman told the incom-
ing freshmen to save partying
for the weekend because their
GPAs will reflect their social
lives.
Dean Speier also warned the
new students about alcohol con-
sumption. Speier said alcohol is
the drug of choice on ECU's cam-
pus. Some of the orientation stu-
dents laughed, but Speier did not
intend for the comment to be hu-
morous.
"Alcohol is the number one
problem we confront on our cam-
pus Speier said.
He said students who abuse
alcohol also abuse their room-
mates, public safety officers and
their residence halls. Other drunk
students have found themselves
passed out in the middle of Fifth
Street.
"Students who are problems
tonight will be referred to my of-
fice and registered for an alcohol
awareness program Speier said.
Speier said many parents of
incoming freshmen have had
questions concerning the safety of
their sons and daughters.
"I think orientation is
handled real well said one par-
ent. "It seems as though the ori-
entation staff has anticipated all
of our questions, and I appreciate
people being there for other ques-
tions
Director of Orientation
David Emmerling compared com-
ing to college to an Oreo cookie.
He described the cookie part of
the Oreo as the transition from
leaving home and the transition
from leaving college to enter the
work force. Emmerling said the
creme filling represents the best
years of our lives where we have
the opportunity to grow academi-
cally.
Some new students eagerly
anticipated their arrival as offi-
cial ECU students in the fall.
" I think ECU is a good place
to be with a lot of things to do
said Clevie Lancaster, a Green-
ville resident and incoming resi-
dent, "it is especially good for
people coming from out of town
and out of state. It is easy to
adjust to
Another incoming fresh-
man, apparently exasperated
from a long day of orientation
activities, said: "I just want to go
home
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Jll�"
The East Carolinian
June 15, 1994
Opinion
Page 3
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staj'Illustrator
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
recycled is
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson. Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders. Typesetter
Lisa Sessoms. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Sec re tan'
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU communitysince 1925, The East Carolinian publishes !2.000copiesevery Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Flag day too often ignored, forgotten!
Yesterday, America celebrated its third
major patriotic holiday in as many weeks.
However, this one received almost no
coverage compared to both Memorial Day
and the 50th anniversary of D-Day.
We are speaking, of course, of Flag Day.
Unfortunately, few are even aware of the
existence of this holiday, and too often those
who are aware, regard the day as some sort
of joke.
This attitude merely reflects the cur-
rent societal trend to regard American insti-
tutions with scorn, something which needs
to be combated at all costs. This tendency,
like the collective historical amnesia from
which our generation suffers is causing
many to hold cheap the freedoms which we
all hold dear.
America is not a perfect country. Just
check this page every week and you will be
told exactly what is wrong, and how it can
be fixed. But all the faults do not detract
from the fact that this is the greatest country
on Earth.
So before you say that Flag Day is just
another stupid holiday, stop to consider just
how important symbols and rituals are in
providing cohesion for nations. One thing
that we all share, regardless of race, etc is
the flag and what it symbolizes.


wM&dmUmmmMWMli
'he dp's.anddon'tsofdisplaying the flag of the United States of America
Never let the flag tdlich the ground;
Never use the flag as a decoration or a tablecloth.
Never hang the flag in a window or on a door.
Fly the flag only during daylight hours.
Always raise the flag as quickly as possible; lower itasslowiy as possible.
When flying the flag with other flags remember:
. The. flag must be as large as the-other flag(s).
The flag must never be flown below the other flag(s).
Tf not flown'above the other flagfs), then the flag
should beat the head of the cohimn, or at its own extreme right.
By Laura Wright
On the job harassment hits too close to home
Weekend before last, my sister
graduated from high school. I went
home to see her walk across the
stage and get her diploma. Much
to my surprise, I nearly cried. I
guess that the combination of pride
that I felt for her, the
overwhelming sound of "Pomp
and Circumstance" and the
realization that I am older than I
ever thought I would be, almost
made me break down
Then I got a grip.
The night ������
before her
graduation, my
sister told me that
she had quit her
job. She had
worked at a cookie
shop for several
months and had
really liked it, so I
was surprised that
she had quit. She
had planned to
work there until mhmmmmm
she goes away to college this fall.
After she had been working
for several months, her boss, whom
we'll call Mr. Jerk (for reasons that
I hope will become apparent),
hired a new employee whom we'll
call Beavis (need I say more?).
Beavis, a 17-year-old high school
drop out, made several passes at
my sister, whom we'll call Lee
Ann (because that's her name).
Lee Ann was unresponsive, not
because Beavis had a girlfriend,
which he did, but because she
simply wasn't interested, and also
because she has some taste.
Apparently, after it became
obvious to Beavis that Lee Ann
wasn't biting, so to speak, he
became overtly hostile to her. She
said she was uncomfortable
around him and didn't want to
work with him if no one else was
in the shop. When his friends came
by to visit, he made sexual
comments about Lee Ann in order
to intimidate her.
Once, he had a friend call my
sister and leave a frightening
message on her answering
machine. He threatened her with
physical violence and called her
names that she was too
embarrassed to repeat to my
parents.
I have always hated the
attitude that it's easier
to pretend that it didn't
happen. Now I feel a
little more
thetic to that
thinking.
sympa-
way of
After
this
incident,
Lee Ann
told Mr. Jerk
that she was
quitting and
she
explained
why. Mr.
Jerk, in an
attempt to
be fair,
asked Lee
Ann to come in and sit down with
him and Beavis, to see if they
couldn't work it out. Lee Ann,
afraid at this point for her safety,
refused, but sent the tape-recorded
message to her boss so that he
could hear it.
Mr. Jerk spoke to Beavis about
the incident, and my sister was
not present to hear what was said.
Afterwards, Mr. Jerk called her
and told her that he was very sorry
that Lee Ann felt that she had to
quit, that Beavis was only kidding
and that she was overreacting.
So, I'm telling this story for
Lee Ann and I'm telling it because
it makes me furious. I guess that
it's easy to form rational opinions
aboutcontroverstal topics, it'seasy
to defend your point of view, it's
easy to be objective, as long as you
are an outside observer. When
something like such blatant
harassment touches someone you
know, objectivity goes out the
window. Rational opinions
become emotional responses. For
example, I was alw ays against the
death penalty until someone I
knew was murdered.
As for what happened to my
sister, after she quit, she let the
situation drop. My parents
encouraged her to leave it alone-
yes, she probably had a case if she
wanted to pursue it, but who
knows what this guy might do to
her if she chose to press charges.
Yes, she might have been able to
get him fired, at least, but who
knows how he might enact his
revenge? My family's philosophy
seemed to be that since she really
didn't need the job anyway, and
since she would have had to quit
in August, it was easier just to
leave the situation alone. Why stir
up trouble?
In the past, it has always made
me angry when women don't try
to defend themselves after they
are threatened or attacked. I have
always hated the attitude that it's
easier to pretend that it didn't
happen. Now that my sister is in
this situation, I feel a little more
sympathetic to that way of
thinking � but I'm all the more
aware of how unfair things are.
I don't care if Beavis needs his
job to make a living, he doesn't
deserve to have it after what he
did. I don't care how
unhumanitarian I may sound, but
I've been dreaming up ways of
getting even and most of them
involve massive amounts of cookie
dough and a very hot oven. Like I
said, reason can easily be over
taken by emotional irrationality.
By Jason Williams
Videotaping of executions should be allowed
Barring a last minute stay of
execution, the state of North
Carolina will have executed
convicted murderer David
Lawson early this morning.
Lawson was sentenced to death in
1980 for killing Wayne Shinn of
Concord during a break-in at
Shinn's residence. Lawson will die
in the gas chamber, the first North
Carolinian to do so in 33 years.
I don't like the death penalty.
I think that it is barbaric and
uncivilized. I think it is cruel and
inhumane. I think that it is unfairly
applied, i.e those who must rely
on court-appointed attorneys, as
well as blacks, are
disproportionately sentenced to
death. Finally, I think it doesn't
work. Since reinstituting the
penalty in the mid-1970s, the U.S.
has experienced a virtually
unchanged crime rate, and a slight
rise in violent crime.
Quite apart from how I feel
about the death penalty, however,
I think that the state should fulfill
Lawson's request to have his
execution videotaped. Originally,
he wanted talk show host Phil
Donahue to broadcast his
execution on his television show;
now Lawson said he would like
for the Department of Corrections
to tape the event to use as a
deterrent.
The case in favor of taping
the execution is convincing, both
for supporters and opponents of
capital punishment. Supporters,
who continue to believe that the
penalty deters other violent
crimes, say executions should be
public in order to maximize the
deterring effect. 'Hang 'em on the
courthouse steps they say.
Opponents say that citizens
should see exactly what they are
acquiescing to when thy go along
with the death penalty. Viewing
the brutality of the punishment,
they reason, will cause people to
change their minds about capital
punishment.
I don't particularly believe
either of those arguments, but they
make their points. I doubt the man
who just caught his wife in bed
with another guy is going to stop
and think about the consequences
of shooting the both of them (i.e
being sentenced to death), even if
he watched David Lawson die on
T.V. the previous day, but the
punishment is supposed to deter,
and certainly it can't accomplish
that if no one ever sees it.
Likewise, I don't think North
Carolinians, or Americans, would
be repulsed enough to condemn
capital punishment after viewing
an actual execution. We have
become desensitized to violence,
and we have enough of the
vigilantism � the frontier code of
justice � left in us to approve of
the "hang 'em high" mentality.
But going back to the fairness
issue, I think that it is only fair, if
the state of North Carolina is going
to kill someone, to allow me, as a
tax-paying citizen of North
Carolina, to see what I had a hand
in doing. I think that I, or anyone
else, ought to be able to witness an
execution, regardless of whether
the condemned wants me to or
not.
The arguments against
televising the execution are weak.
Some claim that children might
see it, and that would somehow
be harmful. If capital punishment
is so abhorrent that we can't let
our children watch it, should we,
as supposedly rational adults, be
participating in the activity at all?
Others say televising the
execution would cheapen it as a
punishment, and accuse Donahue
and others of trying to make a fast
buck. Bull. A stationary camera
positioned infrontof thechamber,
without an announcer or similar
theatrics, would capture the real-
life (and death) image of capital
punishment.
I can watch my state
legislature at work. I can tour the
Governor's mansion, and I can
even tour a prison. I think I have
every right to at least look at the
man that I am killing.
By Patrick Hinson
U.S. interests ill-served by current Haiti policy
Hey, Bill, what are you doin'
pal? What in the world are we
doing in Haiti? I don't get it. I
don't get a number of things. Why
are we putting even more
economic sanctions on Haiti, and
why does it look more and more
like we're going to make a military
move on that place? What purpose
will either of those things serve
the U.S or us as U.S. citizens?
Just what exactly are our
motives in Haiti, and why? I don't
know, but here's how it looks to
me.
Are we making this move
because of the lack of human rights
in that tiny country? For God's
sake, if that is our motive then
we'd better beef up our military,
because we're either going to have
to muscle-in on every country in
the world that treats their subjects
like trash (which is a lot of them),
or we're going to look like a real
tyrant to the rest of the world, only
beating up on those countries that
are (much) smaller than us, like
Panama for instance. What about
China, Bosnia, Rwanda, Somalia
and wherever else people are being
mistreated? Their human rights
records aren't exactly glowing, but
you don't see us getting all excited
about going there. The military's
excited about the possibility of
going to Haiti because Haiti's an
easy game.
Are we pressing them now
because they will not allow a
democratic government? So what?
What business is it of ours what
kind of government they (or
anyone else, for that matter) wish
to allow? What business is it of
ours how they wish to treat their
people, or run their country?
Haven't we got enough problems
in our own country today, without
having to think about spending
more money just to run an exercise
for our huge war machine? Now,
that's really what it kind of looks
like to me; the pentagon needs to
run the war machine so that the
government won't forget how
important it is, and won't stop
spending the billions of dollars
that go into high level pockets and
wasted bullets.
I feel sorry for the people of
Haiti. I feel sorry that so many of
them feel that they have so little to
lose that they take just the shirts
on their backs and their children,
pack them into little boats, and
head for the open sea, toward
America, some mythical land
where it's said people can create
their own futures, with just hard
work and a dream. That must
sound unbelievably tasty to people
who are persecuted just for being
poor, who can look forward to
working hard all their lives, and
having nothing to show for it but
a tin shack and an empty stomach.
I do feel sorry for those people,
but we've got problems here, real
problems. We've got serious
crime, drugs, educational, welfare,
poverty, unemployment and
whatever else kinds of problems
here. We need some serious
reforms in this country. Some
serious domestic problems are
literally tearing thiscountry down.
That is where our focus should be
now, not on some Caribbean
vacation spot that is being ruled
by a greedy, cheap, third world
military dictatorship.
Who are the economic
sanctions on Haiti really
punishing? The evil little
government that has all the money
and power, holding the country in
it's vise grip; or the already
starving people, who have no
power and no access to food? Will
our starving them even more now
really motivate them to overthrow
their current leaders, and install
the one we like? I find that
doubtful. I care about them
because, like everyone else, we
should care and should extend
aid to those who have less thnn we
have. I just think that this is
somewhat useless, that what we
may be getting ready to do in Haiti
is somewhat of a joke, but it won't
be funny if even one American
son or daughter catches a bullet
over there, because it's not worth
it. ;
The huge, dark shadow of a
distant empire looms over the
small, obscure little country of
Haiti right now, while its starving
people take to canoes and rafts
and risk their lives to make it to
this country. Are we in danger of
invasion from Haiti? Will they
launch missiles at us any time
soon? Is there any way they can
make money off of us, other than
from the drug trade? (Now, let's
face it, if people in high places
weren't making money off of the
import of drugs to the U.S would
we have as much of a problem?).
No. We should leave Haiti alone
and worry about our own
business.
r





-The East Carolinian-
Page 4
Classifieds
June 15, 1994
For Rent
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
2 bedroom, energy-efficient mobile
home. Private bath; washer and
dryer, cable TV, furnished. 4 miles
from campus.185.00 per month
plus 12 utilities. CaU 321-3903.
K For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: responsible, non-
smoker for own room in apartment
close to campus.245month and
12 utilities. Call anytime758-9373.
ROOMMATE: Male or female.
Wilson Acres,235month,235
deposit, Pets OK wdeposit. Pri-
vate bedroom. Pool, dishwasher,
on site laundry, etc. Lots of fun. Call
Jenk at 830-6765.
TWO STORY CHERRY OAKS
HOUSE, large lot, fenced-in back
yard, fire place, 3 bedrooms, 212
baths, hot tub, storage bam avail-
able, July 15.800.00 month, 321-
3478.
FEMALEROOMMATENEEDED
lMMEDIATELY,non-smokerpre-
ferred to share 2 brm. apt. at
WyndhamCourt.198 plus utili-
ties and phone. Call 758-3057.
CHRISTIAN, WHITE FEMALE
needed before July 1st at Carriage
House Apartments for170.00 a
month plus 12 utilities and phone.
Call 756-7532 after 5 p.m ask for
Jeannie.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Wesley
Commons, 6 blocks from ECU,
washer and dryer,200.00 and 1
3 utilities, call Dave at 830-4030.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
FALL to share 3 bedroom house
located in a quiet neighborhood
near the hospital. Must be a serious
student and non-smoker.260.00
rent month includes utilities and
cable TV. If interested call Harold
after 4:00 p.m. at 830-5160.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for July 1 or Aug. 1, seri-
ous and non-smoker, close to cam-
pus,19250 a month and 12
utilities.Call758-1479,askforJenny.
HOUSEMATE WANTED. $
150.00 a month and 14 utilities,
cable, phone, washerdryer hook
ups. Pets OK. Call 752-5405.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
for apartment 1 2 block from Art
Bldg 3 blocks from downtown, 2
blocks from Supermarket. Starting
in August. Call 757-1947.
AUGUST 1 2 bedroom duplex, $
250.00. Small pets OK. Or 3 bed-
room duplex,500.00, call 752-
135,Homelocators.
STUDENTS OK! Huge, 5 bed-
room, 2 baths duplex,500.00, call
752-1375, Homelocators.
LOOKIN' GOOD ! 1 bedroom
loft,210.00. Small pets OK, or 1
bedroom garage apartment, $
300.00,caU752-1375,Homelocators.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Pre-
ferred male student to share a two
bedroom and two bathroom mo-
bile home at Greystone Mobile
Home Park. Only175.00 anu 12
utiuties.lfmterested,callScottTan-
ner at 321-0404.
El Help Wanted
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN
SALES. Earn good money with
flexible hours and gain valuable
business experience. Call Bonnie
at 355-7700 for more information
and possible interview.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING- Earn
up to2,000mo. on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies,
World travel. Summer & Full-time
employment available, No expe-
rience necessary. For information,
call 1-206-634-0468, ext. C5362.
NATIONAL PARK SUMMER
JOBS - Tour guide, dude ranch,
hostess), instructor, lifeguard,
hotel staff, trail maintenance,
firefighter, volunteer & govern-
ment positions available. Excel-
lent benefits bonuses! Apply
now for best positions. Call: 1-
206-545-4804 ext. N5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 1-800-436-4365,
Ext.P-3712.
SUMMER RESORT JOBS- Earn
to12hr. plus tips. Locations
include: Hawaii, Florida, Rocky
Mountains, Alaska, New England,
etc. Fordetailscall: 1-800-807-5950
ext. R5362.
For Sale
ENT SEIZE1
CARS, Trucks, Boats, 4-Wheel-
ers, Motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Nationwide auction list-
ings available now. Call 1-800-
436-4363, Ext. C-5999.
MOPEDS, Honda PA 50, only
600 miles,550.00. Puch, 2000
miles,400.00, excellent condi-
tion, 100 MPG, 30 MPH, No
license required. 756-9133.
KENWOOD HOME SYSTEM:
Tuner, power amplifier (100W),
Stereo control amplifier, CD
player (4 pieces).250.00. Call
830-6035.
1986 GRAND WAGONEER,
LTD. All power options, leather
interior. Tow package, excellent
condition. Low mileage. $
7500.00. 321-2924.
LARGE HOME, EXCELLENT
NEIGHBORHOOD. Five bed-
rooms- all large wplenty of
closet space- 2 up 3 down. 3 full
baths, formal living and dining.
Family room and walk-in attic.
Full basement w recreation
room, second kitchen. Work-
shop w fenced backyard,
double carport. Near ECU and
shopping. Utilities and taxes
very reasonable.126,900. 321-
2924.
SCHWINN TRAVELER 18"
road bike, Shimano SIS Drive
Train, new tires. In Excellent
Condition. Call 758-1479, ask for
Jt ny.150.00.
TREK 460, Shimano 105 Drive
Train, two pairs of wheels- Ma-
trix, Araaya, Shimano clipless
pedals wshoes. Excellent con-
dition,450.00 neg. Call
Sheldon at 321-0695.
For Sale
low house on the right. Hours-
Friday, 1:00 - 6:00, Saturday,
7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
1981 HONDA ACCORD, 2S, 5
sp, ac.1050.00. Call 756-8930.
COMMODORE 64 COM-
PUTER, Monitor, Accessories,
Modem, Software, and refer-
ence books. Works as good as
new.350.00. Call 756-8930.
PENTAX CAMERA, K1000,
plus 135 mm� 2.5 macro tele-
photo lens, filters and close up
lenses, auto 2x teleconverter,
flash and tripod.230.00. Call
756-8930.
For Sale
Heroes Are Here Too
116 E. 5th Street
757-0948
Comics and Sportscards
10 OFF w Coupon
expires 8-31-94
SURFBOARD, 64" Freestyle
thruster, excellent condition.
150.00 Call 830-3842. Leave mes-
sage if not home.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
CASH $
FOR YOUR USED,
TOMMY H1LFIGER
WE ALSO WANT:
NICET SHOTS
SHOOTS
POL�
y
MUST SELL: 3 end tables, re-
cliner, table with 4 chairs. Good
condition. 830-2002.
ECU STUDENT POTTERY &
CRAFT SALE, 210 South Pitt
St downtown, take a left at Post
Office onto Pitt St it's th- yel-
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP) DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST.
SUMMER HRS: THURS-FRI 10-12, 1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF WACHOVIA
DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
fcH Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFI-
DENTIAL, PROFESSIONAL
ResumeSecretarial work. Spe-
cializing in Resume composition
wcover-letters stored on disk,
term papers, thesis, legal tran-
scriptions, general typing and
other secretarial duties. Word Per-
fect or Microsoft Word for Win-
dows software. Call today (8A-
5P-752-9959) (Evenings527-9133).
Announcements
LOOKING FOR AN
INTERESTING HU-
MANITIES COURSE?
Russian 2200, Russian lit-
erature of the 19th cen-
tury (Golden Age),
taught in English, will be
offered 2nd Summer Ses-
sion at 9:35. Authors read
and discussed are
Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and
others.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER:
TheNewmanCatholicStudent
Center invites thesummer stu-
dents and guests to worship
with them. Sunday Masses:
Nick OTime
11:30 a.m and 8:30 p.m (fol-
lowed by refreshments) at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
Street, right next to the East
end of the campus. Joinus also
on Wednesday evenings for
Mass at5:30 p.m. followedby
fellowship. For further infor-
mation call Fr. Paul Vaeth,
757-1991.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN IS
TAKING APPLICATIONS
by Dickens
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
Kemple-Boy Quiz
The enigmatic Kemple-Boy is about to:
There's only one answer, chump!
C. Hit the road to the HeroesCon'94 in
Charlotte.The three-day event will take
place on the 17-19 of June at the
Charlotte Int'l Trade Center.
Guests include:
Mike Allred, Mike Mignola, John
Romita, Alex Ross and Kurt Busiek,
and Pirate Comics alumni Jeff Parker
and Chris Kemple.
And tons, nay. HEAPS more!





The East Carolinian
June 15, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5
Rainbo Clothing
starts production
By Warren Sumner
Lifestyle Editor
ECU students with a de-
sire to dress uniquely have a
new fashion option to explore.
Rainbo Clothing is the project
of two college students in the
Greenville area, Troy
Yarborough and Suzanne
Clark.
The new fashion company
is locally operated and spe-
cializes in retro-style designs
and original looks.
Drawing from '70s influ-
ences, the Rainbo line at-
tempts to update past styles
to fit into cur-
She said prospective
Rainbo buyers can be assured
that the clothes they.buy from
the company will not be mass-
produced.
"We really try to be origi-
nal with every design Clark
said. "We're only going to
make a few of each design
and a lot of different colors so
we won't have to worry about
people wearing the same
thing
Yarborough said that
while the company is just now
getting off the ground, it has
already sparked interest in
other parts of the state.
"We've
rent times by
giving the
'70s look a
'90s twist.
Yarborough,
a Washing-
ton, D.C na
"There's no style
around here �
everyone just
sparked some
interest in
Greensboro
and Charlotte
already he
said.
Our
livesaid'that kind OfVeCirS the clothes have
an appeal in
that people
the inspira-
tion to be-
come a fash-
ion designer
was a result
of his years
living in
Greenville.
"I hate to
sound bad or ����
anything, but just being
around Greenville made me
want to do this he said.
"There's no style around here
� everyone just kind of wears
the same things. We'd like to
try to get away from that
Clark, a Raleigh, N.C na-
tive, is responsible for mak-
ing the clothes and has a hand
in their design.
She said that after making
clothes for six years, she has
heard enough compliments on
her work to interest her in her
current venture.
same things.
We'd like to try
to get away from
that
b9
Troy Yarborough
are able to get
the fashions
they see in
magazines,
whereas you
can't get
those any-
���PPPP'W where else
While Rainbo is primarily
making T-shirts for the sum-
mer, Yarborough said in the
fall the line will expand to
include sweaters, jackets and
other types of clothing.
The clothing is affordable,
with no article selling for over
$15, so it should fit well into a
student budget. The clothing
is also unisex, which should
give it an even wider appeal.
Samples and catalogs of
Rainbo products can be ob-
tained at BLT's in downtown
Greenville.

Columbians" to invade Attic
By Warren Sumner
Lifestyle Editor
Greenville will receive its sec-
ond import in less than a month
from Columbia, S.C. 's music scene
when the powerhouse "Phunk"
and reggae of Kindread Soul in-
vades the Attic this Saturday. Fel-
low "Columbians" Hootie and the
Blowfish already have performed
at the club and the S.C. contingent
of acts is becoming a force to be
reckoned with at ECU.
Kindread Soul, formed in its
present lineup just a year-and-a-
half ago, hasbecome one of South
Carolina'sbiggest groups. A staple
in the Five Points music scene (lo-
cated just outside the University
of South Carolina), the band has
been on the promotion trail and by
using sound business philoso-
phies, has garnered enough inter-
est and income to herald a CD
recording. Keep the Faith, the band's
debut release, already has sold
thousands of copies and accord-
ing to percussionist and manager
Stacy Enter, the album has gained
the interest of record labels.
"The CD is doing much better
than we expected he said. "We
released it April 13, and have al-
ready started to reorder more cop-
ies. Our intention with the CD
wasn't to make money or get air-
play, we just wanted to give our
fans something they could take
home and listen to. Fortunately, a
lot of extra benefits are coming
from the CD
Enter said that Kindread Soul,
in its early days, did not follow the
road of playing covers that a lot of
bands take.
"We have been original from
the get-go he said. "We play
maybe two or three covers now,
and the rest of the songs are our
own. Our fans just embraced our
music and are now to the point
where they know it by heart
Photo by Leslie Petty
Rainbo Clothing, owned and operated in Greenville, will soon
provide ECU students with an alternative for their fashion choices
ECU gets award
in "Gray" area
By Mark Brett
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
ECU's own Wellington B.
Gray Gallery recently won a pres-
tigious publications award. The
Gray Gallery publication Minnie
Evans: Artist received second
prize in the category of Exhibi-
tion Catalogue for institutions
with budgets of $500,000 or less
in the 1994 American Associa-
tion of Museums 13th Annual
Publications Design Competi-
tion.
The competition judges de-
signs in museum publications,
and is the only national competi-
tion in this area of design.
This year's competition drew
1,257 entries,22 of whichrecei ved
first prize honors, 28walked away
with a second place finish, and 99
were given honorable mentions.
Winning entries were displayed
at the American Association of
Museums' annual meeting in Se-
attle, Washingtion, from April 24
to 28 of this year. In addition, the
organization's magazine, Mu-
seum News, will run a feature on
the winners in its JulyAugust
1994 issue.
Contributors for the Minnie
Evans: Artist catalogue are
Charles Lovell, director of Gray
Art Gallery and co-editor of the
catalogue; Dr. Erwin Hester of
the English Department, also co-
editor; Eva Roberts of the ECU
School of Art, who served as Art
Director; Stanton Blakeslee, also
of the Art School, who rendered
Design Assistance, and Susan
Nicholls of the Art School, the
catalogue's Production Assis-
tant.
Photo Courtesy of KIS International Management
Kindread Soul, the latest in a long line of South Carolina bands to play in Greenville, will play at the Attic
this Saturday night. The band's unique sound has propelled them to become one of USC's favorite groups.
Enter said the high energy
"Phunk" intermingled with the
reggae that Kindread Soul per-
forms allows for an extremely en-
ergetic show that isn't always
found in reggae alone. Enter said
the "Phunk" style was an example
of "controlled mayhem" on stage
designed to keep audiences atten-
tive and moving.
Other than the interesting
music sounds in the club this week-
end, music lovers might move into
the Attic after hearing about the
promise of free concert tickets.
Joe Tronto, the manager of the
popular club, said that he has re-
ceived over 60 tickets for concerts
at the Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre this season and
will be giving some away every
night at the club. Tronto will fea-
ture giveaways to see Melissa
Etheridge, The Allman Brothers
and Steve Miller. The Attic will
kick off a "Phish" week Satur-
day night.
df Uh .no
JJ Take Your Chances
JtlV Worth A Try
s s s s
JVJVHighly Recommended
Frank Black
Teenager of the Year
m
"l hear surf on kazoo 11 march
with the militia of the mime Mali-
cious are the times
No, these aren't the incoher-
ent ramblings of some bizarre
madman; they're the incoherent
ramblings of Frank Black, taken
from his latest album Teenager of
the Year. Of course, in the end
there might not be that much dif-
ference. Frank has always been a
bit on the strange side, going all
the way back to his days as Black
Francis, energetic frontman for
the Pixies.
Much more than his former
bandmate Kim Deal (now sing-
ing lead for the Breeders), Frank
Black has retained the bizarre feel
of the Pixies in his solo work, at
least in the lyrics. Musically,
Black's solo work sounds like
nothing so much as pleasant
beach music from the shores of
Mars, but this pleasing sound
only amplifies the utter weird-
ness of his lyrics.
That purposeful strangeness
is perhaps best revealed in the
album's first standout track, "(I
Want to Live on an) Abstract
Plain This is a song about liv-
ing in a place where there is no
up or down, North or South, East
or West (or any other direction),
See BLACK page 6

Crystal Waters
Crystal Waters
Storyteller

Three years ago an artist cap-
tivated us with an energetic tune
called "Gypsy Woman You re-
member, the top ten pop hit about
someone who's "just like you and
me but she's homeless la DA
dee, la DA dah
Well, Crystal Waters is back
with her second CD, Storyteller,
which promises to be just as ener-
getic and groovable as the first.
Storyteller mixes housey dance
tracks, pop-oriented refrains and
melodies with soulful ballads
that are rich in detail.
It isn't too difficult to sur-
mise why Waters titled her al-
bum Storyteller. Her poignant
lyrics reflect an eloquence that is
largely unseen in today's music
industry. Its easy to see why this
DC. native who started out writ-
ing poetry later became the
voungest inductee into the
American Poetry Society at age
14.
The first track, "100 Pure
Love is definitely the most
dance-oriented out of the eleven
track CD. It has a house-music
beat that acts like a rhythmic
tractor beam pulling one onto
the dance floor. The 5th track,
"Relax and the 10th, "Daddy
Do also have similar appeals.
Much of the lyrical content
has to do with social issues and
See WATERS page6
Hordee's Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
WRDU 106 Earth buddies Celebration IV
Elvis Costello & the attractions
w The Crash Test Dummies
Saturday, June 18,8:00 p.m.
$14.75$19.75$24.75
Beach Boys w America
Thursday, June 23,8:00 p.m.
$10.75$15.75$23.75
Crosby, Stills & Nash
25th Anniversary Tour
Saturday, June 25,7:30 p.m.
$15.75$20.75$29.75
Phish
Wednesday, June 29,7:30 p.m.
All tickets $17.50






6 The East Carolinian
June 15, 1994
Louisiana pianist shares his blues
NEW YORK (AP) �Dr. John,
"the musical embodiment of New
Orleans chronicles some pretty
wild doings in his autobiogra-
phy, "Under a Hoodoo Moon
But these days, he's some-
what more tame and a lot more
sober.
"I hope somebody learns not
to make some of the mistakes I
made he said about writing the
book, which carries the subtitle
"The Life of the Night Tripper,
Dr. John (Mac Rebennack)
There's a lot Dr. John dis-
cusses in the book that would
raise an eyebrow or two on any
parent. But he says his 85-year-
old mother hasn't criticized him
for "putting my business in the
street
Dr. John said he's been
blessed with a great family and
he didn't want to write anything
that would hurt them.
The book, written with Jack
Rummel and published by St.
Martin's, says Dr. John has a lot
of children, but he won't say just
how many.
Dr. John also has a new re-
cording released by GRP, "Tele-
vision for which he wrote all
but two of the songs. He calls it
funky, fun, dance music. His last
LP was blues and the one before
that was devoted to jazz.
Dr. John has an eight-piece
band, sometimes adds three back-
ground singers, and basically
lives on the road. "If I ain't on the
road, it means we ain't work-
ing He and his band will be on
a tour with B.B. King headlining
from Aug. 9 to Oct. 2.
The 52-year-old musician's
first album was "Gris-Gris
which combined Creole funk,
West Coast hippie mysticism,
jazz, psychedelic rock and pop. It
came out 26 years ago.
The Dr. John the Night Trip-
per persona was the idea of record
producer Harold Battiste. It was
derived from a 19th-century New
Orleans voodoo man. Wearing
bones, beads, plumes and robes
and scattering glitter to the crowd,
the Night Tripper was an instant
hit in psychedelic 1968.
Dr. John also is on High Street
Records' new "Crescent City
Gold its players billed as "New
Orleans rhythm 'n' blues greats
That album was inspired by
Cosimo Matassa's New Orleans
recording studio in the 1950s,
where Dr. John often played, pro-
duced, arranged and composed
for sessions. He is said to have
played on more sessions than any
other New Orleans musician. And
a 39-track, two-CD retrospective,
"Mos' Scocious: the Dr. John An-
thology was issued last fall by
Rhino Records.
WATERS
Con't
from
page5
their realities, such as the plight
of battered women described in
the song "Daddy Do
The tracks "Lover Lay Low"
and "Is It For Me?" showcase a
versatile, jazzy side of Waters'
talents.
Track 3, "Regardless is
reminiscent of "Gypsy Woman
or at least it has that similar
rhythm. For most artists, that
statement iseverything that they
don't want to hear, considering
all that is done by artists to en-
sure originalitv from one CD to
the next. With Crystal Waters'
distinctive, raspy voice and po-
etic lyrics, it's hard to completely
separate that characterizing
melody "la DA dee, la DA dah
Overall, I think the CD will
do well and is worthy of pur-
chase or trade.
� Martin
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pittman Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:00-4:00
r?BUU.E1
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T Entertainment
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"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
BLACK
Newton
Continued from page 5
and how neat tha would be.
What can I say? Welcome to the
unique world of Frank Black.
Going into great detail about
many of the 22 songs onTeenager
of the Year would be a bit point-
less, if not impossible. Frank
Black's music comes from some-
where deep in his head, and any
complex explanation just
wouldn't do it justice. "Calistan
for example, simply defies any
concise explanation, although
Karoke is mentioned once or
twice. Other songs are a little
easier, but still defy all logic, like'
"Speedy Marie which seems to
be about making love to a work
of art.
Still other songs can only be
defined in the simplest of terms.
"Freedom Rock" is about the free-
dom that music can offer when it
doesn't allow itself to be pinned
down to conventions or genres.
"Ole Mulholland" is an elabo-
rate pun set to music.
"Pure Denizen of the Citi-
zens Band" is about the last sur-
viving member of the CB Radio
Culture of the late Seventies. Any
further explanation of these songs
would only complicate matters.
No, it's far easier to simply
discuss Black's pet topics, the
things he most likes to write songs
about. For one thing, he likes
UFOs and outer space stuff. Teen-
ager of the Year only features a
couple of songs in this area, like
"Space is Gonna Do Me Good
but it's an important thing to
know if you want to understand
Black's music. Another favorite
of Black's is the names of places
and their origins. "Ole
Mullholland" is in this vein, the
song's elaborate pun being based
around the names of about half a
dozen cities in the United States
and Mexico.
But, by far, the biggest obses-
sion for Black is weirdos. He likes
to craft tales of those strange guys
you see mumbling to themselves
in the back of the bus, the comic
book geeks, the computer nerds,
the lost and wayward children of
American culture. Every other
song on Teenager of the Year seems
to deal with one of these nut cases,
but Black always treats them with
respect. After all, he is one of them.
Teenager of the Year is pleasant
to the ears and disturbing to the
mind. I wish there were more al-
bums like it, but this brand of
weirdness seems to be the provi-
dence of a handful of artists like
Frank Black and his thematic cous-
ins They Might Be Giants and King
Missile. It's not as good as Black's
ECU's Closest Beach
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Attention
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If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time �- and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in heir name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5lh
Street
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O Box !847, Greenville,
NC. 27835-1847, all: Customer Service.
�Remember lo attach a "letier of
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Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows:
with electric or
gas ipace healing
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Electric Only $100 $75
Electric & Water $100 S85
Electric. Water & Gas110 $85
Electric Sl Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior ;o your arrival at the service address.
Greenville
Utilities
work with the Pixies, but at least
it's more interesting than the
Breeders. Check it out.
� Mark
Brett
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm
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THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
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h�f
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$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
iEC"i
v 5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Aye:
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
I tor, I I "
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THURS17 TRUFFLE (NOVEMBER RECORDING ARTIST)
FRI 18 KNOCKED DOWN SMILIN (FIRST CO RELEASE PARTY)
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SAT 25 JACK-O-PIERCE (ARM RECORDING ARTIST) S3
rLrtwrtwriKrLr.wriKrLrtwrk





The East Carolinian
June 15, 1994
Sports
Page 7
By
Mike
Baumann
Staff writer
Baumann's
Bits
It is true that balls are fly-
ing out of major league
ballparks at record numbers
and that pitchers' earned run
averages are
also exorbitant.
But, are we re-
ally supposed to
believe that it is
because the ball is being made
differently than in past years?
There must be other factors in-
volved. One must only flip on
the tube to see what the real
explanations are.
First of all, every hitter in
the lineup has forearms that
resemble Popeye's forearms.
Even the 7th and 8th place hit-
ters are incredibly well-built.
Teams are purposely stacking
their lineups with guys who
can hitthe ball. Whocanblame
them?
Secondly, thepitchershave
forgotten how to pitch inside.
Gone are the days of the
"knockdown" pitch. One main
reason for its disappearance is
the way hitters retaliate. For
example, if you pitch inside,
you are likely to have some
guy running at you with spiked
shoes and a bat. Pitchers who
dare to "brush" the hitter off
the plate are often libeled
"headhunters
Finally, and maybe most
importantly,thepitchersdoriot
understand the value of "con-
trol" Control means keeping
pitches down and on the cor-
ners instead of up and out over
the plate. Common sense says
that if you keep letting the hit-
ters get to a 3-0 count or 3-1
count, you are flirting with a
potential roof shot. Conversely,
if you can get out in front of the
hitter in the countyou will have
more success. Greg Maddux,
who is and has been one of the
best pitchers in the game the
last couple of years, relies onhis
pinpoint control.
At any rate, there are other
factors involved. Itisnot simply
that the baseball is juiced.
Intramural playoffs start
i
(RS) � As the first summer
session winds to a close, the regu-
lar season of most intramural
sports activities is wrapping up
and playoff action is set to begin.
In five-on-five basketball, "Da
Fat Katz" completed the regular
season with a 4-0 record behind
the steady leadership of-captain
Todd Stephens and George
Hendricks. However, the "Katz"
barely escaped a furious rally from
their biggest rival, "D's Nuts
during a possible championship
preview in capturing a 59-56 vic-
tory after leading by as many as 20
points. "D's Nuts" finished 3-1,
taking their final regular season
contest over "Solomon's
Wisemen" 50-46 behind the of-
fense of Scott Harrelson and Jeff
Byrd.
The "Wisemen" completed a
disappointing regular season with
several close losses and hope to
make some noise in the tourna-
ment with the blue-collar play of
Kenny Muse and Mark Solomon.
However, the big key to the
"Wisemen" success is to keep
Jamie Rowland, now the all-time
intramural leader in ejections, in
the game.
Also in the playoff hunt is the
"Crusties who spent most of the
first week of the season trying to
figure out whether they were ref-
ereeing or playing. The "Crusties"
have come on strong by adding
Chris Loeffel and making full use
of the ballhandling of Shannon
Cowan.
In softball, the weather domi-
nated play in the final week of the
regular season. In the men's divi-
sion, the "Greenville Polecats" and
Intramural
standings
File Photo
Withalltheteamsmakingthe playoffs, championshipsareupforgrabs.lnthe post seasonanything can
happen.Teams with better regular season records will have the higher seedsaccordinqlv.
Have you ever sat through
an entire Atlanta Braves tele-
cast on television? If youarenot
a Braves' fan, chances are you
probably did not make it
through the 3rd inning because
of theirbiased announcers. Yes,
Skip Carey, Ernie Johnson, and
Don Sutton will devise any ex-
cuse possible todefend a Braves'
error. They will also exaggerate
Braves' hits as "line shots" and
"rockets" while referring to the
other team's hits as "bloop"
hits and "excuse me" hits. Their
biased tones may not be recog-
nizable to Braves' fans,but they
are evident to other fans.
The Braves and WTBS are
bothowned by Ted Turner. Itis,
therefore, understandable that
the Braves' announcers want to
projectafavorableimageof their
players. But, whatever hap-
pened to calling it the way it
happens?
Although SkipCarey is not
asbad as DonSutton, who ironi-
cally happens to be a former
Dodger, Skip is nothing like his
dad, who has been in the busi-
ness of broadcasting since the
1940s. Harry calls the shots the
way they "Happen. Sure, he roots
for hishome team. Heevensings
with them. But he has refrained
from using the tone that the
Braves' announcers employ. He
wants his team to win, but he
does not let mat affect the way
he calls the plays. At times, he
even criticizesCubplayers. You
will not catch Braves' announc-
ers doing that. They leave their
criticizing for the other teams.
Maybe it has to do with
winning. The Braves are con-
stantly near the top while the
Cubs often are mired near last
place by season end. With win-
ning comes a certain attitude
and cockiness.
So the Braves may be the
best team in baseball, but the
Cubs have the best announcer
in baseball.
"U Lose II" completed the season
undefeated with their scheduled
meeting being rained out. The
"Polecats" rode the speed and of-
fense of Rodney Young and the
hitting of Romel Racosas to the
top wldle "U Lose II" dominated
opponents with a balanced lineup
featuring Mike Kehoe, Stuart
Sealey and David Parker.
The "sleeper" in the draw ap-
pears to be "Penthouse Revenge
who exploded for 25 runs in the
final regular season game with
Larry "Big D" Stiscia and Dave
Edgerton each scoring four times.
In Co-Rec, the "Greenville 69ers"
have quietly completed the regu-
lar season undefeated with Rickie
Lee and Carl Rouse leading the
offense. "Summer's Finest" is one
of the favorites in the division as
well, due to the hitting of Claire
Norman.
In tennis, Greg Schehr and
Mark Merring continue to hold
court over the men's division
while Debra Riffle and Kim
Brewington are the top players in
the women's division. Frisbee golf
players braved the threats of rain
to take on the ECU course with
Benjamin Deeter carting a 46 for
the top score. Other ranking play-
ers include Hank Norwood, Mark
Johnson, Scott McMahan, Donny
Beriri and Jason McMickling.
Upcoming activities leading
off the second summer session in-
clude softball and three-on-three
basketball. Registration meetings
will be held on Tuesday, June 28 at
4 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. in Biology N-
106. Call Recreational Services at
757-6387 for details.
Simpson suspect in murder case
(AP) � Police briefly hand-
cuffedO.J.Simpsonandquestioned
him for three hours after the blood-
ied bodies of his ex-wife and an-
other man were found outside her
condominium.
Simpson was not arrested in
the deaths of Nicole Brown
Simpson, 35, and Ronald Lyle
Goldman, 25, butyesterday The Los
Angeles Times quoted an unidenti-
fied police source as saying the foot-
ball Hall of Famer is under investi-
gation.
A passerby found Mrs.
Simpson's body near a gate to the
West Los Angeles condominium
early Monday. Police found
Goldman's body in shrubbery
nearby. Police wouldn't say when
the two died.
A blood-soaked glove was
found at Simpson's home, the Times
and Tlie Daily News of Los Angeles
reported, citing unidentified police
sources. 77k Daily News reported
that the giove matched one found
near tlie bodies.
"I know nothing Simpson
said as he got into a patrol car Mon-
day.
Simpson flew to Chicago on
business about 11 p.m. Sunday and
returned around noon the next day,
after police notified him of Mrs.
Simpson's death, said his lawyer,
Howard Weitzman.
"Mr. Simpson is not being
treated as a suspect Weitzman
said. "He had nothing to do with
this tragedy
Police are not ruling anyone
out as a suspect, Cmdr. David
Gascon said.
Autopsies were planned for
today. Coroner's spokesman Scott
Carrier said "sharp-force injuries
which might include stabbing, con-
tributed to the deaths. The Daily
News said the victims' throats were
slashed.
Goldman was a waiter at the
restaurant where Mrs. Simpson
dined Sunday, but he didn't serve
her, restaurant owner Karim Souki
See O J page 8
Struggling franchise looks to Lucas for help
(AP) � The Philadelphia 76ers
are putting their future in trie handsof
a man who knows as much about
recover' as he does about basketball
The 76ers planned to announce
former San AntonioSpurscoachJohn
Lucas as their coachand general man-
eyesterdfoy,WiePfvadelphiaInqiiirer
reported
Lucas,40,reagnedlastweekfrom
theSpursafter leading the team toa 94-
49 record in less than two seasons in
his first head coaching job.
Lucas, who has also been con-
tacted by the Portland Trail Blazers,
was attracted to Philadelphia by the
prospect of holding both positions,
according to the Inquirer's sources.
"The main reason he's coming is
he wants to run the whole show and
not answer to so many people an
unidentified source told the paper.
Lucas, a former cocaine addict,
has never held a general manager's
position Despite his success with the
Spurs, he'c perhaps best known for
working with other recovering ad-
dicts.
A former No. 1 draft pick whose
10-year playing career was marred by
drugabuse,LucaswentsoberinMarch
1986 and then turned his efforts to
hdpingotheratrUeteswimdrugprob-
lems.
Heoperatesadrugtreatmentand
rehabilitation center in Houston, and
also owns and has coached the Miami
TropicsoftheUnitedStates Basketball
League, a team whose roster is often
dotted with recovering addicts.
The team planned to introduce
Lucas at a press conference sched-
uledfor 1 p.m. Monday, one day after
76ers owner Harold Katz met with
Lucas in Philadelphia, the newspa-
per said.
The team told coach Fred Carter
on Monday that his one-year con-
tract, which expires in two weeks,
will not be renewed, the Inquirer said.
The 76ers have been without a
general manager since Jim Lynam
left last month to coach the Washing-
ton Bullets.
Carter, a former player and as-
sistant coach in Philadelphia, led the
team to a 32-71 record in 11 2 years.
Sky
High!
Bill
Romberger,
surrounded
by three
oponents,
jumps to
make a catch
in the
Ultimate
Frisbee
Championships.
The Irates
finished as
National
Champions.
Photo by
Leslie Petty
(Through end of
regular season)
5-on-5
Basketball
Da Fat Katz 4-0
D's Nuts 3-1
The Crusties 2-2
Preseason 1-3
Solomon's
Wisemen 0-4
Men's Softball
Greenville
Polecats 4-0
ULoseH 4-0
Penthouse
Revenge 3-1
Nine Guys
& A P'nut 2-2
Preseason 1-3
Chronics 0-4
Co-Rec Softball
Greenville
69ers 4-0
Summer's
Finest 3-1
Fun Team 3-1
Economic
Society 2-2
Who Cares? 2-2
UMffimaft� wrap imp
Men's
Ultimate
Frisbee top
Women's
Ultimate
Frisbee top
11. East Carolina 14-11
19-3
13-3
20-3
8-4
15-4
21-4
7-9
7-3
15-8
O'O
1 w
11(1
I
�n I
on
rH-t
M
tyjj
lb1
� r
1 1
1UD
1(11)
inn
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at i
1VJ
HO.)
�Irirt
17-10
16-18
3-6
0-6
11-6
5-5
18-10
0-6
7-4
2-4
0-8
1-4
9-10
6-12





8 The East Carolinian
June 15, 1994
Baseball will miss Brock
(AP)�.Arizona State head coach
Jim Brock, one of college baseball's
winningest coaches, died Sunday
night after a long bout with cancer.
He was 57.
Brock compiled a 1,100-440
record in 23 years with Arizona State.
According to the Arizona State Sports
Information Department, Brock died
Sunday night of liver and colon can-
cer.
During Brock's tenure, the Sun
DevilswontwoCollegeWorldSeries
titles and finished second four times
in 11 other trips to the national tour-
nament.
His illness attracted national at-
tentionduringthisyear'sCWS. Brock
sat out ASU's game against Okla-
homa at Omaha, Neb on June 6
because of a reaction to medication. It
wasonly thesecondtimein61 games
this season that Brock's dugout chair
was empty.
In an interview with Phoenix
television station KSAZ before that
game, Brock said he made the trip
because he felt his presence boosted
team morale.
"I don't think it makes me any
more well or any sicker, so this is
where I want to be Brock said. "I'd
be absolutely on pins and needles if I
wasn't here
The next day, he returned to
Tempe on the advice of his family
doctor and checked into Desert Sa-
maritan Hospital in Mesa, where he
remained until his death.
His team was eliminated in a 13-
5 loss to eventual champion Okla-
homa on Thursday.
Hisachievementsthisyearcame
as he battled the cancer, which was
diagnosed in July 1993.
Later that month, doctors re-
moved 80 percent of Brock's liver, 10
inches of his colon and three lymph
nodes. Then he underwent months
of chemotherapy.
OJ
Continued from page 7
said.
"She had dinner here. She called
la ter to see if we f ound her gla sses and
we found them Souki said. He said
Goldmanvolunteeredtoretumthem.
Neighbor Beverly Newman told
Tlte Daily Nobs that she had often
seen Goldman playing with
Simpson's children.
The 5-year-old boy and 7-year-
old girl were found sleeping, un-
harmed, in their mother's condo-
minium. They were turned over to
relatives.
TheSimpsons filed fordivorce in
1992 but were said to be discussing a
reconciliation.
"The situation had seemed bet-
ter neighbor Robert Gerard said.
Weitzman said the two were of-
ten together on family outings, and
bothattended theirdaughter'sdance
recital Sunday.
Simpson pleaded no contest to
wife beating in 1989, paid a $700 fine
and served two years' probation. I le
had been accused of screaming, "I'll
kill you as he slapped and kicked
his wife.
Police questioned Simpson for
about three hours Monda v, Gascon
said. Afterward, Simpson returned
home and police who had spent the
day searching his $1.2 million
Brentwood estate left. The house is
about two miles from Mrs.
Simpson's home.
Bitsof cardboard markedsmall
reddish stains leading up the d rive-
way where Simpson's black Rolls-
Royce was parked.
Detective Tom Lange, chief in-
spector at the site, refused to discuss
what investigators found. As he left
the house, he carried a pair of white
tennis shoes.
Simpson checked into the
O'Hare Plaa Hotel on Monday
morning and left in a hum' about
two hours later, general manager
Peter Phillips said. He had made his
reservation a few davs earlier.
Simpson said he was attend-
ing a function for the Hertz car
rental company, for which he
made a popu lar series of TV com-
mercials.
The NBC-TV sports com-
mentator has also appeared in
several movies, including the
three Naked Gun comedies. He
plaved for the National Football
League's Buffalo Bills, then the
San Francisco 49ers. He retired in
1979.
The Sports Dept. is
hiring writers for
the summer and
fall.
Brand New For '94
Parkview
at Kingston Place
"IT WAS
THIS BIG

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Title
The East Carolinian, June 15, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 15, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1014
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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