The East Carolinian, April 19, 1994






.
Sports
Jordan Visits North Carolina
Former basketball star
Michael Jordan returns to play
baseball in Zebulon, North
Carolina, against the Carolina
Mudcats, Story on page 11.
Lifestyle
Upper Crust Reading
Camilla Beck and Bill
Haberg will be reading
their poetry and fiction
at the Upper Crust
Bakery at 8:00 on
Wednesday, April 20.
Story on page 7.
Today
Tomorrow
��:��: �:
m
The East Carolinian
VoI.69Nq26-
Iah3
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, April 19,1994
14 Pages
SGA votes for class project, against Grad SGA
3w Cfvk i
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
5GA met last night to dis-
cuss partial funding for the Se-
nior Class Gift, partial funding
for a national Residence Hall As-
sociation conference and the ap-
proval of the ECU Graduate and
Professional Student Organiza-
tion.
Because the Appropriations
Committee did not have the op-
portunity to approve money for
theseniorclass gift and it is nearly
the end of the semester, Anna
Harrington requested that SGA
approve partial funding for the
project. While the project will cost
$8,250, Harrington only re-
quested $3,000 to be used for the
Senior Class Project to cut down
bushes along Fifth Street and to
make a brick walkway to replace
trampled grass. Traditionally,
SGA funds 50 percent of the Se-
nior Class Project, but Harrington
only asked for less than 33 per-
cent of the total. The appropria-
tion passed. Harrington said this
project coincides with the Be m-
tification Committee Project and
it will be useful to people passing
through the area.
Mike Carnes requested that
$500 be granted to the Residence
Hall Association to be used for
registration purposes for 13 RHA
members at a national conven-
tion to be held May 25-30 in Flag-
staff, Ariz. The group approved
this bill.
Kristin White, dav repre-
sentative for graduate students,
and Mike Hadley, SGA graduate
president, requested the approval
of the ECU Graduate and Profes-
sional Student Organization
(ECU GPSO) Constitution. This
would form an umbrella group
for all graduate and professional
student organizations on cam-
pus. No funds were requested.
Originally, SGA was to vote on
passing a single bill approving
the constitution and funding. The
bill was divided into committees,
therefore the group voted only
on the constitution. SGA voted
against the bill in a 23-20 vote.
"We will not allow 16.9 per-
cent of the student bodv to be
recognized by representatives
who have a voice in how their
student activity fees are spent?"
Hadley questioned.
SGA Presidential candidate
Ian Eastman voted to pass the
bill.
"I think it is a shame
Eastman said referring to the de-
nial of the bill. "The graduate
students and the underclass are
two different, separate bodies,
and I think they should be al-
lowed to break away in what 1
see as change
Eastman said if elected he
will push to have the constitu-
tion passed. The SGA president
sits on the Board of Trustees who
will vote if the bill is appealed.
Brynn Thomas, Eastman's
opponent, did not vote because
Truck crashes into store
By Morns Weintraub
Staff Writer
Dozens of ECU students
gathered to watch a $45,000 Pepsi
delivery truck burst into flames
just four feet away from City Mar-
ket foodstore last Wednesday af-
ternoon.
An odd series of events
caused the unmanned delivery-
truck's engine to start to crank by
itself, drive towards the store, and
stop just short of crashing through
the storefront at 211 S. Jarvis St.
"It scared the pure-tee piss
out of me said ECU graduate
Chris Siegel. "The power line fell
on the back tire of the truck and it
caught on fire. Then it coasted
down and ran up in front of the
store
Siegel witnessed the bizarre
incident around noon as he stood
in the parking lot adjacent to City
Market while waiting to drop off
his sister's children. "It's the
damnedest thing I ever saw Siegel
said.
After hearing Siegel's ac-
count of what transpired, Green-
ville Fire Chief Raymond Carnev
said, "The electrical current from
the wire caused the ignition to short
out, and start, and since the truck
was in gear it began to move
Luckily, store owner Grant
Wright spotted the truck's flames
before it began moving toward the
store. "I evacuated everyone out
�.�!j(
"5cir
�l
�- ' �.ri '��' '
,�
�"
mto fin
n ii i "rfiiiTt'il� � ���.sSSX-ii��Nsfc "t. s
' �
. , &�
��V,
' �' l
f-noto by Morris Weintraub
A pepsi truck smashed into City Market Food store Wednesday, catching on fire
and destrying the storefront. The scene also frightened ECU students.
the back doors and turned off all
the power in the store Wright
said.
Then Wright and his wife
went back, peered down one of the
aisles, and saw the truck coming
towards them. "It was a strange
feeling to see it going by itself
Wright said. "When I saw it going
up-hill I knew something was
wrong
Wright then approached the
truck with a fire extinguisher, but
turned back when he saw fire
See FIRE page 4
Biologist to speak tonight
Dr. Rebecca Cann proposes new theory of evolution
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
The old story about humans
evolving from apes may actually
be a farce, according to Dr. Rebecca
L. Cann. Tonight, Cann will speak
on research which indicates that
al! modern peopleeventually trace
their maternal genealogies to an
ancestral mother who lived some
200,000 years ago, and probably
was African.
The lecture is presented by
the ECU Chapter of Sigma Xi, a
biology honor society for biolo-
gists holding higher degrees. It
will be held at 7:30 p.m. in room
1028 of the General Classroom
Building. The grant to get Cann to
speak was requested by biology
department faculty members.
"This would be good for all
students, especially minoritv stu-
dents to hear, because it adds
weight to the argument that there
should be no racism said Tracy
Hyman, a biology major who
works in the biology department.
Cann, a national lecturer, is
an associate professor at J. A. Burns
School of Medicine, department
of genetics and molecular biologv
at the University of Hawaii-Ho-
nolulu. She received her B.S. and
Ph. D. degrees from the Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley.
Cairn's research focuses on
a set of genes maternally inher-
ited in thecell's rrutochond ria. She
uses these findings to reconstruct
population diversity. Men and
women did not appear of various
continents, but were originallv
created from the African mother
and eventually left for other con-
tinents where they continued to
evolve. This theory challenges the
original theory of evolution.
"ECU is fortunate to have
such a distinguished lecturer dis-
cuss her findings in this contro-
versial field Hvman said.
A reception will immedi-
ately follow the lecture. Both the
lecture and the reception are free
and open to the public.
he is the Speaker of the House
and votes only in tie-breaking
situations. Thomas said that he
supported passage of the bill.
"I thought it definitely
should have passed Thomas
said. "All they were asking for
was the constitution, not any
money Thomas also said he
would like to see more graduate
students involved in SGA.
Dr. Paul Tschetter, associ-
ate dean of the graduate school,
andagroupofgraduatestudents
were present to support the bill.
"I'm disappointed
Tschetter said. "It's something
that should happen. I guess I am
just surprised
Kristin White, who has been
working on the constitution since
last November, said that, possi-
bly in confusion, SGA members
thought they were voting to pass
appropriations, not a constitu-
tion.
See SGA page 3
VOTE TOMORROW � AGAIN!
The ballot for the run-off elections to be held
Wed. April 20, will look like this:
SGA President
�Ian Eastman
�Brynn Thomas
SGA Vice President
�Sheila Boswell
�Chris Munley
Voting in the run-off elections for president
and vice president will take place from 9
a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wright Place and from 9
a.m. to 6:30 p.m. at:
� the Croatan
� the bottom of College Hill Drive
� Mendenhall Student Center
� Minges Coliseum
Students need only their ID cards vote.
Chancellor speaks to
student parking group
By Jason Williams
News Editor
Chancellor Richard Eakin
walked to the General Classroom
Building Thursday to speak to
STOPP, Students Tired of Park-
ing Problems. Had he driven, he
may or may not have been able
to find a place to park.
David Richmond,STOPP's
president, praised the chancel-
lor for speaking to the group and
for his success in the Shared Vi-
sions fundraising drive. He said
that if anyone could help resolve
the parking problem, it was
Eakin.
"Let me begin with a
cliche Richmond said. "If
there's something that is not
broke, don't fix it. Well, I feel like
the parking situation right now
is broke, and I definitely feel like
we need to do something to fix
it
Eakin said that he proposed
the first parking sticker price in-
crease in 1987, from $25 to $50.
Later, he supported the increase
to $70, which has been in effect
for three years and will continue
next year.
He said that he has consid-
ered many options including
building more surface lots and
building a parking deck.
"The one thing is very
clear Eakinsaid. "Parking decks
allow you to condense, put cars
in very tight, on core campus,
and that would be a definite im-
provement
He stopped short of endors-
ing a parking deck wholeheart-
edly, however.
"Parking decks are an in-
crease in security he said. "That
is a disadvantage. That is, every-
one that has a parking deck has
been telling us that securitv be-
comes a much greater concern.
"I've had a chance to attend
the Board ot Governor s meet-
ings where these things get ap-
proved, and I can tell you, the
price of a deck is clearly in the
nine, ten thousand dollar range
per space he said. He also said
that issues such as soil structure
figured into theequationas well.
"We have come down on
the side of surface lots, for now
hesaid. "We have come down on
the side to remove parking from
central, core campus
The master plan calls for a
pedestrian campus, which would
eliminate many of the roads that
currently cut through core cam-
pus. Parking would therefore be
moved to the fringes of campus.
See DECKpage 4
Pigout Party
a success
By Stephanie Lassiter
Assistant News Editor
Your skin wasn't the
only thing cooking this week-
end. The 11th annual Great
Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin
Pig-Out Party was held this
past weekend and drew an
enthusiastic crowd. Thecook-
ing contest was held several
hours before the game and 45
pig cooks participated.
"We had a great week-
end with great participation
and cooperative weather
said Lee Workman, associate
athletic director for ticket sales
and special events.
The goal ot the
weekend's activities was to
raise $50,000 for an athletic
scholarship fund. At press
time, the financial statistics
were notavailable. The week-
end was sponsored by Toyota
and Eastern N.C. Toyota Deal-
ers. The PittGreenville
Chamber of Commerce vol-
unteers and the ECU Athletic
Committee helped to coordi-
nate the weekend.
Two donations of $1
million each were announced
late last week to help with
renovations in Minges Coli-
seum and Ficklen stadium.
Walter and Marie Williams
See PIGOUTpage 4
Pay
attention!
Student
volunteers at
the Special
Olympics listen
attentively
during an
orientation
session. The
games were
held this
weekend in
the Emerald
City.
Photo by Leslie Petty
I
m & mKtmommmmmm





2 The East Carolinian
April 19, 1994
�"�in. ii iillllniilii M.inn.rt

ground Other
Research Day offers
�f i new perspective
Another fraternity gun incident shakes UNC-CH
.After years of trying to get a handle on the wild fraternity parries
at UNC-Chapel Hill by targeting drinking, university and fraternity
officials are facing a new problem: guns. For the third time this year,
pol ice were called to a fra terni tv par ry Friday when someone pulled out
a pistol and waved it around. Although no shots were fired and no one
was injured, the incident rattled some nerves. In recent vears, concerns
over legal liability have led fraternities to limit the consumption and
distribution of alcohol under a policy known as risk management. The
latest incident occurred at 3:30 a.m. Friday at the Beta Theta Pi house.
Anumber of people had gathered to drink beer and listen to music. At
one point, a man pulled out a silver pistol and started pointing it,
according to Jane Cousins of the Chapel Hill Police Department. A
member of the fraternity called police. When officers arrived, they
found the gunman on the back porch of the house with the gun stuck
in his pants. Police confiscated a .380 semiautomatic pistol and arrested
the man, Cousins said.
NCSU trustees raise student fees
N.C. State University trustees on Friday agreed to several in-
creases in student fees, including an overhaul of the education and
technology fee. Last fall, the university raised that fee from $59 to 5130
per year to generate more mone for the school's labs and computers.
But administrators say that extra monev covered only about a third of
the $2.3 mili jn requested by the colleges. So, the plan for this coming
school yt ar is to raise the fee again trom $130 to 5200 if tl e University
of North Carolina Boarc of Governors approves. Engineering students,
who have to pay an extra fee in add i 'ion to the proposed $200 fee, would
see their extra fee drop from $170 to $100. They would pay a total of
$300. The un. versity also would initiate a $28 annual fee to held finance
a new student health services building. Construction is to begin in the
fall of 1995.
Breakers confronted by herpes tent
As tens of thousands of college students descended this year on
Florida for the usual rowdy week of sex, heavy drinking and second-
degree sunburns, tl ley were greeted by an unusual sight on the beach:
a herpes tent. The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases joined
Burroughs Wellcome Co. to sponsor a Mar. 14-23 program called
"Turning the Tide on Herpes which included an informational tent
located where the action was-on the beach. Brian Austin Green, who
Stars in the television show "Beverly Hills90210 wasa spokesperson
for the effort this year and greeted students in the tent, which featured
a self-graded "Sexual Health IQ" quiz.
Compiled by Stephanie Lassiter. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Did raising the drinking age
law really decrease drunk driving
and other alcohol related occur-
rences at ECU? Have vou ever
wondered about the contextual
influences on categorization skills
after a closed head injury?
These questions and several
other topics were explored and
presented by more than six de-
partments last Friday at the School
of Allied Health Sciences'Research
Day. The event lasted from 10 a.m.
until 3 p.m with a free lunch of
barbecue chicken for all who reg-
istered to attend � more than 100
people. More than 40 presenta-
tions about departmental research
were given on the first floor of the
Belk building. The event was held
in correlation with the School of
Allied Health and Sciences' 25th
anniversary.
"We have presentations that
are going one th roughout the day
said Dr. Stephen Thomas, coordi-
na. or if the event We don't have
the topics clustered bv depart-
ment. We are trying to ensure that
students have an opportunity to
really get to know what's going
on in all cf the departments
The departments of clinical
laboratory science, environmen-
tal health, occupational therapy,
physical therapy, rehabilitation
studies and speech-language and
auditory pathology participated.
The departments of biostatistics,
biomechanics, physiology, reha-
bilitation studies and radiation
safety also made appearances.
These groups made posters
for display tables and gave pre-
sentations in room 101 at different
times during the day to elaborate
on the methods and procedures
used in collecting data. In several
cases, several departments joined
together in a research effort.
"This is a good way to find
out what kind of research other
students are doing and other fac-
ulty Thomas said. "I think you
really develop an appreciation for
different departments in such a
diverse school. It's really surpris-
ing how much research is going
on that relates, and I've seen sev-
eral students and faculty go to
other departments saying 'we
need to collaborate
Each table displayed post-
ers of different sizes and color.
Abstracts of the research were also
available to read. Presenters had a
one-hour time slot when someone
would be available for question-
ing. This allow researchers to
mingle and learn about other ar-
eas of interest.
Thomas said the event wasa
success and he is hoping to ex-
pand to the second floor for next
year's research day.
Correction
The profile of Chris Munley, candidate
for SGA Vice President, that appeared in
theApril 5 edition of TEC incorrectly identi-
fied him as office manager of ECU's Division
of Continuing Education. Munley is a stu-
dent assistant in the Division office.
�The Gathering
A new concept in gaming!
A Fantasy Trading Card game
Challenge an opponent to a
vlagic duel. Your deck holds
all your tools: creatures,
and. spells and artifacts.
Starter Decks
Booster Packs $S
Antiquities o0' a0�
Factory Set r$"
ESP plus � Arlington Village
803A Red Banks Rd � Greenville
(919) 321-3946
See you in Dominia !
mm

Admission: r ;
$5 Members
$6 Guests
10c Domestics
BOTTLES and CANS
75t Shot Specials
THURSDAY,
APRIL 21ST,
"ON THE MALL
12 NOON-6 P.M.
"ROCKY HORROR
PICTURE SHOW
8- 10 P.M.
SNEAK PREVIEW: "NO ESCAPE
Monday, April 25th
8:00 p;m. :
Look for passes at
Mendenhall Information
Desk and Student Store.
� CD "55 r
CO D �
I 68 C JZ
O "D 5
"A NIGHTMARE
BEFORE X-MAS" PG
Wed. & Sun April 20th & 24th.
THE FUGITIVE" PG-13
ThursSat April 21st-23st.
"SHORTCUTS" R
Wed & Sun April 27th & May 1st.
"FLESH AND BONE" R
ThursSat April 28th - 30th.
All Spring & Summer
� �
FREE ADMISSION
M
HAVE A NICE SUMMER,
SEE YOU NEXT FALL i
,i - 'S ATTENDANCE
vy as of
41794 33,148.
for members and greeks
$1.00 for Guests with
student I.D.
8-10 pm
$100 Domestic Bottles & Cans
$1.00 House Hiballs
$2.00 16oz. Margaritas & Tropical Drinks
$2.75 Pitchers
75tf shot specials
Better drink some coffee first-It's going to be a long night!
THE ELBO
In it's 25th year
The Tradition Continues!





April 19, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Clinton reviewing options concerning Bosnia
W ASHING ION K
Calling thf situation � I
sieged town ot tlorazde
and uncertain Pi
I linton Monda) renew i
call for lifting an internal
arms embargo so Bosnian Mus-
lims can better defend them-
selves
Si i retan of State Warren
Christopher -ciid the United
States was "urgently rev
ing our option lor an aj
priate response.
"We have a disappointing
and difficult situation today
Clinton told reporters at the
White House. "This has not
been a great weekend for the
peace effort in Bosnia.
As he left for a trip to Mil-
waukee, Clinton said his top
national security advisers
would meet at the V lute I louse
to discuss possibli
Christopher, I
ing for the White 1 louse for that
meeting, said in a speec h to edu-
cators that "b their flagrant
aggression and inhumane .u
he Bosnian Serbs have
;aii shown their con-
international com-
t ail humanitar-
"At this moment we are
� pi !OHs
sponse to
the traged in (iorazde as well
era II situat ion i n
c hristopher said
1 lecalled the war in Bosnia
"the largest human tragedy in
Euro the descent of the
Iron c urtain
iton accused the
Bosnian Serbs of breaking cease-
� � ments both with the
Russians and with the United
ns in mo ing against the
Muslim enc . .
fhis was the first time
that the Russians reached an
nl w ith the Serbs which
they have not honored he said.
But the president played
down the likelihood of military
intervention, citing the assess-
ment ot the L commander in
Bosnia that air strikes would be
not helpful under the circum-
stances
E en so, two leading mem
bers of Congress called Mon-
day tor the West to act quickly
before other "safe havens ' in
Bosnia are o errun as v ell.
"1 don't think we can tol-
erate the kind ot actions we've
had by the Serbs in recentdays
said Rep. Lee Hamilton, the
chairman of the House Foreign
Affairs Committee. "So I favor
a very aggressive enforcement
of the I . resolutions and
that includes the use of air
power aggressively
Sen. Richard Lugar, R-
Ind. a senior member of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, said it looked like there
was no way now that the United
States can stop the fighting in
i. iorade.
I ugar, R-Ind said that in
order to save the remaining five
remaining Muslim "safe ha-
vens in Bosnia, "we're either
going to have much more ex-
tensh e NATO participation, in
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while von wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pittman Building 757-0003 Mondav - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
SGA
the air and on the ground, or
v e re going to rearm the Bosnian
Muslims so the an fight
Both 1 lamilton D-Indand
1 ugar were interviewed on C BS
Among the options to be
considered is a new c ase tor lift-
ing the arm, embargo on the
former ugoslav ia.t lintonsaid
I lesaid that the French and
English who had opposed mkIi
a move before, might be more
supportive this time � since
their ground fore es are more at
risk now than before.
But C linton suggested it
was unlikely the Lnited States
would move on its own to lift
the embargo and to help arm
Bosnian Muslims
That could backfire and
open the door for other nations
to resume arms sales to Iraq and
stop following the U.Ssup-
ported arms embargo there,
Clinton suggested.
He praised the Russians tor
seeking to persuade the Serbs
� traditional allies � to halt
their attack.
Continued from page 1
"They stopped our consti-
tution so that we are not even
recognized as an organization on
campus White said.
White and Hadlev will di-
rectly appeal the decision to the
Board of I rustees. Each graduate
and professional student contrib-
utes S10.75 annually in Student
Activ it) Fees. I lad the constitu-
tion been passed, the group
would have asked that SO of the
Graduate and Professional Stu-
dent Activity fees be allocated to
the ECUGPSO Funding Board.
StiAet V46oa4
INCLUDES PARTS AND LABOR?
(Excludes Service Specials and Accessories)
MUST SHOW STUDENT I.D.
MKYSl.rK VlymoutH dodge
MERCURY
HOUSING VACANCIES
THE METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
SUMMER & FALL 1994
Private and Double Occupancy
Rooms available
for Male & Female Students.
Space is limited.
Apply as soon as possible.
For More Information & Room Rates
call Scott 830-9527
.
Gi ANT Size
Submarines
&Salads
tv'voft
Winn Dixie
Market Place
310-D E.Arlington Blvd.
Open Daily 11:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
For Fast Take-Out Service
Phone Ahead
321-2220
Fax 756-1775
Now Open
SHA-NA-NA-NAA, NA-NA-NA-NA-NAA,
GET A JOB.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN IS NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER SEMESTERS AND THE
94-95 ACADEMIC YEAR
Tree subtree drinkjj" "
I � Regular Sub
Bu Anj Buy Any fe
I (iiantSub II Regular Sub & II ' '
& Repuiar Get Small Chips
I n T1? a Regu,ar & Regular
1 Drink & di't am " Kinnit'tin rtrinL "
I f Fountain Drink Fountain
regular Sub .
! FREE FREE pDm
tor only
$3.95 LUNCH
Expires 4-20 94
I L� P I II
( hoo.se From:
1 I
Cheese & Salami i
2
Cheese, Boiled Ham. I
Cappacaulo
K
i lam & C heese �
4
Cheese, Proscuttina. & I
(lappacaulo
Expires 4-20-94
11 S3 95
� Valid (A I v-��-7
Expires 4-20-94
I
I
i
POSITIONS AVAILABLE INCLUDE:
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
REPRESENT THE PAPER TO POTENTIAL ADVERTISERS
CREATE ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS
UNLIMITED INCOME POTENTIAL
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
OVERSEE PIRATE COMICS (SELECT CARTOONISTS AND EDIT
STRIPS WITH EMPHASIS ON STORYTELLING AND TECHNIQUE.
ESTABLISH DEADLINES)
CREATE EDITORIAL CARTOONS FOR OPINION SECTION
CREATE GRAPHICS WHEN NECESSARY
STRONG KNOWLEDGE OF COMICS' PROFESSION NEEDED
WRITERS (LIFESTYLE, NEWS. OPINION. SPORTS)
COMPOSE STORIES BASED ON DIRECT QUOTES AND PI BLIC
RECORD IN APHOUSE STYLE
COPY EDITOR
EDIT STORIES FOR CONTEN1 n PH( U'SE STVI E
.0GPA Rl QUIRED MACINTOSH I AIM Rll NCE PRI I ! RRED.
Al'Pn IN HE STUDEN1 PI BS. Bl II DING. 2ND I I (h)i





4 The East Carolinian
April 19, 1994
DECK
Continued from page 1
Shark takes life of swimmer FIRE
Continued from page 1
i
The master plan also calls for a
parking deck to be built some-
time in the future across from
Mendenhall and the new Recre-
ation Center.
Eakin said he supported the
move toward a pedestrian cam-
pus. "It will make for a much
more pleasant environment for
you, and for us he said. "You
don't have to worry about a per-
son buzzing through campus
without regard to the speed limit
or people walking.
"We don't want this to turn
into an urban area of concrete
� and asphalt, devoid of wooded
areas and trees
As for the surface lots, Eakin
said a new one will open soon at
the Belk Building. "It's a lot that
will hold at least 500 cars he
said. The lot, which is currently
grass and gravel, will be paved
some time this summer. Eventu-
ally, it will become the freshman
storage lot, Eakin said.
He said the proposal that is
being considered most seriously
at the present time was a gradu-
ated fee scale. "The theory be-
hind this is if you want to park in
close, you pay more. If you want
to park far away, you get a bar-
gain lot
Two alternatives that are not
being considered are allocating
spaces based on GPA and paving
the grass field across from the big
lot at the bottom of College Hill.
"I proposed that when I first got
here, and I still have the scars to
show the attack Eakin said.
Eakin said that he appreci-
ated the approach that STOPP
was taking to solve the parking
problem. He said that the admin-
istration would try to he lp STOPP
conduct a parking survey on cam-
pus later in the month.
HEADJMG HOME
S"W'N 7 ILW Willt 77� �e�nLT 7
Buy a subscription to The East Carolinian for the summer -
for only 20 bucks! Each week you will get the paper by mail.
' Mail your check or money order to The East Carolinian, Student Pubs Bldg,
ECU, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. I
NameI
Address
� City, State, Zip
WON 1993
BEST NEW VOCAL
GROUP AWARD
ACADEMY OF
COUNTRY MUSIC
AWARDS
April 21st - Last Night Club Appearance
$2.00OFF WITH TfflS COUPON
w?
SAN DIEGO (AP) � A
woman authorities believe was
killed by a great white shark
had recently won her battle
against leukemia, her friends
and co-workers say.
Friends identified the mu-
tilated body of a 25-year-old
woman found floating off a
popular surfing spot as that of
Michelle Von Emster of Ocean
Beach.
"What happened is really
a shame because she had a lot of
tough-going in her life said
Denise Knox, owner of the sta-
tionery and office supply store
PIGOUT
where Von Emster worked as a
clerk. "What she told us was
that she had been in remission
the past two years from leuke-
mia and that she had undergone
really horrendous treatment
The body was found Fri-
day, 200 yards off a beach at
Point Lorna. Marine biologists
said the woman had been at-
tacked by a 12-foot-long great
white shark.
Barring new evidence, Von
Emster's death would be the first
confirmed shark-bite fatality
along the Pacific Coast of the
United States since 1989.
Continued from page 1
around the gas tank. "The gas tank
could have exploded he said.
The reason the tank did not
explode was probablv because the
tank was filled with diesel fuel,
which gives off less vapors and
thus is less flammable than gaso-
line, Carney said.
Carney and other fire offi-
cials said the electrical wire fell
after slowly melting away from a
transformer above the parked
truck. "It was the combination of
an old wire and bad weather that
brought it down Carney said.
Damage to the store is esti-
matedat$4,000,Wrightsaid. The
most expensive damage oc-
curred as result of the truck
knocking down a buttress out
side the store.
"The fire burned some elec-
trical wiring and we need some
repainting done he said. "It was
crazy. I'm just glad no one was
hurt
and their family gave $1 million to
aid Minges. Tne new name of the
facility will be Williams Arena, in-
side Minges Coliseum. The
Williams's own Trade Oil Com-
pany of Greenville (Trade-Mart
Stores). Ron and Mary Ellen
Dowdy of Orlando, Florida, also
gave $1 million to be used toward
Ficklen improvements. The sta-
dium will be renamed Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
"It is a good team effort
Workman said. "The weekend is
extremely important, because it
gives us the chance to raise money
for the athletic scholarship fund
and to get the community out to
have a good time
The festivities started Thurs-
day night with a Golf Classic social
and auction. The Golf Classic, held
Friday, was sponsored by United
States Cellular. Friday's other ac-
tivities included a tennis tourna-
ment, a pig-out awards dinner, the
Toyota fireworks display and a
carnival.
Saturday morning, the
Texasgulf Breakfast of Champions
was held to honor top male and
female scholar athletes and the All-
Academic Team of Student Ath-
letes. Cross-country runners Eric
Adamski and Catherine Norstrand
were named as the recipients of the
1994 Texasgulf Outstanding
Scholar-Athlete Awards. This is the
fourth year Texasgulf has honored
ECU's top athletes.
The real excitement started
Saturday with a pig cooking con-
test. The top pig-cooker was Joe
Lane, who was sponsored by Bass
ElectricStallings Oil. :Later in the
day, 2,700 plates of the barbecue
were sold.
The crowd was entertained
by members of the ECU Jazz Bones
group and by The Embers, a popu-
lar beach music group. A group of
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and
possibly money. The fol'owing options are available:

Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, all: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents' power ccinpany.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
arc as follows: , .
with eleclnc or woul electric
gas space heating or gas space beating
Electric Only $100$75
Electric & Water $100$85
Electric. Water & Gas Si 10$85
Electric & Gas $100$75
You can save lime by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior ;o your arrival at the service address.
Greenville
Utilities
spectators shagged to the tunes of
The Embers, and at one point a
beach-music enthusiast was
dragged onstage to demonstrate
dances such as the Funky Chicken
and the Swim. After the game the
ECU Contemporary Jazz Ensemble
and Jazz Ensemble B performed.
The carnival featured a Ferris
Wheel and a giant blown-up house
where youngsters could take off
their shoes andjumparound.Many
had fun dunking people in the
dunking booth. Mark Barber, an
ECU alumnus and Pirate Club
member, won the first annual
"Paint This One Purple" contest.
Nearly 5,200 people attended
the PurpleGold game, which was
held at 3:00 p.m. The Purple team,
who represented the offense, beat
the Gold defense team. Charles
Bloom, director of the Sports Infor-
mation Department, confirmed
that Duke scouts were present at
the game, and, therefore, true Pi-
rate football was not demonstrated.
Some may wonder why the Duke
scouts made themselves known. If
they disguised themselves as Pi-
rate fans, thev could have seen a
real game. According to Bloom,
scouts are allowed at spring games,
butnotatpracticesessionsorscrim-
mage games. Out of courtesy, they
made themselves known.
"If tickets are sold, you have
to let them in Bloom said.
Camera crews took photos to
be used for a poster displaying the
football schedule and a television
commercial promoting season
ticket sales. Fans who participated
in the photos shoots were asked to
scream, "Find Me In Ficklen
During half-time, last year's
PurpleGold game MVPs were
awarded the Coca-Cola Scholar-
ship. Each year Coca-Cola gives
$4,000 in the name of the previous
year's most valuable players. The
scholarship was named for Jerris
McPhail and Reggie Robinson.
The weekends activities
were wrapped up with the Old
Timer's Baseball Game at
Harrington Field.
&
ALLIED HEALTH
PROFESSIONALS
V�
Plan a future that soars.
Take your science-related degree
into the Air Force, and become an
officer in the Biomedical Sciences
Corps. You'll learn more, you'll grow
faster-you'U work with other dedi-
cated professionals in a quality envi-
ronment where your contributions
are needed.
In short, you'll gain more of every-
thing that matters most to you. You
and the Air Force. Launch now-call
USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
TOLL FREE
1-800-423-USAF
Give Substance to
Dreams
3-DPIolof Z sin (x y) Hgurc-F.ighl Knol 3-Dl'lolofZ sin (x sin (y))
Scientific Visualization
Computer Graphics Technology
Graduates of this associate degree program will help explore new fron-
tiers in medicine, law, engineering, physical science, architecture and
manufacturing or create special effects in television and films.
Scientific Visualization Computer Graphics Technology will prepare tech-
nicians in an exciting new communications process � the transforming of
abstract, numerical concepts and data sets into concrete, multidimensional im-
ages that give a new perspective and understanding.
Students will learn the latest visualization techniques, hardware and software
environments, and specific graphics applications. Through a co-op arrangement,
they will gain valuable experience in the field as paid employees of a participat-
ing industry.
This new program will appeal especially to persons who are creative nnd '
possess strong math and logic skills.
Tuition: $13.25 per credit hour (in-state students)
Enroll NOW for summer or fall quarter!
For more information call Admissions
(919) 662-3500
Or Write
Wake Technical Community College
9101 Fayeuevill- Road, Raleigh, North Carolina 27603-5696
Caregivers of
Pitt County
presents
to benefit Caregivers orPiltPo. oi,rr.tr rpo.ivu. Burroughs Wellcome Co
Come Take Your
Best Shot At
Winning
A Million
Dollars
April 28 & 29 12-8pm
April 30 lam-8pm
May 1 l-5pm
Semifinals 5pm May 1
Finals 6pm May 1
l IV PIU PflKi IV I)
FREE BALL
COUPON
I
Whole Length: l
125 yds for men
115 yds for women
I
I
If
Prizes Include:
Two round trip Continental Airline Tickets,
Golf Equipment, Cosmetics, Gift Certificates
and much more
Cypress Glenn Retirement Community
(4 Blocks East oi Campus)
100 Hickory St.
payable in level monthly installments for 30 years
for more info call: 752-6 lt5 4





�'�,�-�7
The East Carolinian
5
April 19, 1994
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
lififtttJi
Gregory Dickens, General Manager
Maureen A. Rich, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Jodi Connelly. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
M. Jason Williams, News Editor
Stephanie Lassiter, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Gina Jones, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
masthead edf.orial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes etters l.m.ted to 250
wlSlybeedited
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian, Publicanons Bldg ECU, Greenvtlle. N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Spring zombies sighted on campus
Have the days become shorter?
This is one of the things I think about
now as I sit in my classes knowing I should
be somewhere else doing homework, or a
paper or studying for an exam. I can't fig-
ure out if the day itself shrinks, or each
minute, or if it's possible for the very sec-
onds to get shorter. I'm sure that Stephen
Hawking would be disgusted in my pseudo-
Physics reasoning. I know I am.
I always looked upon Senioritis with
disdain. "How could there possibly be such
a thing? Obviously it's just some sort of
excuse for them (seniors) to be irrespon-
sible Well, this semester has proven that
little theory very wrong. There is such a
thing and it has taken over my life.
It begins when we first arrive at col-
lege. At first overwhelmed and stupefied
by everything there is to do, we dive in to
classes and extra-curricular activities with
enthusiasm. It doesn't phase us.
Thatyear contains crucial moments, be-
cause that is where all of the enthusiasm for
our senior year is used up. And being cyni-
cal (another tell-tale sign that we're just
getting older), you can really very plainly
see that this is possible, along with the
theory outlined above concerning time-
shrinkage.
So here we are, enjoying all that col-
lege has to offer, and getting our work
done at the same time (gasp!). There aren't
any graduation preparations to work on,
no senior shows, no end-of-the-year-this-will-
cause-you-blindness-papers, and most likely
no jobs. So, in the beginning we are pretty
lucky.
Sophomore year runs along the same
line, except here you usually have to decide
on a majorminor which you'll just change
five times anyway. Time to start thinking
about that thing that you'll plan for the rest
of your life: The Future.
(By the way, this is something else you
can think of as you veg-out in class. At least
it's fairly constructive. Cartoons and movies
that you once had the time to watch are good
subjects, too.)
As Juniors, (assuming you've made it
this far in the not-so-usual three years) we
start to get a little nervous and slightly crazed
because we notice the swarming zombies
walking on campus with eyes half opened
(from lack of sleep), clothes torn and dirty
(laundry is not high on the list of important
things to do) and arms loaded down with
books (so as to attempt to write that paper
that most likely will cause a person blind-
ness). They are either going to class or to
work.
Zombies don't go downtown and party
as much as they can anymore. Zombies are
just trying to make it through the next 19
days without collapsing from sheer exhaus-
tion.
So try not to irritate us. We may just fall
asleep at your feet.
By Brian Hall
Barney incident causes cultural introspective
This ridiculously
hostile attitude
toward Barney sums
up much of what is
wrong with our
generation, whether
you call it 'X 'Why? or
whatever.
I sit down to write today
with some trepidation, for I
am addressing the subject
which evokes the most vio-
lent emotions, the most ex-
treme reactions. Abortion?
Gun Control? Whitewater?
Political Correctness? None of
the above.
N o ,
the subject
which
causes the
most ha-
tred and
abuse is of
course
Barney the
Dinosaur.
As soon as
the subject ��mmhkh
comes up,
the chorus begins: I HATE
Barney! In the past year Barney
has been beaten up by Charles
Barkley on Saturday Night
Live, had his trademark song,
"I Love You ridiculed by
David Letterman and paro-
died in many forms, some of
which advocate killing
Barney, and now finally, as
reported in The East Carolinian
just last week, a woman was
violently assaulted for merely
dressing as Barney.
Normally I would say
that this last case was merely
an aberration, if not for the
fact that I have known so many
otherwise rational, intelligent
people who I believe if given
the chance would act in the
same way. What is it about
this children's character which
causes such pathological ha-
tred? I will admit that his show
can be very syrupy sweet. In-
deed, it can be so saccharin
sweet that in large doses it
might cause the adult viewer
to become physically ill. How-
ever, since no one is being
forced to watch this show
against their will, and since
many ECU students quite will-
ingly indulge in a substance,
which when imbibed in large
quantities produces the same
effect, logically it cannot be this.
Therefore, since the style
of the show cannot be the prob-
lem, then it
must be that
the content is
creating the
hostility. So
what exactly is
it that Barney is
teaching these
young chil-
dren? Love, re-
spect for all
���bb people, safety
and proper hy-
giene. Unlike most of our cul-
tural icons, Barney does not
curse, talk about sex, violence,
or drugs either. In his theme he
even dares to speak of happy
families.
Does this dinosaur not re-
alize that not only is the family
not important any more, but that
it was what was causing all of
society's problems in the first
place? Obviously, this show is a
threat to the very moral fibers of
our youth.
This ridiculously hostile
attitude toward Barney sums up
much of what is wrong with our
generation, whether you call it
'X 'Why? or whatever. We
have continued the assault
against the societal values which
began in the 50s and 60s. Of
course every generation has
made changes in society, and
many of our inherited values
were wrong, such as prejudice
and segregation. Instead of
merely rejecting those objection-
able values, the counterculture
in their moral arrogance rejected
all traditional values.
However, when all the val-
ues of a society are rejected, then
as Robert Ruark wrote, you had
better have something of value
to replace them. Instead, begin-
ning in the '60s and continuing
to our day, our country has re-
placed all these values with
nothing. No values whatsoever.
Indeed, the very idea of values
prompts nothing but hatred (e.g.
Barney).
This same moral arrogance
is here today Too many in our
generation believe that some-
how our cohort is free from the
failings of previous generations,
that we somehow know better
than our elders, has created the
current group of amoral, self
indulgent, ignorant, lazy "slack-
ers Though this may seem
unduly harsh, this is the way
too many of us are, myself in-
cluded at times.
Take each of these criticisms
one at a time. It would be wrong
to say that our society is immoral,
because that would imply some
sort of moral code. Instead, we
deny that there are any moral
absolutes, that each person is his
or her own moral arbiter.
Rather than use any self
control, we indulge ourselves in
whatever feels good at the mo-
ment. We are the most histori-
cally and culturally illiterate
generation on Earth, and things
are only getting worse. Our life
has in every conceivable way
been easier than our parents, and
infinitely easier than grandpar-
ents and great-grandparents.
About the only things we excel
at are complaining and wasting
time.
The next time you are-
tempted to say how much you
hate Barney, ask yourself what
it is about him that offends you
so much. Maybe the problem is
not with him but inside you.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
In response to the recent publicity of ABLE
(Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality), I feel
that Public Safety has been wrongly accused of
racial intimidation with little evidence to support
these claims.
Public Safety does nothing more than en-
sure the safety of students on campus. If they
are guilt of anything, it is nothing more than
the occasional political incorrect slip of the
tongue.
I am assuming (which I don't like to do too
much, because as we all know when you assume,
you make an "ass" of yourself) that the disgust-
ing broadcast I witnessed April 13, on channel &
news was partially due to the watergun incident
on College Hill last week. From what I gathered
from the news segment, black students think
they will be immune of all crimes just by hiring
black safety officers.
Does ABLE think that a black officer will
be less competent at his duties? That when you
resist arrest if the officer is the same color as
you, you will not be punished for your crimes?
Perhaps it is time for ABLE to reevaluate
its feelings on racial equality and to take a step
back and examine the behavior of those who are
accusing our Public Safety Dept. of these crude
allegations. I'm sure our Public Safety Dept.
doesn't like to be classified as the racist scum
you say they are.
William Roberson
Freshman
Undecided
To the Editor:
It's alarming to me to find a widespread
mind set growing � one I thought I'd left to those
still in high school.
Unfortunately it's permeated the realms of
the university and is festering rapidly. There is
this prevalent trend today to dodge responsibil-
ity, and it has become successively easier to do so
because society swallows all the rationalizations
without thought.
As a future teacher, it turns my stomach to
hear the limp excuse that failure rates must be
attributed to the instructor.
In a college setting where personal improve-
ment through the pursuit of knowledge is first
priority, I find it disgusting that some still choose
to lay their lack of ettort at the feet of their profes-
sors. Since when is the instructor responsible for
student apathy and laziness? His job is to present
material in a way conducive to learning and then
to make himself available and approachable for
additional help. Can he be expected to force study-
ing or the completion of assignments or regular
attendance?
Or perhaps all these petty requirements and
foolish test scores should be "rethought" since
they are just so unfair and too challenging for the
modern student. How absurd for one to expect a
student work for his grade!
Recently one of my professors was men-
tioned in an editorial letter. I'd also like to point
out a few things about Dr. Clemens. He has a
distinct teaching method, and though his de-
mand might be considered rigorous (even for a
diluted curriculum), they're certainly not out-
rageous!
Even so, he makes himself available every
Wed. night, along with several hours a week in
the learning center for outside help. Beyond the
walls of the lecture hall, he is readily approach-
able if one only takes the initiative.
As far as fairness I earned a 71 on my
last test, and that was a B! Would anyone care to
argue that this is the curve of a grievously
unfair professor hell-bent on failing his Stu-
dents?
It would be lovely if people would gain
enough self-respect to accept the consequences
of their actions (or lack thereof) and focus their
attentions on self-improvement. Perhaps then
failure rates would decline.
And I can only hope to be just as challeng-
ing and demanding as Dr. Clemens, because
the way to knowledge isn't lowering the stan-
dards.
Kathryn Smith
Freshman
English
To the Editor:
As an adult student, single parent, and full-
time student at ECU, I have a real problem with
the complete lack of support services at this uni-
versity for adult students.
I know that this university is aware that
there are many students with children on this
campus. It is a direct slap in our faces that this
school puts a daycare on its campus and than
makes it accessible only to faculty. At $78 per
week, no student is going to be able to afford to
put their children in that daycare.
And the youth sports camp that Recreational
Services is offering this summer is a joke. For $45
they will take children for 5 days only, lunch is
not included. This summer youth program is
another direct slam to students with children.
We need a child care program that coincides
with the summer session schedule and is afford-
able. What good is a five-day youth program
going to do for us while we are attending summer
school?
And once again, who is going to be able to
afford the stiff price of $45 except, of course, the
faculty. I believe that ECU has forgotten that
they're here for the students and not vice
versa.
Along with the complete lack of support
for students who are parents, there is also no
adult student housing, no commuter lounge
for adult students who travel from other loca-
tions and need a quiet place to relax, no social
activities, no nothing.
Adult students don't have the luxury of
having mom and dad pay for their education. I
spend hard earned cash for this degree. Yes,
ECU is inexpensive, but than sic I get what 1
pay for.
Adult student populations are growing
faster than any other student population. Other
campuses have already jumped on the band-
wagon and are offering many support services
for adult learners. You either learn how to
attract and retain adult students or else you'll
loose sic them to campuses that are genuinely
interested and willing to help them with their
special needs.
Dana Thielen
Sophomore
Merchandising
Time is running out for the opportunity to complain to 18,000 people! All
letters, in order to be considered for publication, must be typed, under
250 words, and contain your name, class rank, major and a working
daytime phone number. Send these to: Letters to the Editor, The East
Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
��





-sAm
�The East Carolinian
Page 6
Classifieds
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1-6 BEDROOM HOMES, condo's,
duplexes, and apartments for rent.
$190 up! Short term lease avail-
able! Finders 321-6708 small fee.
Near campus rentals available
now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING
SERVICE! Need a roommate list
your ad free. To get a list of all the
people looking for a roommate 321 -
6708 small fee
WALK TO CAMPUS! Available
May 1st. Young professional couple
seeks responsible student to rent a
room one house from campus! In-
cludes cable, phone, utilities and
private entrance. Graduate student
preferred. References required.
Call 758-9903.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER. 1 bed-
room, newly built. $275 month.
Available May. Call Lynn 355-1486
or Kathy 830-4983 leave message.
SUBLEASE: 2 Bedroom apt. avail-
able May-Aug. Village Green Apts.
$360 month- Cable included. Con-
tact Kelli at 758-8591.
SPACIOUS 2 BDRM 1 bath apt.
near campus on 10th st. Includes
washerdryer hookups, central
heat and ac, and basic cable. Rent
$400. Need to rent out by mid-
May. Call 758-5673
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
responsible, non-smoker to share 2
bedroom apartment. $167 a month
plus 12 utilities. Deposit required.
Available May I. Call April 752-
7599
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
for a large two-bedroom apart-
ment, pets allowed. Dishwasher,
pool and laundry facilities. $180 a
month 12 utilities. Available any
time. Please call 756-5134.
HALF BLOCK FROM CAMPUS!
Room for rent May 1st in house on
Library ST. Has wd, dishwasher
cable. $135 a month. Deposit re-
quired. Call Amy 830-1591
AVAILABLE FOR FALL SEMES-
TER- 1 bedroom, in 2 bedroom
apartment. Located in Tar River
apartment complex. Mature, re-
sponsible female preferred. De-
posit required. $240 monthly rent
plus 12 bills. 830-8984
PREFERRED FEMALE ROOM-
MATE WANTED to share house
with males. Private room with 12
bath, washer dryer, $160 a month.
758-6152 available summer fall.
NOW AVAILABLE: 1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village 3 bedroom
tcfwnhouse. Mature, responsible fe-
male NS only. Quiet environment,
nicelv decorated with all major ap-
pliances. $230 1 3 bills. 756-8459
(Sara).
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR
SUMMER Stratford Arms; pri-
vate bedroom in 3 bedroom apart-
ment. Call 931-9345 or 355-5986
after 9:00pm. $175 per month.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom duplex close to campus.
For Rent
$150mo. plus heating and 12
utilities. Responsible, non-smoker
preferred. Call 757-0632
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER or
take over lease. Two bedroom apt.
1 mile from campus, $360 monthly.
Need two people to cover rent. Call
758-5233
TO SHARE3bedroom 2bath. $120
a month plus 1 3 utilities. Deposit
required, male or female, student
or professional must be social. Call
758-1522 after 6:00pm or leave mes-
sage.
AVAILABLE FOR MAY. 1 bed-
room apt. in Cherry Court. Rent
$285, deposit same as rent. Great
location for the serious student call
752-8910 for info.
ONE BEDROOM APTS. for rent.
Available June 1st. Walking dis-
tance to campus. $320 per month.
Rent includes water, cable, pool,
laundry facilities. Please call 758-
2628.
AVAILABLE MAY 1ST 2 bedroom
apt. in summerfield gardens. At
$335 a month it's a steal. Call
(919)756-9784 for info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share 2 bedroom house over
summer 3 blocks from campus $200
a month 12 utilities ask for Lisa
413-0015
TWO PERSONS needed to share a
3 bedroom two bath townhouse
near Lowe's. $200 per month, $200
deposit. Call 321-4793
ROOMMATES NEEDED 1 or 2
responsible people to sublease
apartment near campus for the
summer. $130 per month and 13
utilities contact TJ at 758-3943
AVAILABLE AUGUST! Two bed-
room one bath duplex. Located on
1st Street $370 per month. Persons
needed to take over lease.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share 2 bedroom 2 bath apt. w
in walking distance tocampus. $225
plus 12 utilities. Avail. May 9th-
Aug. Call 752-6962
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to move in for May or June. $113
rent and 13 utilities. A block and
a half from campus call Kim and
Janni. 758-8431
$165 FOR THIS 1 BEDROOM, loft
apartment pet ok walk to campus
or this 2 bedroom duplex $350 call
us! 752-1375 Homelocators fee
DORM BLUES! 3 bedroom house
$320 pets ok! Walk to campus or
this 4 bedroom house. $500 call us!
752-1375 Homelocators Fee
AUGUST 1ST. 3 bedroom duplex
$540 or 4 bedroom, 2 baths $800
both near East 5th street call us!
Homelocators fee
MAY OR JUNE! 1 bedroom du-
plex $250 or Huge 3 bedroom du-
plex $425 walk to campus! Call us!
752-1375 Homelocators fee
2 BEDROOM DUPLEX $295 or
3 bedroom house $390 walk to cam-
puscall us! 752-1375 Homelocators
fee
WEST GREENVILLE! Cheap 2
bedroom house $250 or huge 4 bed-
room, 2 baths house $410 call us!
For Rent
752-1375 Homelocators fee
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED, twobed room, 1 l2bath
apt. WasherDryer, cable, pool,
tennis court. Avail. 5194. $215
per month 1 2 utilities, 1st month
$115. Call Kimberly 919-872-6439
(wkends) 321-8406 (wknights)
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2 bedroom
apartment. Close to campus Great
location. Call Patricia 752-0009
APARTMENT FOR RENT 1 bed-
room, 1 bath, furnished 2 blocks
from campus, window unit ac
available May 1st $250 a month call
830-6615
FEMALE NEEDED to share two
bedroom apartment available in
August. Close to campus. Rent
$122.50 a month plus 14 utilities.
Call Debbie at 931-7430.
EJ Help Wanted
H Help Wanted
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counse-
lors, Instructors, Kitchen, Office,
Grounds for western North
Carolina's finest Co-ed youth sum-
mer sports camp. Over 25 activities
including water ski, heated pool, ten-
nis, horseback, art Cool mountain
climate, good pay and great fun!
Non-smokers. For applicationbro-
chure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pin-
ewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! SpareFull-time. Set own
hours! Rush stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705.
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls,
Girls. Earn big summer cash. The
best summer job around. Playmates
Adult Entertainment call for more
info. 747-7686
HELP WANTED modeling, danc-
ing, adult conversation full or part-
time. Will accomodate school sched-
ule. $300-500 weekly call 746-6762
ATTENTION HORSE LOVERS:
Experienced English rider to help
with barn choresfeeding in ex-
change for pleasure riding. 355-6320
after 5pm
IMMEDIATE OPENING for sec-
retarytypist position apply be-
tween 1:00-3:00 at SDF Computer
Inc, 813 South Evans st. Greenville
(752-3694)
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
extra cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided. Send
SASE to Midwest Mailers Po Box
395, Olathe, KS 66051. Immediate
response
ATTENTION LADIES earn $1,000
plus a week escorting in the Green-
ville area. Must be 18 yrs. old; have
own phone and transportation. We
are an established agency check out
your yellow pages.
CHILDCARE OPPORTUNITIES!
Prescreened families looking for car-
ing individuals to spend a year as a
nanny. $175-$350week, room and
board, car, airfare included. Call
childcrest 1-800-574-8889.
RESIDENT COUNSELOR. Hu-
man services background
preferrred. Free room and stipend
in exchange for hours on rotation.
Contact Mary Smith, Real Crisis
Center, 600 E. 11th St. 758-HELP
AEROBIC INSTRUCTORS: Pitt
County Memorial Hospital is seek-
ing qualified individuals to teach
aerobic classes through its Em-
ployee Recreation and Wellness De-
partment. Persons will contract to
teach on a part-time basis. Inter-
ested candidates should contact Ms.
Scottie Gaskins between 8am-
4:30pmat(919)816-5958.PittCounty
Memorial Hospital.
CHILDCARE GIVER for young
school-aged children wanted for
summer. Responsible, loving, in-
novative person with own car. Ex-
perience and references required.
Call 758-2106 after 6:30pm.
BRODY'S and Brady's for Men is
accepting applications for addi-
tional Part-time Sales Associates.
We seek individuals who have a
genuine interest in helping others
and would enjoy working with
todays hottest fashions. Salary plus
clothing discount. Interviews held
each Monday and Thursday, l-4pm,
Brady's The Plaza.
TIRE INSTALLERS NEEDED:
Sears Automotive. Apply in per-
son. Sears is an equal opportunity
employer mf. Morning hours pre-
ferred.
FILIBUSTER'S: The Restaurant
and Bar for every party is now tak-
ing applications for experienced
waitstaff, bus and dishwashers. Be-
tween 2:00 and 2:30pm Monday thru
Thursday located Downtown
Greenville next door to CD-Alley.
No phone calls please.
April 19, 1994
For Sale
I
Personals
Stuff, Weight gain powders (all),
Amino Acids, Super Chromoplex,
Tri-Chromelene, Cybertrim, Quick
Trim, Super Fat Burners, Herbs,
Multi-Vitamins, Super Golden Seal,
and many more! Call Brad at 931-
9097 for more info.
KITCHEN TABLE vv 4 chairs for
$50 plus a brand new dresser and
nightstandfor$75callanytimeafter
noon.
HUGE, MULTI-SECTIONAL
COUCH. Perfect for fraternity or
rented houses. Asking $150, that's
what I paid for it 1 yr. ago. Call Craig
at 756-8854
THREE PIECE LIVING ROOM
SET. In excellent condition, $200 as
set, negotiable. Call 752-6229
CANNONDALE DELTA V� pol-
ished frame, '94 suspension fork.
Deore LXXT parts mix. Great bike
for a great price! $600 ready to race.
Call 752-2248 for more info.
MATTRESS, box spring, frame nine
months old, good condition, $55 call
355-6017
MICROWAVE $70 or best offer,
must sell! Brand new sterling silver
7" herring bone bracelet with box
tags, $15.14kt 8" small rope bracelet
$25. (plus other silver charms and
rings). Info: 931-8034
USED IBM XT COMPATABLE
(ZENITH) COMPUTER, great for
reports and word processing. In-
cludes vvordperfect, Dos, and other
programs. $350 obo, printer $75 call
355-6333
CONTEMPORARY LOVE SEAT
for sale. Teal, Mauve and Poach. $120
neg. Call Carla 830-1569
DO YOU ENJOY THE OUTDOORS?
LINE UP A GREAT SUMMER JOB NOW
College Students
Positions in Pitt, Jones, Lenoir, Onslow, Greene, and Craven counties.
SALARY $5.75 per hour PLUS MILEAGE
Monitor Crops ! We Train!
Mid May through August
Must be reliable, in good shape, have good trasportation, and
concientious.
Just minutes from Greenville, Kinston and New Bern
Mail or fax resume to:
MCSI PO Box 370 Cove City, NC 28523 FAX (919) 637-2125
REWARD FOR LOST BIRD. Yel-
low cockatiel with pink cheeks.
Responds to the name "Murphy"
with distinguishing tweet. If you
see or hear Murphy, please call
758-7583.
TO MY MELENCHOLY, HYPO-
CRITICAL FRIEND: from the
wisdom of Mr. Billy Joel, "they
say there's a heaven for those who
will wait. Some say it's better but
I say it ain't. I'd rather laugh with
the sinners than cry with the
saints. Sinners are much more fun
and only the good die young
Your faithful servent, Meredith
HELLO ECU kayakers thank for the
patience and support among the
rapids of Nanthala.
For Sale
EUROPE THIS SUMMER? Fly-
only $169! California- $129 ea. way!
Florida too. CaribbeanMexican
Coast rt $189! No gimmicks-no
hitches. Airtech 1-800-575-TECH
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, frame,
mattress, heater, padded rails $175
or obo. 757-9645
MOUNTAIN BIKE: Diamondback
mountain bike. Very good condi-
tion, just like new. Call 830-1223
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS: Warmer
weather is approaching and you
want to look your best! Sports
supplements at major discount
prices: Met-rx, OKG, Creatine,
Cybergenics, Vanadyl Sulfate, Hot
3E Greek
U3 Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resume
secretarial work. Specializing in
resume composition w cover let-
ters stored on disk, term papers,
general typing. Word perfect or
Microsoft Word for windows soft-
ware. Call today (8a-5p�752-
9959) (evenings�527-9133)
OLDER ECU STUDENT with
family seeks position of
groundskeeper in exchange for liv-
ing quarters. 11 years landscaping
experience. Moving to Greenville
in May. Please call Phil at (919)426-
1409 '
CONGRATULATIONS to the
newly initiated sisters of AOPI:
Dana Henson, Tina Lynch, Tara
Mumford, and Joy Sturgis.
CONGRATULATIONS to all the
AOPI sisters for going alum:
Cathleen Bryson, Stacy Carroll,
Beth Edwards, Shawn Fenimore,
Shellee Filar, Julie Fisher, Bonnie
Hiser, Tami Johnson, Robin Lee,
Liz Mullican, Stephanie
Schwartz, Kerri Sechman, Mel-
issa Smith, Lisa Stine, and Jennie
Vest.
BEAUTIFUL GIRLS WANTED
bikini contest for Kappa Sigma's
Bahama Mama. No entry fees to
enter call Preston at 830-0294 by
April 22
SIG TAU, Karaoke was a blast!
Thanks for the support and par-
ticipation. It was a great success!
We look forward to working with
you again soon. Gamma Sigma
Sigma
CHI-O- We enjoyed Brunch the
other day and look forward to
doing it again. Sorry this is be-
lated, PIkA
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Would like
to welcome their new exec: Matt
Hedrick- President, Dale
Alexander and Mike Moonan-
Vice President, Jeremy Finwad-
Tres Rodney Vanek- Secretary-
Congratulations guys.
PHI TAU thanks for the really
fun social! We just couldn't get
enough of that jello We had a
great time! Can't wait to party
with you guys again! Love, Sigma
111
Kingston
Place
STUDENT VILL AGE
Don't Pass
This Up!
(Big Savings)
Call 758-5393
Announcements
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
FOR THE REFORM OF
MARIJUANA LAWS
(NORML) is having an organizational
meeting on Thurs. Apr. 28 at 7:00pm in
RM 221 Mendenhall Student Center.
Come leam how you can help to Legal-
ize it!
METHODIST STUDENT CENTER
There will be a self-esteem workshop
based on John Bradshaw's homecom-
ing held at the Methodist Student Cen-
ter Wednesdays at 3pm for more info,
call 758-2030.
ECHO
will hold its final meetingparty for
this year on Mon. April 18th at 5:00pm
in Fleming Lobby.Officer elections will
be held and food will be provided. All
officer positions are open for '9495.
All interested and all members please
attend!
B-GLAD
(Bisexuals, Gays, lesbians and allies
for diversity) will hold an organiza-
tional meeting on Wednesday night,
April 20 at 7:00pm in Room 14 of the
Mendenhall Student Center (Lower
Level).Orientation doesn't matter, only
support.
ECU COMMUNICATIONS
SOCIETY
is holding officer elections Wed. Apr.
20 at 5:45pm in GCB 1015. Video year-
book preview 6:30-8:30!
PPHA
will have its last meeting for the se-
mester on April 19 at 5:30pm in
Mendenhall StudentCenter, room 212.
All members please attend.
ECU RELIGIOUS STUDIES
2nd annual & Usha Gulati lecture on
World Religions. Tara & Prajna-
Paramita: images of compassion and
wisdom in Mahavana Buddhism. Lec-
ture by Dr. Karen Lang, Dep. of Reli-
gious Studies University of Virginia.
Thur. April 21, 1994 7:30pm in GCB
room 1026. Reception to follow lecture.
PLEASE 1Q1N THE GREENVILLE
FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS) for silent worship- meet-
ing is held at the Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship hall across from Greenville
Athletic Club on Oakmont Dr. off
Charles St South of the Plaza Mall.
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be
paid
pre-
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times free of charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements
Deadline
Friday .it 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may
be cancelled before 10 a.m. the
day prior to publication;
however, no refunds will be
given.
For more
information
call 757-6366.
��





The East Carolinian
April 19. 1994
Lifestyle
Page 7
ECU presents an evening of dance
Photo Courtesy of ECUPIayhouse
Jerry Bass, Lori Eure, Bonnie White and Matt McCulloch are seen here performing Patricia WeeksFrom
Whence I came" in last year's Dance Theatre. This year's will run from April 21-26 at the ECU Playhouse.
Music entertains crowd
By Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
The ECU Theatre will close
the 1993-94 Playhouse season with
an exhilarating evening of dance.
The evening features the choreog-
raphy of the department of The-
atre Arts dance faculty and selected
guest artists.
The evening begins with
"Movers and Shakers choreo-
graphed by Alan Amett. It is meant
to reflect some of the popular so-
cial dances of the '60s and also
hints at one of the major changes
advocated by the movers and shak-
ers of the society: the need to bal-
ance masculine energy with femi-
nine energy. The tumultuous rela-
tionship between Frankie and
Johnny has inspired many artists.
Alan Arnett has chosen a bluesy
ballad by Terrence Trent D'Arby
to choreograph and perform a jazz
dance solo in remembrance of the
legendary couple.
The third piece of the evening
was choreographed by guest artist
Robert Atwood. "Karabagh: In
Tribute to the Victims of
Winnerless Wars a haunting bal-
let set to the music of Dvorak's
Concerto in B minor for cello and
orchestra, is a recognition of all
those unwitting victims who
through no f? It of their own are
thrust into a conflict that not only
tears their families and lives apart,
but often extracts from them the
supreme price� their very exist-
ence.
"Birds of a Feather choreo-
graphed by Dr. Dawn Clark, offers
a whimsical retrospective of social
and novelty dances. The pieces
contain sections aptly named "Fla-
mingo Tango "Pelican Polka
"Chickadee Charleston "Mamo
Mambo and "Toucan Cancan
The evening continues with a piece
created by Patricia Pertalion en-
titled "Falsely Accused a mod-
ern dance based loosely on theThe
Crucible by Arthur Miller.
Pertalion's choreography for
"Moonlight" was inspired by stud-
ies in the Orient this past summer
while on a research grant. The piece
combines classical ballet with ele-
ments of the sleeve-and-ribbon
dances done in China.
Patricia Weeks' piece, "Rain
Falling on Dry Earth was inspired
by Clarissa Pinkola Estes' book,
Women Who Run with the Wolves. A
woman loses touch with her in-
stinctual psyche and then returns
to her natural state after a power-
less experience. The final dance of
the evening by Joseph Carow is an
excerpt from "Carmina Burana
The contemporary composer, Carl
Orf f, has taken a loose collection of
ribald and saucy poems and songs
written by university students,
minstrels, troubadours, and delin-
quent monks in the 13th century
and set them to a strikingly per-
cussive, starkly harmonic, power-
ful score.
The Dance Theatre will be pre-
sented April 21-26, at 8 p.m each
eveningexceptSunday, which will
See DANCE page 10
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Folk singer Charlie King put
on a very entertaining perfor-
mance Thursday night at the
Upper Crust Bakery. The con-
cert was held as part of the
music series held by the Folk
Art Society of Greenville.
King describes himself as a
"Hope Monger
"I look at the world as it is.
I look at the humor, the sad-
ness, the inspiration, and I write
and sing about it he said.
The show had a light-
hearted type of energy. One of
the first songs was about a
stuffed armadillo his daughter
took on family vacations. Be-
fore he performed each song,
King explained what inspired
the writing. When he mentioned
about the vacations he said,
"Family vacations: isn't that
some what of a oxymoron?"
King humorously sang
about political issues in a strong
Irish tone. He spoke out against
the government, aristocratic
people, blind patriotism and
selfish attitudes. One of his lines
was, "I have more in common
with any foreigner, than I have
with any American million-
aire
A certain song told a story
of how apartment owners close
down buildings, and use them
as tax write-offs. They put de-
cals on buildings to make them
look occupied. King felt this was
a crime because thousands of
people were walking the streets
homeless.
One of King's best qualities
was how he got his message
across light- heartedly. He never
spoke condescendingly or
sounded preachy. King seemed
to communicate through some
of his music that, "people that
really think this way, it's kind
of sad but it's kind of funny
Kng isn't incredibly well-
knovn, but many big-name mu-
sicians recognize his talent.
"Charlie King's biggest
fans may be other performers
who draw bigger audiences by
sinking his songs: people like
Pete Seeger, Holly Near, Ronnie
GLbert, Arlo Guthrie . . . Con-
sidering that those folks have
written some pretty good mate-
rial themselves, King must be
doing exceptional said The
lansing State Journal. Pete
Seeger said that King was, "One
of the finest singers and
songwriters of the '70s and
'80s
The only disappointing
aspect of the show was that the
crowd was very small. No more
than 20 people showed up. Most
of the people in the audience
were from the baby boomer gen-
eration; there were hardly any
college students.
Poet presents work
Camille Beck to present at Upper Crust
Second video yearbook to premiere
By Steve Griffin
By Bridget Hemenway
Staff Writer
The Upper Crust Bakery Po-
etry Reading Series will present
ECU student Camille Beck with
ECU professor Bill Hallberg au-
thor of the novel Rub of the Green
on Wed April 20 at 8:00 p.m.
Camille Beck, a senior major-
ing in English, will be a featured
poetry reader for the first time at
the Upper Crust Bakery. Camille
is a recipient of the Russell
Christman Memorial Scholarship
for English majors. Russell
Christman was a professor in the
English Department at ECU dur-
ing the '70s. The scholarship is
awarded to ECU juniors with
emphasis on the student's char-
acter and involvement rather
than grade point average.
Although she is a native of
North Carolina, Camille moved
around the state a bit while grow-
ing up, and graduated from high
school in Winston-Salem. She
said she has been writing "good"
poetry since the fall of 1992.
Good' poetry is poetry I feel,
worth sharing she said.
Camille said she writes "in-
your-face poetry with an unusual
grace. But I'm still changing,
crafting
There are a few people who
have influenced her writing such
as George Beck, Sylvia Plath, Kate
Daniels, Adam Schonbrun and
Tom Robbins.
With a degree in English and
a minor in gerontology, Camille
would like to establish creative
writing programs with older
adults.
She has attended ECU
throughout her entire college ca-
reer and will be graduating in
December of 1994.
Jazz talents
win over
audience
By Kris Hoffler �
Staff Writer
This year's Spring Jazz
Festival at the ECU School of
Music involved much more
than a jazz concert. The visit-
ing artists that were show-
cased at the festival also gave
clinics and discussions at the
school of music. This year's
three special guests were
Mulgrew Miller (piano),
Christian McBride (bass) and
Grady Tate (drums).
All three have an incred-
ible talent, and numerous re-
cordings under their belt.
Mulgrew Miller has played
with the Duke Ellington Or-
chestra, Art Blakey and with
the Jazz Messengers, and the
legendary Betty Carter. Chris-
tianMcBrideisa recentgradu-
ate of Juilliard and has per-
formed on over 75 recordings
in the last eight years. His
sheer genius is even
more impressive
when you
consider he
is 22 years
old.
Grady
Tate, aver
s a t i 1 e drum
mer and swooning vo-
calist, has played with Stan
Getz, Benny Goodman,
Quincy Jones and numerous
others. Grady is also gaining
a reputation as a first-rate
singer.
These special guests and
the ECU Jazz Ensemble A per-
formed Saturday at Wright
Auditorium, and they pro-
vided quite a treat for all who
attended. The program
opened with a trio consisting
of the guest artists. Tate and
McBride made an awesome
rhythm section, and
Mulligrew's piano styiings
were impeccable.
Jazz being the expressive
medium that it is makes it .
hard to really say what hap-
pened, words fall short in con-
veying the immediacy and
flow that is jazz. The trio ex-
panded into five with the ad-
dition of trumpet, saxophone
and trombone, courtesy of the
ECU music school faculty.
There was also a solo vocalist
Helen Pridgen, who sang a ,
soft ballad as trio accompa-
See JAZZ page 10
Staff Writer
The ECU Communications
Society will present the world pre-
miere of the video yearbook on
Wed April 20. The video is called
The Treasure Chest and can be seen
in Room 1015 in the General Class-
rooms building from 6:30 p.m. to
8 p.m.
Both the Communications
Society and the video yearbook
are faiurly new groups that have
had successful starts this year. The
Communications society just got
started this year in and this is the
video yearbook's second year
making the video.
Seventeen students worked
on the video over the whole year.
The video is 49 minutes long and
there are 5,000 copies printed and
available to students.
"It has a little bit of every-
thing from the past yearsaid
Greg Brown, director of the year-
book. The video is broken down
into three sections � academics,
organizations and Pirate life,
which is all about student life at
ECU. There are also some stu-
dent interviews discussing
varioussubjects regarding ECU.
The executive producer is
Steve Lewis, and he made the fi-
nal decisions on how the video
was to be carried out. Theeditng
team consists of Andy Bronn,
Kelly Smith and Mike SnvJer.
During the fall semester, the gioup
looked at three different video
yearbooks�UNCG's, GeorgeMa-
son University's and last year's
ECU's yearbook�and critiqued
them. This way they could make
improvements in the yearbook to
make the best possible vide year-
book for the 1994 school ear.
"We would like to expand
the video yearbook ever more
next year Brown Said.
The ECU Communication?
society is another group getting
off the ground. They hive had
some good events sucl as one
hosting the yearbook's premiere.
"We feel that we h.ve had a
late start, but have had gxd fund-
ing and look forwarc to more
involvementsaid the President
of the Society Troy Deyfuss.
The society wen'on a trip to
Raleigh last weekenc to tour the
Fox Television Staton and the
News & Observer. Trips like this
are a good opportunity for the
students to see whit the jobs are
really like and tall to some com-
munications proftssionals.
"With the hep of the faculty
and students in fie Communica-
See YEARBOOK page 10
Don't Buy
S S
�V Take Your Chances
m
���'i, "� �
t, �m,k- -
' &�,V5w
l K �
d&
Sausage
Riddles Are
Abound Tonight
Let's face it, sausage is
ground-up pig meat, mixed with
a random sampling of spices and
stuffed into a casing sometimes
made of the intestines of the very
pig that died providing the meat
in the first place. It's greasy, dis-
gusting and generally not very
good for us. But, we eat it any-
way. I guess it smells too good,
all fried-up and lurking there on
our breakfast plates between the
eggs and a piping hot cup of cof-
fee. We just can't help ourselves.
Tne band Sausage evokes a
similar response in me, even
though they're not (to the best of
my knowledge) composed of any
spices or ground-up pig meat.
What the band Sausage is com-
posed of is Les Claypool, Todd
Huth, and Jay Lane�three musi-
cians associated the with MTV
Smash Hit band, Primus. I'm not
entirely sure that listening to
these guys is very good for my
health either, though, so maybe
they're more like edible sausage
than I thought.
For instance, you can never
be sure exactly what parts of a
pig get ground up to make edible
sausage. Similarly, no one seems
to know what the exact origin of
this audible Sausage is, either. Is
this a side project for Primus
See SAUSAGE page 10
Godstar
Lie Down Forever
1JJ
Gosdstar's recent release "Lie
Down Forever" is incredibly me-
diocre. This Australian band claims
to be a close relative to the
Lemonheads. But I can hardly see
the connection.
The first song, "Lie Down For-
ever" sounds like theCure warmed
over. It featured very few rhy thmi-
Worth A Try
Definite Purchase
cal variations, and has no real
depth. The next song, "Sleeper
was simply an extension of the
first song.
The third song 'Kitchen is
kind of entertaining. It's a happy
little love song which was previ
ously released on Lemonheads
album, It's a Shame About Ray.
The vocals on "Kitchen" sound
like a cross between The Stone
Roses and Elvis Costello. They
were obviously trying to sound
English throughout this album.
The next song, "It's Down to
You to Make It Up to Me is
basically a Pixies rip-off with al-
most exactly the same progres-
sive chord changes that also fea-
tured the same glittering guitar
solos.
The fifth song Dead Sad
Night was incredibly basic. In-
cluding the chorus, the entire song
had a total of two chord changes.
. The last song 'Turn
Around was the best song on
See GODSTAR page 10
i �
k;1wjiiiiiii





8 The East Carolinian
April 19, 1994
8 The Last Larounian '��
"Nunsense" attracts many special stars
NEW YORK (AP) � "1 used
to do so many talk shows says
Dody Goodman in a voice that
lies somewhere between Betty
Boop and Blanche Dubois, with
maybe a bit of your Aunt Mildred
from Columbus thrown in for
good measure.
"But you have to have a sex
change or get hit in the knee with
a pipe to get on them now she
sighs.
It's a voice that can make just
about any subject sound funny, a
talent that has served Goodman
well over the years, particularly
.as a sidekick to Jack Paar on his
old late-night television show, on
the soap spoof "Mary Hartman,
Mary Hartman" and in countless
TV and radio commercials.
These day s if you want to hear
, the distinctive Goodman gargle
in person, you have to go to the
Douglas Fairbanks Theater where
the actress has become the first
jiame performer to join the New
rTork cast of "Nunsense
I You remember "Nunsense7"
The little musical about nuns, the
! Little Sisters of Hoboken to be
specific, that's now in its ninth
� year off-Broadway?
The show has been done just
' about everywhere. In 1991, there
were more than 300 productions
! playing around the world. As of
��mm ii H i
this year, "Nunsense" has re
turned an astonishing 1,500 per-
cent profit on its original invest-
ment of $150,000.
The "Nunsense" alum asso-
ciation on the road includes such
diverse performers as Phyllis
Diller, Kaye Ballard, Peggy Cass,
Pat Carroll, JoAnne Worley, Edie
Adams, Jaye P. Morgan, Alice
Ghostley, Georgia Engel, Pudgy
and even Honor Blackman �
Pussy Galore of James Bond movie
fame � who appeared in the Lon-
don production.
Goodman is a "Nunsense"
veteran, traveling with the show
for two years in the role of Sister
Mary Amnesia. Now she has
graduated to the role of Mother
Superior, a part she adores.
There's not much about the show
she doesn't like. Heck, she even
likes the costumes.
"I love the habit she says
with a sly smile on her face. "You
have the most marvelous shoes,
too. They're great big black Ox-
fords, and they are so comfort-
able. And the wimple is so good.
It hides your double chin � al-
most. And the robes. You don't
have to worry about your tummy
sticking out. You actually look
quite attractive
Goodman looks just fine in
her civilian clothes, too. She has a
sweet impish grin and wears her
:�
THE LEO JENKINS
MEMORIAL
2'i�piours
igainsi
curly reddish-brown hair short
Details about her age are cheer-
fully left obscure, although she ar-
rived in New York in the late 1930s
to study dance at the School of
American Ballet and the Metro-
politan Opera Ballet School.
Her parents loved show busi-
ness, although they weren't in it
themselves. Her father ran a small
cigar factory in Columbus, Ohio.
"They thought, 'She'll go, and
it doesn't matter. When her money
runs out, she'll be back the ac-
tress recalls. "But I stayed
Goodman danced in the cho-
rus of several shows choreo-
graphed by Jerome Robbins, in-
cluding "High Button Shoes" and
"Miss Liberty Her first speaking
role was in the Rosalind Russell
musical "Wonderful Town" in
1953.
"I had to make so many transi-
tions into other things says
Goodman, who fortunately was in
the right place at the right time for
all those changes. "When I first
came out of dancing, I did revues
It was the early to mid-1950s,
when small, topical nightclub re-
vues flourished, and Goodman, a
natural comedian, thrived in them.
She performed in shows by Ben
Bagley and Julius Monk and in
Jerry Herman's first effort, a revue
called "Parade
Her spot on Paar's show be-
gan in 1957 and lasted seven years.
"I was just thrown into the
talking Goodman says. "I had
no idea how to do that. In fact, they
just called me up and asked me if 1
wanted to be on 'The Jack Paar
Show I didn't know who Jack
Paar was. They said, 'We just want
vou to sit and talk
Goodman's success on Paar's
program and her frequent appear-
ances on "The Merv Griffin Show
"Duckman" raises satire debate
and "Girl Talk" in the 1960s are
not surprising. She's a talker with
a slightly off-beat outlook. Plus
she could tell a funny story.
In 1974, for example,
Goodman appeared with Bette
Davis in "Miss Moffat a musi-
cal version of Emlyn Williams'
"The Corn Is Green Scheduled
for a long tour, it opened and
closed in Philadelphia in less
than two weeks.
"Oh, Bette was a grouchy
lady � a very grouchy lady
Goodman giggles. "Well, it was
at that time in her life when it
was too difficult for her to sus-
tain a big part like that and go on
the road. She had so much on
her mind. "One Friday night �
I had a dressing room next to
hers and she always came in
early � I came in and she wasn't
there and I thought, 'Oh-oh We
were booked for a year's tour.
We heard over the loudspeaker:
'Will everyone gather in the
house She was on a plane to
California and had never handed
in her notice.
"It was the best part I ever
had in my life and I did it for
only a week or two
Good man has a fondness for
today's television talk-show
hosts, particularly David
Letterman. She has appeared on
his show and likes the man a lot,
saying "He understood my
sense of humor.
"I will do a dumb thing for
fun Goodman adds. "That's
how I got the reputation for be-
ing dopey and dumb.
"I don't like dumb jokes but
I will do dumb things for a laugh.
It makes people think they are
superior but I know they are
not
NEW YORK (AP) � When
is a duckiot a duck? When he's
Duckman, a cartoon hero billed
as "a privjte dick-family man
whose briliant, adult-themed
satire airs in late prime time
Saturday on cable's USA Net-
work.
Satire?
Yup, satire. And on USA
Network, too, which is what all
television wculd look like if the
FCC did not �xist.
"Duckman produced by
Klasky-Csupo, Inc the same
house that brought us the ex-
cellent "Rugrats" on cable's
Nickelodeon, is based on the
comic strip created by Everett
Peck.
Satire is the only way to
explain the "Duckman"
premise: He's a typical,
middle-aged, yellow-feath-
ered duck with a big orange
bill, the biggest, whitest set of
maloccluded teeth since "The
See DUCKMAN page 9
Wfe'll fix you good.
Maintain the Quality"
with Genuine I ionda Service
Oil and Filter
Special
This service offer includes:
�Drain and replace engine oil
� Install Genuine Honda
oil filter
� Check fluid levels
� Inspect wipers and blades
�Inspect tires and check air
pressure
Price $19.50 plus tax
Not valid w any other coupon
10 Discount
to ALL ECU
Students, Faculty,
and Employees!
FREE Shuttle
Service!
Please Call For Appointment
Bob Barbour Honda3300 S. Memorial Dr.
Greenville, NC 27834355-2500
ALFREDO'S
New York PIZZA
an
JOIN THE FIGHT
feAi&M
VMflnflHHHnHHMBMnHBni
APRIL 29-30
Starting Time: 6 p.m.
Registration begins at 4:30 p.m.
at East Carolina University track
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run or jog in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call 32, l-2oaO
FUN FOOD AND EXERCISE
GUARANTEED FOR ALL!
HOSTED BY:
Alpha Phi Omega
American Cancer Society
Sponsored by:
Bud Light
Eastern Carolina Coca-Cola
GlaxoCerenex Pharmaceuticals
Talk FM WZCI FM 98.3
GlennonBitton
Quixote Travels, Inc.
APPLICATION TO PARTICIPATE
I will recruit a team - send me information
I would like to be on a team
Enclosed $10 per person
Mail to: American Cancer Society, PO Box 377
Greenville, NC 27835
ECU's Closest Beach
WHICHfiRD'S BE0CH
Located on the Pamlico River in Washington
�Sandy Beach
�Conveniently located Mini-Mart
Beer. Snacks. Lotion & Bathing Suits
�Tube Rentals for "Good Times"
�3 Flume Waterslide
�$1.00 per person
�$2.00 person on Weekends
�Country Dance Every Saturday Night
ALL SUMMER LONG!
Washington
Whic lard's Beach Rd.
ECU
10th Street
Hwy33
Chocowinity
�MSi
1 Large 2
Topping Pizza
$4.99
till 6 pm
Daily
Lunch Special
THREE
POOL
TABLES
Mortal Combat 2
& Air Hockey
2 Slices 1
Topping
and Drink
$1.99
till 3 pm
1M
Open Daily From Ham to
946-0011
TRIAD-AREA
STUDENTS
W t S u
Looks like a
Vivarin night.
The big one's only 12 hours away. You
could have paid more attention in
class, but tonight you've gotta
cram. First, you better keep
those eyes from closing.
Revive with Vivarin.
Safe as coffee, it
helps keep you
awake and mentally
alert for hours.
So when your most
difficult problem to
solve is how to
stay awakemake it
a Vivarin night!
' H G
EARN TRANSFERABLE
COLLEGE CREDIT
THROUGH CHALLENGING,
STIMULATING COURSES
DURING SUMMER SESSION
ATEL0N
COLLEGE
CONVENIENT LOCATION
FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING
COURSES ARE OFFERED IN ALL DISCIPLINES.
FOR EXAMPLE:
Revive with VIVARIN
U�e only � directed Contain! caffeine equivalent to 2 cup� ol coHee MWmlthKHne Beecham.
Art 237
Bus. Adm. 360
Bus. Adm. 419
Economics 246
English 217
English 332
English 362
History 374
Jri-Comm. 367
Jrl-Comm. 465
Pol. Sd. 329
Religion 378
panish I I I
"neatre 101
Photography I & II
Principles of Decision Science
Sales Management
Statistics for Economics and Business
Women and Language
Literature of the South
Study of Film
Germany- Unification to 1945
Information Search
Media Law
Political Behavior
Book of Revelation
Elementary Spanish
Introduction to Theatre
REGISTRATION JUNE I
FOR MORE INFORMATION,
OR A COMPLETE LIST OF COURSES,
CALL THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
I-800-334-8448 OR 910-584-2370





April 19, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
Campus Showings
Thursday- Saturday, April
THE FUGITIVE
Thursday, April 21
21-23
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE
"HOW

If you would like to gain valuable
experience working for an award-
winning magazine and earn some
extra money at the same time,
Expressions is the opportunity
for you.
We have the following key positions
available for the year 1994-1995:
� Business Manager
� Art Director
� Advertising and Circulation Director
� Associate Editor
� Copy Editor
� Typesetter
� Staff Writers (3)
Staff Illustrators (2)
Correction
In the April
14th Barefoot
article the hand
PMS played at
the Delta Sigma
Phi house, not
at the Sigma Pi
house.
DUCKMAN
Simpsons and eyes and brows
that reside on his eyeglasses in-
stead of his face.
Duckman lives in a down-
at-heels neighborhood beside
the freeway in a malevolent car-
toon universe which strikingly
resembles the pop culture of Los
Angeles.
As a family man, he is a flop.
He lives with his dead wife's
identical twin, Aunt Bernice, his
three sons, 16-year-old Ajax (a
dead ringer for Baby Huey); the
10-year-old twins, Charles and
Mambo, who share the same
body; and Gramdma-ma, a to-
tally inert old lady whose only
expressions are flatulent.
Duckman is a lazy, libidi-
nous, weak-willed, shallow,
self-centered, insensitive, inse-
cure bundle of neurotic energy
who can't see the forest for the
trees and is loathed by his sis-
ter-in-law and dissed by his
sons.
And, of course, he's just as
lovable as you and 1. (It helps,
too, that Duckman's voice is pro-
vided bv Jason Alexander, the
nerdy George of NBC's hit
sitcom "Seinfeld)
In his job as a private dick,
Duckman has a deadpan pig
named Cornfed for a partner,
whose monotone voice hovers
between Jack Webb and Miguel
Ferrer. His office assistants are
two angelic, cloyingly sweet
stuffed teddy bears named
Fluffy and Uranus whom
Duckman routinely destroys,
just because they're so sweet.
Say, did somebody mention
satire? Emphatically, yes.
In a previous episode,
Duckman � guilt-ridden for his
wife's untimely death � tried
to rescue his faltering sex life
with a "beak augmentation"
while tormented with lust for a
set of pneumatic twin blondes.
In another episode,
Duckman is forced to take his
sons to the museum and causes
Continued from page 8
� then thwarts � the domi-
nation of the world by an om-
nipotent supercomputer that
calls itself Loretta.
In Saturday night's epi-
sode, we join Duckman, sit-
ting bleary-eyed before the
television set very early in the
day. Why?
"He's been there since 10
o'clock last night Bernice ex-
plains. "The cable company
accidentally unscrambled the
Bouncing Naked Flesh Chan-
nel for 3 seconds and he's
afraid to blink in case it hap-
pens again
No other sitcom, not the
even "The Simpsons is as
hard-wired into alienation,
with comedy so angry, edged
and relentlessly funny in its
pursuit of a larger truth.
"Duckman" is as pure and
truthful as you can get.

It any of these positions interest
you, please come by the Expressions
office in the Publications Bldg. by
April 25, 1994
Deadline
Kingston
Place
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
One Less Worry During Exam WEEK
Your Next School Years Living Space In A
Student Village will be Guaranteed
If You Apply Now!
AT A PRICE THAT WILL COMPETE WITH THE DORMS!
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES
MAY 1 - AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
Introducing the fastest ways
to get tnrough college.
Power Macintosh� 610060 8160. Apple" Color Plus
14" Display, Apple Extended Keyboard U and mouse.
Only $2,050.00.
Power Macintosh� 710066 8250.
internal AppleCD� 300i Plus CD-ROM Drive. Macintosh'
Color Display, Apple" Extended Keyboard U and mouse.
Only $3353.00
Speed. Power. And more speed, thafs wnatifenwft)Wer MMntesrf & all" afoot. I& a
Macintosh with PowerPC" technology. Which makes it an
incredibly fast personal computer. And the possibilities are
endless. Because now you'll have the power you need for high-performance annlications
fhe new Power Macintosh from Apple
like statistical analysis, multimedia, 3-D modeling and much more. So, what are you
waiting for? Visit your Apple Campus Reseller for more in-
formation and see for yourself. Now
at Power Macintosh is here, college may never be the same.
Applet.
Student Stores
Wright Building � 757-6731
Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
�994 Apple Computer Inc. All ryibt! nsentd Apple, the Apple kfp and Macmliisb an n&kmt trademark. Of Apple Computer. Im AppleCl) and Power Maarmsb art trademark of Apple Computer Inc taslE "a tokirrurt J International liusmess .Madras Corpomtm. ustd under ban
, �
lJi (1�Bfe-





10 The East Carolinian
April 19, 1994
SAUSAGE
Continued from page 7
frontman Les Claypool, or is this
something that was recorded be-
fore the current Primus line-up
formed? Mysterious!
Either way, this audible Sau-
sage album, Riddies are Abound
Tonight, is a savory blend of mu-
sical stvles and instrumental in-
terplay in much the same way
that edible sausage is a savory
blend of spices, intestine, and pig
flesh. Claypool's unique bass
stvlings aren't quite as dominant
here as they are on Primus
projects.
. � . It's the guitar work of ex-
Primus guitarist Todd Huth that
attracts the most attention on this
album. Claypool tends to stay in
the background, lurking like ed-
ible sausage between the guitar
' and the booming drums of Jay
Lane. This music is funkier than
Primus, while still retaining that
flavor of jazz and weirdness that
Les Claypool brings to anything
he works on.
Claypool also sings on this
! album, and his peculiar, nasal
twang will most likely prove just
as annoying to Primus-haters as
it ever has. In fact, Sausage am-
plifies all the traits that make
some people dislike Primus. The
music is dense and complicated,
and it doesn't follow any easily
predictable rhythm pattern.
Claypool's vocals are often
muddy and reduced to insane
mumbling, and the lyrics are
sometimes complete nonsense. Of
course, these are the same traits
that Primus fans (like myself) love
the most, so maybe it's a moot
point.
I like Sausage, in both its au-
dible and edible varieties. Both
are complex and messy, and a bit
disgusting when you get right
down to it. But that's what makes
it so cool. So, when dealing with
audible Sausage and Riddles are
Abound Tonight, heed the warn-
ing of the album's final track,
"Caution Should be Used While
Driving a Motor Vehicle or Oper-
ating Machinery Just be careful
out there. Sausage is heady stuff.
� Mark
Brett
JAZZ
Continued from page 7
nied her.
Thesecond half was mostly Big
Band, with Hoagy Carmicheal's
"Star Dust" and three arrangements
by Duke Ellington. The ECU Jazz
Ensemble showed their skills and
ability to turn up the volume on
Ellington's "I'm Beginning to See
the Light My personal favorite
was their interpretation of "Cara-
van They shifted Ellington's ar-
rangement around a little and re-
ally picked up the tempo; it was
much faster than I've ever heard it,
and it worked very well.
Cathy Creech took the stage to
sing "I Want to Run to You a pop
song arranged for a contemporary
GODSTAR
jazz feel. The program ended with
Ellington's "Cottontail This was
an open jam session with solos
abounding�all the guests artists
really shined.
McBride started the song with
an excruciating bass solo that just
about got me out ot my seat. It
would have been worm it to attend
the nights performance just to hear
this. The rest of the tune was spent
passing the solos around. Almost
everyone got their chance and per-
formed well.
It'sreallvasham that this
happens only once a year, but I
guess that makes it even more valu-
able.
Continued from page 7
Lifestyle meeting this
Wednesday at 5:30 for those
who can last!
YEARBOOK
Continued from page 7
tions sodety , we can bring the
communication department
togetherDreyfuss said.
The Communications socety
will also be having elections for
next semester at 6 p.m. before the
showing of the video in the same
room. Anyone interested in work-
DANCE
ing on the video for next year
can join the yearbook group by
contacting Greg Brown. Copies
of the video yearbook, TheTrea-
sure Chest will be handed out at
Barefoot On The Mall on Thurs-
day April, 21.
Continued from page 7
the album. It featured good varia-
tions, and retained a little original-
it) It was relatively easy to listen to.
One of the most disturbing
things about this album, aside from
the music itself, was that the record-
ing was poor. It was almost like
thev plugged in a microphone and
recorded the music. A lot of times
the bass and drums were almost
impossible to hear. The band also
has no real identity. After listening
to the album, I felt like I'd just heard
a lot of covers of English bands. If
it'sany conciliation, the album cover
featured some really nice art work.
� Daniel
Willis
have a 2 p.m. matinee only. The
performances will be held in the
McGinnis Theatre on the ECU cam-
pus. Individual tickets cost $7.50
for the general public and $4.50 for
ECU students. Tickets may be
purchased in person at the
McGinnis Theatre box office or
by phone with a Visa or
Mastercard by calling 757-6829.
s:
Congratulations to the
ry elected officers oi
damma bta Jljx .
Rot Gluckman - President
Lisa Ezzell - Vice President
Brandie Harker - Treasurer
Gail Hardee - Corresponding Secretary
Marl" Buchanan - Roll Secretary
Pam Sutton - Reporter
Michele Amick - Historian
'94-95 will be the hest year yet
J
East Carolina Playhouse
presents
EAST
CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
April 21, 22. 23, 25 and 26, 1994 at 8:00 p.m.
April 24, 1994 at 2:00 p.m.
ECU Students: $4.50 General Public: $7.50
CALL-757-6829
Carolina East Mall
PRESENT
-Atxer-icon tfWwoutc
HIGH FASHION
PHOTOGRAPHY
AFFORDABLE
FOR EVERYONE!
vi
$100 value for only
f�ylDP
�Sto"
$14
95
,aJ.
- 2 for 1
Special
Sitting lee-
V onlV! iT
Glamour Sitting Fee Includes:
� Complementary Makeover and Hairstyling
� Wardrobe & Accessory Changes
� Personal Glamour Photo Session
� View Proofs in 2-3 hours
See a Glamour Photo Representative to make your
appointment for your Glamour sitting at Carolina East Mall
THURSDAY, APRIL 21
THRU
SATURDAY, APRIL 30
INDOORS
RND
1 OUTDOORS
Thursday, Hpril 21st. Haue Ule Got R Deal for you!
(Rain Date: Friday, April 22nd.)
From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
fit Our Best Euer, Pre-inuentory . . .
SIDEWRLICSRLE
OLD
TEHTB00K
EDITIONS
$5 RN
RRMFULL
JTL
REMRINDER
BOOKS
SPECIALLY
PRICED
FROM 99
28 OFF RLL OF OUR WEARING APPAREL
INCLUDING SOLE-PRICED ITEMS:
� New Summer T-Shirts
� Sweatshirts
� Mom and Dad shirts for Mother s
Day and Father s Day
� Rlumni apparel for graduation gifts.
(New design East Carolina Graduate T-Shirt.)
� Shorts
� Wide selection of caps.
� Children s Rpparel.
SALESMEN'S SAMPLES
T-SHIRTS $5
SWEATSHIRTS $1B
JZL
LDRTCH
FOR
RDDITI0NRL
SRUINGS
ON
SELECTED
ITEMS.
20 OFF
PORTRL
POSTERS
(INSIDE STORE)
GRAB
BAG
miMlDENIMffi
EKCEPT SALESMEN S SRMPLES.
Wright Building at the Heart of the Main Campus.





The East Carolinian
April 19, 1994
Sports
i-lVr-l. 3 Page M'
Football puts a wrap on spring drills
By Brian
Olson
Sports Editor
There he was, dressed in his
blackuniforxn,playingbaseballin
his home state of Norm Carolina.
The crowd of
8,200 went bal-
listic and
sounded like a
crowd of 20,000 when No. 45 was
in action, or just walking by the
stands. It vvashim�Michael Jor-
dan.
It was a dream come true for
aD the young kids to see their fa-
vorite athlete in person.
His aimess madehis appear-
anoeatfiveCTounryStadiumplay-
ing for the Birmingham Barons
against the Carolina Mud Cats.
The rightfielder had a pleasant
outing, 2-for-4 and a stolen base.
The former basketball star is now
hitting a team-high 304 and kept
his five-game hitting streak alive.
He is now 7-for-23 after seven
games this season (through Sun-
day).
'Tmjust trying to hit the ball
as it comes to me Jordan said.
'Tmjust trying to improve every-
day.It's been a lot of fun thus far
and I just hope I can try to keep
improving'
In his first at-bat, Jordan hit a
slow grounder to second for the
second out in the second inning.
His first hit came during his
second at-bat in the third. After
missing the first two curves, tak-
ing a third pitch brush-off, hitting
a foul ball, he hit the fifth pitch
inbetweentheshmistoparKlthird
baseman. Theaxwdloved every
bitofit
"Man I can't believe it said
nine-year-old Ken Christensen
Tve waited so long to finally see
Michael Jordan in person. He's
beenrrryfavoriieplayerrnywhole
life andlgot here early this morn-
ing to see him play
Fans started to get to the
baliparkin the morning andearly
afternoon even though the game
wasscheduledtostartat6:05p.m.
tojustgetaglimpseorpossiblyan
autographof their favoriteathlete.
When Jordan wasonbasehe
also drew attenhcmfromMudcat
pitcrters-Afterfourthrowstohokl
him on, Jordan stole second and
went to third on the wild throw.
Jordan'ssecondhitcameona
0-2countAfterfoulingarrmefjrst
two pitches, he hit a tex-ieague
single into rightfield. Again Jor-
danrecewed attention on the base
paths.
After three attempts to pick
him off first, the Cats caught Jor-
danoff-guardwhenhewascaught
offihebag after ihefirst pitch The
No. 7 hitter was caught in a run-
down and tagged out The disap-
pointed rookiewalked back to the
dugout withhishead down
The only action he saw in
rightfield was a dearth fielded
routine one-hop single.
Jordan was yanked, from
rightfield however, in favor of
Randy Hood in the bottom of the
ninth Hood would drop a crucial
ball in the inning en route to the
Mudcats come from behind, 4-3
win
Kkiscould couldbeheard all
dayscreaining"Jor-dan,Mich-aeL
No. 45 Besides the kids enthusi-
asm, adultswere excited as welL
A lady in the stands yelled,
"Michael, can I have a kiss?"
'If s always good to come
home'Jordansaid "That'swhere
everything started, not just for
basketballbutbaseballaswelLrm
just glad to be able to come back
and pky for North Carolina
people
Thafsrhetypeofdayitwasat
Five-County Stedium. It was
Kiichael Jordan day.
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Mitchell Galloway is a sophomore from Bennettsville, S.C and Coach
Logan hopes he can improve the receiving core from last season.
Jordan, Barons lose
Photo by Brian Olson
Michael Jordan, seen here in batting practice, was told to be more
aggressive at the plate by the team's hitting coach. M hit a homerunpractice.
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
While Sunday night's game
centered onMichaelJordan through
his eight and half innings, the
Mudcats drew all the attention in
?he bottom of the ninth to pull out a
4-3 come-rrom-behind win over the
Birmingham Barons in a Class AA
game of the Southern League.
The former UNC, Chicago Bull
basketball star had a quality day, 2-
for-4 with a stolen base, but was on
the bench when the hottest action
took place.
Jordan was replaced by Randy
Hood for defensive purposes in
the bottom of the ninth when the
Mudcats (6-5) rallied for two runs
and the victory.
"As of Sunday he Jordan is
not our best rightfielder defen-
sively head coach Terry Francona
said. "That does not mean that
from two weeks from now he won' t
be. That will not surprise me one
bit, our objective is to win games
and he understands that. We took
him out for defensive purposes
and that happens all the time with
a lot of people. I don't think that
will last very long knowing
Michael
Tim Marx's game winning
bases loaded single brought home
the winning run for Carolina in the
ninth. DH Mark Johnson led off
the inning with a double and the
Barons brought in reliever Matt
Karchner to help try and save the
day. The next batter hit a fly ball to
Jordan's replacement in rightfield,
Hood, who dropped the ball. This
resulted in runners at the corners
with no outs. Then trouble broke
loose with the Barons (2-8).
Francona and shortstop Glenn
Disarcina were ejected for arguing
the controversial dropped ball.
Firstbaseman Mike Brown
then singled in the first run and
thirdbaseman Bruce Schreiber was
intentionally walked to set up
Marx's game winning hit.
Mike Zimmerman picked up
the win for Carolina and Karchner
took the loss.
Francona seemed to pleased
with the obvious hard work ethic
of his 31-year old rookie.
"We ask our guys to make
improvements every dav and he's
certainly doing that out there
Francona said. "He makes adjust-
ments and that's important to me.
He watches, he learns, he's really
doing a great job
Ficklen Stadium receives donations for expansion
(SID) � Ron and Mary Ellen
Dowdy, of Orlando, Fla have
announced a $1 million gift to
the East Carolina University Edu-
cation Foundation, the
fundraising arm of ECU athlet-
ics.
The gift will go towards the
plcinnedexpansion of ECU's foot-
ball stadium, which will be re-
named Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
Ron Dowdy, who is a mem-
ber of the school's Boa rd of Trust-
ees, currently oversees commer-
cia 1 leases, residential apartments
and several other enterprises, as
part of Dowdy enterprises in Or-
lando.
"This is a crucial period of
time in the growth of the ECU
athletics program. I felt that it
was time for someone else to step
up and make a significant ges-
tureof financial support if ECU's
football program is to stabilize at
the highest level of competition.
Mary Ellen and I are happy to be
in a position to make such a gift
stated Dowdy.
Dowdy, a 1966 graduate of
ECU, served in the U.S. Air Force
from 1966-71, reaching the level
of Captain.
After leaving the service,
Dowdy entered the imported
fine-gift-andfurniture business in
Winter Park, Fla. He also man-
aged the successful campaign of
Florida State Senator Alan Trask.
Dowdy has been involved in
many civic organizations, includ-
ing the Executive Committee of
the florida Citrus Sports Asso-
See FICKLEN page 14
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
If there is one word ECU foot-
ball fans want to hear from this
year's spring practices, it is
probally, 'improvement
After last year's 2-9 season,
head coach Steve Logan has his
work cut out for him in rebuilding
the program. Logan received a big
assist in the return of starting quar-
terback, Marcus Crandell, who
went out in last year's second game
with a broken leg.
DuringSaturday's final scrim-
mage, the quarterback combina-
tion of Crandell, Chris Hester, Dan
Gonzalez and Perez Mattison led
the Purple team (the offense) over
the Gold (defense) 20-6. The Purple
team scored points like a normal
game, while the defense scored
points for stopping or causing turn-
overs from the offense.
"I think that we are going to
get back to doing what it is that we
usually do best Logan said.
"That's throw and catch the short
ball
Freshman John Peacock, of-
fensive MVP, ran for a team-high
59 yards and Mitchell Galloway
led the receivers with threecatches
for 38 yards. Transfer Ben Fossey
also caught three for 34 yards and
one touchdown.
Since this was a scrimmage
within the team, coaches want to
play athletes that are competing
forstarting roles or are transefers.
This helps coaches understand a
player's ability at normal game
speed.
Offensively, the highly tal-
ented running back Junior Smith
did not even participa te in a single
play. More regulardefensivestart-
ers played because of a slim
amount of backups at certain po-
sitions.
"I think it was a fun game
Smith said. "Everything was a
based offense and based defense.
I think we got a lot of work done
for the younger guys. A lot of the
older guys didn't play today, but
we wanted to get a chance for the
younger guys to get better in this
last spring game so they can help
us out next year
Last season, the Pirates really
improved on the defensive side
of the ball under first year defen-
sive coordinator Larry Coyer. He
left the team over the winter to be
a defensive line coach for the
NFL's New York Jets. Paul Jette
has taken over the reigns of this
young defense from Texas Chris-
tian University.
"We've talked toourdefense
about picking up where they left
off last year and getting better
Logan said Alot of that is going
to depend on what our defensive
secondary does. We have to get
better in the backend, there's no
question
The defensive unit only had
three seniors listed on a 37-man
roster, but the young squad ap-
pears to be pretty solid up front.
Junior linebacker Mark Libiano,
defensive MVP of the scrimmage,
See SCRIMMAGE page 14
It's 'Hammer lime' in KG
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
With names such as Delgado
and Hammonds floating around the
American League as early Rookie of
the Year choices, it is easy to overlook
another player, Kansas City Royals
designated hitter Bob Hamelin. Early
on in 1994, "The Hammer" has made
his presence felt, giving the Royals a
badly-needed dose of power while
filling the roster position vacated by
the retired George Brett.
The 6-foot, 235-pound Hamelin
graduated from Irvine High School,
in Irvine, Ca. where he played both
baseball and foofbalL He wasrecruited
by Notre Dame as a linebacker, but
chose to play baseball for UCLA and
Rancho Santiago Junior College. He
promptly set a California Juco record
31 home runs in 1988.
Hamelin was Kansas City's 2nd
round selection in the 1988 June Free
Agent Draft. In 1988,hewas named to
the Northwest League All-Star team
aftercompilinga .298averagewithl7
home runs in just 235 at bats.
He moved to Double-A ball in
1989 and hit .308 with 16 home runs
before a stress fracture in his back
prematurely ended hisseason. How-
ever, he was still named a Southern
League All-Star, and was placed on
the Royal's 40-man roster after the
season
Continued back injuries limited
Hamelin to just 200 games and 657 at
bats over the next three seasons, and
Hamelin underwent posterolateral
disc fusion surgery to permanantly
correct the problem.
In 1993, Hamelin was healthy
throughout the season and put up
outstanding numbers to prove it. He
was named an American Association
All-Star while playing for the Triple-
A Omaha Royals,andhit 259 with 29
Photo by Dave Pond
Hamelin was recruited out of high school by Notre Dame as a
linebacker, but went to UCLA to play baseball. He is the Royals' DH.
home nans and 84 ntns batted in �
the best on the team. Furthermore,
his glove turned out to be as lethal as
his bat
Hamelin led the American As-
sociation in double plays (116), as-
sists (90), games (127), and earned a
.991 fielding percentage before be-
ing called up to the major league
club in September.
Hitting 224withtwohomeruns
in sixteen games, Hamelin got Eis
first tasteofbigleaguepitching while
starting 14 of the final 15 Royals
gamesa t first base due toan injury to
regular K.C. first baseman Wally
Jovner.
Prior to the 1994 season,
Hamelin and the Royals received a
scare�whilerompetinginanESPN
See HAMMER page 14
Central Scouting Bureau aids NHL
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
Now that the hockey season
has moved into the playoffs, fans
may wonder why the Penguins
drafted Mario Lemieux to begin
with. That is where the Central
Scouting Bureau (CSB) comes in
to play. Up-to-date and detailed
reports and evaluations are given
to each team's general manager
prior to the NHL draft by the
CSB. Without the scouting bu-
reau, a player such as Lemieux
might have never been discov-
ered.
Each team in the NHL funds
a central scouting agency (the
CSB). It consists of anywhere
from 12-16 scouts whose job is to
evaluate eligible amateur athletes
who will be available for each
NHL draft. The scouts can be
assigned to one specific geo-
graphic region or travel thecoun-
try, giving "second opinions" on
prospects who have received fa-
vorable reviews from other
scouts.
The scouts attend as many
amateur games as possible, fil-
ing game
reports
on each
scouted
player. At
the end of
the sea-
son, it is
not un-
common
for more
than 80
reports to
be on file
for an in-
dividual
player.
After
season's end, each scout is re-
quired to file a qualitative report
for every player that they have
seen enough to have become fa-
Mario Lemieux
First pick in '84 draft
miliar with their talents.
The scouts assess each
player in ten different area$:
skating, shootingscoring, po-
sition play, checking, puck con-
trol, passing, hockey sense, de-
sireattitude, tough-
nessagressiveness, and
sizestrength. The crite-
ria of the report has not
changed since 1982,
which suggests that
scouts have remainedin
agreement regarding the
dimensions necessary
for NHL success.
For each area (taslc
requirement), there are
roughly seven to ten sub-
divisions. For example,
toughness;
agressiveness is broken
down into seven compo-
nents: mean streak, hit-
ting, physical, fighting, menta.
toughness, not intimidated, and
See HOCKEY page 14





12 The East Carolinian
April 12, 1994
Lady Pirates make history
(SID)� The Lady Pirates track
team went into last weekend s Colo-
nial Athletic Association Champion-
shipmeetvN'ithhighexpectationsand
came away with just what they
wanted, placing second �the best
finish in East Carolina history.
"The girls competed extremely
well, coming together as a team when
we reallvneeded them to, head coach
Charles Justicesaid. "We couldn't be
morepleased withourperformance
Dava Rhodes turned in ECU's
only first place finish in the 5000
meters, setting a new track record
with a time of 17:20.97. Her sister,
Tara, finished third in the sameevent
with a time of 17:41.72, just barely
, gettingedgedoutbyJamesMadison's
Stephanie Herbert for second.
Carla Powell and Amanda
Johnson scored valuable points for
the team, placing in the 100- and 200-
meter events. The team also picked
up points in almost every event, en-
ablingECLvithonlythe4x400meter
rela v remaining, to stay close enough
to have a chance to beat William &
Mary.
The team of Alexis Jacks, Kiesha
Johnson, Marvina Hamilton and
Cindv Szmanski turned in its best
time of the year and took third to put
the Lady Pirates in front of the Tribe
by only half a point.
The final standings team stand-
ings were George Mason (112), ECU
(51.5), William & Mary (51), JMU
(31.5), UNC-Wilmington (17) and
Richmond (6).
Mens track dominates
NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
"BARS THAT WON'T GET YOU IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW"
758-2712
(SID) �The ECU men's track
program showed its muscle Sat-
urday at theCAAChampionships
held at William & Mary. The Pi-
rates dominated the sprinting
events, while setting CAA meet
records. The team placed fourth
in the conference overall, an im-
pressive feat considering the team
is primarily limited to sprinting
events.
Freshman Dwight Henry (Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla.) led the Pirates
with a 46.97 second finish in the
400 meter dash. Henry captured
first in the event, setting a new
meet record. The Pirate standout
was also named the Men's Athlete
of the Meet. Teammate Kareem
Lamb finished fourth in the event
at 48.44 seconds.
Henry was also successful in
the relay events, anchoring a first-
place finish in the 4x100. The Pi-
rates' 4x400 squad captured a sec-
ond-place finish
Senior Charles Miles (India-
napolis, IN) also scored big for
ECU, narrowly edging out fellow
Pirate Lewis Harris (Wadesboro,
NC) to win the 1 (X) meters. Tremain
Parker finished fifth in the event
Harris was able to reverse the
order, however, in the 200 meter
run, as he narrowly bested Miles to
win that race. Freshman Brian
Johnson (Beaufort, SC) garnered a
fifth-place finish.
The Pirates were able to score
points outside of sprint competi-
tion with the performance of Mt.
Olive, NC, native Chris McKinney,
who set a meet record in the triple
jump at 49 feet 11 inches and fin-
ished third in the long jump.
The Pirates' next scheduled
competition is at the Penn Relays
in Philadelphia Pa. this weekend.
Minges has ceremony
Pirates double up Tar Heels
Sanbum paves way
11:009:30
piday-Saturda
11:30-10:00
XU
77T
rv
Delicious i
Chopped Sirloin �
with mushroom gravy or peppers & onions g
$2
includes choice of potato and hot Texas toast.
FREE SUNDAE BAR
"EAT IN ONXY"
FRKK POTATO BAR
Limit 4 persons per coupon. Must
present coupon when ordering.
Coupon expires April 21, 1994. Not
valid with any other discounts or
specials.
Good at Greenville locations only.
2903 E. 10th St.
(SID) � A complete game
with 10 strikeouts by ECU pitcher
Mike Sanburn combined with a
two-run single in the bottom of
the fifth b; Chad Triplett gave
ECU a 6-3 win over 22 Univer-
sity of North Carolina Wednes-
day night at Harrington Field.
Sanburn gave a solid pitch-
ing performance for the Pirates.
UNC had 10 hits on the night, but
the Pirates had a rare error-free
game to support the Pirate right-
hander.
Manny DaSilva stole home
in the fifth on a Mitch Jones
strikeout to give UNC its only
lead of the night at 3-2, but the
Pirates answered with two runs
in the bottom of the inning to take
back the leadpermanently.
After Tarheel reliever Jay
MacMillan walked Jason Head
and allowed a hit by Brian Yerys
with two outs, Triplett drove in
Head and Yerys with a single.
TONIGHT
ABLE Presents
Dr. Ivan Van Sertima
Historian, Literary Critic, Linguist
& Anthropologist
Author of
They Came Before Columbus:
The African Presence in Ancient
America
7pm
Hendrix Theater
Free Admission
ECU scored two insurance
runs in thesixth inning following
a Jones error with two outs. The
Tarheel third baseman overthrew
first allowing Jamie Borel to take
two bases.
MacMillan was then replaced
by Scott Wissel in the middle of
the count and allowed Head a
base on balls.
ECU'S Rick Britton followed
with a two-run double, scoring
Borel and Head for a 6-3 lead.
Sanburn allowed three hits
in the next three innings and
struck out two batters while the
Pirate defense turned a double
plav in the seventh and played
clean defense the rest of the way
for the win.
Sanburn improved his record
to 6-3 while UNC's MacMillan
took his first loss, falling to 3-1.
The Pirates improved to 28-
11 with their third straight win.
UNC falls to 27-10 on the season.
(SID)�ECU officialsand state
legislators officially signaled the
renovation of the 27-year-old
Minges Coliseum Thursday night
at a groundbreaking ceremony. At
the same rime, it was announced
that the new arena inside Minges
Coliseum will be named Williams
Arena, in recognition of a $1 Mil-
lion gitt bv the Walter L. Williams
family.
Mr. Walter L. Williams, presi-
dent and founder of Trade Oi 1 Com-
pany, gave ECU Athletics a $1 mil-
lion gift in November, 1993, as a
part of the university's Shared Vi-
sions Campaign.
Trade Oil Company, a family
owned and operated company,
was founded in 1984 and presently
operates 29 gasconvenience stores
in eastern North Carolina under
the name of Trade Mart.
"It is a great honor to have East
Carolina University name the arena
inside Minges Coliseum for me
said Williams. "I have a great deal
of pride in our university and I am
fortunate to be able to give some-
thing back to ECU. It should not
matter where vou went to school,
if you live in eastern North Caro-
lina, vou should support East
Carolina University. It is our
school
Williams has also been a
Pirate Club member for over 27
years, while his son, David, and
his son-in-law, Edwin Clark,
have been members for 10 and
12 years, respectively.
"Walter Williams' vision
for our basketball program is
truly coming to fruition with
the Minges project underway
said Dave Hart, ECU director of
Athletics.
"It is a fitting tribute that
the arena bear his name
The new Williams Arena
will seat 7,500 fans, be air-con-
ditioned, have a new playing
surface, new lighting and new
locker and team areas for men's
and women's basketball and
volleyball, as well as other fea-
tures which will make it a very
modernized arena.
Minges Coliseum was
builrin 1967 at an original cost
of $2 million.
The original facility was
dedicated on Jan. 27, 1968, in
the name of the Minges family.
Most College Graduates Enter
the Real Wbrld As a Sales Representative
After Graduation
You need the experience and we can help you gain
that experience before you graduate.
Qualifications:
�A full-time student with no more
than 15 semester hows of classes
�At leasi a 2.0 average
� Your own transportation
�An excellent work ethic and
a willingness to learn
�Available to work about 20 hours
per week, Monday-Friday
�Previous sales experience is not required
EAST
CAROLJWAN
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer ;
COPYRIGHT 1994-THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY Each of these advertised items is required to be
PRICES GOOD SUN APRIL 17 THROUGH SAT
APRIL 23,1994 IN.GREENVILLE. WE RESERVE
THE RIGHT TO LIMIT 0UANTIT1ES. NONE SOLD
TO DEALERS.
readily available for.sale in each Kroger Store, except as specifically noted in
this ad If we do run out of an advertised item, we will offer vou your choice
of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the savings or a raincheck
which will entitle you to purchase the advertised item at the advertised prir
within 50 days Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item purchaser





April 19, 1994
The East Carolinian 13
Questionable Carlton remarks settle
(AP) � The controversy over
Steve Carlton's alleged anti-
Semitic remarks is quieting
down, which seems appropriate
for the formerly silent left-
hander.
David V. Kahn, president of
the American Jewish Congress,
on Thursday welcomed Carlton's
statement disavowing a number
of inflammatory positions attrib-
uted to the pitcher in Philadel-
phia Magazine. Kahn said his or-
ganization no longer opposes
Carlton's induction into the Hall
of Fame.
"It is, of course, impor-
tant to the millions of Americans
who view majorleague baseball
as one of the most precious of our
national institutions that those
who are honored by entry in its
Hall of Fame exhibit character
and values in keeping with their
acknowledged skill on the field
Kahn said in a statement.
"SteveCarlton was undoubt-
edly one of baseball's most out-
standing pitchers. We are re-
lieved to hear from him that he
denies making remarks that
could be interpreted as offensive
to Jews and that he finds them as
repugnant as we do. Just as base-
ball embodies our best Ameri-
can tradition, so does Mr.
Carlton's rejection and repudia-
tion of bigotry
The AJC reacted angrily to
the article and asked that the
pitcher be barred from enshrine-
ment in Cooperstown. Of par-
ticular concern were references
to The Elders of Zion and 12 Jew-
ish bankers meeting in Switzer-
land and ruling the world.
Carlton, elected to the Hall in
January and due for induction on
July 31, issued a statement in
which he said, "I have just be-
come aware of the request for an
apology from the American Jew-
ish Congress. I join with them in
calling for an apology for the in-
sensitive remarks attributed tome
by Pat Jordan, the man who wrote
the article in question.
"The article has almost no
truth in it. I reject it completely. It
is wrong about my baseball ca-
reer, my personal beliefs, my fam-
ily life and my new hometown.
There are so many errors that it
would be foolish to try to correct
them individually. But let me say
that I specifically deny saying any-
thing that could be interpreted as
offensive to Jewish people. Istand
on my long record of treating all
teammates and opponents with
the same respect, be they Jewish,
black or white
Carlton said that Sandy
Koufax, a Jew, was one of his role
models and that he would be ap-
pearing at an event with Koufax
in the near future.
Jordan, a minor-league
pitcher before turning to writing,
stood by his story, which he de-
veloped in a two-day visit to
Carlton's 400-acre ranch near
Durango,Colo.
"I went there and I wrote
what he said and I don't care
what he says Jordan said from
his home in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
"I didn't invent this stuff
Adult
Entertainment
Center
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Lady Pirates shutout SMS
Ward steals three
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers" 11pm
CASH PRIZE
Cotttrtnnt ntriJ to irt c remitter m adtvticc. Mtffl armv by 8:00
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
$Dancers wanted$
EAST CAROLINA
COMMUNICATION SOCIETY
PRESENTS
A SNEAK PEEK OF ECU'S
VIDEO YEARBOOK

ME MIEASraiB CHBSV
i)
WHEN: Wednesday, April 20, 1994
WHERE: Room 1015 GCB
TIME: 6:30 to 8:00 pm
FREE REFRESHMENTS
Pick up your ;opy of iht 'TREASURE CHEST al Barefool On The Mall.
(SID)�The ECU softball team
defeated Southeast Missouri State,
3-0, in day one, on Friday of the
FrostCutlery Softball Tournament.
The Lady Pirates' other scheduled
game for the day, against No. 2
Southwest Louisiana, was post-
poned until Saturday morning due
to rain.
Against the Indians of South-
west Missouri State, speedy ECU
senior Michelle Ward stole three
bases, pushvig her season total to
70. The NCAA's leading base stealer
in 1993, Ward only needs three more
stolen bases to tie last year's single
season record of 73.
In thegame Wardgaveanother
outstanding performance, going 3-
3 with one double and two runs
scored. Lisa Corprew, LeannMyers
and Dana Crosby all had one RBI
each.
Freshman Jill Rowlands
pitched a shutout, pushing her over-
all record to 16-4.
Due to rain, Saturday's games
will be started early and ECU will
play four games. The Lady Pirates
meet up with No. 2Southwest Loui-
siana, George Mason, UNC Char-
lotte and Louisiana Tech. Saturday
ends round robin play and the top
three of six teams from each pool
(there are three pools) will play in
single elimination on Sunday.
Accepted at
more Schools
than you were.
VISA
It's everyvfae
you'want to be!
VIM U.S.A. Inc 1994
Ranked sixth in the South re-
gion, ECU has won 23 of its last 27
games. The Lady Pirates have more
wins already this season than they
had overall in 1993 (34-22). ECU's
record now stands at 37-13.
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dlckln�on Avm-
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Regujrecl
mm
1994
DANCE TEAM
TRYDUTS
APRIL 22-23
APRIL 24
Meet at:
SCALES FIELD HOUSE
5:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
MAKE
TOR
BOOKS
We Buy More Used BooksThan
Anyone InTown. Period
516 S. Cotonche Street, 758-2616
Open 9:00-6:00 Monday-Friday, 10:00-5:00 Saturday
Open til 7 PM April 28, May2-4 Open til 6 PM April29-3(1 May 5-7
mmmmm hmmzm
-� hm





14
The East Carolinian
April 19. 1994
HAMMER
Continued from page 11
FICKLEN
Continued from page 11
arm wrestling tournament, I lameUn leading the Royals with four home
injured his arm. runsand 14RBIs I leiscurrenth inthe
"Itoieatenetaninmy elbow, but midst of a five game hitting streak,
itwasheakdbefbrelcamedownht Before the 1994 season, Hamelin
(Florida) for spring training hesaid h'll) amassed a total ol just 26daysoi
"I think I've got rid of all the other major league service, the ke word
injuiHsasweUandl'mhealthyforthe here, as with Hammonds or Delgado
first tiirie in a while oranyotherrookieaswell,ispotentiaL
through the first two weeks ol I' hecan live up to his. Bob I lamelin
the 1994 season, ' the I lammer" is couldbecomeoreofthebiggesthome
maldngalotofnoise,batting 67and rm hitters in the American 1 eague
SCRIMMAGE
Continued from page 11
and sophomore B.I. Crane are big
play makers and will draw concern
from opposing offenses next sea-
son. The defensive line has been
beefed up over the off season. I he
secondary will possibly be a ques-
tion mark tor next season and I ogan
specified that they have improved.
but still need a tree sate j
"When we came out here this
spring, iw was the most intense
alert group of kids that I've work
with since the 1991 spring 1 ogan
said. "From the standpoint that ev-
erybody had played and they un-
derstood game speed ami under-
stood whythecoacheswerei cach-
ing them so hard because the) 've
been out there and they know what
game speed is all about
"1 couldn't have been more
pleased with what our kids came
out with. Thev brought it out ev-
eryday. We got better every day
and didn't have one flat practice. I
couldn't be more proud of the way
thev responded and if we pick up
where we left in three-a-days, then
we'll have a good edge on for the
Duke game
It appears that Mattison will
be redshirted since he his in the
same year -is Crandell. I lester has
the two spot and Gonzalez slips
into third string.
1 Hiring the off-season punter
Bill Wilson left the team and was
replaced by EdCrabtree. I leaver-
aged 39.2 vardson fiveattempts in
the st rimmage.
Kicker chad Holcomb went
two-tor-two in field goals from 22
and 27 yards.
Mattison threw his II i pass to
receiver Derick Batson on a 4l�-
yard pas Gonzalez threw the
other 11) pass to Fossey.
ciation, the Board ol I in tors
for the I londaitrus Bowl and
the Senior c itizen Ad isor
Committee m i )range C ounty
' i he I ow d 's g nerosit)
n I �hi( all represents the new
level ol horizon w� are realizing
through tin Shared Vision c am
: " I ave 1 lart, ECU dire tor
oi Athletic s, said. I he 1 towdys
have pro ided us with a very
timely, and verv gracious boost.
and we .ire most appreciate e
la lues's i u klen Stadium was
built in 1962-63 ami dedii ated on
Sept 21. 1963. rhe original sta
HOCKEY
dium consisted ol the permanent
stands on the south side, a small
press box and theoldlightinj
tern, which was removed after the
ll74 season. 1 he total cost forthe
original stadium wasS 100,000.
I uture plan - all for the next
phase ol stadium expansion to
consist ol a stale of-the art press
box, to include club seating f pon
completion ol the new press box
facility, a final phase ol the sta-
dium expansion will provide an
upper deck that would add an
estimated 15,000 seats, bringing
the stadium capacity to 50,000.
Continued from page 11
Former figure skater dies
Bui
�n
fiesty.
Immediately prior to the pro-
fessional draft, a general scout
meeting is held. Every base pro-
hie from each scout is labeled for
rev iewandthorough!) examined.
Scouts who disagree with the
written evaluation can propose
amendments to the reports
Whether the change is imple-
mented depends on the consen
sus ol the other scouts who have
observed the player in review.
Alter agreeing on base pro-
tile content, a summary scouting
report is constructed for each
player. After looking at all of the
draft reports, each player is
placet! in order by rank. A player
is ranked not onlv by the possi-
bility of having a professional
career, but also bv how long the
st outs thmk that the player's ca-
reer will last.
i l'j Forme: O ipii and W
world champion figure skater John thosi d i
Curn died vesterdav from an In i first
All s relatetl illness,hisageiitsaitl lished in 1992 in tl
I ie was ! I urn said hi
1 he agenl, lean I liamond, said that he was Hl :
t urrv suffered a hi art attai k this v.
morningathishomenearStratford- tracted a sexua mii
upon- on. ease, ' j n I ple
I he English si iter, w ho w on would snarl a
the World Championships and the awa fi
gold medal at the 1976 Olympics in afraid that peo irovv
Innsbrut k. Austria, wasdiagnosed brk ks through the
as having the HIV virus in IS Currj said VID! illed
c urr returned home in July, man oi his friei
1991, from New York after being 'The) I
told he had developed UDS 'I had fewer and fewer friends! c
He moved in with his widow d hey had died from IDS.M)
mother, Rita and received regulai whole circle of frii I I don t
treatment at St. Mar) sHi ; italin just mean lovers but I m talking
I option. about pals and people vougi to the
In the last years of his life. Curry theal fheyare
spoke openly about his disease and all d
acknowledged that he was homo wned for his
sexual. "There are days when I'm artistry on ice, mixing i lassit al bal-
justamessand I wake up and thmk let with acrobatics
Central Bool
�WlhTrl
i (pen 7 days .� week � M Sal 9a-2a � Sun T- V
Tuev. SI domestics
All day fc night
Wed: Ladies Nijht
Ladies pla .ill day free
Everyday - ,t2o Bud draft 2
Part Time Bar Tender Needed
Appl bj appointment onl)
Call 752-6728
from 9-5 M on-Wed
IF YOU FIRST DOIM'T
SUCCEED, YOU'RE
ABOUT AVERAGE.
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
�?�:����'��'��'��'��� '��'��'� '�'�'��:�:�'��
L0TSABLUESA TOUR
MOJO COLLINS
THE HEATERS
LI'L DAVE & THE HOWLING BLUES BAND
TERESA - B, S, & M
CONGRATULATIONS TO POST METAL SYNDROME,
BATTLE Of THE BANDS'94 WINNER
FORUM COMMITTEE
THE MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE BRINGS YOU
MASTER OF CEREMONIES,
BLAIR SHANNON
THE VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE BRINGS YOU.
Creation Fest
bring your own incpiration & imagination
BRINGS
SPEAKING
BOOTH"
something
ITHE MARKETING COMMITTEE BRINGS YOU
FOR
OFFICIAL
r94 T-SHIRTS
BARE
FIND OUT
WHAT YOU NEED TO DO
IN ORDER TO
GET ONE OF THESE
COLLECTORS'S ITEMS
ON YOUR BACK
THURSDAY, APRIL 21st
"Barefoot on the Mall
12-6 p.m.
"Rocky Horror Picture Show
8-10 p.m.
THE SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
BRINGS YOU
NOVELTY
ATTRACTIONS:
0KBITR0N
)Xri-
BOUNCY BOXING
G0LPA-GOG0





Title
The East Carolinian, April 19, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 19, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1006
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy