The East Carolinian, June 1, 1994






Sports
Coach K. Stays
After contemplating coaching jobs
in the NBA, Mike Krzyzewski will
remain the Duke head coach.
Story on page 7.
Lifestyle
Hootie and the Blowfish
Anxiously awaiting the
release of their album
'Cracked Rear View Hootie
and the Blowfish will perform
at the Attic Thursday night.
Story on page 5.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 29- �32
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 1,1994
8 Pages
Scandals
receive
attention
Jason Williams
News Editor
The Washington press
corps, along with much of the
popular national media, is
once again abuzz with talk of
presidential scandal. Many
say President Bill Clinton's
accusers threaten his legisla-
tive effectiveness and tarnish
the image of the office itself.
Will charges of sexual
harass-
Analysis
m e n t
while gov-
ernor of -m���
Arkansas,
or even a lawsuit, bring dowr
the Clinton presidency the
way the Watergate break-in
and subsequent cover-up
ended Richard Nixon's politi-
cal career? Given the history
of such matters and today's
political climate, the answer is
probably not.
Undoubtedly, Republi-
cans and other political foes,
most notably the Religious
Right, are licking their chops
at the prospects of the Paula
Jones case actually going to
trial. Even if Jones settles out
of court, there is political hay
to be made out of her ever
having brought up the allega-
tions in the first place.
And beyond thecharges
of womanizing, which the
nation has heard, and re-
sponded to at the polls, be-
fore, there remains the specter
of Congressional hearings on
the Whitewater land deal.
Despite House Speaker Tom
Foley's thus far successful ef-
forts to postpone them, Con-
gress appears willing to con-
tinue the investigation and
may proceed with hearings as
early as June.
All of this may seem too
much for one man, and his
legislative agenda, to over-
come. But Bill Clinton is the
"comeback kid He showed
that in the campaign, and
again in his fights over his
budget, NAFTA and gun con-
trol. He may not win them
all�witness gays in the mili-
tary�but he is resilient none-
theless.
Though the critics will
continue their calls for sanc-
tions, punishment, impeach-
ment, et cetera, Clinton should
escape the Paula Jones affair
unscathed, at least for the time
being. The President hired one
of the top D.C. lawyers, Rob-
ert Bennett, whose specialty is
keeping cases from going to
court, and chances are he will
do just that. If anything,
Clinton may face a civil suit of
some kind after he leaves of-
fice, but that will be in 1996 at
the earliest, and Jones may
have lost her desire to fight by
then.
The public is fickle when
it comes to the sex lives of
politicians. Monkey Business
and a mere Polaroid sunk Gary
Hart's presidi ntial aspirations
in 1988, while a national repu-
tation for womanizing and
even charges that he was re-
S'ion ib'c for a young
See ANALYSIS page 2
Student fees on the rise
eri Howell
Staff Writer
Watch out students, it's
happening once again. Next
year's student fees are climbing
the never-ending ladder of infla-
tion, and the costs appear to be
soaring into the sky.
On May 6, the ECU Board
of Trustees approved a $97 rec-
ommended increase in manda-
tory student fees, said Jim
Plummer, director of the Uni-
versity Budget office. Plummer
confirmed that these mandatory
student fees include and sup-
port those activities that are cov-
ered by the state, such as inter-
collegiate athletics, intramural
and recreation, theStudentGov-
ernment Association (SGA),stu-
dent publications, health sen-ices
and debt service for some of the
buildings on campus.
"It is not uncommon for
any campus to raise some fees
because of the lack of support
from the legislature said Lay ton
Getsinger, associate vice chancel-
lor for business affairs. "We will
never be a Harvard or Yale, but
we need to be in competition with
those universities such as UNC.
Our job is to support the students,
and make things good and af-
fordable for them so they will want
to come back as alumni
These recently endorsed in-
creases will be submitted to the
University of North Carolina
Board of Governors, Plummer
said, whose approval is necessary
before the fees can take effect. He
explained what the fee increases
would include and said they could
begin to take effect after the Board
of Governors holds its first meet-
ing in June.
"Of course, we hope that
these increases will come into ef-
fect soon Plummer said.
Forty dollars of the fees will
go toward the renovation and
enlargement of Minges Coliseum.
The debt service fees, which are
paving for the enhancement of
Minges, are also paying for the
riew Student Recreational Center
and the repairs that were finished
last year on Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium. The increase for student
fees will total $22, Plummer said,
and will include $4 for transit fees
(campusbusing),$l for Fine Arts,
$16 for the new recreational
center's staffing and programs,
and $1 used to expand the Stu-
dent Fund Accounting Office
(SFAO) hours from 8 a.m. until 5
p.m Plummer confirmed. The
SFAO issues emergency loans and
issues student payroll checks. The
remaining $35 will be used for
athletic fees.
The current $696 student
fees of 1993-94 will be raised to
$793 for the upcoming 1994-95
academic yearat ECU, confirmed
Richard Brown, vice chancellor
for business affairs. New facili-
ties, such as the $11.4 million
ongoing expansion of Minges
Coliseum, will include the $40
The
Breakdown
Minges Coliseum$40.00
Athletic Programs35.00
Rec Center Staffing & Programs16.00
Transit Services4.00
Fine Arts1.00
Student Fund Accting Office1.00
Total fee�
$97.00
increase
increase that has already been
approved bv the Board of Gover-
nors in Chapel Hill.
Getsinger does not feel that
ECU would lose many out-of-state
students because of this tuition
increase.
"We want to keep educa-
tion afloat so we can provide what
we can and want for the stu-
dents he said. "We are a
business just like any other
business, and, unfortunately,
the cost of education will go
up, and ECU is more of a value
See FEES page 2
More parking lots closing
Jason Williams
News Editor
The west end of campus,
beside Mendenhall and behind
Jovner Library, is beginning to
look more like a prison than a
parking lot.
Because-of construction on
the Recreation Center and on the
renovation of the library, Parking
and Traffic Services fenced in part
of the parking lot directly behind
Joyner and closed Ninth Street
past Lawrence Street and Glenn
Way (the street that runs directly
behind Jovner) to all thru-traffic.
Two gravel lots, the corner
lot close to the woods and the lot
behind Public Safety, have been
fenced in as well. The east end of
the paved lot has been converted
from "university registered" to
"staff" parking. The remainder of
the paved lot has been designated
"commuter
Pat Gertz, director of park-
ing and traffic services, said con-
struction on Joyner has already
taken the small staff lot directly
behind the library building. To
compensate for this loss, the 60
spaces directly south of that were
designated as "staff
The parking lots directly
behind Jovner and beside
Mendenhall that a re being fenced
in now will not be re-opened. The
gravel lot behind Public Safety
will only be used to house con-
Photo by Jason Mnmt
Welcome to Mendenhall State Prison. Fences like this one have heen
erected at other sites around campus, including behind the libraty.
MiuUioi.LrailersduringtheJoyner construction traffic entei Hum
renow.tion, however, and mav re- Tenth Street rather than through
Fiber optics strung
out across campus
open after the project's comple-
tion in about three years, Gertz
said.
Gertz also plans to create 12
to 14 metered pa rking spaces near
the Rec CenterMendenhall.
These would replace the meters
that were on the west side of
Mendenhallpriortoconstruchon.
In addition to the lots on the
west end of campus, the staff park-
ing lot beside Slay and Umstead
residence halls has been closed
becauseof construction. Gertz said
that meant the loss of about 70
spaces, which have not been re-
placed at the current time.
"I felt like it was better that
the middle of campus she said.
The renovations of Slay and
Umstead residence halis are ex-
pected to take approximately one
ear, Gertz said.
Freshmen will be moved far-
ther from campus, as well. The
freshmen storage lot at Minges
Coliseum has been moved to a
newly created lot at the Allied
Health (Belk) Building.
Further construction will
require additional changes in
parking throughout the summer
and into next fall. "Students
should pav attention to the signs
and be aware of changes in park-
ing Gertz said.
New program offers academic support
Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
When many students come
to ECU, they have delusions of
grandeur: late night parties,
members of the opposite sex and
no curfews. How quickly stu-
dents learn that these fantasies
can be wiped away and thev
can be sent straight home.
University officials from
various departments created an
academic support program for
students who find themselves
in academic trouble and need
direction. Once students reach
a minimal GPA, a letter will be
sent to them referring them to
their academic adviser. From
there, they will be led in the
right direction.
"The Academic Support
Program is designed to help stu-
dents who get in academic dif-
ficulties said Don Joyner, as-
sociate director of intervention
programs and director of the
freshmen seminar course. "We
do care about the students, and
we want them to know we want
to educate them in curriculum,
but also in how to succeed and
how to set goals
The program is open to any
student, regardless of classifi-
cation, who gets into academic
trouble. The students will be re-
quired to attend presentations
on campus dealing with time
management, reading text-
books, note taking and other
topics related to good study
habits. Joyner said students
must be active participants in
the adviseradvisee relation-
ship.
"We think it is important
to teach students how to be an
advisee Joyner said.
Students who are referred
to the program will be assigned
a new adviser who will help the
student to register for appro-
priate courses, as well as to sug-
gest presentations that would
most benefit that particular stu-
dent.
The new center for the pro-
gram will be located in Brewster
B-103, and will be a computer
See ADVANCEMENT page 2
Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
The orange flags and col-
orful spray-painted lines which
have recently appeared on the
ECU grounds are not part of the
campus beautification plan, but
ra ther the ini tia 1 steps of the new
fiber optics system being in-
stalled.
"We are upgrading and re-
placing the old telecommunica-
tions infrastructure on campus
with new intelligent data hubs
and new telephone switching
POiiip' ent that utilizes a fiber
opuc i vickbone said Tom Lamb,
associate director of Computing
and Information Systems (CIS).
Fiber optics is a type of
cable made from glass fibers
which are smaller than human
hair, but can carry enormous
amountsof data, Lamb said. The
new svstem will be much more
reliable than the system now
being used, and will upgrade
the telephone network, as well
as expand the computer capa-
bilities.
"The data component will
greatlv enhance the capabilities
of the data system over the old
system Lamb said.
The new data system will
be a combination of the Ethernet
svstem with an Asynchronous
Transfer Mode (A TM) backbone.
The ATM being used by the the
fiber optics system is not related
to the ATM machines used by
financial institutions.
The current telephone
system only has room to allo-
ca te a handful of new telephone
numbers; therefore, an exten-
sion is needed. The new sys-
tem will house 10,000 phone
numbers. On day one of the
installation, approximately
6,000numberswiilbe assigned.
"Right now the tele-
phone system has about five
numbers left to assign said
Jim Crain, director of telecom-
munications services. "We just
outgrew it
The improved telephone
system will be in effect in July,
and customers will find much
of the same service they are
currently being offered. The
new phone lines will be com-
plete with call waiting, call for-
warding, speed dialing and
phone mail, which was not pre-
viously offered without cost
from the local phone company.
"We will be able to pro-
vide a modified version to meet
their requirements Crain
said.
Crain said that the new
svstem will tie the dorms and
other campus facilities to-
gether.
"It basically pulls the
dorms into our system Crain
said. "The dorms will be pro-
SeeFIBER page 2
Phone prefixes to change
Wendy Roundtree
Staff Writer
Many people have dif-
ficulty figuring out which
prefix to use, 757 or931, when
dialing a campus telephone
number, but no longer. On
July 1, university telephone
numbers, including dorms
and academic departments,
will replace their previous
prefixes with a new 328 pre-
fix.
" The ECU campushas
grown out of its present tele-
communication system
said Jim Crain, director of
telecommunication services
for ECU.
Crain said that the
university's telephone sys-
tem is so saturated with 757
and 931 numbers that no
new combinations can be
derived. Another three-
digit prefix would have to
be acquired, causing more
complications to the already
crowded system. Because of
See PREFIX page 2





2 The East Carolinian
June 1, 1994
ADVANCEMENT
Continued from page 1
Inmates learn the art of upholstery making
Fifteen inmates at the North Carolina Correctional Institu-
tion for Women are busy hammering, nailing, cutting and
measuring, trying to beat an important deadline. They are
working hard, putting the final touches on a project which goes
on display at the prison next month. The women are students in
a vocational upholstery class sponsored by Wake Technical
Community College. The class, which lasts for six months,
draws to a close June 3 with a "parade of rooms" including a
formal living room, dining room, master bedroom, guest bed-
room and family room. Inmates build or sew everything in the
rooms. Furniture upholstered in the class was picked up from
local trash sites. Inmates will explain how they turned the
furniture from trash to treasure during the display. Since Janu-
ary, inmates have been studying and perfecting upholstery
skills. They've made everything from footstools and chairs to
quilts and curtains. An intense seven-hour training class begins
at the prison each weekday morning at 7:30. Inmates learn how
each piece of furniture is manufactured and all the steps neces-
sary to dismantle it and to remove and replace the old fabric,
paddling and legs. In the third month of the class, the women
begin working on their display project. Furniture made by the
inmates will be sold to non-profit organizations for use by
needy families.
UNC doctor sentenced to service, counseling
A former UNC Hospital pediatrics resident was found
guilty last week of sexual assault against a patient who was
recovering from a hysterectomy. Jose Genero Diaz of Chapel
Hill, whq,pleaded no contest to a single count of misdemeanor
assault, was sentenced May 12 to two years probation and 100
hours of community service. An Orange County District Court
judge also ordered Diaz to enroll in the state's Physicians'
Health Assistance Program. The judge handed down a sus-
pended sentence, which means Diaz's 90-day jail term was
deferred for three years. If Diaz complies with the judge's
orders, he will not have to serve the term. Diaz was charged wi th
first-degree sexual assault Feb. 10 after Stephanie Brown of
Asheboro told public safety officers he had fondled her breasts
and tried to kiss her. Brown was in a fourth-floor room when a
man came in and identified lumself as one of her doctors. She
struggled away from the suspect after he started fondling her
breasts when he claimed to be checking her breathing. When a
nurse entered the room, the suspect fled and later was identified
as Diaz, a second-year resident. He was fired March 1.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
center complete with word pro-
cessing and a program called
SIG1-PI.US which is a career ex-
ploration computer program.
Students will be able to find our
what courses are applicable to
particular professions.
"It will allow the students
to explore the careers they are
interested in Joyner said.
Education 1000 will also be
taught in the center. The course
deals with adjusting to college,
career exploration, study skills,
values clarification and
multicultural education. Stu-
dents whose GPAs fall below a
1.5 will be required to take Edu-
cation 1000.
Last semester, the Supple-
mental Instruction Program be-
gan to offer students a tutorial
program which differs from tra-
ditional tutoring. An excep-
tional student in a particular
area, such as chemistry, is paid
to audit a course which that stu-
dent excelled in. The students
in academic difficulty meet sev-
eral times a week with the stu-
dent leader to discuss the course.
This type of tutorial helps the
students to learn how to discuss
course material and to imple-
ment this into a learning pro-
cess.
Dorothy Muller, dean of
undergraduate studies, said that
while 1,900 students were on
PREFIX
the Chancellor's List, Dean's
List or Honor Roll last semes-
ter, about 1,200 students are in
academic trouble per semes-
ter.
"This is a long time com-
ing and I hope it's going to
help Muller said. "When we
get the center done, we will
have access to student infor-
mation. Academic support is
not remedial. Students need the
support that we can provide
Continued from page 1
Cool people write for
TEC news dept. You
can tool Stop by the
Student Pubs Bldg.
at 4p.m. today.
Wendy & Teri this
means you too.
FIBER
Cont'd
from
page 1
vided services through ECU. They
will be able to dial four digits rather
than seven
While the phone services will
be operating by July, other fiber
optics construction probably will
not be completed until spring of
1995. Lamb said that in order to
provide ECU with upgraded net-
working, therewill be some disrup-
tion on campus.
"There will be some disrup-
tions in people's lives, but we will
try to make it as easy as possible
Lamb said. "Bear with us
!
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this situation, Odin made the fi-
nal decision to switch the tele-
phone numbers to a single, new
prefix, leaving the last four digits
of each person's number the same.
"It took awhile to get used to
the 757 and 931 numbers. This
will be a .lot more convenient
said Amy Zmistowski, a junior
SLAP major.
When people try to reach stu-
dents by dialing the old phone
number, they will be interrupted
by a voice-intercept system. The
system will tell the caller that the
number they dialed has changed,
and he or she will give the caller
the new telephone number. This
system will be in effect until Octo-
ber, 1995.
For academic department
headquarters, permissive dialing
wiil be used unui October 1. Per-
missive dialing will allow people
to reach professors and other fac-
ulty members with the old tele-
phone numbers. After October 1,
there will be twelve months of
voice-intercept connected to the
system before the I - fer becomes
permanent.
"The single prefix will
make it a lot easier for people to
learn the numbers around cam-
pus. It will probably be a lot easier
to remember numbers said
Joanna Stout, a sophomore politi-
cal science major.
During October, 1995, the
757 and 931 telephone numbers
will revert back to Carolina Tele-
phone Company. Carolina Tele-
phone will then use those num-
bers for othr-r city locations.
Continued from page 1
than other North Carolina
schools
Plummer said the Athletics
Department has requested the $35
increase that would raise the ath-
letic fee from $185 to $220. This
has not yet been passed, but such
persons as Earline Leggett, assis-
tant athletic director for business,
and Plummer are hopeful it will
go through.
"Thirty-five dollars has been
approved by our Board of Gover-
nors Leggett said. "We started
this two years ago, and this sum is
exactly what we are asking for.
We need a say to finance the
women's non-revenue athletics
since we've lost ESPN
Leggett explained what the
$35 increase would include. Ap-
proximately $12 would improve
women's non-revenue athletics
ANALYSIS
woman's death in 1969 at
Chappaquidick have not kept
Edward Kennedy out of the Sen-
ate.
People seem to be in a for-
giving mood as of late, or at least
they do not seem as eager to kick
a man while he is down. Nixon
got to rest in peace as the nation
mourned "a complex man rather
than a fallen president, and former
leaders Reagan and Bush were not
hounded for their roles in Iran-
Contra.
That last point is what should
allow Clinton to breathe a sigh of
and $14 is required to replace lost
television revenues from ESPN
and others, that the department
used at one time to enhance both
women's and men's non-revenue
sports. The remaining $9 of the
total $35 increase will go towards
mandatory and statutory in-
creases, including grant aids and
any kind of salary increases.
"The increase is definitely
essential if we want to meet cur-
rent demands and continue to
enhance the funding of all the
women's athletic programs said
Athletic Director, Dave Hart.
Some other campus charges
will also go up for the 1994-95
academic year. Richard Brown
noted that the charges for resi-
dence halls with air-conditioning
will rise by 5.7 percent from $1,750
to $1,850, and those without air-
conditioning will increase by 6
percent from $1,500 to $1,590.
Brown also said the tui tion
costs will increase. The rates for
full-rime North Carolina resident
undergraduates for next year are
expected to raise by 4.6 percent
to $4,797, and out-of-state un-
dergraduates should expect a 5.9
increase to $11,291. Those costs
for bo thin-state and out-of-state
students include tuition, fees, a
non air-conditioned room and a
meal plan; however, books and
personal expenses will not be
covered by this sum.
"These things that are a
quality of life for the students,
unfortunately, need to be funded
by the studentsGetsinger said.
"The more attractive ECU is, the
more readily accepted a
student's diploma will be
Continued from page 1
relief. Even during Reagan's De-
partment of the Interior fiasco (re-
member James Watt?), even dur-
ing the Wedtech scandal involv-
ing Reagan's Attorne'y General Ed
Meese, even during the Iran-
Contra hearings, the previous ad-
ministrations were still able to
function.
So, if the President's men are
tied up in nasty, televised hear-
ings throughout much of the sum-
mer, Clinton will still navigate his
health care reform bill through
Congress, right? Not so fast, say-
opponents to reform, but no one
says that Congress will do noth-
ing.
Sen. Bob Dole RKan Sen.
Phil Gramm RTex. and other
potential Republican candidates
for President in '96 cannot af-
ford not to pass some version of
health care reform. Albeit the
bill may belong to the current
media darling, Sen. John Chaffee
RR.IbutPresidentClintonwill
still be able to claim a victory for
himself. A similar situation ex-
ists with welfare reform; every-
one benefits if Congress does
something.
So while the media smell
blood, it must be coming from
Washington's murderous
streets. President Clinton will
survive this latest attempt to
sidetrack his legislative initia-
tives and pass a few domestic
programs anyway. Then it will
be up to the voters to decide if
"the character question" really
matters or not.
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�. .
June 1, 1994
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 3
77ie Ztas Carolinian
;SMfr! :
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Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Warren Sumner, Lifestyle Editor
Mark Brett, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst Sports Editor
W. Brian Hall, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Tonya Heath, Advertising Director
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Alexa Thompson. Copy Editor
Marcia Sanders, Typesetter
Lisa Sessoms. Typesetter
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
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Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Patrick Hinson, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
James B. Boggs, Asst. Creative Directoi
Leslie Petty, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
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ServinetheECUcommunity since 1925. r����C�r�m�� publishes IZ.OOOcopiesevery Tuesday and Thursday The
mastheL dftonal in each edition is the opinion of the Edi.or.al Board. The East Carolinian welcomes e.ters limited to 250
Letieri should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publical.ons Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 2788-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
2 p
Patch;
Trie
ecu

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it
Zo
Once again student fees will be
increasing next year. If it seems as though
this happens every year, there is a good
reason � it does. According to an ECU
press release, mandatory student fees have
increased by an average of 7.4 percent in the
past five years. (The inflation rate for the
same time period was only a little more
than 4 percent.) Like everything else about
ECU, except the amount of parking, the rate
of increase is growing; this time student
fees will be going up nearly 14 percent.
Not only is this increase quite hefty, the
timing of this action at the very least appears
suspicious. The ECU Board of Governors
approved and anrounced the rate increase
on May 6th. This was the day after exams
ended, and the day before graduation. By
that time, most students had already headed
out of town for the summer. Undoubtedly,
the first that many will hear about this
increase will be when they receive their
school bill in the mail. If the intentions of the
board were pure, if this action was not a
deliberate attempt to sneak this past most
students unawares, then surely the board
should have notified the student body, or at
least flw student media, rf the impending
increase before May 6th.
Leaving aside both the tremendous rate
of this increase and the lack of warning, as
difficult as that may be, most of the projects
to be funded by this measure are deserving
of our approval. The money which will be
used to renovate Minges will be of benefit to
both the school and to the students who
attend events therein. Eventually, such
expansion should even be self-financing. The
increase in athletic fees, though more difficult
to swallow, will continue to provide
opportunities for participation in the non-
revenue sports (everything except football
and basketball). The money for the bus
sendee is much needed, especially since
much of the parking behind the library has
now been lost to new construction.
Most objectionable of all the requests is
the increase for Recreational Services. This
comes on top of the last increase, which
began last semester, to pay for the new
Student Rec Center. Even this is tolerable if
it means no more intramural basketball
games at 11 p.m.
While individually these projects are
fine, the priorities of the administration are
clearly out of touch with those of the students.
Other than the small increase for the bus
service, there is no hint of help for the already
dire parking shortage. The only plans seem
to be to eliminate even more spaces. These
increases present the appearance of forcing
students to pay more for fewer spaces. If
there is a plan to alleviate this major concern,
now would be a good time to reveal it.
ECU has grown dramatically in the past
few years, and has plans to continue this
growth. For us students, this means both
benefits and drawbacks. We can only urge
the administration to make these difficulties
as easier to bear as possible.
X

oY)
K&eLe vi

By Patrick Hinson
World anxiously awaits American leadership
By Laura Wright
Leisure activities provide personal definition
I guess it's all in the
way you view the
world. It's all about
what gives you
pleasure in your spare
time.
Wasn't this a great weekend?
I wouldn't know; I spent the whole
time working. It was a holiday
weekend, wasn't it? That's what
they tell me. I hope that everyone
who didn't have to work spent
this weekend outside somewhere,
preferablv by a body of water.
That's what I would've done, if I
could have.
In fact, I did HeHMflHHm
spend
Saturday
afternoon
(after work)
in Bath, N.C.
If you've
never been
there, you
should go if
vou get the
chance. Bath
is a really quaint waterside
historical town about an hour from
Greenville.
I feel like I'm becoming an
expert on nearby getaway
locations.
What really amazes me is why,
when people get a weekend off,
they spend it in a mall. I know that
this is the case because I work in a
mall. I could see the sunshine
through the glass, I could dream
about being out in it. I guess that's
why I kept asking people what
they were doing shopping on such
a nice day, as were those of this
past weekend. Okay, maybe I was
just jealous. After all, shopping is
the great American pastime.
Holidays and consumerism go
hand-in-hand even when it's 80
degrees and sunny. Sometimes,
you just gotta have that new pair
of shoes and no nice day is going
to stand in your way.
I know what mv dad did this
weekend. I can guarantee that for
at least one day, he washed the
cars. My dad does this every
weekend. First he washes his car,
then my mom's Then he washes
my sister's car. On the unlikely
chance that I am home, he washes
my car. Washing cars makes less
sense to me than shopping. Well,
actually, they
make about the
same amount of
sense. Sure,
while you're
washing your
car you get to be
outside when
it's nice, but
what is the
point?
Washing
�� your car keeps
it clean and shiny until the next
time you drive it. The way I look at
it, it rains often enough to dispense
with car washing all together.
I guess it's all in the way you
view the world. It's all about what
gives you pleasure in your spare
time. About half the residents of
my apartment complex get out
and wash their cars, crank their
car stereos and socialize. Maybe
car washing makes sense if you
get to hang out with like-minded
people while you do it. I, however,
am not like-minded. I would rather
watch Beavis and Butthead than
wash my car. I would rather eat
pork rinds. Just an aside � who
decided that pork rinds were a
good thing? To which food group
do they belong? I've never been
able to figure out the appeal of
those things either.
But as far as inane activities
go, mowing the lawn ranks
number one with me. Think about
what a lawn is. It's nothing more
than a plot of land with a specific
kind of grass growing on it. The
grass is neither edible nor
smokable so it serves no purpose
except to grow and look green. On
hot dry days, people water their
lawns so that the grass will grow.
When the grass grows, they
complain about how badly the
yard needs mowing.
Mowing the yard requires
time and energy. My dad just
about killed himself trying to take
care of the yard at our old house.
Every Saturday, he would get up
and tackle the grass and the
bushes. He pulled up weeds. He
planted flowers. And for what, I
ask you. So that people would
drive by and say to themselves,
"Nice yard
Maybe we do things li ke mow
the yard and wash the cars because
such activities provide us with a
sort of routine. In a country where
people are often held to rigid work
schedules, the thought of free time
can be terrifying. Perhaps we need
the security of an unending task to
perform when we're at loose ends.
I'm not criticizing my dad,
either. If clean cars are important
to him, then fine. If a well-
manicured yard gives him a sense
of accomplishment, more power
to him. He always washed my car
for me when I was in high school,
so I can't complain too much. He
did make me mow the lawn,
though. We lived on one of the
busiest streets in town and my
dad made me drive a lawnmower
the size of a small tractor around
the front yard. I can't think of
anything more socially
devastating for a 15-year-old
female.
Each night on the news, we
watch the Serbs systematically
massacre Bosnian and Muslim
men, women and children, day by
day killing more people and
destroying more towns. The
European community awaits
American action. Many people in
America wait for it too, but will it
ever happen? Probably not.
America has no interests to defend
in Bosnia, and the people here do
not wish to send their sons and
daughters to die in any more
foreign countries.
Each night, we watch the
rebel factions in Rwanda
hideously murder thousands of
their own people � totally
innocent people. It's not a war
there, it's a killing party, a frenzy,
and the world community awaits
American action. Will America
make a move? That's left to be
seen. We have no interests to
defend in Rwanda either, and the
ugly slap in the face from Somalia
still stings. Mighty grateful people,
those Somali's.
The North Koreans refuse to
show us their nuclear sites and
their nuclear capability. Why?
Because we have no business
seeing them, they feel. However,
it's obvious that they're pumping
out nuclear warheads as fast as
they can make them, while they
stall for as much time as they can
get, until someone finally gets up
the guts to take action against
them. They want nuclear
capability for the same reason
everyone else in the world wants
it, as a bargaining power-chip, and
to break out of the economic
sanctions that the UN has placed
against them for so long now.
Meanwhile, everyone seems to
await the American response. Will
we actually do anything about it,
or will President Clinton just keep
talking tough forever?
India's nuclear power plants
are crumbling around their ankles,
leaking God only knows how
much radiation into the
atmosphere around them (and
maybe, soon, around us). The
children born in towns near those
plants are horribly deformed, and
people are dropping dead of
mysterious causes, yet when the
nuclear community insists on
inspecting the plants, the
government of India, much like
North Korea, tells us where to stick
our inspection teams. Everyone
feels America should do
something.
Why is it that anything that's
going wrong in the world today
automatically becomes the
potential responsibility of the
American government? Why
doesn't one European country
come to the aid of the people of the
former Yugoslavia? How can those
countries sit back on their laurels
and call us cowards for not
intervening? Why doesn't one
other country in Africa come to
the aid of the people in Rwanda?
How can anyone sit back and
watch that slaughter? Why hasn't
China, Japan or Russia made any
kind of move to stop the
production of nuciear bombs in
North Korea? Why don't those
countries take some part in
defending theirnational interests,
not to mention their safety?
There are, by far, too many
nuclear warheads on this planet
as it is. The current nuclear powers
should work together to cease the
production of any more. Yet, they
all wait for the American response,
and they'll be the first to criticize
whatever that response will be,
same as always.
It just makes me wonder if
there really is such thing as a world
community. Communities work
together for their common
interests. They look out for each
other, not just for themselves.
Everyone hates America for not
doing anything, and then they hate
us for interfering where we don't
belong. Everything is left up to us,
and when we do something right
we're expected to share the credit.
People really don't seem to change
that much as they get older. We're
still guided by the same things we
were as children: greed, power
and control. We just seem to call
them different things as adults.
The world community, if there
really is one, has their work cut
out for them, and we've got a lot to
learn about working together.
America, as arrogant as we may
be, cannot continue the trend of
being the world's police officer.
That is a job for a world
community, not a single nation,
regardless of how powerful that
nation is. The Second World War
(now almost a distant memory),
and Viet Nam should, if any thing,
have taught us that lesson.
Letters to the Editor
The Jews in Europe could not defend
themselves from Hitler's genocide � they were
unarmed. East European nations behind the Iron
Curtain attempted to rebel on numerous occasions
but failed � they were unarmed. The courageous
1989 Tiananmen Square protesters in china were
brutally suppressed. Can you guess why?
Our Founding Fathers were aware that the
most well-intentioned of governments could become
tyrannical. To insure that the governed could alter or
abolish the movement if it proved destructive of the
ends for which it was created, the right to keep and
bear arms was given a high place in our Bill of Rights.
Indeed, while I disagree with most of the tenets of
China's Chairman Mao, I concur with his belief that
all power comes from the barrel of a gun. As horrible
as that may sound to the more timid members of our
societv, history attests to its validity. Benjamin
Franklin asserted that those who would give up
personal liberties for temporary safety deserved
neither.
While searching for a "magic pill" to the crime
problem, Americans are doing exactly what Jefferson
warned against. Our crime problem lies in people,
not the weapons they choose. Legislation banning
certain weapons will do nothing to alleviate crime,
but it will infringe on our rights. The Constitution
our political leaders swore to preserve is being
destroyed.
Steven A. Hill
Junior
EnglishHistory
All letters, in order to be considered for publication, must be
typed, under 250 words, and contain your name, class rank, major
and a working daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to the
Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville,
N.C, 27858-4353.
Would you like to have your opinions read by thou-
sands of newspaper readers? Exercise your constitutional
right to free speech. Apply now to write for The East
Carolinian this fall. Applications now being accepted for
the opinion page and a planned weekly satire page. Pick up
your application at the newspaper office, in the Student
Pubs building.
. �





-The East Caroliniair
For Rent
ROOMMATES NEEDED FOR
FALL to share 3 bedroom house
near Hospital. Must be serious stu-
dent and non-smoker. Located in a
quiet neighborhood with lots of fruit
trees. Has garage for some storage.
Rent of260.00 monthly. Includes
utilities and washer dryer. Avail-
ablejuly 15-August 15.Call Harold
after 4:00 p.m. if interested.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female,
upperclassman, non-smoker pre-
ferred to share house with other
females, rent150.00 and share
utilitiesphone. Own room and
bathroom, if interested, call 758-
8126.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
house 1 block from campus.150.00
a month and split cable, phone and
electric. Call 830-1765, ask for An-
drew.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
i 2 bedroom and 2 bathroom mo-
t-tile home at Grevstone Mobile
Home Park. Can start renting May
18, only S 175.00 and 1 � utilities.
Prefer non-smoking male student.
Call Scott Tanner at 321-0404 if in-
terested.
NEED ROOMMATE FOR 2 BED-
ROOM APT. 1 block from campus
rents S 142.50 rent, deposit is the
same as rent. 1 2 utilities, washer
dryer included in rent. Call 757-
2820, leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED for apartment 1 2 block
from Art Bldg 3 blocks from down-
town, 2 blocks from Supermarket.
Starting in June. Call 757-1947.
ROOMMATES NEEDED to share
a four bedroom apartment in Tar
River. Needed June 1st and or July
1st. Rent is $162.50. Call Nickie or
Dawn at 758-4332.
Classifieds
June 1. 1994
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls,
Girls. Earn big summer cash. The
best summer job around. Play-
mates Adult Entertainment call for
more info. 747-7686.
INTERNSHIP AVAILABLE IN
SALES. Earn good money with
flexible hours and gain valuable
business experience. Call Bonnie
at 355-7700 for more information
and possible interview.
ENTHUSIASTIC SALES
PEOPLE to operate cart in shop-
ping mall in Greenville, Wilson or
Rocky Mount. Call the
Globetrotter in Raleigh (919) 782-
5450, to arrange interview.
CRUISE SHIPS HIRING- Earn
up to S 2,000 mo. on Cruise Ships
or Land-Tour companies, World
travel. Summer & Full-time em-
ployment available, No experience
necessary. For information, call 1-
206-634-0468, ext. C5362.
NATIONAL PARK SUMMER
JOBS - Tour guide, dude ranch,
host(ess), instructor, lifeguard,
hotel staff, trail maintenance,
firefighter, volunteer & govern-
ment positions available. Excel-
lentbenefitsbonuses! Apply now
for best positions. Call: 1-206-545-
4804 ext. N5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE !
Many positions. Great benefits.
Call 1-800-436-4365,
Ext. P-3712.
RESIDENT COUNSELOR. Hu-
man services background pre-
ferred. Free room and stipend in
exchange for hours worked on ro-
tation. Contact Mary Smith, REAL
CIRSISCENTER,600E. llthStreet,
758-HELP.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to care
for children in our home. Tuesday
and Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:00
p.m.Call756-0417,before 9:00p.m.
SITTERDRIVER NEEDED
Need a female to come to my house
Monday - Friday at 8:00 a.m. and
take my daughters to activities at
9:00. Requirements-be responsible
and honest, have own transporta-
tion, provide 2 credit references. If
interested, call Bonita Edwards at
321-4944. You may leave a mes-
sage.
For Sale
For Sale
For Sale
FURNITURE: Couch and match-
ing chair, $80.00 (set). Kitchen table
wchairs,75.00. Tan lazy-boy, $
40.00. 752-3552.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-Wheelers,
Motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Nationwide auction listings avail-
able now. Call 1 -800-436-4363, Ext.
C-5999.
MOPEDS, Honda PA 50, only 600
miles, S 550.00. Puch, 2000 miles, $
400.00, excellent condition, 100
MPG, 30 MPH, No license re-
quired. 756-9133.
55 GAL. AQUARIUM with stand,
under-gravel filter, heater, and
decorations; complete fresh wa-
ter set-up (fish optional). $225.00:
also, 10 gal. Hex. with stand, $75.00.
Call Clark, after 7:00 p.m 830-
6035.
FOR SALE: NOVARA MOUN-
TAIN BIKE. 21" Frame. Shimano
Deore DX components, hubs.
Ritchey bars, tires. Mavic rims.
Scott Unishock fork. No off-road
use. $525.00. 752-8816.
ATTENTION PARROTHEADS:
For sale, 4 Grass-Passes to Satur-
day night's show. Call 757-2821.
BUY USED, QUALITY, NAME BRAND
S2.00UP MEN'S SHIRTS, PANTS, SHOES, ETC.
(TOMMY &ALL BEST BRANDS)
$29.00UP STEREO (AMPS, TUNERS, CD, SPKRS)
529.00UP VIDEO (T.V VCR)
S29.00UP MICROWAVE (SMALLLARGE)
S5.00UP TELEPHONES AND ANS. MACHINES
$15.00UP MISC. FURNITURE
(CHEST OF DRAWERS, TABLES, DESKS, ETC.)
EVERYTHING CLEAN, FRESH,QUALITY
CHECKED AND READY TO GO
Student Swap Shop
(THE ESTATE SHOP)
DOWNTOWN WALKING MALL
411 EVANS ST. SUMMER HRS. THURSFRI 10-12
1-5 & SAT FROM 10-1
SAVE $1 OFF EACH PIECE OF CLOTHING
COME INTO THE CITY PARKING LOT IN FRONT OF
WACHOVIA DOWNTOWN,DRIVE TO BACK DOOR & RING BUZZER
:zerJ
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Deadline
Monday at 4:00 p.m
for Wednesday's
Summer edition
Announcements
Any organization mey use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the pubic
twotimes freeof charge. Due to the limited
amount of space, The EastCardiniancannot
guarantee the publication of announce-
ments.
Displayed
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Displayed advertisements may
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day prior to publication
however, no refunds will be
given.
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DENTIAL, PROFESSIONAL
ResumeSecretarial work. Spe-
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Announcement
VOLUNTEERS SOUGHT
FOR CHILDREN'S
TELETHON.
Volunteers are needed for the
ninth annual telecast of the local
Children's Miracle Network
Telethon, which supports the
Children's Hospital of Eastern
North Carolina, a division of
Pitt County Memorial Hospital.
Sought are people who can as-
sist for any period of time from
9:00 p.m. Sat June 4, to 6:30
p.m. Sun June 5, by perform-
ing tasks that range from an-
swering phones to providing
hospitality for special guests.
Airing on WTTN-7, the telethon
will benefit the pediatric spe-
cialty hospital whch serves 34
counties in eastern North Caro-
lina. Local segments originat-
ing from the Brody Medical Sci-
ences Building on the EastCaro-
lina University School of Medi-
cine campus will alternate with
the national broadcast from
Disneyland in Anaheim, Calif.
Persons interested in joining the
Children's 4iracle Network in
a "Celebration of Life" should
call the local telethon office at
816-KIDS or 1-800-673-KIDS.
MONSTER
TRUCKS,
WOMEN IN
BIKINIS,
WASHED UP
TV
PERSQiWJTIES,
AND
EVERYBODVS
FAVORITE
PIL GROUPIE
HRIS KEMPL
KOTttsntesi
IN
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it cami ntem mt senoou
SCHEDULED DATES AND APPEARANCES:
JUNE 8 GUNS AND BUNS CUSTOM AUTO SI IOW
with SPECIAL GUESTS:
Optimus Prime
The Green and Red Rangers from "The Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers"
Tawnee Hughes
(the 1994 Field and Stream Calendar Centerfold of the Year)
Adam West (TV's Batman)
Jack Morkheimer (PBS's Starhustlen
Wm&ZllS! SVtSPSTKSZ!
Upper
Crust
Bakery
212 E.
5th
Street
June 3-10
��"





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The East Carolinian
Wednesday, June 1, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 5
Hootie and the Blowfish return to Attic
Photo Courtesy ot Flahco Management
Hootie and the Blowf.sh return to the Attic this Thursday. The group is set to release their first major-label album, Cracked Rear View, on Atlantic
records onjuly 5. This Thursday's performance could be a rare opportunity forCreenvillefansto see the band.
By Warren Sumner
Lifestyle Editor
Greenville music fans have an
opportunity to see a band that could
be on the brink of national success
this week, when the Columbia, S.C
based group HootieandtheBlowfish
returns to the Attic this Thursday.
Thebard,anxiousryawaitingtheJuly
5 release of its first major-label CD
(Cracked Rear View on Atlantic
Records), has solidified its status as a
regional act and is prepared to re-
ceive the national exposure that their
album release should provide.
According to lead singer Darius
Rucker, the process of getting to the
point that every musician dreams
about has been less man a bed of
roses.
'Tthasn'tbeeneasy'Ruckersaid.
"When you drive all me way to New
York and play in front of five people
it's pretty tough. But we've just stuck
together and believed in ourselves,
andnow thatwe'vecometothepoint
where we are now, all the terrible
nights have become worthwhile
The group formed eight years
agoascollegestudentsattheUniver-
sity of South Carolina. Taking a "no
philosophy, anti-image" approach
which the group hasexpressed since
its formation, the band hasbrokenall
the rules of what is expected of up-
and-coming acts. They have won the
hearts of audiences all over the East-
em seaboard with their danceable
pop sound,and after recently spark-
ing the interest of Atlantic Records,
they are poised to move onto the
Billboard charts.
Rucker said thathequickly got
over the initial excitement of re-
cording the group's upcoming al-
bum when the band got to Los
Angelesand worked with industry
producers.
"When you're working late
nightsand theproducerisyellingat
you for singing flat it kind of hits
youhesaidItwasquiteanexpe-
rience and a lot of work
Rucker saiddespitethe record-
ing experience, the reality of the
possible result of the Atlantic
recording's release has not hit him
yet
"Wewanttobeexcited,butthe
releasedateisstill fiveweeksaway
he said. "Its going to take a while
because we're playingso much, but
as July 5 gets closer and closer, I'm
sure ifll start to hit us
Rucker said the strenuous
schedule the band faces is hard,
because they travel anywhere from
Boston, Mass to Gainesville, Fla
but most of the strain the band suf-
fers from is self-inflicted.
"Most of the pressure that we
deal with we put on ourselves he
said. "Since we play so much, we
are concentrating on our perfor-
mancesmore.Wewanteverynight
See HOOTIE page 6
Bad Girls another
cowboy cliche
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
As much as I liked Unforgiven,
I almost rue its success because the
film has now spawned a new gen-
eration of Westerns churned outby
a Hollywood system driven by
greed. In the last year, Posse,
Geronimo and Tombstone were re-
leased, and mis summer Maverick
and Wyatt Earp are already slated
for wide release.
The Hollywood Western, a
genredominated almost entirely by
males, has recently seen its inevi-
table evolution bring females into
the limelight. This year, The Ballad
of Little )o and Bad Girls helped to
drive the revitalizauon of the West-
em. The latter of the two films is
now playing in Greenville.
Bad Girls tells the tale of four
prostitutes who must run from the
law because one of them killed a
man. Eileen Spenser (Andie
MacDowell), Anita Crown (Mary
Stuart Masterson), Lily Laronette
(Drew Barrymore) and Cody
Zamora (Madeline Stowe) ride
horses, shoot guns, and generally
embody the cliches normally given
to male.
Though perhaps unintentional,
Bad Girls plays as a high spirited B
Movie. The filmmakers seem to
know that they have absolutely
nothing new to convey in Bad Girls,
but that the fun of the film is in
succumbing to every bad Western
cliche. Bad Girls revels in its medi-
ocrity which serves to make the
film, if not a work of art, at least a lot
of fun.
From the very beginning, Bad
Girls stakes its claim against a seri-
ousinterpretation.Codykillsaman
for harassing Anita.The man wants
a birthday kiss and becomes deter-
mined to get it from Anita. A short
time later, Anita kneels at the site of
her husband's grave and tells him
that she still has not kissed another
man in the three years since he has
died. The viewer's eyes may blink a
few times at the preposterousness
of mis situation, men he or she is
likely to settle back easily in the
theater chair upon realizing that
Bad Girls is not going to take itself
seriously.
Every one of the girls gets into
trouble and must be rescued by the
other three. Cody is about to be
hung for murder when her friends
stage a daring rescue. Lily gets kid-
napped by some ruffians who ter-
rorize the foursome for most of the
film. Eileen has trouble mounting
her horse, and because of this gets
caught and is put in prison, thus
prompting her friends to make a
jailbreak. Anita is saved at the be-
ginning before she has to kiss a
man.
Every one of the above situa-
tions is so contrived as to be charm-
ing. Not once does the viewer be-
lieve that any of the girls are in real
danger. Only men get killed in Bad
Girls � the females are accorded
long life.
The two actresses from whom
one would expect the least, Andie
MacDowell and Drew Barrymore,
surprisingly turn in the most in-
spired performances. MacDowell
may have finally found an outlet for
her limited acting talents. She may
have been trying to be serious, but
the little smirk on her face through-
outthefilmindicatesotherwise.She
sweetly tells men that she is a fine
lady from New Orleans in her most
Southern twang when she actually
hails from a Texas scrub ranch. Her
upbringing never gets played as a
tragedy, but only as a way of adher-
ing to the convention of the classic
Western movie.
Barrymore plays a tart with all
the requisite spice. She isdearly the
happiest of the four with her chosen
profession. She views men with
See BAD GIRLS page 6
J Uh no.
JV Take Your Chances
JtJV Worth A Try
JJJJ Highly Recommended
Violent Femmes
Hew Times

L
Check out page 6 for
upcoming concerts
at Walnut Creek
Amphitheatre this
summer.
When I first looked at my copy
oiNewTimes, the latest album from
the Violent Femmes, alarm bells
went off in my head. The cover
features some kind of lame art de-
sign with a screw and a buzzsaw,
and a scary "Hi, we're cool" band
photo. This kind of packaging gen-
erally signals uninspired music re-
corded mainly to fulfill contractual
obligations. These vaguely dissat-
isfying albums tend to end up in the
local "used" bins within a month,
and sit there like hideous orphans
waiting hopelessly for a new home.
Thankfully, New Times
shouldn't suffer that fate, even
thoughitopens with five reallyflac-
cid tunes that sound as if they were
made to please single-hungry
record executives. These songs, in-
cluding the title track, are done in a
heavy-handed, over-produced
variation of the Femmes' trademark
jangly style. Though well-played,
they are uninspired and largely for-
gettable.
The sixth track, "Machine
breaks that pattern. This one is a
spoken word track, with Gordon
Gano delivering an insane mono-
logue that sounds like something
from a King Missile album "I got a
machine Gano rambles, "And I
took over the world But nothing
changed That wouldn't be fair
Strung out over a military drum-
beat, this track is a real departure
for the band. Though it breaks the
monotony, this track does lack the
much-needed energy required to
lift this album out of its rut.
That energy arrives with the
next track, "I'm Nothing Filled
with nervous melodies, this song
gives you the feeling that Gordon
Gano is that weird kid nobody
wanted to sit next to on the school
bus. "Are you a republican or a
democrat Gano wails in his best
frustrated weird guy voice, "A lib-
eral fascist full of crap I'm noth-
ing Violently fast-paced, with
Gano's familiar zero-distortion gui-
tar whipped up to a fever-pitch,
"I'm Nothing" is the Violent
Femmes at their best.
From this point, New Times
picks up considerably. On the slow
"When Everybody's Happy the
Femmes give us their take on John
Lennon's "Imagine with their
usual twist of damaged isolation:
"Can you imagine The world at
See FEMMES page 6
Tniffle
nervous Laughter
m
The Merriam-Webster Dictio-
nary defines truffle as "a Euro-
pean underground fungus
which is further described as con-
taining an edible fruit often made
into delectable candies. Could it
be that this 1989 edition (inciden-
tally the same year the band
formed) derived its definition
from the outrageously talented
band Truffle? I say, definitely.
Okay, maybe this is a difficult
analogy to grasp; let me explain.
There are over 60,000 identi-
fied species in the kingdom fungi,
only a couple of those species, in-
cluding truffles, are edible. It may
sound cynical, but the music in-
dustry kingdom is becoming
much the same; diversified and
numerous with only a few bands
that are edible. Truffle, with its
fresh sound and poignant lyrics,
is not only edible, but delicious.
Nervous Laughter is the na-
tional debut for this group of
former University of New Hamp-
shire students, originally Savoy
Truffle, now shortened to just
Truffle. Their sound is firmly
rooted in rock-n-roll, however,
they achieve a unique sound by
infusing components of Country,
R & B and Reggae. In addition to
the uniform guitar, bass and
drums, the group has added the
auditory pleasures of a mandolin
and lap steel to help complete the
uniquenessof their music. Added
to this ensemble of instruments is
a god-like voice and lyrics from
the heart.
The first track, "Trouble"
opens the CD with a funky rock
beat that fuels the curiosity for
more. The second track, "Forty
Winks Away a simple rock song
with Country influence about life
and losing sleep gives way to "I
Can't Shake It a jamming tune
that features the guitar and bass
talents of band members Ned
Chase and David Bailey.
The superior vocal quality and
rangeof Truffle's lead singer, Dave
Gerald, is most evident on the
fourth track, "St. Mary's Glacier
a song with dual meaning I could
not quite grasp. The song is deliv-
ered in a gruff, sexual murmur
that is interrupted with a throaty
whisper of, "We'll be over" and a
primitive growl of, "I'm no d iffer-
ent It is this distinctive voice that
will become one of Truffle's trade-
SeeHOOTiE page 6
MM
' ��.





6 The East Carolinian
June 1, 1994
This Month at
Hardens Walnut
Creek
Amphitheatre
Bette Middler
Thursday, June 2
8:00 p.m.
Jimmy Buffett
& the Iguanas
Friday - Sunday
June 3,4,5
8:00 p.m.
Phil Collins
Tuesday, June 7
Time: TBA
Hank Williams, Jr.
wColl in Raye & the
Kentucky Headhunters
Saturday, June 11
7:00 p.m.
WRDU Earthbuddies
Celebraton IV w Elvis
Costello & the
Attractions wThe
Crash Test Dummies
Saturday, June 18
8:00 p.m.
Beach Boys w
America
Thursday, June 23
8:00 p.m.
Crosby, Stills, & Nash
25th Anniversary Tour
Saturday, June 25
7:30 p.m.
Phlsh
Wednesday, June 29
7:30 p.m.
On Sale Now
$25.00$45.00$75.00
Sold Out
On Sale Now
$18.75$25.75$34.75
On Sale Now
$12.75$16.75$22.75
On Sale Now
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On Sale Now
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On Sate Now
All Seats $17.50
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pittman Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
PROPHECIES
that are
BEING FUIXFIUED
A Slide Presentation of some
Contemporary and Archaeological
Evidence
General Classroom Bldg Room 2004
Wed. June 1 at 8:00 pm
Apostolic Campus Ministry
BAD GIRLS
Continued from page 5
much disdain and uses them as
much as they use her. When cap-
tured,she saucily defies her captors
whenever she can and her spirit is
never broken. Madeline Stowe and
Mary Stuart Masterson never seem
to realize that Bad Girfe isafilm with
no artistic aspirations. They both
play their roles too seriously for the
mood of the film yet do not go
overboard enough with their seri-
ousness to parody their characters.
Bad Girls is filled with little
pleasures. Cody is set to be hung on
a sign post which reads: "ECHO
CTTYColorado'sFriendliestTown
During moments of intense action
(at least intense for mis film) silly
slow-motion photography is used
which accentuates the overblown
melodramatic situation.
Many of the Western conven-
tions are adhered to in Bad Girk but
reversed. For example, Eileen
FEMMES
meets a nice man who is very weak
and whoeventu ally fallsforEileen.
It is Eileen who decides to settle
down with a man, thus making the
female character the one with
power.
Bad G iris is the sort of film that
encourages a large buttery pop-
corn to be consumed during it.
Bad Girls, much as the name im-
plies, winks at the audience and
lets the viewers know their junk
food, for the body or mind, some-
times provides a wonderful way
to feel decadent without really
being so. Like the buttered pop-
corn, Bad Girls knows it has noth-
ing but empty calories to offer the
viewer, but it knowingly smiles
on those viewers who care to par-
take in its forbidden fruits with
little guilt.
On a scale of one to ten, Bad
Girls rates a six.
Continued from page 5
peace When everybody's happy
But me?" They flirt with calypso
on "This Island Life" and "Jesus of
Rio The frantic "Agamemnon"
deals with Gano's obsessions with
women and poisoned relationships,
as does the gen tl er "Mirror Mirror
The final standout track on the
albumis'TSawYouintheCrowd
Simultaneously charming and
creepy, this is the story of Gano
spotting a girl in the crowd and
wanting to invite her back to his
hotel room after a show. Far from
some kind of Aerosmith power fan-
tasy, however, this song is a tale of
unrequited love. The way thatGano
is able to deal with such an uncom-
TRUFFLE
marks.
The second half of the CD,
starting with "Steerhoms only
gets better. The seventh track,
'Twisted Old Tree is probably
one of the best songs on the CD,
showcasing the band's talent as a
group. DaveGerald'svocals, Ned
Chase's mandolin and lap steel,
David Bailey's bass and Brian
Dionne's drums come together to
deliver a song that is contagious
to the listener.
The mandolin's unique appeal
appears in "The Wind in Me It
gives the song an old time, blue
grass influence that is bom mod-
fortable subject in such a sensitive
manner is nothing short of amaz-
ing.
Despite some standout tracks
on the second half of the album,
New Times feels a bit rushed. It
does not stack up well next to the
Violent Femmes' first album (re-
leased an unbelievable fourteen
years ago), or even their last effort,
Why do Birds Sing? Still, it is good,
and well-worth a listen.
And lef s try to keep it out of
those used bins, shall we? Nothi .ig
is sadder than orphaned music.
� Mar
Brett
Continued from page 5
em and entertaining. The final
track, "Storyman closes the CD
with a slow, soulful, "hate to go"
attitude. Once again, Dave
Gerald, lead vocals, tears into the
heartand the mind with a smooth,
low tone and insightful lyrics.
A band that is said to have an
explosive live show seems to have
transferred that same quality on
to disk. If the old saying, "It only
gets better with age is true than
we're all in for a real treat.
�Patricia
Dally
Lifestyle Writers-Please
call me at home! I have
stories for all of you! I love
all of you and want you
to be my
literarylove
slaves!
Warren
HOOTIE
Continued from page 5
to be as good as the night before
The group has performed at the
Attic for two years, playing their first
dates to less-than-stellar audiences
According to Joe Tronto, the club's
cwnerandmanager,thebandseerned
to take off in Greenville overnight
"The first couple of times in they
just plodded around Tronto said.
"Then it seemed, all of a sudden, they
just blasted off
Trontosaid thatheisconfidentin
the hand's chances for succeeding na-
tionalfy,andgivesthegrouphishigh-
est recommendation.
"They are probably one of the
mostdeservrngbandslhaveeverhad
at the dub he said.
Rucker said the band holds a
warm feeling for its home market in
Columbia, and has resisted the urges
to move into bigger dues.
"We love Columbia and are so
grateful for all the support ithas given
us he said. "All the pictures on the
CD cover were taken in Columbia,
and we won't forget where we came
from. Thaf s why we've stayed put
while so many other bands have de-
rided to move to Atlanta, New York
and LA"
Rucker said the group hopes to
pickuparioperiingslotonarnajortour
when the CD is released. Should this
be the case, it could prove to be the
group's last performance at the Attic,
as they will undoubtedly move into
bigger venues. This could be a rare
opportunity for Greenville music lov-
erstosee,orrather listen to, the future.
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
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INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
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FREE BAKERY & DESSERT BAR
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FREE POTATO BAR
Limit 4 persons per coupon. Must
present coupon when ordering.
Coupon expires June 15, 1994. Not
valid �ith any other discounts or
specials.
Good at Greenville locations only.
2903 E. 10th St.
H
Is
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2400 S. Memorial Dr. Greenville Buyers Market Greenville, NC 321-6960
We axe celetkating. owe one yewt annwexdxvty
Nancy Boone, Willie Boone, Michelle Rawles, Faye Joyner, and Carla Avery
would like to say thank you for all your love and support!
Michelle
Nail technician
Everybody is talking
about Faye. She has over
14 years of experience
and a hairstyle just for
you.
Cet ready for summer
with her new customer
special
Relaxers, cut & stvle . 40.00
Michelle says, "If your
nails are not becoming to
you, then you should be
coming to me
Get ready for summer
with my
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Special30.00
Acrylic Nails 40.00
Faye
Hairstylist
Thank you for
allowing us to
serve you. We
promise to
continue to
provide a
relaxed
atmosphere, a
professional
attitude, and
quality products
and service.
Patrece says, "If your
hair is not becoming to
you, then you should be
coming to Hair is
Hair She will style
your hair to bring out
a new you.
Patrece
Hairs tvlist
Carla is inviting new and
old clients to come in for her
hairsfyling expertise. Get
ready for summer with her
spectais.
Haircuts 8.00
Manicures 10.00
Perm, cut & style . 40.00
(Long hair slightly more)
Carla
Hairstylist,
Manicurist
Call For Our Tuesday Special
Relaxer For Two PeopleS5 each
Perm Or Body Wave For Two PeopleS5 each
Shampoo, Bfow Dry, Style For Two People . .20 each
(A TRADITION SINCE LATE SEPTEMBER)
7-52-5855 110 E. 4th St Downtown
OPEN ALL SUMMER
(COME ON IN, THE ALE IS JUST FINE)
Yhursdav
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ri
"ALBUMS GALORE"
(NO KIDDING, WE'VE GOT THESE DIG BLACK ROUND THINGS, AND IF YOU STICK A
NEEDLE ON THEM AND SPIN 'EM, MUSIC COMES, GO FIGURE)
RATARAFEBKi
(PEASANT'S FAVORITE RASTA DUDES)
� D.S.F. EARTH CORPS
(NOT HEAVY, RUT HEADY)
85fMolson Night
MUGNITE CONTINUES
OUR MOTTO: IT IT AIN'T COT A HANDLE. IT AIN'T A MOG.
Sunday
Tuesday
rLrkrkrkrkrkrkTLrkrk





mmtmmmmmmmiimmmmm
W�awiii i �Mii�ir:
The East Carolinian
June 1. 1994
Thoughts
Hcdkey may not be the
most popular sport in the
South, buttheway this year's
By N H L
Brian Olson P�ffs
have un-
Sports Editor , , , .
folded
would interest even the less
than average sports fan.
The Stanley Cup Finals,
begun last night with game
one between the New York
Rangers and the Vancouver
Canucks, will be another
great series in these 1994
playoffs.
The two best teams are
supposed to play in the
Stanley Cup Finals, but they
might have squared off in
the Eastern Conference Fi-
nalsover the past two weeks
between the Rangersand the
New Jersey Devils. The
Rangers eliminated the Dev-
ils in the final gameseven,2-
1, in double overtime. The
ghosts of 1940 can be laid to
rest, but through much of
the series it looked as if they
would never disappear.
New York was down 2-
1 in the third period of Game
Six and were facing elimina-
tion on the Devils home ice
at the Meadowlands. The
stadium was full of energy
and the impossible dreamof
an upset was just 20 minutes
away. With rookie
goaltender Martin Brodeur
stopping every puck that
came his way, the Devils
appeared headed to their
first Stanley Cup.
Enter playoff veteran
Mark Messier.
The quotes read "We'll
win game six" on the front
page of every New York
newspaper. This mailman
delivered.
Messier would have a
third period hat-trick en
route to a 4-2 win to force
game seven back at Madi-
son Square Garden. His go-
ahead goalbroughttheever-
confident Devils to scratch
their heads in disbelief.How
could the league's No. 1 de-
fense have such a let down,
especially at home?
Game seven was then
anyone's to take. This long
physical series would go to
the team who wanted it the
most and would go all outto
do so.
The teams battled
through the first two peri-
ods scoreless. The Rangers
broke the ice and took a 1-0
lead into the final seconds of
regulation.
The Devils were desper-
ate and with about 15 sec-
onds remaining, Brodeur
went to the bench in favor of
an extra skater. The Devils
hung tough, forced a Ranger
icing and capitalized on a
face-off in the Ranger end.
VaJery Zelepukinpicked up
the loose puck and stuffed it
by Mike Richter with seven
seconds remaining. A pin
cou'd have been dropped
and heard in the Garden.
The marathon series
was not about to finish. The
most exciting form of over-
time, sudden death, would
manufacture a champ.
AfterascorelessfirstOT,
Ranger Stephane Matteau
wrapped around the game
winner in double OT. Madi-
son Square Garden was in
an uproar and the ghosts
were laid to rest.
Ranger coach Mike
Keenan, who constantly
plays mind games, now
makes his third trip to the
Stanley Cup Finals with his
third team (Philadelphia and
Chicago were the others).
The trip is well deserved be-
cause N.Y. was also the best
team during the regular sea-
son.
The Devils might have
See OLSON page 8
Sports
Page
Krzyzewski
stays at home
(AP) � Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski said Tuesday he is
happy there and will remain at the
school.
He has coached Duke to two
national basketball titles and got-
ten the Blue Devils into the NCAA
Final Four seven times in nine years.
Krzyzewski last week issued a
terse statement confirming that he
was exploring other job offers.
However, some had warned
Krzyzewski that learning to run a
team the NBA way would be diffi-
cult.
"The game is different said
fromer Portland coach-turned
broadcaster Jack Ramsay in a tele-
phone interview Monday. "The
rules are different. It's almost a
different sport. So, he's got to expe-
rience that, and that's a huge ad-
justment
Kr7yzewski had some expo-
iuje to the NBA as an assistant
coach with the Dream Team that
medal at the 1992 Barcelona Olym-
pics.
A major difference between the
college and pro environments is
the power a coach can apply to
shape his team, Ramsay said.
At Duke, Krzyzewski is able to
mold a group of young adults into
one unit. Making an impression on
older men who receive huge sala-
ries requires different coaching
techniques.
Ramsay said he never found a
player who didn't want to learn
how to play the game.
"I found almost universally
they all want to be taught hesaid.
"But it'sa tough job, and it's gotten
tougher because of the no-cut,
highly lucrative player contracts,
and the fact that management lev-
els above the coach pretty much
dictate who makes up the squad,
and in some cases, who plays. I
don't think you can coach if you
don't have control f your players
.�mi the men's basketball gold and have authority over them
ECU earns respect
(SID) � ECU, along with 19
other Division I-A football pro-
grams, earned special recognition
by the College Football Association
in its yearly survey of graduation
rates for football players, officials
announced Tuesday.
This year's survey is high-
lighted by Duke University's 95.7
percent graduation rate, earning the
institution its sixth Academic
Achievement Award.
CFA �������i
u
The
Academic
Acheivement
Award was es-
tablished in 1981
and is presented
annually by the
Touchdown
Club of Mem
phis, Tenn. The
award recog-
nizes the CFA
member with
the highest
graduation rate
among mem- ���������"
bers of its football team.
AlongwithECU,eighteen other
CFA schools achieved honorable
mention status for having gradua-
tion rates of 70 percent or better.
"Being among the universities
L ing recognized for graduation
rates of their football program is
very satisfying said Dave Hart, Jr
ECU Director of Athletics.
"Colectively, we strive for academic
achievement throughout our ath-
letic program. We are honored and
proud to be recognized in this fash-
ion
According to the CFA survey
results, the overall graduation rate
was 58 percent, a slight decrease
from the 57 percent reported in 1992.
The three CFA member classes
recruited under Proposition 48
���������B (freshmen
classes of 1986-
88) have an av-
erage gradua-
tion rate of 58
percent
(graduated
from 1991-93).
This is an eight
percent in-
crease over the
five-year pe-
riod prior to
Proposition 48
(freshman
classes of 1981-
Being among the
universities being
recognized for
graduation rates of
their football
program is very
satisfying. 9
Dave Hart, Jr.
Director of Athletics
85, graduated from 1986-90). The
average graduation rate for the
freshman class of 1976-80 was 45
percent.
TheCFAAcademic Achievement
Award, and the honorable mention
recipients, will be given plaques at the
CFA'sannual meeting, which will take
place June 3-5 in Dallas, Texas.
Wilke hits academically
(SID) � Georgeann Wilke, a
senior outfielder on the ECU soft-
ball team, has been named to the
1994 GTEAcademic All-
America District III softball team,
officials announced May 24.
The Salem, N.J native has a
3.45 cumulative grade point av-
erage, while majoring in Thera-
peutic Recreation at ECU.
Wilke helped lead coach Sue
Manahan's squad to a 40-24 over-
all record in 1994 and a second
straight berth in the ECAC
Championships. Wilke hit .230
this season with 18 RBI and 10
stolen bases. She also commit
ted only five errors in 126
chances.
Wilke has been named to the
ECU Honor Roll and Dean's List
and is a member of the Student-
Athlete Advisory Council. In
1993, she was the female winner
of the Texasgulf Outstanding
Scholar-Athlete Award.
District III covers the states
of Florida, Georgia, North Caro-
lina, South Carolina and Virginia.
Voting is done by the College-
Sports Information Directors of
America. Wilke will now be eli-
gible for the All-America team,
which will be announced June 9.
Track teams shaping up
Dava Rhodes
Tara Rhodes
Lady Pirates fare well at ECAC event
(SID) � The 1994 Lady Pi-
rate Track team enjoyed its best
season to date by claiming 14th
place at the ECAC Outdoor
Championshiplast weekend
hosted by George Mason Uni-
versity. ECU was led by the out-
standing freshman duo of sisters
Dava and Tara Rhodes. Dava
was the first ever ECU female
athlete to win an event at the
ECAC Outdoor Championship.
With the victory Dava also shat-
tered ECU's 10,000M school
record. Her ECAC time of 35.13.43
broke the school record by more
than one minute. Tara also had an
excellent season which culminated
in a fifth-place finish at the ECAC
meet.
The Lady Pirates scored a
school-best, 16 overall points,
which was one better than CAA
foe James Madison. Freshman Lave
Wilson had a good meet finishing
13th overall in the triple jump with
a distance of 387.75 The 4x100
team consisting of Carla Powell,
Amanda Johnson, Shantell
Carter, and Nicole Crews also
had an excellent meet finishing
seventh overall with a time of
47.22
Coach Charles "Choo" Jus-
tice was very pleased with the
meet and said, "Dava's win takes
us as a team to another level.
This meet fields some of the best
teams in the country, and with
no seniors competing for us at
EC AC's, we will be able to build
and grow for the future
i
-
Photo by Garret Killian
ECU track members from left to right: Brian Johnson, Kareem Lamb, Lewis Harris and Dwight Henry.
GMU
(SID)�The ECU men's track
program finished theirseason May
21-22 after competing in the IC4A
championships held at George
Mason University. The Pirates'
performance was highlighted by a
championship run in the 4x400 re-
lay. The ECU squad, consisting of
Brian Johnson, Kareem Lamb,
Lewis Harris, and Dwight Henry,
finished nearly two seconds ahead
of the rest of the field at 3.07.99. The
victory was a grea t ending to a disap-
pointingseason for coach Bill Carson.
"It was a great win Carson
said. "If we only had two more
weeks, we could have qualified for
nationals, but that's the way things
go
Pirate triple-jumper Chris
McKinney alsocame through with a
personal best jump to finish 5th.
McKinney landed at 50-feet-00.75
inches to score for the Pirates.
Senior Charles Miles finished
his career at ECU with a 10.81 sec-
ond performance in the 100 meter
dash, finishing seventh. Teammate
Kareem Lamb finished sixth in the
400 meter dash at 47.64.
The 4x100 relay run was not as
successful as the 4x400 squad, as
runners Brian Johnsonand Charles
Miles were victim to a faulty ex-
change. The squad finished 8th at
41.07
this season with 18 RBI and 10 gible for the All-America ream, of the rest of the field at 3.07.99.1 he inches to score ror me i u�i�. ��
stolen bases. She also commit- which will be announced June 9.
Russian Rocket set to explode during the 1994 Stanley Cup Finals
v.uv.�i,�,K,mhi� "Thev come out of an elitist Rangers goaltender Mike Rid
(AP) � Growing up in Russia,
Pavel Bure never thought much
about the Stanley Cup.
Same thing for Sergei Zubov,
another of the Russian players in
the Stanley Cup finals.
But one of them will make his-
tory for his country in the series
between the Vancouver Canucks
and New York Rangers which
started last night.
For the first time, a Russian will
havehisnameenscribedontheCup.
"Yes, I know about that said
Zubov, the defenseman who led
the Rangers m scoring this season
with 89 points. "I hope it's me.
"I ha v e everything else, includ-
ing a gold medal from the Olym-
pics. But the Stanley Cup is bigger
than the Olympics
Bure, the Canucks' 60-goal
scorer and a boyhood pal of Zubov
from Moscow, has also made the
Cup his holy grail.
"Since I've come into the NHL
he said, "I've wanted to win the
Cup. I think I've been here long
enough to know what it means
Bure is on!v in his third year in
the NHL but has established him-
self as a powerful offensive force.
Zubov has, too, although only in his
second year.
They are among a current crop
of superb Russian players in the
NHL who have made an impact.
Along with Zubov, forwards Alexei
Kovalev and Sergei Nemchinov and
defenseman Alexander Karpov tsev
have played important roles in the
Rangers' charge to the finals.
"It will be great for the series
Ron Smith said, who, as a Rangers'
coach for part of last season and a
Canucks' assistant this year, has
coached all of the Russians playing
in the finals.
"They come out of an elitist
program, and they are all highly
skilled players. They have just ac-
celerated daily" since joining the
NHL, he said. ,
That's an apt description of the
Russians currently in the NHL. Just
about all of them are great skaters
and have marvelous puck-handling
skills.
Bure is a case in point. He is
nicknamed "The Russian Rocket"
because of amazing speed which
often sets up breakaway situations
that put goaltenders at his mercy.
"He's a complete player
Rangers goaltender Mike Richter
said. "He's very, very strong. He
has a fantastic shot and he gets it
off quickly.
"He anticipates well. But his
physical skillsare second to none
Added Kovalev on his coun-
trvman:
"I watched him play against
Toronto. Nobody can stop him.
We need to skate to stop him
Kovalev himself is no slouch
in the speed department, nor are
Zubv, Nemchinov or
See NHL page 8





8 The East Carolinian
June 1. 1994
Ward named player of year
(SID)-ECU senior outfielder
Michelle Ward has been named
the 1994 ECAC (Eastern College
Athletic Conference) Player of the
Year while teammate Lisa
Corprew joins Ward on the ECAC
All-Stars First Team.
Ward, who holds the NCAA
national stolen base record for
single season (80,1994) and career
(193), played in 59 games for the
Lady Pirates in 1994 and posted a
.413 batting average with 17 runs
batted in. In current NCAA statis-
tics, Ward is third in the nation in
stolen bases per games with an
average of 1.311.
The Virginia Beach, Va. na-
tive and All-American candidate
was a repeat performer on the
All-State First team. She is the ECU
career leader in batting with a .384
average, runs scored (164), hits
(229) as well as stolen bases (193).
Joining Ward on the All-Star
team is ECU senior catcher Lisa
Corprew. Corprew also hails from
Virginia Beach and was a high
school teammate of Ward at
Bayside High.
Corprew batted .317 in 1994,
drove in 30 runs as well has steal-
ing 433 bases. Corprew hit six
doubles and six triples in 1994
and led the Lady Pirates with two
home runs.
ECU scareer home runs leader
with 11 homers from 1191-94,
Corprew is second on the all-time
RBI list with 99 and third career
stolen bases with 82. She also set a
career record for games played
with 211 and is the third all-time
leader in runs (111) an hits (157).
Corprew and Ward helped
guide ECU to a 1411-79 overall
record in the last four years (40-24
in 1994) which included two 40
win seasons and back-to-back
berths to the ECAC Softball cham-
pionship.
The Sports
Department
needs
Courier outlasts Sampras
Summer
and Fall!
Blame Penske and his turbocharged engine
(AP) � Roger Penske won the
Indy 500. He also ruined it.
When the car owner with the
deepest pockets shows up at the
Brickyard with the most talented
drivers and a turbocharged
Mercedes V8 engine, set up by the
world's best design team for just this
one race, the only reason to run it is
to find out which of his entries gets
the victory lap.
For the record, it was Al Unser
Jr who led 48 of the 200 laps. But it
just as easily could have been team-
mate Emerson Fittipaldi, who led all
but seven of the remaining 152 laps.
Or even Paul Tracy, the tiiird mem-
ber of Team Penske, whose day
ended on lap 92 with a busted turbo-
charger that gave the silver-haired
maestro one of his few anxious mo-
ments.
"I didn't win this race 10 times,
the people who work for me woi
this race 10 times Penske said Sun-
OLSON
day.
That, depending on your view,
is either passing around the credit or
the blame.
What Penske did was fair How-
ever, if he didn't violate the letter of
Indy's laws, he certainly violated the
spirit. Whether he gets the chance to
claim an 1 lthsilver trophy as easily as
he picked up No. 10 could well de-
pend on how much smarter the
rulemakers become in the next year.
Penske madetheoutcomeaspre-
dictable as it was monotonous. Unser
began as the pole-sitter and Fittipaldi
on the outside of the front row with
Brazilian Raul Boesel sandwiched be-
tween them. By fheend of the first lap,
the two Penske Mercedes roared re-
morselessly away from the starting
grid and were 10 car-lengths clear of
the underpowered field. Then, they
began picking through the various
mishaps, wrecks and debns toward
what seemed like the pre-ordained
Continued from page 7
finish
By lap 150, the two of them and
pesky rookie Jacques Villeneuve were
the only three drivers still on the lead
lap. By lap 180, Unser and Fittipaldi
had the track pretty much to them-
selves. Evenso, Unser had the gnawing
sense that the race was Firtipaldi's to
lose.
"But the race ain't over 'til the fat
lady sings he said. "I've won several
races on the very last lap and I've lost
several races on the very last lap
Other than Tracy's problem, the
only other anxious moment Penske
had to suffer through was when Unser
and Fittipaldi tried to resolve their little
"competition" problem without ruin-
ing both cars.
Coming out of Turn 4 with the
lead, Fittipaldi drafted behind Unser
and tried to slingshot pasthim. Instead,
his car lost the downforce that makes it
stick tothetrack,drifted to therightand
into the wall justshortof thestart-finish
line. The Brazilian wound up 17th
"It's a real shame what hap-
pened Fittipaldi said. "It's a shame
it wasn't 1 and 2"
That was almost certainly what
Penske envisioned last November
when, afterstudying the United States
Auto Club rules for the 1994 race, he
found a loophole that he could drive
a Mercedes through
Three yearsago, US AC hoped to
shore up the poorest teams here and
encourage American manufacturers
to invest more in Indy-car racing by
allowing stock-block engines an ad-
ditional 10 pounds of turbocharger
boost.
What USAC had in mind was
restoring the competitiveness of an
aging Buick engine that has been in
use here since 1987. Wha t they could
not riave imagined was that Penske,
as smart as he is rich, would devote
his considerable resourcefulness to
skewering their kindness.
(AP) � Jim Courier dashed
archrival Pete Sampras' dream of a
fourth straight Grand Slam title,
outplaying the world No. 1 in four
sets yesterday in the quarterfinals
of the French Open.
Courier, seeking to regain the
crown he won in 1991 and 1992, had
lost 10 of 12 matches to Sampras,
including the last four in a row. But
this was their first clash on clay, and
the No. 7 seed showed why he likes
the surface with a relentless 6-4,5-7,
6-4,6-4 victory.
Courier will seek revenge in
Friday's semifinals against Sergi
Bruguera, who dethroned him in
last year's final. The Spaniard, yet to
lose a set in five ma tches here, ousted
fourth-seed Andrei Medvedev of
Ukraine 6-3,6-2,7-5.
At the net after match point,
Courier said he apologized to
Sampras for breaking the Grand
NHL
Slam streak.
"You go out there and play
the best you can Courier said,
speaking French to a local TV net-
work. "That's life
In women's quarterfinals, top-
seeded Steffi Graf and record-set-
ting Mary Pierce each won deci-
sively to set up a much-anticipated
semifinal showdown Thursday.
Pierce, the power-hitting No.
12 seed, routed Austrian Petra
Ritter 6-0, 6-2 to reach a Grand
Slam semifinal for the first time. In
her five matches through the
quarterfinals, Pierce has lost only
six games, the best showing ever
in the tournament.
Graf overcame 36th-ranked
Ines Gorrochategui of Argentina,
6-4, 6-1. She has reached at least
the semifinals in every French
Open since 1987, when she won
the first of her three titles.
Continued from page 7
Karpovtsev.
When the Rangers needed more
neu tral-zone speed against the New
Jersey Devils in the Eastern Confer-
ence finals, coach Mike Keenan gave
Nemchinov more ice time.
When the Rangers needed
some spark on their No. 1 line in the
same series, Keenan put Kovalev
on the wing with Mark Messier and
Adam Graves.
When the Rangers wanted to
juice up their offense, they put
Zubov on the back line with Brian
Leetch, another offensive-minded
defenseman.
"The Russians have influ-
enced us positively Canucks'
general manager-coach PatQuinn
said. "They have puck-handling
and skating skills that the Cana-
dian boys don't have
Noted Trevor Linden, the
Canucks' captain: "Their style is
speed. It's certainly impacted on
our hockey team. I'm sure it's im-
pacted the Rangers). They have
several Russian players; all have
speed. The European influence has
opened up the game
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZZA
ALFREDO'S
r
lost the series, but in the hearts of
many, are still champs. This under-
dog team faced adversity all sea-
son. Since the Devils came to East
Rutherford, N.J in 1982 from Colo-
rado, they have never gained re-
spect beca use of the other local teams
(Rangers, N.Y. Islanders). Now, af-
ter this season, they have established
their own identity.
Devil veterans Bernie Nicholls
and Bobby Carpenter would go on
to say that this is the best team that
they have ever played on. That is
something to say when Nicholls
has played with Edmonton when
they were a destiny and Carpenter
has played with some great Boston
teams. The Devils might not have
had the best individual stars, but
their team make-up was extraordi-
nary.
The Devils had a hard time sell-
ing seats during the regular season,
and in the wars with N.Y half the
fans were wearing the red, white
and blue shirts of the Rangers. All of
the media hoopla helped make the
Devils a true and unforgettable ac-
complished underdog.
Thesportstalkradiostationsand
the NY newspapers never gave the
Devils a fair-shake, but maybe now
they will get some deserved respect.
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 1, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 01, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1011
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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