The East Carolinian, June 10, 1994






( omics
Pirate Comics, Grandson!
So, you jonesin' for comics? Well turn
to page 7 and you'll see lots of cool
violence in Kemple Boy, learn the
history of Nick OTime, and a new
Fun n' Games. And much more.
Welcome
ntiti
Students
Lifestyle
Collins ignites the Creek
Phil Collins delivered a
show to delight even
those fans who thought
the X-Genesis front man
had fizzled with age.
See story on page 9.
�O
The East Carolinian
Vol.69No.6t-23M
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
June 10-July 23,1994
16 Pages
ECU experiences an eventful year
Jason Williams
News Editor
Tlw East Carolinian edito-
rial staff spent the past week re-
viewing the biggest news sto-
ries of the 1993-94 school year.
Some of the news was routine,
such as parking problems, and
some of it was extraordinary,
such as the armed robberies.
August 25 Two women
were abducted from the Chico's
Mexican Restaurant parking lot.
Both women escaped unharmed.
September 9 Health Ser-
vices announced that they would
begin charging a nominal fee �
$1.00 for over-the-counter medi-
cines and $2.50 for prescription LS2000, to the faster Marquis sys-
drugs. Before this, the medicines
were free of charge.
September 14 The North
Carolina Board of Governors ap-
proved plans for the construc-
tion of a Recreation Center to be
built on the parking lot at
Mendenhall Student Center.
September 19 The Pi
Kappa Alpha fraternity was dis-
ciplined following a fight at an
ECU football game. The fight led
to elimination of all reserved
seating for Greek organizations
at the games.
October 5 Joyner Library
announced that it would con-
vert its old computer system, the
tern.
October 14 U.S. News and
World Report named ECU one of
the top 10 best buys in the south.
October 19 The first of four
armed robberies of students at
gunpoint were reported in TEC.
Four Ayden, N.C. youths were
later arrested for the robberies.
November 4 Voters ap-
proved a state-wide bond refer-
endum that allocated $34.5 mil-
1 ion to ECU for the renovation of
Joyner Library and the acquisi-
tion of the former Rose High
School property.
November 16 A fight at an
Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity party
led to several arrests and ques-
tions about how Public Safety
polices campus parties. Mem-
bers of the fraternity, along with
members of Allied Blacks for
Leadership and Equality (ABLE)
have met with Public Safety to
discuss minority issues since.
December 7 Graduates to-
talled 2,100 in the fall commence-
ment exercise. Professor of Medi-
cine Dr. Thomas G. Irons deliv-
ered the commencement ad-
dress.
January 18 A fire at Clem-
ent Residence Hall caused $5,000
damage to the dorm and sent
two residents to Pitt County Me-
morial Hospital. Fire alarms on
the first five floors malfunc-
tioned, and resident advisers
were forced to alert residents by
pounding on doors.
January 20 Officials broke
ground on the Recreation Cen-
ter. The project is expected to be
completed by November 1995
and will cost $18 million.
January 27 ECU reached a
financial settlement in the final
civil suit associated with the
wiretapping scandals of a few
semesters ago. ECU will pay
Patricia Bullock, a former em-
ployee of the ECU Public Safety
department, a total of $16,747.
In her suit, Bullock accused
former Director of Public Safety
James DePuy of illegally or-
dering subordinates to tap her
telephone.
February 8 Chancellor
Richard Eakin kicked off the
first Shared Visions
fundraising campaign at the
Greenville Country Club. ECU
has received $43.2 million to-
ward its goal of $50 million as
of May.
February 17 A ruptured
water line flooded Memorial
Drive and caused a water
shortage at Pitt Memorial Hos-
pital, the ECU Medical School
and area apartment corn-
See REVIEW page 3
Shared Visions campaign succeeding
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
Perhaps the ECU Shared Vi-
sions campaign commi ttee's goal of
$50 million was not optimistic
enough,since$43.2hasalreadybeen
raised. While the campaign will still
run through December 1995,asorigi-
nally planned, the Shared Visions
committee members will focus on
areas of the campaign which have
not been fully funded.
"It has come along very well
said Charles D. Phlegar, campaign
director and associate vice chancel-
lor for institutional advancement.
"We are actively trying to reach our
original goal of $50 million by De-
cember, a year ahead of schedule
Shared Visions was formed to
raise money for academics, medi-
cine, athletics, campus building and
renovation projects and endow-
ments to support students, faculty
and campus programs.
Phlegar said the committee
plans to concentrate on 15 regional
See VISIONS page 3
Attendance up
for summer
sessions
By Wendy Rountree
Staff Writer
ECU witnessed a slight in-
crease in the number of students
attending its first summer ses-
sion this year than in 1993.
The registrar's office re-
leased to the ECU news bureau
that enrollment numbers for the
first summer session were up
from 6,550 students last year to
6,590 students this summer.
Summer school enroll-
ment increases are the result of
more students deciding to
spend at least part of their sum-
mer vacation in school. Students
have many different reasons for
taking courses during the sum-
mer.
"I wanted to be with my
now ex-boyfriend said Angie
Hicks, a senior therapeutic rec-
reations major. "I wanted to be
in Greenville
A few students have de-
cided to change career paths by
�"hanging majors. Once the ma-
jors are changed, students de-
cide to take summer school
classes to acquire the number of
course hours needed to fulfill
See SUMMER page 2
Community school
grads earn more
Photo by Harold Wise
ECU students, faculty and staff can now find some consolation in the fact that the new Todd
Dining Hall will adequately fuel those lengthly hikes to those far-off parking spaces.
By Teri Howell
Staff Writer
Excited about coming to a
four-year university foryour edu-
cation? Here is some news that
my dampen your spirits.
The planning and research
section of the North Carolina De-
partment of Community Colleges
recently released a study that
found the average community
college graduate earns a higher
salary in his or her first year of
employment than the typical stu-
dent who graduated from a uni-
versity.
Part of this statistic can be
explained by age. The study re-
vealed that the average age for a
community college graduate is
29 while the average age for a
university graduate is 22.
"Students above the age of
22 that are still in the community
college system have already es-
tablished a base salary if they are
working said Jim
Westmoreland, director of ca-
reer planning services at ECU.
Westmoreland said once
these students earn their de-
gree their yearly salary in-
creases.
The results of the report
showed that when certain fac-
tors such as age are taken into
consideration, thefirst-yearsal-
ary for a community college
graduate is practically as high
as that of the student who earns
a bachelor's degree.
"We don't really ask
what our graduates earn a year,
nor do we have a salary study
per se Westmoreland said.
"We try to look and see how
new careers and jobs will make
our students happy, and we
want graduates to find careers
that show their strengths as
well as provide enjoyment for
See GRADUATES page 3
Parking situation updated
Jason Williams
News Editor
Of all the campus issues
The East Carolinian covered last
semester, parking may be the
most controversial. Students,
faculty and staff have long com-
plained that there is not enough
parking, and parking lots are
becoming construction sites
faster than grass fields are be-
coming parking lots.
A committee was formed
some time ago to set a course of
action concerning parking. The
committee is charged with de-
termining a level of servi ce, that
is how many spaces per 100 stu-
dents should the university pro-
vide, and the price of a parking
decal.
Currently, ECU provides
34 parking spaces for every 100
persons at ECU. That compares
with an average for the UNC
system of 40 spaces per 100 per-
sons, and the highest level of
service at 55 spaces per 100 for
UNC-Wilmington. ECU sold
10,000 stickers for the 6,500 pa rk-
ing spaces on campus this year.
At $70, ECU is below the
average price for parking decal
for UNC schools. Students at
UNC-Chapel Hill pay $292 for
parking stickers while students
at N.C State pay $360. UNC-
Greensboro, UNC-Charlotte
and UNC-Wilmington charge
$150, $120 and $80, respectively.
The option most seriously
discussed by the parking com-
mittee this past semester was a
graduated fee scale. Under this
plan, students (or faculty and
staff) would pay a premium for
desirable parking spaces located
close to central campus. Stu-
dents who wished to pay less
would park farther away from
campus, and would be encour-
aged to use the transit system.
The ECU Master Plan, a
document created to give the
Chancellor and others a vision
for the future, includes plans
for a parking deck to be con-
structed between Mendenhall
and McDonald's. Layton
Getsinger, vice chancellor for
business affairs, estimates the
cost of a 1,800 space deck at
$16.2 million. Among the op-
tions discussed by the parking
committee was building a deck
and raising the decal prices to
$230.
The parking committee
has disbanded for the summer,
and will reconvene in the fall.
Psychology professor Dr. Den-
nis Chestnut served as chair-
person of the committee.
See PARKING page 2
Poppies commemorate veterans
Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
While some ECU students
skipped class to go to the beach
on Memorial Day, others remem-
bered the lives lost in past wars.
Hugh McGowan Jr. of Greenville
wants the entire ECU and Green-
ville communities to remember
those lost and injured, as well as
those who continue to fight for
our country.
Each year, McGowan and
the local chapter of the Veterans
of Foreign Wars (VFW) sponsor
a "poppy day when the bright
red flowers are sold in remem-
brance of the war heroes.
"It means more to me rep-
resenting my buddies when I
can't go to Italy or Normandy
McGowan said. "There is no way
to thank them. All we can do is
pray
Groups like the American
Legion, The Veterans of Foreign
War and the Disabled American
Veterans select a day to hand
out the poppies for donations.
The donations are used to aid
widows of lost soldiers and the
wives and families of disabled
veterans. The American Legion
sold the poppies over Memo-
rial Day weekend.
The poppy originated in
Europe from a group of French
women who made flowers of
red material to remember the
See POPPIES page 2
Start
Now
Listen up
parents! All
students must
have at least
five sweat-
shirts with the
ECU logo.
ECU Student
Stores have
just what you
need.
-





2 The East Carolinian
June 10, 1994
Ex-Carolina players buy dance club
Two former towering Tar Heels revisited their alma mater
this week, but not just to shoot some hoops and sport Carolina
blue. Former first-team Ail-American forward J.R. Reid and
center Marty Hensley came back to purchase Players, the fa-
mous Chapel Hill night spot. Reid, who now plays for the San
Antonio Spurs, said he had always wanted to be in the nightclub
business. Hensley, who played at UNC from 1985 through 1990,
said his goal was to go into business for himself. Hensley and
Reid have been friends since their Tar Heel days and have kept
in touch because Hensley takes care of Reid's finances. The new
owners said possible changes included having Players open on
Wednesday nights with drink specials. Reid played for the Tar
Heels from 1987 to 1989 before being drafted in the first round
by the Charlotte Hornets. He made the NBA All-Rookie second
team in 1990. He was traded to the San Antonio Spurs, where he
has continued as a backup center in the 1992-93 season. In
addition to being voted All-American in his 1988 season with
the Tar Heels, Reid captured Most Valuable Player of the year
the same year. Hensley spent much of his time with the Tar
Heels out with a knee injury.
Boy, 10, receives bachelor's degree
Ten-year-old Michael Kearney got his bachelor's degree in
anthropology Sunday, apparently making him the youngest
college graduate. He wants his parents to give him a car for his
accomplishments, and figures by the time he is old enough to
drive it, he will have a master's degree. Michael graduated with
honors from the University of South Alabama. He finished with
a grade point average of 3.6 out of 4.0. Kearney's aspirations
include becoming a game show host.
Heh, hey, hey � we're stuffed
Move over, Barbie. Watch out, Barney. You've got compe-
tition. Now Beavis and Butt-head dolls, stuffed clones of the
channel surfing, surburban misfits of MTV fame, can be found
at a retail store near you. And just like their cartoon counter-
parts, the two dolls utter such typical "Beavis & Buttheadisms"
as "Yeah, heh, heh, heh .This sucks; change it "Shut up,
Butt-head and Whoa! That wuz cool The talking dolls,
manufactured by Dakin Inc retail for $25 and join a line of other
Beavis & Butt-head merchandise that includes keychains, gym
socks and � yes � spitballs.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
i
Frequently Called Phone Numbers
Admissions757-6133
Career Services757-6050
Office of the Chancellor757-6212
Dean of Students757-6824
Student Financial Aid757-6610
Joyner Library757-6514
Mendenhall Student Center757-4700
Parking and Traffic Services757-6294
Public Safety757-6787
Recreation Services757-6387
Registrar's Office757-6747
Student Health Services757-6841
University Student Loans757-6816
ECU Student Stores757-673 1
ECU Athletics757-4600
SUMMER
Continued from page 1
Housing
The East Carolinian
757-6450
757-6366
PARKING
Continued from page 1
the new major's requirements.
"Because I changed my ma-
jor, I came to summer school
to get on schedule said Shelly
Morris, a junior mathematics
major.
Some students said they
decided to attend summer
school because they did not like
the time periods when neces-
sary classes would be offered
during the fall.
"I don't want to be taking a
lot of night classes said Robin
Days, a junior community health
education major. "There's an in-
crease in the number of night
classes this fall. So, I'm taking
some of these classes now dur-
ing the summer
Still other students said
they have had difficulty in reg-
istering for and taking classes
during the fall and spring se-
mesters.
"I'm taking, now, a course
for my major, but I couldn't get
it for the regular semester said
Demetria Gordon, a communi-
cation major with a concentra-
tion in public relations. "So, I'm
taking it this summer
"I've been trying to get
speech for the last three years,
and I just got it this summer
Hicks said.
Many students said the
lack of class sections and some
class scheduling made it diffi-
cult to register for classes dur-
ing the regular school term.
"I know some classes you
couldn't get this year said
Kimberly Best, a junior com-
munity health education ma-
jor. "I know classes you
couldn't get in health areas
"I have five classes that
are only offered in the fall
Morris said.
Also, the registrar's of-
fice released to the ECU news
bureau the numbers of part-
time students attending the
first summer session. Last
year, there were 1,643 part-
time students. This year, the
number rose to 1,801 students.
Lighter course loads and
part-time jobs are a few rea-
sons some students enroll in
school only part-time.
"Either students can't
get the classes they want, and
it's no point in taking classes
you don't need Hicks said.
"Or . . . they want to work a
part-time job
Other students return to
the university to further their
education after a few years in
the work force.
"A lot of people go out
with a degree and have to go
back to graduate school
Morris said.
Each orientation student will
receive a packet containing infor-
mation about parking on campus.
During orientation, students will
be allowed to park in commuter,
resident and university registered
parking lots.
When students return in the
fall, freshmen living in residence
halls will be able to purchase a
FreshmanFringe permit for $70.
These permits allow students to
park in lots located on Reade Street
and at the Allied Health (Belk)
building.
Freshmen living of f-campus
may purchase a Limited Com-
muter permit for $30. This permit
will be valid in the fringe lot lo-
cated near Minges Coliseum. The
ECU transit buses will provide
shuttle service to and from class-
room areas.
POPPIES
FRESHMEN!
�t involved! The Fi? Ctirolinitin i .i
un organization, whit, h means von
ice as we (.lid when we tirst started.
completely student-run organization, wli
have as much experience as we did when
Here's vour chance to start flu fling up th
earn some money! Stop In and fill out an a
ume ana
Continued from page 1
WELCOME CLASS OF 1998!
-Tbepnsfi
m�&Zte'
blood shed. Later, the idea spread
to America where red tissue pa-
per flowers were sold.
The "Buddy Poppy" was
copyrighted by the Veterans of
Foreign Wars in 1924. Since, the
poppy has been updated to a more
silky version from the tissue pa-
per version.
"The VFW brought the
Buddy Poppy over to America
McGowan said.
Local groups either observe
Poppy Day around Memorial Day
or during ECU homecoming.
McGowan hopes that by selling
poppies around ECU's homecom-
ing more students will become
aware of the importance of re-
membering those involved in
wars.
"I wish the college students
of ECU would realize the impor-
tance of the Veteran's Buddy
Poppy days he said.
McGowan, who has been a
Greenville resident all of his life,
fought in World War II as a re-
connaissance non-commissioned
officer for a tank battalion at-
tached to the 45th Division. He is
a member of the VFW, the Mili-
tary Order of the Purple Heart,
the American Legion and several
other military organizations.
McGowan's name was added
to a list of war participants on a
monument of the beach at
Normandy.
"My name will be on the
Normandy beach Wall of Lib-
erty on a monument similar to
the Vietnam Memorial
McGowan said.
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June 10, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
GRADUATES
Continued from page 1
them
Westmoreland said it was dif-
ficult to compare community col-
leges and universities.
"It's kind of like dealing with
apples and oranges he said. "You
can't really compare a business de-
gree with a medical degree
The report considered earn-
ings recordsofsalariesof4,080com-
munity college graduates with as-
sociate of applied science degrees;
4,605 university graduates with
bachelor's degrees; 1,623 with
master's degrees; and 136 with doc-
toral degrees.
"In the past, there has been a
notion that the individual who at-
tended a community college was
acquiescing to a lower standard of
achievement said Bob Scott, presi-
dent of the community college sys-
tem. "This report nullifies that no-
tion
"The study sounds as if it is
promoting the community college
system Westmoreland said. "The
demands are going to be different
for botha university graduate and a
community college graduate
VISIONS
Continued from page 1
REVIEW
campaigns across the state to raise
the additional $6.8 million. The cam-
paign will continue through Decem-
ber 1995, raising additional money.
"Wewillre-evaluatewherewe
are at the end of the year to concen-
trate on areas that have not been
fullv funded Phlegar said.
The Shared Visions plan has
marked $10 million for student de-
velopment to be broken down into
scholarships, fellowships and other
awards. The largest portion of the
money raised will go towards cam-
pus development. Nine million dol-
lars will be used to renovate Minges
Coliseum and expand Ficklen sta-
plexes. Repairs were made
quickly, and water pressure was
restored by the afternoon.
March 1 Dining Services
announced that freshmen enter-
ing in the fall of 1994 will be re-
quired to purchase a nine or 14
meal plan along with signing a
housing agreement.
March 3 The excavation
project or. Cotanche Street caused
a sewage back-up in Mendenhall,
flooding the basement and clos-
ing that part of the building.
March 22 An electrical short
circuit and some smoldering in-
sulation in the attic of Jarvis Resi-
dence Hall forced several resi-
dents to evacuate the building.
No one was injured and residents
returned to their rooms in the
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
Openings for Fall & Both Summer Sessions '94
Your Next School Years Living Space In A
Student Village will be Guaranteed
If You Apply Now!
afternoon.
April 7 The Student Gov-
ernment Association (SGA) held
elections for executive officers for
1994-95. A run-off election was
scheduled after no candidate for
president or vice president re-
ceived a majority, and several can-
didates filed complaintsof wrong-
doing during the campaign.
April 21 Ian Eastman was
elected president and Sheila
Boswell was elected vice presi-
dent in run-off elections for SGA.
April 21 ECU announced
plans to consolidate student I.D.
cards and meal cards. The new
cards will also be used to vote in
dium. An additional $2 million will
go to Jovner Library additions. The
Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center will
receive $3 million.
The Shared Visions campaign
got off to a fast start on February 3, at
the Greenville Country Club. The
program originated three years ago.
ECU'smostambitiouspreviouscam-
paign for the School of Business
raised $2.5 million. Before the end of
February,$37millionhadbeenraised
for this campaign.
"We will continue raising
money, but focusing on the areas
that haven't been fully funded
Phlegar said.
Continued from page 1
SGA elections, check out books,
obtain tickets to athletic events
and a key-less entry system for the
dorms.
May 6 The ECU Board of
Trustees approved a $97 increase
in student fees. The bulk of the
money ($75) will go toward reno-
vating Minges Coliseum and to
athletic programs.
May 18 Graduates totalled
2,100 in the spring commencement
exercise. Watergate journalist
Daniel Schorr delivered the com-
mencement address, and Surgeon
General Joycelyn Elders gave the
convocation at the Medical School
ceremony.
An "Extra Special Place" !
THE ORDINARY, THE EXTRAORDINARY,
THE UNUSUAL AND UNIQUE
Holusion�Art Prints � Tornado Lamps � Sand Pictures
Lava LitesR� Motion Waves � Furry Animals � 3-D Puzzles
and Much, Much More
llgjjgflg
May 27
Allied Health � An officer reported hearing shots fired
in the area of the rappelling tower at Allied Health. A check of
the area was completed with negative results.
May 28
Clement Hall � A student reserve officer reported a
suspicious person at the bicycle rack southwest of Clement
Hall. The suspicious person fled the area and could not be
located.
May 30
ECU Police Department � A student was arrested at the
ECU Police Department for larceny and obtaining property by
false pretense.
General Classroom � An officer assisted the Greenville
Rescue Squad with a student having seizures in the General
Classroom Building.
Graham � A bomb threat was called into the ECU
switchboard giving no location and a second bomb threat for
the Graham Building was called into Pitt County's emergency
number 911.
May 31
Commuter Lot on 10th and College Hill Drive � A
student reported damage to her vehicle while parked in the
commuter parking lot on 10th Street and College Hill Drive.
June 1
College Hill Drive � A student reported the larceny of
her ECU parking permit from her vehicle parked in the parking
lot on the northeast side of College Hill Drive.
Cotten Hall � A resident of Cotten Hall reported receiv-
ing harassing phone calls in her room.
June 6
Willis Building � A staff member reported damage to
one of the north windows of the Willis Building.
AT A PRICE THAT WILL COMPEfE WITH THE DORMS!
THE FUN PLACE TO SHOP!
ESP plus Inc � M-Sat 10-7
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Greenville, NC 27858 � (919) 321-3946
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from official ECU
Public Safety crime reports.
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tiiffimtm.
Page 4
June 10, 1994
The Clearly Labeled
Satire Page
President radically changes health care bill
Staff Reports
President "Pass my Bill"
Clinton announced today a series
of new changes in his health care
plan that, he says, will win over
Republicans and ensure passage
of the bill.
White House spokesmuppet
George Snuffleupogus addressed
the Washington press corps while
standing in the Rose Garden.
Snuffy first announced that thorn
abrasions would be covered by
the revised health care plan. Before
he could explain the rest of the
bill, he was mobbed by hundreds
of adoring fans screaming, "He's
sooooo cute
With Snuffleupogus
indisposed, Clinton turned to
press secretary Dee Dee "Secret
Ad" Myers to finish the press
conference. Myers immediately
announced that bad hair would
be covered by the plan, and that
barbers could be sued for
malpractice for giving bad hair
cuts. She is expected to file the first
suit against her own barber in
November.
Claiming to have seen the
ghost of former Reagan press
secretary Merlin Spitzwater,
Myers fled the scene, leaving
Clinton to battle the media. When
Clinton took the podium, he told
Sam Donaldson to "shut up
causing the ABC reporter tobreak
down and cry.
Clinton said his bill would
expand family coverage to include
one spouse and one lover free of
charge, with each additional lover
to be covered with a $200
deductible. While Gennifer's with
a 'G' would be covered, Jennifer's
with a would not.
Another provision in the bill
would extend coverage to women
figure skaters who get hit on the
knee with a stick. Women figure
skaters who come from bad homes
and who had a tough childhood
and who married scumbags and
who cry too much on national
television would not be covered.
Psychiatric treatment for
brothers who shoot their parents
while eating ice cream because
they had a tough childhood will
be covered, but only if they were
sexually abused and only if the ice
cream is vanilla.
Bobbitization, the medical
term for the reattachment of
penises, will be covered under the
plan, but only if the emasculated
male finds it himself. Special tax
breaks will be available for the
purchase of cocker spaniels and
wiener dogs for medical purposes,
however.
Reaction to the new plan was
mixed.
Sen. Ted "Wanna take a
drive" Kennedy praised the
President. "In the grand tradition
of my late brother, it's about time
we had a president who cares
about their girlfriends. Now if we
can only get that clause about
prescription strength alcoholic
beverages passed
Sen. Jesse "I do not look like a
frog" Helms was predictably
upset. "I can't believe that my
slaves won'tbecovered under this
plan. And my friend, Sen. Lauch
Faircloth? Not everyone was
fortunate enough to be born with
a brain. Where is he going to get
tr? money to pay for one?"
Clinton may find support
from unlikely sources, however.
Noted media personality Rushan
Limburger said he liked the fact
that the plan covered liposuction
and other weight reduction
procedures. He said he also agreed
with Clinton's decision not to
cover brain implants.
"If Joe Schmo can just walk in
and get a brain for himself,
complete with original thoughts,
then how many people will be left
to watch my show?" Limburger
asked.
Paula Corbin Jones, on the
other hand, reacted with anger
when she learned that convicted
bimbos would not be covered.
"Not even my bad nose job. Not
even my breast enlargement. Not
even my sssssssss " she said, as
the rest of the air whooshed out of
her head.
Clinton said he was sure the
bill would pass now that he
enlisted former President Ronald
Reagan to promote it. Reagan has
been criss-cross the country,
handing out condoms and urging
old men not to give up sex. "Look
atme Reagansaid. "I waselected
president when I was 69 and I've
screwed a lot of people during
that time
Surgeon General sparks new controversy
Staff Reports
New protests have arisen on
campus, nearly a month after the
visit of Surgeon General Joycelyn
Elders. Elders was on campus to
speak at the ECU School of
Medicene commencement. At that
time, approximately 50 people
protested her appearence due to
her stand against the tobacco
industry.
Now, it has been revealed
that while on campus, the Surgeon
General also engaged in one of her
other controversial pursuits.
Long noted for her strong
support of sex education and
condom distribution in the early
grades, it has now been learned
that Elders distributed free
condoms to campus squirn'
Elders claimed studies which have
shown that the population of
squirrels on campus has exploded
in recent years as justification for
her actions. According to Elders,
squirrel condoms should help
prevent the many unplanned
pregnancies on the ECU campus.
She also claimed that condoms can
help stop the spread of such
dangerous sexually transmitted
diseases as sciurilis,
squirrelorrhea, as well as the
Campus resident tries his free Squirrelstyle� condom on a fry.
deadly NUTS virus.
"We must make every
squirrel a planned and wanted
squirrel Elders said. "We've
allowed young male squirrels to
go around and donate sperm. We
need to offer hope to these young
rodents
Many groups are upset by
Elder's plan. Lobbyists for the
hunters of the nation, the
American Rifle Fanatics (ARF),
fear the plan will leave no helpless
little animals upon which their
members to use their assault rifles.
Chester Holinuts, Bishop of the
Mall in the Rodent Catholic
Church, also vigorously opposes
the policy. "I vigorously oppose
this policy the bishop said.
Speaker for the ECU Squirrel
Foundation, Hike Nuts, could not
be reached for comment.
Also fighting the policy is the
ECU administration, which feels
that giving the condoms away will
prevent the proposed installation
of condom vending machines in
campus trees.
However, in the end, the
whole debate may turn out to be
merely academic (possibly the first
academic event ever at ECU). With
all the new construction, most
campus squirrels have been forced
to find homes elsewhere, thereby
bringing an end to any population
surplus.
Dreaded new plague strikes America
Staff Reports
Large numbers of doctors,
citizens and go-getters are
frightened and stymied by the ever-
growing strain of strep called
'stressiskaka
This
offspring of
L strep is
� blamed for
rampant
apathy and
unwillingness
to take
responsibility
in middle-
' c 1 a s s
Americans.
responsible
"It's astound-
ing. Apparently
these people lose
all feeling in their
backbones
Stressiskaka is
for serious and
conv enient spasms of paralysis and
eventual total inertia, leading
others to tend to the sufferer, buying
them food and driving them
around town looking for cigarettes
at all hours of the night. But the
most serious ailment seems to be a
breakdown of nerve connections
with the backbone.
"It's astounding said Dr. Hee
B. Geebie, a
noted expert on
stressiskaka
sufferers.
"Apparently,
these people lose
all feeling in their
backbones. They
forget they have
a spine and thus
�� tend to wither
into vulnerability quite easily
Those suffering from
stressiskaka are reported to find no
pleasure from completing such
ECU Transit acquires new mode of transport
Staff Reports
Ever been late for a class
because the ECU Transit bus was
stuck in traffic? Well, those days
are over, thanks to the recent
acquisition of the Purple People
Mover, a state-of-the-art
hovercraft designed to replace
those ugly purple buses in the
Transit Service's fleet.
The Transit Service purchased
four of the hovercraft, with plans
to buy six more. Also in the works
are plans to build a teleporter to
beam students from the new
commuter parking lot in
Winterville to various buildings
on campus.
"We're real proud of them
new fangled machines said
Harry Butts, director of ECU's
Transit Services. "We thought
about replacing the buses with
horse-and-buggies, but we
decided that was just a little too
much technology for us
The hovercraft are equipped
with plush leather seats that have
a personal stereo and a television
monitor built into the seat backs.
A flight attendant is also available
to serve alcoholic beverages in
ECU transit's newest addition really covers the field.
those little airplane bottles.
"I think this sort of thing is
exactly what we need to attract
quality students to ECU said
Chancellor Al Cohol. "And you
should see the guys at the golf
course when I pull up in this baby
The Student Government
Association appropriated the
money necessary to purchase the
hovercraft. "We are committed to
helping students get to class on
time said SGA President Hugh
Jass. "Also, we thought our
fraternity could use these things
for keg parties on the weekends
The only problem with the
hov ercraft, like most other vehicles
at ECU, is parking. So far, the craft
have not found a permanent
parking place. Pilots tried landing
somewhere near the mall, but kept
land ing on squirrels, drawing fire
from animal rights activists.
The hovercraft have been
parking on top of the General
Classroom Building. Students
wishing to ride on the new
hovercraft should go to the third
floor via the stairs closest to the
Graham Building, and take the
ladder at the top of the stairwell to
the roof. Hovercraft depart every
half hour from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Menendez Brothers battered from the grave
Staff Reports
New evidence will be
presented by Eric and Lyle
Menendez's defense lawyers that
the boys' parents continue to batter
them, only now it's from the grave!
Attorney Leslie Abramson says
she has solid new evidence that
Jose Menendez is returning nightly
from the grave to batter the boys,
calling them horrible names (like
'sissy boy'), and generally
torturing the young men even
more in death than he had in life.
Kitty is supposedly returning as
well, standing next to Jose and, as
usual, shaking her head in cruel
affirmation, and saying, "Yeah
"These boys just can't take
much more of this torture
Abramson said. "They should be
set free where they belong. They're
no damn use to me any more
anyway�they're out of money
In between sobs, and
adjusting his toupee, Lyle
Menendez described Jose standing
over his bed nightly in his cell,
saying over and over again,
"You're not going to keep that
Bentley, You're not going to keep
that Bentley! You'll drive the
Jaguar convertible and you'll like
it, young man all the while
stroking his wallet, slobbering, and
staring wide-eyed at Lyle's crotch.
"They've got to let us out of
here before anyone finds out about
that Swiss bank account uh, I
mean, before we go totally insane
Lyle said.
Potential jurors are now
being chosen for the Menendez's
upcoming second trial. A survey
of the group of potential jurors
brought up interesting, although
common, responses. Said one juror
of the boys: "Society should be
ashamed of itself for incarcerating
these poor boys for even this long.
Who can blame them for
shotgunning their parents to
death. I think the fact that Jose is
returning from the gravejust goes
to finally prove what a cruel and
inhuman man he must be even
dead! And why doesn't Kitty stop
him? She deserves every shell she
got. More kids should be as
courageous and good looking as
those two nil-American boys
As the Menendez boys are
now strapped for money, they
broke their story where they felt it
might do them the most good (and
earn them the heftiest sum); in the
National Inquirer. Eric Menendez
(the wimpy one) said "by going to
the Inquirer, we wanted America
to know just how pitiful we
actually are. We want everyone to
understand that we are the true
victims of this whole crime. After
all, we didn't get to spend but
about a fourth of our rightful
inheritance, after those horrible
murderers broke in and killed our
awesome, most-perfect parents
(At this point the reporter
reminded Eric that they had
already confessed to the crime,
dumping the previous "other guys
did it" alibi, and claiming sexual
abuse as the motive.) "Oh, damn,
yeah, that's what I meant
anyway reiterated Eric.
The new defense strategy is
expected to be a very touching,
and no doubt theatrical, bold new
move by the brothers' attorneys,
but hopes are high for their next
trial. "America is too damn dumb
to believe that these boys actually
killed their parents of their own
free will Abramson said, in
between smacking around her
legal assistants. "They had to! They
had to do it to end their suffering,
and to get to that huge dough. You
should believe me, if for no other
reason, because you believed me
last time and this time I'm really
telling the truth
arduous tasks as a full work week
and laundry. This disease, which
has recently been found as far away
as FrenchGyana, is detectable only
by its symptoms, and those who
have stressiskaka can be found en
mass as panelists on daytime talk
shows.
"I'm inclined � compelled,
really � to present what stress I
encounter to the world said
Patricia O'Squeal, 45, of Arnold,
Mo. "If I don't show all those
watching at home what I'm going
through, how will they know?
"Look, as a patient � no,
victim! Write victim. It sounds
better � of stressiskaka, I want the
world to know that my inability to
cook and keep strong social
contacts is not my fault. It's not. I
am a victim. (Sniff) And I just want
to be (sob) accepted for what I am
Pool
Shark
ECU Swim team
captain Drip E. Head
takes a bite out of the
competion during a re-
cent meet.
without having to go out in that
cruel world (sniff) and � excuse
me, I'm sorry. Can I bum a smoke?"
Talk show host Sally Jabbering
Donatello concurs with O'Neal
and empathizes with others like
her.
"It's a real disease she said. "I
believe that in my heart of hearts
and I have nothing but the deepest
respect for these people. They take
time out of their busy days of
drinking heavily and watching Gigi
to come on our show, well, OK, my
show, and tell their stories.
"Just last week I talked to a
victim of stressiskaka. She doesn't
get more than $400 a month from
the government and still she finds
a way to feed her 37 cats, keep up a
smoking habit and go out for raves
every night. She's an inspiration to
us all
Locally, many here in the
Emerald City have been rumored
to have the stressiskaka strain.
Doctors at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital have had no calls or
appointments by people who claim
to suffer from the disease.
"I haven't seen a patient fitting
such a description said Dr. Ray
Gunn, from the center. "I've put in
45 hours a week here for three
months and this is the first I've
heard of such a thing. Has anyone
considered the possibility that these
people are just butt lazy?"
Students at ECU who claim to
have the disease are appalled at the
doctor's comments.
"Who's he calling 'lazy?"
asked Millard Dude, a sophomore
from Venice Beach, Cal. "Man, I've
got that, uh, that stripping kookoo
thing. And I ain't lazy. I mean, I've
been known to go to classes on
Friday, man
While medical analysis can't
identify the victims, many of those
rumored to have stressiskaka have
been seen around the town
commons on the popular donkey
rides. Gunn sees a connection.
"I've seen people just sit on
those things for dayshe said.
"They have to be dragged off to
bathe. And afterward they're fine.
They don't pout and they actually
do the dishes. So, in my opinion, all
those who have stressiskaka and
riding on those rides should get oft
their asses and do something





June 10- 1994
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
PrfrttfdOf.
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
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Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
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y
Since this edition of the paper is
primarily focused at the incoming freshmen
who are here for orientation, we thought
that we would share the wisdom gained
after many years of struggling. We do this,
not at of any real hope or belief that anyone
will listen to us, but because as editors, it is
our job to tell everyone in the world how
best to live his or her life.
About the best advice that we at T)te
East Carolinian can give you is to get involved.
Pick something that interests you, and join
up. There are literally hundreds of
organizations, performing groups, athletic
clubs and academic societies on campus, all
of whom gladly welcome new members.
Moreover, do not wait until late in your
college career to do so.
All the upperclassmen may seem a little
intimidating at first, so you may feel afraid
to join one of these many groups. You may
feel as if you have nothing to contribute.
However, you must always remember, only
a few short years ago we upperclassmen
were all in the same shape as you are now.
Not a one of us who began to be active in
student activities only late in our academic
careers (and some of us waited very late)
would not give anything to go back and
start much sooner.
Not only is getting involved during your
first year more fun in the long run, it is also
much easier academically. It can be difficult
to balance a full course load with
extracurricular activities. However, doing
so teaches one to budget one's time wisely,
something every college student has to do
during his, or her, last few years. The sooner
that this very important skill is learned, the
better.
So pick some activity, any activity, which
appeals to you. Jump in with both feet,
whether you choose Ultimate Frisbee,
College Bowl, Rugby, or writing for any of
the fine campus publications. Here at The
East Carolinian we are always looking for
more young talent to share the joys of long,
late nights, immenent deadlines, too little
pay and all the good times that come with
working with great people.
By Jason Williams
If
o o


kai�"W
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AUaMVS V
By Brad Oldham
Tailgating a basic part of ECU social life
� - .iv?:C-K�i ,it-� 1rill Tri-1or�o ann nr�cr
Clinton not yet one of ten greatest Presidents
Hey kids, remember the Bugs
Bunny cartoon where Bugs's
nephew has a test in American
History, so rather than study, he
listens to his uncle make up his
version? The Wascally Wabbit
goes on about how his great
ancestor so-and-so participated in
famous events throughout history
and how if it weren't for the
Warner Bros, clan, we'd still be
Englishmen.
Well, tor those of you who
plan to major in History or Political
Science, as well as those of you
who want to get your B.A. in B.S
listen up. Here follows the
indisputable, irrefutable, mostly
sincere ranking of the greatest and
worst American presidents.
Besides, you'll m
need something to
argue about when
you discover
Filibusters.
1. Abraham
Lincoln � Yeah,
I'll be
conventional. He
ended slavery,
saved the Union
and brought the
top hat back in
style. Besides, if
the South hadda
ought to count for something.
4. Woodrow Wilson � An
unabashed liberal, he broke up
monopolies, passed banking
reform and led us through WWI.
The United Nations, probably the
greatest achievement of the 20th
Century, is his legacy. Plus, he
lived in Wilmington, N.C. for a
while.
5. James K. Polk � I know, I
know. You're asking "Who the
hell is this guy?" He was prez in
the 1840's and 50's, and is
responsible for the westward
expansion of the country. Okay,
withouthim,weneverwouldhave
made it to California, thus no
Hollywood, thus no TV, et cetera.
6. James Madison � The
Father of the
Constitution,
Blame
Reagan, rather
than Bush or
Clinton, for
most of the
mess we are in
now.
Madison
was another
whose
contributions
to American
history
extend
beyond his
presidency.
We have
him to thank
for the wall
o f
won (as Bocephus so eloquently
put it) we'd all be dirt poor cotton
farmers who talk like Jesse Helms.
2. George Washington�The
father of our country has never
really gotten his due as President.
Can you imagine organizing a
bunch of rich, old, white men (who
wore wigs and spoke with an
accent) into a cohesive national
government without a precedent
to follow?
3. Thomas Jefferson �
Jefferson, my sentimental choice
for best, was probably the most
brilliant mind the U.S. of A. has
ever produced. Despite being a
better author (the Declaration of
Independence), architect
(Monticello), philosopher,
statesman and gardener than he
was president, the Louisiana
Purchase, among other things,
separation between church and
state. God bless him.
7. Franklin Roosevelt � Got
us out of the Depression, led us
through the war vs created big
beauracracy and increased
national debt. You make the call.
8. Lyndon Johnson �
Whereas Kennedy mostly talked,
LBJ followed up with action. The
Great Society, the space program
and civil rights legislation
outweigh the tragedy that was the
Vietnam War.
9. Theodore Roosevelt� Had
to pick a Republican somewhere,
just for good measure. Actually,
Teddy quit the party in 1912 and
ran to the left of Wilson on the
Progressive, or Bull Moose ticket.
A Republican environmentalist�
what a concept.
10. Andrew Jackson�
Although a case could be made
against him on the basis of racism,
the populist Democrat probably
did more to improve the lot of the
common man (and woman) than
anyone before him.
The middlin'
Nixon�many achievements,
and not given enough credit for
his domestic programs, but he was
too flawed.
Carter � Folks ought to
remember Camp David, but
instead they remember "malaise
Bush�He's right up there
with, oh, say, Millard Filmore.
Ford � Well, he fell down a
lot, if that counts for anything.
Eisenhower�Tough talk, but
he didn't have the guts to pass
civil rights.
Truman � see Eisenhower.
The ugly
39. Herbert Hoover�He gets
a bum rap, because he contributed
much to government both before
and after his single term as
President. But he presided over
the stock market crash and much
of the Depression, and he did little
to alleviate the situation.
40. Calvin Coolige � Plain
and simple, this pro-business
Republican flat out caused the
Great Depression. The only way
he could have been any worse is if
he had been a cultural conservative,
too.
41. Ronald Reagan � This
former (and presidential) actor
brought environmental policy info
the 19th Century. Blame him rather
than Bush or Clinton for most of
the mess we're in now.
42. Ulysses S. Grant �
Possibly the only president to have
worse advisors, looser control and
more scandals than Ronald
Reagan.
And where, you might ask,
does Clinton fit in? Let's put him
11th for now, counting on health
care and welfare reform. His
foreign policy will improve in his
second term. Trust me.
By the way, in case you're
wondering, Bugs's nephew
flunked his history test.
It's that time of year. A time
when East Carolina and Greenville
prepare for another fresh batch of
new college students. Yes, its
orientation once again. And we,
as fine upstanding, veteran college
students, must set forth to help
mold these young
whippersnappers into fine,
upstanding students that this
school is famous for producing
every year. And I've come up with
a tip as an example of prepara tion.
You see, it is our job to turn
the clueless youth of today into
slightly older, yet still very much
clueless youth of tomorrow. Guys,
you will have plenty of time to do
this while blatantly trying to
persuade the freshman skirts at
the Elbo that you really are captain
of the football team, president of
the IFC, valedictorian and
anything else she wants to hear.
All the while filling them with free
beer. So, I'll give you just one
example of what I'm talking about,
considering space is short and so
is your attention span. What's one
thing this school does better than
anything? You guessed it,
tailgating. If there is one thing that
we Pirates know how to do, it is
how to tailgate. Duke and Carolina
can keep their future national
leaders; if there is a keg to be
tapped, there will be an ECU
student waiting at the helm.
This is a vital part of ECU life
that the incoming freshmen will
need to know about early. When
we take on Syracuse in the home
opener this season, it will mark
the third year in a row when ECU
has had nail-biters against the
Orangemen (I'm kidding). So, to
many, the pre-game ritual of
drinking enough that all the
players look the same come
gametime will be necessary.
It seems every year Dr. Eakin
and Public Safety try to make rules
to somehow eventually end
tailgating as a tradition here in
Greenville. There is nothing that
angers a Pirate more than being
told he, or she, can't drink their
swill as they like (except maybe
taking away parking spaces with
telling us).
Well, maybe they do have a
point. I know that these freshmen
are happy to be in college and
everything, but life can sure go
sour after your third beer. If the
football games are anything like
last year's, Coach Logan might
require that you get tanked before
entering Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
Who doesn't remember "the
fight the incident in the stands
during last year's Syracuse
game,thatcausedsuchviciousand
wicked rumors to rock our
peaceful campus. Oh gad, now
ESPN won't want to come to
Greenville anymore. Children in
Nebraska will see such crude
violence, and bang little Bobby on
the head with corn on the cob.
True, ESPN is not coming
back to Greenville this year. But
not because of any fight; it is
because we were 2-9. It's that
simple. And don't let anyone tell
you otherwise.
So, set an example for those
less experienced. Drink if you like,
but set a limit for yourself. Like
walking or forming words or
something.lt might be a good time
to stop if you can't do either of
these. And don't pick these stupid
fights with each other. I don't care
if your mom does have more hair
on her upper lip than your friend
Steve, There's no need to throw
blows. We are all out there to have
fun.
True, if you are that drunk,
then you probably won't have
enough sense to know better, but
nobody made you tilt the cup.
There is nothing that makes "Joe
ECU Cop-boy" happier than
eliminating one more drunk guy
from the tailgating field.
Well, there's your example.
Like tailgating, there will be many
more hints and suggestions that
orientation members will look to
the summer residents for. Lead by
example, Pirates. If your attitude
is that of one worth following, the
future leaders of our campus will
be in good shape. After all, ve've
got an image to maintain.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Welcome to East Carolina ' niversity. As
Director Chief of the ECU Police Department, I
would like to take this opportunity to tell you about
the campus police department and our concern for
your safety while on campus. Our office is located at
609 East Tenth Street and our emergency telephone
number is 757-6150. You will also find numerous
emergency telephones located throughout the
campus which dial directly to our department. You
may use the emergency telephones at any time to call
for assistance.
Our staff is made up of thirty-five sworn
officers who patrol the campus twenty-four hours a
day throughout the year. Officers of the department
are charged with responsibility of protecting life and
property, preventing and detecting crime on campus
and providing essential services to the University
community. The officers are trained to understand
the pressures an needs of students, faculty, and staff.
The Department is responsive to the needs of our
academic community and trained to handle problems
in a discreet and sensitive manner.
Our patrol division is made up of uniformed
officers who patrol the campus on bicycle, foot, and
vehicle. The investigative division is made up of
highly trained officers who specialize in criminal
investigation. The crime prevention office provides
security programs, resident hall lectures, and media
relations for the department. Our training officer
provides in service training required by the state as
well as specialized training. The department also
hires students who work as student officers. They
work during the evening hours and act as eyes and
ears for the department.
I hope that you will take time to talk with our
officers while on campus. They are here to assist you
and to make your visit to our campus safe and
enjoyable. Remember that no campus is a sanctuary
from crime. You should make sure that valuables are
secured and most importantly always be aware of
your surroundings.
Teresa Crocker
Director Chief
To the Editor.
It's summer and my idea of a good time is
walking around campus enjoying the beautiful
scenery and the humid air of Greenville. The only
problem is that the recent pillaging of the grounds
has created a barrier around campus. Just today, 1
walked out of the Student Publications building to
head to the General Classroom Building when I
realized that I was blocked in. Was this some sort of
effort to contain me in The East Carolinian? Perhaps it
was because I had a ton of work to complete for the
orientation issue, and Latin American Literature was
the last place I wanted to spend my sunny afternoon.
Nevertheless, it was fairly necessary that I attend
class, as I have already missed several meetings. So
I headed around the construction, much to my
chagrin. I practically had to walk to Mendenhall and
make a 180 degree turn in order to get headed in the
right direction. By the time I got past the construction,
I was so irritated that I did not enjoy my walk, in fact
I resented it.
Granted, the university will be greatly benefited
by the new fiber optics system, but was it necessary
to tear up the entire grounds and reek havoc on
innocent pedestrians? Perhaps the landscape
designers of the plan should have taken those of us
who walk around campus into consideration? By the
way, have you tried to get from the commuter lot to
GCB lately?
Stephanie Lassiter
Graduate Student
English
AH letters, in order to be considered for publication, must be typed,
under 250 words, and contain your name, class rank, major and a work-
ing daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to the Editor rhe East
Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C, 27858-4353.
i
r





'� mi i�M�
Page 6
June 10. 1994
Opinion Page Supplement
By Patrick Hinson
By Brian Hall
The origins of human courage mysterious
Bush adminstration still mislabeled as a conservative
What hap-
pens within a
person that
gives them the
ability to go
forward?
At the bottom of the peach
orchard, just outside of
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in 1864,
a division of southern troops stood
massed in the burning heat of the
summer, no
doubt their
heavy gray
uniforms soaked
through with
sweat as much
from fear as from
the July heat.
They
looked out over
the wide, open
field that they
would soon be �����
ordered to move slowly across; a
long, open, uphill and unprotected
walk into the Union rifles and
artillary, massed on the hillsides
facing them.
Historians must wonder
what went through their minds
that day, as they squinted up into
the sunlight, perhaps trying to pick
out forms and shapes from the
blue Yankee lines up ahead. The
Union guns were dead quiet,
saving time and ammunition for
what would surely be a slaughter,
should the confederates be
ordered to take the hills.
It has been recorded that
while those soldiers at the bottom
of the hill awaited orders, they
wrote farewell letters home, and
many of them wrote their names
and addresses on small sheets of
paper and pinned them to their
uniforms, so that their bodies
could be indentified, and the
proper relatives notifed of their
deaths. (The Union troops did the
same thing, at a similar battle and
in a similar situation in Cold
Harbor, Massachusetts).
They must have known they
were going to die, against such
terrible odds, and yet still they
didn't turn and run, like almost
any sane person might have done.
When Picket's confederate
division was ordered into the field
that day at
Gettysburg it was
massacred. It was a
huge waste of
human life, yet no
men could havedied
more bravely.
These past few
weeks, with the
overload of
information and
photographs taken
����� at Normandy that
were all over the news and
television, I didn't really think mat
much about what it must have
been like to have actually been
there. It really wasn't until I saw a
very small picture, in Newsweek
magazine, of a landing craft full of
men approaching the beach, that I
got a feel for the actual experience.
The picture was taken inside
the boat, and focused on the
postures and expressions of the
soldiers as they got ready to enter
the battle.
It was obvious that they were
already under fire, as each man
seemed to sink into the metal of
the boat they dinged so tightly to,
and their grim, strained
expressions and terrified eyes said
it all. They were dead scared.
Everyone there thatday must
have been more terrified than we
can possibly imagine. Hopefully
none of us will ever have to feel
what they must have felt, many of
them experiencing their last
feelings on earth in those few
moments. I couldn't help but stare
into that picture and wonder what
it is about humans that makes us
do these incredible things, actons
that are so totally against our
natural tendency for self
preservation.
What happens within a
person that gives them the ability
to go forward, despite the ultimate
peak of terror, the face of deam?
Do we do it because the people
around us push us forward, or is it
because of some built-in voice
urging us onward? What is it, in
times like those, that keeps us
going, that keeps us from turning
and running?
In what many might call a
low point in time for the morals
and actions of present day human
beings, we should remember that,
for each one of us, there is
something within us that is capable
of great actions, great bravery. If it
were not so then many more
people would have run in
situations like Gettysburg and D
Day, situations that tested the core
of human spirit unlike any others.
Perhaps the two are
innapporpriate examples, but they
are just two of the many that
showed the level and intensity of
bravery that people are capable
of. It's true mat we can be at times
very cruel and insensitive people,
but we are also capable of great
things, capable of accomplishing
whatever we might have the
courage to imagine.
Those who went before us
may or may not have been
different people man we are now.
I don't think they were. I think
that, at their best, (and regrettably,
at their worst as well) they were
simply a window of what we are
also capable of being.
So, when times get tough, as
they always seem to do, we can
run from them or move forward,
the choice is always ours, although
at times it is a hard one to make.
In conversations in the past
few weeks I have found that people
of all political stripes still have the
mistaken belief that President
Bush was a conservative. One
would have thought that four
years of his incompetence and
mishandling of the political legacy
left to him by President Reagan
would be enough to disabuse
anyone of such notions.
Temperamentally, as well as
ideologically, Bush was a classic
moderate. Any examination of his
record shows that Bush was
incapable of any sort of ideology
beyond a desire to be liked and a
near obsession with compromise,
especially in domestic policy.
There is nothing that should
irritate serious conservatives than
to hear the phrase "Reagan-Bush
administrations because this
suggests that the two
administrations followed the same
policies.
Bush inherited a vigorous
economy, and a powerful political
coalition of Americans committed
to limited government, a strong
national defense, and respect for
the values upon which society was
built. Only in these last two areas
did Bush even make even a passing
attempt to follow Reagan's
example.
The economy which Bush
iherited in January 1989 was in
its 75th month of continuous
growth. Eighteen million new jobs
had been created since Reagan's
tax cuts took effect in 1983.
Inflation was down 135 from
1980, to only 4.6. The biggest
economic problem he faced, the
budget deficit, had fallen for three
consecutive years. The Democrat-
controlled Congressional Budget
Office projected that it would be
only $135 billion in 1992, less than
two percent of the Gross Domestic
Product.Instead, he turned his
back on the policies he inherited,
and agreed to the disastrous 1990
budget deal. Predictably, this
biggest tax increase in history
(until President Clinton's budget
last summer) caused a recession
and a dramatic increase in the
deficit.
Worse for conservatives than
the actual tax increases were the
loss of the ground which had
previously provided the best
distinction between the two
parties. Had Bush but stood up to
the Congress (which throughout
his term was always, even at the
end, more unpopular than he) and
refused to budge from his
campaign promise, the American
people would have rallied to his
side and the distinctions between
the two parties would have been
fully seen. Instead, Bush fueled
the cynical belief mat there was no
real difference between the two
parties.
Bush also returned to the
country to the Carter era policy of
over-regulation. He expanded the
number of federal regulators back
to the Carter level of 120,000. He
signed a new Clear Air Act, which
increased the cost of
environmental regulation by $25
to $40 billion, a nearly 33
increase, all for uncertain
environmental gains.
His cabinet appointments,
such as William Reilly at the
Environmental Protection
Agency, saddled smallbusinesses
with billions in higher costs and
paperwork, as well as criminal
penalties for honest errors, as well
as instituted a new wetlands which
threatened the life savings of
thousands of small property
owners. Between 1989 and 1992,
the regulatory burden on small
business increased by more than
34 percent.
As if all this were not bad
enough for conservatives, Bush
also let the proud Reagan record
of the 80's be bashed as merely a
"decade of greed" when only the
"rich got richer" and the only jobs
created were for burger flippers.
Not once did he rise to the defence
of the policies which formed the
core of the Republican strategy.
Bush even refused to defend
himself when accused of racism
after the Willie Horton ad in 1988.
Bush did support a few good
programs: school choice, capital
gains tax cuts, and term limits. But
as in all things he was incapable of
expressing logical reasons why
they should be enacted.
So I wish that we would get
rid of all these "Don't Blame Me, I
Voted For Bush" bumper stickers.
I will admit that I voted for Bush.
Given the options (a loon, a
prevaricator, and Bush) was there
any choice? But whether Mr.
Clinton or Mr. Bush won, the basic
course of the country would be
unchanged from the previous four
years. Instead of talking about the
end of the Reagan-Bush era, we
should rather realize that, as John
O'Sullivan says, we are really in
the second (and hopefully last)
term of the Bush-Clinton era.
Be a campus leaderwrite forThe East Carolinian. Applications
now being accepted at the Student PuBs! Building: j
Orientation
Students!
There are many ways to see
your name in print.
A. Get involved on
campus.
B. Eat more eggs than
Cool Hand Luke.
C. Break the law.
D. Work for The East
Carolinian.
Whether you want to write,
edit, design, layout, sell ads,
typeset, illustrate, work with
computers, photograph, or
simply get a regular
paycheck, TEC wants to put
you to work. All majors and
class ranks are welcome.
Apply at our offices on the
2nd floor of Student Pubs
Building (across from the
library).
The East
Carolinian
Planning your 4-year
"Career"
Tips from Career Services
EBESHMSN
"How to Get a Good Career St
�Good Performance in school shows work
�Common eouftsyof:lettffia Rstfesso know in
advinse H yoatpust 'ss$as mipilevelobi
i�Enylfpp6luilty1o4fll jRpfii!11
�Know that the Counseling Center is located on the
floor of Wright.
�Also use CampusPublic Libraries or Career Services
'or career information
fljMMiMS computer Pfgojam at Career Services or
Counseling Center can
salaitB? expected, and edt
Is
to resi
ition neei
SOPHOMORES
"Choosing a Major for Your Car
�Career Exploration"
you are a transfer studf, welcome.
pface with students who can and will help
fBrsjI. '
I
fwamm questions
iumoptions
�isthere a cIuInjt ni(itlo& Mfo!r
major Consider joining the Law Society,
SAM. AMA, SCEC. Consider helping set up a
erograrjspr inviting a speaker.
�Ermine courses In your major. Your
prSffssojS-Hn spend even more class time
since msarry ofyour classes are smaller.
These sanfc:rqf�rs might be your
references later,
�Are there ECIii!ui�i;)m your depart-
ment who could spsalf to $m campus
groups? Talk to pecljaingejype of
work you are interested in,
�Start to list your Work Expjrlences,
Schools Attended, Honors & Activities, and
sfK)SSfblerj:ferences. which, will rnjkepour
1 resllie at thfl beginning of vouf serfj&ryear.
�C8-0P anc yowraawsors may help a&you
search for reiafed experfcrm.
�Choose a Major
if you havefbt i
Revtiw al ayaiffcbie majors
Visitpaimental offices
Visit tie counseling center
met some people, you could:
iServe in a Residence Hall group
in a campus organization
Ejpy campus activities
sifllarn abput ECU Leadership i
van! work experience, foofcing
our own, ajpetting people know you
eciate anjp� offered,
d aboi4b-fr (Cooperative EdufialftHi, -In
Cog.
S:SK�S:ftS
mmsms.
"Making Career Connections"
ick up a registration packet at Career Service early
your last acadejftflyear.
�You will be at$ffo puour resumes and three
letters of reference oj� fijBMn a central location. Put
10 resumes on fimil'Cjrler Sjjyices.
Iljployers recruit lP:yoi:majpr, then you will be
;a!lei Interview at Cara�i�er5 between October
SAGtj:April. A monthly listing $yaf!abJ9 to people who
trave registered.
"aj&nd workshops on the job search, resume
;stlng, and interviewing. These are assays sr-
Sncnced in The East Carolinian announcernariwtion.
mifau can begin to contact employers on your own
ing Fall Break, etc.
se the Resource Rooms of Career Services to learn
fRore about companies, gpyeriirpntlagjncles, flic
lratecm qStospeemb$f�hipslQSeniors.You
Ian meetmpiyirsi!iroul& srgihizatjbns fee mis





Think your Ve hip 'cause
you're headed for
college?
Well, ECU has something
your little high school
never had Pirate
Comics
Si
-
I Kead it now and in the
fall, jerky. And maybe
you'll be cool.





.iiJMHiiaiin'
FALL
FORMAL
RUSH, 1994
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
SORORITIES
OH, THE
PLACES
HE'LL GO!
Zeta Tau Alpha
ZTA
Founded; LongwixxJ College, Orhjlw 15. IH9H
Colors: Turquoise and Gray
flower: While Violet
Mason: bunny
Nickname: Zetas
Philanthropy: Assih ialkm for Kctardcd Citizens
CXJUJO
Sigma Sigma Sigma �ZX
Founded: lungwocxJ College. April 20, IK9K
Colors: Royal 1'iirplc and While
Flower: Purple Violet
Mascot: Sailboat
Nickname: Sigmas
Philanthropy: Robbie Page Memorial. Sigma Saves Chiklren
Cfet Omega
XQ
Founded: I Diversity of Arkansas. April 5. IWt
Colors: Cardinal and Sir.iw
How en While Carnation
Mascot: Owl
Nickname- CfaiO's
'hikinthropy: Service rand for Social Services
Alpha Om icron Pi A Ofl
Founded: Barnard College, Columbia t Iniversity. January 1. IHV?
Color: Cardinal
Flower: jat quiniinot Rose
Mascot: Panda bear
Nickname: AOI'i s
Philanthropy: Arthritis Keseareh Foundation
'Alilui OiHknni I'i
�Viii( �� Mr
llvnj'niv ihfs mil
htltvtl yJiifitlm
nvsl us n symlml
Alpha Phi
AO
Founded: Syracuse University. Octolier 1(J. IK7
Colors-Silver and Bordeaux
Flowers: l.ily of the Valley and Fornet-Me-Nnt
Mascot; Teddy Hear
Nicknuine. Alpha Phi's
Philanthropy: Alpha Phi Foundation
Alpha Delta Pi
ami
Founded: Wcsleyan Female College, May 15. 1X51
Colors:ture Blue and White
Mower Wcxxlland Violet
Mascot: Lion
Nickname: ADPi's
Philanthn)py: Konakl McDonald House
Alpha Xi Delta
Founded: Lombard College. April 17. IW.i
Colors: Dark Blue. Light Hue. and Gold
Flower: I'ink Killamey Hose
Mascot: Fuzzy Teddy lktr
Nickname: Alpha Xi's
Philanthropy: American l.ung Association
ASA
J�S
Delta Zeta
Foumled: Miami I iniversity. October 21. 1902
Colors Kose and Cavil
Flower Pink Killamey Rose
Mascot: Turtle
Nickname: IVs
Philanthropy: talludet Sclxxil lor the Deaf
if
1U
Bast Carolina University Bush Registration
Your registration must be accompanied with a check for $25, non-refundable. made payable to
the E.C.U. Panhellenic Association. Fall Formal Rush is prior to school 8tart-up. Rush dates
are August 17 - August 22, 1994. For residence hall students, the residence halls will open
early for women going through rush. There is a residence hall fee for early arrival which
will be collected at sorority rush check-in and a meal plan fee. The established check-in
time for students registered to go through rush has been set for August 17 between 12:00 noon
and 4:00 p.m. at Mendenhall Student Center. Rush Orientation will begin at 3:00 p.m. for
parents and 5:00 p.m. for students. You must supply eight photos of yourself at the start
of rush. Registration deadline is August 9, 1994.
Sorority Rushee Data
Interested in Sorority
Life? First Day
Orientation
Jones Cafeteria 6:00 pm
LAST NAME
FATHER'S NAME:
j
MOTHER'S NAME:
HOME ADDRESS:
FIRST
MIDDLE
SOCIAL SECURITY 7
AGE
LAST
FIRST
MIDDLE
LAST
FIRST
STREET
HOME PHONE:(
HIGH SCHOOL:
CITY
ST
MIDDLE
ZIP
NAME
HIGH SCHOOL GPA:
ADDRESS
RANK:
LOCAL ADDRESS:
OFF-CAMPUS ADDRESS:
ON-CAMPUS ADDRESS:
Phone
ROOM
CURRENT ACADEMIC STANDING!
HOURS:
DORM
GPA:
MAJOR:
August 17-22,1994
casual attire
any questions?
call 757-4235
IS THERE A SORORITY AFFILIATE IN YOUR FAMILY? (Y N)
RELATIONSHIP: NAME:SORORITY:
SORORIT Y:
HIGH SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
OTHER COLLEGES ATTENDED:
NAME:
GPA:
PREVIOUS COLLEGIATE ACTIVITIES:
HOBBIES:
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL INFORMATION RELEASE FORM
In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, I hereby grant the
Dean of Students at East Carolina University the right to release the needed academic
information for sorority pledging and initiation to Panhellenic or the appropriate sorority
when necessary. My termination from rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
STUDENT SIGNATURE
DATE
Return to: 204 Whichard By August 9





Hie East Carolinian
June 10, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 9
Phil Collins delivers at Walnut Creek
Photo Courtesy of Atlantic Records
Phil Collins brought an all-star band and his repertoire of Top 40 hits to
a near-capacity crowd at the Walnut Creek Amphitheatre Tuesday night.
By Warren Sumner
Lifestyle Editor
I heard a lot of things about
Phil Collins before I went to see
his show. I heard he was lethar-
gic, that he lacked intensity and
that his vocal stamina was sus-
pect. 1 heard that, despite having
an ensemble of world-class sup-
porting musicians, he couldn't
duplicate his performance on
record when he hit the stage.
1 heard that I would be bored
to tears watching him stand on a
platform, going through the mo-
tions, waiting for his time to leave
his audience and end his concert.
I heard I would bedisgusted after
making the trip to see his show,
and would wish I stayed home.
I heard wrong.
Phil Collins tore through two
incredible sets Tuesday night at
Walnut Creek Amphitheatre,
playing over 20 songs that have
riddled the Top 40 charts for over
a decade. His repertoire of hits
and spectacular staging delighted
a near-capacity crowd who came
to hear the Genesis frontman and
drummer represent his own con-
tributions to popular music.
Collins entered his industrial-
style stage rather inconspicu-
ously, emerging suddenly from a
prop door in the middle of the
stage. The door, located in a run-
down house, provided a point of
focus for the staging. A large neon
"hotel" sign adorned the stage,
which was full of spinning fans
and moving scenery. Wearing a
gray overcoat and black hat,
Collins looked as if he had
stepped out of a '50s detective
movie.
With a sly smile at the crowd's
roaring approval, Collins re-
moved his overgarments and
stepped up to an assorted pile of
pots, pans and other trash directly
in front of his "house This refuse
turned out to be a drumset in
disguise, and Collins quickly be-
gan to play a solo for the cheering
crowd, an unusual way to start a
concert.
Drummer Ricky Lawson en-
tered on an adjacent drumset and,
after a few minutes of thunder-
ous percussion, the pair were
joined by keyboardist Brad Cole
and Collins kicked off the open-
ing to "I Don't Care Anymore
Collins left the drumming to
Lawson at this point, pulling a
wireless microphone from his
"pile of trash
Collins paced the stage like a
tiger while singing this opening
number, which by its end had
heralded the emergence of the
rest of Collins' band, namely
Darryl Struemer on guitar and
bassist Nathan East, formerly of
Eric Clapton's band.
The group quickly went into
the second song, "Billie Don't
Lose That Number which al-
lowed for the entrance of two
background singers. Collins con-
tinued to pace the stage, adding
many vocal embellishments to the
hit which are not heard on the
radio version.
After this number, Collins
showed his on-stage sense of hu-
mor by scolding a late-arriving
couple for missing his first two
songs.
"You were too busy fooling
around in the car weren't you?"
he joked.
Collins then played an elec-
tric piano, lulling the crowd into
complacency with his ballad "Ev-
eryday" and "Survivors in the
Night 3oth songs were off his
latest album Both Sides, and well
received by the audience. He then
stopped to tell the audience about
the tour's affiliation with Sears,
which was brought about after
the company came up with ideas
of how to help Collins' adopted
charity of aiding the homeless.
Before starting off "Another
Day in Paradise Collins' an-
them toward the homeless
cause, he urged the crowd to
donate spare money in collec-
tion pots located around the
venue. He gained the respect
and appreciation of the entire
audience when he urged the
concert-goers to forego buying
his concert T-Shirt, and instead
donate the money to homeless
charities.
"1 don't need the money,
they do he said. "I've already
got enough money
After the standing ovation
following "Paradise Collins
went into a ballad mode, which
showed off his considerable vo-
cal skills. "I Wish It Would Rain"
was followed by "One More
Night" and "Groovy Kind of
Love all proving how under-
estimated a vocalist Collins is.
"Separate Lives" emphasized
that point while showcasing the
extraordinary voice of back-
ground vocalist Amy Keys. The
title track to Both Sides finished
the first set and Collins and his
See COLLINS page 10
Summer success in
the cards for Maverick
By Ike Shibley
Health text gives "the skinny" on fat food
Staff Writer
The first official summer
movie to ride into Greenville
theaters this year is a breezy
little film about a gambler called
Maverick.
As summer films go, one
could not expect much more
than one gets delivered by Mav-
erick. Full of one-line zingers, a
glib attitude, and three likable
stars, Maverick has the deck
loaded in its favor.
Brett Maverick (Mel
Gibson) is a gambler and a con-
artist who wants to find out
just how talented he really is by
entering the Al Rivers Draw
Poker Championships taking
place on the Mississippi River.
Unfortunately he is three thou-
sand dollars shy of the twenty-
five thousand needed to enter.
Maverick spends most of the
film trying to rustle up the
money. He tries to win the
money in cards, collect old
debts and even once tries to
earn money by returning sto-
len property to a mission.
During the course of his
travels Maverick meets Anna
Belle Bransford (Jodie Foster),
a savvy hustler who tries to
steal from him. With her femi-
nine charms when attempts to
sweet talk Maverick after he
catches her stealing his wallet.
From the outset Maverick is
attracted to Anna Belle.
Maverick also meets Zane
Cooper (James Garner), a wily
lawman who pretends to be
slightly incompetent but who
retains all his former strength
and mental facilities.
Maverick bustles along at a
fairly brisk pace. The different
situations in which Maverick
finds himself change quickly.
From a poker game to a bed-
room to a steamboat to a stage-
coach to an Indian camp to a
card tournament to a campfire
in the woods, the scenes alter-
nate in a rapid fire succession.
Richard Donner, the director
who has also worked with
Gibson on all three Lethal
Weapon movies, seems to know
that, in the summertime, audi-
ences likea film that keeps mov-
ing.
He also knows that tongue-
in-cheek humor works well
during the summer months.
See MAVERICK page 11
By Patricia Dally
Staff Writer
Iswhatyou want really whatyou
getatMcDonald'stoday,orisitmore
fat, calories and sodium than you
bargained for? Does Kentucky Fried
Chicken really "do chicken right?"
Should you "run for the border" after
eating at Taco Bell?
Surprisingly, in today's health
conscience, high-paced society, fast
food has become a way of life. People
do not possess the time or energy to
cook a healthy meal at lunch or after
a long day at work. Fast food, v ttich
is relatively inexpensive, also meets
the needs of those who live under the
constraints of a budget
True, fast food is fast, easy and
economical, but how much nutri-
tional value are people sacrificing for
the luxury of a quick, no-mess meal?
Author and registered dietitian
Marion Franz, sets the record straight
with her new bestseller, Fast Food
Facts. The new book contains nutri-
tional information on 1,500 delicious
menu items from37of themostpopu-
lar burger-flipping, chicken-frying,
pizza- spinning fry-tossing fast food
chains in the United States.
Itincludes comprehensivecharts
and data on fat; saturated and unsat-
urated, cholesterol, calories, sodium
and everything else you would want
to know about your favorir? fast food
vittles. Also included, is dietetic infor-
mation about new "lite" or "healthy"
Photo by Harold WIs
An ECU student gulps down a cheesburger at a local fast food restaurant. New studies have analyzed the
fat content in fast food, and a new book, entitled Fast Food Facts, helps readers make informed choices.
m
CD Reviews
menu items. Fast Food Facts contains
many interesting tibits of informa-
tion such as:
� Every tablespoon of dress-
ing mayonnaise, or "special sauce"
adds an extra 100 to 200 calories to a
sandwich or salad.
� Mushrooms,greenpeppers
and onions add almost no calories to
CD Reviews
pizza.
� Kentucky Fried Chicken's
mashed potatoes have only 71 calo-
ries and 2 grams of fat
� Beans in burritos, tacos and
chili are a great low-calorie source of
fiber.
This new educational book is
now available in two useful versions.
Thefirstisa 112 page tradesize(81
2X512) convenient for the kitchen
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Food Facts is a small (4X5 12)
paperback, highlighting 15 of the
most popular fast food chains, that
is perfect for traveling with you in
your purse of briefcase to any of
your fast food pit-stops.
CD Reviews
53

to
Uh
no
Take Your Chances
JW Worth A Try
JVJV Highly Recommended
m
Z 2ft J
?rti�

Johnny Cash
American Recordings
toto
In the tiny autobiography in the
liner notes of johnny Cash's new
release, American Recordings, Cash
writes of being a boy in northeast
Arkansas and returning home from
singing on the porch with his friend.
"The long walk home alone at
night wa scary. It was pitch dark on
the gravel road and if the mxn was
shining, the shadows were even
scarier. The panthers sounded closer,
and I just knew that every dark spot
on the road wasacottonmouth snake
ready to kill me. But I sang all the
way home and derided that that
kind of music was going to be my
magic to take me through all the
dark places
If s difficult not to think of any-
thing dark when regarding Cash.
The first, best "man in black" and a
performer famous for playing to in-
mates in prisons, Cash is a perfect
choice for producer Rick Rubin
(Beastie Boys, Red Hot Chili Pep
pers) to present to modem rock au-
diences who want to tap their feet
while hanging their glu)my heads.
Admitted ly, hearing that Rubin was
working the boards for Cash's new
CD, I thought of "The Wanderer
the singer's technogospel turn on
U2's Zoori 7 w a nd i ma gined the d ea th
cries of longtime fans condemning
another legendary performer sell-
ing out to get into to wallets of Gen-
eration X.
Well, listen up, all you maudlin
slackers and musical purists, 'cause
American Recordings is untainted
Cash�solo acoustical performances
with the famous bruised soul and
earth-crumbling voice. What Rubin
has wrought is a tremendous pack-
age that both encapsulates the genre
of music Cash has performed for
most of his 62 years and gives those
unfamiliar with Cash's work a per-
fect introduction.
Recordings is a haunted album
about conviction and confession.
Leonard Cohen's "Bird on A Wire
Nick Lowe's "The Beast In Me" and
"Thirteen" by Glenn Danzig are of
efforts to live on with the burden of
fateor internal conflict. The majority
of Recordings deals with Cash'sChris-
tian belief4 in a quiet manner. The
See CASH nage 10
Rob Rule
Rob Rule
to
"This is the band I've always
wanted to be in gushed Rob Rule
guitarist David King. If so, that's
kind of sad, because Rob Rule is
possibly the most mediocre, bland
and justplainboringband I've heard
in a long time. Formed by King and
drummer James Bradley, both of
whom were once members of the
infinitely more interesting Mary's
Danish, Rob Rule is described as a
roots-oriented, melodic, guitar-and-
keyboards-based, southern-fla-
vored Anglo pop-rock band. 1
would dispense with all that and
say they're just lame.
On their self-titled debut a Ibum,
Rob Rule attempts to demonstrate
their love of such groups as Savoy
Brown, Bad Company and the Roll-
ing Stones. On songs like "She Gets
Too High "Wayside "The Find"
and most of the rest of the album,
they attempt to wear these influ-
ences on their sleeve while filtering
it all rhrougha more modern "alter-
native" sound. This isn't a bad idea
in and of itself. But instead of in-
vigorating this older music with a
modem edge and an energetic per-
formance, Rob Rule simply waters
it down. Not only have I heard
these riffs before, but I've heard
them a lot, and I've heard them
done better.
But the really bothersome thing
about Rob Ruleisnot thatthey'reso
lame. It's that they should know
better. King and Bradley were both
members of Mary's Danish, a criti-
cally-acclaimed alternative band
that didn't spend any time cover-
ing old ground. Mary's Danish ap-
parently split under the pressure I t
ROB RULE
creative differences, cutting King
and Bradley free to form Rob Rule
with Robbie Allen. Allen is a
former guitar tech for the Red Hot
Chili Peppers, a band that knows
a bit about energy and making old
sounds new again. With these
guys fronting the band, Rob Rule
should be anything but boring,
even to cynical musical ears like
mine.
Unfortunately, only two
songs on the album show even a
trace of energy. "Free for the Mo-
ment is an old-fashioned Seven-
See ROB RULE page 10





10 The East Carolinian
June 10, 1994
Hardee's Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
Hey, Mon! Rolley Gray reggaes the Attic
Hank Willimas Jr. w Collin Raye
and Kentucky Headhunted
Saturday, June 11,7:00 p.m.
$12.75$16.75$22.75
WRDU106 Earthbuddies Celebration IV
Elvis Costello & the Attractions
wThe Crash Test Dummies
Saturday, June 18,8:00 p.m.
$14.75$19.75S24.75
Beach Boys wAmerica
thursday, June 23,8:00 p.m.
$10.75�15.75$23.75
Crosby, Stills & Nash
25th Anniversary Tour
Saturday, June 25,7:30 p.m.
$15.75$20.75$29.75
Phish
Wednesday, June 29,7:30 p.m.
All seats $17.50
Allman Brothers Band w Big Head Todd &
The Monsters and the Screaming Cheetah
Wheelies
Friday, July 1,5:00 p.m.
$15.75$20.75$29.75
CASH
By Martin Newton
Staff Writer
Last Saturday night, local
reggae fans got the opportunity to
check out Rolley Gray and Sunfire,
areggaeband thatbrings the best of
Island sounds to the Attic on a regu-
lar basis. This up-and-coming four-
some performed before what
turned out to be a medium-sized
crowd despite the Attic's seasonal
shortage of patrons.
The show got started around
eleven o'clock and showcased cov-
ers from Bob Marley, Peter Tosh,
and Yellowman. The band also
threw in some original material, all
with a characteristic island feel. The
group wasn't lacking in their spir-
ited Jamaican groove, which kept
the Attk crowd swaying to their
tropical beat The band, a mainstay
Continued from page 9
in the Emerald City music scene,
also had no difficulty drawing vocal
responses from its audience.
Several times during the show
the West Indian band prompted the
crowd to become involved by ask-
ing in a thick Island voice, "Are ya
readae to partay, Greenville?" As
more and more late night patrons
poured through the doors, the re-
sponse would become louder and
more spirited.
ROB RULE
The most enjoyable and spir-
ited song by far was "Legalize It
the Tosh cover that either every-
body knew orat least seemed to fall
in tune with the lyrics. This set sent
thecrowd into thatfestive swaying
mode that seems to go hand-in-
hand with live reggae music, Co-
rona beer and good times.
The drummer, after explain-
See SUNFIRE page 11
acoustic guitar, the lone simple in-
strument, underscores the personal
faith he tries to live by without a
shadow of pretentious testimonial.
Cash's"LettheWhistieBlow" speaks
of the honest acceptance of action
while his "Redemption" and "Like
A Soldier" and Tom Waits' "Down
By the Train" are testaments of di-
vine grace for fallen men. "Bury Me
Not" and "Why Me Lord" are mod-
em psalms of gratitude and rever-
ence. "Delia's Gone" is a fond re-
membrance of a loved woman that
COLLINS
the narrator killed when she was
"cold and mean the kind of evil
make me wanna grab my
submachine
"Delia's Gone" is sincere mono-
logue meant for a laugh. "If your
woman's devilish You can let her
run Or you can bring her down
and do her Like Delia got done
The levity of "Delia the rowdiness
of 'Tennessee Stud" and the sar-
donicismof'TheManWhoCouldn't
Cry" is not so much needed as wel-
come, for they allow Cash to smirk,
Continued from page 9
even if it's a weary smile. The wit of
the latter also balances the somber
mood and lets Cash hint that while,
yes, these songs are of hard lives and
choices, life goes on and people can
only carry on the best they can.
American Recordings isn'ta come-
back; Cash never went away. But, it
serves as a clarion call to popular
lamenters that, while singing of pits
of despair can sell to the high school
crowd and the languid, this man in
black is singing with getting on af-
ter the fact. There's nothing wrong
with crying in your beer, but after
it's done, you gotta get up and walk
home. Even if if s on dark gravel
roads.
�Grcgoiy JT
Dickens
ties-style rocker that manages, for
one bright and shiny moment, to
show the energy of its influences.
The guitars jump and kick, the
drums roll, everything falls into
place; basically, the band sounds
like it's interested in this one. The
other energetic song on Rob Rule is
"Chrome a left-over from King's
days with Mary's Danish. Here the
band's modem rock roots show the
most, with messier arrangements
and grungier guitars.
Rob Rule is not a bad band.
They have talent, as they prove with
Continued from page 9
their cover of the Allman Brothers
classic "Melissa But ultimately,
"Melissa" also shows their chief
weakness. They play the song
well, but they're only playing the
notes in rote imitation of the origi-
nal. There's no feeling behind it,
and in rock thaf s a cardinal sin.
So, even though Rob Rule doesn't
neccessarily suck, I can't recom-
mend it, either. Give this one a
miss.
� Marit
Brett
3i3i3i3i3i3i3i3i3i3i
group left the cheering crowd for
a fifteen-minute intermission.
The audience was energized
by the first set, but the best was
yet to come.
Collins emerged with his
band for the second set to the
opening of his dark, haunting "In
the Air Tonight Singing on a
wireless headset mic, Collins sang
the song with an angry furor
standing in a swirling tornado of
light. Collins sat on an
unobscured drumset and joined
Lawson in pounding out the thun-
derous intro to the song's third
chorus.
"Hang in Long Enough" and
"Find A Way to My Heart" off
Both Sides saw the entrance of the
Backstreet horns. Collins and
Keys were playful on the latter, a
warm and unabashed love song,
holding on to each other like
schoolkids on their first date. This
moment was particularly comi-
cal as Keys towered over Collins'
short stature.
"Easy Lover" was the next
offering and was ever)' bit as pow-
erful as the recorded version. East
capably covered Philip Bailey's
vocal parts while holding down
the song's solid bass grooves. The
horns were featured next on "I
Missed Again playing shouting
horn stops and high energy so-
los.
"Something Happened On
the Way to Heaven" was the
show's next highlight as Collins
and the band reproduced it per-
fectly from the record. Taking a
much-deserved breather from the
strenuous set, Collins sent his
talked with the crowd and teased
them with bits of Genesis songs
interposed with the music. Drum-
mer Lawson then kicked off
"Love Don't Come Easy which
saw everyone on the stage don
black sunglasses, even the light
technicians supported high in the
trusses. These technicians were
allowed to dance alongside the
group and for a minute it looked
as if the road crew would even
get into the show.
'Two Hearts" was Collins'
next number and was somewhat
of a letdown from the high en-
ergy of "Love Don't Come Easy
This energy was quickly reig-
nited, however, with a 10-minute
version of "Sussudio This song,
the show's climax, saw a veri-
table explosion of activity on the
stage with the entire ensemble
dancing and playing. Confetti and
light explosions electrified the
crowd which sent the ensemble
off-stage to a thunderous roar.
The concert ended with the
encore "Take Me Home Each
member of the band made their
exit from the stage in turn, wav-
ing good-bye to the audience's
cheers as they left.
Eventually, Collins was left
alone. Donning the hat, overcoat
and sly smile he started the show
with, he bid his good-byes to the
crowd and walked away through
the stage's central portal, leaving
the crowd satisfied and this writer
very impressed.
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June10, 1994
The East Carolinian 11
MA VERICK
Much like he did for Lethal
Weapon 3, Dormer puts sly hu-
mor at a premium. Every charac-
ter in Maverick talks sarcastically
at some point in the film and
Maverick is sarcastic almostcon-
stantly.
Dormer adds some humor-
ous touches that nudge the
viewer's ribs more than gener-
ate laughter. One can almost see
Dormer behind the camera
winking at the audience when
Danny Glover appears as a bank
robber. When Maverick pulls the
bandanna off Glover's face both
characters look at each other for
a time with vague recognition
then simultaneously shake their
Continued from page 9
heads and say "nan
The type of punch-drunk hu-
mor evidenced in Maverick is ex-
emplified by a line Mavenck uses
when grabbed by a mean-look-
ing hombre: "I smelled trouble
and refried beans
Several scenes are replete
with screwball comedy. One in
particular has Maverick talking
to an Indian tribe while pensive
settlers look on. Only Maverick
understands the Indians, who
turn out to be Maverick's friends.
Maverick tells the chief (Graham
Greene) to look angry and shout
at the settlers to terrify them while
he and the chief talk about old
times.
Coastal Casual
Clothing Company
10U B Charles Blvd.
East Carolina's Nature & Trail Shop
Our Trail's Arc Also On The Water
When Planning Trips
Look To The Four C's
For:
As always in Donner films
the political message is cloaked
but evident (remember the tuna
in Lethal Weapon 3 that Danny
Glover's daughter will not eat be-
cause of the dolphins killed in
netting the fish?). In Maverick
Donner pokes fun of the way the
white man has treated the Native
Americans and in doing so brings
some attention to the problem.
Nothing in Maverick stands
out as being original. The story
seems borrowed from many
sixties Western series. (Maverick
itself was one of those Westerns
although the show is rarely
shown in syndication.)
Maverick's trials all lead to an
inevitable conclusion designed to
please audiences without mak-
ing them think too much. Even
the few twists thrown in at the
end of the film play like an at-
tempt to make the viewer think
the film needs to be pondered. (I
assure anyone who sees the film
and tries to reconcile the turn of
events in the film's finale that
not even the filmmakers could
probably tell you how to recon-
cile it.)
Gibson alternates between
SUNFIRE
drama and sarcasm in his film
choices of late. For every The Man
Without a Face or Hamlet he does
a Lethal Weapon 3 or a Maverick.
Because his droll humor works
so well, his roles in the latter two
films seem refreshing. Gibson
knows that he is not regarded as
a serious actor yet he does not
seem to mind.
Jodie Foster does well in one
of her first attempts at comedy.
Filling a role originally assigned
to Meg Ryan she plays coy yet
smart with an engaging attitude.
James Garner brings a
smooth confidence to his role as
Cooper. Having played the origi-
nal Maverick watching Gibson
play the part may have been dif-
ficult for Garner but his perfor-
mance on screen would indicate
otherwise. Gamer is a consum-
mate professional and gives an
aura to the film that it would not
have otherwise had.
Maverick will not win any
Academy Awards and it will not
be on any critics' top ten lists; but
for light, summertime enjoyment
Maverick deals a good hand.
On a scale of one to ten, Mav-
erick rates a seven.
Continued from page 10
Travel accessories from Eagle Creek
Light weight jackets from Sierra Design
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Wide selection of sport sandals by Teva
patagonia W2H
M@U$ crtbrti
ing to the crowd "how its done in
Tobago and Trinidad " drifted into
the only original number that was
performed. By this time the crowd
was more than into the Island groove.
As far as the style of reggae that
Rolley Gray and Sunfire performed,
it was somewhere between Bob
Marley and UB40. (Bob Marley for
the soul-searching lyrics and UB40
LIVE
for the up-tempo arrangements.)
Between the songs, the lead gui-
tarist would say a few words-of-wis-
dom to the audience, dealing with a
variety of issues,beforebreakinginto
another groove. Late in the evening,
the dance floor was nearly crowded
and the swaying continued.
Overall, the performanceturned
out to be fun and well received by the
crowd. If Island sounds and happy
times are your bag, Rolley Gray and
Sunfire will be right down your line.
1
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The East Carolinian
June 10, 1994
Sports
Page 12
Ponderings . . .
Here is a special install-
ment of "Ponderings" just
for the freshmen orientation
By
Rhodes reaches
ECU milestone

crowd. In it (as
Dave Pond always), I give
Assistant my straight-
Sports Editor up opinions of
things happening in the
sports world to enlighten the
faithful TEC readers. Hope
ya like it

The Philadelphia
Phillies have returned to the
bottom of the National
League Eastern standings.
Unlike other sub-par sea-
sons, they have the talent to
compete. The problem is, it's
all on the disabled list, and
media members and fans
(fans orbandwagoners?) are
unhappy. They are still the
same charismatic bunch, but
being mired near the bot-
tom of the division has seem-
ingly changed a lot of the
media and fans' views of the
tobacco- chewin down-
and-dirty boys of Philly.
Once thought of as colorful,
the Phillies now talk too
much. Once defensive spe-
cialists, they are now viewed
as hot-dogs. The difference
is, the disabled list has been
used 22 times in 59 games
this season, while it was only
used six times all of last sea-
son (162 games). By the way,
they are also in the toughest
division in baseball, with the
move of Atlanta to the East-
ern division. Why is it that
the Mets, in last place, are
having a "good season
while the Phillies are awful,
while ahead of New York?
I'm sure that Phillies 3B Dave
Hollins wanted to break his
wrist and IB John Kruk
wanted to have testicular
cancer and blow out a knee
before the All-Star break. No
one can win consistently
with their All-Stars on the
DLL Leave the Phillies alone.
Moving to the college
ranks, it would be great to
see Arizona State win the
College World Series. This
goes beyond any favoritism
or bias towards the Sun Dev-
ils as a team. You see, the
head coach (for 23 seasons)
of the Sun Devils is a 57-
year-old cancer victim
named Jim Brock, whose
boriy has been ravaged by
hisjillness. He can hardly
wak and suffers from jaun-
dicfc, but has only missed
ond game and no practices
this season. One player was
even quoted as saying that
theteam is afraid to lose be-
cause Coach Brock might
die: Brock continues to coach
and inspire his team through
hissickness, and it would be
nice to see him get a champi-
onship return for his effort.
This could be Brock's last
CWS, and what better way
for him to go out than on top
of the baseball world?

Salary caps are an es-
sential part of any sports
league. The NFL's salary cap
destroyed team chemistry in
some cases, but was a bless-
ing for other teams. How
could the Tampa Bay Bucs
or New England Patriots
compete (monetarily) with
the Dallas Cowboys or the
Sart Fransisco 49ers without
it? The San Diego Chargers
were devastated by the cap,
losing an All-Pro wideout
and running back. However,
San Francisco, a team that
was supposed to get killed
by the cap, came out well
even with it in place. Mov-
ing players under the cap
will take practice, but it will
all balance out in a season or
two, as did the NBA after its
cap was introduced. Now
major league baseball is
See PONDERINGS page 15
(SID) � ECU freshman Dava
Rhodes placed eighth in 10,000
meters at the 1994 NCAA Track
and Field Championships on June
1, to become ECU's first female
track athlete to earn All-American
honors.
Rhodes, from Mechanicsville,
PA finished the race with a time
of 35:10, a new personal best and
ECU school record.
"She got in there and ran with
some of the best in the nation
Villanova'sCarolJusticesaid. "At
the end, she broke some girls and
just ran a heck of a race. She was
real nervous before hand. This is
the first time she has run against
competition at that level, and she
beat a lot of girls who had a lot
faster qualifying times than her
The first ECU female track
athlete to qualify for the NC AAs,
Rhodes made herself eligible for
competition after winning the
10,000 meter race at the ECAC
championships on May 20 with a
school-record time of 35:13. She
was also the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation 5,000 meter champion
winning the April 16 event in
17:20.
Rhodes also competes in cross
country for ECU where she was
named as the C AA Rookie-of-the-
Year in the fall.
Sept. 10
Sept. 17
Sept. 24
Oct.1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15
Oct. 22
Oct. 29
Nov. 5
Nov. 12
Nov. 19
tball Schedule
at Duke7 p.m.
at Temple6 p.m.
SYRACUSE4 p.m.
SOUTHERN MISS4 p.m.
(Pirate Club Weekend)
at South Carolina1 p.m.
VIRGINIA TECH1:30 p.m.
(Hall of FameLetterwinners' Weekend)
atTulsa7 p.m.
CINCINNATI (Homecoming)2 p.m.
at Auburn2 p.m.
CENTRAL FLORIDA 1:30 p.m. (Academic SuccessChamber of Commerce Day)
at Memphis2 p.m.
out!
After
struggling the
past two
season, ECU
head coach
Steve Logan
has a highly
talented group
of players that
could bring
back another
bowl game.
1993-94 basketball season re-cap
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
After the dust has cleared on
the 1993-94 ECU basketball sea-
son, it can honestly be said that this
was a year of many ups and downs
for head coach Eddie Payne.
It was an exciting season to
watch for the Pirates, who after
winning the CAA tournament the
year before, were on cloud nine
prior to the start of the opening
game. And how can you blame
them? This was a team that had
played the eventual NCAA
champs, UNC Tarheels, and really
put up a decent fight. Okay, so they
lost by 20, but they only trailed by
10 at the half, and Billy Packer said
they played defense against the
Heels as good as any team in the
tournament.
All this hype might have been
a bit too much, too soon for ECU.
Remember, this was a team that
had not had a winning season in
See BASKETBALL page 13
Players off to the pros
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
ECU baseball players Richie
Blackwell, Mike Jacobs, Jamie
Borel and Johnny Beck were re-
cently selected in the 1994 ama-
teur draft.
Jacobs, a sophomore from
Smithfield, N.C was selected in
the 16th round by the Boston Red
Sox while Blackwell, a junior from
Whiteville, N.C was chosen in
the 17th round by the Pittsburgh
Pir. ?s.
Jacobs saw action in nine
games this season and pitched just
9 13 innings. He struck out 13
batters in his appearances and had
no decisions. His ERA for the sea-
son was 3.86.
Blackwell had a 3.55 ERA for
the Pirates in 66 innings pitched.
He was second on the team in
strikeouts with 79 and ranked
13th in the nation in strikeouts
per nine innings (10.8). He had a
5-2 record for tine season in 13
appearances and 11 starts.
Borel, ECU's career stolen
base leader, was selected in the
29th round by the Detroit Ti-
gers. Borel was the Pirates' lead-
off man and played centerfield.
Borel batted .358 and had 43
stolen bases and 25 RBIs.
Beck, ECU's career strikeout
leader, was among eight play-
ers signing minor league con-
tracts with the Philadelphia
Phillies. The Garner, N.C na-
tive was selected in the 43rd
round. He was assigned to Class
A Bata via (N. Y.) Clippers. Beck,
12-1 during his senior season,
had one save and a 3.29 ERA
File Photo
As seen here, the Pirates have always concentrated on a team
philosophy. This year's team had many stars, but it was always a
team effort that earned them victories.
Young Crane adjusts
ECU Baseball leaders
1994 Final Record (36-18)
INDIVIDUAL BATTING LEADERS
Batting Average
Frank Fedak, ss .447, 38 AB
Rick Britton, 3b .365. 197 AB
Brian Yerys. dh .364, 220 AB
Dennis Dunlap, 2b .364, 11 AB
Jamie Borel, cf .358. 212 AB
Slugging Percentage
Matt Aldridge, It 600
Rick Britton. 3b 599
Brian Yerys. dh .541
Jamie Borel, cf 486
Frank Fedak, ss 474
At Bats
Brian Yerys, dh 220
Jamie Borel, cf 212
Jason Head, If 208
Rick Britton, 3b 197
Chad Triplett. c 190
Home runs
Rick Britton, 3b 9
Chad Triplett, c 9
Scott Bermingham, 1b 8
Brian Yerys, dh 8
Jason Head, If 5
Runs Batted In
Brian Yerys, dh 59
Rick Britton, 3b 53
Jason Head, If 39
Chad Triplett. c 39
Jamie Borel. cf 25
Stolen Bases (sbsba)
Jamie Borel. cf 4359
Rick Britton, 3b 1115
Chad Puckett. 89
Heath Clark, 2o 78
Brian Yeryb. dh 67
INDIVIDUAL PITCHING LEADERS
Wins
Johnny Beck 12
Mike Sanburn 7
Richie Blackwell 5
Lyie Hartgrove 5
Jason Mills 4
Innings
Mike Sanburn 96.2
Lyle Hartgrove 94.1
Johnny Beck 90.1
Richie Blackwell 66.0
Jason Mills 38.2
Strikeouts
Mike Sanburn 82
Richie Blackwell 79
Johnny Beck 70
Lyle Hartgrove 60
Jason Mills 43
Saves
Johnny Beck 1
Jason Mills 1
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
For any student, coming to a
large university can be a difficult ad-
justmeutfromhighschool life. Throw
in the demands of athletics, and mak-
ing a successful transition becomes
even more trying.
For B.J. Crane, however, being a
true freshman as well as a starring
linebacker for the Pirates' pigskin
squad is an everyday walk in the
park
BornNov.9,1974,B.J.grewupin
the Atlanta area, where he found a
love for athletics and for God. He
comes from a family with many di-
verse talents, and he and his two
younger brothers are all exception-
ally talented in various sports and
musical aspects.
At Lovett High School in At-
lanta, Crane was a tri-letterman, gar-
nering letters in football, basketball,
and baseball. In 1992, during his se-
nior season of football, Crane, due to
team injuries, played ironman-style
football. Hestarredbothasa running
back,carryingtheball 92 times for622
yards andasastrongsafety, where he
snatched two interceptions, caused
three fumbles and blocked a punt as
well as a field goal.
"Althoughlplayedstrongsafety
in high school, the media portrayed
me as a linebacker, because I some-
how always ended up in the middle
See CRANE page 15
During the 1994 season. Coach
Overton's Pirates compiled a 27-6
record at home . They batted .304.
slugged .458, and had a .381 on base
percentage collectively. The Pirates
also turned one triple play on their way
to a .941 team fielding percentage.
ECU had an excellent season on
the mound, as well. Opponents batted
just 245 against Pirate hurlers, en
route to a 3.35 team earned run
average. Four shutouts were thrown by
ECU moundsmen - two by Richie
Blackwell, one by Mike Sanburn, and a
combined shutout by Johnny Beck and
Mike Jacobs.
ECU pitchers notched 16 complete
games during the season, led by Lyle
Hartgrove, (5). Johnny Beck and Mike
Sanburn (4 each), Richie Blackwell (2)
and freshman Ryan Kraft also added
complete games.
Congratulations to the entire Pirate
organization for continued success on
the diamond.
Compiled by Dave Pond
Moore makes ECU football unique
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
The scene is nearly the same
every Saturday. A near-capacity
Ficklen Stadium crowd watches its
ECU quarterback drop back into
the shotgun passing formation,
avoid the oncoming defensive rush
and complete a 15-yard pass to one
of his awaiting receivers.
The crowd
on the Virginia Tech 20-yard line,
where it is FIRST DOWN PI-
RATES
TheFicklencrowderuptsagain.
ECU football announcer John
Moore enjoys his role in inciting
these Greenville "riots" and views
the fame of his broadcast style with
those who attend ECU football
games as "flattery
How he developed the pause
between
66
erupts into a
deafening
howl, applaud-
ing the tremen-
dous play of its
offense. Their
team is in scor-
ing position,
poised to seize
the game from
their rivals.
Then, just
as the celebra- �,
tion begins to
quiet, a baritone voiceexplodesover
the stadium's public address sys-
tem: "Quarterback Marcus
Crandall's pass is complete to
Morris Letcher for a gain of 15
yards
The crowd braces in anticipa-
tion of what is to come. They know
this speaker quite well and the ex-
citing message he is about to de-
liver.
Finally, the deep voice ends
their suspense: "The ball is spotted
Working with East
Carolina Football
is one of the
greatest things I've
ever done.
John Moore
ECU Football Announcer
"firstdown"
and "Pi-
rates" has
broughthim
a cult hero
status.
"It was
something
that sort of
evolved
around
three years
. ago he
said. "I an-
nounced that there was a first down,
and subsequently closed down the
mike tocheck some statistics. I came
back on and said 'Pirates' and it just
sort of kept going from there
Moore, an announcer for ECU
football games since 1984, credited
WNCT-TV's Jim Woods for help-
ing him get his job.
"When Jim had to stop an-
nouncing, he recommended me for
the job he said. Moore knew
Woods through his 13-year experi-
ence at WNCT radio.
Moore and his wife of 24 years,
Diane, have lived most of their
lives in eastern North Carolina,
except for Moore's 13-month ser-
vice in Vietnam in 1968-69. Moore
has worked in broadcast radio
service since 1976.
"Working with East Carolina
football is one of the greatest things
I've ever done he said. "It's a big
thrill, a big thing in my life. Some-
times, after the game, the job turns
intoasocialevent.It'sterrificwork-
ing with some of the wonderful
people from our school. People like
Lee Workman and Jeff Charles are
always a big help
Moore mentioned that the
sporting staffs from Syracuse, Pitt
and Temple were all "class acts
but the staff from the University
of Miami was the worst he had
ever worked with. "It was like
they were doing us a favor by
being there he said.
Moore has one son, John IH,
who attended ECU. Moore said
that his son has already expressed
interest in following in his father's
footsteps, as he has assisted Moore
in high school football broadcasts.
Thatbringsabout the possibility of
a Moore legacy at ECU.
If thatoccurs, however, Moore
does not think his son will adopt
his trademark slogan. "He'll prob-
ably comeup with oneofhisown
he said.


sat
File Photo





13 The East Carolinian
June 10. 1994
ECU clubs have
much to offer
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
Have you ever wanted to play
underwater hockey or take a shot at
Goju Shorin Karate? Well, these and
many other activities can be found in
theECUClubSportsprogram. If they
donothavewhatyouarelookingfor,
you can even start your own club.
Many students do not realize
ECU has so many successful dubs
andsomerjinesmeygetconfusedwith
varsity programs. Some club sports
include rugby, lacrosse and cycling.
These clubs are not considered vari-
ety sports by the university, so the
studentsmustraise 40 percentof their
teams' funding, and the university
will supply the other 60 percent re-
quired if they believe there is enough
interest.
"Aclubisagroupofpeoplewith
a similar desire according to Pat
Cox,assistantdirectorofClub Sports.
"Adubcan be entirely sports-related
like rugby, lacrosse, martial arts, and
be a spedal interest like hackey sack.
They have to show demonstrative
interest and get enough people inter-
ested in doing it. For my needs, in
termsofnumberstostartaclub, there
has to be enough people to comple-
ment that activity. It really only takes
two people to kick a hackey sack
around and that's fine, but you're
obviously really not going to do a
wholelotincompetition.Ontheother
hand,forlacrosse,theyprobablyneed
a minimum of 22 people to play the
game because of the type of sport
Some clubs have really pro-
gressed and grown over theyears.The
underwater hockey dub is only four
years old, and in their second year
they held their regional tournament
in Minges Coliseum and attracted
over 15 teams.
Women's soccer has taken a big
step forward in recent years. The team
accepted their first invitation to play
in the state tournament in 1993 and
came away with a second place fin-
ish. The team has been very success-
ful and now will be recognized as a
varsity sport this fall.
Since these are clubs, they are
required to help raise theirown funds.
The teams go about raising their 40
percent in different ways. Some have
car washes or sell T-Shirts. The ECU
rugby team has been very successful
See CLUB page 14
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BASKETBALL
Continued from page 12
over a decade. Even when they won
the CAA tournament they still had
a losing record. And here people
were throwing great expectations
even Dickens could not match. But
you had to feel good for Coach
Payne and his Pirates. They led ECU
to a post-season tournament for the
first time since 1972. When the foot-
ball team let us down in the fall of
1992, our basketball team picked up
the slack in the winter.
So how did ECU respond to all
these dog-gone expectations? Well,
first the good. With a 15-11 overall
record, and 7-7 in the CAA, it was
the most overall wins since 1982-83,
and the most conference wins ever
in a season. Their five-game win-
ning streak in the beginning of the
season was the longest in four years,
and they had the best 12-game start
since 1957-58. And hey, people fi-
nally realized that ECU has a bas-
ketball team. Seriously, Minges Coli-
seum was not just the place where
you took PE 1000 anymore, it was
the home of maniacs.
Minges averaged 4,820 fans per
game, and sold out two games
against UNC-Wilmington and Old
Dominion. Five crowds made the
top 15 in Minges history. This was a
place where a tradition of basket-
ball was beginning. ECU won 10 of
12 games at Minges, and the two
losses against JMU and ODU were
by just two and three points respec-
tively.
The road, however, was not
kind to the Pirates. Willie Nelson
singing "On the Road Again" would
have sent chills up the spine of any
Pirate fan this season. In 15 games
away from Minges this season,
ECU was an abysmal 5-10. Losses
against teams like Mount St.
Mary's, William & Mary, and
Furman, who ECU had beaten 92-
61 at Minges just a month and half
earlier, were just plain inexcus-
able. The road was the difference
for ECU this year. You just can not
play that inconsistently away from
your homecourt and wind up in
the top of your conference.
Another weakness this sea-
son for ECU was the inability to
maintain leads until the final
buzzer. Double-digit leads in the
second half against teams like
Richmond, Old Dominion, and
James Madison all slipped away.
These were teams that they were
capable of beating each occasion.
Possibly players were tired or
drained, but forced shots and nu-
merous mental mistakes killed the
Pirates in the crunch time of many-
ball games.
The Pirates played best as a
team this season, but there were
some stand-out performances. Se-
nior Lester Lyons, who was pre-
dicted to be the CAA's Player of
the Year coming into this season,
was put in a situation he was a bit
unfamiliar with: he actually had a
supporting cast. Lyons was named
as a CAA second team pick, lead-
ing the conference in steals, and
placing seventh in scoring with an
average of 16.6 per game.
"Lester Lyons can create of-
fense better than anyone I've
coached Payne said As far as a
guy who can score, he's quick, he
can elevate, and he gets some very
nice assists. Lyons was just an out-
standing player for us
Junior Anton Gill, who is a
natural forward, was forced to
play the center position this sea-
son. Gill stepped up his immensely
the second half of the season, fin-
ishing the year with an average of
14.2 points per game, and ranked
second in the conference in field
goal percentage with 58.7 percent
on the season.
"He's a very quiet player
Payne said. "People take him for
granted, but he's very consistent
The freshmen duo of Skipp
Schaefbauer and Tim Basham was
a pleasant surprise this year. They
combined for 753 points and both
were in the top 10 in 3-point per-
centage. Both players made the
CAA All-Rookie team.
"I thought from a program
stand-point, we made a lot of
progress this season Payne said.
"We've established in our play-
ers' and fans' minds that we can
compete. We had an opportu-
nity to have a very nice season.
There were six losses that could
have gone our way. And three of
those teams, we were better
than
With ECU coming off a good
season and the renovation of
Minges complete, the 1994-95
season could be the beginning of
a new Pirate basketball era.
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NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
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Summer & Fall Semester Campus Mass Schedule
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
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953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
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June 10. 1994
The East Carolinian 14
No.
One
Congratulations!
The ECU Irates
won the
National
Championship
in ultimate
frisbee. The
team started the
season in the top
10, moved up to
number one and
then slipped
into the top five
before winning
the ultimate
frisbee
tournament.
CLUB
Continued from page 13
since it started in 1975. They raise their
money from player dues and alumni
contributions. They hold an Annual
Alumni Game every season, and all
the alumni and players come back
together for the game and afterwards
have a cookout.
The team usually receives about
$15-$20 from each contributor. The
team tries to keep in touch withformer
players and maintain good contacts,
explained team player and leader Jay
Keller.
"Money depends on equipment
for the team because we will help
purchase equipment for the team
saidjeannerte Roth, marketing direc-
tor.
"It depends on what they want
to do that year as far as their season
is concerned, like some are more
active like soccer and lacrosse and
already have a lot of contacts and
are very active with a fall and
spring season. It all depends on
the needs of the club
Once you have fielded a team,
it is not hard to find competition.
Many teams are into leagues and
unions.
Some new clubs this past year
were climbing and a martial arts
club which makes a total of 22
active clubs at ECU.
The ECU Club Sports pro-
gram is action-packed for all stu-
dent, faculty and staff.
Club sport manuals on how
to start a club can be picked up in
Pat Cox's office in Christenbury.
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15 The East Carolinian
June lO, 1994
CRANE
Continued from page 12
of every play Crane said.
Coach Bob Babich, who recruited
B.J. out of Lovett High, said, "In him I
saw an explosive athleteone who
could have a very successful career
with us in Greenville. B.Js a hard
worker on and off the field He has
shown us big-play ability in the short
time that he has been with us
B.J. chose East Carolina over
Southern Methodist University be-
cause it felt right. I was all set to
attendSMUunfilIviitedhere.Iknew
that ECU was for me
Playing against a nationally-
ranked squad such as Syracuse in his
first collegiate game was also very
exciting.
"It's an awesome feeling. Last
yearl watched SyracuseQB Marvin
Graves on telexision and now I'm on
the other side of the ball, eye to eye
with him Crane said.
Crane attributes his desire to be
the best football player that he can be
to his father, Benny. "My dad put a
fierceness in my heart that made me
want to be in on every play he said.
"My dad motivates me a lot. I'm also
motivated by thefanfare and recogni-
tion that comes from the game
Another reason I want to due
well is to prove wrong the people that
don'trespectfhePiratedefense. Iwant
people to be worried about coming
into Ficklen Stadium and lining up
against us
Crane knows that he is young
and will make mistakes, but he has
shown a great attitude coming into
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"I trv to improve my play within
the team aspect with every down
Cranesaid. "Startingisgreat,butif me
plaing on the scout team is best for
the team, thenl'llplayscout.Ihaveno
problem with that
"I just thank God for the oppor-
tunity. Without Him I have nothing,
but with Him I have everything
"I've never considered myself a
good player, but a good athlete. A
good athlete can become a good
player, but someone who is just a
good player is not a good athlete
In the classroom, B.J. is double
majoring in political science and fi-
nance, hoping to pursue a career in
politics.
"Football getsmynameoutthere,
so people will know who I am he
said. "That will help out a lot in poli-
tics. Also, I want to be monetarily
successful so I can help out those who
are less fortunate than I am
Time demands often put great
pressure on athletes, and Crane is no
exception to the rule.
"I'm just starting to relax he
said I think I've found the balance
between my classes and football that
I needed to so that I can succeed in the
classroom as well as on the field
When he is not drilling quarter-
backsorstudying, Cranesaid rhathe
likes to spend time with his girl-
friend, Tracy. He alsoenjoys writing
lyrics and collaborating with his
brothers on the more musical as-
pects.
"I'm not a me-type person �
I'm real laid-back Crane said. "I
enjov making people happy. I don't
care if I'm in a good mood or not, if I
can make you happy, then that, in
rum, will make me happy
With his future brightand wide-
open, many important choices lay
ahead. One thing about B.J. Crane is
etched in stone.
"I'm going tochange the world
he said with a convincing smile.
PONDERINGS
Continued from page 12
pushing for a cap. I hope that they
install one, because presently there
is no way possible that Bud Selig's
Milwaukee Brewers can compete
neck-and-neck for players with the
deep pockets of the George
Steinbrenner-led Yankees. Which
is precisely why the Yankees, with
past-free agents Danny Tartabull,
Wade Boggs, and Jimmy Key are
in first place, while the Brew Crew
is floundering in last with their
past free-agent acquisitions, Tom
Brunansky and Jesse Orosco.

Looking at the NBA Finals, I
don't see any way for the Rockets
to lose to New York. Prior to
Wednesday's open-ing tip-off,
Hakeem Ola juwon has dominated
Patrick Ewing this season, scoring
33 ppg while grabbing 16.5 re-
bounds per game. Ewing, on the
other hand, was held to 12 ppg and
under 10 rebounds per game. Sec-
ondly, the Rockets' "BombSquad"
of Kenny Smith, Robert Horry,
Vernon Maxwell, and Sam Casell
(all who are underrated) are on
fire, and will prove to be too much
for the Knicks from the perimeter,
giving Hakeem and Otis Thorpe
that much more room to toy with
Ewing inside. Hopefully the Rock-
ets will not be distracted by the
"Choke City" moniker�given to
Houston for losses such as the Oil-
ers' 41-38 loss to the Bills in '93
(after being up 35-3), or heavily-
favored U. of Houston's 1983 loss
to N.C State in the NCAA Basket-
ball Championship. (Olajuwon
was a member of the U. of Hous-
ton team in '83) He recently stated
that he would tike to win for the
city of Houston, not just for him-
self. When they win, it will be for
him, and the Houston fans will
show great appreciation to him
for lifting the curse.
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Student Stores
Welcome
to all freshmen
& parents!
Come
And See Our
Orientation
Specials
And Get Acquainted With
Your Campus Bookstore.
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2. GRAHAM BUILDING
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5. MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
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At The Heart Of The Main Campus.
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 10, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 10, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1013
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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