The East Carolinian, April 21, 1994






HMMWMWliHMi
. . . . �
Lifestyle
Pirate Comics, squishy pellet!
Everyone says goodbye or later. sjsf"
Don't you feel like chump change S
for not writing in to let us know how
cool we are? Page 7 for all that.
No Escape!
Hendrix theatre will be
previewing No Escape,
an action-adventure film
starring Ray Liotta, at
8:00pm on Monday, April
25. Story on page 13.
The East Carolinian
Vol.69Noj93
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday,April21,1994
16 Pages
It's over! Eastman, Boswell win SGA run-off
Results
Box
SGA Run-Off Election
Results
President
Ian Eastman
Brynn Thomas
Unanswered
Totals
No.
585
512
7
3.8
46.4
.6
1104 100
Vice President
Sheila Boswell
Chris Munley
Unanswered
Totals
No.
587
502
15

53.2
45.5
1.4
1104 100
Bv Stnhame Lassiter
Assistant News Lditor
Ian
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Is this what they mean by stuffing the ballot box? Actually, in a run-off election not marred by the controversy
that surrounded the original election, a fair number of students turned out to vote.
And the winners are
Eastman and Sheila Boswell.
After two weeks of hard-
fought campaigning , the races for
SGA president ar.d vice president
have finally come to an end. In the
run-off for president, Eastman de-
feated opponent Brvnn Thomas, 53.0
percent to 46.4 percent.
Thomas' running mate,
Boswell, defeated Eastman's run-
ning mate Chris Munley, 53.2 per-
cent to 45.5 percent.
"Wow, I can't believe it
Eastman said. "And I'm glad it's
over
Eastman said he intends to
follow through with the nine points
of his platform, particularly the for-
mation of a graduate student um-
brella organization.
"I will bring the bill to form
such an organization in front of the
Board of Trustees,becauseit'ssome-
thing I strongly believe in Eastman
said.
The East Carolinian notified
Thomas of the defeat.
"I was kind of mad because
all of our stuff (campaign posters)
got torn down thenightbefore,but
there was a pretty good turnout
Thomas said.
According to Elections Chair
Dale Emery, the turnout of 1,104
voters was excellent for a run-off
election.
"I think things ran very
smoothly this time around Em-
ery said. "There was great team-
work with everyone involved
After the polls closed at 8:00
p.m Thomas and Boswell left the
sight to await the vote count.
Eastman remained with the elec-
tions chair and members of the
media. Munlevwasnotified shortly
after the decision was announced.
When asked what his plans
for the future included, Munley
expressed a strong interest in con-
tinuing to work with the SGA.
"I will definitely be getting
involved in trying to make SGA a
more pro-active organization
Munlev said. "I would like to con-
See SGA page 3
Meal cards, student IDs soon to be combined
8y Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
ECU has a very promising
future ahead. Plans include an
updated, sophisticated library
and a one of a kind student rec-
reation center. ECU will also
step up to a one-card student
IDmeal card.
The new system is still in
the works as committees work
to find out the greatest needs
that the new cards will address.
"Right now, students use
two cards; one for dining and a
bookstore account, and the other
for student activities, "said Frank
Salamon, director of Dining Ser-
vices. "We want to make life sim-
pler for everyone by combining
the cards into one
Uses for the two cards will
be combined into one card. For
example, the new system will
allow a key-less entry system for
the dorms. Students will be able
to vote, check-out books, obtain
tickets to athletic events, and buy
meals all with the convenience
of one card.
The changes are scheduled
to be completed by the spring
semester in 1996.
"The process of converting
our current system to the new
one is a lengthy one Salamon
said.
The school's mainframe
will have to be changed to handle
the abilities of the new system.
The cards will all work on a
magnetic stripe principle simi-
lar to the ones on credit cards.
The staff will also have to be
trained on how to use the sys-
tem as well as the technology
used to process the cards.
The biggest delay is coming
from the fact that there are no
available phone lines for the sys-
tem to use. Also, any department
that currently uses one of the
cards for anything will have to
allocate money for card readers.
The question that most
people have regarding the new
system is: "What if I lose my card
and someone then has access to
everything that I do There is a
high degree of security with these
new cards. Just like now, if a stu-
dent loses their meal card, one
phonecalltoDiningServiceswill
put a block on that card, making
it invalid. This will allow only
students with up-to-date, valid
IDs to partake of the services pro-
vided by ECU.
The goal of the system and
its capabilities were best ex-
pressed by Salamon when he
said, "What we are trying to do is
every thing convenient for every-
one
Sculpture
removed
By Mike Walker
Staff Writer
Batter
up!
The most
famous
Birmingham
Baron lays
down a bunt in
batting
practice.
Michael Jordan
went 5-11 in a
recent series at
Five County
Stadium in
Zebulon.
Photo by Brian Olson
ECU to celebrate Earth Day
Jason Williams
News Editor
Twenty-four years. In that
period of time, acres upon acres of
trees have been chopped down.
Miles of rivers and streams have
been polluted, and the air over
many cities has become unhealthy
to breathe. Were it not for the first
Earth Day, first celebrated 24 years
ago tomorrow, who knows how
much worse it could be?
ECU'senvironmental health
honorsociety probably knows, and
that is why they will be celebrating
the event by recognizing activists
and health professionals for their
dedication toa betterenvironment.
Richard K. Rowe, James H.
Mulligan and John Anema will be
honored for their work in the envi-
ronmental policy field in a cer-
emony starting at 11 a.m. Friday at
the Belk (Allied Health) Building.
ECU's chapter of Epsilon Sigma
Nu, the National Environmental
Health Honor Society, will spon-
sor the program.
Rowe, of Raleigh, is the head
of the Division of Environmental
Health in the N.C Department of
Environmental, Health and Natu-
ral Resources (DEHNR). He is in
charge of public water supplies,
pest management, shellfish and
milk sanitation, on-site water treat-
ment and food protection for the
state.
Mulligan, a resident of
See EARTH DAY page 3
Nobody can define art.
All people have different
ideas about what is and what
isn't art. And when pieces of
art get displayed in public
there is always some ques-
tion over whether or not it is
art and should be displayed.
This was the case of five
ECU art students who tried to
present their sculpture to the
public by placing it outside.
After about one and half days,
their piece of art became the
victim of selfish acts of van-
dalism.
Stacey Crabill, Ashley
Williams, Tanya Cahoon,
Vanessa Daughtry, and
Kasana Llfton are under-
graduate art students. For a
project in Design 2, they col-
laborated and made a sculp-
ture.
The sculpture consisted
of a real clothesline with
working clothespins and real
articles of clothing. The ar-
ticles of clothing that the five
students made were, a pair of
jeans, a bra, a pair of boxers, a
See ART page 4
eople
on time;
Q. Should freshmen
be allowed to have
cars on campus?
Photos by Leslie Petty
r Mm " Hfei-
t � ��

Dana Green, junior: "No, until we
are provided with more parking
spaces so that everyone can park
Carrie Shields, freshman: "Yes,
because it would make it a lot
easier on us. But if I was a senior
and could not park and freshmen
could, that would bother me
Scott Anderson, junior: "No,
because they need to earn their
priveleges, a rite of passage
through college social life which is
necessary for their development
Michael Edgerton, sophomore:
"When I was a freshman, it was
nice to have a car. But considering
the parking problem, I do not think
it would be a good idea to allow
freshmen to have cars





m$mmmm
2 The East Carolinian
April 21, 1994
April 14
Fleming Hall � 3:00 p.m. Report of larceny of personal items.
South of Tennis Courts-Ficklen � 3:20 p.m. Damage to per-
sonal property (vehicle).
April 15
Southeast of Cotten Hall � 3:36 a.m. Student arrested for DWI.
North of Christenbury�3:30 a.m. Damage to personal property
(vehicle).
Brody Building Auditorium � 8:15 a.m. Larceny reported of a
telephone.
East of Greene Hall �11:15 a.m. Larceny of bike parts.
Founders Drive � 6:09 p.m. Non-student arrested for Driving
While their License is Revoked (DWLR).
April 16
Jones Hall�2:25 a.m. Report of affray (a noisy quarrel or brawl).
South of Spillman � 12:30 a.m. Damage to personal property
(vehicle).
Whichard Building � 4:13 p.m. Damage to outside window.
April 17
Founder's Drive � 1.37 p.m. Non-student arrested for D.W.L.R.
McGinnis Auditorium & Theatre Arts Center � 10:37 a.m.
Damage to personal property.
Belk Hall � 5:44 p.m. Domestic dispute and trespassing re-
ported.
Tyler Hall � 7:45 p.m. Larceny of clothes.
April 18
Austin Building � 6:05 p.m. Second degree trespassing re-
ported.
Jones Hall � 8:45 p.m. Report of Harassing phone calls.
South of Rawl � 9:16 p.m. Larceny of bicycle.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from official ECU
police reports.
ABLE meets with Public Safety
0 0 000000000000
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Last week's silent protest in
front of ECU'S Public Safety build-
ing by members of Aliied Blacks
for Leadership and Equality
(ABLE) may have been a similar
plea as the one heard almost 30
years ago.
According to the account
written in East Carolina University,
the Formative Years by Dr. Mary Jo
Jackson Bratton, professor of his-
tory at ECU, in 1968 a group of 67
African American students pre-
sented a petition to President Leo
Jenkins calling for an immediate
improvement in racial practices.
Similarly, members of ABLE
marched in front of Public Safety
last week with a list of grievances
asking the department to alter the
way African Americans are treated.
In response, a meeting was sched-
uled.
Monday, at 5 p.m approxi-
mately 10 ABLE representatives
and students sat down with Teresa
Crocker, director of Public Safety,
in the basement of Mendenhall to
discuss group concerns and pos-
sible solutions to the proposed
problems.
The meeting began when
Crocker briefly introduced herself,
and then opened the discussion to
those present. The questions and
answers lasted for over an hour
and a half, ending with the goal of
establishing a potential public
safety employment student review
board.
In her introduction, Crocker
explained that she came to ECU
last November and was a graduate
of N.C. State. She went on to say
tha t she is currently going to school
at N.C. Central for a Master's de-
gree in criminal justice.
"I wan ted a different perspec-
tive of criminal justice and felt that
I could get that at a predominantly
black school Crocker said.
Crocker also said that she
wants ECU's public safety serviceto
become one of the best programs "
in the country. She said that since �
coming to ECU, 10 employees are g
no longer with public safety, and
this signifies a definite time of "
change for the department. t
Demetrius Carter, spokesper-
son for ABLE, asked Crocker if she-
felt that a problem exists between i
African Americans on campus and t
Public Safety. Crocker said that
there may have been a problem,
but predicted a different future. (
She said that no one deserves pref-
erential treatment, but if there are
problems she should be informed
of them.
"I ha ven't had students come
to my office and complain that they
have been treated differently
Crocker said.
This comment sparked reac-
tions that some students may not
know where to go when instances
occur. Many students may not feel
comfortable addressing the direc-
tor of public safety.
"If there 'sa problem withone
of my officers, I have a right to
know that Crocker said.
One of the proposed griev-
ances on the list given to Crocker
last week was the need for public
safety to employ African Ameri-
can officers in proportion to the
number of African American stu-
dents on campus.
When the subject was ad-
dressed, Crocker responded that
20 percent of public safety posi-
tions were filled by African Ameri-
cans, which outnumbers her inf or-
mationthatbetweenlOand 12per-
cent of ECU students are African
American. She also said that she is
hoping to fill half of the current ten
openings with minorities.
One student said it did not
matter if public safety employed
solely Caucasians, because the at-
titudes of some of the officers
needed "serious alterations Stu-
� r
El
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MEMORIAL
15
24Wiours
gaftnsi
CANC
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JOIN THE FIGHT
APRIL 29-30
Starting Time: 6 p.m.
Registration begins at 4:30 p.m.
at East Carolina University track
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run or jog in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call �JZ1-Zo�5o
FUN FOOD AND EXERCISE
GUARANTEED FOR ALL!
Sponsored by:
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See ABLE page 4
APPLICATION TO PARTICIPATE
I will recruit a team - send me information
I would like to be on a team
Enclosed10 per person
Mail to: American Cancer Society, PO Box 377
Greenville, NC 27835
The 12th Annual
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Monday, April 25
8:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Passes Available At
Mendenhall Info Desk &
ECU Student Store
Presented By
The Student Union
Films Committee
i I����'
v . �





April 21, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
SGA
Continued from page 1
TRIAD-AREA
STUDENTS

W
H G
EARN TRANSFERABLE
COLLEGE CREDIT
THROUGH CHALLENGING,
STIMULATING COURSES
DURING SUMMER SESSION
gratulate Sheila on ,1 jt h well done. I
thi'ik everyone worked extremeh
hard and I would like to thank ev-
eryone for coming out So, we re
going toseew hatgoesonherenow
East Carolinian could not
reach Boswell for comments.
Emery requested that a repre-
EARTH DAY

K
sentah v toi
present durii
i K'er.j urrentS( IA president, n
sented rhomasand Boswell.
' Eastman did a great job in
the election, he won and hedesen es
every right and respect oi being the thesemester,
I am ' r tne
studentsbei - eyl
oi e, i astman said
Among his plans tor the up-
coming war. Eastman hopes to ex-
tend cl : p dates to the end ot
asa plan w here
during exams
I would realh like to thank
� pie who came out and
supported me Eastman said. "I
think people are ready to see it we
can') moving more for the
students and eetoutof all the nega-
te !A president 1 )yersaid.
the library will be open 24 hours bvity associated with SGA
Continued from page 1
T
AT ELON
COLLEGE
CONVENIENT LOCATION
FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING
COURSES ARE OFFERED IN ALL DISCIPLINES.
FOR EXAMPLE:
Art 237
Bus. Adm. 360
Bus. Adm. 4! 9
Economics 246
English 2 i 7
English 332
English 362
History 374
jri-Comm. 367
jri-Comm, 465
Pol. Sci 329
Religion 378
Spanish I I I
Theatre lOI
Photography I & I!
Principles of Decision Science
Sales Management
Statistics for Economics and Business
Women and Language
Literature of the South
Study of Film
Germany: Unification to 1945
Information Search
Media Law
Political Behavior
Book of Revelation
Elementary Spanish
introduction to Theatre
REGISTRATION JUNE I
FOR MORE INFORMATION,
OR A COMPLETE LIST OF COURSES,
CALL THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
1-800-334-8448 OR 910-584-2370
Greenville, is a regional supervisor
at DF11R who is responsible for
implementing the state's regula-
tory program for air, surface water
and ground water in eastern North
Carolina. 1 he regional office is
b ised in Washington, N.C.
ohn Anema is the chair oi
the local chapter of the Sierra Club,
and is also active in the Pamlico-
Tar River Foundation. Anema has
organized educational programs
on waste incineration and other
regional environmental issues Re
cently he appeared on a panel dis-
cussion at a convention organized
b ECU'sCollege Democrats
Anema said that the first
Earth Day grew out of the anti-war
movementduringtheVi -mamera.
I le said that some oi the enthusi-
asm for environmentalism has
waned since that time.
"There is still a strong anti-
em ironmental movement
Anema said. 'The emironment
sometimes gets overshadowed b
iLies like the economy and crime
"What we need is better plan-
ning, especially on the regional
level. We also need to reconstruct
our thinking toward sustainable
de elopment rather than growth
Dr. Trenton Davis, professor
oi environmental health, also un-
derstands the significance oi Earth
Day. He credits the environmental
movement of the late 1960s and
early 1970s with stimulating envi-
ronmental legislation.
"The first Earth Day led to
the most important piece ot legis-
lation we've ever had Davis said.
The legislation was the National
I nvironmental Polio Act of 1969
iNI PA). Thislavi requires the fed
era! government to consider the
impact of an action on the en i-
ronment. A government ageno
must file an environmental impact
statement that allows for publii
comment before taking .k tion.
Other significant legislation
passed during this time was the
t leanAir ctofl970andthe( lean
Water Act oi 1972. ITiese laws es-
tablished national standards for air
and water, tor which state- must
create a plan to meet Both laws
ha e been amended se era! times,
but are credited with improving
air and water quality.
Davis -aid that since the first
Earth Day, much lias changed,
"here is le� pollution, generally,
and people appreciate natural ar-
eas. Also, people are better in-
formed about environmental is-
sues.
We come a long way as
to educating the public about en-
vironmental issues Davis said.
' 1 can -ee this in our freshmen
students, rhev are much more
knowledgeable about the environ-
ment
Davis al-o -aid that people people
should remember the environ
mentaftt r I arth I )ayhaspassed.
"We are still a long way trom
controllingallol the environmen-
tal issues that affect our health
Bill Winchester, student
president of Epsilon Sigma Nu,
said he is looking forward to
tomorrow - ceremony.
"Every year we induct new
members into the honors K iet
he said. "We also choose people
wiiii have shown outstanding
service to the environment. For
some oi the recipients, it might
seem like a job, but these are
who go above and be-
yond
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4 The East Carolinian
April 21, 1994
ART
Continued from page 1
bikini, a dress, a T-shirt, and socks.
The only difference between the
sculpture and a real clothesline
vas that the sculpture was four
limes as big as a normal clothes-
line. "The jeans that hung on the
clothesline were about 11 feet
long Williams said.
The project was originally
designed to be site specific, and
the site they picked to hang their
sculpture up on the balconies be-
tween Fleming and Cotten dorms.
One of the aspects of their project
jvas to secure the correct permis-
sion to hang their piece. How-
ever, when the five students
started to hang their piece on
Monday, April 11, they ran into
some problems. According to
yVilliams, they were told "very
Explicitly" by the University
Housing Director Emmanuele
Amaro that they were not allowed
to hang it there. Williams notes,
they were under the impression
that they had the permission.
"As far as we knew, we had
gone through sources and gotten
permission Crabill said.
However, according to
Amaro, the five students did not
get the correct authorization.
"They did not have any permis-
sion Amaro said. "They didn't
even go through the Dean of Stu-
dents or my office .
According to Crabill, Amaro
didn't even give them time to ex-
plain and threatened to cut the
sculpture down. "He said that if
he let us hang it up without spe-
cial reason, then at any point, any-
one could hang a banner out of
their window Crabill said.
Williams said she under-
stood he was just doing his job,
but she feels that he treated them
like children. "He threatened to
vandalize our sculpture Will-
iams said.
Williams points out that
their sculpture is not a banner. "I
don't think what we worked so
many hours on should be com-
pared to an old sheet with spray
paint on it that says, rush what-
ever Williams said.
"To us it's like someone
else's research paper Crabill
said.
After the initial removal, the
five students secured permission
to put up their sculpture in front
of the between the art building
and Fifth Street. Williams notes
ABLE
however, that the Dean of the Art
School, Michael Dorsey, had to
spend a lot of time meeting with
groundskeepers to get permission
for the five students to hang their
sculpture.
" He spent a lot of his time in
meetings fighting to keep the
sculpture up Williams said. Ap-
parently, Chancellor Eakin also ex-
pressed support for-the students
to hang up their sculpture.
After a day and a half of
hanging in front of the art build-
ing, the sculpture started to get
vandalized. According to Will-
iams, first the bra was cut off at the
straps and stolen. After that the
bikini, boxers, and T-shirt were
stolen and the dress was ruined.
"It was like once we fought
to get it up, we had to endure
Continued from page 2
vandalism Crabill said. The van-
dalism was not reported to ECU
Public Safety. "We just assumed
that that would be something we
couldn't recover Williams said.
The group expressed anger
over the vandalism because, now
the public won't be able to see
what thev wanted to share.
"To us, it was something
that we wanted to share for
other people to view and then
thoseare the people that didn't
consider the time and effort
that we put in something like
that Williams said. "We felt
like so many people were en-
joying it Crabill said.
dents felt that officers would stop
them for no reason, or not give a
reason, and that was not fair.
Crocker agreed and said that in-
forming suspects of police action
was recommended, but could not
become policy because prior noti-
fication is not a good idea in all
situations.
"It's very difficult to hire
young police officers Crocker
said. "Every time they see some-
one on TV they think its a drama,
that you have to pull your weapon
and that's not true
Recruitment was cited by
many as a major flaw of public
safety. Crocker said there is a lack
of African American officers ap-
plying for positions and she has
"put the word out" at predomi-
nantly black institutions across the
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valid with an other discounts or
specials.
Good at Greenville locations only.
2903 E. 10th St.
state. One student said he had ap-
plied for a position and never re-
ceived any kind of contact as to
where the application stood at any
time. Crocker said she is planning
to implement a recruitment team
within the next two years which
will at least confirm the receiving
of applications.
She said that ECU isa friendly
environment where trouble does
not occur often. She is trying to
recruit students of ECU who would
enjoy a campus situation.
Unrest was present in the
room as students felt the meeting
would end, as previous meetings
in January did, with no action.
Crocker said these feelings were
due to a lack of communication
and that she has been available for
discussion.
When asked what actions
Crocker has taken since January,
she said she is recruiting some of
the best diversity training avail-
able in the country for annual in-
struction. She has also informed
supervisors to look for unneces-
sary aggression in officers, as well
as planning surveys for the stu-
dent body. She said she is also in
the process of updating the proce-
dure manual to her philosophies,
but all of these actions would take
time.
"They are not getting things
done in the timely fashion that I
would like Crocker said.
Students from across the
room said they would feel much
more comfortable with a student
screening board to help in select-
ing potential employees of public
safety.
"I've thought about that an
awful lot Crocker said. "I've also
Attention
Returning Students
If yon plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P O Box !847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, all: Customer Service.
Rcmembcr to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish lo have ihe utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposi's
are as follows: . . , . . .
with electric or wout electric
gas space healing or gas space heating
Electric Only S100S75
Electric & Water $100S85
Electric. Water & Gas $110$85
Electric & Gas SI00$75
You can save lime by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
Greenville �S� Utilities
made some phone calls. I still be-
lieve it's not feasible to go through
that process. 1 feel confident in my
ability to choose
After a lengthy debate and
some compromising, Crocker
agreed to begin the formation of a
student review board by the end of
April.
"It will give you a feel for
what the students want a mem-
ber of ABLE said.
When asked whether or not
she believed the arrest of Allen
Williams, on April 5 was made
with unnecessary force Crocker
commented that the incident is
currently under investigation by
ECU attorneys.
ABLE will hold another meet-
ing next Wednesday to begin
implementing the ideas proposed.
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for mote info call: 752-6154





The East Carolinian
April 21, 1994
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Gina Jones, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Jodi Connelly, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Hurt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chinh Ngyeun, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserv es the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C, 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
"In wildness is the preservation of the world" j
Friday is Earth Day. It is a day you either
feel impassioned about, or one that seems to be
the most worthless holiday in existence. Need-
less to say, I view Earth Day as not only an
important observation, but one that encour-
ages people to remain faithful to part of their
con tract with wha fever higher power to which
they happen to answer.
Twenty-four years ago, Earth Day began
in a decade that was hell-bent on getting past
and recovering from the Vietnam experience.
It was before the monty-grubbing span of the
'80s, and after the free love excesses of the Age
of Aquarius. In other words, we had a lot to
learn.
So along comes a celebration of Mother
Earth and the beginning of a movement that
owed many of its traits to American Indian
tradition and minimalist thinking. We real-
ized that we needed to change or, in not so
many years, the environment could face ulti-
mate, irreparable destruction. In many ways,
it has.
Countless acres of precious rainforests all
over the globe have disappeared, due to mass-
grazing. The air was indelibily polluted by
factories, automobiles, industrial chemicals
and forest-reduction. The water was abused in
much the same fashion. Thanks to illegal in-
dustrial dumping and the increase of algae,
our water systems became clogged and unus-
able. We were destroying the ground we
walked on, the air we breathed and the water
we drink. In a roundabout way (to be totally
existential), we were destroying ourselves.
Earth Day certainly didn't solve these prob-
lems, but it brought about the realization that
change needed to occur. Enthusiasm to make a
change stimulated environmental legislation�
the most important of which was the National
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Sim-
ply put, this law requires the federal govern-
ment to think before they act. A huge step for
humankind, so to speak.
The Clean Air Act of 1970 and the Clean
Water Act of 1972 were doubly significant, since
they established national standards for air and
water and improved the quality of both. Since
then, many people have seen nature in a differ-
ent light and have taken steps toward a cleaner
planet. National parks saw an increase in visi-
tors, the number of environmental periodicals
reached an all-time high, and environmental
education gained interest.
The only problem with Earth Day is that
many people forget to remember the environ-
ment after the observance day is over. Keep in
mind what is now an old adage: Rethink, reuse,
recycle.
And along a similar strain (in some alter-
nate universe, maybe), Friday is the observance
of Alexander Kerensky's birthday. Kerensky
was the first democratic president of Russia, in
power between the reign of Nicholas II and
Lenin's Communist movement. Although his
time in office was short-lived, it is still a signifi-
cant contribution in the now-democratic coun-
try. So, in his honor, toast Aleksei with a shot of
Stolichnaya and whoop it up in celebration of
the Earth'
By Laura Wright
Strippers reinforce idea of the body as merchandise
Sure, we can pay our
tuition with the money
that we make from
such endeavors, but
participating in such
lines of work sort of
defeats the purpose of
getting an education in
the first place.
It's the end of the se-
mester and I am so glad.
I have nothing creative
left to say, and if I have to
form one more rational
thought I think that I'll turn
into an avocado.
I was going to do a re-
cap of the year's events, but I
can't re-
ally re- �����MHH
member
what has
happened
this year.
No,
seriously,
I remem-
ber the
relevant
stuff like mm
Tonya
Harding and Nancy Kerrigan,
Lorena Bobbitt, the
earthquake(s), etc.
I say "etc because my
brain is burned from grading
journals and papers, from
standing in line at the library
to use the new computers,
from searching for periodi-
cals that simply don't exist
no matter how often I'm told
otherwise.
I say "etc because I
don't have the energy to
search through my memory
banks and retrieve old infor-
mation.
And I'm still in mourn-
ing over Kurt Cobain. I know,
I know. He's dead and there's
plenty of other good music
out there to listen to; but I
have been pretty profoundly
affected nonetheless.
Well, I seem to be off on
a tangent before I even be-
gin. Back to what I started to
say, I was going to do a year
end recap, but I decided
against that course of action.
Besides, I've been sheltered
by this non-world that we all
refer to as East Carolina Uni-
versity, so I haven't really had
to deal with many real world
events anyway.
I sat down with last
Thursday's edition of The East
Carolinian and started to read an
article on the front page about
the women's
�������i studies confer-
ence that took
place at ECU
last weekend.
Lillian
Robinson, one
of the speakers
at the annual
meeting of the
Southeastern
Women's Stud-
ies Association
(SEWSA), discussed the debate
over whether or not prostitu-
tion serves to oppress women.
Some feminists claim that
prostitution and similar lines of
"sex work such as stripping,
are a woman's choice and
women benefit monetarily from
them. Robinson, however ar-
gued that these sources of in-
come are exploitive and result
in sexual subjectivity.
I was reading along, think-
ing about all of the times I've
heard women say things like,
"Strippers make killer money.
These stupid guys come in and
drool and hand out their money
like idiots while the women get
rich I think that no matter how
much money the women make,
there's always the owner of the
club who's making the real
money � and he's most likely a
man.
So, it doesn't really further
the cause of women to dance in
the nude or to act as escorts,
etc.(there's that etc. again). It
serves the cause of the people
who own the clubs, the people
who run the "escort services
For women to buy into the
idea that by taking money for
these services they somehow
beat the system, is untrue. By
participating in the exchange of
goods for currency, they actu-
ally reinforce a system where
women's bodies are merchan-
dise.
But I'm not trying to say
that men should be held entirely
responsible. They're the ones
who benefit so why should we
expect them to change? And, as
a friend of mine said, women
are allowed to make stupid
choices if they want to. The op-
portunities are wide open if you
want to take off your clothes for
money.
As I continued to read and
turned the pages, my senses
were assaulted by advertise-
ments for clubs where "danc-
ers" are wanted and classifieds
where female escorts can make
so-called "big bucks Hope-
fully, although I doubt it, these
ads signify that there is a short-
age of women who are willing
to sell themselves.
More likely, I'm afraid,
these ads appear in a college
newspaper because college
women are likely to respond to
them. It's really kind of ironic.
Sure, we can pay our tuition with
the money that we make from
such endeavors, but participat-
ing in such lines of work sort of
defeats the purpose of getting
an education in the first place.
I'll leave you with these
thoughts. Have a great summer,
don't sell yourselves short, and
always, always question the sys-
tem.
If you notice that some-
thing about it appears a bit sus-
pect, remember that you can al-
ways refuse to take part in it.
See ya.
THINKS SHE'S
SHE JUSTMAOB
He� zent mis'my.
ONLY fAY-S '
MONey fop-
we rnsst
lcMTTrg.TleU
I
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TH'S GEtJT JU5r
ry��D5 TO Go n
THC StTrt��oAA
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MATUTTIB- ST6f
TH5 GUY'S SPAIN
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tPl�M
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
I am writing to express my thoughts of this
whole Kurt Cobain situation.
When I first heard of Cobain's suicide, my
thoughts were that it was incredibly ignorant for
anyone to feel any remorse or compassion for this
self-absorbed and odious character who had been
bitching and whining his way through the musi-
cal scene for the past few years.
I was always put off by Cobain's arrogant
comments in interviews and his obnoxious, ego-
centric attitude toward other musicians such as
Eddie Vedder and Mike McCready, whom I felt
were far superior musically (and still do).
At the time of his death I held the position
that his passing was just another self-made drama
that Cobain wished to heap upon us.
But after much thought and reflection, my
position has changed. I remember how I felt on
August 27, 1990; when I learned that my musical
hero and vicarious guide, Stevie Ray Vaughn,
had been tragically killed in a helicopter accident.
My grief was palpable and overwhelming.
Though I had never known the man person-
ally, my loss and pain were truly real. It stands to
reason that some Nirvana fans were equally struck
by the loss of Kurt Cobain. For them my heart
sincerely empathizes and grieves.
Yet, still, the situations are not the same,
Cobain took his own life, whereas Stevie died
involuntarily. Stevie Ray had his own battles
with addiction and depression, but in the last two
years of his life had found peace from the de-
mons that haunted him. I dare to think that
Cobain could have discovered the same tran-
quility had he just found a brief glimmer of
light and hope in the dark periods of his final
year. His young daughter will have to grow up
knowing that her love was not enough to buoy
her father in his bleakest hours.
Author William Styron, in his brilliant
book on depression, Darkness Visible, said that
the pain of severe depression is quite un-
imaginable to those who have not suffered it,
and it kills in many instances because its an-
guish can no longer be borne
I realize now that Cobain's pain was obvi-
ously tremendous and he exercised what he
thought was his only remaining option.
As I said, my heart goes out to those who
sincerely mourn the loss of Kurt Cobain. But his
death is not a verdict, nor is it a thing to be
immortalized, but an act of a desperate man; an
act be pitied.
Stevie Ray Vaughn's death came during the
happiest, most triumphant days of his life. Kurt
Cobain died under a cloud of misery and pain
and self-loathing that none of us will ever truly
understand. We shouldn't judge Cobain's final
action or imitate it, but instead, hope that he has
now found the peace that eluded him in life.
Charles F. Grantham
Graduate
Geography
To the Editor:
It took me a while to decide whether or not
to write this letter because I am usually a soft-
spoken person who waits for someone else to
speak up. I finally decided that I could not let Mr.
Dyer's remarks go unnoticed.
Anyone who listened to the SGA presiden-
tial debate knows that it was very intense almost
to the point of name-calling. I listened intently
trying to get a feel for each candidates position on
issues facing the ECU campus. I felt that each
candidate did their best to answer the questions
of the callers and of the hostess.
However, when Mr. Dyer called he really
upset me and the other people around me listen-
ing to the debate.
For those who didn't listen to the debate,
Mr. Dyer attacked Ian Eastman right from the
start. This did not bother me, because I feel that a
candidate for the presidency ought to be able to
handle any questions whether they are aimed
directly at himher or not.
It was just one simple issue that Mr. Eastman
asked Mr. Dyer about, which was the student
tuition payment program. Mr. Eastman explained
that when he tried to propose this program it was
brought to his attention that, to his astonishment,
one had already existed for the past two years.
Mr. Dyer's reason for the SGA not bringing
this to the attention of the student body is
because, and I quote we don't want the
middle class students of ECU to abuse this
policy
What I am a middle class student and
when I told my parents, who by the way aren't
paying for my schooling, they were pissed off!
I can't believe Mr. Dyer, who supposedly rep-
resents all the students of ECU, could have
been elected. If my parents would have known
about this payment policy I would not have to
work sixty hours a week just to make ends
meet. I would be able to concentrate on school
alone.
With tuition and fees increasing each year
my parents can only afford to put clothes on
my back and an occasional $20 check in the
mail. (When a good month comes along) Grant
it they aren't poor but anyone who pays out of
state tuition will agree that it can put a strain on
any middle class family.
Without rambling on, I just want the
middle class students of ECU to know how Mr.
Dyer feels about them and that he is backing
Mr. Brynn Thomas who, in all probability, feels
the same way about this SGA policy.
Sean Edmiston
Sophomore
Economics
To the Editor
As my third year at East Carolina comes to a close,
I am becoming disgusted with people advocating pro-
gun issues who (in all probability) have no first-hand
knowledge of the violence guns are capable of commit-
ting.
Well, gather round 'cause here's something they
won't teach you in an English class. About five years ago,
Michael Charles Hayes ("not guilty by reason of insan-
ity") went on a shooting spree in Winston-Salem, N.C.
and killed four people, wounding five others (myself
included).
Later,itwas revealed thatjustthreedaysbefore the
incident, Mr. Hayes had bought two new guns, one of
which was a .22 rifle used in most of the shootings.
Having suffered a gunshot wound to the chest, I have
received some insight into the problems of guns and
violence.
Now chew on this. In 1988, handguns killed seven
people in Great Britain, 19 in Sweden, 53 in Switzerland,
25 in Israel, 13 in Australia, eight in Canada and 8,915 in
the good 'ole U.S. of A. God bless America.
Itdoesn'ttakeacoUegeeducation to realize people
without first-hand knowledge of this kind of violence
cannot appreciate the need for something so simple
asa 10-day waiting period on purchase ofhandguns.
Sure, Michael Hayes was an "honest citizen" claim-
ing his right to bear arms, but did he actually need
those guns "right now? Perhaps if it was necessary
to wait the 10-day waiting period he could have
solved his internal problems without needless vio-
lence. Of course, this is not a solution, merely a
beginning.
In closing, government is not necessarily trying
to implement centralized control over our lives. It is
merely attempting toexercisesomecontrolover guns
in the streets the only feasible way it knows how at
this point. People should realize owning a gun is not
a solution to social and political unrest. Instead, we
should take an active stance in our government by
voting, lobbying, writing to your senator and "ques-
tioning authority The pen is mightier than the
bullet.
Greg Tirrell
Senior
Psychology
-�. �





HHMva
The East Carolinian
Page 6
Classifieds
April 19, 1994
For Rent
For Rent
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1-6 BEDROOM HOMES, condo's,
duplexes, and apartments for rent.
$190 up! Short term lease available!
Finders 321-6708 small fee. Near
campus rentals available now!
: -NEW ROOMMATE LISTING SER-
VICE! Need a roommate list your ad
free. To get a list of all the people
"looking for a roommate 321-6708
- 'small fee
' WALK TO CAMPUS! Available May
1st. Young professional couple seeks
responsible student to rent a room
one house from campus! Includes
cable, phone, utilities and private
- entrance. Graduate student pre-
. -ferred. References required. Call 758-
, -9903.
SUBLEASE: 2 Bedroom apt. avail-
I able May-Aug. Village Green Apts.
$360 month- Cable included. Con-
' tact Kelli at 758-8591.
'FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
responsible, non-smoker to share 2
� bedroom apartment. $167 a month
plus 12 utilities. Deposit required.
Available May 1. Call April 752-7599
EEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
' for a large two-bedroom apartment,
- pets allowed. Dishwasher, pool and
: laundry facilities. $180 a month 1
2 utilities. Available anv time. Please
call 756-5134.
AVAILABLE FOR FALL SEMES-
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ment. Located in Tar River apart-
ment complex. Mature, responsible
female preferred. Deposit required.
$240 monthly rent plus 1 2 bills. 830-
8984
NOW AVAILABLE: 1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village 3 bedroom
townhouse. Mature, responsible fe-
male NS only. Quiet environment,
nicely decorated with all major ap-
pliances. $230 13 bills. 756-8459
(Sara).
TO SHARE 3 bedroom 2 bath. $120 a
month plus 1 3 utilities. Deposit re-
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professional must be social. Call 758-
1522 after 6:00pm or leave message.
AVAILABLE FOR MAY. 1 bedroom
apt. in Cherry Court. Rent $285, de-
posit same as rent. Great location for
the serious student call 752-8910 for
info.
ONE BEDROOM APTS. for rent
Available June 1st. Walking distance
to campus. $320 per month. Rent in-
cludes water, cable, pool, laundry
facilities. Please call 758-2628.
AVAILABLE MAY 1ST 2 bedroom
apt. insummerfield gardens. At $335
a month it's a steal. Call (919)756-
9784 for info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom house over summer
Lf 3 blocks from campus $200 a month
2 12 utilities ask for Lisa 413-0015
iTWO PERSONS needed to share a 3
iedroom two bath townhouse near
J-owe's. $200 per month, $200 de-
posit. Call 321-4793
ROOMMATES NEEDED 1 or 2 re-
sponsible people to sublease apart-
ment near campus for the summer.
5130 per month and 13 utilities con-
tact TJ at 758-3943
AVAILABLE AUGUST! Two bed-
fQom one bath duplex. Located on
1st Street $370 per month. Persons
needed to take over lease, call 758-
6692'
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom 2 bath apt. win
walking distance to campus. $225
plus 12 utilities. Avail. Mav 9th-
Aug. Call 752-6962
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
move in for May or June. $113 rent
and 13 utilities A block and a half
from campus call Kim and Janni. 758-
8431
$165 FOR THIS 1 BEDROOM, loft
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this 2 bedroom duplex $350 call us!
752-1375 Homelocators fee
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AUGUST 1ST. 3 bedroom duplex
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near East 5th street call us!
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MAY OR JUNE! 1 bedroom duplex
$250 or Huge 3 bed room duplex $425
walk to campus! Call us! 752-1375
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'2 BEDROOM DUPLEX $295 or 3
bedroom house $390 walk to campus
call us! 752-1375 Homelocators fee
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED,
two bedroom, 1 12 bath apt.
WasherDryer, cable, pool, tennis
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12 utilities, 1st month $115. Call
Kimberly 919-872-6439 (wkends)
321-8406 (wknights)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share 2 bedroom apartment. Close
to campus Great location. Call
Patricia 752-0009
APARTMENT FOR RENT 1 bed-
room, 1 bath, furnished 2 blocks from
campus, window unit ac available
May 1st $250 a month call 830-6615
FEMALE NEEDED to share two bed-
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Close to campus. Rent $122.50 a
month plus 14 utilities. Call Debbie
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Furnished, pool, 3 bd room, 2 12
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FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
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water, 12 utilities. No pets al-
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NON-SMOKING PERSONS needed
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Newly remodeled! Close to campus!
Pets ok! Call Amy at 830-1591.
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for summer. Private furnishedun-
furnished bedroom, shared bath, 1
12 blocks from campus. Non-
smoker. Rent includes water, sewer,
AC, and cable. Call 758-3519
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share nice 2 bedroom, 112 bath
townhouse. Close to campus and
Mall $395 12 utilities. Call 752-
2116
NS FEMALE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom townhouse. All appliances
including wd $225 12 utilities.
756-9953 Lori.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR SUM-
MER to share 2 bedroom, $185 a
month, pool, big bedroom, personal
bath, bus available. Call Randv at
758-3313
PLINKO RULES! 2 bedroom 1 12
bath Oakmont Square Apt. to sub-
lease. On site laundry facilities,
maintenance, pool, volleyball. $410
month call 355-3454
AVAILABLE MAY 15TH- $178 1
3 utility month, 7 min. walk from
campus, washer drver, dogs ok.
Prefer social mf, calf830-6703
ROOMMATES TO SHARE OR
TAKE OVER LEASE. 3 bedroom, 2
bath house. 1 2 block from campus.
WasheTdrver. $210 per mo. Call
Rich 757-0896
APARTMENTS WANTED: Law
firm needs two fully furnished apart-
ments suitable for married coupls
during summer: June 24- Julv 30.
Contact Bert Speicher, 355-3030.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER 2 bed-
room apt. 2 miles from campus. $400
a month includes water and cable.
Pool, volleyball, tennis
accomodations. 321-6521
THREE BEDROOM DUPLEX for
rent for summer at Wyndham Circle.
758-2559. Two bedroom apartment
for rent for summer $380 neg. Call
752-8655
SUBLET FOR SUMMER 2 blocks
from campus $150 util.
washer,dryer, cable ac. call Brian
758-2941
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED-
anytime May through August 15th,
$175 month, furnished, close tocam-
pus, ac, water and utilities included.
752-1492
E Help Wanted
$250 -$500week
2 12 year old Marketing Firm
needs 20-25 winners with
wheels who can run their
own show wherever they
please -Full-Part-Interviews
Holliday Inn
5 - 9 P.M. Mon-Tues
April 25-26
S10-S400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! SpareFull-time. Set
own hours! Rush stamped enve-
lope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1 B-295 Durham, NC
27705.
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls,
Girls. Earn big summer cash. The
best summer job around. Playmates
Adult Entertainment call for more
info. 747-7686
HELP WANTED modeling, danc-
ing, adult conversation full or part-
time. Will accomodate school
schedule. $300-500 weekly call 746-
6762
ATTENTION HORSE LOVERS:
Experienced English rider to help
with barn choresfeeding in ex-
change for pleasure riding. 355-
6320 after 5pm
IMMEDIATE OPENING for secre-
tarytypist position apply between
1:00-3:00 at SDF Computer Inc, 813
South Evans st. Greenville (752-
3694)
ATTENTION LADIES earn $1,000
plus a week escorting in the Green-
ville area. Must be 18 yrs. old; have
own phone and transportation. We
are an established agency check out
your yellow pages.
CHILDCARE OPPORTUNITIES!
Prescreened families looking for
caring individuals to spend a year
as a nanny. $175-$350week, room
and board, car, airfare included.
Call childcrest 1-800-574-8889.
CHILDCARE GIVER for young
school-aged children wanted for
summer Responsible, loving, in-
novative person with own car. Ex-
perience and references required.
Call 758-2106 after 6:30pm.
BRODY'S and Brody's for Men is
accepting applications for addi-
tional Part-time Sales Associates.
We seek individuals who have a
genuine interest in helping others
and would enjoy working with
todays hottest fashions. Salary plus
clothing discount. Interviews held
each Monday and Thursday, l-4pm,
Brodv's The Plaza.
TIRE INSTALLERS NEEDED:
Sears Automotive. Apply in per-
son. Sears is an equal opportunity
employer mf. Morning hours pre-
ferred.
FILIBUSTER'S: The Restaurant
and Bar for every party is now tak-
ing applications for experienced
waitstaff, bus and dishwashers. Be-
tween 2:00 and 2:30pm Monday
thru Thursday located Downtown
Greenville next door to CD-Alley.
No phone calls please.
YOUTH SPORT CAMPS: assistant
director and instructors. Sponsored
DO YOU ENJOY THE OUTDOORS?
LINE UP A GREAT SUMMER JOB NOW
College Students
Positions in Pitt, Jones, Lenoir, Onslow, Greene, and Craven counties.
SALARY $5.75 per hour PLUS MILEAGE
Monitor Crops ! We Train!
Mid May through August
Must be reliable, in good shape, have good trasportation, and
concientious.
Just minutes from Greenville, Kinston and New Bern
Mail or fax resume to:
MCSI PO Box 370 Cove City, NC 28523 FAX (919) 637-2125
� lifllliMfl I 4iffilTH'liHH!l Bin
by ECU Recreational services.
Camp to run June 13- July 1. Obtain
applications in 204 Christenbury
Gym.
"EXPERIENCED WAITSTAFF.
Must be outgoing, energetic, and
willing to learn. Flexible hours. Ap-
ply at Greenville Country Club
Tuesday- Friday, 2:00-4:00 pm
only
"GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
is now accepting applications for
an immediate, full-time line cook.
Split shifts and weekends. Apply
in person
AGRICULTURAL RETAIL
STORE: Has opening for part-time
stocker and sales. Person needs to
have stocking experience andor
farm background. Must be able to
work afternoons and every other
Saturday consisting of approx. 30
hours per week, pick up applicaiton
at Agri Supply Company. No phone
calls. EOE
For Sale
Sports Card Show
Sat, April 23, 1994
from 9-4. Adm is $1.
Bring this ad for free
door prize.
Ramada Inn
Greenville Blvd
264 Bypass
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, frame,
mattress, heater, padded rails $175 or
obo. 757-9645
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS: Warmer weather
is approaching and you want to look
your best! Sports supplements at ma-
jor discount prices: Met-rx, OKG, Cre-
atine, Cybergenics, Vanadyl Sulfate,
Hot Stuff, Weight gain powders (all),
Amino Acids, Super Chromoplex, Tri-
Chromelene, Cybertrim, Quick Trim,
Super Fat Burners, Herbs, Multi-Vita-
mins, Super Golden Seal, and many
more! Call Brad at 931-9097 for more
info.
KITCHEN TABLE w 4 chairs for $50
plus a brand new dresser and night
stand for $75 call anytime after noon,
call 758-6458
THREE PIECE LIVING ROOM SET.
In excellent condition, $200 as set, ne-
gotiable. Call 752-6229
MATTRESS, box spring, frame nine
months old, good condition, $55 call
355-6017
USED IBM XT COMPATABLE (ZE-
NITH) COMPUTER, great for reports
and word processing. Includes
wordperfect, Dos, and other programs.
$350 obo, printer $75 call 355-6333
CONTEMPORARY LOVE SEAT for
sale. Teal, Mauve and Peach. $120 neg.
Call Carla 830-1569
EUROPE THIS SUMMER? Fly-only
$169! California- $129 ea. way! Now.
Florida too. CaribbeanMexican Coast
rt $189! No gimmicks- no hitches.
Airtech 1-800-575-TECH.
SINGLE LOFT FOR SALE- only $65,
Dorm size refrigerator for sale- only
$40 Available as soon as possible! Please
call 931-8522.
LOFT & CARPET call Nicole 931 -8553,
best offer, or come see 213 Jarvis Hall.
GOLF SHOES new, lightweight, wa-
ter proof and comfortable various col-
ors and sizes available just $39.95 a
pair call 830-9442
AIRLINE TICKET: roundtrip Delta
ticket good to anywhere in U.S. or
Canada (except Hawaii). Valid until 3
95. $275 Call 752-8308
PING EYE GOLF IRONS (3-pw), sand
wedge, putter, spaulding executive
graphite shaft woods (1 -3-5), Ping Tour
bag, new golf caddy, EXC. $525 obo.
BCA Rocky mountain bike, gel seat,
bear claw peddles, new tires and rims,
plus many xtras. exc $150 obo. Call
758-7615 "
MICROWAVE FOR SALE.very good
cond. compact family size, great for
E3 Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resumesec-
retarial work Specializing in resume
composition w cover letters stored on
disk, term papers,general typing Word
perfect or Microsoft Word tor windows
software. Call today (8a-5p�752-9959)
(evenings- 527-9133)
OLDER ECU STUDENT with family
seeks position of groundskeeper in ex-
change for living quarters. 11 years
landscaping experience. Moving to
Greenville in May. Please call Phil at
(414)426-1409
ZOJ
Greek
BEAUTIFUL GIRLS WANTED bikini
contest for Kappa Sigma's Bahama
Mama. No entry fees toenter call Preston
at 830-0294 by April 22
DELTA CHI would like to welcome our
new brothers Marc Gainey, Tyler
McAdams, Tommy Poole.
DELTA CHI would like to congratulate
Phi Tau and Delta Zeta for winning Mud -
Football. Thanks for everyone partici-
pating it was a huge success.
PHI SIGMA PI: come and share the
wonder, share the old and new. Cel-
ebrate the sunshine, a child can bring to
you. We'll see you tomorrow, 330 pm at
The Agnes Fullilove Shelter.
ALPHA PHI FORMAL was a weekend
never to be forgotten. It started Friday,
we grilled in the sun, we danced and
played pool, it was preformal fun. Sat-
urday dinner was the wildest of sights
the table in the corner brought the room
to new heights. Awards were given to
outstanding Phis congratulations Kim
Parker, Elizabeth Clifford, Angie Por-
ter, Kristine Anderson, Amy Lassiter,
and Stacev Klatskv. Sad, but true formal
its all over but next year is coming be-
fore we know it. Alpha Phi.
COLETTE LOMBARDO- Thank you
for such a great job with Dream Girl
Formal! We had a great time! Congratu-
lations to Christi Radoll for vour Dream
Girl award, and to everyone else who
received awards that night. Looking for-
ward to next year
TO THE NEW MEMBERS OF DELTA
ZETA- Get excited about Lamplighting
next week! We love you! Love, your
sisters.
CONGRATS TO DELTA ZETA soft-
ball and indoor soccer teams for two
undefeated seasons! You go girls! Love
your sisters and new members.
CONGRATULATIONS Ashley
Hamilton and the rest of Panhellenic
Exec, on vour initiation into Order of
Omega. Love, thesistersand new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS to the broth-
ers and new initiates of Sigma 'u on
winning the annual "Greek Week"
championship.
SIGMA NU would like to congratu-
late their new intiates Greg Rocchio,
Donald Revnolds III, and Brandon
"Snarf" Waddell.
SIGMA NU would like to congratu-
late three brothers on winning awards:
Paul Kennedy- Man of the Year, Jason
Linder- Brother of the Year, and Mike
Collini- Athlete of the Year.
THE BROTHERS AND NEW INI-
TIATES OF SIGMA NU would like to
thank Michael "Ratt" Luck on organiz-
ing one of the best formal weekends
ever at Nags Head.
SIGMA COCKTAIL is Friday night
we'll have a blast dancing throughout
the night. What a fun way to end this
fabulous year!
ALPHA XI DELTA wants to give a
belated congratulations to our Greek
Goddesses! Holli, Mandy, Ali, and
Stacie for winning third We are really
proud of you guys!
SIGMA PHI EPSILON, around the
world in SO days? Not when the Sig
Ep's and Alpha Xi Delta get together!
Our journey began somewhere down
in the Keys, then up to NYC for a visit
with the Snoop-Dog! For the good
world travelers, to heaven they did go,
but the others, well god only knows!
Our trip was soon over, oh how time
flies we ended the evening with a toast
to the skies! Thanks for a great night!
Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
AIRLINES
NOW HIRING ENTRY
LEVEL
Customer ServiceBaggage
Handlers
Many other positions.
S400-S1200 Weekly
Local or Relocation
For Applications &
Information
Call 1-510-796-9675
Ext. A464
1 nil-Time Temporary Positions Available
lor last Carolina Students
(ieneral (oustruction labor
(no tools needed � on IimjHiM
M.iiKl.tlor drnesireen mini red.
McicKeiizie
Corporation
" I he People (onipanv"
355-1414
(�OX Arlington KlvuV, Suite (�, lireem

tiona) Adult BasebaU Association
Now forming teams for spring
and summer league. Players,
coaches and whole teams
needed, Ages 18-65. College
students welcome. Games are
played on weekends. Limited
spaces available. For
information,
call 919-447-4939
Kingston
Place
STUDENT VILLAGE
Don't Pass
This Up!
(Big Savings)
Summer





Adventures of Kemple Boy
By Kemple Phoebe
THURSDAY APRIL SLlE nine
OCLOCK PM A 8Ai.MS m&MT
THE KtNO OF NI6HT MAKES A
SODS CURL UP with A 80TTLE
OF THUNDER8IRD AND A GOODJ
PAL AND GWE THE WOR.P
�COCkESED" NEW MEANING.
Ime I WAD NO sviCh�UUSiow.s
X WAS WRAPPING op A
LONG TERM PROJECT AND
HO NO TIME TO MUDDLE
NINE - O -TWO. THE DOOR.
SUMWEP OPEN, AND iM
WALKED TYE LONGEST,
TALLEST DRINK. OF U.ATER-
I'D SEEN IN A PEC A DC.
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THIS TALL, AND
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HAVE A PHOTO OF THIS
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WANG TV
By Ferguson & Manning
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Fergi
The characters 'Alex" and "Mis
Whiggs" were drawn by Alex L.
Ferguson, who also drew backgrounds
ind cut his cuticles with exacto blades
In the real world. Alex, having little
knowledge of video production, pesfan
to waich "Animaniacs" and build lnue,
useless gadgets and pr"P thai worry
hjs mother He owns a cat that he
affectionately calls "Demon Spawn
from Hell" and his main goal in life is
to appear in People magazine

ia'
k Maiming is the one PCSpOR
: the comical drawings Df "hoc
av and "Camilla " He wu ttsc
mi "t ic s&tp'i pel
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Frlc R.
Manning
be nob, Ala taadvfttmj laiemblei
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KflB shooting his dog. 1 averne. and
grj-tuanng from the Commmial An
den HUoal) desfecistDdQcanooatoa,
fat absing. and he is praying that his
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Fred's Corner
By Parnell
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HAVING CHECKED VJNDEK F
FOR FEEDBACK FO� �E'P
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DATION, r FOUND NO SUCM
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LADS LOCK IS OUT FOR,
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Nick O'Time
By Dickens
V"� PRFriMfTniDTCWM! IfVECTHt .�raiAL
ANY LL'CKCM
THE MISSWG
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I CON'T WORK Lite TtiVt AHMcR'
wwtiwjwgffa
This ain't the end for our
not ��� Jearles .icro and
those'who oppose him
Nick returns this summer
md,God willing, the fall
with the answers to
burning question ifcc
What happened (bNick
and the GoOOl
Is Big Daddy O a few
� (hofl oO salad '
Wh,i do� errifshQld
Whtfvt ChjiidFnf.ini.
Supr Fiwt. and Pig Pig '
�,�i, l.itly. am there any
Nkk Nut outirvrc
Murphy & Davis' Final Presentation of Seigfreid and Barth
Ct, pgo TLC? C.we.riTIC, C&t Pu, SC'fa'it �?- � 3 tFLT iZ�1.t i�t KOm�
by Walker
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i





BAREFOOT '94
BROUGHT TO YOU TODAY
BY STUDENT UNION
MOJO COLLINS
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
THE MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE.
i

in
f I m
LOTSABLUESA TOUR
MOJO COLLINS
THE HEATERS
Ul DAVE & THE HOWLING BLUES BAND
TERESA -B.S.&M
CONGRATUtATIONS TO POST hffiTAt SYNDROME,
BATTLE OF THE BANDS 94 WINNER !H
FORUM COMMITTEE
PLEASE-
NO ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES
OR COOLERS
ALLOWED.
THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE BRINGS YOU
Creation Fest
bring75urown
BRINGS YOU.
SPEAKING
BOOTH"
something
o-r
ITHE MARKETING COMMITTEE BRINGS YOU
CONTEST FOR
OFFICIAL
'94 T-SHIRTS
BAREI
'AV'NT
FIND OUT
WHAT YOU NEED TO DO
IN ORDER TO
GET ONE OF THESE
COLLECTORS ITEMS
ON YOUR BACK
THURSDAY, APRIL 21st
"Barefoot on the Mall
12-6 p.m.
"Rocky Horror Picture Show
8-10 p.m.
THE SPECIAL EVENTS COMMinEE
BRINGS YOU
NOYHTY
ATTRACTIONS'





mmmmmmmmmmmt
1 ��
The East Carolinian
April 21, 1994
Sports
Page 9
What's On Tap?
Thursday, April 21
Softball
at UNC Wilmington
Wilmington, N.C 6 p.m. (DH).
Friday, April 22
Golf
at Palmetto Intercollegiate,
Charleston National Country
Club, Charleston, S.C.
Saturday, April 23
Baseball
at James Madison,
Harrisonburg, Va 1 p.m.
(DH).
Golf
at Palmetto Intercollegiate,
Charleston National Country
Club, Charleston, S.C.
W. Track
at UNC Wilmington Quad
Meet, Wilmington, N.C.
Sunday, April 24
Baseball
at James Madison,
Harrisonburg, Va 1 p.m.
Golf
at Palmetto Intercollegiate,
Charleston National Country
Club, Charleston, S.C.
Hie 411
Tuesday, April 19
Baseball
lost at N.C. State 3-9.
Men's CAA Lenders
(Through April 18)
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB
ODU 14-4 .778 �
UNCW 8-7
UR
JMU
ECU
W&M
GMU
8-7
8-7
6-6
6-9
1-11
.533
.533
.533
.500
.400
.083
4.5
4.5
4.5
5
6.5
10
Overall
32-7 .821
24-21 .533
23-16.590
25-13.658
28-11 .718
21-16.568
11-20-1.359
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
aadMaa
Average
Kevin Gibbs, ODU
Brian Yerys, ECU
Juan Dorsey, JMU
Tom Scoscia, UR
Jason Trollo, JMU
Triples
Matt Quatraro, ODU
Kevin Gibbs, ODU
Brian Fiumara, ODU
Maika Symmonds, ODU
Donny Buries, JMU
Home runs
Jeff Dausch, ODU
Sean Casey. UR
Joe Higman, JMU
Mike Ruberti, W&M
Chad Triplett, ECU
Runs Batted In
Jeff Dausch, UR
Brian Yerys: ECU
Mike Rubierti, W&M
Sean Casey, UR
Matt Quatraro, ODU
Stolen Bases (sbsba)
Jamie Borel, ECU
Kevin Gibbs, ODU
Sfiawn Knight, W&M
Battle Hotiey, UNCW
Jeff Kaufman, JMU
.439
.423
.409
.396
.392
7
6
5
4
4
12
11
11
11
9
49
45
45
43
41
3448
3235
2124
1315
1111
Ehsiiiita
Wins
John Smith, ODU8-1
Brett Wheeler, ODU7-0
Brian McNichol, JMU7-0
Johnny Beck, ECU7-1
Bobby St. Pierre, UR7-1
Earned Run Average
Brett Wheeler, ODU1.75
Lyle Mangrove, ECU1.78
John Smith, ODU2.49
Anthony Eannacony, ODU2.51
Richie Blackwell, ECU2.77
Strikeouts
Bobby St. Pierre. UR81
John Smith, ODU73
Scott Forster, JMU72
Richie Blackwell, ECU64
Brian Smith, UNCW64
Saves
Denis McLaughlin, ODU8
John O'Reilly, ODU3
Dixon Putnam, UNCW2
Dalton Maine UR2
TstfM Sii'Iailss
Batting Average
James Madison.342
Old Dominion.336
East Carolina.316
Richmond.311
William & Mary.302
UNC Wilmington.272
George Mason.255
Earned Run Average
Old Dominion2.67
East Carolina2.85
UNC Wilmington3.82
James Madison4.11
William & Mary4.72
George Mason4.86
Richmond5.52
Compiled by Dave Pond
Wolfpack defeats Pirates
Box score
(NC STATE SID)�N.C. State
got home runs from PatClougherty,
Andy Barkett and Rob Winkler as
the Pack rolled to a 9-3 win over in-
state rival ECU.
NCSU scored five times in the
first inning. Clougherty started the
scoring with his fifth home run of
the season, scoring Larry Edens
ahead of him. Later in the inning,
Andy Barkett had a run-scoring
single and Ryan Ferby added a
double, scoring two more Pack
runs. State also added a single run
in the second on a Clougherty
single.
The Pirates finally broke
through Pack starter Matt Roupe
for a run in the fifth inning on an
RBI double from Chad Puckett to
cut the lead to 6-1.
Winkler (2) and Barkett (6) hit
back-to-back solo home runs in the
fifth, and Ryan Ferby scored on a
wild pitch from Pirate reliever Ja-
son Mills to close the Pack scoring.
ECU managed two more runs
off of Roupe in the seventh on a
single from Brian Yerys, scoring
Jamie Borel and Jason Head.
Roupe (6-0) remains unde-
feated for the season and State im-
proves to 30-12-1.
Richie Blackwell (4-1) lost for
the first rime this season and the
Pirates fell to 28-12.
East Carolina000
N.C. State510
010 200-3
030 00x-9
East CarolinaabrhbL go a
Borel. cf4100 4 0
Head, 1b5110 6 0
Britton, 3b5000 1 2
Yerys. If4022 2 0
Billingsley. dh3010 0 0
Bermingham, dh0000 0 0
Triplett, c3000 10 1
Edwards, rf3010 0 0
Clark, 2b3100 1 2
Puckett. ss4021 0 2
Total34373 24 7
Batting:2b � Yerys,Puckett,Head. Fielding:
DP�1.E �Britton.
N.C. Stateabrhbii po a
Sergio, 2b5000 3 0
Tracey, 3b3010 1 0
Edens, If2200 2 0
Clougherty.dh4123 0 0
Wells, rf3100 2 0
Ross, rf0000 1 0
Winkler, cf4221 6 0
Barkett, 1b4222 5 2
Ferby. ss4122 0 3
Lawler, c3000 5 0
Totals32998 27 5
Batting � 2B: Ferby. HR: Barkett, Winkler,
Clougherty. Team LOB: 4.
PiTCHiNG
East. Carolina
Blackwell (L 4-1)
Rosenberger
Mills
Hartgrove
N.C. State
Roupe (W 6-0)
Stutz
Lee
Ip h r er bb so
6 6 5 2
2 2 0 6
10 0 1
0 0 0 1
1 4
3.2 3
2.1 2
1 0
ip
hrer bb so
6.2 6 3 3 4 4
0 10 0 0 0
2.1 0 0 0 1 0
File Photo
After beatingtwo other ACC opponents this year, Duke and UNC, the Pirates found it tough playing
on an oppenents field. The Bucs take their, 6-6, CAA record to lames Madison this weekend.
WP: Rosenberger, Mills.
GAME DATA � T: 2:23 A: 479
UMPIRES � HP: John Josey. 1B: Ron Powell,
3B: Pete Bock. Compiled by Dave Pond
Rugby team pulls victory
Staff Reports
File Photo
The ECU rugby team play their alumni this
Saturday at 1 p.m. on the Allied Health Field.
The East Carolinian
ECU's rugby team went to Richmond, Va and
came away victors in the Richmond Collegiate Tour-
nament. The Pirates scored at will in two games and
created a narrow one-point loss in a match they could
have won. They even got some help from the Univer-
sity of North Carolinia to secure the win.
In the first round, ECU lost a very close decision to
James Madison, Virginia's champions, 11-10. The Pi-
rates started slowly, possibly because of a three hour
drive that started at six a.m.
ECU scored when Joey " Dogboy " Meekins crossed
over for a try which Rich Moss converted. Moss also
had a penalty goal, but it was the difficult kick he
missed with one minute left that made the difference.
When JMU was penalized near the sideline, Moss
lifted a kick into the twisting wind. The ball seemed to
go between the uprights, but the referee waved it off
and time ran out as the Pirates were driving into the
Dukes' goal line one more time.
Without leaving the field, the Pirates then faced
Virginia Commonwealth University. The frustration
from the previous jss led to an annihilation of VCU by
a 43-3 score. The Pirates were led by Rick Snow and
See RUGBY page 12
Blackmon receives highest honor
(SID)�Sophomore forward
Tomekia Blackmon; from Snow
Hill, N.C, was named the Most
Valuable Player for the 1993-94
ECU women's basketball team at
the annual Lady Pirate Basket-
ball awards banquet held Mon-
day night in Greenville.
Blackmon led the Lady Pi-
rates in scoring and rebounding,
averaging 14.2 points and 6.9 re-
bounds a game. A seond-team
All Colonial Athletic Association
selection, Blackmon was seventh
in the CAA in scoring and sixth
in field goal percentage (.494) and
sixth in rebounding.
Blackmon was also the re-
cipient of ECU's rebounding
award.
Senior guard LaShonda
Baker from, Myrtle Beach, S.C,
was the recipient of ECU's Best
Defense Player Award after av-
eraging 1.7 steals a game during
the season.
Sophomore LaTesha Sutton,
Tomekia Blackmon
from Waltsonburg, N.C, re-
ceived the Most Improved
Award after seeing action in all
26 games this season. Sutton av-
eraged 10.5 minutes a game and
averaged 3.4 points a game.
ECU's Coaches Award was
presented to sophomore Belinda
Cagle, from Trenton, Ga and
the Scholar-Athlete Award was
given to freshman Justine
Allpress from, Staffordshire, En-
gland.
Sophomore Danielle
Charlesworth from, Richmond
Va received the Free-Throw Per-
centage Award after shooting
79.7 percent from the line this
season. Senior Janet Rodgerson,
a 68.8 percent free-throw shooter
for the Lady Pirates, was given
the 10,000 free-throw award for
leading the Lady Pirates in prac-
tice free-throws, with over 4,000
made this season.
Rodgerson and Baker re-
ceived Team Captain Awards at
the banquet in addition to their
other honors.
Rodgerson was named as a
four-year letterwoman for ECU,
while Baker, Blackmon, Cagle,
Sutton and Angela James re-
ceived two-year awards. Allpress
and Charlesworth joined Tracey
Kelley, Shay Hayes and Michaela
Wallerstrom in receiving first-
year letters.
Curry rides away with third victory at Speedway
(SPEEDWAY SID) � Larry
Curry, form Knightdale, N.C, led
the entire 50-lap Pepsi Sportsman
feature event to collect his third
win of the year on Saturday. Steve
Heath led the final seven laps of the
Barbeque Lodge Mountain Dew
Pure Stock 50-lap shoot-out to col-
lect his third win of the season. In
other actionat the EastCarolina Mo-
tor Speedway, it was William
Hardison winning his third 30-lap
Winner Chevrolet Stock four cylin-
der feature. John Wiley grabbed
the win in the Budweiser Super
Stock 40-lap main, and Hank
Jarman won his second 50-lap
Hardees Late Model Stock feature
of the year.
Larry Curry started the 50-lap
Pepsi Sportsman fea ture even t from
the outside of row one alongside
Jeff Harrisof Greenville, N.C, When
thegreenflagdroppeditwasCurry
getting the jump with Harris slip-
ping to second. Rusty Daniels of
Alliance, N.C, was running third
behind Curry and Harris before
making an inside move to get by
Harris for second.
The 19th lap shoot-out saw
See RACECAR page ' 1
Lacrosse finishes
winning season
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
The ECU men's lacrosse club
ended their season Sunday with
a winning record of 7-4, despite
the loss of a few key players.
The team opened the sea-
son on March 17 with a 17-0
shutoutover NC- Wesleyan,but
then lost their next two games to
Duke and UNC-Wilmington.
"After those two losses, we,
as a team, decided to make some
neccessary changes in order to
have a winning season co-cap-
tain Ward Taylor said.
The team used newcomers
Heath Harmon, Daniel Weidert
and Stephen Padgett on
midfield, TheronGoodson, Reid
Tingle and Greg Daisey on de-
fense, Dereck Janes on attack and
Greg Mott in goal. This was
done in order to fill those posi-
tions left vacant by former
players.
Returning teammates in-
cluded Kirk Katburg, Drew
Bourque and Ward Taylor on
atttack, Mike Marshall, Dave
Nett and Rich Rollason on
defense and Troy Plavec as
the only veteran midfielder.
However, the whole goal
of the season wasnot just about
winning, but about learning,
also.
"Many hours were spent
working with the first-time
players during practice to help
them with basic fundamen-
tals said another co-captain
Mike Marshall.
See LACROSSE page 12
1994 Lacrosse Results
NC-WesleyanWon 17-0
DukeLost 14-12
UNC-WLost 13-12
NC StateWon 12-4
UNC-GWon 13-2
JMUWon 11-7
ASUWon 10-4
GMULost 8-5
UNC-GWon 10-5
W&MWon 9-7
VCULost 10-9
Team Record
7-4
Graphic by Brian Olson






10 The East Carolinian
April 21. 1994
Magic soap opera has new act
I i He - in I le'sout
I e s pla ing. I le's not.
Hc'sc oat hing H�
If Magic Johnson isi
up the del.
worth ol l
We � �
.Hid v
chasingallhisdreams,heshouldbe ment on him this latest epistxle
sin hi Someotusarewobblvenough affected the loam. And chances are
i ust trying to keep track of them he wouldn't say am thing bad about ol what
Since leaving the NBA ir No Magii inan � ise But taking into lessh K
vember, 1991, soon aftei learning account the recent coaching fiasco, Sio
(urn nut tob
the nilist
i in ha e it both vva s
think about that tin
�t i m Ins r
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he had contracted the UDSvirus, Magic has nov saddled him and gifted floor leader ever to play ba
lohnson's Life has been .11 ing run- the I akersorganizatii mv ithnearh ketl
ning series of been then that three years of detail work - all of tl Maj
He has been a retired, unreHred essentially fornaughtandnonec I
and re-retired player. I lehasbeena without- onsequcn � u h
part-time basketball broadcaster
and barnstormer, businessman and
AIDS education crusader. In just
the last two weeks, he v ent from a
recent hire to the I os Angeles 1 ak-
ers lame-dui k i oa h.
11 ir an athlete who never had a
problem making the riht choice at
the end of countless games o er a
doen seasons, that is ,m awful lot
ol indecision in a short time.
l' e got to get out for a better
person to come in here Johnson
said late last week, confirming ru-
mors hewas getting outofthecoach-
Lng end of the business.
As soon as somebod) turns on
klieg lights and sticks a microphone
m trout of him, ohnson iist can't
s.i no. loanything
I hree months after his first re-
tirement in that rush ol adrenalin
he felt after stealing the sin v at the
NBA All -Star game, someone asked
Johnson whether he'd ever return
to the NBA. He said it was unlikely.
I ater that summer, alter Barcelona
and the Dream leametra aganza,
it became maybe. A month later.
justbeforethe 1992-93NB season
it was definitek . A few days after
that. Magic re-retired.
As we know now. the ston
didn't end even there. The follow-
ing August, after scoring the game-
winning basket in his ow n benefit
game, "A Midsummer Night's
Magic, he felt the same rush of
adrenalinand fielded thesameques-
tion about returning. This time
Johnson replied "might'fora "halt-
season, but left it up to 1 akers
general manager lerrv West ti lean
NFL players
move around
(AP) � TheGreen Bay Packers
have another sack specialist, the
Washington Redskins have a new
quarterback and the 1 os Angeles
Raiders havea328-pound behemoth
to protect Jeff HosteUer.
(Yi the last day tor restricted
tree agents to sign with new teams,
those were thi .hree biggest moves
Monday. The Packet - signed Sean
Jones, the Redskins got John I reisz
and I os Angeles picked up Kevin
Gogan
In other moves, quarterback
Bobby I lebert re-signed with the At-
lanta Falcons,cornerbackBenSmith
was traded from Philadelphia to
Denver, center im Sweeney re-
signed with the New N ork lets and
return specialist Vai Sikahema re-
tired.
�Previous
EAST
i CAROLINIAN
.iiulmi.ei i ;lli
Recycle The
East Carolinian
IVIASCOT TRYOUTS
WHEN: APRIL 22-23, TRYOUTS APRIL 24, 1994
WHERE: SCALES FIELD HOUSE .
TIME: 5:00 PM
� i
� 3Mascots will be selected � For more information contact Shannon Smith at 757-4672
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April 21. 1994
The East Carolinian 11
MAGIC
Continued from page 10
can deflect covereage off White.
"It's a tremendous relief to me
because it fills a hole that the Packers
have a glaring need for � a player
opposite Reggie White thatcan cause
concern for the offenses we play, par-
ticularl v within our division Green
Bay general manager Ron Wolf said.
The team wouldn't release terms,
but published reports said the con-
tractwasworthS7.8millionover three
vears, making Jones the Packers' sec-
ond-highest paid defensive player
behind White.
Jones,31,is tied with the Vikings'
Chris Doleman for ninth place on the
career sacks list with 88 12 in 10
seasons. He averaged 11 over the last
four years.
Friesz will give the Redskins a
veteran to help groom the quarter-
back Washington is expected to take
with the third pick in the draft �
either Heath Shuler of Tennessee or
Trent Dilfer of Fresno State.
Friesz, the San Diego Chargers'
one-time starter, signed a one-year,
S900,000 deal. Last season's Wash-
ington quarterback, Mark Rypien,
was released last week.
Gogan, 6-foot-7and 328 pounds,
signed a three-year, $3.7 million deal
with the Raiders after the Cowboys
tried in vain to convince him to stay.
Gogan said he talked Monday to
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones. A Raid-
ers official who requested anonymity
said Gogan also was called by Dallas
quarterback Troy Aikman and
Aikman's agent Leigh Steinberg.
"I appreciate what Jerry did
Gogan told Dallas television station
KDFW. "If 1 didn't agree to a deal, I
would have loved to have come (to
Dallas) in the last minute, but I didn't
think that was fair. I gave the Raiders
my word and that's my word
To replace him, Dallas signed
Derek Kennard of the New Orleans
Saints, a 6-3,300-pound lineman.
RACECAR
Continued from pagelO
ECU's Closest Beach
WHKHfiRD'S BEACH
Located on the Pamlico River in Washington
�Sandy Beach
�Conviently located Mini-Mart
Beer. Snacks. Lotion & Bathing Suits -
�Tube Rentals for "Good Times" J&ElL
�3 Flume Waterslide r-
�S1.00 per person
�$2.00 person on Weekends
�Country Dance Every Saturday Night
��
-jS- ,
ECU
10th Street
Washington
Whiciard's Beach Rd.
Hwy33
��
3 Q.
O
�o
i5'
zr
Chocowinity
946-0011
Currv hold on for his third win of
the year, while Harris settled for
second. Tommy Beaman of
Saratoga, N.C. finished third while
Tonv Hawkins, from Tranton, N C
and Ricky West, from Bethel N.C.
rounded out the top five.
Ronald Brown, from Kinston,
N.C, started the Mountain Dew
Pure Stock 50 lap feature from the
pole with Walt Bedard, from
Tranton N.C. on the outside. When
the green flag dropped itwas Brown
taking the points with third-place
starter Heath taking second. Brown
and Heath would play cat-and-
mouse throughout the entire event
until the race tightened up.
William Hardison, from Stokes,
N.C, started the 30-lap Winner
Chevroletfour cylinder feature from
the pole and he would never look
back. Hardison would lead the en-
tire 30-lap event, taking a three-
second winover Lewis Everett, from
Tarboro, N.C, Ronnie House, from
Bethel, N.C, recovered from an
early accident to take third while
VirgilToler, from Washington, N.C.
finished fourth.
John Wiley, from Greenville,
N.Cbattled with Ricky White, from
Windsor. N.C, for the entire 40- lap
distance in the Budweiser Super
Stock main event. At the finish,
though, was Wiley got the win over
Ricky White.
Hank Jarman, from Kinston,
N C, and BobShreeves, from Chesa-
peake, Vastarted the Hardees Late
Model Stock Car feature from the
front row. Jarman got the jump over
Shreeves but the Virginia driver
staved on the high side trying to
regain the front spot. But it was
Jarman taking control with Mike
Conover,fromGreenville,N.C,fall-
ing in line for second. Shreeves
slipped to third, but then had me-
chanical problems and would lose
a lap in the pits.
Itwas all Hank Jarman though
as he would get his second win of
the season. Conover trailed Jarman
across thestripe by threecar lengths
for second. Wayne Balch, from
Chester, Va would take home a
third place finish in just his second
start at the East Carolina Motor
Speedway.
Olson's Trivia
Q: What Natioanl
League East team used
to be called the Blue
Jays?
'sailliMcl eiudiapeiiiu auj v
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THE YEAR, ECU!
HAVE A GREAT SUMMER!
SEE YOU IN THE FALL!
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1994
DANCE TEAM
TRYOUTS
APRIL 22-23
APRIL 24
Meet at:
SCALES FIELD HOUSE
5:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
Men:
Women:
Men:
Women:
All-Campus
Total Package
Notliin But Net
All-Campus
Super Ho's
FratSor Gold
Sig Ep A
Alpha Phi
AftlfMtt
Frat Purple
Lambda Chi B
FratSor Gold Frat Purple
Phi Tad ThetaChi
AlplmPhi
Ind. Gold
Total Package
NBN
Ind. Gold
Super Ho's
Rec Girls
Ind. Purple
Bullets
Ind. Purple
Roughnecks
Men:
Women:
Men:
Women:
Men:
Women:
All-Campus
Long Fellows
Graffix
All-Campus
Cubbies
ACL
All-Campus
Phi Tau
ZTA
lol MktUl
FratSor Gold Frat Purple Ind. Gold
Kappa Alplm A ThetaChiB Long Fellows
FratSor Gold
SigEp
Delta Zeta
Frat Purple
ThetaChi
FratSor Gold Frat Purple
Phi Tau Sig Ep B
ZTA
Ind. Gold
Cubbies
AGL
Ind. Gold
Dolphins
Garnma Sig
Ind. Purple
Graffix
Ind. Purple
Carriage
Ind. Purple
Pi Lambda
Men:
Women:
Men:
Women:
Co-Rec:
FratSor Gold
Sig Ep A
Alpha Phi
All-Campus
Pi Lambda Phi
Silent Attack A
Silent Attack A
Frat Purple
KAB
Ind. Gold
Tappa Kegs
T)k Girls
FratSor Gold Frat Purple
TlKtttCM J; SigEpB
Alpha Phi
Ind. Purple
Creatures of Leisure
Ind. Gold
Pi lambda Phi
Silent Attack A
Free Throws: W Temple & Kristen Rosignolo
3 pt. Shoot Out: Wes Creef & Sandy Meadoxos
Reebok Spot Shot: Gregory Collier & Erin Casey
Overall Winners: Orlando Whitaker & Erin Casey
$L V�Ji CoMt
8 Foot Division:
9 Foot Envision:
10 Foot Division:
Cedric White
Carlos Blake
Jerris McPhail
� ������������������ 0tb 0ditohJ WWw
�Basketball Invitational: Men: Total Package 'Big Splash Golf Bonanza: Guy Kemp �
Billiard: Scoff Hoivell -Bowling Singles Men: Wynn Whittingimm; Women: Sheila Provo
�Co-Rec Flag Football: Thrills-N-Skills 'Flag Football Qualifier: Men: Super Ho's; Women:
Alplw Delta Pi "Frisbee Golf Singles: Men: Keinn Gaskins; Women: Anne Tyler �Golf
Doubles: Jonathan Rucker & Miclmel Durlmm �Kickball: White Hall �NCAAPick'Em: Men:
Roy Knauf; Women: Lynda McCormick ?Putt-Putt: Men: Terry Honeycutt; Women: Kerry
Lynch � Racquetball: Men: Jeff Byars; Women: Brandi Dutcfter -Table Tennis: Till Hageman
�Trivia Bowl: Three Men & A Lady "Turkey Trot: Men: Mike Ford; Women: Vibeke Siainsen;
Team: Phi Kappa Tau �Co-Rec Volleyball: Gold: Team Americana; Purple Purple Haze
�Whiffleball: PPE �H-O-R-S-E: George Hendrix
F:or additional information on now to get involved with Recreational Services
Intramural Activities, Call 757-6387 or stop by 2Q4 Christenbury Gymnsium
.





12 I The East Carolinian
1arch 24, 1994
Balboa, U.S. vying for World Cup appearance
i Al'i Marcelo Balboa was a
defender on the 1990 United States
socoa teamrhatrnaderustarvbvquali-
fving tor the World Cup tournament
h�r the tiit time in 4I ears
"We were a buiiih of kids, he
said after fuesday's practice for
Wednesdays World Cup exhibition
against Moldova at Davidson Col-
leg i We want h i prcw e this year that
we re a lot better than w e were in XW
The 1990 L S. soccer team lost
IhreestraightgarnesintheWorldCup
LACROSSE
in Italy, losing 5-1 to Czechoslovakia,
1-0 to Italy,and 2-1 to Austria.
Balboa is back on the 1994 team,
which has just one win and seven tie
in 10 games.
Wednesday's Kneupwasmark-
edlvdirferenttromtheonethatplaved
Moldova toa 1-1 tie Saturday night at
Jacksonville, Fla.
With World Cup play just two
months off, U.S. coaches w ant to get a
ekser look at some other players K
fore paring tlie M Nnan rosti x down U
22 by the lime 3 deadline.
In additu n, the top L' S. forwards
and midfielders are either injured or
w ith their dubs in Europe and won't
be available for another month.
"While our tirst prioritv tomor-
row night is to win, we are facing a
difficult decision over the next few
weeks'assistantcoachSteveSampson
said Tuesday following practice at
Richardson I leld. ' We need to let a lot
of players play their way on the team
or off the team
Continued from page 9
These players include: Joe
Camp, Eric Rothrock, Fred Rover,
Craig Davcett, fhomas Gatouzis,
Dan Dil eo. Steve Dirmars, Chris
Odium ell and 1 es C arithers.
With the changes made, the
team was able to pull together and
come back with tour consecutive
wins over IMC State, UNC-Greens-
RUGBY
boro, lames Madison and Appala-
chian State.
Two weekends ago, the team
traveled to Wilmington to partici-
pate in the second annual Coastal
Carolina Lacrosse Invitational, in
which thev placed third out of It'
teams. The only los in the tourna-
ment was to champion George
Mason.
The season came to an end last
weekend with a double header in
Virginia. Although the team was
lacking some manpower because
of scheduleconflicts, thev were able
to beat William and Marv7. but
lost in double overtime to Virginia
Commonwealth, 10-4
Continued from page 9
Clint Breed, both of whom scored
two tries. Moss totaled 13 points.
two penalty goals and a conver-
sion.
The score would have been
worse, except most of the trys
Were touched down in the cor-
ners, faraway from the goal posts.
In rugby, the conversion is taken
from a point on the field in line
with the touchdown. The side-
line is not the place from wich to
kick from on a windyday,and no
kicker had much luck this week-
end.
The Pirates then got two
breaks. First, thev had two hours
off until their match with Caro-
lina Second, the 1 leels upset JMU
i 5-8.1 his meant an ECU win over
Carolina would create a throe-
wax tie tor tirst place with point
differential deciding the issue.
Given their rest period, the
Pirates went after L'C with a
vengeance. A well-balanced at-
tack saw six players score tries as
Snow , Patterson and Moss were
joined by Jay Keller, Steve Flippen
and Sean Miller as try scorers.
Moss had live conversions and a
penalty goal to lead the team with
18 points.
The final score of 43-3 was
especially satisfying to the Pirates
because Carolina beat ECU last
fall. The Tarheels fell early in the
state championships last week;
so the Pirate ruggers did not get a
shot at them on a weekend when
thev shutout both N.C. State and
Duke.
The last match of the day saw
1Mb beat up VCU, 34-0, but it
made little difference. Given their
tight matches and the low scores
JMU had recorded, the Dukes had
to win by more than 7S points to
take tirst place. The Pirates took
the trophy with a 79 point dif-
ferential compared wit
Madison's 30 Jnd Carolina's -
50.
ECU'S ruggers close out their
season at 8-3. Each loss was by
one score against a club consid-
ered superior to the Pirates until
this spring.
All wins came with big scores
as ECU showed it was ready to
step up and play with the big
bovs from the north. Even more
heartening was the performance
of the B-side which beat four A-
teams over the course ot the the
spring as they thoroughly domi-
nated Division II colleges in N.C.
and triumphed over a senior club
side.
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
North in Lines is nw
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students .mil stafi lot its Summei I (eel
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iii
iimawn'i�imaH�i m�H�mn 1.1
The East Carolinian
April 21. 1994
Lifestyle
Page 13
No Escape from prison in the future
Photo Courtesy of Savoy Pictures
Ray Liotta, as Marine Captain John Robbins, fights for his life in No Escape, a futuristic action-adventure set
in the year 2022. The movie will be shown at Hendrix Theatre on April 25 at 8:00 p.m.
By Gina Jones
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Ready foranothersneakpreview?
Well, the Student Union Films Com-
mittee is,and- ready or not- it's com-
ing. No, it's nota Tlireesome, but it's just
as exciting.
No Escape is a futuristic action
thriller whichstarsRay Liotta asCapt.
JohnT. Robbins,acriminalwhoissent
to prison.
The catch? The prison is a remote
island called Absolom, where there is
no escape and almost no chance of
survival,andprisonersareabandoned
and left to die.
On Absolom, there is a primitive
civilization divided into two groups;
the Outsiders, anarchistic savages led
by Marek (Stuart Wilson), and the
Insiders, a group of peaceful colonists
led by the Father (Lance Henriksen).
The two groups are enemies and are
constantly battlingeachother. But John
Robbins has only one agenda: surviv-
ing and escaping the island.
Ray Liotta, who plays Robbins,
has starred in many acclaimed
"sleeper" movies. The role that made
him famous was for gangster Henry
Hill in Goodfcllas, for whichhe received
an Oscar nomination.
Lance Henriksen, who plays the
Father, is well-known for his role as
Bishop, the android in Aliens. He has
also starred in Stone Cold, Tlie Termina-
tor and fagged Edge.
Kevin Dillon, brother of Matt
Dillon, plays Casey, a fellow inmate.
His other films include TJw Doors and
Platoon.
Ernie Hudson, who plays
Hawkins, has starred in Qiostbusters,
Ghostbusters and The Hand tlrnt Rocks
the Cradle.
No EscapealsostarsStuart Wilson
(Marek), and Michael Lerner (the
Warden).
No Escape is based on Richard
Herley's 1988 British sci-fi novel The
Penal Colony. No Escape1 is a story of
renewal and redemption, a testament
to the idea that even in the worst of
environments, said Lance Henriksen,
one of the film's stars. "There will be
men who seek a sense of belonging
and association with each other. They
are compelled to rebuild a society bet-
ter and more justthantheonewhohas
See NO ESCAPE page 14
Kappa Sigma
party commences
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
1 he 12th annual Kappa Sigma
Bahama MamaParty will takeplace
on Saturday, April 23, and it is guar-
anteed to be another success.
For one day, the corner of
Anderson and 10th street will turn
into a block egBrej
party � com-
plete withsand
and milsic to
make you feel
like you are in
the Bahamas.
The party
will begin at 1
p.m. with the hhmhih
band Mother Nature.Theywillplay
until 2:30 p.m at which time the
much-awaited bikini contest will
takeplace. Cashandprizesarespon-
sored jointly by Lori's Intimate Ap-
parel, The Attic and the Kappa Sigs.
Firstplace wins$150incash, second
place gets $75, and $25 goes to the
third-place winner. Giftcertificates,
valued up to $75, will also be
awarded.
Then, at approximately 3:30
p.m the band Roily Gray and
Sunfire will begin their set. They
will play until the party ends at 5:00
p.m.
Wegpt the idea to
help the Cystic
Fibrosis cause from a
brother of ours. "
Preston Aldridge
Every year, the fraternity
chooses a different organization to
benefit, and this year's cause is the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. This
benefit is made possible beca use of
such sponsors as Bud Light, The
Attic, Lori'slntimate Apparel,Sun-
shine Alternative Productions,
UBE, Papa John's Pizza and Lou's
BHHHB Beach
Bingo.
"We
got the idea
to help the
Cystic Fi-
brosis cause
from a
brother of
�sBHS�BBaaiM�Bi ours said
Preston Aldridge. His father is vice-
presidentofmarketingfortheFoun-
dation in Wilson, so it appealed to
us. "We want to carry on the tradi-
tionof the party, while alsobenefit-
ing a good cause at the same time
Tickets are $6 in advance and
none will be sold at the door. They
will be available in front of the
Student Store on Thursday, from 9
a.m. until 2 p.m or by calling 757-
1005or 752-5543. Toenterthebikini
contestcontact Preston Aldridgeat
830-0294.
The party isB.Y.O.B.Nobottles
please.
Lecture focuses on images of deities
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Feminist images of deity in
Buddhism will be the topic of an
upcominglec ture given on thecam-
pus of ECU.
The lecture is the second an-
nual Umesh and Usha Gulati lec-
ture on World Religions. It is spon-
sored by the ECU religious studies
program and will be held Thurs-
day, April 21, at 7:30 p.m. Admis-
sion is free.
The speaker, Dr. Karen Lang,
teaches in the department of reli-
gious studies at the University of
Virginia at Charlottesville. A spe-
cialist in Asian Languages and Lit-
erature, she is the author of one
book and numerous articles. Her
lecture is titled "Tara and Prajna-
Paramita: Images of Compassion
and Wisdom in Mahayana
Buddism
The Gulati Lectureship is
funded partially by contributions
from Umesh and Usha Gulati of
Greenville, N.C
"While the primary thrust of
the religious studies program is to
provide an academic minor option
for students, we also want to serve
the public through quality programs
on religious topics Dr. Calvin
Mercer, Director of the program,
explained. "We are most fortunate
to have the services of someone
withsuch deep knowledgeof Asian
traditions to deliver this lecture
Recent studies on religion and
gender have raised questions about
women's experience within reli-
gious institutions. Lang believes the
pattern of identifying women with
sensual desire occurs with regular-
ity throughout much of the
androcentrieliteratureof early Bud-
dhism.
"Despite these negative images,
the tradition records the presence
of enlightened women who are ex-
emplars of compassion and wis-
dom she said. "The Mahayana
tradition of Buddhism symbolizes
the qualities of compassion and
wisdom with the feminine images
of Tara and Prajnaparamita. These
images and the major texts of
Mahayana encourage Buddhist
practitioners to transcend limita-
tionsof gendersteroetypesand gen-
der roles in their meditational prac-
tice and in their religious institu-
tions
The lecture will be held in the
General Classroom Building in
Room 1026. A reception will follow
the lecture.
Farmville hosts 1994 Dogwood Festival
Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
The Farmville, N.C, area was
settled in the 1760s in the midst of
some of the most fertile farmland
in the world. Incorporated in 1872,
Farmville is home to folks who are
proud of their community. The
turn of the 20th century brought
much prosperity to the village, as
tobacco cultivation and the ad-
vent of the East Carolina Railroad
brought a business boom to the
area. Today, the town continues
to prosper and to strive for the
best.
April is the month that
Farmville eel- r
ebrates spring byc
honoring North
Carolina's state ,
flower and
southern favorite,
the Dogwood. The
festival will be held
April 22-23. Performing at the i
festival for the first time will be
the Panama Steel Band. This latin
steel drum band was formed in
1988. The band creates a cruise
ship atmosphere with arrange-
ments of calypsos, popular tunes
and other latin music. The fea-
tured instrument of the band, the
steel drum, originated in Trinidad.
It is made from 55-gallon oil bar-
rels. Panama Steel has previously
opened for Jimmy Buffet concerts.
Other band appearing at the
festival include Cold Sweat,
Middle Swamp, The Fabulous 4,
and The Tar River Community
See DOGWOOD page 15
i
5
it
CD Reviews CD Reviews CD Reviews
Flanagan
discusses
dreams
By Cindy Hawkins
Staff Writer
In his most recent book,
Conciousness Reconsidered, Dr.
Owen Flanagan asserts that,
"Threeofthegreatestperplexi-
ties are these: Why is there
something rather than noth-
ing? Howdidsomeof thestuff
there is come to be alive? How
did some of the living stuff
come to be conscious?" For
persons intersted in these and
related ponderings, Dr.
Flanagan,aprofessorof experi-
mental psychology and phi-
losophy at Duke University,
will be presenting a lecture
titled "Deconstructing Dreams
: The Spandrels of Sleep
Dr. Owen Flanagan is a
highly respected and promi-
nent figure in the fields of psy-
chology and philosophy. He
has published over thirty ar-
ticles in magazinessuchasjour-
nal of Philosophy, Ethics, and
American Psychologist.
He has held positions at
BrandeisUniversity,Wellesley
College, and at La Trobe Uni-
versity in Melbourne, Austra-
lia. He hasbeen the recipient of
numerous awards and fellow-
ships, and serves on the edito-
rial board of the journals Con-
sciousness, Cognition, and
Psyche.
Dr. Flanagan's merit as a
philosopher is indirectly com-
municated through his most
notable accomplishments.
What is most interesting is the
content of his work, particu-
larly mConcsioiisness Reconsid-
ered. Inthiswork,hestatesthat,
"We are conscious creatures.
Perhaps we are information
processors, but if we are, we
areconcsiousinformationpro-
cessors. Our mental life has a
phenomenal side, a subjective
side,thatuTemostsophisticated
information processor might
lack
"Deconstructing
Dreams: The Spandrals of
Sleep" willbepresentedonFri-
day, April 22, from 3:00p.m. to
5:00p.m. inGeneralClassroom
Building 1005, and promises to
be stimulating and intellectu-
ally provocative. In addition t6
the open presentation, Dr.
Flanagan will meet with all in-
trigued persons withquipscon-
cerning existence and con-
sciousness for afternoon cof-
fee. Anyone interested inmeet-
ing with Dr. Flanagan should
contact John Bickle in the de-
partment of Philosophy.
Where's The End of Vandalism?
Don't Buy
s'f Take Your Chances
JyJ Worth A Try
ssss
i fd rJ fd 'Definite Purchase
Syn
Matter of Time
Somethingcompelledmetograb
the nearest dictionary and look up
the definition of "jaded" as I listened
to Mrt terofTimeby Syn. Asdefinedin
the Merriam-Webster dictionary,
jaded isanadjectivemeaning'dulled
byanexcessiveindulgenceMybrain
neurons immediately scrambled to
push toward a connection between
the guttural voice of frontman, Ray
Lane, and the meaning of jaded.
Lane's music is guitar-driven,
which is not entirely unusual in the
year in which Pearl Jam makes the
cover of Newsweek. Yet, while it is
powerful and brooding, the music
tends to fall short in the most imagi-
nativeand comical ways. Forinstance,
the song "Hey John" is a
comtemplativetributetoJohnLennon
mat would be a really good song until
Lane inserts "coo-coo-ca-choo" into
the chorus, thuscrossingintotheever-
mysterious realms of the Pillsbury
Dough Boy theme song. The rest of
the songs consist of love songs, alone
songs,and 'screw italT songs�quite
standard, really.
Yet, there is a painful relation-
ship portrayed on Matter of Time,
though I'm not sure who it is be-
tween At times, Lane accuses God.
Atothertimes,heattackssocietyand,
at other times, he attacks himself. In
the song "Take it Back Lane la-
ments, "All my life I'vebeen loosing
A life that was never mine" to the
See SYN page 15
Hole
Live Through This
JJJ
Believe it or not, I bought the new
Hole album because I liked the first
one. I didn't buy it out of morbid
curiosity about Hole singer Courtney
Love's marriage to the late KurtCobain.
I didn'tbuy itbecauseof all the media
hype, which included cover stories in
every music magazine on Earth I
didn't even buy it because Sphi maga-
zine called it the best album so far this
year. No, I just remember how good
thatfirstalbumreallywas.Sometimes
I think I may be the only one.
It's been hard to avoid the hype
on this one, it really has. Even before
her husband's suicide, Love was a
fixture in theentertainmentpress. Her
heroin addiction and the attempts by
social services to take away her baby
were only the tip of her media iceberg.
It was all quite sordid, and the really
sad thing is,nobodywouldhavecared
if she hadn't married Kurt Cobain.
What'sevensadder,though,isrhefact
that no one would care about Hole's
music if it wasn't for Cobain, either.
Their new album, whichhas the sadly
ironic title Live Through Tftis, would
most likely be widely ignored, and
that's too bad. People as talented as
Loveandherbandmatesdeservemore
recognition than that.
Perhaps that's why certain songs
on this new album comment so bla-
tantlyonall thehypethaf ssurrounded
Love. In "Creditin theStraight World
Love tells us how she had to become a
See HOLE page 15
DES MOLNES, Iowa (AP) �
Grouse County, which may or may
not be in Iowa, exists in an "Ameri-
can Gothic" world where vandals
have thrown a rock through the
pointed upstairs window of the little
white house and bent the tines of
the farmer's pitchfork into an excla-
mation point.
It's the world of Tom Drury's
firstnovel, 77a? Endofrandalism. And
it's a place where Grant Wood
people walk through a Magritte
landscape.
"I've had people ask, 'What's
your book called? said Drury, in-
terviewed by telephone from his
home in Litchfield, Conn. "And I
say, "The End of Vandalism And
they say, 'Is it a manual about stop-
ping vandalism?' And I say, No,
not at all
Rather, Drury's book is a state-
ment on life in Grouse County,
where not a lot is as it seems at first
glance.
The land would seem to be
Iowa, with people going to Des
Moines to lobby the Legislature,
buying tractor parts in Sioux City
and going up north to a fishing
camp in Minnesota. But Drury says
it could be anywhere in rural
America; it doesn't have to be Iowa.
"It never comes right out and
saysdirectly, This isexactly where
we are he says.
If s a story of babies aban-
doned and babies lost, of divorce
and dating, of families close-knit
and families unraveling.
The main characters are
Louise Darling, a photographer's
assistant, her ex-husband, Tiny, a
thief and a vandal, and her cur-
rent husband, Dan Norman, the
county sheriff. Alistattheback of
the book names 65 other charac
ters, whose lives intersect those of
Louise, Tiny and Dan in some
way � and in sometimes unex-
pected ways.
"It seems to me that the writ-
ing in the book will be going along
in a certain recognizably realistic
way and then suddenly, or not so
suddenly, it just will kind of lapse
into a sort of surreal and funny
image the writer said.
The story is often driven for-
ward by acts of vandalism � like
the time Louise and a friend break
into the high school gym and spray
paint "See the lonely boys out on
the weekend" letter-by-letter on
the football team's helmets.
"Infact,I think the vandalism
often comesoffina favorable light,
See VANDALISM page 15
f





14 The East Carolinian
April 21, 1994
Roseanne claims abusive huband; files for divorce
LOSANGEl ES(AP) �They
flashed their tattooed rear ends in
public, posed for gross-out photos
and squabbled with 1V networks.
It wasn't pretty while it lasted, and
now the union of Roseanne and
Tom Arnold is coming to an ugly
end.
Mrs. Arnold tiled tor divorce
Monday and got a restraining or-
der against her husband and busi-
ness partner, accusing him ot slap-
ping her around.
The 41-year-old star of one of
TV's most popular shows fired her
husband as executive producer of
"Roseanne cutup his credit cards
and dashed off to Europe for a
three-month trip without him, a
source close to the couple said.
She also fired Kim Siva, the
couple's assistant who had joined
them in a mock, three-way mar-
riage, said the source, who spoke
on condition of anonymity.
Mrs. Arnold said in court pa-
pers that couple, who married Ian.
20, 1990, officially separated Fri-
day.
"1 now realize that I have been
a classic batteied and abused wife
Mrs. Arnold said in court papers.
"Throughout our marriage the re-
spondent hit me, struck me, has
thrown objects at me, pinched me
and verbally abused me. He also
has pushed me against walls, while
he screams and shouts at me,
drowning out any possible plea
that I might take for him to stop
PMK, the public relations firm
representing the Arnolds, said
there was no comment from Mrs.
Arnold or her 35-year-old husband,
a comic who is filming his own
CBS series, the low-rated "Tom
The caustic, corpulent couple
began with a stormy courtship that
overlapped with Mrs. Arnold's
breakup from her first husband.
The actress postponed their 1990
wedding until her husband-to-be
sought help for substance abuse.
In her book "My Lives she
sas she was sexually abused as a
child, leading her to abuse drugs
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and alcohol.
1 lie Arnolds made news to-
gether by flashing their ample bot-
toms � each bearing a tattoo of the
other's name � at the lc89 World
Series, mud wrestling in photo-
graphs for Vanity Fair, recounting
personal recollections of child abuse
and squabbling with networks over
their contracts.
The divorce filing came three
days after an argument erupted be-
tween the Arnolds on the set of
ABC's "Roseanne which has tra-
ditionallv ranked in the top 10 each
week
Mrs. Arnold claimed her hus-
band forced his way onto the set
Friday � past the four securitv
guards she hired to prevent him �
and assaulted four people.
That same day, she said, she
called police after her husband
charged into her Los Angeles home
and threatened her three children
from a previous marriage. She said
NO ESCAPE
in court papers that her husband
had moved out six months ago
In asking tor a restraining or-
der, the comic declared: "1 have
often been the subject of humiliat-
ing stories in tabloid newspapers.
However, 1 must make these rev-
elations at this time because of the
conclusion that I have reached that
! cannot continue to live in a clas-
sic battered wife syndrome men-
tality
An entertainment industry
analyst said that the impact of the
split remains uncertain but that
Mrs. Arnold clearlv outweighs her
husband in ratings clout.
"If Roseanne Arnold left
'Roseanne that would have an
impact on Capital Cities-ABC and
on Viacom, which syndicates the
show said Jeffrey Longdon of
the Seidler Cos. securities firm.
"Tom Arnold is not someone who
would impact the earnings per
share of any company
Continued from page 13
abandoned mem, but thev never give
up thei r dreams of freedom and justice
in the world thev left behind No Es-
cape, a Savoy picru res release, was wri t-
ten bv Michael Gavlin and Joel Cross,
produced by Gale Ann Hurd, and di-
rected by Martin Campbell. It is sched-
uled tor national release on April 29.
If you're in the mcxd for science
fiction mixed with high-energized
and fast-pacedaction,Mo Escape isthe
movie for you. Go see it at Hendrh
Theatre on Monday, April 25, at 8
p.m.
Exxon Products
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King's & 100's at $1.53 tax
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PICK ONE UP!
Campus Paperback Bestsellers
1 THE CLIENT by John Grisham
2 THE PELICAN BRIEF by John Grisham
3 SCHINDLER'S LIST by Thomas Keneally
4 JEDI SEARCH by Kevin J. Anderson
5 WINTER MOON by Dean Koontz
6 THrtAtJSMAN OF" SHANNARA by Terry BrBots"
7 THE TAO OF POOH by Benjamin Hoff
8 THE TE OF PIGLET by Benjamin Hoff
10 YOUNG MEN AND FIRE by Norman Maclean
Taken from the Association of American Publishers
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April 24, 1994 at 2:00 p.m.
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April 21. 1994
The East Carolinian 15
VANDALISM
Continued from page 13
depending on which act we're talk-
ing about Drurv said. "It's a way
of sort of rearranging reality to get
vour point across.
' And when you think about it,
fiction writing is a way of doing the
same thing
Then there's the night Tiny in-
vades the End of Vandalism Dance
at the high school gym and vandal-
izes the anti-vandalism collage.
And the Saturday afternoon that
Albert Robeshaw's rock band
climbs the Pinville water tower and
paints "Armageddon" and "Tina
Rules" to wake up the folks of
GrouseCountv and honor the Talk-
ing Heads.
"A lot of it is like political ex-
pression Drurv said. "When
Louise paints the Neil Young lyric
on the football helmets, what she's
doing is making her point in a very
noticeable way that the school sys-
tem is spending too much money
on football.
"So it's a way of getting a plat-
form. Bevond that, I'd have to relv
on vour interpretation of why there
is so much vandalism
Although he grew up in Iowa,
in a rural setting much like Grouse
County, Drurv denied that the
scenes of vandalism are autobio-
graphical "I'd sav there is no more
vandalism in my past than there is
in anv average Midwestern child-
hood he said.
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BREAK THE CYCLE: CHANGE YOUNG LIVES.
DOGWOOD
Continued from page 13
Band. Spirituals will be performed
by The Vines Family and country
groups theTamsand Silver Wings
top the list of the musical enter-
tainment.
New features added this year
include an antique show and sale
and gardeninglandscaping expo.
Plant professionals will be happy
to answer questions and provide
suggestions for vour lawns and
gardens.
A unique performer called the
Fairvtaler will be there to provide
captivating adventure fantasy sto-
ries that call for audience partici-
SYN
pation. She appears in glittery
gowns, dancing and singing magi-
cal melodies to enhance her sto-
ries. The actress behind the
Fairvtaler, Pauline Faneuf, has
appeared on television in "Big
Brother Jake" and "Unsolved Mys-
teries Call vour friends and
neighbors and socialize against a
bac kd rop of flowers, music, enter-
tainment and fun during the 7th
Annual Farmville Dogwood Fes-
tival.
For a schedule of events, write
P.O. Box 86, Farmville, NC 27828
or call 919-733-5814.
Continued from page 13
soulful acoustic projections of his gui-
tar. This would explain his comment
that, "I didn't trust life or God and I
wasn't gonna be his sucker anymore.
That's when I picked up a guitar to
scream out a few feelings
Yet, theme after theme and riff
after riff left me aching to call the
cheapest 1-900-HELP line, even
though I wasn't really moved. Lane
succeeds in screaming out a few feel-
ings, but the monotony of the music
left me with the impression that this
singersongwriter and liismusic were
well, jaded.
� Cindy
Hawkins
Central Book &
IF YOU FIRST DON'T
, YOU'RE
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756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
HOLE
Continued from page 13
freaktobenotieed. "1 lost a leg and an
eye she sings, "I've got credit in the
straight world This isn't the kind of-
notoriety she wants, but I, for one, am
awfully glad she'susingittotellpeople
off.
The rest of the album seems a bit
more like theolderHolestuff, but with
what is perhaps a more mature twist.
Songs from the first album, like "Teen-
age Whore" and "Gixxl SisterBad
Sister" explored the taboos of female
sexuality indisrurbing terms andsnarl-
ingrhvthmsthatreallygotinv'ourface
On songs like "Miss World" and
"Jennifer's Body the new album
seems more interested in the expecta-
tions of women and the disturbing
reality. Sex is still a major topic, but it's
not handled in as graphic a manner.
Love still growls and screams, but it's
not as brutal. Generally, Lizv Tliwit�li
Tliis is just not as juicy as the first
album; Hole isn't quite so sticky any-
more.
An unfortunate side effect of this
new maturity, however, is a drop in
the band's intensity. As guitarist Eric
Frlandson said in one i t the numer-
ous Holeinterviews(theonlvonel let
myself read), the guitars sound
wimpy on Live Tliwugli Tliis. Of
courHconsidenngrhatSonic Youth's
Kim Gordon produced the first al-
bum and brought her noise guitar
sound to it, 1 suppose any tiling short
of an all-out assault would sound
wimpy. But themusic here occasion-
ally slips into something too stan-
dard; even once in a while, Hole
sounds like just another alternative
band. And that's one tiling we really
don't need anv more of, thanks.
Butoveral 1, this Lsa gtxxl album.
When Courtney Love screams, she
screams effectively, and even- so of-
ten Hole's punk roots show beauti-
fully. So, never mind the hype, the
controversy or the non-stop MTV
exposure.Liv Tlirough Tliis deserves
to be heard. Check it out.
� Mark
Brett
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� Kio preliminaries held Saturday,
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� FINALS ON SATURDAY. APRIL 30th.
� Doors open at & PM with FREE
admission 'til 9-30 PM.
� $3.00 cover
Drink specials: Blue Hawaiians and
Bahama Mama? for $3.00
Greenville
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 21, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 21, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1007
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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