The East Carolinian, June 8, 1994






Off they go!
Four ECU baseball players
have been selected in the
baseball amateur draft. See
story on page 7.
if- ,
Buffet brings Key West to Raleigh
Parrotheids got their fill for
three days straight as Jimmy
Buffet delivered his unique
brand of tropical pop at the
Walnut Creek Amphitheatre
Page 5.
Jt
Today

mmmJk
Tomorrow
i
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 29-D3 33
Circulation 5,(MM)
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 8,1994
8 Pages
SGA gears up for productive summer
Stephanie Lassiter
ssistant News I ditor
nd ing his s u m m e r
ip ravs and enjoving
tlantic waters are not
in the plan for newh t leered S IA
dent Ian Eastman. Instead.
Eastman is spending his sum-
mer trying to make t hanges and
improvements to the ECU Stu-
dent i ,o eminent Association.

against Brynn 1 homas, took of-
fice shorth after the April race.
Eastman said he is still familiar-
izing himself with the students'
needs and wants.
"We want to take each step
at a time Eastman said. "You
can't jump in with both feet, you
have tti warm yourself up
Eastman's first plan is to
allocates funds for a Student
Support Service, rhisservici
signed by Academic Support, is
to; students who need tutorial
assistance with their course
work. A student who has com-
pleted a course and excelled, will
he paid to attend the course
again, this time offering assis-
tance to the student- who need
it. Hie Academic Support Pro
gram currently funds most oi
the-e courses, but Eastman be-
ie es
some i-
W IV
ition ovi
W
C urrent
hopes
ter and
den
should also tund
funding will
ident tutors,
ngthatcan
intstostart
lation plan,
eirtu-
eral months.
� looking to have it
imer of next
die work -
ill to be open
eriods. Eastman
nhall "student (
Dining Hall will be
t
left open overnight to otter stu-
dents a quiet and sate atmo-
sphere in which to study. He
also mentioned possibly having
the snack bar open during these
stud times.
S( A also wants to allocate
funds that will directly benefit
i I 's reputation.
"We recently funded the
ultimate team that went to the
nationals Eastman said. "We
were able to help out the ulti-
mate team to be able to repre-
sent ECU
1 ater this month. Eastman
plans to meet with Chancellor
1 akin, Vice Chancellor for Stu-
dent lite Alfred Matthews and
several other university officials
to have an evening walking tour
iif campus to determine poten-
tial danger spots which could
use additional lighting.
"We are going to be meet-
ing with faculty to show that we
care and that we are making the
effort to be there he said. "This
summer, while we have time, 1
am making a point to let the
faculty and staff know who I am
and who St .A is.
Eastman is interested in
starting a radio show through
WZMB w here students can call
in nd ask questions about S( i
Other future plans include
placing an SGA box in The I
linian , and naming his
cabinet later this month.
"It is one of the ideas ot
-i IA to get ECU out in the
spotlight he said.
F.astman said that SGA,
like the rest of ECU, was not
notified of student fee in-
creases until shortly before the
decision was made.
"We didn't hear one
word about student tee in-
creases until the very last
minute he said. "I don't
know if it was on purpose, but
no one could question it
Lawler named
interim dean
past leadership experiences on
rampus
Wendy Rountree
Statt Writer
1 m extremely familiar
Dr. rheresel awlerwillbe- with university academic affairs
interim associate vice and health science areas
cha forresi irehanddean lawler said. "(I sat on the
luate school at EC I GraduateCouncil,theGraduate
i i n.ir irilv fillin hp Curriculum Committee and for
federal m
eptedanof- berol sponsored gr,
:ium-
: lent at the As vice chancellor, Lawler
versitv ot Central Honda. will tackle many different du-
Chancellor Richard Eakin ties.
iwler to the post. "The V.C. (Vice Chancel-
"I am pleased that lerrv lor) for research is sible
lawler: id to accept this for soliciting grants for research
- n said in a state- and training I- I d is
ment released to the EC I news the support office for faculty de-
bureau e is a talented and velopment she said,
expi I administrator re- Lawler, who received her
searcher and teacher and she undergraduate degree from
will bring � leadership Georgetown University, her
tothegradual imandour master's degree from I C
Chapel Hill ,m. her doctorate
iSi tate dean of from N.C. State, said that tire
EC L A School ot Nursing since vice chancellor serves as a "con-
188 I awler said she feels con- duit for ECU faculty and stal
fidei t abour mo ing into a new
position because of her man) See LAWLER page 2
Music has the
power to heal
File Photo
rherese lawler will fill the position of associate vice chancellor of
research and dean of the graduate school beginning July 1.
History professor authors book about Soviet Union
Ten Howell
Staff Writer
Ml;
professors ha e
set m the ear 1999and isahyp
thetical look at what might have
happened it the Soviet Union still i nited Stah
udentsbelieve existed and there were a third
an easy life: teach- world war. Palmer describes his
r a couple ot hours a day, book as a studyI "net assess-
sitting in their offi es waiting tor ment Net assessment is the w av
s stems, u
:
turned to military studies in
� ; d how the graduate school. He worked for
ous weapon tire U.S. Na v studying maritime
eis, planes hisurv and at the Pentagon in
our military Washington, D.C during Desert
the air. lie be- Storm. Part of Palmer's duties
iuld be interesting to were to predict what would come
misguided students, and occa- the artillery of the United States writeabouthowotherpartsofthe outofthewar.
sionallv attending a faculty meet- interacts with artillery ot other tvorld would interact during wai "I was the first who turned
ing I i Michael Palmer, history parts of the world, including the
professor, proved this theory SovietUnion.
ng by recently writing and ' I he wa to show how
publishing his seventh 1 - things interact is to show a hvpo
thetical situation, Palmei
I "�� � �'� ' fhatwas whatl wastrvingl
uch in a memo asking what would
happen if thev surrendered said
r studied Russian as Palmer 'We'dbeleftwithallthese
t Political Science and people and not enough water or
. as an
ollegeandthen SeeBOOKpage2
Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
'Music hats charms to sooth
it savage breast -from "The
Mourning Bride a poem by V il-
ium Congrev e.
While main' people lew
music is a form ot entertain-
ment, others are using it as a
primary source for healing
physical and mental illnesses
"I am a great believer in
Music Therapy said Dr.
Michelle Hairston. chair of the
music educationtherapy de-
partment. "There are so many
avenues where we can help
people in the medical field: de-
velopmental disabilities, men-
tal health and geriatrics
The ECU School of Music
offers a bachelor's degree and
two master's degrees related to
music therapy.Currently, there
are 23 students pursuing a
Bachelor's of Music in Music
Therapy. There are It! students
studying to receive either their
Master's in Music in Music
I Therapy, or their Master's in
Music in Musk Educatiop with
Option B. The Option B plan is
designed for students who have
a music background but no
music therapy experiei
"A music therapist is a hi
havioral scientist who uses the
art o! music in a humanistic set-
tingsaid Dr. Barbara Memory,
associate professor and director
of music therapy.
Memory said music is a
great way to teach people and to
help tocalm them in critical situ
ations.
"Music can change our
moods, make us more alert, calm
us and because it can change our
behavior, it is a good me-
dium for helping people
Memory said.
Music has been used to
ease patients into surgery and
to calm small children who
might be frightened by sur-
gical procedures.
"It can help people in
the hospital to relax during
procedures, alleviate pain,
promote development and
help people to deal with hos-
pitaliation Memory said.
I he music therapist is a pro-
fessional in that she assesses
the client's needs and plans
and individualizes the pro-
gram and observes the re-
sponse to treatment
Students involved in
the music therapy program
must complete a six-month
practicum during their
couise work. Many students
work either for Pitt County
Memorial Hospital or at
nearbv schools.
Our students get a
wide variety in their back-
ground of the kind of popu-
lations thev can work with,
because the school system
and the hospital let us come
in Hairston said. Wethink
it is a valuable resource that
the students have sn many
different opportunities
Hairston mentioned
the need for music therapy
a child s life, even
during pregnancy
We span the entire lite-
span, she said "We work
with at-risk mothers. We also
use music with premature
babies to help stabilize respi-
ratory and cardiac func-
tions
One sailor remembers D-Day landing at Omaha
PARIS(AP) itei putting anniversary.
in North Benedetti, softened his
; mdItalv,GeneBenedettiwas as he recalled nearing the N
home liiste.nl, the coast It wasn't the first tinii
fficer to fated a hostile beach.
rattack, lost 22,000
ing th.n nigh to
rs in I unisi,
to head-
detti ami
I nglanda mi nth before 1)� I )ayand
Benedetti joined the military I ed officers were
boatoi . ! rein h just before the Japanese itt.
Pearl Harbor on Dec 7, 19
. namedOmaha volunteered for Navy landin
and f his landing trainingin June 1942 earlve
i raft -ii, nearh every C.I totakepartinnearlvevervarr
i one oi tni
nis i peration in and neat I
ihe first was the I S
in- asi( 'ii i t li in k
told t to( aid iff Wales A
lined their
I .it.ii mishaps
nA.iw i 11
WWII
recalled
Even oyner
Librar took part
in thevorld-vide
i ommemoration
of the 50th
annivers.irv ot D-
Day. Ih�s exhibit
portrays man
aspe Is of WWII
Photo by
Harold Wise





.��i '���ib, �
The East Carolinian
June 8, 1994
D-DAY
Continued from page 1
Science, math graduates form an alumni association
The N.C. School of Science and Mathematics has always taken
pride in the fact that it's not like any other high school in the state.
That assurance was bolstered when the NCSSM board of trustees
approved the school's first alumni association, a rarity for Tar Heel
high schools. Now the committee that worked to organize the asso-
ciation will ask the alumni for the go-ahead. Little opposition is
expected. After all, the alumni got the ball rolling. The Alumni
Association of the N.C. School of Science and Mathematics is the
brainchild of Leonardi, the first graduate to teach at the school. She
broached the idea with alumni who are friends. About 18 months
ago, they formed an organizational committee to set up bylaws for
the association and even started a newsletter to drum up support.
The graduates will have the final say June 4, the school's annual
Alumni Day.
High School scientists crack code for cancer genes
Maybe other teenagers like to hang out at the mall after school.
Not Yu-Fong Hong and Li Ho. They've been busy mapping cancer-
related genes, becoming two of the youngest researchers in a global
effort to crack the human genetic codes. What Hong, 17, and Ho, 16,
did was map three cancer-related genes to specific chromosomes,
groundwork that could help other scientists looking for the basis of
a particular cancer. Hong and Ho are juniors at California High
School in San Ramon, about 30 miles east of San Francisco. Ho and
: Hong logged 80 hours in the lab, checking and rechecking methods
and results. Finally, the day came when they looked at a copied
sample, trapped in a slice of clear gel, under ultraviolet light. There,
they feasted their eyes on the first step to success, bits of DNA
. glowing salmon pink. Charting their findings on a special graph, the
two were able to match the genes to a specific chromosome. The
genes had been sequenced, meaning their DNA has been studied, but
not mapped. The genes' products are involved in regulating cell
division, the process that causes cancer if it runs amok.
Boy, 10, receives bachelor's degree
Ten-year-old Michael Kearney got his bachelor's degree in
anthropology Sunday, apparently making him the youngest college
graduate. He wants his parents to give him a car for his accomplish-
ments, and figures by the time he is old enough to drive it, he will
have a master's degree. Michael graduated with honors from the
University of South Alabama. He finished withagradepointaverag
of 3.6 out of 4.0.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
15-man crew, three tanks and about
140 combat engineers.
The littlecraft churned through
geysers sent up by German shells.
Bulletspunchedthehull.Adudshell
slammed into the heavily armored
pilothouse.
The ramp dropped. The tanks
moved onto the beach and were all
hit. The engineers fell in the German
crossfire. Some of Benedetti's crew
were killed. Two of his boat's three
BOOK
other resources
Palmer nicknamed his
book,Ti? Book That Wouldn't Go
Away. He finished his novel in
1991. However, when the Soviet
Union collapsed, some reconstruc-
tion had to be done on the book.
Palmer described howThe War
That Never Was initially was to be
based on the hypothetical future
of the war most many people be-
lieved would occur.
"The book was like a mov-
ing target because things kept
changing, almost daily Palmer
said. "I set the book in the future,
so nobody could really touch it
Palmer wanted to get an ac-
curate picture of warfare in his
novel and by asking some co-
workers at the Pentagon to define
terms and to give true military
jargon, the picture became clearer.
The War That Never Was took
LAWLER
obtain extra-mural funding from
sources outside of the univer-
sity, such as the federal govern-
ment
Lawler said that her duties
will include overseeing all
graduate programs on campus.
She will "work with graduate
assistants and with all graduate
studies processes from admis-
sion, progression and research
requirements She also said that
engines were knocked out when he
took the craft back out to sea. After
about30yards,theGermansstopped
trying to sink him and started con-
centrating on the incoming boats.
The Germans kept up the fire
all day. Benedetti made two resup-
ply runs in smaller boats. But the
beach was almost lost until destroy-
ers came in close enough to touch
bottom and opened fire at the bun-
kers from point-blank range.
Continued from page 1
a year to write, but was not pub
lished until March 1994. Editing I
was hard and tedious for Palmer,
who had to keep changing what
he had submitted to his publish-
ers.
"I had other things that 1
wanted to get started on said
Palmer. "It can be very tiresome
writing the same book over and
over again
Palmer's advice for anyone
interested in writing a book is to
listen to your editors.
"My first manuscript was
returned to me with red ink every-
where and my stomach just
dropped said Palmer. "It's like
typing. The more you work on it,
the better you get
The War That Never Was,
which covers warfare in all parts
of the world, is sold in Michael's
Bookstore at the Plaza.
Continued from page 1
Brand New For '94
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PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED BY PRO MANAGEMENT OF GREENVILLE
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SPONSORtD By TMC STUM NT GOVERNMENT ASSOCt ATON
the Graduate School headquar-
ters is moving from Brewster
Building to the Ragsdale Build-
ing, possibly before August 1.
Except for two years work-
ing as an administrator at the
Pitt County Community Health
Department from 1973 to 1975
and five years working at the
Area Health Education Center
in Greenville from 1976 to 1980,
Lawler has been a member of the
nursing faculty at ECU since 1969
and looks forward to returning
to nursing after the interim term
as vice chancellor.
"I think this is an interest-
ing challenge, and I have done
other administration roles and
enjoyed them, but I want to go
back to nursing
Since Lawler is the tempo-
rary replacement for Vice Chan-
cellor, a search will begin to find
a person to fill the position per-
manently.
Chancellor Eakin and a
committee will conduct a search
for the permanent vice chancel-
lor in the fall, said Dr. Phyllis N.
Horns, dean of the School of
Nursing.
"I wish the search to be an
expedient and swift process
Lawler said.
WILSON ACRES
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Rent includes
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�Patio with Fence 'Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks 'Walk-in Closets
featuring
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located 4 Blocks from ECU with Bus Service
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GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WUTHIN
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NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
BAKERY, DESSERT RAR - HOT & COLD FOOD
Students receive tree beverages w ID
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Coupon expires June IS, 1994. Not
valid with any other discounts or
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Good at Greenville locations only.
r4l
2903 E. 10th St.
S;
��"iMmMBHH





The East Carolinian
June 8, 1994
Opinion
Page 3
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson, Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders, Typesetter
Lisa Sessoms, Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Warren Stunner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Director
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
As we all know by now, Monday was
the 50th anniversary of D-Day, the Allied
invasion of Normandy. While no doubt
many of us are tired of all the seemingly
endless hype and TV specials surrounding
the event, such occasions serve important
purposes in our society, other than giving
members of the media something to cover.
First, it reminds us, or at least it should,
that our senior citizens were all once our
age, that they once faced all the obstacles we
do. They once had the same dreams of
accomplishing great things. They once
wondered if they would ever find a job.
These citizens can be one of our greatest
resources if only we would learn to draw
upon their wisdom and experience.
Second, it makes us remember the many
men and women (who are all too often
forgotten; there are six nurses buried at
Normandy) who fought and died to defeat
the enemies of freedom and protect our
liberties. These brave soldiers, sailors and
airmen faced incredible dangers, risking
everything, and far too many did not return.
Yet President Clinton is right when he
said Monday that "these men saved the
world The importance of the Normandy
invasion is almost impossible to overstate.
Had the attempt failed, the contest in Europe
might well have been over which of the two
most repugnant regimes of the 20th century
would control Europe. Instead, their victory
allowed the preservation of freedom in
Western Europe, and the eventual end of
conditions came about, without which
solutions can be difficult to find. It also
provides a foundation for defending the
freedoms which we all enjoy and take for
granted.
As the president said, these men were
"the heroes we can never repay All we,
who have benefited so much from the
sacrifice of those who have gone before us,
can do is to keep their memory alive. We are
also obligated to "expand freedom's reach
forward as the president said.
This is the only way we can even attempt
to pay these men and women back for the
priceless gift which they have left to us. We
must now take the baton, and carry forward
the work which was begun those many
years ago, on the deadly beaches in the
north of France.
By Jason Williams
2"? Kgft vj
By Patrick Hinson
Grad school like a beast, kills, eats its young
Administration faces potential Korean crisis
The United States, along with
the rest of the international
community, continues to monitor
the "nuclear issue" in North
Korea, while an unlikely ally,
communist China, is the key to
stabilizing the situation.
What has Nor Korea got
that frightens the United Nations,
and galls the US.The Associated
Press circulated a story Saturday,
June 4 that speculated North
Korea had nuclear capabilities,
but did not yet have a warhead.
By the same token, however, the
CIA believes that the Koreans
have enough materials, such as
plutonium, for one or two nuclear
devices.
Theoretically, North Korea
could launch a strike on
neighboring South Korea, or even
on nearby Japan, inflicting heavy
casualties on these densely
populated countries. This is
unlikely, considering the US
maintains defense accords with
both nations and currently has
36,000 troops stationed in the
Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), but
it is nonetheless possible.
Some commentators have
compared the current regime in
Pyongyang to Saddam Hussein's
Iraq in 1990. Like Hussein, the
Koreans may be willing to test
the resolve of the US, and the
Clinton administration, which is
still finding its way in foreign
affairs.
Clinton is viewed around the
world as a wimp, much like
former President Bush before the
Gulf War. In fact, the two rivals
are quite similar in style, if not
substance. Like Bush, Clinton
approaches foreign issues with
hesitance, waiting for the world
to form an opinion, before
forming one of his own.
Bush is credited with having
expertise in foreign policy, and
indeed, it may well have been his
strong suit. He was not, however,
the genius in international affairs
thatsome claim he was. He usually
took the lead of Britain's Margaret
Thatcher, and too often he allowed
Secretary of State James Baker to
make the crucial decisions.
Sen. John McCain, RAriz
nota as a dove on Bosnia and
Haiti, as well as more hawkish
members of Congress, call for
preemptive action in North Korea
and belittle the Clinton team for a
failure to act. Appearing on CBS's
"Face the Nation McCain said,
"The administration has
performed so far in the highest
traditions of Neville
Chamberlain referring to the
British prime minister accused of
appeasing Adolph Hitler prior to
World WarU.
Much of this criticism is, of
course, partisan hot air. Sen. Bob
Dole, RKan for instance, is one
of Clinton's strongest critics, and
is thought to be considering a run
for president in 1996. It would
obviously be beneficial to claim
more experience in foreign matters
than the sitting president.
(Personally, I believe Dole will
pass on running in 1996. With his
current attacks, he is only trying
keep the pressure on Clinton only
in his role as Minority Leader.)
Economic sanctions against
the North Koreans seem to be the
favored course of action, though
some supporters question their
effectiveness. Sanctions are the
traditional favorite of the UN,
though, and an overextended and
war-weary Security Council
would be reluctant to endorse
anything tougher.
Therein lies the problem. The
US prefers that the UN take the
lead in the Korean conflict. In order
to do that, the Security CounoJ,
consisting of the US China,
Russia, Great Britain and France,
must vote unanimously to act; a
veto by any one of the members is
sufficient to halt an action.
Communist North Korea has
few friends in the world, but
communist China Is one of its best.
In addition to angering its ally
should sanctions be enacted,China
would stand to lose a bundle in
trade with Korea if it voted for
sanctions. On the other hand,
China dearly benefits from a nuke-
free Korean peninsula.
Would China be willing to join
the world in condemning its
partner, or at least acquiesce to
world opinion? Surprisingly, the
answer may be yes.
The Clinton administration
pondered at length the decision to
extend to China Most Favored
Nation (MFN) trading status to
China, in the wake of its continued
abuses of human rights. After a
series of trips by Secretary of State
Warren Christopher to Beijing,
Clinton offered MFN without
much fanfare.
It is not farfetched to believe
that in exchange for MFN, the US
will get China's cooperation
concerning North Korea. Perhaps
Christopher even talked Beijing
into leaning onits smaller neighbor
to give up the arms race.
If this turns out to be true, and
China is able to force Korea to
back down, Christopher should
be issued a public apology from
the State Department officials who
called for his resignation last year,
and from fair weather Democrats
who rarely supported him in the
past, and who continue to criticize
him today.
Clinton made a wise choice
with the experienced, albeit
boring, Christopher, and his
expertise in Middle East politics
has already produced one peace
agreement involving Israel and
another one is expected in the near
future. Who knows, with a few
more treaties around the world,
Clinton may be able to run in '96
on his foreign as well as his
domestic policies.
I think that it's safe to say
that I had no idea what I was
getting into when I started
graduate school. Like everyone
else, I had somewhat figured out
what it was that I wanted (a job). I
just had not really planned, or
thought about, what was going to
be expected of me as a graduate
student once I got both feet into
the program. I really don't think
anyone can predict what it's going
to be like, you just have to
experience it for yourself.
It gets suicidal. It really does,
and I know it doesn't get that way
just for me. I have other friends,
both in my program, and in other
programs in graduate school, and
we're all going through pretty
much the same experiences; too
much to do, with too little time in
which to do it, plus extracurricular
work that is supposed to support
our ongoing school work.
It's not that I think the faculty
and professors in our programs
are cruel people. Not at all. Even
professor I know seems to have
more work piled on them than
they can possibly finish, and yet
they get it all done, the same as the
students, somehow, and at the end
of each semester you feel like ten
linebackers roughed you up, and
left you laying in an alley. But you
get back up, and you push on, and
that's what makes the difference
between you and everyone else.
Whatever else tha t happens, when
you lose that will to keep going,
you've lost it all.
There comes a time in every
student's career when its just
seems to be impossible, that there
is no possible way around this
new boundary (like maybe Math
1065, or Latin IV, or Chemistry, or
maybe some other, personal
problem). You start to feel like
giving up. I feel that way often,
even now, as far as I've come. At
times it just doesn't seem worth it
any more.
It will be worth it though. We
must keep reminding ourselves
that. even when we have no logical
explanation, or examples to use
for why it will be. We must use
ourselves as examples. We must
become the pathfinders, when
there doesn't seem to be anyone
who has gone before us, who has
forged a way ahead for us.
Sometimes you just have to trek
on through the brush, even when
there's no clear path.
You see, I have no real idea
where I'm going, even after all
this time, but I do know I'm going
somewhere, which is always better
than standing still. Sometimes,
when that's all you have to go on,
it will just have to do.
Graduate school is hell,
which is not to say that
undergraduate classes aren't
either. Many of mine were, as I'm
sure many of yours are too. Don't
give up. I guess I'm saying that to
both of us. If we give up, we'll just
go back to what we know is behind
us, even though at times that may
seem like the safest alternative.
What's behind us, though, are low-
level jobs that will forever limit
our ability to create, to imagine.
If we can stick it out, we will
have the power and the ability to
create our own future, to choose
the path that we want to take. It's
like deciding whether or not to
climb a mountain. If you choose
not to, at least you know what it's
like down at the bottom: safe and
secure. If you do choose to climb,
however, it's a long, uphill fight,
but only those who choose to do
so will get to see that view from
the top, and God only knows
what's up there, unless we find
out for ourselves.
Letters to the Editor
Editor's note: There were several inadvertent errors in Mr. Hill's letter in last week's edition of The East
Carolinian,or which the Editor appologizes. The letter should have appeared as below:
To the Editor:
The Jews in Europe could not defend
themselves from Hitler's genocide � they were
unarmed. East European nations behind the Iron
Curtain attempted to rebel on .numerous occasions
but failed � they were unarmed. The courageous
1989 Tiananmen Square protesters in China were
brutally suppressed. Can you guess why?
Our Founding Fathers were aware that the
most well-intentioned of governments could become
tyrannical. To insure that the governed could alter or
abolish the government if it proved destructive of the
ends for which it was created, the right to keep and
bear arms was given a high place in our Bill of Rights.
Indeed, while I disagree with most of the tenets of
China's Chairman Mao, I concur with his belief that
all power comes from the barrel of a gun. As horrible
as that may sound to the more timid members of our
society, history attests to its validity. Benjamin
Franklin asserted that those who would give up
personal liberties for temporary safety deserved
neither. While searching for a "magic pill" to the
crime problem, Americans are doing exactly what
Franklin warned against. Our crime problem lies in
people, not the weapons they choose. Legislation
banning certain weapons will do nothing to alleviate
crime, but it will infringe on our rights. The
Constitution our political leaders swore to preserve
is being destroyed.
Steven A. Hill
Junior
EnglishHistory
To the Editor:
The institutions of learning have forsaken God.
This present evil world reflects this gross departure
that is becoming more evident each day.
I am not a prophet, yet I realize this nation and
the world needs someone to pronounce curses on it
to WAKE THIS WORLD UP and bring it to its senses.
In God's name, I curse the top 100 people
involved with the Abortion Movement. May they be
stricken with the plagues that they have earned and
truly deserve for advocating the butchering of
defenseless innocent children.
In God's name, may these plagues be of such an
evil nature that it will deter others from wanting to
follow them. And may God avenge the death of all
these aborted children and destroy all the wicked
people involved for their good and for the world's
good.
May God back my words up and put true Godly
fear on this world again.
Donald Raymond Wheatley
Grifton, NC
All letters, in order to be considered for publication, must be
typed, under 250 words, and contain your name, class rank, major
and a working daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to the
Editor The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville,
N.C 27858-4353.





vmmmmmmmmmmmmmmuumummmmmmmrmm
Page 4
June 8, 1994
Opinion Page Supplement
By Maureen Rich
By Laura Wright
Biking in Greenville dangerous to the health
The weather was perfect last
week, aside from the 99 percent
humidity and the blazing sun
beating down on my back, when I
decided to go for a nice, leisurely
bike ride.
I don't mean a ride on one of
those stationary exercise bikes,
although perhaps that's what I
need to invest in. I'm talking about
two wheels on the open road facing
an army of vehicles with twice,
sometimes nine times, as many
wheels on their modes of
transportation as mine.
My attempt at riding a bike to
get in shape was a well-intentioned
idea that blew up in my face.
I don't understand it. How do
people doit? My whole hour-long
trip was one huge, sweaty disaster.
I ended up fearing for the very life
I was trying to improve. I'll need
either thirty hours of aerobic
exercise, or years of therapy, to
relieve the stress that ride caused
me.
. My tragedy began as I
foolishly wandered outside of my
littte apartment complex parking
lot. What a dumb mistake that
was � I should have just ridden
around in circles in the safety of
my parking lot.
. Immediately, I was swept
away with the rest of the traffic
flying through the streets of
Greenville. Fear slowly crept into
my heart as I encountered obstacle
after obstacle.
Take left turns, for example.
How do you turn left? Traffic
regulations tell bike riders to obey
all traffic signals and rules of the
road. So, does that mean I need to
get in the turning lane to take a
left? Somehow, the idea of sitting
in the middle of the road with
Huge engines revving behind me
does not appeal to me. Therefore,
when faced with an intersection, I
did the only wise thing: I took a
right.
After fifteen minutes of right
turns, I wound up back at my point
of origin. Feeling ridiculous yet
slightly more daring, I went Tor
the big left turn. It was stressful,
but I made it through unscathed. I
was then on a real road, a big road
with a speed limit much more than
15 miles per hour, which, believe
me, I was nowhere near, anyway.
My question at that point
became, "Is my life in serious
danger of ending right now?"
Apparently, unbeknownst to me,
a game exists in the minds of
drivers. They compete to see who
can come the closest to hitting bike
riders without actually touching
them. It must be a fun game,
because it seemed quite popular.
Now, I can hear all the drivers
of the world gasping in
indignation at this theory. I can
relate, because I drive, too.
In fact, I've occassionally
cringed when I see a bike rider up
ahead. I don't mean them any
harm, I just wish they weren't
there. No one wants a bike as a
hood ornament. I hope.
Well, my trip continued � at
a much slower pace as I progressed
� and I started to have blurred
vision. At least, I thought I had
blurred vision. It might have been
the fact that I was being passed
repeatedly by real bikers going at
quite a fast pace.
I call them real bikers because
they exuded "real-bikerness
Biker shorts, helmets, water bottles
galore, and a hunched over,
intense posture that told me that I
had better get the hell out of their
way. So I did. About every ten
seconds. I expected to be passed
any second by the elderly lady
often seen riding throughout
Greenville with her flowing skirts,
professional helmet and big bike
basket. You get an idea as to how
fast I was going.
I figured out pretty quickly
that bike riding just wasn't for me.
Too much debris in the road, too
many already-in-shape cyclists
and not enough lemonade stands
along my journey. After only half
an hour of slow-motion pedaling I
was completely exhausted and
aching all over. And I still had to
turn around and ride home.
I thought of all the people I
knew who lived along the way
and contemplated begging for a
ride home, but my pride kicked in.
I imagined carrying my bike
aboard a bus, but I was broker
than broke. Finally, I did the only
thing left that I could do. I stopped
by the side of the road and
pretended to fix a shaky gear while
trying to quell my
hyperventilation and rest my
weary legs. Hey, I had to maintain
some sort of dignity.
My reason for sharing all of
this humiliation with our readers
is this: I firmly believe that a
separate road system � and not
just those silly little bike trails that
end up nowhere�should be built
immediately, for the sake of bike
riders everywhere. Traffic and
bikes just don't mix, so I'm calling
upon society in general to
segregate the wheels. Bikes and
cars are not the same, and they
belong apart.
I learned a lot from that
scorching afternoon. I learned to
appreciate life in general, and my
car especially. The worst part is
dea ling with a boyfriend who rides
15 to 30 miles four times a week at
an average speed of 15 miles per
hour, and returns looking relaxed,
refreshed and quite fit. Kind of
blows my whole theory to pieces,
doesn't it?
Racial tensions lie in wait below the surface
Ah, Greenville.
The other day, a friend of mine
stated that Greenville has all of the
negatives of a big city, without
any of the positives. By this
statement, I think that he meant
that Greenville has all of the cri me
of a larger place without any of the
social or cultural benefits of big
city life.
Before I moved here, another
friend, who has lived here all of
his life, told me that Greenville
had a serious amount of drug-
related crime. I sort of pshawed
this notion, claiming a holier-than-
thou attitude. I stated that I was
from the bustling metropolis of
Greensboro, and that the severity
of the crime problem in Greenville
was probably minimal.
Now I feel differently. After
hearing about random shootings
and crack houses, I have noticed a
tendency to marginalize the crime
problem by stating that these
crimes are "drug-related Such
statements are most often made
by white community members, in
order to soothe the worried minds
of other white community
members. In the minds of many
whites, I think that the phrase
"crime within the black
community" could be substituted
for "drug-related crime
In the past, I have steered clear
of certain issues because I have
been insecure in my ability to
correctly articulate my point of
view. Racial issues have been
among that lot. I suppose this
avoidance results in part from a
sense of so-called "white middle-
class guilt and in part from a
sense of abstract fear of being
misunderstood (also fear of death
threats from people who feel that
"Rush is Right"). So, I proceed
with caution.
Considering the fact that the
black community is
underrepresented in local (not to
mention statewide, not to mention
national . . .government,
Greenville's crime problem does
not get the attention that it needs.
It gets dismissed by whites as "not
our problem When it does get
attention, it seems to be surface
attention. Token attention.
The roots of crime in
Greenville run deeper than the tern
"drug-related" can express. Racial
tension abounds in the South �
with good reason � and
Greenville exemplifies a
somewhat intolerant southern
mindset. There is a long history of
oppression that pervades modern
reality. Greenville functions much
like other southern towns, under
a system of unspoken segregation.
The black and white communities
function separately, but because
the black community is at a
political and social disadvantage,
these two seemingly independent
microcosms effect one another in
negative ways.
We claim that we have
achieved racial equality, but a
drive around Greenville should
be enough to indicate otherwise.
By claiming that drug-related
crime is a black problem, and
therefore not a white concern, the
white community remains
oblivious to the larger system of
inequality that exists, and has
existed, in Greenville for a long
time.
And things are getting worse
and worse every day. The
atmosphere feels like a powder
keg. I think that there are slight
indications of danger, small
warning signals, all the time, but it
may take something major to make
us believe that racial inequality is
everybody's problem.
Forgive me if I sound like a
public service announcement.
Reverend Jesse Jackson and
Congresswoman Eva Clayton
came to Greenville this past
Sunday and spoke to the
congregation of a black church.
They encouraged black
community members to register
and vote. They advocated a united
front against drugs and violence
in the black community.
Most importantly, though,
they called for a change in
collective thinking. Just because
things have been presented to us
as etched in stone doesn't
necessarily mean that Ihey are.
Conservative thinking doesn't
benefit anyone, black or white, in
terms of the racial powder keg. It
would be nice if we could convince
ourselves that we have to work
together in order to rectify a
situation that effects us all, but I
am doubtful. Peaceful revolution
would be ideal, but I'm preparing
for an explosion.
Applications for opinion writers for this fall are now
being accepted at the offices of The East Carolinian. Pick
up your application in the Student Pubs Building.
Page 3
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
JuneS, 1994
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATES NEEDED toshare
a. four bedroom apartment in Tar
River. Needed June lstandor July
1st, Rent is $162.50. Call Nickie or
Dawn at 758-4332.
ROOMMATE NEEDED toshare
2. bedroom, energy-efficient mo-
bile home. Private bath; washer
and dryer, cable TV, furnished. 4
miles from campus.185.00 per
month plus 12 utilities. Call 321-
3903.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: responsible, non-
smoker for own room in apart-
ment close tocampus. $245month
and 12 utilities. Call anytime 758-
9373.
ROOMMATE: Male or female.
Wilson Acres,235month,235
deposit, Pets OK wdeposit. Pri-
vate bedroom. Pool, dishwasher,
on site laundry, etc. Lots of fun.
Call Jenk at 830-6765.
ROOMMATES NEEDED ASAP!
Male or female: 2 brs. available in 4
br. apartment in Tar River. Rent for
June and July only75.00 plus 14
utilities and phone. Pets allowed,
but no large dogs inside. Pool and
tennis court priviledges. Bus ser-
vice available. For more informa-
tion, call: Betsy, 752-5294.
ROOMMATE WANTED 2 story
Cherry Oaks house, large lot,
fenced-in back yard, storage bam
and hot-tub. Large room with pri-
For Rent
vate bath, utilities, phone, and cable
included.400.00 per month, 321-
3478.
FEMALEROOMMATENEEDED
IMMEDIATELY, non-smoker pre-
ferred to share 2 brm. apt. at
Wyndham Court.198 plus utili-
ties and phone. Call 758-3057.
WELCOME BACK ! 1 bedroom
loft210.00, or 2 bedroom duplex
$250.00 small pet OK ! 752-1375.
Homelocators.
3 BEDROOM duplex,450.00 air,
fridge, stove, pets ok! Walk to bus,
752-1375. Homelocators.
2 BEDROOM house, air, fridge,
stove,400.00 or Big 3 bedroom
house575.00. 752-1375.
Homelocators.
SOMETHING SPECIAL! 1 bed-
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house540.00. 752-1375.
Homelocators.
CHRISTIAN, WHITE FEMALE
needed before July 1st at Carriage
House Apartments for170.00 a
month plus 12 utilities and phone.
Call 756-7532 after 5 p.m ask for
Jeannie.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Wesley
Commons, 6 blocks from ECU,
washer and dryer,200.00 and 1
3 utilities, call Dave at 830-4030.
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
FALL to share 3 bedroom house
located in a quiet neighborhood
near the hospital. Must be a serious
student and non-smoker.260.00
rent month includes utilities and
cable TV. If interested call Harold
after 4:00 p.m. at 830-5160.
63 Help Wanted
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN
SALES. Earn good money with
flexible hours and gain valu-
able business experience. Call
Bonnie at 355-7700 for more in-
formation and possible inter-
view.
ENTHUSIASTIC SALES
PEOPLE to operate cart in shop-
ping mall in Greenville, Wilson
or Rocky Mount. Call the
Globetrotter in Raleigh (919)
782-5450, to arrange interview.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING- Earn
up to2,000mo. on Cruise
Ships or Land-Tour companies,
World travel. Summer & Full-
time employment available, No
experience necessary. For infor-
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C5362.
NATIONAL PARK SUMMER
JOBS - Tour guide, dude ranch,
host(ess), instructor, lifeguard,
hotel staff, trail maintenance,
firefighter, volunteer & gov-
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Excellent benefits bonuses!
Apply now for best positions.
Call: 1-206-545-4804 ext. N5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 1-800-436-4365, Ext. P-3712.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to
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Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Call 756-0417,
before 9:00 p.m.
EASY WORK ! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assemble Products at
home. Call Toll Free, 1-800-467-
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For Sale
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-Wheelers,
Motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Nationwide auction listings avail-
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C-5999.
MOPEDS, Honda PA 50, only 600
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400.00, excellent condition, 100
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55 GAL. AQUARIUM with stand,
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decorations; complete fresh wa-
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also, 10 gal. Hex. with stand, $75.00.
For Sale
Call Clark, after 7:00 p.m 830-
6035.
FOR SALE: 1987 NISSAN
SENTRA. Great gas mileage. Ex-
cellent condition. Call Kim at 830-
3842. If not home, leave message.
KENWOOD HOME SYSTEM:
Tuner, power amplifier (100W),
Stereo control amplifier, CD player
(4 pieces).250.00. Call 830-6035.
1986 GRAND WAGONEER,
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interior. Tow package, excellent
condition. Low mileage.7500.00.
321-2924.

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WE ALSO BUY STEREO, TV, MICROWAVE, ETC
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The East Carolinian
June 8. 1994
Lifestyle
Pages
NC Parrotheads 'Buffetted' at Walnut Creek
Outdoor festivities in the parking lot of the Jimmy Buffet shows
have proven to be as much of a draw as the concerts themselves
Photo Courtaay ot MargwItavW Roconte
Margaritas,
Carribbean
hamburgers, fins and Jimmy Buffett tunes were abound at Walnut Creek thb past Saturday as the
folk music icon entertained thousands. Buffett thrilled the crowd with old and new songs alike.
By Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
The Annual Jimm luffett
concert has become tht biggest
summer party around North
Carolina ever since he has added
a third show to the weekend.
There are only three cities in the
country inwhichBuffett performs
three consecutive nights, Raleigh
is one of them.
It is a weekend full of cheese-
burgers, margaritas, fins and
whatever else comes to mind
whenone thinksof Jimmy Buffett.
I had a chance to attend the
Saturday show (which some say
is the best, because the audience
has a full day and night to enjoy
the show). What makes this con-
cert different from any other is
the party before it in the parking
lot. Buffett tailgating gives ev-
eryone a chance to show off their
Key West attire and get prepared
for the big show.
Getting prepared includes
grilling out cheeseburgers,
drinking lots of beer and
margaritas and singing some old
Buffett tunes along with friends.
The "Buffett attire" includes Ha-
waiian shirts, some wild looking
hats and putting a big shark fin
. a the topsof cars. This year, the
fins on the cars seemed to be the
big attraction. I even saw a man
with a full shark fin outfit. An-
other tailgate attraction was a
band, The Iguanas, playing in
the parking lot.
The show began around
8 p.m. Buffett started off with a
song from his new album. The
crowd seemed to enjoy this song,
but were ready for some old fa-
vorites like "Volcano which
turned out to be his next song. A
volcano was displayed in the back
of the stage, �
complete with
erupting lava.
The next
couple of
songs got the
crowd imme-
diately into
the show, be-
ginning with
Buffett's im-
pressive ver-
sion of
"Brown Eyed
Girl" and the
classic song
"Fins As the
sun went
down and
night fellonWalnutCreek, Buffett
told the crowd he was ready to
play his version of a love song,
"Why don't We Get Drunk and
Screw Everyone sang along to
this one, which was one of the
better played songs of the night.
Buffett then went into some
of his new songs, which was the
down part of the show. My only
complaint of the whole show was
The 'Buffett
attire' includes
Hawaiian shirts,
some wild
looking hats and
putting a big
shark fin on the
tops of cars.
New book gives fat fads on fast f i
�:�:�
By Patricia Dally
Staff Writer
Is what you want really what
you get at McDonald's today, or is
it more fat, calories and sodium
than you bargained for? Does Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken really "do
chicken right?" Should you "run
for the border" after eating at Taco
Bell?
Surprisingly, in today'shealth-
consdous, high-paced society, fast
fcraihasbecomeawayoflife.People
do not possess the time or energy to
ccokahealthymealatlunch or after
a long day at work. Fast food, which
isrelativelyinexpensive,also meets
the needs of those who live under
the constraints of a budget.
True, fast food is fast, easy and
economical, but how much nutri-
tional value are people sacrificing
for the luxury of a quick, no-mess
meal?
Author and registered dietitian
MarionFranz sets the record straight
with her new bestseller. Fast Food
Facts.
The book contains nutritional
information on lOOdeliciousmenu
items from 37 of the most popular
burger-flipping, chicken-frying,
pizza-spinning,fry-tossingfastfood
chains in the United States.
It includes comprehensive
charts and data on fat (saturated
and unsaturated), cholesterol, calo-
ries, sodium and everything else
one might want to know about fa-
vorite fast food vittles.
Also included is dietetic infor-
mation about new "lite" or
"healthy" menu items.
Fast Food Facts contains many
interesting tidbits of information
such as:
� Every tablespoon of dress-
ing, mayonnaise, or "speciai sauce"
adds an extra 100 to 200 calories to
a sandwich or salad.
� Mushrooms, green pep-
persand onionsadd almostno calo-
ries to pizza.
� Kentucky Fried Chicken's
mashed potatoes have only 71 calo-
ries and 2 grams of fat
� Beans in burritos,tacosand
chili are a great low-calorie source
of fiber.
This new, educational book is
now available in two useful ver-
sions. The first is a 112 page trade
size(812"X5 l2"),convenientfor
the kitchen shelf.
The second version of Fasf vood
Facts isasmall (4n X512") pay-
back, highlighting 15 of the most
popular fast food chains. This is
perfect for traveling in purses of
brief cases to any of those fast food
pit-stops.
to
Uhno.
Take Your Chances
$ Worth A Try
jJJJ? Highly Recommended
Nefertiti
LJJF.E.
to)
Before Queen Latifa, Yo-Yo and
MC Lyte, the rap world was mostly a
patriarchy. These women, among
othershave helped, to add variations
and a distinctly female flavor to a
maledominated medium. Nefertiti is
thelatestto"stepuptothemike"with
her debut album LJ.F.E. on Mercury
records.
The album's title, LJ.F.E, is an
acronym for Living In Fear of Extinc-
tion, a title given to Nefertiti by Pro-
fesorGriff,former member ofTAiblic
Enemy. The title is a statement on
how the artist sees modem times and
human existence in general.
Nefertiti says, 'Ve are living in
fear of death and that goes for every-
body. The ozone depletion, pollu-
tion,homelessness,war.Theworldis
in such turmoil; we live in fear of
everything. I believe fear is the first
form of motivation
The first track is a speech by
Minister Louis Farrakhan set to a
background beatltstatesthatall revo-
lutions must begin with the mind,
and does so without any of the ex-
pected extremist attitudes. The al-
bum is not overly concerned with
Mack problems, the theme is more
involved with the troubles thatweall
face. There are also the standard rap
songs of competitive self praise, but
they are few. The main lyrical subject
is political and social criticism, sort of
inthesarredassasPublicEnemy,but
not quite as hard.
Oneof the stronger tracks ispro-
duced, co-written and performed by
Guru and DJ Premier of Gangstarr. It
is a jumpin' old school song, "No
Nonsense" warns of not stayingtrue
to the game. There is one song that
really throws me: "My Soul Good"
was written by Nefertiti and Neil
Young. It's not an outstanding song
besides that fact, it just raises a lot of
questions.
"Miss Amutha Nature" is the
first single. It warns of the price we
will all pay for environmental de-
struction, probably a first for rap
music Nefertiti says "We just have
to try and get back to nature and
See LJ.F.E. page 6
The Lion King
(Soundtrack)
Walt Disney Pictures
to)
111 be honest There's not much
you can say about a Disney
soundtrack Usually the a-side is
packed with catchy tunes with short
bouncy notes,strongvocalsand cute
sound effects in the background.
Sometimes fhere'sa gem. Snow White
had "One Day My Prince Will
Come Pinnochio had "When You
Wish Upon A Star" and Dumbo fea-
tured "When I See An Bephant Fly
And, of course, there's "The Bare
Necessities" from 77k Jungle Book.
Usually the b-side is full of
instrumentals and usually ignored
by kids and their parents. And usu-
ally Disney soundtracks are bought
he played too many disappoint
ing new songs when he could
have been playing more famil-
iar, old songs.
The encore made up for mis
part of the show when he ended
with two of my favorites,
"Margaritaville" and "Come
Monday
The reactions in the crowd
were,forthe
most part,
positive
about the
show. A
loyal Jimmy
Buffett fan,
(which
some call a
"R�ro(nead"y
from Ra-
leigh had
tickets to ev-
ery show of
the week
end.
"Satur-
, day night
was better
than Friday and this year's show
was tine best I've seen so far he
said.
"I really enjoyed the show,
but it could have been a little
longer, because I was having
such a great time said another
Raleigh native.
This was true, but well just
have to wait until next year for
another Buffett party.
The Flintstones turns out to
be a 'Yabba Dabba Don't'
By Ike Shibley
for one song to be played over and
over.
But when Disney tapped the
team of Ashford and Menken for The
Little Mermaid, the prospect of music
that rivals the animation for consis-
tent quality allowed the movies to
reachlargeraudiences.Itwasn'tthat
earlier musicwasn'tas good in films
like Lady and the Tramp or The
Aristocats, it just wasn't aimed for
popular consumption like Ashford-
Menken songs are and their off-
Broadway experience ("Little Shop
of Horrors") meant they knew how
to make a song fit alongside dia-
logue and not bore the kids or par-
ents. Tough trick
And so Mermaid, Beauty and the
Beast and Aladdin were huge in the-
aters and in record stores. When
Ashford died before Aladdin's music
was finished, Disney hired noted
lyricist Tim Rice ("Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat
"Jesus Christ Superstar") to fill in.
Rice was given The Lion King and he
asked for Elton John as his writing
partner, who reportedly took less
than twenty minutes to write the
basic melody of each song. Hans
Zimmer wrote the score and ar-
ranged the croBlperiormances with
gospel singer Andrae Crouch and
enlisted the aid of the South African
Committed Artist Choir.
See LION page 6
Staff Writer
"Flintstones, meet the
Flintstones. They're tite modem
stone age family
Meet77ieFJnteto��S,thelatest
in a seemingly endless string of
television remakes.
Meet 77k Flints tones, another
film with no point other than to
capitalize on the public's appetite
for nostalgia.
Meet 77k Flintstones, a mar-
keting dream for businesses from
Mattel to McDonald's (or
RocDonaki's, as the restaurant is
shamelessly promoted in the film).
Meet the makers of The
Flintstones, who had to know that
creating a live action film based on
cartocncharactersisatrickypropo-
sition.
Tocreate the town ofBedrock
thefilrrarakerssparednoexpense.
They also spared no expense on
the technical effects that helped
bring Dino to life as well as the
Dirtabird,theSabretoothtigerand
the living garbage disposal All
these beings have more life than
their human counterparts. The
money spent makes the film inter-
esting to look at, but not to watch.
The trouble with the film is
thatevenwiththesupposednum-
ber of screenwriters thought to
have worked on the script, (32 ac-
cording to Entertainment Weekly)
the story iseven more ancientthan
its prehistoric setting.
Fred Flintstone, portrayed by
John Goodman gets duped into
being the fall guy of an evil em-
ployee of Slate Enterprises, Cliff
Vandercave (Kyle MacLachlan).
TherestcfthefflmchrcnkiesFred's
troubles and his inevitable suc-
cess.
Although the story is not the
reason viewers are rumbling in to
see TheFIintstones,a ptotwithany
kind of intelligence would have
been a beneficial commodity to
help the film stay around longer
than a few weeks.
The reason to see The
Flintstones, other than the sets and
the amazing special effects, is to
see the human personification of
the cartoons.
Goodman brings a "roly-
poly" good will to Fred. While
filming Always, Steven Spielberg
("Spielrock" in 77k FUntstones'
credits) reportedly told
Goodman that he would makea
great Fred. At times, Goodman
seems torn between creating his
own Fred and portraying the
Fred of the cartoons. The film-
makers obviously wanted the
Fredofthecartoons;soGoodman
spends most of his time yelling
"YabbaDabbaDoo'buthedoes
so without much enthusiasm. It
does not help that his voice
sounds very little like the ani-
mated version of his character.
Rick Moranisdoes nothing
as Barney except follow Fred
and try to capture Barney's vo-
cal nuances. Moranis adds very
little to his role.
ElizabethPerkinsandRosie
ODonnell play the roles of
Wilma and Betty well. Perkins
looks remarkably like Wilma
and hasher voice down very
well�sherecervedvowelessons
from the woman who vocalized
Wilma in the animated series.
O'Donnell lacks Betty's
svehness,butcapturesher giggle
to a tee.
CKhermterestingcharacters
who appear are Elizabeth Tay-
lor as Wilma'smother and Halle
BenyasCMVandercave'ssec-
retary. The most interesting
character, Fred's dictabird, is
voiced by Harvey Korman.
Korman's smugness appropri-
ately fits the bird's resentment
of having to work for a boss like
Fred. Cameos by Jay Leno and
Johnathan Winters help to pro-
vide distraction from the barren
plot
"The Flintstones" cartoon
was a take-off of "The Honey-
mooners so it was not at all
original.
TTKFiinistorifismoviethere-
fore has even less originality.
Therxmtofdirrurushingreturns
has been reached.
The best 77k Flintstones of-
fersisan interesting lookathow
to make a liveaction film from
cartoons.
The worst it offers is an-
other obvious attempt to
squeeze money from consum-
ers without providing them a
shred of quality.
On a scale of one to ten, 77k
Flintstones rates a four.





6 The East Carolinian
June 8. 1994
LION
Continued from page 5
The resulting soundtrack is
hardly a one-trick pony. 77k Lion
�4(JngSmndtrackKBectsiesettingof
the storyline�theplainsand jungles
of Africa � with surprising range.
From the glorious vocalsand wood-
winds of "Circle of Life" to actor
Jeremy Irons' serpentine singing an
"Be Prepared" and Elton John's
stomping version of "I Just Can't
Wait To Be King" the soundtrack is
made for as varied an audience as
Disney has ever attempted to reach.
.Riceobviously enjoyed himselfwrit-
ing the lyrics with such bits as the
allusion toa mane asa sign of power
in "I Just Can't Wait To Be King "I
only need a little time Perhaps a
little hair I'm gonna be the mane
event I'm brushing up on look-
jngdown (Ill skip mentioningany
connection between the song and
Elton John's recent hair transplant)
there's even an allusion to flatu-
lence in "Hakuna Matata If Walt
Disney really was frozen when he
died, he must be spinning like Dor-
othy Hamill about now.
The CD's great. It's catchy, has
great beats and you can dance to it
Granted, it may not fit in the multi-
disc player between the Doors and
Husker Du, but it shows great vari-
ety and even works as a skeletal
storylineon itsown And for those of
you who try to avoid music like this,
it should be playing on the taped
music in elevators and department
stores any time now. So go ahead,
buy it listen to it and get it stuck in
your head now and get it over with
�Gregory
Dickens
Yo, Lifestyle writers!
Meet with me
Wednesday at 5 p.m.
iiWUimvilmM4kvW!ii'4
you going to do �
stay home and watch
'FreeWUly?'
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
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Openings for Fall & Both Summer Sessions '94
Your Next School Years Living Space In A
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AT A PRICE THAT WILL COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
U.F.E.
Continued
from
page 5
explain thatnomatterwhatyoudoin
mis world, no matter what color you
5re,orhow much moneyyou have�
uon'tmesswimmother nature
fFrue enough
As a first effort L1F�. is a good
release, but not great The ideas pre-
sented are probably new to the rap
world, but the presentation is not
verv innovative.
The music has the standard
mega-bass and strange but catchy
lcorsthatcausethatinvoluntaryhead
bobbing. However, the lyrics are the
best part, so 111 end with a little quote
from the track "Made In the USA it
gives a good summary of what
Nefertiti calls an "inner album
"Devoid of principles, lacking in
purpose Deluded to think we've
rich resources in surplus Unaware
of any history ortradition Destined
to a fate of inevitable perdition
� Kris
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UNIVERSITY
NOTICE
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
TELEPHONE NUMBER CHANGE
"WE ARE CHANGING TO SERVE YOU BETTER"
PHONE NUMBER CHANGE
931 TO 328
757 TO 328.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S EAST CAMPUS IS SCHEDULED TO CHANGE THE
TELEPHONE PREFIX (1ST 3 NUMBERS) FROM 931 FOR THE RESIDENT HALLS
AND 757 FOR THE STAFF AND FACULTY TO 328. ONLY THE PREFIX WILL BE CHANGED.
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The East Carolinian
June 8, 1994
ECU Baseball Leaders
1994 Final Record (36-18)
INDIVIDUAL BATTING
Batting Average
Frank Fedak, ss
Rick Britton, 3b
Brian Yerys, dh
Dennis Duniap, 2b
Jamie Borel, cf
Slugging Percentage
Matt Aldridge, rf
Rick Britton, 3b
Brian Yerys, dh
Jamie Borel, cf
Frank Fedak, ss
At Bats
Brian Yerys, dh
Jamie Borel, cf
Jason Head, If
Rick Britton, 3b
Chad Triplett, c
Home runs
Rick Britton, 3b
Chad Triplett, c
Scott Bermingham, 1
Brian Yerys, dh
Jason Head, If
Runs Batted In
Brian Yerys, dh
Rick Britton, 3b
Jason Head, If
Chad Triplett, c
Jamie Borel, cf
Stolen Bases (sbsba)
Jamie Borel, cf
Rick Britton, 3b
Chad Puckett,
Heath Clark, 2b
Brian Yerys, dh
LEADERS
.447, 38 AB
.365, 197AB
.364, 220 AB
.364, 11 AB
.358, 212 AB
.600
.599
.541
.486
.474
220
212
208
197
190
9
9
b 8
8
5
59
53
39
39
25
4359
1115
89
78
67
INDIVIDUAL PITCHING LEADERS
Wins
Johnny Beck 12
Mike Sanburn 7
Richie Blackwell 5
Lyle Hartgrove 5
Jason Mills 4
Innings
Mike Sanburn 96.2
Lyle Hartgrove 94.1
Johnny Beck 90.1
Richie Blackwell 66.0
Jason Mills 38.2
Strikeouts
Mike Sanburn 82
Richie Blackwell 79
Johnny Beck 70
Lyle Hartgrove 60
Jason Mills 43
Saves
Johnny Beck 1
Jason Mills 1
During the 1994 season, Coach
Overton's Pirates compiled a 27-6
record at home . They batted .304,
slugged .458, and had a .381 on base
percentage collectively. The Pirates
also turned one triple play on their way
to a .941 team fielding percentage.
ECU had an excellent season on
the mound, as well. Opponents batted
just .245 against Pirate hurlers, en
route to a 3 35 team earned run
average. Four shutouts were thrown by
ECU moundsmen - two by Richie
Blackwell, one by Mike Sanburn, and a
combined shutout by Johnny Beck and
Mike Jacobs.
ECU pitchers notched 16 complete
games during the season, ted by Lyle
Hartgrove, (5). Johnny Beck and Mike
Sanburn (4 each), Richie Blackwell (2)
and freshman Ryan Kraft also added
complete games.
Congratulations to the entire Pirate
organization for continued success on
the diamond.
Compiled ty Dave Pond
Rhodes earns
AU-American
status for ECU
(SID) � ECU freshman Dava
Rhodes placed eighth in 10,000
meters at the 1994 NCAA Track
and Field Championships on June
l,to become ECU'sfirstfemale track
athlete to earn All-American hon-
ors.
Rhodes, from Mechanicsville,
PA finished the race with a time of
35:10, a new personal best and ECU
school record.
"She got in there and ran with
some of the best in the nation
Villanova's Carol Justice said. "At
the end, she broke some girls and
j ust ran a heck of a race. She was real
nervous before hand. This is the
first time she has run against com-
petition at that level, and she beat a
lot of girls who had a lot faster
qualifying times than her
The first ECU female track ath-
lete to qualify for the NCAAs,
Rhodes made herself eligible for
competitionafter winning the 10,000
meter race at the ECAC champion-
ships on May 20 with a school-
record time of 35:13. She was also
the Colonial Athletic Association
5,000 meter champion winning the
April 16 event in 17:20.
Rhodes also competes in cross
country for ECU where she was
named as the CAA Rookie-of-the-
Year in the fall.
Sports
Page 7
Four ECU baseball players drafted
File Photo
Senior, Johnny Beck will be missed by Pirate fans. Not only did he have
a quality 1994 season, but was the ace behind coach Overton's staff.
Players win honors
(SID)�Four members of the
ECU baseball team were selected
second team All-East on the
American Baseball Coaches As-
sociation-East Region
All-Star team an-
nounced on Thursday.
Johnny Beck, a se-
nior left-handed pitcher
from Garner, N.C re-
ceived his first AU-East
honors.
The ECU career
strikeout leader led the 7
Pirates with a 12-1 attlte
record and had a 3.29 ERA in 90
13 innings pitched this season.
Beck was also named second-
team All Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation this season.
Jamie Borel, a senior out-
fielder from Overland Park, Kan-
sas, was a repeat selection after
also being named to the squad in
1993. Borel batted .358 for the Pi-
rates and set new ECU career (69)
and single season (43) stolen base
records. A two-year starter for
the Pirates, Borel was a first-team
All-CAA selection this
season.
Britton, a senior in-
fielder from Venice, Fla
led the Pirates with a .365
batting average and .599
slugging percentage.
Britton drove in 53
runs and had 15 doubles
and nine homers for the
year.
He was also selected as a sec-
ond-team All-CAA selectionand
was a versatile player for the Pi-
rates, starting all 54 games and
splitting time between the out-
field, first base and being desig-
nated hitter.
ECU completed the season at
the CAA tournament on May 21
with a 36-18 overall record.
Borel
Adamski runs with
All-Academic team
(SID)�ECU cross country run-
ner Eric Adamski has been named to
the 1994 GTE University Division
AcademicAll-Districtni at-largeteam
announced on May 31.
The 10-member at-large team is
comprised of varsity athletes from
sports other than baseball, football
and basketball. District III consists of
aJlDivisionIschoolsinFlorida,Geor-
gja, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Virginia.
A senior from Deprew, N.Y
Adamski served as captain of the
1993 men's cross country team. A
two-year letterman for the Pirates,
Adamski was ECU's second highest
placer in four meets during the 1993
seasonand was ECU's top finisher in
the Methodist College Invitational,
taking second place, his highest fin-
ish of the season.
CAA Update
On Monday, UNC-
Wilmington named Jerry Wainright,
a Wake Forest assistant basketball
coach for the past nine seasons, as
their new head coach
He replaces Kevin Eastman,
who resigned in May to take the
head coaching position at Washing-
ton State University.
The 47-year-old Wainright as-
sisted both Bob Staak and Dave
Odom for the Demon Deacons.
Update by Dave Pond
A physical therapy major,
Adamski was named the 1994
Texasgulf Outstanding MaleScholar-
Athlete in April, being recognized as
ECU's top student-athlete.
In 1993, Adamski, who holds a
3.928gradepointaverage, wasnamed
as a Colonial Athletic Association
Scholar Athlete and has been a two-
time member of the Texasgulf All-
Academic team.
He is a member of the Golden
Key National Honor Society, Omi-
cron Delta Kappa National Leader-
ship HonorSociety and the Phi Kappa
Phi National Honor Society.
Members of the All-District HI
team are now eligible for the national
GTE Academic All-America team,
which will be announced June 21st.
See ADAMSKI page 8
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
ECU baseball players Richie
Blackwell, Mike Jacobs, Jamie Borel
and Johnny Beck were recently se-
lected in the 1994 amateur draft.
Jacobs, a sophomore from
Smithfield, N.C was selected in the i
16th round by the Boston Red Sox
while Blackwell, a junior from
Whiteville, N.C, was chosen in the
17th round by the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates.
Jacobs saw action in nine games
this season and pitched just 9 13
innings. He struck cut 13 batters in
his appearances and had no deci-
sions. His ERA for the season was
3.86.
Blackwell had a 3.55 ERA for the
Pirates in 66 innings pitched. He was
second on the team in strikeouts
with 79 and ranked 13th in the
nation in strikeouts per nine in-
nings (10.8). He had a 5-2 record for
the season in 13 appearances and
11 starts.
Borel, ECU'scareerstolenbase
leader, was selected in the 29th
round by the Detroit Tigers. Borel
was the Pirates' leadoff man and
played centerfield. Borel batted .358
and had 43 stolen bases and 25
RBIs.
Beck, ECU's career strikeout
leader, was among eight players
signing minor league contracts
with the Philadelphia Phillies. The
Garner, N.C, native was selected
in the43rd round. He wasassigned
to Class A Batavia (N.Y.) Clippers.
Beck, 12-1 during his senior sea-
son, had one save and a 3.29 ERA.
8r iII � M 1 1
Mike
Jacobs
� � ; Pirates headedto pros
16th RoundBoston Red Sox sophomoreMike Jacobs, RHP 0-0, 3.86 ERA, 13Kin9. 1 ip
17th RoundPittsburgh Pirates juniorRichie Blackwell, RHP 5-2, 3.55 ERA, 79 K in 66 ip
29th RoundDetroit Tigers seniorJamie Borel, CF .358 BA, .452 SLG, 43 SB �
43 rd RoundPhiladelphia Phillies seniorJohnny Beck, LHP 12-1, 3.29 ERA 70 K in 90.1 ip 1
Summer schedule full of events
(RS) � Rec Services is spon-
soring a wide array of activities
within the Intramural Sports pro-
gram for the ECU community dur-
ing the heat of the summer months.
First Summer session programs
currently operating include basket-
ball, soffball, and tennis.
The 5-on-5 basketball league
ended week one of play on Thurs-
day as several teams began to assert
theiron-courtpower. "DaFatKatz
led by ToddStephens, BrianHaislip
and Jay Howe, have unveiled a fast-
break style that has taken them to a
a potent inside-outside game with
Kevin Fields and Brett Bi ttner in the
lane, while Jeff Byrd and Eric Fisher
launch bombs from the perimeter.
Lurking in the wings as a "sleeper"
is "Solomon's Wisemen, "featuring
IM veterans Mark Solomon, Jamie
Rowland and Jason Bailey.
Softball play hasbeen competi-
tive and exciting within the Men's
and Co-Rec divisions. In the Men's
league, "U-Lose U powered by the
offenseof captain Stephen Lovett,and
Jay Gaskins' "Greenville Polecats"
have gotten off to 2-0 starts. Other top
teams include Dave Pond's "Pent-
house Revenge" and "NineGuys and
FNuT.
TheCo-Rec league hasfeatureda
number of very close contests. Two
teams finished the first week unde-
feated. The "Greenville 69ers" won
two close games behind the efforts of
2BJennifer HobbsandSS David Batts.
"Summer's Finest" won their only
game of the week behind the offense
of Lynda McCormick and Patrick
Phillippe. Luxkingdosdybehind these
top teamsarejohn Whitehead's "Eco-
nomics Sodety"and the mysterious
"Fun Team Team member Randy
Odom boldly predicts ihatthey are the
team to beat, and will not lose again.
Thetennissinglesleagueindudes
tcppkyersMarlcMening,GregSchehr
and Kenji Fujinaga in the Men's divi-
sion while Debra "Rockett" Riffle and
Kim Brewington have emerged
as the topwomen'splayers. Regu-
lar season tennis play will con-
dude on Friday prior to next
week's elimination tourney.
UpccHninglntramuralSports
events indude ihe BigSplashGolf
Bonanzas�a golf putting, chip-
ping and driving contest at The
Big Splash, on Wednesday, June
8.Also,aFrisbeeGolfSingtesTour-
ney hdd at the ECU Frisbee Golf
CourseonWednesdayJune8and
Thursday, June 9 from 3:00-5:00
pjrL
The Basketball Shooting
Triathlon, a series of basketball
shooting activities such as Hot
Shots, Free throw shooting and
a Three Point contest, will be
held at Christenbury Gym from
4:00-6:00 pm on Tuesday, June
14. Sign-ups for these three
events will be conducted on-
site with a valid ECU identifica-
tion card.
File Photo
The Knicks tough style of play carries into the 1994 Finals
By Beau Schillito
Staff Writer
The New York Knicks beat
the Indiana Pacers Sunday night
at Madison Square Garden with
tough physical play not seen since
that of the 1980's Detroit Pistons.
The Knicks have been criti-
cized all season for being a cheap
team, instigating team brawls in
the playoff series against the New
Jersey Nets as well as the Chicago
Bulls. Their agressive play has
given them the reputation as a
bunch of punks playing streetball.
However, their amoeba defense
has stifled offenses all season long
and created turnovers, in the play-
offs. Reggie Miller, who killed
them in the fourth quarter of game
five, with 25 points, was held in
check by John Starks for only two
baskets in the second half.
Miller, who could have won
the game with a turnaround
jumper, choked with an air ball.
He was then flagged with a con-
troversial flagrant foul on Starks,
which helped end the game. Their
performance was not pretty, but
their king-of-the-hill style has got-
ten them into the NBA finals.
Their bad boy image and in-
timidating defense has brought
forth criticism from many players
and coaches.
"We mav not be the prettiest
team or have the most skill at
times Knicks coach Pat Riley
said, "but the one thing this team
has is heart �and I can't under-
stand anyone questioning that.
This team is all about heart
It seems true that Bulls coach
Phil Jackson wants to pass these
guys off as punks. The Knicks
have earned respect and it seems
they do play with heart. Still, the
question remains: Can they beat
Hakeem Olajuwon and the Hous-
ton Rockets?





8 The East Carolinian
June 8, 1994
ADAMSKI
Cont'd
from
page 7
J 994 GTE UnavrsihjDii'isionAca-
demic All-District III Ai-Large Sqiwi
Eric Adamski (East Carolina,
Cross Country, Senior)
Erwin Aguilera (North Carolina
State, Soccer, Senior)
Rob Cook (Virginia, Track,
Graduate Student)
Peter Duitsman(SouthCarolina,
Soccer, Senior)
Frederik FJiasson (Virginia Com-
monwealth, Tennis, Senior)
Matt Holthaus (James Madison,
Cross Country, Senior)
Gregory Kin (South Carolina,
Soccer, Junior)
Rick Mansfield (William &Mary,
Gymnastics, Senior)
Paul Stevens (GeorgiaTech,Ten-
nis, Junior)
Barry Wynn (Georgia, Swim-
ming, Sophomore)
The Sports
Department is
hiring writers
for both
Summer
sessions and the
Fall. To apply,
come by the
TEC office on
the 2nd floor of
the Student
Pubs, building,
across from the
library. Ask for
Brian Olson or
Dave Pond.
5V�v
Adult
Entertainment
jf Center
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE
'Constant WBd to call & rtymter m gdemct. Mud �ttw by S:00.
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
No
Good!
Basketball
players will
not be seen
this
summer at
t h e
basketball
courts at
the top of
College
Hill. The
University
removed
the nets and
baskets for
the
summer.
File
Photo
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St
Pittman Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZZA
Dinner Special
1 Large 2
Topping Pizza
$4.99
Take Out Only7-11 pm nightly
ALFREDO
SPORTS
BAR
r.f!
Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
Daily
Lunch Special
2 Slices 1
Topping
and Drink
$1.99
Featuring
Foosball, Air
Hockey & Pool
Tables
OPEN MIY
FOR LUNCH
HAM 2PM
7PM3AM
752-0022
Wed: 99i
32oz
BEER
Thurs: 10t
DRAFT
TrTT9Wj2dz
BEER
Mon: 10t
DRAFT
Tues: 25(
DRAFT
MAD HATTER
I
I
I
I
I
I
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage time 9:00pm
um Call 756-6278
McDnnal
r 5 miles west of Greenville on 264 All.
Dlcktnaon Avq.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
Man
P15580R13 26.52
P16580R13 29.97
P17580R13 29.17
P18580R13 30.50
P18575R14 31.82
P19575R14 33.15
P20575R14 34.48
P20575R15 35.80
P2I575R15 38.45
P22575R15 39.78
P23575R15 41.1
DRICADIER
BG 402SX
�Steel belted for
strength
�Radial polyester
cord body
�Aggressive ribbed
tread
�All-season capability
�M&S Rated
Auto Care Center
758-2306
1604 Dickinson Ave.
Hours:
Mon-Thurs 8-6
Fri8-5
Radial Passenger I Sat 8-1 Protection, Performance & Quality
FREE Tire Rotation
With Any Service
I OIL FILTER &
I CHANGE PLUS
I LUBE
I $17.50
i
I plnsqlv ir 1'iimriMl lim.W.
Olhtr Brands & Wiifjhlv StiBhtl
Htgtar.
Most cars jnil light trucks.
Ofta ralid wittiraupoe Ant01 iom4
Front Brake Service
$72.50
Lifetime Warranty Pads
$62.50
1 Year Warranty Including
Semi-Metallic Puds
r
i
i
i
i
i
$5.00 OFF
Any AC Service
This coupon is worth
$5.00 Off
Most cars and light trucks.
CV JOINT SERVICE
$50.00
AN ENGINE DIAGNOSIS
WITH THE
SMART ENGINE ANALYZER
mis COUPON rSWORTHSS.OOOFI THI
REOI LARPMCI hi siki ENOINE
MtALYZERCOMPt rER DIAGNOSIS
i Ollc, ratio W.Ul, ouponthrai W I" 9 I Oiler jlid �,th upon Ihn, CM-IO-M J �� �IV M� JL� M Xll �� ��� � -J
Remove axle, old outer hoot,
clean & repack joint & install
new outer boot-
Most cars and light trucks
Offer valid with coupon Ihru OH- 10-su
$5.00 OFF
i
i
-i
WEDNESDAY BAND NIGHT
Tonight
Sports
pat
Sports Pad
AMSTERDAM
FREE COVER TILL 10:00 PM
18 & OVER
Sharky's
50 Drafts
Sharky's Only - Busch
$1 Domestics
$3 Cover for All
$1.50 HIGHBALLS
EVERY THURSDAY
BLOCK PARTY DollarNite
FREE COVER TILL 9:00 PM
Come into any club entrance Thursday and then
feel free to roam from club to club!
FREE MEMBERSHIPS
All Bars
Dollar Nite MHC�. billiards- rock r rou
All Bars DOWNTOWN
M .���'

.jp.rf ��
j�W"





Title
The East Carolinian, June 8, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 08, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1012
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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