The East Carolinian, April 14, 1994






Comics
Pirate Comics, Mullet Head
Watch Wang TV's ratings
plummet, the Kemple Boy
Revenge Squad resurfaces,
and more. Join us and use
your powers for evil! Page 7.
Lifestyle
Check It Out
Jenkins Auditorium will
host a viewing of Barbara
Trent's The Panama
Deception on Tuesday,
April 19 at 7:00 pm.
Story on page 9.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol.69Nor
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday,Aprill4,1994
16 Pages
ABLE protests treatment by Public Safety
Photo by Harold Wise
The minority group Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality (ABLE) gathered yesterday in front of Public
Safety to voice their concerns that blacks are mistreated by certain Public Safety officers.Several meetings
have been scheduled in an attempt to resolve these differences, one for Friday and one for Vfonday.
Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
A group of minority students
marched in front of ECU's Public
Safety department in silent protest
Wednesday at4p.m. toexpresscon-
cernover minority trearmentoncam-
pus. Later members of the group
met with Director of Public Safety
Teresa Crocker, Vice-Chancellor for
Business Affairs Layton Getsinger
and University Attorney Ben Irons.
Members of Allied Blacks for
Leadership and Equality (ABLE)
joined arm in arm and patiently
waited for the arrival of Teresa
Crocker, director of Public Safety,
who had canceled a 4 p.m. appoint-
ment with Demetrius Carter, spokes-
man and president of ABLE. They
were able to meet with the group
about 5 p.m.
Carter told the press that if the
list of proposed grievances is not
met, the group will proceed to the
next step in their plan of protest.
Carter would notcommenton what
the next step might be. "She
(Crocker) promised some plans of
SGA
scandal
continues
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
The cynic's view would
be that all politics are dirty. Ac-
cusations of conflicts of inter-
est, negative posters and illegal
campaigning on election day-
have produced more than a few
cynical students about the re-
cent SGA elections and subse-
quent run-off next week.
Candidate for president
David Reid withdrew from the
election Monday citing, as rea-
sons for his decision, "negative
campaigning, "a "pattemof lies
and personal attacks alleged
against me by other Candida tes
andor persons" and "the clear
conflicts of interest that exist
within the SGA and more par-
ticularly on the elections com-
mittee itself
Reid filed a formal com-
plaint to Dean of Students Ron
Speier Thursday following the
election. The complaint will be
heard by the elections commit-
tee, but at press time, no action
had been taken.
Inhiscomplaint,Reid first
charges that some candidates
for office sat beside the students
who staffed the ballot boxes, a
violation of Article VII, Section
3of the SGA Election Rules that
states: "Campaign literature of
any type, solicitation for the ad-
vancement of any candidate, or
commercializa tion in f avor of a
candidate shall not be permit-
ted within twenty-five (25) feet
of any polling place during the
hours of election
"And that's not the only
thing Reid said. "People run-
ning on thesame ticket as Brvnn
were going up and sitting right
beside the ballot box. The SGA
president was walking people
up to the ballot box and sitting
there and watching them vote
Reid also said he saw stu-
dents who manned the ballot
boxes tell people how to vote.
"I think that's wrong
See SGA page 5
SGA cycles for Red Cross
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
The street and sidewalks
in front of the Student Stores
hosted a comical event yester-
day morning when members of
the SGA struggled to keep four
tricycles in motion to raise
money for the American Red
Cross.
Despite frequent stops to
talk with friends passing by and
rain delays, members of SGA
took turns riding one hour shifts
for the first annual tricycle-a-
thon. The event was scheduled
to run from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m
however, broken tricycles and
rain cut the event short at
around 1:30.
"Riding for the Red Cross"
was the theme, and SGA hoped
to raise between $500 to $1,000
from the event through indi-
vidual rider sponsorship, said
Anna Harrington, senior class
president. Donations at the table
in front of the Students Stores
were also encouraged.
"I feel that the American
Red Cross has experienced quite
a bit in the past year with the
hurricanes, the fires, the earth-
quakes and the floods
Harrington said. "I feel that
their supplies really
deplenished, and it's an organi-
Wing Chun catches on
By Mike Walker
Staff Writer
Admit it, we have all seen
the old Bruce Lee movies in
which Bruce miraculously jumps
10 feet in the air and does a fly-
ing kick into the enemy's face in
the blink of an eye. And we have
all fantasized that one day we
could be like Bruce and walk the
streets without worry. Well,
Bruce Lee was a talented man,
but he had some help from
imaginative
u What we're
doing is
strictly what
works on the
street
Maurice Duclos
Wing Chun Instructor
film pro-
ducers in
Hollywood.
How-
ever, here in
Greenville
any one of
us can learn
a practical
form of self-
defense that
was one of
the styles
that Bruce ��������i
Lee learned. This style of mar-
tial arts is known as Wing Chun
Kung Fu.
Maurice "Duke" Duclos is
the instructor at the Greenville
Wing Chun school. Duclos trav-
els to Greenville every evening
Monday through Friday to in-
struct students in the arts. "What
we're doing is strictly what
works on the street, what's prac-
tical for actual street
fighting'Duclossaid.
Duclos said that even
though the crime rate in Green-
ville has increased, there really
has not been an increase in the
amount of people attending the
school. According to Duclos,
men and women study martial
arts for different reasons.
"Women usuallv don't study
self-defense until it's too late,
while men will usually study
self-defense for more of a macho
type of reason Duclos said.
Duclos said that most people do
not really
realize how
important
self-defense
is. "Self-de-
fense is like
insurance
he said.
"You don't
realize how
really im-
portant it is
until some-
one else hits
��"��" you
Duke explained the sport.
Wing Chun is a Southern Chi-
nese boxing system. It is not a
tournament form of martial arts
in which belts and competitions
are used. Its primary function is
to teach a practical form of self-
defense. Wing Chun uses close
contact punches and stri kes, and
it does not employ any kicks
above the groin. It does not look
See WING CHUN page 4
zation that depends a lot on do-
nations just from the American
people and it serves the Ameri-
can people. This is just a good
way to do something simple to
give back to them
By 11 a.m two of the tri-
cycles had nearly lost a wheel
due to the enormous cumulative
weight of its riders. Taller par-
ticipants had a hard time bend-
ing knees to keep the tricycles
going, while smaller riders were
abie to push the peddles with
their feet and do tricks like go-
ing backwards and turning
around in circles. Within a few
hours, all of the tricycles but one
appeared to be in shambles.
Volunteer
GAL program
aids children
By Jeb Brookshire
Staff Writer
Child abuse is a rapidly
growing problem not only in
North Carolina, but nationally.
The Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion has some frightening statis-
tics on child abuse. A child is
molested every two minutes. One
out of every three children will be
molested before they are 18. Sev-
enty-five percent to 80 percent of
sexually abused children are
abused by family members.
Eighty-five percent of abused chil-
dren without help could grow up
to be abusive parents. In North
Carolina, there were 76,610 re-
ported cases of child abuse or ne-
glect.
Every year thousands of
children fall victim to crimes of
violence, psychological torment
or sexual abuse. As a result, these
children are often thrust into
courtrooms where thev have to
let lawyers and other officials
make decisions for them.
In 1983, North Carolina es-
tablished the Guardian Ad Litem
program. The GAL program pro-
vides these children with a voice
in the courtroom. "Ad Litem"
means "this litigation" or "for this
case The GAL works along with
See GAL page 3
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
action Carter said. "We can't have
this continued treatment of African
American students
ABLE's list of complaints
stated a need for a larger number of
African American officers on the
Public Safety staff, so as to be in
proportion to the number of African
American students on campus.
The group also demanded a
diversity training program for cur-
rent Public Safety officers. Crocker
said that she is attempting to hire
more African Americans, but has
had trouble finding qualified appli-
cants.
"That was a concern that I
had, the lack of African American
officers as a representation of the
student body she said. "In going
through applications, I can say that
the African American population is
not responding toourads and thatis
unfortunate.
" Wehavealsoorganized train-
ing through the community college
on two d ifferent speakers to come in
and handle diversity-type train-
ing. We hope that can happen
during the summer
Carter stated that several
incidents have occurred over the
past year. Carter spoke specifi-
cally about last week's arrest of
Allen Williams, which he said was
unjustand "the tip of the iceberg
Other grievances listed in-
cluded Public Safety's failure to
disclose arrest procedures, and
the need for an independent in-
vestigation of arresting officer
Kittrell in the Williams incident.
"Thatcould have happened
to us all said Susan Stewart, a
member of ABLE who met with
Crocker yesterday. "That fright-
ened us as members of the Afri-
can American community
"We have agreed to take
another lookat this incident Irons
said. "We are certainly willing to
take a review, speak to those in-
volved and try to come to a
resolution. "Ironssaidhecould not
comment on the investigation and
See ABLE page 5
Photo Courtesy of SAM
SAM visits Cowboys,
wins awards in Dallas
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
In addition to being the
home of the NFL Cowboys,
Dallas, Texas, is one of the
business capitals of North
America as well. American
Airlines is based in Dallas,
Ross Perot, who founded Elec-
tronic Data Systems (EDS),
makes his home there, and the
Society for the Advancement
of Management (SAM) re-
cently held its annual confer-
ence in this metropolis.
At the conference, five
SAM members from ECU par-
ticipated in two case competi-
tions and came awav with sev-
eral awards. Dr. Frederic
Hebert, faculty advisor to the
group, won an award as well.
A team consisting of
Steve Ingram, Stacey Catenis
and Paula Cuthrell beat five
other schools to win the Tho-
mas R. Greensmith Award for
first place in the open divi-
sion. This is the second vear in
a row that a SAM team from
ECU has won the open divi-
sion. Last year, a team com-
prised of Eric Jumper, Tami
Johnson and Jon Matthews
won at a conference held in
Orlando.
The team analyzed a case
written about the Houghton-
Mifflin textbook publishing
company and presented rec-
ommendations to a panel of
three judges. For their analy-
sis, the team had to identify
the strategic problems of the
firm and make recommenda-
tions to solve those problems.
The competition is similar to
ECU's business policy course.
"They made their 15-
minute presentations, and
they were judged, and our
team was lucky enough to
win Hebert said.
ECU was represented by
another team consisting of
Hal Miles and Kenny Muse
who competed in the under-
graduate division against 15
other schools. Though thev
did not win, Hebert said that
the team "did a great job also
"They only place the first
three, and we didn't place
said Hal Miles, president of
the ECU chapter of SAM. "I
was satisfied with the way we
presented, though
In addition to the team
awards, ECU brought home
several individual awards as
well. Dana Morris received
one of 16 National Outstand-
ing SAM Student Awards,
and Morris and Paula
Cuthrell received Outstand-
ing Regional SAM Student
Awards.
"Eighty students are
nominated for the outstand-
ing student awards Hebert
said. "They take people who
See SAM page 5





mmmmimv mi ���
2 The East Carolinian
April 14, 1994
Career day can show you the light
April 8
Tyler Hall � 11:00 a.m. Report of larceny of fire extin-
guisher.
North of Flanagan Building � 4:00 p.m. Larceny of a
hanging banner.
Ficklen and Charles Street Parking Lot � 4:28 p.m. Break-
ing and entering; larceny of a vehicle.
April 9
Belk Hall � 9:32 p.m. Report of harassing phone calls.
April 10
South of 10th Street � 2:28 a.m. Non-student arrested for
DWI.
Fifth and Jarvis Street � 2:55 a m. Non-student arrested for
DWI.
April 11
Tenth and College Hill Drive � 3:16 a.m. Non-student
arrested for DWI.
Speight Building � 1:25 p.m. Larceny of school property.
Aycock Hall � 2:25 p.m. Damage to real property (door).
Brody Building � 3:14 p.m. Damage to personal property
(vehicle).
General Classroom Building�3:30 p.m. Larceny of wallet
and notebook.
Belk Hall � 7:50 p.m. Larceny of resident parking decal.
Aycock Hall � 9:30 p.m. Report of damage to property
(door).
April 12
Bathroom at Aycock Hall � 8:57 a.m. Larceny of school
property.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from official ECU
police reports.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
If you are uncertain about
what career interests you, per-
haps you need to visit one of two
career days to be held next week.
The School of Social Work
and the department of criminal
justice will be holding a career
day Monday, April 18, in
Mendenhall from 10 a.m. until 1
p.m.
"Anyone interested in a ca-
reer in criminal justice or human
services should come said Vicki
Peterson, director of field educa-
tion at theSchool of Social Work.
Between 30 and 40 agen-
cies are expected to attend the
fair. There will be representa-
tives from the police department,
the department of social services,
mental health department, hos-
pitals and prisons.
"This is a good opportu-
nity' for graduate and under-
graduates who are entering the
job market to see what is out
there Peterson said.
This career day, hosted by
the School of Social Workde-
partment of criminal justice, the
Graduate Association of Social
Workers and Alphi Phi Sigma, is
their third annual career day for
the school. Alphi Phi Sigma is
theCriminal justice HonorSoci-
ety.
"This is the first step in the
interview process Peterson
said. "Often people make con-
tacts at career days that result in
employment
If helping people get wel-
fare or fighting crime does not
sound appealing to you, maybe
a career in technical and profes-
Explosives found in fields
MORRISVILLE, N.C.(AP)�
Authorities evacuated Wake
County soccer fields and called in
an Army explosive ordnance
demolition unit after two boys dis-
covered three Civil War-era mor-
tar shells at a creek on Sunday.
The boys' discovery brought
a rapid end to soccer matches still
in play, said Lewis Hannah, father
of one of the boys.
The shells probably were left-
overs from a skirmish between
Confederate and Union forces 129
years ago this month at what now
is the Cedar Fork Soccer Center in
Morrisville, Hannah said.
The park was closed and will
remain closed until an Army crew
does a sweep of the area, which it
expects to complete Monday. Two
of the shells still had fuses and
could have posed a danger.
Alex, 8, a second-grader at
Morrisville Elementary School, and
B.J. Shillinglaw, 10,aneighborwho
attends Washington Elementary,
found the shells Sunday afternoon
while they were trying to throw
back unwanted fish.
"We were pretty excited be-
cause we had never really seen one
of those bombs in our life Alex
said. "We didn't expect to find it
because we didn't know there was
a battlefield there once
The boys were going to put
the fish in the creek at the park
when Alex spotted a shell on the
shore next to the creek. Alex said
the shells looked like "little torpe-
does
After pulling up two more
from the water with a net, Alex and
B.J. hauled two of the objects 30
yards to a soccer field, where fam-
ily members were watching Alex's
brother Tyler finish a game.
"They just walked up on the
field and said, 'Look what we
found " Hannah said. "It was not
what we anticipated
sional writing does.
On Wed April 20, the stu
dents and faculty of the Master's
of Arts in Professional and Tech-
nical Writing and members of
the Society for Technical Com-
munication, will host their first
Information Exchange Day in
General Classroom from 9:30
a.m. until 12:30 p.m.
Nearly 20 companies will
be represented by technical writ-
ers, editors, media specialists and
other professional writers. The
Technical and Professional Com-
munication master's program,
which is fairly new to ECU, of-
fers students who enjoy writing,
the opportunity to write text
more marketable than creative
writing.
Graduates of the program
are now employed as technical
writers, editors of medical jour-
nals, public relations special-
ists and layout designers. Tech-
nical writing involves writing
a wide range of documents
from brochures to software
documentation.
Students interested in
finding out more about profes-
sional and technical writing are
encouraged to ship by the main
hall of General Classroom
Building to speak with com-
pany representatives.
"Career day is important
for students to know what po-
tential employers are looking
for said Tammy Carter, presi-
dent of the ECU student chap-
ter of The Society for Technical
Communication (STC) Italso
is crucial for companies to
know there is a qualified and
talented group of professional
writers at ECU
Murderer looking at life term
WILMINGTON (AP) � Ju-
rors will rest easier if they sentence
Kenneth Junior French to life in
prison for the bloody murders at a
Fayetteville restaurant last year, a
defense attorney said today.
A prosecutor said French
showed no remorse for the killings.
As the arguments proceeded, rela-
tives of the victims cried freely.
French, 23, was convicted
April 1 of four counts of first-degree
murder and eight counts of assault.
He killed four peopleand wounded
eight others at Luigi's restaurant
last Aug. 6.
Jurors who convicted him
now must decide if his punishment
will be life in prison or death.
French will personally plead
for Ws Ufe d urmg closmg arguments
today.
Defense lawyer James Parish
said the law doesn't require the
death penalty.
"Whenever this is through,
and you think about it a week from
now or a year from now, I would
suggest if you spare his life, it will
be easier for you to remember it
Parish said. "And if you thinkabout
thiscase 10 years from now, he will
still be in prison
Defense lawyers contend
French suffered from pathological
intoxication when he stalked
through the restaurant, shooting
anyone who spoke.
The combina tion of excessive
drinking and memories of an abu-
sive childhood made French snap
and go on the rampage, they said.
Prosecutors will point to the
calculated nature of the killings.
District Attorney EdGrannis
already has pointed out the killing
of Ethel Pa rrous as she pleaded for
mercy and the killing of James C.
Kidd as he shielded his son.
Mrs. Parrous and her hus-
band Pete, who owned the popu-
lar restaurant, were killed along
with Kidd and Wesley Scott Cover,
both patrons.
Grannis said French didn't
show remorse for his actions.
STUDENTS
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m -��. m �





April 14, 1994
1 he hast Carolinian
Blacks more susceptible to cancer
SAN i R i IM O (AP)
Blacks cannot metabolize one oi
the most deadh cancer-causing
chemicals in cigarette smoke as
well a- unites a new studv
�.hows.
1 hat may explain why black
smoker are 50 percent more
likely to get lung cancer and to
die from it. fohn'Richie ot the
.American Health Foundation
said Sunday.
"There are some ery strik-
ing differences in the waj blacks
and whites metabolize (chemi-
cals) in cigarette smoke he said.
fhis represents a significant
public health problem
The data indicates blacks
have less of a capacity than whites
to detoxify NNK, one of the most
significant tobacco-related car-
cinogens linked to lung earner.
Richie told the annual meeting ot
the American Association tor
. arucr Research.
The results are particularly
relevant because cigarette manu-
facturers are aggressively target-
ing blacks in marketing cam-
paigns, he added. The tobacco
Institute has denied targeting any
one segment ot the population.
Ric hie and his colleagues
evaluated smokers tor products
oi k excreted in urine, lie
noted that the same i hemi als �
NNALand NNA1 -Glut - were
measured in a previous founda-
tion study linking secondhand
smoke to lung cancer.
WAI is highly carcino-
genic, inducing lung tumors in
mice. The studv found that black
smokers had 30to 35 percent more
WAI in their urine than whites.
' The bottom line is that
whites have more ot the detoxi-
fied metabolid and blacks have
less said Dr Ste en I lecht, one
� t the stud) s co-authors.
I he lung cancer trial tested
"il blacks and 15 white smokers
matched forage sex and thenum-
ber of cigarettes smoked. It is now
being expanded to include 160
people and will eventually look
at 320. 1 he results seems to be
holding, Richie said.
The test subjects live in the
racially-mixed city ot Mount
Vernon, A
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while ou wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S Evans St Hours:
Pittman Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
reenville NC
Steven I annenbaum, a pro-
lessor ot chemistry and toxicol-
ogy at the Massachusetts Insti-
tute ot technology and one ot
the outside evaluators for the
study, said the NNK produ( tsin
the urine has broader implica-
tions.
I his adds weight to the
idea that there's something in
tobacco smoke that does cause
lung cancer he said.
"It's an interesting new
finding, added Dr. Regina
Santella ot Columbia University,
who is measuring how cigarette
smoke products bind to DNA.
"Now we must determine,
is there a genetic basis or some
environmental factor that's re-
sponsible1" Santella said.
Blacks and whites, for ex-
ample, may eat different
amounts oi truitsand vegetables,
which could affect their ability
to metabolize cancer-producing
i hemicals, she said.
It is likely that a combina-
tion of both environment and ge-
netics will be found to play a role
in who develops cancer, al-
though scientists are finding an
increasingly strong genetic role
in susceptibility to the disease.
Richie said his test may
eventually be used to show
whether individual smokers
have a higher susceptibility to
lung cancer. But they will have
to wait because the test, which is
very complex and labor inten-
sive, is not vet available to phy-
sicians.
The 20 Who
Refuse To "Click It"
Stick It To
The 80�Who Do.
"Click It or Ticket" is working. Eighty percent of North
Carolina's drivers are buckling up their seat belts, compared
to 65 a year ago.
But aren't you tired of subsidizing those drivers who refuse
to obey the law and "Click" their seat belts? It's a crime how
much they cost us in higher health care costs, higher taxes
and increased insurance bills.
Remember, if you get caught not wearing a seat belt, you
will be ticketed. No warnings, no excuses. And you will lose
a nice pile of money JUKBT
OR TICKET.
Sponsored by The Governor's Highway Safety Initiative and
Law Enforcement Agencies Statewide.
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Continued from page 1
an attorne advocate to represent
the child foi tin' duration of the
case hut does net serve as the
child's legal guardian and has no
control over the child's person or
property. Unlike the attorney ad-
vocates, the GA1 volunteers do
not provide legal representation
tor the child. Rather, the) assist in
the presenting ot the case.
" I heseare not your average
volunteers said Catherine Darby,
the( IA1 district administrator tor
Pitt County "We have a lot ot
really dedicated people working
for us
During 1992-1993, 2,785
C i I. olunteers worked with 155
attorney advocates to serve over
1 3,422children across NorthCaro-
lina. In 1'itt County, there are 68
(iALsand twoattorney advocates
rhebiggest challenge that theGAL
program faces every year is insur-
ing that there will be a volunteer
advocate for every case.
Because ot the potential ot
not having enough volunteers for
every case, the North Carolina
GAI program is kicking off its
mm4 public awareness campaign,
called "Speak up lor North
Carolina's abused and neglected
children, during April, which has
been recognized as Child Abuse
Prevention Awareness Month and
National Volunteer Month. Vol-
unteers are needed in all 10(1 coun-
ties in North Carolina.
Since the participants in the
GAI program are volunteers,
there is no special training re-
quired beforehand to become a
C.l . I he volunteers undergo a
ZO-Z hour training program (hat
:s conducted by the local district
administrator. GAI volunteers
learn about courtroom procedure
as well aseffec tiveadvocacy tech-
niques tor children.
ihe role of a .IAL to a child
is important I he I l. olunteers
otter the children that they repre-
sent trust and advocacy during
the complex legal proceedings.
Ihev also encourage the children
toexpress their own opinions and
hopes, while remaining objective
observers.
"This is a highK effective
program Darby said. "These
volunteers, when paired with the
attorneys, do a lot to move the
case along
"here is no requirement on
the number of cases that the( !ALs
take Most volunteers take mi
about twi � i time.C hi the
average, a olunteer m.u -1
about 10-15 hours a month in
(ourt tor ea !� . ase. 1 he time
spent on ea h tse ai ies a
i .isc do
A GAI olunteer is dedi
cated tothecaseuntilitisclosed.
Usually, there mhii ase rotation
among the l ALs. ITus helps to
provide a consistent figure in
the proceedings and provide
i ontinuity tor the i hild.
"Ihe volunteers strive to
reunite, if possible, the child with
the pa rents, so that thei hilddoes
not languish in toster care
I Xirbvsaid. "(. Kir mam goal is to
see that permanency is estab-
lished
The GAI program also
sponsors a program that pro-
ides probonoattorneys tochil-
dren who are victims or wit-
nesses in criminal cases.
HEAPMG HOME
TlCSUMMER?
Sw 'N 7 v-H wfiiti 7we EMGRrtr Siiv
Buy a subscription to The East Carolinian for the summer -
for only 20 bucks! Each week you will get the paper by mail.
I1
1 Mail your check or money order to The East Carolinian, Student Pubs Bldg,
ECU, Greenville, NC 27858353.
Namej
I Address
I City, State, Zipi
VARSITY CHEERLEADING
TRYOUTS
im wi
1
m
j
- �?�
m
WHEN: APRIL 22-23, 1994 �
WHERE: MINGES COLISEUM LOBBY
TIME: 5:00 PM TRYOUT: APRIL 24
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT SHANNON SMITH at 757-4672
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable tune - and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At ur parents' request, vour unlit)
service may be put in their name Just pick
up a "Request tor Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 21 1 in the Off Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities m office, 200M 5th
Street
Have your parents complete the
application (which must he notarized) and
mail iUo GUC PO Box 847. Greenville,
N C. 27835 1847, alt Customer Service
�Remember to attach .i "Ictu i
redil ii parents power c mpai .
Option B: Dtposjt Required
It you wish to have the utility service put in
vour name, a deposit will he required Deposits
arc as follows
with
iru or out electric
; beating or gai p�v-e heating
:ricOnly S100
Electric v. Water Si00
Electric. Water & Gas SI 10
, & Gas S100
S75
SS5
SS5
S'1
can s�ve time by mailing the deposit
in advance Be sure to include youi name, where
scrMvV will be required, when service
on and j phone number where we may reach you
mi arnvai at the -
Greenville
Utilities





4 7 The East Carolinian
April 14, 1994
Remember, all of
the world is a
cookie jar, and all
of my news writers
are crumbs. L
however, am a
chocolate chip
with a scheduled
meeting today at
4:00 p.m
WING CHUN
Continued from page 1
r,�
EAST CAROLINA
COMMUNICATION SOCIETY
PRESENTS
A SNEAK PEEK OF ECU'S
VIDEO YEARBOOK
"Til� TIRIASIUjRE �HIE�T"
WHEN: Wednesday, April 20, 1994
WHERE: Room 1015 GCB
TIME: 6:30 to 8:00 pm
FREE REFRESHMENTS
Pk 19 tout cv �a "TREASURE CHESr a! Barefoot On The Mall
fancy, but in reality, it is among
the most effective of the martial
arts. In the school, students are
immediately taught the essen-
tial basic moves. These moves
are practiced over and over again
until the student is able to react
to any situation knowing the cor-
rect move to use.
"Think about a basketball
player Duclos said. "They don't
know 50 million ways to dribble
a ball and 50 million ways to
shoot, but by training the basics
over and over again they get crisp
and tight with what they do, and
that's where you get your ability
level from The art of Wing
Chun allows a person to wipe
out an attack the second it is ini-
tiated.
The Wing Chun system
does not place its emphasis on
strength or muscular build. In
fact, the art of Wing Chun was
developed by a woman, and it is
the only martial arts style that
was developed by a woman.
"We rely more upon pre-
ciseness of technique and the
style itself as opposed to brute
strength Duclos said. However,
students taking Wing Chun do
power exercises in their work-
outs that develop tendon
strength and muscular endur-
ance.
People studying Wing
Chun can learn enough to be able
to defend themselves in a rela-
tively short period of time, as
compared to other martial arts.
If a person goes to the school two
or three nights a week, he or she
will be able to defend themselves
fairly well within six months or
so. "I think the Wing Chun train-
ing definitely erables a person
to be a much more effective self-
defensive street fighter in a
shorter period of time Duclos
said.
Maurice Duclos.studied
several other forms of martial
arts before starting Wing Chun.
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He eventually met up with Situ
Brian Edwards, who taught him
the art of Wing Chun. "Sifu" is a
respectful Chinese term for in-
structor or a mentor. "Even after
studying martial arts for years
and years, he (Edwards) showed
me that what I knew was noth-
ing Duclos said.
Edwards teaches at the
Wing Chun home base in Fay-
etteville. Edwards runs all the
Wing Chun schools in the area.
Currently, Edwards is one of the
best Wing Chun teachers in the
world. "Brian Edwards is both a
premier martial artist and in-
structor, and he's definitely the
one that most impressed me out
of anyone I've ever seen Duclos
said. Edwards is an eighth gen-
eration disciple of the Wing Chun
style and has 21 years of experi-
ence in it.
There are currently about
50 students at the Greenville
school. The school is open Mon-
day through Friday from 7:00
a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and Monday,
Wednesday, Friday and Satur-
day from 2:00p.m. to 4:00p.m.
Duclos pointed out that this al-
lows for smaller classes and more
individualized training. The
rates for the school are $50.00
per month for a 12-month con-
tract, $60.00 per month for a 6-
month contract, and $70.00 per
month for a month-to-month
contract. The rates may seem
steep at first but Duclos said that
if you look at how many times
the school is open, the price is
not that bad.
There are also Wing Chun
Schools in Fayetteville and Ra-
leigh, and they are planning on
opening schools in Charlotte,
Wilmington and Greensboro. Ac-
cording to Duclos the Wing Chun
style is one of the more popular
styles of Kung Fu. "Wing Chun
is sought after in the martial arts
community and we're spread-
ing Duclos said.
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April 14, 1994
The East Carolinian 5
SGA
Continued from page 1
Reid said I think the people work-
ing the polls ought to be totally non-
biased and if someone asks them
who they voted for, they should
say, 'I'm sorry, this is a secret ballot
I cannot divulge that informa-
tion
"That's how I'm going to in-
struct my poll workers in the future,
but I didn't have that authority to
tell them that before responded
Elections Chair Dale Emery. "I
wasn't there at the polling booths.
David or Ian weren't there either.
We have to rely on eyewitnesses
and sworn affidavits. That's my
position�if there's a problem, let's
get it out of the way so they can deal
with the issues
David Richmond, who cam-
paigned for Reid in front of Joyner
Library on election day, said he saw
several instances of wrongdoing at
that polling station.
"First, I told TEC at about
two o'clock I saw Keith Dyer, with
a Brynn Thomas campaign button
on, standing behind the pollster
Richmond said. "It was hard to tell
ifhewas talking to the voters,buthe
was talking to the pollsters.
"The second time, I was stand-
ing at the brick wall near the li-
brary. A little bit later, I saw two
Thomas campaign workers start
talking to people he knew. He basi-
cally took this one girl and pushed
her up to the votingbooth. He stayed
there thewhole time whileshevoted
and he was talking to her while she
voted
Dyer said charges that he vio-
la ted any election rules were "abso-
lutely untrue
"I've been here for three
years he said. "I know what the
rules are. I am definitely not dumb
enough to do that
Dyer said that he was check-
ing the polls throughout the day to
find outaboutthevoter turnout. He
said that people may have misinter-
preted his approaching the ballot
boxes as taking people to the boxes
and telling them how to vote.
Eastman filed a similar com-
plaint with the elections committee.
He said Monday, "I walked around
the comer with these two girls and
I told them, 'You go do it (approach
the polling station and act tike you
do not know whom to vote for)' and
they went up there, and they told
me, 'Yeah, they were telling people
who to vote for
Candidate for president
Brynn Thomas said that he had no
knowledge of any rules violations
on the part of his campaign work-
ers. Thomas was out of town for
most of election day attending an
SGA conference.
"I instructed my campaign
workers not to break any rules he
said. "My campaign workers knew
the rules. It is also the responsibility
of the poll keepers to keep people
out of the 25-foot line. They should
ask them to leave
Reid's third complaint con-
cerned Emery's affiliation with the
fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon. Both
Emery and Thomas are members of
that fraternity.
"No, look at the people in
SGA, a lot of Sig Eps are in there
Emery said. "I'm not going to be
responsible for the fact that I was
chosen unanimously for this posi-
tion
"I think Emery should re-
sign Reid said. "I think there is a
clear conflict of interest. I think the
elections were poorly run. I think
they were biased to Brynn Thomas
Reid also said he thought the
decision to hold a special run-off
between Ian Eastman and himself
was unfair. "I think the decision to
hold, first, a run-off between the
two people for second place and
then another election for someone
to run against Brynn Thomas is
unfair
To resolve Eastman's com-
plaints concerning the poll work-
ers, Emery told the SGA General
Assembly Monday that he had con-
tacted the Navigators, a campus
Christian organization to man the
polls. He said he felt that none of the
candidates could get a fair hearing
before the elections committee.
"I'm just going to let them
vote on it Emery said. "It might
makeuslookguiltyand that'ssome-
thing that I'm really concerned
about.
"The complaints are going to
have to be proven. They are very
hard to prove, and if an outside
group runs the polls next time, then
it shouldn't matter anyway
Emery said Monday night that
Eastman agreed to this arrange-
ment, and chose to overlook his
past complaints in an effort to move
ahead with the campaign.
Finally, Reid said he believes
he found out who printed and dis-
tributed thenegativecampaign fly-
ers about him and his running ma te,
Scarlette Gardner. He blamed Tho-
mas Blue, former president of the
College Democrats for the flyers,
stating that although he was unable
to prove it, the flyers were similar in
design to some "Conservatives for
Change" flyers distributed by Blue
during the 1992 presidential cam-
paign.
"I'm positive who did it Reid
said. "There's no doubt in my
mind Reid said a possible motive
for the attack involves city politics.
Reid managed Greenville mayor
Nancy Jenkins' last campaign, while
Blue supported her opponent and
is also close to a city councilman
who frequently votes against
Jenkins.
"David Reid is a friend of
mine Blue said, in response to the
accusations. "Iwasoneof thepeople
who talked to him early on about
running. I feel strongly about his
candidacy, and it breaks my heart
to think that a friend feels this way
ABLE
Con't
from
pagel
SAM
Continued from page 1
are active on campus and sub-
mit a nomination. Out of these,
they pick 37 regional winners,
and out of that they pick 16 na-
tional winners. And we had two
of them
Hebert also won his third
Outstanding Faculty Advisor
Award, one award that he
downplayed. "Yeah, I won too.
The student chapters nominate
the advisors and I think there
were 10 other advisors who won
awards
In addition to the case com-
petition, the conference offered
several speakers on the topic,
"Cooperating to Compete:
Building Alliances for Competi-
tive Success Students attended
workshops on interviewing and
networking and panel discus-
sions on such firms as Whirl-
pool, USAirBritish Airways
and EDS.
"The representatives from
EDS talked about how they de-
cided to choose sports as their
alliance Hebert said. "They
adopted World Cup soccer with
whom to forge in alliance. They
will be handling all the logis-
tics, the electronic part of it and
the management of data for it. It
will be broadcast all over the
world
"What I liked the most
about it was that students were
the first priority Miles said.
"They allowed us to submit our
resumes to be put into a book-
let. The booklet will be sent to
the Fortune 200 companies free
of charge
Hebert said that SAM is
"an organization of students in-
terested in, or hoping to get into
management in some way He
said SAM is oriented toward any
major, not just management or
even the School of Business.
SAM brings in speakers to
talk about topics of interest to
future managers, Hebert said.
For example, Parker Overton,
founder of Overton's sporting
goods store and Bill Bowen,
founder of Bowen Cleaners have
both spoken to the group in the
past. SAM members also take
plant tours of such industries as
Empire Brush and Overton's.
Students who participate
in the conference are selected
using a "performance ap-
praisal system Hebert said
Students earn points through
various campus activities and
the people with the most
points are eligible for the an-
nual trip.
"It is an all-expense paid
trip Hebert said. "SGA ap-
propriated us some money,
which paid for two plane tick-
ets and registration, and we-
raised the money for the rest
SAM will hold its next'
meeting Tuesday, April 19, at
3:30 p.m. in room 1028 of the
General Classroom Building.
New officers will be elected
and new members are invited
to attend.
I WON 1993
I BEST NEW VOCAL
GROUP AWARD
ACADEMY OF
COUNTRY MUSIC
AWARDS
April 21st - Last Night Club Appearance
r$2.00 OFF WITH THIs"c0UP0n"1
i1
Exxon Products.
$3.49 a 6-pack
40oz & 32oz
atS1.19 i
CIGARETTES starting at $1.15 tax
King's & 100's at $1.53 tax
2753 East 10th St.
(Beside Colonial Heights Shopping Center)
m
UI.J.UI,
could not say whether or not disci-
plinary actionhadbeentakenagainst
Officer Kittrell.
"Wehave the fear thatwehave
an officer on staff that can brutalize
African Americans and we can't do
anything about it Carter said.
"We're just fed up with the instances
thathavebeenoccurringon this cam-
pus he said. "Students have been
stopped by Public Safety for no rea-
son whatsoever
In reference to this point,
Crocker said she was reviewing the
Standard Operating Procedure
(SOP) manual. "We are takinga look
at the SOP manual and making sure
that it addresses the things it needs
to as to diversity-type issues she
said.
Carter said that he met with
Crocker last semester, but that she
has failed to produce a written plan
of action to help prevent differential
treatment of African American stu-
dents.
At the end of the impromptu
meeting, Getsinger asked the stu-
dents to meet with Crocker and
membersofmeadministrationagain
to work out their problems.
Carterdecided to hold an open
meeting Monday, April 18, at5p.m.
at Mendenhall, probably in the fac-
ulty dining hall. A second business
meeting was scheduled for Wednes-
day, April 20 at 4 p.m. All interested
parties are inv ited to attend the open
meeting on Monday, Carter said.
BS in Communication
majors
(Current and Interested)
(RadioTV, Broadcasting,
Announcing, Production)
You are cordially invited to attend a
Welcome Reception
Meet and talk with Dr. Charles Coble, Dean, and
Dr. Larry Auld, Chairperson
(questions and discussion)
WHEN.Monday, April 18, 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: General Classroom Building 1028
Refreshments provided
a i JL Tx

s
I
I
THE LEO JENKINS
MEMORIAL
gainstj
CANCk
JOIN THE FIGHT
APRIL 29-30
Starting Time: 6 p.m.
Registration begins at 4:30 p.m.
at East Carolina University track
Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer.
Team members run or jog in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call 32X-2o5o
FUN FOOD AND EXERCISE
GUARANTEED FOR ALL!
Sponsored by:
Bud Light
Eastern Carolina Coca-Cola
GlaxoCerenex Pharmaceuticals
Talk FM WZCI FM 98.3
GlennonBttton
Quixote Travels, Inc
HOSTED BY:
Alpha Phi Omega
American Cancer Society
APPLICATION TO PARTICIPATE
I will recruit a team - send me information
I would like to be on a team
Enclosed $10 per person
Mail to: American Cancer Society, PO Box 377
Greenville, NC 27835
i;
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU I


c
m

D m

3










MONDAY, APRIL 18th,
7:30 P.M.
"� Tfc T '
RF
FREE TO THE
PUBLIC.
RECEPTION WILL FOLLOW.
FOR INFORMATION. CALL 757-4715.





F
The East Carolinian
Page 6
Opinion
April 14. 1994
I
I
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Gina Jones, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
t Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kempie, Staff Illustrator
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jodi Connelly. Copy Editor
PhebeToler. Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
friasthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
"For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
General Manager says goodbye
I sit here today writing this piece and
reflecting on past memories. A year ago to-
morrow, I was appointed General Manager
of The East Carolinian. During my term I have
dealt with many things. First of all there was
"change I show up to work to find out that
half of my staff is graduating and half of that
half are managers. So starting off was a great
feat, as was producing that first newspaper.
But to no avail, we did what we started out to
do, though it took us almost 36 hours to
complete.
During my term, my staff and I expe-
rienced confusion, frustration and joy. All in
that order. Training the staff over the sum-
mer was not such a great task, but to watch
them leave was even tougher. Enough of the
cdmplaining. I just wanted to show that put-
ting a student newspaper together isn't as
easy as it looks.
Over the last eight months I have
worked closely with a staff of about 22 stu-
dents. Now these guys really put their heart
into their work. I have seen dedication be-
fore, but if you were to come up here on a
production night you would see real dedica-
tion and heart that is put into producing a
quality newspaper. These students deal with
everyday life, teachers, homework, finals,
pfdjects and also stay up to ungodly hours
making sure this paper gets to your local
newsstand. Some nights (far from many) these
students may get to leave at the decent hour
oMl:30 p.m and have been up some nights
until 3:30 a.m. These same students have
classes the next morning starting at 8:00 and
y:UU a.m. bo you see, there is much sweat and
tears that goes into bringing you this fine
newspaper.
Finally, I would like to give some ad-
vice and say a few words of encouragement
to the new staff moving in soon. First there is
the new General Manager, Gregory Dickens.
I wish you the best of luck and remember,
never think it's going to be OK, because it's
usually not. Next would be Maureen Rich,
the expectant new Managing Editor. I leave
you with a great staff and the "How-to manual
for being a Managing Editor overnight I
leave Burt Aycock a bag of nuts for helping
me proof this article. To Brian Olson, I leave
a large pizza with everything on top for those
late, late nights. To the new Lifestyle Editor,
I leave you a face and a body to fill the seat.
To Tonya Heath, the new Advertising Direc-
tor, I wish you great success and hope you
can find a staff by the Summer (or at least by
the Fall). To Tony Dunn, I leave you with a
map to The East Carolinian and "another how-
to book To Joe Horst, I leave a pesmanent
position at The East Carolinian and many
thanks for all your help. To Deborah Daniel,
I leave an honorary membership to the liter-
ary club of America. She has played the sup-
portive role in all our jobs and I wish her the
best. Imagine what it would be like in a day
without Deborah, Hmm!
To everyone else that is not graduat-
ing this Spring, good luck next year and keep
up the good work. I know you'll fair well in
the next chapter of "The often very late show
of The East Carolinian
By Laura Wright
Today's folklore often misleading and far-fetched
The world is an
unsafe place. On top
of having to worry
about grades and
such, now we have to
worry about all of this
other nonsense too.
Have you heard about the
gangs that have moved down
South from New York City and
Chicago? These guys drive
around at night without turn-
ing on their headlights. If you
flash your brights at them, to
indicate
that they
need to
turn on
L h e i r
lights, they
follow you
home and
kill you.
fee war e;
don't flash
your ���������im
Frights at
anyone. My mother's best
friend's daughter's
boyfriend's aunt's brother
. knows someone who got killed
by one of these psychos.
Also, while I'm distrib-
uting warnings, don't drink
any soft drink out of a can. My
sister's best friend read some-
where that there have been
Several reports of people
jdrinking canned soft drinks
and discovering rat parts float-
ing around in their drinks.
Same things is true for fried
phicken; be careful about
(where you get it. I know some-
bne who knows someone
whose cousin ate a fried mouse
pnce by accident.
The world is an unsafe
?lace. On top of having to
vorry about grades and rela-
ionships and such, now we
"lave to worry about all of this
pther nonsense too.
And there are some seri-
ously deranged people out
here, too. Did you hear about
he guy who gave his dog a
bath and tried to dry it off by
putting it in the microwave?
Needless to say, the pup ex-
ploded. What a mess.
OK, I'm really not that gull-
ible. Did you know that gullible
isn't in the dictionary? We hear
tales like these all of our lives
and, if you're
like me, you
may even be-
lieve them for
a while. They
usually in-
volve some
fear inspiring
detail or some
repulsive ele-
ment and usu-
i, ally they are
linked to some-
one with whom we are remotely
familiar.
For example, "my best
friend's uncle teaches junior
high school and he told my
friend about some girl who
(this story usually involves the
surgical removal of a misplaced
hot dog. Oh come on; you know
you've heard this one before).
Thr-e shared stories are of-
ten referred to as urban folklore
and in a culture that is largely
visually oriented, these folk tales
represent what remains of a once
prominent oral tradition of story
telling. At one time, all informa-
tion was communicated through
the spoken work.
Later, written discourse
replaced verbal transactions,
specifically as a way of preserv-
ing one's heritage. Because writ-
ing allows individuals to record
specific events, file them away,
and bring them out again later,
there was less of a need to re-
member historical events and
moral codes of conduct in order
to communicate them to "the
next generation Similarly, as
we become more and more me-
diatelevision oriented, our
need for written communication
becomes obsolete. Our memo-
ries get even worse.
But these folk tales are still
around and as far fetched as they
often are, we believe them until
we stop to examine the improb-
ability of the events involved.
The main reason that these tales
exist is that they help to dis-
courage culturally unacceptable
behavior.
They provide us with hor-
ror stories about people who go
against the understood moral
code upon which our culture is
based. They forewarn us about
the possible outcomes of our ac-
tions.
Take as an example the
headlightgang violence story.
It seems that this tale expresses
the idea that in an increasingly
violent society, it is not safe to
offer assistance to strangers. Just
look what happens if we attempt
to inform the driver of unlighted
cars that their lights are off: We
end up dead.
Chances are, these stories
have a basis somewhere in real-
ity. Someone may very well have
found a rat in a soda can once.
As a result of that story, we have
grown suspicious of mass pro-
duction; we don't trust what we
can't see.
Just recently I heard about
a fraternity that hired a strip-
per. After this woman stripped,
she proceeded to have sex with
every member of the fraternity
and now it has been discovered
that she had AIDS at the time.
Once again, woman leads to the
downfall of man.
I think one of my sister's
boyfriend's cousin's sons was
in that fraternity
My Jog HtKE 13
FlrxOHP im off
TO OTK6K MPVf7ATU�tS
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
I would like to comment on the disgruntled
student's attempted character assassination of a
colleague of mine and my Department that was
printed in the April 7th issue of your paper. The
letter was so full of untruths, misrepresentations
and errors, that I initially felt it didn't deserve a
response; however, since some students are unfa-
miliar with our Department and our faculty, I do
not wish to let the letter go unchallenged.
I am amazed at how the facts of Mr. Khoshnan's
complaint have changed since he first made me
aware of the situation at the end of fall semester or
early this semester. I recall no allegation of unprofes-
sional conduct of any kind on the part of my col-
league at that time. Mr. Khoshnan openly acknowl-
edged to me that he had gotten the grade that his
course scores entitled him to receive, and that the
grade was consistent with the majority of the grades
he received on assignments and tests over the semes-
ter.
What Mr. Khoshnan wanted my colleague
to do was to combine selected good scores from
both semesters, and come up with a grade that
would be higher than he got either time. Since I
did not agree with his complaint either, I under-
stand that he continued his protests to higher
authorities, perhaps adding to the story at each
level.
Anyone (students and faculty alike) who
knows the faculty member that was singled out,
knows that he would never use the language
attributed to him in Mr. Khoshnan's letter.
The failure rates quoted by Mr. Khoshnan
are also highly exaggerated and incorrect. Yes,
General Chemistry is a difficult and time con-
suming course, and far too many students do not
pass it. This is true for all of the introductory
science courses in all science departments (and
dare I say other areas as well). New, difficult
topics are presented daily, that must be under-
stood and not just memorized.
Successful students devote many hours to
classroom attendance, assignment reading, prob-
lem solving, asking questions, and seeking guid-
ance about problematic material, and study, study,
study. The Chemistry Department assigns its more
experienced and patient faculty to these intro-
ductory courses for we realize that much "per-
sonalized" guidance and assistance is needed in
these courses.
But these faculty can only teach the mate-
rial and try to motivate the student. They can-
not learn it for the student. The student must
assume responsibility for the learning, and seek
assistance when course material doesn't make
sense. Faculty involved with these courses fre-
quently are teaching over 200 students a semes-
ter. This may not allow much "personalized"
time for each individual student, but few
enough students come by for extra help that
those that do generally get the personal atten-
tion and guidance that they need.
Most of these faculty offer problem ses-
sions and quiz reviews for their students, not
because they are required (they are not), not
because they get paid extra for them (they
don't), but because they care for their students
and are more than willing to participate in any
activity that enhances the learning opportuni-
ties for their students. The Chemistry Depart-
ment also provides a Student Learning Center
with tutors and supplemental material for all
of our introductory courses.
If we were the Gods that Mr. Khoshnan
thinks that we feel we are, then it would be a
simple matter for us to snap our fingers and
bestow all chemical knowledge on our stu-
dents. We obviously are not! We are no less
human than any of our students. We can only
do our best, just as we expect our students to do
their best.
Unfortunately not every student is will-
ing, able, and motivated enough to devote the
time and effort needed to understand the course
material. Those that do, earn good grades as an
indication of this "learned" knowledge. We
cannot cheapen these "earned" grades by giv-
ing "unearned" grades to students who don't
deserve them.
Mr. Khoshnan also implied that he is a
senior chemistry major, ready to graduate and
move on to a chemistry job or professional
school. He is in fact a second degree student in
his first year at East Carolina, taking freshman
and sophomore level courses. He is several
years away from being considered a senior
chemistry major.
James E. Hix Jr. Ph.D.
Associate Professor & Director of Under-
graduate Studies
Department of Chemistry
To the Editor:
I am writing in response to the editorial
written on Kurt Cobain's death (Kurt Cobain
Wrongly Deified in Death 4-12). I am shocked at
the anger the writer expresses for a group of
mourners. I understood that not everyone is ac-
cepting to the "Generation X" title or alternative
music, but this editorial was cruel.
You may be forced to accept a "disillusioned
martyrhero" as your representative, but I don't
feel that I've been forced to accept anything. To
many Kurt was a hero, but to others he was just a
singer. I admired Cobain's song writing. He put
the pain and questions of a generation into a
song. You may not be part of this particular gen-
eration, but like it or not there are many unhappy
suicidal 20- year olds in the world. What crime do
you believe was committed in a few albums?
You were quick to point out his drug use as
an example of his "severely messed up life
Cobain used drugs because he needed to cope
with his terrible stomach condition. He used drugs
as a way to kill the pain. I don't see this as a crime.
If I was in that much pain I'd probably do the
same thing. Cobain was very unhappy, but why
should he be condemned for his personal feel-
ings?
You wrote that Kurt didn't want us, that
obviouslv is not true. If Kurt didn't want us he
wouldn't have poured out his soul in his music.
Kurt died because he felt he was lying to his
fans by pretending to be happy. I'm not trying
to justify his action, but this is the reason he
gave in is own words.
I don't believe that Kurt is a hero, but I do
believe that he deserves respect for his accom-
plishments in the music industry. If it wasn't
for Nirvana, it's likely that Seattle bands would
still be back in Seattle.
The only thing I agree with in your col-
umn is the statement that our generation "is
not lost, disillusioned, hopeless, cynical, drift-
ing people Our "generation" is whatever we
make it. You can't blame Douglas Coupland or
Nirvana fans for the outcome.
Kurt did what he felt he had to do, and no
one should judge his decision. I only hope that
his wife and daughter won't be the receivers of
other's anger and disgust.
Gena Kirby -
Freshman
Social Work
Editor's note: Kurt Cobain, on more than one occasion, attempted to alienate his audience by declaring that
he didn 'I want the fame and fortune that went along with being a musician.
All letters, in order to be considered for publication, MUST be typed,
under 250 words, and contain your name, class rank and major and a
working daytime phone number. Send these specimens to: Letters tc the
Editor, The The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville,
N.C 27858-4353.





The East Carolinian
April 14, 1994
Classifieds
Page 7
For Rent
For Rent
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1-6 BEDROOM HOMES, condo's,
duplexes, and apartments for rent.
$390 up! Short term lease available!
ftnders 321-6708 small fee. Near cam-
pus rentals available now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING SER-
VICE! Need a roommate list your ad
free. To get a list of all the people
Jooking for a roommate 321 -6708 small
fee
SUBLEASE for summer or take over
lease. Two bedroom apt. near cam-
jus, $380 monthly. Need one or two
people to cover half rent or more. May
4s paid, call Neil, 758-2334
WALK TO CAMPUS! Available May
1st. Young professional couple seeks
responsible student to rent a room one
house from campus! Includes cable,
phone, utilities and private entrance.
Graduate student preferred. Refer-
ences required. Call 758-9903.
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER. 1 bed-
room, newly built. $275 month. Avail-
able May. Call Lynn 355-1486 or Kathy
830-4983 leave message.
SUMMER APARTMENT: (Mid-may
-mid-August) one bedroom, Tar River
Estates, furnished, access to pool and
sand v-ball courts, walking distance
to campus. Perfect for summer school.
Call 752-2492 anytime
AVAILABLE MAY- to take over lease.
3 bedroom2 baths wyndham Circle
Duplex with wd hookup. Rent $650
month. Call Michelle or Pam at 752-
6757
SUB-LEASEa twobedroom apt. start-
ing in Mid May. $380month and lo-
cated at King's Row Apts. Call 757-
2781 for more info.
TOWNHOUSE summer discount
Twin Oaks 3br 2 l2baths 12 month
lease$570monthdiscounted to$480
month during summer Patio, fireplace,
washerdryer hookups, pool. Call
(919) 752-2851. Available May 16th.
No Pets. Thanks.
SUBLEASE: 2 Bedroom apt. available
May-Aug. Village Green Apts. $360
month- Cable included. Contact Kelli
at 758-8591.
HOUSEMATE WANTED to share
large 3 story house 3 minutes from
campus by car. Must be non-smoker,
grad student preferred, commuter
ideal. Please call Michael G. Morris at
752-3635, leave message if no answer
available May 1st.
SUBLET FOR SUMMER SEMES-
TER! Furnished 2 bedroom, house
$500 walking distance to campus. Call
us! 752-1375 Homelocators fee
JUNE 1ST 2 bedroom duplex $325 or
large 3 bedroom duplex $425. Call us
752-1375 Homelocators fee
WALKTOCAMPUS! 1 bedroom just-
in 5235 pet ok! or August 1st. 2 bed-
room, $350 both near East 5th St Call
us 752-1375 Homelocators fee
MAY 15TH! 3 bedroom house, with 2
baths, $600 or huge 4 bedroom
townhouse with 2.5 baths, basement
and more! $800 call us 752-1375
Homelocators fee
PET LOVER! 2bedroom house $400
walk to campus! or Larger 3 bedroom
house $550, call us! 752-137:
Homelocators fee
CHEAP! CHEAP! 1 bedroom, loft
apartment $165 on campus or 2 bed-
room house 3 miles from campus
A$240 call us! 752-1375 Homelocators
fee.
ROOMMATE NEEDED May-July or
Aug or 1st session, furnished, close to
campus, cheap utilities, $175 mo. 752-
1492
UNFURNISHED LARGE FRAME
HOUSE, 6-8 bedrooms, 2 baths, for-
mal areas, suitable for responsible stu-
dent group. 2 blocks from campus.
$960month. Available June 1, possi-
bly sooner. Also private efficiency ga-
rage apt. for one. $250month. Avail-
able May 15. Please call 752-5296
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share2bedroom 1 l2bath townhouse
apt. Washerdryer, pool, tenniscourt.
$215month 1 2utilities,avail. May
1,94. 321-8406
SPACIOUS 2 BDRM 1 bath apt. near
campus on 10th st. Includes washer
dryer hookups, central heat and ac,
and basic cable. Rent $400. Need to
rent out by mid-May. Call 758-5673
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
responsible, non-smoker to share 2
bedroom apartment. $167 a month
plus 12 utilities. Deposit required.
Available May 1. Call April 752-7599
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
a large two-bedroom apartment, pets
allowed. Dishwasher, pool and laun-
dry facilities. $180 a month 1 2 utili-
ties. Available any time. Please call
756-5134.
ATTENTION new 2 bedroom 2 bath
apartment for summer sublease. Dog-
wood Hollow near campus (also avail-
able for lease renewal) For more info,
call 758-1317
ROOMMATE WANTED: Wesley
Commons Duplex. 6blocks from ECU,
washerdryer, $200 mo. 13 utili-
ties, Call Dave at 830-4030
HALF BLOCK FROM CAMPUS!
Room for rent May 1st in house on
Library ST. Has wd, dishwasher
cable. $135 a month. Deposit required.
Call Amy 830-1591
FEMALE WANTED to sublease 2 bed-
room apartment. Close to campus.
$190month and 12 utilities. I will
pay May rent. Contact Bryth 758-4450
AVAILABLE FOR FALL SEMES-
TER- 1 bedroom, in 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Located in Tar River apartment
complex. Mature, responsible female
preferred. Deposit required. $240
monthly rent plus 1 2 bills. 830-8984
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 12 block from art build-
ing, 3 blocks from downtown, 2 blocks
from Supermarket. Starting in June
call 757-1947
PREFERRED FEMALE ROOM-
MATE WANTED to share house with
males. Private room with 12 bath,
washer dryer, $160 a month. 758-
6152 available summer fall.
NOW AVAILABLE: 1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village 3 bedroom
townhouse. Mature, responsible fe-
male NS only. Quiet environment,
nicely decorated with all major appli-
ances. $230 1 3bills. 756-8459 (Sara).
ROOMMATE WANTED FOR SUM-
MER Stratford Arms; private bed-
room in 3 bedroom apartment. Call
931-9345or355-5986after9:00pm.$175
per month.
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
responsible, non-smoker to share new
3 bedroom, 212 bath townhouse for
second summer session, $200 utili-
ties. Call Karyn 931-8458.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom duplex close to campus.
$150mo. plus heating and 12 utili-
ties. Responsible, non-smoker pre-
ferred. Call 757-0632
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER or take
over lease. Two bedroom apt. 1 mile
from campus, $360 monthly. Need
two people to cover rent. Call 758-
5233
URGENT! female roommate needed
May 1st to share 2 bedroom apt. $157
1II cable utilities. NS please! Call
Penny at 830-3761
TO SHARE 3 bedroom 2 bath. $120 a
month plus 13 utilities. Deposit re-
quired, male or female, student or
professional must be social. Call 758-
1522 after 6:00pm or leave message.
El Help Wanted
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors,
Instructors, Kitchen, Office, Grounds
for western North Carolina's finest Co-
ed youth summer sports camp. Over
25 activities including waterski, heated
pool, tennis, horseback, art Cool
mountain climate, good pay and great
fun! Non-smokers. For application
brochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pin-
ewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing Bro-
chures! Spare Full-time. Set own hours!
Rush stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705.
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls, Girls.
Earn big summer cash. The best sum-
mer job around. Playmates Adult En-
tertainment call for more info. 747-
7686
HELP WANTED female escorts ap-
plications available now. Lucrative fi-
nancial opportunities. Call 321-8252
anytime or 714-5350 after 4:00pm
HELP WANTED modeling, dancing,
adult conversation full or part-time.
Will accomodate school schedule.
$300-500 weekly call 746-6762
ATTENTION HORSE LOVERS: Ex-
perienced English rider to help with
barn choresfeeding in exchange for
pleasure riding. 355-6320 after 5pm
IMMEDIATE OPENING for secre-
tarytypist position apply between
1:00-3:00 at SDF Computer Inc, 813
South Evans St. Greenville (752-3694)
RESPONSIBLE STUDENT(S) to pick
up 2 children at 7am and bring to
school (Elmhurst ECU Pre-School)
at 7:30am; then pick up by 5:30pm and
bring home. Call Randy at 756-8861.
Note: Starts May 23,1994
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Midwest Mailers Po Box 395, Olathe,
KS 66051. Immediate response
GREEKS AND CLUBS EARN $50-
$250 for yourself plus up to $500 for
your club! This fundraiser costs noth-
ing and lasts one week. Call now and
receive a free gift. 1-800-932-0528 ext.
65
ATTENTION LADIES earn $1,000
plus a week escorting in the Green-
ville area. Must be 18 yrs. old; have
own phone and transportation. We
are an established agency check out
your yellow pages.
EUROPE THIS SUMMER? Fly-only
$169! California- $129 ea. way! Florida
too.CaribbeanMexicanCoastrt$189!
No gimmicks-no hitches. Airtech 1 -800-
575-TECH
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, frame,
mattress, heater, padded rails $175 or
obo. 757-9645
1985 CONNER MOBILE HOME,
12'x56 Two bedrooms, one bath,
k; nen and livingroom. Located in
Evans Mobile Home Park. Partly fur-
nished, underpinning and a 6'x6' stor-
age building included in the price.
Perfect for starting couple or ECU stu-
dents trying to save on monthly rental
costs. Available for move in on A ugust
1st. Asking $9300. Those interested
please call (919)321-2577 for more in-
formation.
LOSE WEIGHT NOW! 25- 30 people
wanted. No will power needed. Doctor
recommended. All natural. 100 guar-
antee. Products for bodv builders too!
Call: 752-2551
FOR SALE: couch with ma tching chair,
$125 Dorm loft with headboard and
bookshelf, $90 ask for Lee Ann 752-
1360
78 VOLKS RABBIT good condition
$700 obo must sell asap at, 2 dr call
931-7381
QUEEN SIZE, SEMI WAVELESS
WATER BED. Large headboard with
mirror. Padded rails, hea tes. Good con-
dition, no leaks! $150 obo must sell!
Call Paul 931-7273 leave message
50 GAL. FISH TANK on sale for $80.
Tank stand w shelf & 7 gold fish in-
cluded.Call Mercedesat752-86671eave
message
FOR SALE: 1 Smashing Pumpkins con-
cert ticket. For this Saturday, April 16at
the William & Mary Hall. Paid $19. Call
Jeremy, 931-7128
SPECIALIZED HARD ROCK,
mountain bike like new with
aftermarket rims, neck, crank $325
752-7136
YARD SALE: Clothes, furniture,
housewares and more Good and
almost new condition. Plenty of must
haves. Saturday April 16th 7:30am-
until Address: 524 Longmeadow Rd.
(behind tennis courts on Elm St.)
FOR SALE- Single loft $60 refrigera-
tor $60. Call Jenny at 931-7749
MOUNTAIN BIKE: Diamondback
mountain bike. Very good condition,
just like new. Call 830-1223
B AVER XT7 ROLLERBL ADES. Top
of the line. Bought too small (size 10)
skated on five times (almost new con-
dition). $250 skates.will sell for $195.
Call 757-3545 Jamie.
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS: Warmerweather
is approaching and you want to look
your best! Sports supplements at ma-
jor discount prices: Met-rx,OKG,Cre-
atine, Cybergenics, Vanadyl Sulfate,
Hot Stuff, Weight gain powders (all),
Amino Acids, Super Chromoplex, Tri-
Chromelene, Cybertrim, Quick Trim,
Super Fat Burners, Herbs, Multi-Vi-
tamins, SuperGoldenSeal, and many
more! Call Brad at 931-9097 for more
info.
j Services Offered
perfect orMicrosoft Word forwindows
software. Call today (8a-5p�752-9959)
(evenings�527-9133)
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies for
hire. Specializing in Fraternity and So-
rority socials and weddings. For the
widest selection of music and unbeat-
able sound and professionalism, ex-
cept no imitations! Discounts toallECU
students. Call Rob @ 757-2658
OLDER ECU STUDENT with family
seeks position of groundskeeper in ex-
change for living quarters. 11 years
landscaping experience. Moving to
Greenville in May. Please call Phil at
(919)426-1409
IQ
Greek
m
Personals
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS! How
would you like a free breakfast and the
chance to hear the "success secrets" of
established local leaders? Success at
sunrise is April 19 and 20. from 8-9am.
Call 757-4796 to register or stop by 109
Mendenh.Ml.
REWARD FOR LOST BIRD. Yellow
cockatiel with pink cheeks. Responds
to the name "Murphy" with distin-
guishing tweet. If you see or hear
Murphy, please call 758-7583.
MEREDITH: Good girls go to heaven
and Bad girls go everywhere.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN, Thank you
for a great year. You all have been
wonderful to work for and I am sorry it
mustcometoanend. I wish you all the
best next year and hope to see you in
the not-so real world. Good luck to
Gregory, Maureen and Tonya, for you
three have some big shoes to fulfill.
Thanks again to the staff of TEC, I will
miss you all. Your Ex-General Man-
ager. Lindsay!
JOE HORST, Thanks for all your help
this past year. You have really been
there when I needed you and I won't
forget that. I hope everything pans out
for you. Keep up the good work in
school and I'll see you soon. Lindsay
Fernandez.
gg Greek
H3 Services Offered
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resumesec-
retarial work. Specializing in resume
composi tion w cover letters stored on
disk, term papers, general typing. Word
PHI SIGMA PI, Congratulations to all
the new brothers: Charity Adams, Brian
Broush, Britton Colvert, Jeremy Cohen,
Danielle Hobbs, Jeanne Horack, Nicole
Johnson, Cori Martin, Brandi McClain,
Holly Morrison, Luong Ngo, Denny
O'Brien, Jason Painter, Ryan Perry,
Lynn Phipps, Cara Poludniak, Susan
Price, and Jennifer Winslow. Job well
done! Make us proud to be a TAU
CHAPTER BROTHER, Love Lindsay
and the fellow brothersofPhi Sigma Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS Sigma soft-
ball Team on your win Monday night
against ADPI. Good work girls. Love
vour Sigma sisters.
PHI TAU were very much looking for-
ward to our pre-downtown Thurs.
night. It will be great to see you guys!
Can't wait! Love, sigmas.
AOPI- A very belated thank you for the
great time we had down at Corrigan's.
Next time we'll bring the crayons and
the twister board! Love Delta Sigma
Phi.
DELTA SIGMA PHI would like to
congratulate their newly elected offic-
ers for fall '94- spring '95. Joe Elder-
President, Chuck White- Vice Presi-
dent, Stephen Lewis- Treasurer, Eric
Hall- Sergeant at Arms and Fruitloop-
Secretary. Way to go guys! Let's keep
the tradition going!
BROTHERS OF DELTA SIG Get
readv to sink the island this weekend
with our dates! This is going to be one
formal we'll never forget!
CONGRATULATIONS DEEon win-
ning Greek Goddess! Also, congrats to
Jenny, Michele and Misty for being
contestants. Love, your Chi O sisters
PIKA- We all had a super time at
Champagne Brunch on Friday! Can't
wait to party with you guys again!
Love, the sisters of Chi Omega
NEW MEMBERS OF AOPI keep up
the good work�Justafewmoredays!
Love, the sisters
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA OMI-
CRON PI would like to thank Allison
McKinney for herpositive inspirations
she brought the sisterhood. Keep up
the good work gals� the end is near!
SISTERS OF AOPI In a couple 6t'
weeks, we'll be heading to the beach.
It'll be a crazy day, cruising across the
waves. For the time has grown near
for the end of the year, a time for"
celebration and cheer to mark-off, a
successful year as we pull out of the
dock.
i
CONGRATULATIONS new broth I
ers of Phi Sigma Pi: Denny O'Brien
Jennifer Winslow, Lynn Phipps, Su- ,
san Price, Britton Calvert, Cory MarJ
tin, Jason Painter, Luong Ngo, Holly
Morrison, Brandi McClain, Ryan Perry,I
Jean Horac, Brian Broush, Jeremy 4
Cohen, Danielle Hobbs, Nicole
Johnson,Cara Poludniak, and Charity
Adams.
ZETA TAU ALPHA-You girls did a
great job at all-sing especially James;
(Tammy) Brown and John (Edyl
Travolta. Also, thanks to all the Zeta's'
who participated in and supported -
Theta Chi volleyball.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN- j
Coo-Coo-Ca-Choo!Heyeggman-lay
off! We get the point- lets call a cease
fire on the egging! You win! Love the
sisters of Alpha Delta Pi
PHI SIGMA PL I want to wish all the'
brothers of Phi Sigma Pi the best in'
the coming year. Thank you all for a
most memorable time these past years
Good luck to all and keep up the good- ,
work. Love Lindsay, your Ex-Presi- n
dent. n.
ALPHA DELTA PI COCKTAIL'
DATES Hold your horses! Alpha;
Delta Pi Spring Cocktail is just around,
the corner- so dust off your duds and
get ready for a great weekend aC
Rockspring Equestrian Club.
DELTA ZETA- All I've got to say is
formal is around the way. Grab your
date and don't delay. The date is set
the plans are made- all that's left is for
us to make our way. See you at
Rockspring Equestrian Center on Sat-
urday- Don't be late, and get ready
for the night of your life
DELTA ZETA- Volleyball players
you were terrific at the Theta Chi
Tournament- way to play. And to our
football players you played terrrific
at Delta Chi Mud Football in the Mud
and all. Congrats on these Champi:
onships!
PHI SIGMA PI EXECUTIVE COUN-
CIL, Thank you for all your help this
past year. You guys really made a
difference and it shows. We have
been through some rough times and
we came up shinning. I wish you all
the best next yea rand for those gradu-
ating, I know you will succeed in your
endeavors. I wish David B. and Donna
B. the best as they tackle another year
with TAU CHAPTER. I owe you
guys a lot, and I will never forget yoii
all. Love Lindsay!
Announcements
THEGREENVTLLERECREATION
AND PARKS DEPARTMENT
is still accepting teams for its 1994
City Softball league. An entry fee
of $400 is required of all teams.
The deadline for entering a team
is Wednesday, April 20th. For
addtional info, contact Ben James
or Michael Daly at 830-4550 after
2pm.
PRESERVING FAMILY
DOCUMENTS
A program on preservation of
family photographs, papers, and
recordings Wed. Apr. 27, 1994
1:00- 4:30pm Willis Building Au-
ditorium First and Reade Streets
Greenville NC Please call 757-
6673 or 757-6671 for free reserva-
tions
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION
FOR THE REFORM OF
MARIIUANALAWS
(NORML) is having an organizational
rreetironThursApT.28al7fl0pminRM
221 Mendenhall Student Center. Gome
learn how you can help to Legalize it!
METHODIST STLJDESTT CENTER
TretevviDbeaself-esteemworkshopbased
on John Bradshaw's hcrneoorning held at
the Methodist Student Center Wednes-
days at 3pm for more info, call 758-203Q
ECHO
will hold its final meetingparty for this
yearonMcriArlSharSflOpminr
Lobby. Officer efections will be held and
food wiDte provided All tifficer positions
are open for ,9495. AD interested and all
rnernbers please attend!
B-GLAD
(Bisexuals, Gays, lesbians and allies
for diversity) will hold an organiza-
tional meeting on Wed nesday night,
April 20 at 7:00pm in Room 14 of the
Mendenhall Student Center (Lower
Level). Orientation doesn't matter,
only support.
STOPP!
meeting today at 2pm. Chancellor
Eakin will speak to the group and
answer questions afterward. Come
out and let your voice be hea rd abou t
parking
ECU COMMUNICATIONS
SOCIETY
isholdingofficerelectionsWed.Apr.
20 at 5:45pm in GCB 1015. Video
yearbook preview 6:30-8:30!
rut
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-
paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursdav's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may-
be cancelled before 10 a.m. the
day prior to publication
however, no refunds will be
given
For more
information
call 757-6366.
.�





�HMMmmn
G 9:
PIRATE
1 -1
jcjyentures of Kemple Boy
Cartoonist Meeting, You X'ers
Guess what, Power Rangers?! Next week is the last edition of
Pirate Comics for Spring '94. That means it's cartoonist
meeting time! So how about next Thursday. April 21, all you
cartoonists march your butts down for a meeting at 50! Yes,
I know that's the day of Barefoot on the Mall, but it'll be worth
missing an hour of some blues band because as promised,
I've got a mysterious guest speaker for you who'll discuss
working in the comics biz! So if you know what's good for
you, you'll be there. Attendance is mandatory. That is all.
By Kemple
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
Phoebe'this s spring, a
Time WWEIV A MANS THOUGHT
TWJNS TO poETRI.IDLE Chit
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shoe shopping !�,
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"� ' ' -
II�"





The East Carolinian
Apnl 14. 1994
Lifestyl
Page 9
Barefoot back with bands and fun
If weather perm
such as PMS, B,
its,
S&
Barefoot 1994
M and Teresa.
will be
Games
Photo Courtesy ot Student Union Activities
filled with fun and games. Several bands will be playing April 21,
include the Orditron and the Velcro Wall and much, much more.
By Vail Rumley
Staff Writer
Put on your bathing suit, grab
some friends and the cooler because
it's time to head for the annual Bare-
foot on the Mall to get together with
10,000 of your closest friends and
classmates.
Barefoot on the Mall kicks off at
noon on Thursday, Apnl 21, with the
winner of the last week's Battle of the
Bands, PMS (Post Metal Syndrome).
PMS, an alternative rock group, hails
from Greenville and appeared re-
cently with theSex Policeat the Sigma
Pi house.
Next in the m usical lineup stands
B,S, & M (Barton Shaffer & Mills), a
sometimes acoustic�sometimes not
rock group with a sound ranging
from alternative progressive R.E.M.
to the heavies of Rolling Stone classic
rock. Following B,S, & M, Teresa pays
tribute to woman musicians through
the'bOsand into the 'highlighting
hits by such artists as Bonnie Raitt,
Meussa Etheridge, Indigo Girls and
Janisjoplin.
Wrapping up the music of the
day come three hinds under the title
Lotsabluesa: Little Dave and the
Howling Blues Band, The Heaters
and Mojo Collins.
"I've seen Little Dave and the
Howling Blues Band live and they're
good said Bobby GetcheJL a mem-
berof the BarefmtCommittee. "What
really made them stand out as a blues
band was their harmonica player
Little Dave and the band come
from Raleigh, but are well traveled,
and well known throughout North
Carolina. The Heaters also claim the
same local fame asa Fayettevilleblues
band that's been together and tour-
ing the N.C. music scene for years.
Mojo Collins, a premier
songwriter and performer, will be the
finale for the live music. Collins, in 30
years of performance has appeared
in concert with such classic acts as
Santana, Leon Redbone, Credence
Clearwater Revival and Stevie Ray
Vaughn.
But music isn't the only thing on
the Barefx x t Agenda. M uch planning
on the the part of the Barefoot Com-
mittee provides ECU students with
the option to play, eat, speak and
See BAREFOOT page 11
Vie Panama Deception lecture,
viewing presented Tues.
Joe Clark: 'principal' reformer
By Cindy Hawkins
Staff Writer
The Seattle Post Intelligencer com-
mented that, "If sprobablysafetosay,
that few films have caused George
Bush mire misery than Barbara
Trent's The Chicago Sun-Times de-
clares tru t. "There is no mistaking the
stand of director Barbara Trent: she is
appalled atwhatthe United Statesdid
mPanarraButthisadvocacy does not
into ��������H
sion on the Panamanian people, as
well as a media establishment that is
controlled by political and economic
forces that result in d ish irted facts and
censorship. Maureen Shea, assistant
professor of Spanish at ECU states
that, "We never saw what happened
down there as Americans, but mere
was a lot gom� on tha t we never heard
about"
Trent lias repeatedly exposed co-
vert operations in the US. govern
ment, with
Trent has
repeatedly exposed
covert operations in
the U.S.
government.
unfairness
Barbara
Trent's politi-
cal activity
since the late
1960s culmi-
nated into the
A c a d e m v
Award�win-
ning docu-
ment a r y "���"�"
film,77;c Panama Deception which will
be showr on April N at 7:00 p.m. in
I en kins Auditorium.
However, though the film won
an Academy award and has been ac-
daimedindbrikidcastthroughoutthe
world, many people in the United
States have probably never heard of it
because United States broadcasters
blackba led it.
Trent draws on two years of re-
search preceding the US. invasion o!
Panama, as well asactual footagedur-
ing the invasion In the film, Trent
investigates the effect of the U S. inva-
standing sev-
eral thieats to
her life and
work. The
.American Hu-
manist Asso-
c i a t i o n
awarded her
with the 1992
Humanist
mmmmtmmmmm rts Award
"ft r her courage us adv xacy of pro-
gressiveideasthroughdocumentary
Trent lays bare the deceptive forces of
the political establishment and hopes
to educate audiences about media
cover-ups and to teach them to ques-
tion the multiplicity of current issues,
such the events in Hasten Europe and
Africa.
Trent will discussTlie Panama De-
ception after its viewing. The lecture
The 1 Axreption of The American Iib-
lic is free and open to the public. The
movie will be shown on April 19th at
7:00 p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
By Stephanie Tullo
Lifestyle Editor
Inspirational principal Joe
Clark will be visiting ECU for an
evening lecture based upon his
experiences on Monday, April 18
at 7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
JoeClark, in 1983,became Edu-
cator and Principal of Eastside High
in Patterson, N.j. transforming the
crime-infested, drug-ridden, inner-
city school into an institution full
of pride and learning.
Clark, a former Army drill in-
structor, sees the way to education
asa mission. In his earlier years, he
worked while attending school to
help support his mother, brother
and sisters. He continued on to get
his B.A. from William Patterson
College and was a stiaight-A can-
didate for his Masters degree at
Seton Hall University.
He disagrees with those who
believe that learning is disrupted
by tough discipline. Instead of pro-
vidingsvmpathytostudents,Clark
has high expectations for the stu-
dent body, challenging them to
develope skills for success and con-
fronting them when they fail to
reform.
After two years under his lead-
ership, the former juvenile playpen
Eastside High wasdeclared a model
school bv New Jersey's governor.
Clark was named oneof the nation's
10 "Principals of Leadership" in
1986. In 1990, he resigned as princi-
Photo Courtesy ot Student Union
Clark will speak Monday, April 18,at Hendrix Theatre. He was the one
man who successfully reformed the Eastside High in Patterson, N.J.
pal of Eastside High School.
Clark has won national acclaim
for his achievements in a Time maga-
zinecover story, a "60 Minute" pro-
file and appearances on "Donahue"
and "Nightline President Reagan
named him a model educator. Clark
was also the subject of the film, Lean
On Me.
Presently, through his book
Laying Down the Law, his speeches
and his consulting,Clark shares his
experiences with people ail over the
country. He believes that "every-
day, pride in self and school must
be reinforced. Everyday, the value
of academics must be demon-
strated
Literary
figure
speaks
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Notable literary figure
Lawrence Lipking will speak
Thursday as a part of the ECU
Theory Colloquium Lecture
Series. The Lecture Series is
designed to present a forum
for a group of interdiscipli-
nary speakers dealing with
present topics in literature. It
attempts to foster dialogue
and debate about the certain
literary issues. This presenta-
tion is titled "Materializing
Shakespeare: Samuel
Johnson's Frame of Mind
Lipking is an endowed
chair Chester D. Tripp Pro-
fessor of English at North-
western University. Heisalso
currently a Fellow at the Na-
tional Humanities Center.
Much of his research is
based on 18th century lan-
guage as well as contempo-
rary literary theory. He also
edited the ISthCentury Norton
Anthology of British Literature.
ECU English professor Tom
Shields noted, "He's a very
respected critic of contempo-
rary literature
Lipking has also written
manv books, and in numer-
ous publications. He's the
author of Abandoned Women,
Poetic Tradition, The Life of The
Poet: Beginning and Ending
Poetic Careers.
His essays ha ve appeared
in the Critical Inquiry, Vie Age
of Johnson, Profession, and
Modern Language Quarterly.
One of his most highly ac-
claimed articles appeared in
a 1989 issue of the New Repub-
lic dealing with his theory of
competitive reading. ECU
English Professor Jeff Will-
iams said, "Lipking's theory
states that education in the
Humanities is based on
competiveness and not on
building people up. Most
people think knowledge is
accumulative. But this theory
is built on knocking people
down, the 'king of the hill'
theory
The lecture is ex-
pected to last approximately
45 minutes, and will be fol-
lowed by a short question�
and�answer period. It will
be presented on Thursday,
April 14, at 4:00 in Room 3006
of the General Classroom
Building.
V
CD Reviews CD Reviews CD Reviews ��

Don't Buy
V Take Your Chances
,mj
JyV Worth A Try
c
Definite Purchase
Various Artists
7Tie CrOW (Soundtrack)
When a friend i f mine asked me
if I'd heard the soundtrack from 7 he
Civic , I looked at him funny. An
action movie soundtrack? I la! Vi-
sions of Arnold Schwarchzenegger
cavorting with ACDC on MTV
flooded my mind. "Not bloody
likely I snarled "No, really he
saidwithamazmggoodhumor,and
pulled ,i copy off the rack.
I stared at the disc and read the
label aloud. "New tracksby theCure,
Nine Inch Nails, Rage Against the
Machine, Rollins Band, Pantera.and
Mv Life With theThrill Kill Kult?My
Life With the Thrill Kill Kult? My
God! They're not even trendy
Mv friend, seeing the new wis-
dom in mv eyes, just nodded his
head sagely as I bought the thing on
the spot. I don't think I ever said
"Thank vou
The Crow, for those of you who
don't know, is an action film star-
ring Brandon 1 .ee, son of late martial
arts star Bruce Lev. Brandon died
during the filming ot the movie in
North Carolina last year, and last I
heard the fate (t the m vie was up in
the air. But here's the soundtrack, so
maybe they finished it without him.
Anyway, thesoundtrackisdedi-
cated to Brandon I ee, and, appro-
priately enough, it soundsabitlikea
funeral dirge. A very angry funeral
dirge at times, but a dirge nonethe-
less. Could they havepk ked a more
See CROW page 12
Lyres
Some Lyres
The Lyres have been around
since 1978, making their own weird
brand of garage punk. Now, years
later thevhaveputoutacompilation
album, Some Lyres, containing tracks
from the band's genesis back in '78 to
tl Lei r latest releases. Thealbumspans
some 16 years, which I guess is nor-
mal for a "best of" release.
What we have here is a mixture
of new wave, punk and some mid-
'60s stuff like The Animals. The Lyres
have a nice sound, but I think they
were better fit for the '80s. Being an
eighties child myself, I have grown
sick of the plasticityof that decade.
Although that is just what appeals to
others, I find it hard to stomach any-
more, especially after all those "hits
of the '80s" commercials.
However, not all of this album is
new wave songs like "Touch" and
"Here's a Heart" sound like some-
thing straight out of the '60s. Even
the cover art for the CD is a repro-
duction of The RollmgStones record
Some Girls. In fact, the further you go
in the album, the more it sounds like
flower-powered beach music. They
are sort of like the Surf Punks crossed
with The Byrds. A tension-keyed
organ gives them the thin, angular
screaming sound of themidHlsbut
the guitars are more tuned in with
modern and hardersrvlesof playing
most of the time.
There are some softer tunes like
See LYRES page 12
O
r
n
e
arecr
Start Your Networking
at the Career Day For
MSW, BSW, CRIMINAL JUSTICE, LSS,
PSYCHOLOGY, CDFR, SOCIOLOGY, SPED,
COUNSELING, AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
MAJORS
WHEN?
Monday, AprlllS, 1994 � 10:00a.m. to 1:30p.m.
WHERE?
Great Room
Mendenhall Student Center
WHOWILtBBtlfERE?
Non-ProriiAgencies
Mental Health Agencies
Department�f Social Service
Poltee Agencies
CorreconalCenlers
r
HERE ARE SOMECARSER QAYPOINTERS!
I. Dress professionally
2 Bring multiplecopies of your resume
&�� Brushuponyxmra��er50�aiinterview
skills
Gaihetm much information as possible
Send inank-you noles
Remejtnl)er,yc�axerepren.tiJiig our
university!
�Sponsored by the Social Work 'Criminal Justice Departmeni and
Career Services 757-6050
4,
5.
6.





10 The East Carolinian
April 14, 1994
Tess wins
feSff Writer
S" Last slimmer, the thrill of being a
9fi6et service agent came to us from
Hollywood in the movie In tfie Line of
Fre. Thisspring it's the film Guarding
Tiss, a story that portrays the less
abmorousanddramaticsideofserv-
ingone's country. However, the film
qpBXciting nonetheless.
; Nicholas Cage plays Doug
3igsnic, a young secret service agent
assigned to protect former first lady
1essCarlisle(Shirly MacLaine). Doug
hates,his job because Tess can be
dirtanding,cantankerousand mean!
rjewever, later in the story, Doug
cjbrrtes to realize that Tess is actually
l&jelyanddepressedandher actions
arise out of boredom, not genuine ill
will
As GuardingTess opens, Doug is
seen leaving his assignment. As he
te a superior about his years with
Te$s, Doug's agitation with the first
lacty becomes evident. Doug tells his
superior how Tess can be many dif-
ferentpeople�adoring andwonder-
fufto the public but finicky and cruel
in-private. Doug's superior then in-
f ojjns him that "one of her personali-
ties has requested that Dougstay for
adether tour of duty.
� BecauseTesshascalledthepresi-
dejjt, Doug knows that to refuse
vttjuld be theequivalent of resigning.
Reluctantly, he agrees to go back to
wr&k guarding Tess.
S GiwrdiwgTessisfilledwimmany
snjall moments that blend together to
wejive a charming story. Many indi-
vidual incidents stand out although
mjfct scenes work well in the film.
5 Oneparticularlyfunnysequence
haf Tess playing golf in the middle of
wiflter and ordering Doug to get her
bait Another occurs when Tess goes
toPPera and falls asleep. While trying
toinoveTesstoalessvisibleposition,
sh�bolts awake and drops her pro-
gr�n from the balcony. Yet another
soe takes place in a grocery store
wtjere the agents use their walkie�
tajfies to do price checks.
What makes this story so warm
and wonderful is its two stars.
NfcfcLainehassaid thatshe welcomed
tjf challenge of playing an older
wpman (MacLaine herself isonly59).
1,
;r:
���
�' .�.
�i '
10 �
She gives Tess the necessary edge to
make her seem disagreeable while
stillexposingherweaknessand frailty
that becomes evident to the audience
only later in the film.
NicholasCageplayshis role per-
fectly. He exhibits an appropriate
amount of frusta tion and clumsiness
while always being believable as a
secret service agent. Despite his as-
signment, Cage's portrayal makes it
clear thatDougwoulddowellinafar
more demanding position.
One of the niceties of Guarding
Tess is that Doug learns to appreciate
his fate of guarding Tess instead of
bemoaning it. He decides to optimis-
tically tackle his assignment rather
than pessimistically count the days
until he can transfer. In this respect
the film provides an uplifting mes-
sage as well as a delightful story.
The one aspect of the story that
seems superfluous is a brain tumor
thatTesshas.Oneextended sequence
shows Tess having a myriad of tests
done while the solemn doctors stand
around and shake their heads. Yet
save for a few isolated moments the
tumor is never talked about and no
resolution is made about treatment
or prognosis.
The rest of the story about the
tumor may have been left on the
editing room floor, which is where
the few remaining scenes about it
should have been left. These scenes
add nothing to the story and as such
need not have been in the film.
Amidst a scarcity of decent films
in Greenville, Guarding Tess is like
sunshine on a spring day. The film is
so filled with warm wit and genuine
good feelings, that disliking it is al-
most impossible.
On a scale of one to 10, Guarding
Tess rates a seven.
D
Q
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Top Ten
Rollins
Liar
Rage Against the Machine
Darlcness
Beck
Pay No Mind.
Soundgarden WM
Black: Hole Sun U
BGreenday
Basket Case
Afghan Whigs M
Gentlemen U
D Vanilla Train wreck
Sister
nin ri
Dead Souls LJ
BPaveir.ent
Cut Your Hair mm
Stidoht OCOAaX
Miss World
INCLUDES PARTS AND LABOR!
(Excludes Service Specials and Accessories)
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(can not be used with other coupons)
CHRYSLER VlymoutH Dodge
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East Carolina
Auto & Thick Center
Lincoln Mercury � Chrysler Plymouth Dodge
MEMORIAL DRIVE � GREENVILLE. NC
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You've proved all the onlookers wroftgl �Never once did you listen to any of the
negative comments. YouhaveoneapMeyond the call of duty. Earning
nearly all A's since your return. Nobody calf stop you once you decide what you
want. You've got the heart to reah crab anything in this life you want.
I'm proud just to know you, butyiiiGwie: so, to be sharing the same blood.
Congratulations, love your brotfer and Phi Sigma Pi forever.
FIESTA AT
Mexican Restaurant
And Bring Your
Amigos!
-Pitcher of Beer &
Hot Wings $7.99
-12 Price Pitchers
of Beer
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$1.25
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12 PRICE
APPETIZERS
VVI I). Alter 9 P.M. � Dine
521 Cotanche St. � 757-1666

may
get paid
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After all, this book from
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-





Who's There?
BAREFOOT
April 14. 1994
The Hast Carolinian 11
Continued from page 9
-Attic-
Thursday- Uncle Mingo
Friday- Sex Police and Dag
Saturday-Alma
�O'Rocks�
Friday-Henry Acrobat, 25th Hour and
Smackapple
Saturday- Pandora's Lunchbox, Johnny
Bravo
�Wrong Way Corrigans�
Wednesday- kareoke night
Thursday- Bird and Cortright
Friday- Thomas Brothers Band
Saturday- The Heaters
much more.
"We started pursuing the real
planning of Barefootattijestartoftrus
semester said Chair of the Visual
A rtsCommittee LukeSandasNow,
afterhundredsofcollectivemanhours
and several ulcers, we're there
Student Union�sponsored ac-
tivities include theOrbitron, in which
a willing participant Ls strapped to a
spinning, revolving wheel creating
the feeling of a gravity-less trip; the
Velcro Wall, a favorite of Barefoots
past, where students in Velcro
jumpsuitshurl themselvesontoa wall,
hoping to stick higher, or better, than
the next guy, and go to the Velcro
championships; Bouncv Boxing, a
game for feuding friends using large
gloves to pummel each other while
bouncing around an air filled ring;
Golf-A-Go-go, a full�length Putt-
Purt-like golf course; the Speed Pitch
for those willing to go up against the
clock to hnd out who should have
been a majc r league pitcher; and Cre-
ation Fest, where would-beartistscan
create what they desire with Student
Union�provided supplies.
Prizes go to the best speaker of
the impromptu speech contest at the
Speaking Bcxth. Contestants are not
limited in their choice of topics, but
long�winded participants are dis-
couraged.
"We think there'll be about 30
organizationsatBarefootsaid Sand-
ers. "Some of which will havebcxiths,
others activities
One km nvn activity is the RHA�
sponsored, "Do it in the Mud a
game in which players search for ob-
jects in a pit of mud for prizes. The
twist, however is that one must use
the feet to find them.
Tlw Rocky Honor Picture Show,
startingatS p.m will close this vear's
Barefoot on the Mall festival
Central Bool
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?





12 The East Carolinian
CROW
April 14. 1994
Continued from page 9
depressing group of musicians than
this? I can just picture them, sitting
around the studio, trading stories of
their suicide attempts and compar-
ing the scars leftby their self-inflicted
wounds. The only way this album
couldbeanymoredepressingwould
be if the Smiths had re-formed for it
(take that as you will).
Getting down to the music itself,
I suppose the Cure is as good a place
to start as any. Their track opens the
album uponasadnote(bigsurprise)
with "Burn It's typical Cure: slow,
ethereal and very, very depressing.
Also typical is Stone Temple Pilots'
"Big Empty which means that
they've yet again managed to rip off
Pearl Jam and Alice in Chains simul-
taneously without anybody calling
their bluff.
Nine Inch Nails does an indus-
trial version of "Dead Souls" by Joy
Division. Considering that the Joy
Divisionboys were the origjnalKings
of Depressed White Boy Gothic
Bands and that NIN's Trent Reznor
may currently hold the champion-
ship belt for self-loathing, I think you
can guess how this one goes.
Next is Rage Against the Ma-
chine with "Darkness which sud-
denly whips the album up into a
white-hot fury. Placing Rage here
may have been a mistake; with this
one exception, the album gets pro-
gressively heavier with each track.
The irrepressible anger of this band
breaks the flow.
Rage is followed by the oddest
choice for the album, and its biggest
disappointment, the Violent
Femmes. Knownmainlyforinsanely
clever (if depressing) lyrics and
bouncy, low-production music, the
Femmes don't really fit in. Unfortu-
nately, rheircontribution, "Color Me
Once has beenproduced into some
sort of neo-gorhic nightmare, com-
plete withecho-chamber drumbeats
and all sorts of stuff to which the
Femmes don't adapt very well.
The Rollins Band contribution,
"Ghostrider is also a bit of a sur-
prise: they sound like Danzig! Scary
stuff from Mr. Henry "MTV " Rollins.
Can the rumors be true? Has Rollins
sold out? Stay tuned
The remainder of The Crow
progresses more smoothly. Helmet
and Pantera turn in gut-ripping per-
formances, as does For Love Not
Lisa. MyLifeWimmeThrillKUlKult
is also typically perverse on their
track After the Hesh " The only real
surprise left at this point is the Jesus
andMary Chain's "Snakedriver on
which they sound more energetic
than they have in years. Maybe they
cut back on the heroin.
As the album winds down, it
also begins to slow down. So we get
Medicine's "Time Baby III and fi-
nally Jane Sieberry's haunting "It
Can't Rain All the Time Sieberry
sounds like Siouxsie Sioux on
downers here, but mis song offers a
welcomeray of hope after all the rage
and depression.
This slow build of depression
into anger and the gradual release
makes The Crow a very satisfying
album. It'snotoftenyou get this kind
of attention to emotional detail. The
only real flaws I can see are the Vio-
lent Femmes track and the inclusion
of such obvious posers as Stone
Temple Pilots on what could have
been a completely genuine album.
Check it out.
� Marie
Brett
LYRE
Continued from page 9
'No More" that have that dreamy
Doors sound.Then"She'sGotEyes
sounds like a real watered-down
Clash.
New wave, punk, retro60s?
This is something like multiple per-
sonalities think. You certainly can't
accuse the Lyres of being stagnant. If
your musical tastes lean more to-
ward the modern cutting edge this
is probably not one for you, but if
you ever get nostalgic about the
Reagan era, check out the Lyres'
newest release Some Lyres.
� Kris
Hoffler
"(hisses are going, aim in won't stop, outside
my window I here mowing K a siren of a cop,
When can I leave and have this all stop"
�signed, V (inuluating Senior
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BW
The East Carolinian
April 14, 1994
Wliat's On Tap?
Thursday, April 14
M. Tennis
at CAA Championships,
Harrisonburg, Va.
Friday, April 15
Softball
at Frost Cutlery Invitational,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
W. Tennis
at CAA Championships,
Norfolk, Va.
Saturday, April 16
Softball
at Frost Cutlery Invtational,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
M. Track
at Mt. SAC Relays, Walnut,
Calif.
at CAA Championships,
Williamsburg, Va.
W. Track
at CAA Championships,
Williamsburg, Va.
W. Tennis
at CAA Championships,
Norfolk, Va.
Sunday, April 17
Softball
at Frost Cutlery Invtational,
Chattanooga, Tenn.
W. Tennis
at CAA Championships,
Norfolk. Va.
The 411
Tuesday, April 12
Baseball
beat Duke University 12-5.
Men's CAA Leaders
Sports

.
Page 13
Frisbee teams sweep
By Steve Lienert
Staff writer
After adjusting to the alti-
tude in Blacksburg, Va. this past
weekend, the Irates and Helios
began their stretch run to the
National Championships by
sweeping through an ultimate
tournament in Virginia Tech.
The Irates swept through
pool play unscathed on Satur-
day, crushing Clemson, Charlotte
and Virginia Tech. On Sunday,
the Irates, battling harsh weather,
continued their mastery over
Washington area teams. Two of
their three wins were against
teams from D.C.
The finals were played in the
midst of a frosty mountain down-
pour which seemed to only
strengthen the Irate resolve. As
fans observed the finals from their
warm dry cars, the Irates, soaked
and cold, marched through the
mud for goal after goal. While
seven men werepkwing, 15Irates
stood huddled together waiting
to substitute into the game, mean-
while cheering on their fellow
teammates. It took a gel of 22
players to put the Irates over the
top for a 15-8 victory over Ano-
dyne (D.C.) and yet another tour-
nament championship in this en-
chanted season.
Pirate ruggers
reach milestone
Staff Reports
File Photo
The Helios win on Sunday avenged the loss to Tech on Saturday. The
IratesshouldbetheNo. 1 seed from the mid-atlantic region this weekend.
The Helios captured their first
tournament championship of the
season by beating the host team
Virginia Tech in the finals 15-5.
CAA regular season takes shape
ODU finds success on road
(Through April 10)
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB Overall
ODU 12-3 .800 � 30-5 .857
UR 7-5 .583 3.5 21-4.600
UNCW 7-5 .583 3.5 22-17.564
ECU 6-6 .500 4.5 26-11.703
JMU 6-6 .500 4.5 22-11 .667
W&M 6-9 .400 6 18-16 .529
GMU 1-11 .083 9.5 9-17-1 .352
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
laMJiag
Average
Kevin Gibbs. ODU.433
Matt Quatraro, ODU.421
Jamie Borel. ECU.397
Brian Yerys, ECU.393
Dan Almonte. ODU390
Triples
Matt Quatraro. ODU7
Kevin Gibbs. ODU6
Donny Burks. JMU4
Maika Symmonds, ODU4
Ryan Wilson. W&M �3
Home runs
Jeff Dausch, ODU12
Sean Casey, UR10
Chad Triplet ECU9
Mike Ruberti. W&M9
Jon Higman, JMU9
Runs Batted In
Jeff Dausch, UR45
Sean Casey, UR41
Brian Yerys, ECU40
Rick Britton, ECU39
Matt Quatraro. ODU39
Stolen Bases (sbsba)
Jamie Borel. ECU3145
Kevin G.bbs. ODU2831
Shawn Knight, W&M2023
Battle Holley, UNCW1212
Jeff Kaufman, JMU1111
EBsMaa
Wins
John Smith, ODU8-0
Brett Wheeler, ODU7-0
Johnny Beck, ECU7-1
Anthony Eannacony, ODU6-1
Bobby St. Pierre. UR5-1
Earned Run Average
Brett Wheeler, ODU1.75
Lyle Hartgrove, ECU1.78
Anthony Eannacony, ODU2.45
Richie Blackwell. ODU2.59
John Smith. ODU2.63
Strikeouts
Bobby St. Pierre, UR71
John Smith, ODU64
Scott Forster, JMU62
Brian Smith, UNCW59
Richie Blackwell, ECU55
Saves
Denis McLaughlin, ODU7
John O'Reilly, ODU3
Dixon Putnam, UNCW2
Dalton Maine, UR2
1mm eiattaUsa
Batting Average
James Madison.346
C!d Dominion.343
East Carolina.320
Richmond.306
William & Mary.292
UNC Wilmington.278
George Mason.251
Earned Run Average
Old Dominion2.77
East Carolina2.84
UNC Wilmington3.55
James Madison3.64
William & Mary4.70
George Mason481
Richmond5.23
Compiled by Dave Pond
By Dave Pond
Photo by Garret Kiilian
Leadoff man amie Borel has been a leader by example for the Pirates this
season. He heads the team with a .397 batting average and 31 stolen bases.
Assistant Sports Editor
Old Dominion University con-
tinues to lead the CAA with a 12-3
conference record. Their success can
be attributed to one statistic � the
Monarchsare8-2whenplayingaway
from home. ODU is the only team in
the CAA that has exceeded a .500
winning percentage while playing
away games.
Old Dominion is 30-5 overall.
Seniorsecond baseman Jude Dona to
leads the CAA in doubles with 20,
while Kevin Gibbs (.433) and Matt
Quatraro (421) are the top two hit-
ters in theconference. On themound,
freshman Brett Wheeler leads the
conference in ERA (175) and has
earned a perfect 7-0 record for the
Monarchs.
The Richmond Spiders are 3.5
games off the pace, tied for second
See BASEBALL page 15
The East Carolinian
All spring, the Pirate
ruggers have worked for last
weekend. A total team effort
paid off as the Pirates swept to
Division I and Division II Colle-
giate Championships, the first
time this has been done. To make
the victory sweeter, the tourna-
ment was held at ECU.
It took the Pirates time to
get started against Guilf ord Col-
lege in the first match. When
they did, ECU ran off 18 straight
points to advance to the second
round. They were led by Tim
Oswald's two tries and Opie
Moss's drop goal.
In the second round, the Pi-
rates faced a hardy Duke side
which had caused them prob-
lems last fall. Duke's two East-
em Rugby Union all stars were
no match for ECU's dynamic
team effort. The ruggers were
led to a 31-0 victory by Rick
Snow's three-try hat trick.
In the final, ECU faced
North Carolina State. The
Wolfpack had beaten up UNC-
Wilmington and humiliated
UNC-Chapel Hill to reach the
final. State started out strongly
and pounded at the ECU goal
line for over 10 minutes.
The forwards, led by All-
American candidate Jay Keller
and ERU all stars Byron Sullivan
and Matt Hobgood, went on a
rampage which produced ball
from every phase of the game.
Given possession, ECU's backs
ran at will. It was not a question
of State's defense, which was
adequate, rather it was the con-
tinuous pounding assault all
over the field which State could
not shut down.
The Pirates saw hat tricks
by Oswald and Snow and nu-
merous scores by forwards and
backs as they achieved total
domination over their Raleigh
rivals. In the second half, the
Wolfpack were simply over-
whelmed as the Pirates scored
at four-minute intervals to total
a wondrous 60 points in a festi-
val of running and passing
which even State supporters
cheered.
This was only the Pirate tri-
umph. Under tournament
rules, any Division I college
could enter team in Division II
provided the players did not
also participate in the upper
division. The Pirates entered
their Second XV team and,
while they did not always have
an easy time of it, the younger
Pirates also triumped.
The Pirates gave up an
early try to Western Carolina
but did not crack. The for-
wards, led by redoubtable Jerry
Stephenson and Clay
Cartwright, won almost every
contested ball to deny WCU's
backs any other chance at scor-
ing. When the teams switched
around at half time, the Pirates
had the wind, the sun and a
moral victory. Playing a ver-
sion of kick and chase, the Sec-
ond XV team ran in three tries
as by Hansborough, Nunn and
O'Briant to knock off the Cata-
mounts 17-5.
The first round victory put
ECU into the hunt for another
championship. Now on a mis-
sion, the Pirates exploded
against Saint Andrews College.
Opting to play into the sun and
wind again, the Pirate ruggers
held a slim 14-13 lead at half-
time. Led by Jason Webb's five
tries, the Second XV ran up a
51-16 victory to enter the fi-
nals.
Against Davidson, the Pi-
rates had about all they could
handle. In a fast-paced match,
the final score was in doubt
until the last minute. Dennis
McLane blocked and fell on a
Davidson attempt to kick the
ball from his own ingoal. The
Pirate victory gave them a Di-
vision II Championship, a chal-
lenge which clearly spurred the
First XV on to the Division I
victory.
The Pirates close out their
spring season next weekend
with a tournament in Rich-
mond, Va.on April 16.0n April
23, EC U hosts its annual alumni
match, a hard played game,
marked by sportsmanship and
technique, as the oldsters once
again attempt to demonstrate
that age and experience might
just overcome youth and en-
thusiasm.

:�
5S
5S
I
Pirates slam
Blue Devils
(DUKE SID) � The ECU base-
ball team defeated the Duke Blue
Devils on a neutral field Tuesday-
night, 12-5 at Five County Stadium.
The Blue Devils (20-13) stayed
in the game until the seventh inning
when the Pirates (27-12) sent 10 men
to the plate, scoring six in the inning.
The Pirates were led at the plate by
Rick Britton and Brian Yerys who
each went two for four, Yerys with a
double and driving in three runs.
Offensively for Duke, freshman short
stop Frankie Chiou led the way go-
ing two for three with a walk and an
RBI.
Jim Sander picked up the loss
for the Blue Devils dropping his
record to 2-1 on the season. Richie
Blackwell got the win for ECU going
to 4-1.
The Pirates racked up three runs
in the first inning. After Head and
Britton walked, Yerys doubled to
right center for two RBLs.
Yerys scored on a groundball by
Chad Triplett which turned into an
error.
The Bucs would rally for three
more in the fourth. Lamont Edwards,
former ECU football player, reached
on an infield single to start things off.
Borel's fly ball advanced Edwards to
third. Jason Head then singled him
in to give the go ahead run, 4-3.
Britton then singled in Puckett.
Yerys then singled in Head for the
final run of the inning. The Pirates
finishedscoring in the seventh with
six runs.
Indians have
No. 9 surprise
(AP) � The Cleveland Indi-
ans, given grudging consideration
as a contender, have found some
early season help from an unlikely
spot - rookie Manny Ramirez in the
No. 9 hitting position.
The 21-vear-old Ramirez hit
two home runs - his second and
third of the season - in Cleveland's
first five games of the season- four
of them wins by Indians - with six
hits, eight RBI and four runs scored
in 14 at-bats for a .429 batting aver-
age.
"I'm a line-drive hitter said
Ramirez, who was New York City
public high school player of the
year in 1991. "I'm feeling more com-
fortable without putting any pres-
sure on myself
He was called up by Cleveland
on Sept. 1 and created a stir when
he hit two home runs before
hometownf arts in Yankee Stadium
in his second major league game.
.After that he went 0-for-17 for the
rest of the season.
Cleveland Manager Mike
Hargrove took a matter-of-fact tone
toward his young prospect.
"1 don't know if he hits home
runs in bunches or not Hargrove
said.
"I haven't seen him that much
to know. Last year he .333 in the
minors so that doesn't sound like a
streak hitter to me. But we're going
to trv to give him a full season in the
big leagues this year to see what he
can do
Day two forces dropout at Invitational
(SID) � The Lady Pirate soft-
ball team dropped out of the Tar
Heel Invitational on day two after
going 3-2 in the tournament. ECU
defeated Florida State (1-0), UNC
Charlotte (6-0) and lost to Virginia
(1-8) on Saturday.
In the early morning game
against No. 20 Florida State, ECU
freshman Teryn Ford pitched a 5-
hit shutout. The game went score-
less until the top of the sixth inning
when the Lady Pirates rallied to
score the the only run of the game.
With one out, senior catcher Lisa
Corprew singled to leftfield.
Corprew then stole both second
and third base. Leann Myers flew
out, leaving senior Georgann
Wilke at the plate with a chance for
See SOFTBALL page 14

Jr
jC4 iV '
1 �-��� ;1 'i
� " "V?
4-�vH. . i
'l
Photo by Cedrlc Van Buran
ECU senior centerfielder and 1993 NCAA stolen base leader Michelle
Ward now holds the NCAA individual career stolen base record with 170.
Track teams compete well over weekend events
(SID)�The ECU men's track
program offered one of its stron-
gest outings of the season in a
four-team invitational meet held
at the University of Florida on
Saturday. The Pirates dominated
most of the events they entered,
as several individuals in the pro-
gram captured high marks
against fierce competition.
Senior Charles Miles cap-
tured two first-place finishes, fol-
lowed by teammate Lewis Har-
ris. These runners seized the top
two positions in the 100 and 200
meter sprints. Miles finished the
.100 at 10.78 seconds, followed by
larris' 10.85 mark. Miles was
clocked in the 200 at 21.32 sec-
onds, with Harris at a close 21.57.
Both races proved to be the pair's
best performances of the outdoor
season to date.
Herman Parker finished the
100 for the Pirates at 11.08 in fifth
place and was followed by team-
mates Ken Laws (11th), Chris
Pressley (12th) and Artee
Franklin (13th).
The 200 was rounded out by
Catonsville, Md. sophomore
Kareem Lamb's fifth place fin-
ish, and the efforts of Parker (7th),
Brian Johnson (8th) and Franklin
(11th). The Pirate 4x100 relay
team also scored a second-place
finish at 40.99, its best outing of
the season.
The 400 meter run, how-
ever, proved to be unkind to the
Pirates as Kareem Lamb and
Dwight Henry finished the race
in fifth and sixth places, at times
slower than in previous races.
The Pirates are scheduled
to travel to the CAA Champi-
onships in Williamsburg, Va.
and the Mt. SAC Relays in Wal-
nut, Calif, on Saturday.
The East Carolina Lady Pi-
rates competed in their largest
meet of the 1994 season last Fri-
See TRACK page14





14 The East Carolinian
April 14. 1994
TRACK
Continued from page 13
jfcy and Saturday in Durham with
J& teams participating making
i�mpetition extremely tough.
I- ECU upheld Head Coach
Sharles Justice's optimism head-
ing into next weeks Colonial Ath-
letic Association Championships
,by turning in their finest perfor-
mance to date.
� Dava Rhodes continued once
�again to show her talent by plac-
mg ninth in a field of 70 runners
�iivthe 3000 meters by breaking
the school record with a time of
10:02.42. Her sister Tara Rhodes
placed 21 st in the same event with
a time of 10:27.59, which would
have broken the old school record
also.
Other outstanding perfor-
mances included the 4x400 meter
relay team consisting of Alexis
Jacks, Cindy Szymanski, Kiesha
Johnson and SunshineSandridge
which took first in their heat with
a time of 4:03.42. It was also their
best performance of the year.
Lave Wilson in the triple
jump placed eighth with a jump
of 37'5 Alexis Jacks won her
heat in the 800 meters running a
personal best timeof 2:18.29. Also
winning her heat was Theresa
Marini in the 1500 meters with a
time of 5:14.0. And scoring a per-
sonal best was Kim Pakowski in
the discus throw with a distance
of 125 feet.
"I was extremely pleased
with the efforts of our girls to-
day Justice said. "It gives me
every reason to be optimistic
about placing as high as second
place next week at the CAA's if
we can put together our best ef-
fort.
SPORTS NOTES
(SID) � The East Carolina
men's basketball team will play in
the Aloha Classic, Dec. 19-20,1994,
in Honolulu, Hawaii, school offi-
cials announced Tuesday.
The Pirates' only other trip to
Hawaii was Dec. 22-24,1989 in the
Chaminade Christmas Classic,
played in Honolulu.
ECU joins Eastern Illinois,
Northern Arizona and host
Chaminade in the tournament.
Pairngs, along with the remain-
der of ECU'S 1994-95 basketball
schedule, will be released at a later
date.
The Annual ECU baseball
lettermen game will be held Satur-
day, April 16th at Harrington Field
as a part of the 11th annual Great
Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-Out
Party.
Former Pirates will take on the
1994 Pirates in an exhibition at 6
p.m. ECU has a rich tradition in
baseball, having won a NAIA Na-
tional Championship in 1961, made
14 NCAA tournamentappearances
and seen over 60 players go on to
sign professional baseball contracts.
The football scrimmage will be
Saturday at 3 p.m.
Olson's Trivia
Quiz
Q. Who is the lone NBA team to
lose only one post-season game?
3il aii joJ SJ9 di idans AMd �?9Z 3H suv
MiM v isSoi wtwi Auo am 3A3M. syonq aaynvMHfM
3tf� S43XIS viiidppvjiiM uotdmviij pijom �861 H1'V
Vikings could still land Moon
(AP) � Houston Oilers quar-
terback Warren Moon continues
talking with the Minnesota Vi-
kings about a possible trade but
remains interested in finishing his
career with the Oilers.
! "Warren still wants to be in
Houston Moon's agent, Leigh
Steinberg, said after the latest
found of negotiations with the
Vikings. "But if there's going to
bea trade, Minnesota would be a
re&sonable place.
"Warren hasn't totally ruled
out restructuring his contract
with the Oilers
; Moon said after a meeting
with Oilers general manager
Plovd Reese last week that he
vyould not agree to a restructured
cbntract.
! ; Steinberg and Moon have
been meeting with Vikings vice
president Jeff Diamond at
Steinberg's office in Newport
SOFTBALL
Beach, Calif.
Moon is scheduled to make
$3.25 million this season.
Backup quarterback Cody
Carlson, with a $3 million con-
tract this season, is in the final
stages of restructuring his con-
tract.
The Vikings also want to re-
structure Moon's contract, giv-
ing him less money this season
and helping their salary cap.
"We're still talking to Minne-
sota Steinberg said. "We talk on
a daily basis. There's no time-
table but a third-party event could
force the issue
Other NFL notes:
� The Pittsburgh Steelers
have made an offer to Dallas Cow-
boys wide receiver Alvin Harper.
However, Harper's agent says
more discussions are expected.
Agent Jimmy Sexton declined
See NFL page 15
Continued from page 13
Lets
Party
The ECU Pirate
pigskin party
will be held this
weekend. There
will be a football
scrimmage on
Saturday at 3
p.m.
CONGRATULATIONS
GRADS
There is still time to choose from our complete
selection of Custom Announcements, Name Cards,
Memory Books, Party Supplies and gifts.
Special moments
Fine Papers � Gifts � Fragrances
110 East 5th Street - Downtown Greenville
758-1151
Photo Courtesy
of SID
I
fhegame-winriing hit. Wilke, who
went 2-3 in the game, blasted a
triple, driving Corprew home.
: � The Seminoles couldn't come
back, leaving the victory for ECU.
ford's pitching record jumps to 9-
3:
' ECUdefeatedUNC-Charlotte,
6-0, in its second game of the day
with sophomore Tracie Podratsky
(jll-3) pitching a 1 hit shutout. Se-
nior Michelle Ward had four of
ECU'S 11 hits going 4-4 with three
stolen bases and one triple. Lisa
Corprew added to ECU's romp
going 2-3 with two stolen bases, 1
RBI and one double.
The UNC-Charlotte game left
ECU seeded third in its pool be-
hind No. 1 seeded Florida State
and No. 2 seeded Georgia Tech.
In the single-elimination
bracket East Carolina lost to Vir-
ginia, 1-8. ECU pitchers Jill
FkBvlands and Teryn Ford gave up
lrhits combined with Rowlands
(15-4) taking the loss.
; East Carolina scored its only
run in the first inning with
Georgann Wilke hitting Michelle
Ward in with an RBI single. The
Cavaliers went on to dominate the
game, tallying 12 hits.
East Carolina's overall record
now stands at 36-13, with ECU
winning 22 of its last 26 games. The
Lady Pirates return home to take a
break before going on the road to
Chattanooga, Term, to compete in
the Frost Cutiery Tournament
April 15-17.
IT'S BACK !
SEMI-ANNUAL
WRESTLING TOURNAMENT
APRIL 17
CHRISTENBURY GYM
REGISTER: APRIL 5 - IS
Sign -up at 204 Christenbury Gym
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
SPONSORED BYt RECREATIONAl SERVICES
O BELK HALL COUNCIL
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES
MAY 1 - AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
Casfc PrlZee!
CONTEST
Ladies, Show Off Your Tan. The Winner
Will Advance To The Emerald Isle Beach
Music Hot Tan Contest!
� Rio preliminaries held Saturday,
April 9th, 16th and 23rd.
� FINALS ON SATURDAY, APRIL 30th.
� Doors open at 6 PM with FREE
admission til 9-30 PM.
� $3.00 cover
Drink specials: Blue Hawaiians and
Bahama Mamas for $3.00
IF' Greenville
� A Step Above The Rest.
W INN 207 svv Greenville Blvd. � Greenville. NC 27B34 � 355-5000
Brought to you by the Student Union Films Committee
April 14,1994.
PENNIES ATTENDANCE TO DATE IS 32,149.
WE ARE GETTING CLOSE TO OUR GRAND TOTAL OF 35,000
PEOPLE THROUGH THE DOORS OF HENDRIX THEATRE, SO
INCREASE YOUR ODDS OF WINNING350.00 BY COMING TO
THE MOVIES.
Monday, April 25th, 8:00 p.m.
SNEAK PREVIEW: "NO ESCAPE
Rarpfnot on the Mall '94: April 21st. 8:00 p.m.
"ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
B.Y.O.B. (BRING YOUR OWN BLANKET )
Come as your favorite character.
Anyone interested in joining the Student Union Films Committee,
either call 757-4715, or come by Room 236 and pick up an application.
OtfT IP M"ll TOU
1994
DANCE TEAM
TRYOUTS
WHEN: APRIL 22-23, TRYOUTS APRIL 24, 1994
WHERE: MINCES COLISEUM LOBBY
TIME: 7:00 PM
� 3Mascots will be selected �For more information contact Shannon Smith at 757-4672
APRIL 22-23
APRIL 24
Actual Tryouts
MINGES COLISEUM LOBBY
7:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
.






April 14. 1994
The East Carolinian 15
BASEBALL
Continued from page 13
withL NC-Wilmington. The Spiders
boast a 7-5 conference record and a
21-14 overall record. They lead the
CAA in home ru ns .is a team vi th 44
in35 games. Senior Jeff Dausch leads
the CAA in home runs (12) and RBLs
(43). The L'R bats have kept them in
the race, for the Spider hurlers are last
in the CAA with a team 5.23 ERA.
However, sophomore RHP Bobby
St. Pierre has amassed a league-high
71 strikouts through April 11 th.
UNC-VVilmington, the surprise
of the CAA, is tied for second place in
theconference(7-5,22-17overall).The
Seahawks are 18-4 at friendly Brooks
field, but are an abysmal 4-13 on the
road. Senior third baseman Battle
Hollev leads the team with a .382 bat-
ting average and 12 stolen bases. On
the mound, senior Brian Smith and
junior John Babson have combined
for an 11-5 record in 129 innings of
work. Smith is currently fourth in the
CAA in strikeouts with 59.
East Carolina (6-6,27-11 overall)
is in a two-wav tie for fourth place in
the conference with James Madison
University. The Pirates are an out-
standing 24-5 at home, but only 3-6
awa v from Harrington Field, and play
eight of their final 13 games on the
road Outfielders Jamie Borel (.397)
and Brian Yerys (.393) are third and
fourth in the CAA batting race, and
Borel leads the conference in stolen
bases with 31. On the mound, senior
Lvle Hartgrove is second in the CAA
with a 1.78 ERA. Junior Richie
Blackvvell is fourth with a 259 ERA
and leads all NCAA Division I pitch-
ers in strikeouts per nine innings with
a 13.2 average.
James Madison University leads
the CAA with a .346 team batting
average and, as of April 11, are in the
midst of a nine-game winning streak.
The Dukes are being led atthe plate by
second baseman KevinNehring (.389)
and CAA Player of the Week Joe
Higman, whobatted .733infivegames
last week to boost his season average
to .387,seventhin theconference. Fresh-
man AndrewGordon leads the Dukes
with a 3.09 ERA, and junior Scott
Forster has rung up 62 strikeouts in
48.7 innings.
William & Mary is 18-16 overall
and 6-9 in the CAA, good for sixth
place in the standings. They are fifth in
the conference in both team batting
(.292) and pitching (4.70 ERA). In the
batter's box, the Tribe is led by senior
first baseman Mike Ruberti, who is
i lifting .366 with rune home runs and
36 RBLs, and shortstop Shawn Knight,
who is currently third in the confer-
ence with 20 stolen bases. Junior Eric
Pfitzner leads the Tribe on the hill with
a 3.30 ERA in 46 innings of work.
George Mason University is still
in the CAA cellar, and have compiled
a 1-11 CAA record (9-17-1 overall).
The Patriots are last in the conference
witha.251 teambattingaverageh'le
the GMU hurlers are sixth with a 4.81
ERA. Senior catcher J.J. Picollo has an
eight-game hitting streak in progress,
and has thrown out 17 of 42 (40.4
percent) base stealers this season.
NFL
from
page 14
to comment on reports that
Harper has been offered a con-
tract in the range of $1.4 miliona
year over three years.
Harper is a restricted free
agent, and the Steelers would
have to give the Cowboys their
first-round (17th overall) and
third-round picks if the Cowboys
opted not to match the offer.
� Unsigned quarterback Brett
Favre practiced with the Green
Bay Packers at their first Arizona
minicamp, and tight end Jackie
Harris and cornerback Terrell
Buckley failed to show.
Favre said that he was "close
- verv close" to agreeing to terms
and that he felt the camp was too
important to miss.
� Warren "Rennie" Simmons,
an assistant coach with the Wash-
ington Redskins from 1981-93,has
been hired as tight ends coach for
the Los Angeles Rams.
ECU's Closest Beach
WHKHflRD'S BE0CH
Located on the Pamlico River in Washington
�Sandy Beach
�Conviently located Mini-Mart
Beer, Snacks. Lotion & Bathing Suits
�Tube Rentals for "Good Times"
�3 Flume Waterslide
�$1.00 per person
�$2.00 person on Weekends
�Country Dance Every Saturday Night 'XT �0
-ss$p
ECU
Washington
Whiciard's Beach Rd.
Hwy33 �
10th Street )pT
pa
o
"O
(O
Chocowinity
946-0011
ELBO
ELBO
TUESDAY
DRAFT
9PM until 2AM
Wednesday jk
Classics Nite!
Admission $3.00 members
$4.00 Guests
Draft All Nite
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mama's
50tf Jello
75t Kamikaze
75t 100 M.P.H.
FEATURING THE BEST IN
CLASSIC ROCK
Hair is feeler
T
REDUCED PRICES
MEAT BUN LENGTH OR
BUN LENGTH LIGHT
OSCAR MAYER
WIENERS
GREAT
ON THE
GRILL
BEER BRATS �BEER CITY GRILLERS
J0HNS0NVILLE
BRATWURST
����Ld�
&
YELLOW AP
CORN e �Z9
KIWI J�C
FRUIT �23
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FRESH Jiff
LEMONS .AO
GRAPEFRUIT
GREAT DELI-BAKERY
IN THE DELI-BAKERY
HOT DOG OR
HAMBURGER BUNS
8CT.
ALL VARIETIES
BAGELS
We will also
accept
Mastercard, Visa,
and Discover Card
for your
convenience-
GREAT VALUE
DIET PEPSI OR
PEPSI COLA
2 LITER
HARRIS TEETERTHE BEST IS WHAT WE'RE All ABOUT
HT
MACARONI &
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.25
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93.5 SQ. FT. WHITE 08 154 SQ. FT. PIUSH WHITE
CHARMIN ULTRA
BATH TISSUE &
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ALL VARIETIES
GATORADE
DRINK
32
OZ.
.89
PICTSWEET
EXPRESS
BROCCOLI 5oz.
.25
SELECTED VARIETIES
SUAVE HAIR
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.92
IN THE DELI- BAKERY
ALL VARIETIES
NACHO CHIPS,
1
79
Prices Effective Through April 19, 1994
'rices In The Ad Effective Thursday, April 14 Through Tuesday.April 19, 1994 In Greenville Store Only We
Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Solo To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps





HMHNNMMM
161 The East Carolinian
dnmsaritrms
BASEBALL
American League
CALIFORNIA ANGELS�
Placed Mark Langston, pitcher, on
the 15-day disabled list, retroactive
to April 6. Recalled Brian Ander-
son, pitcher, from Vancouver of
the Pacific Coast League.
SEATTLE MARINERS�
Placed Keith Mitchell, outfielder,
on the 15-day disabled list. Recalled
Greg Pirkl, infielder, from Calgary
of the Pacific Coast League.
TEXAS RANGERS�Pur-
chased the contract of Rick Helling,
pitcher, from Oklahoma City of
the American Association.
Optioned Darren Oliver, pitcher,
to Oklahoma City.
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS�
Designated Al Osuna, pitcher, for
assignment.
CHIC AGOCUBS�Called up
P Chuck Crimfrom AAA Iowa.
FLORIDA MARLINS�
Placed IFGregColbrunn on the 15-
day disabled list, retroactive to
April 9.
PHILADELPHIA
PHILLIES� Acquired P Shawn
Boskie from the Chicago Cubs in
exchange for P Kevin Foster.
SAN DIEGO PADRES�
Signed IB Kevin Maas to a minor -
league contract and assigned him
to AA Wichita.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Associa-
tion
CHICAGO BULLS�Acti-
vated Will Perdue, center, from the
injured list. Placed Jo Jo English,
guard, on the injured list.
HOCKEY
National Hockev League
ANAHEIM MIGHTY
DUCKS�Recalled Scott McKay,
center, from San Diegoof the Inter-
national Hockey League.
SAN JOSE SHARKS�Re-
called Kip Miller, center, and
Michal Sykora, defenseman, from
Kansas City of the International
Hockey League.
Build
Your
Future
To New
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echnical
ake
ommimity
Can one of these
two-year associate
degree programs
enhance your
education with
hands-on experience:
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Call Wake Tech
Admissions � 662-3500
Or Write
yiOl laycticvillcRdRaleigh,NC276Q3
April 14 1994
Introducing Eastern North Carolina's Finest New Supermarket -X-
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ff w i
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Quantities �Copyright 1994, Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc.





Title
The East Carolinian, April 14, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 14, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1005
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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