The East Carolinian, April 12, 1994






Lifestyle
ECU Grad wins honor
Masters candidate and
guitarist Kenneth Meyer
wins Wurlitzer Collegiate
Artist Competition. Story on
page 6.
Sports
What a Comeback
from behind
rally
William and Mary
Pirates
to beat
13-12 in extra innings
Story on page 9.
Today
NNxN
iVV
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol.69No.4a53
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, April 12,1994
12 Pages

Truth" in Russian media?
By Jon Cawley
Staff Writer
Gennady Gerasimov, best
known as former Soviet President
Mikhail Gorbachev's press
spokesman, was at ECU Friday
presenting two lectures that were
open to students and the general
public.
Gerasimov's accomplish-
ments include serving as Russian
ambassador to Portugal and
Lisbon, Chief of Information De-
partment, Soviet Ministry of For-
eign Affairs, spokesman for
Eduard Shevardnadze, Editor-in-
Chief tor the A loscoiv News, politi-
cal advisor to Yuri Andropov,
Editor of World tAarxist Review
and syndicated columnist for
Novosti Press Agency.
The first lecture was pre-
sented to Dr. Carmine Scavo's
Media and Public Policy class and
focused on Gerasimov's impres-
sions of the Soviet media. Later,
Gerasimov spoke concerning
post-communist Russia.
Gerasimov's first-hand
knowledge and experience in the
Soviet media provided the sub-
ject matter for his presentation.
He described the Soviet
government's policy on the me-
dia, which was based on Oscar
Wilde's impression that "a prob-
lem does not exist it it is not talked
about
This policy was obtainable
by the Soviet government because
the state had a monopoly on the
presses and post offices,
Gerasimov said. That hurt the
competitiveness ot the newspa-
pers because thesta te gave money
to the papers they liked, he said.
Because newspapers and
journalists were in financial
trouble, they could be bought.
With money, anyone could buy
an article that would show them
Federal Express
plane hijacked
Employee facing review
attacks pilot
MEMPHIS, Term. (AP) �
A Federal Lxpress cargo plane
veered dangerously off course at
rimes as its crew fought off a man
who attacked them with ham-
mers, a knife and a spear gun- an
air traffic controller said.
Ihere were long gaps be-
tween radioed messages from the
plane, and sometimes the plane's
microphone was on bu t transmit-
ted only heavy brea tiling, Kent
Heshman said inSunday editions
of The Commercial Appeal.
"I (felt) so helpless. I was
just trying to get him pointed back
to where he needed to go
Fleshman said.
Fleshman said the plane
suddenly veered off course sev-
eral times and tha t the pi lot, J ames
Tucker,sounded disoriented and
was breathing heavily.
"He asked, 'Where is the
airport?' I said '12 o'clock That
means he was pointing straight at
the airport Fleshman said. "And
then withinacouple of moments,
he asked (again), 'What direc-
tion7' And that's when I knew
something was really wrong
Fleshman guided the plane
to a safe landing at Memphis In-
ternational Airport, where it had
taken off from en route to San
Jose.
"Mv heart was in m v throat
the entire time Fleshman said.
See EXPRESSpage 3
in a positive way and someone
else in a negative way, he said.
The main newspaper was
Pravda (or "Truth"), which was
established in 1412 bv Vladimir
Lenin and had "an enormous cir-
culation of more than 11 million
Gerasimov said. "Across thecoun-
trv, every morning the postmas-
ter brought you your Pravda for
vour morning cup of tea
Another newspaper was
Izvestia, translated as "News
which also followed the party line
in the Soviet Union. Gerasimov
remarked that there was "no truth
in Pwnfoandnonews in Izvestia
an old Russian joke.
The most popular newspa-
per is Trud, which means "I a-
bor Gerasimov said. The trade
unions publish the paper which
hasa circulation "even bigger than
the circulation of Pravda he said.
Although in Gerasimov's
opinion Russia has "the most in-
teresting press, today all publica-
tions are down With glasnost
and perestroika readers got too
much information, and families
that subscribed to five or six news-
papers now get one, Gerasimov
said.
None of the papers adver-
tise for consumer goods,
Gerasimov said.The Russian me-
dia do have foreign correspon-
dents and publish foreign news,
although not stories like the Tonya
Harding incident, he added.
The Soviet Union had six
television stations; one national,
one in Moscow and the rest local
stations, two of which Yeltsin
wants to keep control, Gerasimov
said. When asked how the West
can best help Russian journalists,
Gerasimov responded "bring us
an independent printing plant,
but the government is not going
to give you that
The second lecture on post-
Phcto by Cedric Van Buren
If you think the press in the United States needs moral assistance, you
missed hearingabout the horrifvingmedia conditions in Russia from the
former press spokesman for Gorbachev last Friday.
communist Russia was mure a
question-and-answer session, in
which Gerasimov discussed
many topics concerning the
breakup o the former Soviet
Union and the future direction of
the region.
In explaining thedifference
between capitalism and social-
ism, Gerasimov explained that
"under capitalism man exploits
man, under socialism it is just the
opposite He said under social-
ism the state exploited thepeople.
Gerasimov believes that the
Soviet system failed not because
the military budget created a bur-
den on the Socialist system, but
because the system failed to ac-
complish its goal: "to create a
new Soviet man
America hasa melting stew
because some nationalities still
stick together, Gerasimov said.
See GERASIMOV page 3
Women learn to fight back
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
Think of the word feminism.
What images come to mind? Is it
the passionate defenders of
women's rights fighting for equal-
ity or is it Rush Limbaugh's
"feminazis" taking on govern-
ment with their own agenda?
More than 150 women came
to Greenville this past weekend
to participate in the annual meet-
ing of the Southeastern Women's
Studies Association (SEWSA) to
debate that premise and other top-
ics. The title of the conference was
"Constructing the 21st Centurv:
Women andin the World
"SEWSA is a group of femi-
nists, individuals and organiza-
tions in the southeastern states
who are committed to the promo-
tion and support ot women's stud-
ies and women's advocacy in
schoolsand communities states
a brochure promoting the organi-
zation.
Each year SEWSA holds a
conference at a major university
in the southeast, I ast year's meet-
ing was held at Vanderbilt I m
versify in Tennessee
" The conference was a
huge success said Ml Adams, a
gr iduate assistant in theWomen's
Studies Program who helped or-
ganize the event. ' i think it was
very produ tiveand it wasa lotol
tun being there. We v ere pleased
with the turnout
I lie i ontereiu e, w h uh
spanned parts ot three days, in-
cluded speakers trom ECL .other
universities and other walks ot
life, panel and roundtablediscus-
sions and three keynote speakers.
One ot the keynote speak-
ers, Lillian Robinson, spoke on
the topic of the global sex indus
try and women's participation in
it. Robinson teaches English at
Virginia Polytechnic and State
University and has written exten-
sively on the topic ot women's
roles in society. She has also been
featured in the journal TlieNation
for n article on prostitution in
Thailand.
Robinson blamed the Thai
sex industry, known worldwide
for the youth, accessibility and
low i ost ot its prostitutes, on the
American military. "In 1967, Thai-
land signedi. ontrac tswith theL .S.
government to provide rest and
relaxation for troops stationed in
'southeast Asia Weal! know what
wasmeantby rest and relaxation
Robinson i ritk ized the n k k
magazine,sjii. which is pub-
lished bv the same i ompany that
distributes Penthouse, for jn ar-
ticle entitled "We Tree a Sex
Slave " She asked the audience
rhetorically if they wen'supposed
to laud the journalists who kid
napped lb) 12 year old prostitute,
and, alii i revving their w av to
the Burmese border announced
thev freed hei
Ina similai vein, she . riti-
ized the I hai g v ei nment fortai
itlv supporting tin- $4 billion a-
year industry and American femi-
nists for not condemning prosti-
tution. She said some feminists
"valorizesex work and say that
prostitution is a choice of many
women. Robinson also said all la-
bor was exploitative and prosti-
tution led to "sexual subjectivity
and sexual alienation
Saturday's other plenary
speaker was Linda Brown of
Bennett College. Brown's talk was
entitled "UnderstandingSymbols
and Images of Racism in our Cul-
ture
Brown discussed advertis-
ing icons such as Aunt Jemima
and the black man that appears
on the Cream of Wheat packages.
She also mentioned the toothpaste
Colgate which is sold in Asia Mil-
der a different prejudicial name
and featuresa man in blackface as
spokesman for the product.
Biown said that popular
images ot men and women, espe-
cially black men and women,can
be divided mto three categories.
Men are either "Uncle Ren.uses,
Sambos or savages she said.
Women all tall into the categories
of "Jezebel, Mamie or Esther from
Sanfordand Son
" Brow n decried the lack of
quality leading roles for bl.uk
women also Adams said. She
talked about how society indoc-
trinates you when v ou are young
and teaches von these kinds of
stereotypes
WOMEN pageZ
Reid withdraws
from SGA race
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
Candidate for SGA presi-
dent David Reid tormallv with-
drew his name from consider-
ation in a press conference at The
East Carolinian yesterday. He is-
sued the following statement:
"This morning at 8 a.m. I
submitted mv withdrawal of my
name on the ballot as a candidate
for president of the Studen tGov-
ernment Association This was
not an easy decision for me but
one that I feel most comfortable
with. I would like to thank all the
people that voted and supported
me in mv campaign. I said from
the beginning that this would be
a learning experience and it was.
"I honestly feel that things
need to change in the SGA and
today I am publically endorsing
Ian Eastman for S( I A president.
Ian, like myself, wants to bring
about change on the SGA I
want to end the negative cam-
paigning and focus on the real
issues, not pie in the sk-� prom-
ises that are made to just to
get votes. The pattern of
lies md personal attacks al-
leged against me by other
candidates and or persons
quite simply make a mock-
ery ot our student govern-
ment election process.
Secondly the clear con-
flicts of interests that exist
within the SGA and more
particularly on the elections
committee itself are issue
enough for even the most
uninformed student to eas-
ii discern that theSGAbarn
needs to be cleaned out ,nd
cleaned out now
Had Reid not with-
drawn, he would have faced
Ian Eastman in a run-off
Wed April 13. The winner
of that run-off would have
gone on to run against Brvnn
Thomas the following
Wednesday, April 20.
ECU students will de-
cide between Eastman and
Thomas for SGA president
on April 20.
College student attacks
Barney in Massachusetts
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
WORCESTER, Mass. (AP)
� A woman dressed as Barney
was attacked bv a college stu-
dent acting on a dare who said
he hated the cartoon dinosaur.
Deborah McRov suffered a
neck injury that doctors told her
would take up to six weeks to
healI said, 'Why are you do-
ing this to me?' And he said.
Because we hate Barney
McRov told the Telegram & Ga-
zette.
Derrick McMahan, a stu-
dent at Worcester State College,
hit McRov on a $10 bet from his
roommate, police said. The two
students were leaving the phar-
macy parking lot when the at-
tack occurred.
"One student bet
McMahan that he wouldn't
tackle Barney said an uniden-
tified police source. "Instead ot
tackling her, he knocked her to
the ground, kicked oft her face
piece and started to punch
her in the face
McMahan was charged
with assault and battery.
"Unfortunately, it goes
to show you what little re-
spect people have tor other
people the police source
said. "This incident had
nothing to do with Barney,
the woman's face piece was
off when he punched her
McRov was dressed up
to help Brooks pharmacv cel-
ebrate the opening of a new-
store when the attack oc-
cui red Friday.
We had a lot ot wit-
nesses said McRov, who
i elebrated her 40th birthday
the day of the attack. "One
little bov said, 'I'm going
home to get mv gun, Barney,
and I'm going to shoot him
"In September, four youths
were lined S200 each for at-
tat king a person in a purple
dinosaur costume at a store
opening in Galv eston, Texas.
It's
not
so
easy
Yesterday,
students
participated in an
obstacle course
put together by
People United to
Support the
Handicapped
(PUSH) in an
effort to clue
people in on just
how it feels to he
nallengedwitha
handicap.
Photo by Cedric Van
Buren





2 The East Carolinian
April 12, 1994
y
mmeFca-
Lightning strikes, kills one
THEY'RE
barefoot '94
Vandals destroy newspaper inserts
; A group calling itself "Pissed Off Wimmin" claimed responsibility
fof destroying 10,000 pro-life newspaper inserts that were supposed to be
distributed April 5 by The Miami Hurricane. However, the student news-
paper at the University of Miami has vowed to deliver reprinted adver-
tising supplements as scheduled. The group that identified itself as Pissed
Off Wimmin, or POW, faxed a press release to the newspaper March 28,
claiming responsibility for trashing the supplements. Police believe the
inserts from Human Life of Minnesota Inc a pro-life organization, were
destroyed between 2:30 a.m. and 5 a.m. March 28. The 12-page tabloids
were strewn across the floor of a stairwell in the VVhitten University
Center and red paint was poured on them. A flier glued to the wall
depicted a coat hangar and the words "The alternative to legal abortion
Officials could not immediately explain how the vandal knew where the
supplements were stored in the University Center.
Georgia Tech wins a fortune on "Wheel"
By guessing the phrase "mashed potatoes four Georgia Tech
students won 550,000 for their school on "Wheel of Fortune's" College
Week. In addition to the $50,000 annuity to be used for scholarships, the
Georgia Tech team also raked in almost $88,000 for themselves. The Tech
team was composed of three engineering majors and a management
science major. The other schools competing on College Week were
UCLA, the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Arkansas. The
four teams met at the DisneyMGM Studios in Orlando on March 5 to
tape a week of shows that will air May 16-20. The final standings: in first
place was Georgia Tech with combined winnings of $137,950; second,
UCLA with $45,800; Arkansas, $31,248; and Pittsburgh, $5,500.
UNC-CH Trustees vote to increase student fees
UNC's Board of Trustees voted two weeks ago to increase student
fees by about $80 for most undergraduates and to institute a $500 "quality
fee" for master's students at the Kenan-Flagler Business School, The Daily
Tarheel reported. The increased fees, which affect only UNC-Chapel Hill,
were proposed by the chancellor's student fee committee and are about
12.4 percent higher than this year's fees. UNC-CH ranks 13th among the
16 members of the UNC system, Trustee Annette Wood said. Currently,
the school collects $573 in fees, incl uding a $60 athletic fee. UNC-G collects
the most at $871, and Winston-Salem State University, Pembroke State
University and FayerteviUe State University collect the least in student
fees.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
NASHVILLE, Term. (AP)�
A huge bolt of lightning struck as
people played Frisbee on a rain-
drenched field, killing one person
and injuring 18 others.
"It was like a grenade that
exploded player Fred Baes said
Sunday. "People were standing
there and they went 'Bang Just
like that. Everybody on the field
hit the ground
"It was a huge bolt he said.
"It knocked me back about 5
yards
Police did not know if the
lightning hit the ground or the
people. From descriptions given
by the injured to doctors, the bolt
may have ricocheted off the
ground or off one of the people it
hit, said Elizabeth Spurgeon, a
spokeswoman for Southern Hills
Medical Center.
"The doctor who treated
some of the injured said some-
times lightning can hit one thing
and go back up into the air and
spread out like a starburst
Spurgeon said.
The Ultimate Frisbee Match
was being held on a soggy field
when the lightning struck around
1:30 p.m. Sunday, Detective Brad
Putnam said. It had been raining
off and on since the games began
that morning, he said.
Officials said the games had
been halted earlier in the day to
allow a thunderstorm to pass.
Seven of the victims were
players and the rest were specta-
tors. Shawn Adams, 29, of Chatta-
nooga was killed, police said.
Carmen Lapoma, 28, of At-
lanta was in critical condition to-
day. The other 17 injured people
were treated and released Sun-
day.
Twenty-four Frisbee teams
arrived in Nashville on Friday for
games that use a flying disk to
play soccer, tag and football.
Anyone interested in writing for the news
department is urged to contact Afeureen or Jason
at 757-6366 for more information.
CORRECTIONS
People on the Street incorrectly identified two individuals.
. Ramon Navarro was identified as Bob Wharton, while Bob
; Wharton was identified as Ramon Navarro. Also, Phi Sigma Pi
was incorrectly said to have sponsored the PUSH rock-a-thon on
page two.
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WOMEN
Continued from page 1
Saturday night theconference
featured a performance by ink
Burrows entitled "Sister! Sister in
which Burrows acted out the roles
of I4 people, mostly black women,
throughout history. In acting out
the different characters, from So-
joumer Truth toa young Irish boy,
Burrows changed only her voice
and the position of her shawl.
"It was astounding Adams
said. "She covered such a wide rage
ofemorions.Itwaslikegoinginto 19
differentshowsallinthesamenight
GERASIMOV
she would dim the light, and when
she turned them back on, she would
be a different person
Adams said the conference
ended Sunday with a student cau-
cus and her own contribution to the
event,asun e of ECU studentscon-
cerning feminist issues. A Vims said
�.he bund that although most stu-
dents agreed with the feminist posi-
tion on a number of issues, they were
reluctant to accept the label of femi-
nist.
This is the first year SEWSA's
Continued from page 1
annual conferent e was held at EC U.
Conference coordinators included
Dr. Linda Allied and Dr. Susan
McCammon, professors ol psychol-
ogy, and Dr. Marie Ian, protessorof
English
This year's conference was
sponsored by the ECU Women's
Studies Program, theCollegeot Arts
and Sciences, theOtticeof Academic-
Affairs, the Office of the Chancellor,
the EthnicStudies Program andCon-
tinuing Education and Summer
School.
Cont.
from
p.1
Russians thought they had a melt-
ing pot and the new Soviet man
would be "nation blind This did
not happen and continues to be a
problem today, he said.
Gerasimov explained that
"Perestroika means you leave the
building untouched, but you
change e ervthing within With
the breakup of the Soviet Union,
however, the Russian people do
not trust this idea because, m many
opinions, it brought crime. Some
are beginning to think that the old
days were not that bad, he added.
Manv of the audience's ques-
the next presidential election is
scheduled to take place.
Zhinnovskv is "riding the sails of
discontent and the only way to
diffuse his appeal is to improve
theeconomicsituation,Gera.simov
said.
Gerasimov explained that
Russia is in need of help and is the
land of opportunity for those in-
terested in Peace Corps-type ac-
tivities. The people of Russia are
in need of lessons in management
and bookkeeping, Gerasimov said.
Gerasimov savs he does not
have political office aspirations
dons pertained to the Neo-Fascist vet, despite rus extensi e expen-
Russian candidate, Zhirinovsky, ence in the field. W ith 1, part.es,
Gerasimov felt it important toneu- I can't make up my mind, he
trah.e his appeal by 14 when said.
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The East Carolinian 3

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The East Carolinian
Page 4
Opinion
April 12, 1994
The East Carolinian
'�mmisi
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Gina Jones, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirfz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Sniff Illustrator
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jodi Connelly. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
-masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
"words, which may be edited tor decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Kurt Cobain wrongly deified in death I
In lieu of Kurt Cobain's death last week, an
entire generation is forced to accept a disillusioned
martyrheroastheirrepresentative. Well,hedidn't
want us, and we certainly don't need him.
From MTV's "Week In Rock" to CNN, the
reports covering the death of Nirvana's lead singer
ranged from bizarre to just plain stupid. CNN
covered the story reservedly and matter-of-factly.
MTV's Kurt Loder cried during the Nirvana trib-
ute and then practically choked on his tears as he
informed a nation of Nirvana fans not to turn
around and do what Cobain did. He then advised
them to listen to the four Nirvana records during
the weekend because "they're all pretty good
Nice eulogy, Mr. Loder.
This Generation X thing was lame enough
before we were forced to swallow the pathetic
drug abuser as our leader in our "slacker" lives.
Thank Douglas Coupland for labeling an entire
generation of people as hopeless and unproduc-
tive members of society and then look to Kurt
Cobain as some sort of cynical god that may or
may not have been able to lead us out of the
fabricated despair that Coupland sums up for us
in Generation X. He never wanted the fame, or so
he claims. Obviously he never knew what came
along with the limelight. So, instead of dealing
with it, he puts a shotgun to his head and pulls the
trigger.
We (the twer' ' something group), as a col-
lective unit, are not lost, disillusioned, hopeless,
cynical, drifting people. Individually, we may
each have varying combinations of characteris-
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chinh Nguyen, Systems Manager
tics. But we aren't one huge, pathetic person who's
down on life and doesn't give a crap about what
happens tomorrow. But this is what we've become
to others, to the press, and if we're not careful, to
ourselves. A USA Today "Appreciation" story by
EdnaGundersen, reasons that "suicideisnotsharne-
ful,butneither is it admirable Abouttheonly thng
I've read or heard on the news that hasn't glorified
Cobain was this one story by Gundersen. She
insists that the man should not be deified.
To be quite honest, this act of Cobain's didn't
surprise me one iota. He, very plainly, was a man
severly messed up on drugs and certainly not ready
to face that fact. He was self-destructive and un-
happy. The near-fatal coma, now believed to be a
suicide attempt, was covered over as an accident.
Cobain abruptly checked out of an L. Aarea rehab
center, bought a shotgun and then was missing for
close to a week. His family and friends knew about
his constant depression and suicidal tendancies.
And yet despite all of this, his fans still made him
their anti-hero.
Kurt Cobain was that person with the right
combination of ideals and emotions thatCoupland
describes as Generation X. We are not Kurt Cobain.
We are individuals and we have the present and the
future. Unfortunately, what we now have thrust
upon us is a Christ-like grunge figurehead that
everyone expects us to follow into our worthless
future. But with all that's happened, all we owe
anyone is grief. Cobain is not a god. All that's tragic
in this story is that people sometimes see this as the
only way out.
By Barbara irwin
Future teachers face some irony, many rewards
By Brian Hall
Clinton accused of more sex allegations
Those who recall the media
firestorm about the Senator
Packwood sexual harassment
charges last fall, or the Clarence
Thomas-Anita Hill imbroglio in
1991, one might think that the
press would be drooling at the
possibility of another high gov-
ernment official facing possible
charges of
governor had at least some mea-
sure of power over her career. Re-
portedly he then told her that "you
havenicecurvesand ran his hand
up her leg. Allegedly, Mr. Clinton
then exposed himself and asked
Mrs. Jones to perform oral sex on
him. Again, these are all allega-
tions, which the President has de-
nied through
What we need is
more bulldogged
determination and
devotion to the
truth on which the
media prides itself.
sexual ha-
rassment.
Indeed, one
would think
that they
would ac-
tively seek
such cases
out, since
members of
the press mmmmmm
"simply
want to expose stories for what
they are - truth or fiction as was
published in these pages just last
Thursday. So why is there such
an astounding silence from the
press on the subject of Paula
Jones?
No doubt most readers are
asking themselves, Who? Do not
feel bad. Among newspapers,
only the Neiv York Post, Washing-
ton Times, and Los Angeles Times
have covered the story. ABC
briefly mentioned her story once.
The rest of the press has been
mute. If one had read any of these
stories, one would have learned
that in May of 1991, while she
was working as a hostess at the
Arkansas Quality Management
Governors' Conference at the
Excelsior Hotel in Little Rock,
then-Governor Clinton had an
armed state trooper invite Mrs.
Jones to his room to meet him.
Considering the invitation an
honor, she went along. Once
alone with the governor in his
room, with the trooper waiting in
the hallway, she claims that he
implied his authority over her,
and mentioned that he knew her
boss. As a state employee, the
Dee Dee
Meyers.
However,
Mrs. Jones has
corroboration,
both from four
Arkansas state
troopers who
worked on the
governor's secu-
rity detail,
claiming that
they frequently were used to invite
women to see the governor alone,
and from two friends others. When
she returned to the lobby, obvi-
ously shaken, she immediately con-
fided in both her friends her ver-
sion of what occured. Both women
have signed sworn affidavits sup-
porting Mrs. Jones' story.
Personally, I do not like the
use of one person's word against
another in this manner. However,
since the press decided in 1991 that
one woman, coming forward years
after the supposed offence, could
destroy a man's reputation, then,
to be fair, the media, the National
Organization for Women, and even
Hillary Clinton, who presented an
award for courage to Anita Hill,
should either hold our president to
the same standard, or offer an im-
mediate apology to Clarence Tho-
mas.
Of course, there are a few
differences between the two cases.
Clarence Thomas was being nomi-
nated for the Supreme Court; Bill
Clinton has been entrusted with
the highest office in the land. Miss
Hill was a lawyer, trained in ha-
rassment law, somehow failed to
tell anyone about the alleged ha-
rassment, or even keep a diary of
the offenses. She did however, fol-
low her alleged harasser from one
job to another. No one has ever
accused Justice Thomas of any
other misconduct with women.
Mrs. Jones has produced two wit-
nesses, plus her alleged harasser
has a long history of rumored
sexual indiscretions. Miss Hill has
toured the country, making
speeches at $10,000 a pop. Mrs.
Jones has not attempted to make
one cent from her story. While Nina
Totenberg and Tim Phelps had to
encourage (some might say force)
Miss Hill to make her charges pub-
he, Mrs. Jones has had to beg mem-
bers of the American press to cover
her story, including giving an ex-
clusive interview with The Wash-
ington Post. The Post has run noth-
ing in the weeks that have elapsed
since, and rumors of shouting
matches at the Post have found
there way into print. Apparently
some staffers at the paper feel edi-
tors are trying to bury the story.
There is the small difference in
political ideology in the two al-
leged perpetrators, but of course
that could not be the reason for the
difference in the press' treatment
of the two cases.
Mrs. Jones may leave the
press no choice. She has until May
8 to file a civil suit against the Presi-
dent. In such a case, the possibility
that the preponderance of the evi-
dence might be against the presi-
dent is quite real. So we could be
facing a situation where a sitting
president is forced by a court to
make reparation for a possible
criminal act. Obviously then, this
story is of immediate importance.
If this were the first hint of
possible wrong-doing by President
Clinton (as it was in the Thomas
case), then perhaps the press' re-
luctance would be justified. What
we need is more of the bulldogged
determination and devotion to the
truth on which the media prides
itself.
It's just about closing time
for the 1994 spring semester, and
I can't help but to think of that
fresh, new crop of college gradu-
ates motivated to hit the pave-
ment, assuredly toting that little
cylindrical, ribbon-fastened
document, ready to sell their tal-
ents and abilities to the company,
firm or institution offering the
best price. Yes, it is true, some
grads have the good fortune to be
a littlechoosy in their professional
endeavors.
However, as graduation
draws near, my heart goes out to
those who will soon be entering
the field of teaching. At times, I
don't know whether to congratu-
late them or pity them. They have
made a decision to enter a profes-
sion in the hope of changing a few
lives and perhaps to even chal-
lenge the educational system in an
attempt to improve it for their col-
leagues and students.
Unfortunately, as young
teachers step into a classroom with
all these lofty ambitions, they are
met with the old relics who offer
nothing more than, "Yeah, I used
to think that way, too and within
about two weeks the rookie-
teacher is conceeding defeat to a
system that will seemingly never
change.
Furthermore, it is a system
that is threaded with such illusion
and irony that many teachers end
up merely acting the part and
abandoning the entire role of en-
couraging learning and fostering
success in their students.
Consider how an interview
may sound between the principal
or superintendent and a young,
first-year recruit: "Unless you are
concerned with a problem in pa-
perwork, don't rely heavily on
your administration. Also, you
may find it a little tough to deal
with your colleagues since they
seem to be somewhat uncoopera-
tive. Furthermore, on days where
school is cancelled due to hurri-
cane warnings, you are still ex-
pected to be here, preferably 30
minutes earlier. For your summer
break, you need to update all your
files and lesson plans and attend
at least two graduate school
classes. We really encourage our
teachers to earn their Masters.
By the way, since your stu-
dents are typical adolescents, they
may seem a bit irrational, emo-
tional, and threatening at times,
but that's normal; you're not the
ony one who must deal with that,
you know. Okay, your starting
salary is $18,300 and we'll review
you for an increase after your fifth
year. Good luck
It's easy to imagine a wide-
eyed, open-mouthed, semi-para-
lyzed college graduate now' on-
dering why they could be so stu-
pid as to pursue a career in this
field. There is a national outcry for
better schools and better educa-
ors, and even though the better
teachers hear this, their outcry for
higher wages seems to fall on deaf
ears.
In a study by Xavier Univer-
sity, teachers reported they spend
at least 50 percent of their time
teaching on classroom manage-
ment, aka, disciplining stu-
dents. Also, 54 percent of the
schools surveyed reported a
dramatic increase in violence
over the past year alone. And is
it no wonder? The Department
of Education recently revealed
that over 100,000 students bring
guns to school each day. And
finallv, without too much con-
sideration about the demands
imposed upon these young
teachers by the parents, one
bewildering fact is that parents,
whose children are disrespect-
ful at home, always seem to be
so shocked to learn about the
behavior problems they are hav-
ing at school.
Given all the above men-
tioned, it is baffling why any-
one would want to devote their
career to one of high stress, high
expectations, low pay and little
recognition. A teacher really
never knows if they have been
successful unless they are for-
tunate enough to have one stu-
dent return years later and of-
fer a note of thanks. That's the
kind of success a teacher hopes
for but seldom receives.
We all have a special
teacher who we may say
changed our lives or who we
really thought was great. To the
new, young teachers, you may
be one such idol to many stu-
dents. Although you may never
know it, that is the true success
of your field. Hopefully, it's
enough to keep you fighting for
the more tangible and deserv-
ing rewards as well.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Kudos on a satirical job well done. The Least
Carolinian front page of Thursday's March 30(pre-
April Fool's) issue was the most hysterical copy I've
read in a while. I can't determine what made me cry
more, the top story on the PC speech codes cr the
plans to raz Dick's mansion and build a parking
deck. And the cow in the weather corner; god, now
that was a screamer.
I am glad to see the return of The Clearly
Labeled Satire Page, even if it's just for one issue.
Several years ago, much to the chagrin of the Media
Board, Chippy Bonehead and I (going by the moni-
ker of Earl vis) started the satire page which ran every
Thursday. After its debut, someone wrote a letter to
the editor complaining that it should be clearly la-
beled. Hence, the following week gave birth to The
Clearly Labeled Satire Page. During our satirical
reign, we wrote tons of outrageous stuff�including
a scatological advice column and the terrifying
Adventures of Squirrelman�but you, my friends,
have outwitted us and produced a hilarious parody
of campus news.
Please keep it up. The Satire Page is a needed
comic relief for those delving into the perils of
academe. And while a proposal to continue Satire
may find resistance from no other than the Media
Board, the Satire Page would receive a welcomed
reception from its readers: the students.
The talented writing demonstrated in The
Least Carolinian can't fall victim to the Board's
purse-strings approach to censorship. In addition,
the argument that the renewal of Satire will jeop-
ardize the paper's credibility is a load of beaver
dung. Just keep it Clearly Labeled and pump out
the humorous copy. Again, thanks for the laughs.
Tim Hampton
Graduate
To the Editor:
In response to Rizz Khoshnan's letter to the
editor on April 7th. Please don't feel sorry for us
chemistry students, we will surely hate working
hard in college and then making one of the top
salaries in the job market when we graduate with a
four year degree. If you can't pass an entry level
course in chemistry (because that is all Dr. Clemens
taught last semester), then maybe you should try
another field which interests you and does not re-
quire chemistry. Could it be that maybe you didn't
give a decent effort toward the class or is it easier to
just put the blame on someone else other than your-
self to justify your shortcomings!
I am a chemist and I admit that it was probably
the most difficult and rewarding endeavor I faced,
but it was worth it to me. 1 had to take some classes
over, study over the weekends and holidays, and get
tutored by graduate students, the learning center,
and even the professors. But I didn't blame anyone
except myself when things got difficult. Of course I
received that help because I wanted help, and if the
chemistry department just didn't care or not
worth a then how did I and all the other students
get help and you didn't?
Every year you hear freshman or transfers
who take introductory chemistry courses complain
about how hard chemistry is or how bad the profes-
sor is. But chemistry is not for memorizing facts or
figures, its about thinking and reasoning informa-
tion. Chemistry is a science, not a crip coarse for
undergraduate study.
It doesn't take a genius to figure out that if
they're not doing well in history, english, foreign
languages, or psychology then why would they
major in that field? So tell me, why are you major-
ing in chemistry if you can't do well in an introduc-
tory coarse in Chemistry? P.S. � Good luck at
McDonalds.
Chip Tillett
Senior
Chemistry
m ii





�� -I !� � II .1 �.��? Ht-1"�
MMWMi
The East Carolinian
April 12� 1994
For Rent
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Now Taking Leases for
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CALL 752-2865
Classifieds
Page 5
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1-6BEDROOM HOMES, condo's,
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$190 up! Short term lease avail-
able! Finders 321-6708 small fee.
Near campus rentals available
now!
NEW ROOMMATE LISTING
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your ad free. To get a list of all the
people looking for a roommate 321-
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SUBLEASE for summer or take
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or two people to cover half rent or
more. May is paid, call Neil, 758-
2334
APARTMENT FOR RENT 2 bed-
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FEMALE ROOMMATE
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May 94 to May 95 pref. Rent $170
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Belk Hall. Must be non-smoker
like dogs. $150 mo. 1 2 utilities.
Call Amanda at 931-8618
FLEEBIN FLOBBIN GRADY
WORE CUG AS. 2 bedroom 112
bath Oakmont Square Apt. to sub-
lease. $410month Call 355-3454
FEMALE WANTED to sublease 2
bedroom apartment. Close to cam-
pus. $190month and 12 utili-
ties. I will pay May rent. Contact
Bryth 758-4450
is currently accepting
applications for the position of
Production Manager. Some
audio editing experience is
required and Audio Production
Majors are preferred. Apply at
WZMB andor contact A. Lee
s Judge at WZMB at 757-4751. J
NEEDED AT ONCE Girls, Girls,
Girls. Earn big summer cash. The
bestsummer jobaround. Playmates
Adult Entertainment call for more
info. 747-7686
5:30pm and bring home. Call
Randy at 756-8861. Note: Starts
May 23,1994
For Sale
El Help Wanted
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Coun-
selors, Instructors, Kitchen, Office,
Grounds for western North
Carolina's finest Co-ed youth sum-
mer sports camp. Over 25 activities
including water ski, heated pool,
tennis, horseback, art Coolmoun-
tain climate, good pay and great
fun! Non-smokers. Forapplication
brochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp
Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC
28792
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Greatbenefits. Call
1-800-436-4365 ext. P-3712
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
Brochures! SpareFull-time. Set
own hours! Rush stamped enve-
lope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
HillandaleRd. 1B-295 Durham, NC
27705.
HELP WANTED female escorts ap-
plications available now. Lucrative
financial opportunities. Call 321-
8252 anytime or 714-5350 after
4:00pm
HELP WANTED modeling, danc-
ing, adult conversation full or part-
time. Will accomodate school sched-
ule. $300-500 weekly call 746-6762
EARN MONEY in your own home
or business stuffing envelopes.
Great opportunity! Tired of work-
ing for someone else? For info, rush
$1 nd self addressed stamped en-
velope: Pobox 1811 Greenville, NC
27835
ATTENTION HORSE LOVERS:
Experienced English rider to help
with barn choresfeeding in ex-
change for pleasure riding. 355-6320
after 5pm
EASY WORKEXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call
toll free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920
SUMMER IN THE SUN. Positions
available for energetic, enthusias-
tic, individuals at Avon Resort near
Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.
Spend your summer outdoors help-
ing with our natural grass, minia-
ture golf course or indoors in our
oceanfront grill. Beautiful surround-
ings, fun co-workers, and even
accomodations for the right folks.
Mail your resume to Avon Resort,
Po Box 583, Avon, NC 27915 or call
(919)995-6740
IMMEDIATE OPENING for sec-
retarytypist position apply be-
tween 1:00-3:00 at SDF Computer
Inc, 813 South Evans st. Greenville
(752-3694)
WANTED: Industrious students to
care for yard & pool. 10-20 hours
weekly. Call 355-3030 between 8:30
and 5:30.
$$$ ATTRACTIVE FEMALES
For TV commercial. Good voice
and cheerful. (No experience nec-
essary) (Bring your female friend)
on camera interviews. April 12
from 3pm to 9pm T-shirt and blue
jeans. This is legitimate at
Gunsmoke Outdoor TV produc-
tions 15 miles south in Grifton on
right 1 2 block pass Piggly Wiggly
(919)524-4112
NOW HIRING part time waitstaff
$4.25 hour. NO phone calls please.
Come by Amichi's Stantonsberg
Square Shopping Center.
RESPONSIBLE STUDENT(S) to
pick up 2 children at 7am and bring
to school (Elmhurst ECU Pre-
School) at 7:30am; then pick up by
EUROPE THIS SUMMER? Fly-
only $169! California- $129 ea. way!
Florida too. CaribbeanMexican
Coast rt $189! No gimmicks-no
hitches. Airtech 1-800-575-TECH
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED, frame,
mattress, heater, padded rails $175
or obo. 757-9645
1985 CONNER MOBILE HOME,
12'x56 Two bedrooms, one bath,
kitchen and livingroom. Located in
Evans Mobile Home Park. Partly
furnished, underpinning and a 6'x6'
storage building included in the
price. Perfect for starting couple or
ECU students trying to save on
monthly rental costs. Available for
move in on August 1st. Asking
$9,500. Those interested please call
(919)321-2577 formore information.
LOSE WEIGHT NOW! 25- 30
people wanted. No will power
needed. Doctor recommended. All
natural. 100 guarantee. Products
for bodv builders too! Call: 752-
2551
FOR SALE: couch with matching
chair, $125 Dorm loft with head-
board and bookshelf, $90 ask for
Lee Ann 752-1360
78 VOLKS RABBIT good condi-
tion $700 obo must sell asap a 1,2 dr
call 931-7381
QUEEN SIZE, SEMI WAVELESS
WATER BED. Large headboard
with mirror. Padded rails, heates.
Good condition, no leaks! $150 obo
must sell! Call Paul 931-7273 leave
message
MICROWAVE- practically new-
900 watts $175; couch- good struc-
ture. Needs recovering. Matching
love seat. Both $75 call home 355-
5249 or work 757-6693
50 GAL. FISH TANK on sale for
$80. Tank stand w shelf & 7 gold
fish included. Call Mercedes at 752-
8667 leave message
alism, except no imitations! Dis-
counts to all ECU students. Call
Rob �757-2658
OLDER ECU STUDENT with
family seeks position of
groundskeeper in exchange forliv-
ing quarters. 11 years landscaping
experience. Moving to Greenville
in May. Pleasecall Phil at (919)426-
1409 '
I
Personals
ATTENTION ALL STUDENTS!
How would you like a free breakfast
and the chance to hear the "success
secrets" of established local leaders?
Success at sunrise is April 19 and 20.
from 8-9am. Call 757-4796 to regis-
ter or stop by 109 Mendenhall.
IQ
Greek
W Services Offered
TYPING- Quick and accurate re-
sumes- letters - term papers, excel-
lentproofreadingskills,satisfaction
guaranteed. Wed Fri. 9am- 5pm
reasonable rates 321-1268
ACCURATE,FAST,CONFIDEN-
TIAL,PROFESSIONALResume
secretarial work. Specializing in re-
sume composition w cover letters
stored on disk, term papers, general
typing. Word perfect or Microsoft
Word for windows software. Call
today (8a-5p�752-9959) (eve-
nings�527-9133)
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies for
hire. Specializing in Fraternity and
Sorority socials and weddings. For
the widest selection of music and
unbeatable sound and profession-
TOTHEDELTAZETAALLSING
GIRLS- You gals did a great job at
the Attic Monday night! The boots
were cool and the cowboy hats
looked just right! Andrea, you made
a great Bocephus and your mus-
tache was exquisite! The singing
could have gone on all night long
becauseit'sa "family tradition Love
your sisters and new members. "
GREAT JOB DELTA ZETA
GREEK GODDESSES! And Julie-
you did an awesome job as Delta
Chi's greek goddess Love the sis-
ters and new membersof Delta Zeta.
THETA CHI- Thanks for the great
social We'll go "around the world"
with you anytime! Love the sisters
and new members of Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS,CliffWall
and Britt Webb, who are new broth-
ers of the Delta Alpha chapter of
Sigma Tau Gamma remember it's
harderbeingabrotherthana pledge!
JULIE ALBERGOTTL thanks for
being our greek goddess. You were
great. Yessir, Yessir, Yessir Delta Chi
PHI UPSILON OM3CRON would
like to welcome the following ini-
tiatesinto their honorfraternity: Amy
Artuso, Michelle Baritell, Jill
Blackwell, Kathryn Bott, Carole
Bovard, Christine Burdt, Shannon
Carroll, Cindy Colwell, Virginia
Creighton, Michelle Daenzer, Mat-
thew Davenport, Paula DeCarlo,
Joey Eck, Elizabeth Edwards, Brandi
Foster,Carla Fritzsche,CarrieGrady,
Lorri Harrison, Jennifer Hemink, Vir-
ginia Hiatt, Jessica Hoeverman,
Honna Kozik, Charles Kresho,
Cynthia Ladas, Audra La thorn, Lisa
Mariani, Candy Pearce, Rebecca
Rollinson, Melanie Rublein,
Katherine Sare, Tammy Taylor,
April Walker, Michelle West, Nicole
Gehweiler, Kimberly Graham
TO THE EPSILON PLEDGE
CLASS OF ESA, Congrats on your
first pinning, we are so happy to
have you. We could not have raised
700dollarsforSt.Judeswithoutyou!
Thanks so much for your help, I'm
looking forward to your sister pin-
ning ceremony-from your crazy vp,
squeeze!
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
1994 Greenville Pitt County Spe-
cial Olympics spring games will
be held on Fri. April 15 at Rose
High School Stadium. Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as
buddies chaperones for the spe-
cial olympians. Volunteers must
be able to work all day from 9am
to 2pm. An orientation meeting
will be held on Wed. April 13 in
old Joyner library room 221 from
5 til 6pm for more info, contact
Lisa Ihly at 830-4551
ART AND RELIGION IN
THE SAMUEL RICHEST
COLLECTION,
Art History society presents a
lecture by Dr. David Steel, cura-
tor of European art, North Caro-
lina Museum of Art on Wed.
13 at 7:00pm in the Francis
Speight Auditorium in Jenkins
Fine Arts Building.
MASSAGE CLINIC
given by ECU PT students, April
13 from 6pm to 9pm at Allied
Health Bldg. $1.50 per 10 min,
max. 30min. $2.00 at the door.
Tickets may be purchased from
PT students or Back & Limb
Clinic in advance. Ladies wear
halter or bikini top & shorts, men
t-shirt and shorts.
THE NEXT GAMMA BETA
PHI MEETING
will be held on April 12 at 5:00pm
in MSC Multipurpose room. All
members must attend! Officer
nominations and elections will
be held at this meeting. Don't
forget your baked good for
Teacher Appreciation Day! We
would also like to thank all mem-
bers who helped with the book
drive and who donated books.
We look forward to seeing you
there! for more info, contact
Allison at 931-8285.
THE EASTERN CAROLINA
CHAPTER OF THE
INSTITUTE OF MANAGE-
MENT ACCOUNTANTS
invites students and faculty to
the chapter's April 20th meet-
ing. The meeting will be held at
the Three Steers Restaurant on
Memorial Drive and begins at
6:30pm. For more info, call our
Student Director Joe Kraus (756-
9064)
THE GREENVILLE REC-
REATION AND PARKS
DEPARTMENT
is still accepting teams for its
1994 City Softball league. An
entry fee of $400 is required of
all teams. The deadline for en-
tering a team is Wednesday,
April 20th. For addtional
info, contact Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550 af-
ter 2pm.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-
paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetofhelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may
be cancelled before 10 a.m. the
day prior to publication,
however, no refunds will be
given.
For more
information
call 757-6366.





The East Carolinian
Page 6
Lifestyle
April 12, 1994
Scared Weird Little Guys visit ECU
Locals from "Down Under" visits ECU for one night of comedy at Club
The show, sponsored by the Popular Entertainment Committee, will be
Cobain's widow reads
suicide note to mourners
Photo Courtesy of ECU Student Union
7:7 in Mendenhall Student Center,
(�in at 77 p.m. on April 19.
By Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
From the heart nt "Down Un-
der Melbourne, Australia come
the Scared Weird LittleGuys. Af-
ter performing for over six years
in various groups, including
Australia's most popular a
cappella group The Phones, John
Fleming and Rusty Berther have
brought their refreshing, unique
brand of musical comedy to a
new level Scared Little Weird
Guys has won the distinction of
being named Best Comedy Act
bv both Campus Activities
Victoria, Australia and theCana-
dian Organization of Campus
Activities. In Melbourne, they
have a weekly breakfast radii)
show and appear regularly on
major Australian TV programs.
Their witty and clever parodies,
versatile style and exceptional
musicianship make them one of
Australia's most exciting and
popular acts.
Fleming and Berther have
performed over 1,300 shows to-
gether and will add another 50 to
that list after their extensive Ca-
nadian tour from Vancouver all
the way to St. ohn's. Berther re-
vealed a strategy used when it
comes to talk shows. "We'll come
in and talk to the guys whodo the
show first, ()ne ot them will giv'e
us a suggestion )bout something
that's happened during the day
or something that's in the news
and then we'll sneak out the back
for 20 minutes and write a song
and come back and do it on the
air
There's a little bit of a prob-
lem with having people under-
stand some of it We have to watch
we don't speak too fast in be-
tween songs. People who haven't
tuned into our accents you can
see desperately trying to under-
stand what we're doing. There
are a few songs we couldn't do
because they had inside refer-
ences to Australia
Scared Weird LittleGuys will
be at Club 7:57, brought to ECU
bv the Student Union Popular En-
tertainment Committee. The per-
formance will begin at 7:57 p.m.
in Mendenhall 244 on April 19.
Admission is free and refresh-
ments will be served.
SEATTLE (API Kurt
Cobain's widow read from his sui-
cide note in a recording plaved for
thousands ot young people who
githered at a candlelight vigil to
cry for thegrunge rocker and curse
him for killing himself.
About4 500mourners,mostly
in their teens and 20s, listened sol-
emnly Sunday to the tape ot
Courtney Love reading from
Cobain's note. Man) in the crowd
wore scruffy, ripped clothes, the
signature ot the grunge rock cul-
ture that Cobain's band. Nirvana,
helped boost into the mainstream.
"I haven't telt the excitement
for so man) years. 1 telt guilty tor
so many years C ourtney 1 ove
said on the tape as tear1- flowed
freely in the i row d. " I he tact is
can't tool you, any one of vou. The
worst crime is taking it
I ove interrupted her narra-
tive to add. in a voice thick with
tears, "No, the worst crime is lea
ing
Before reading the note, I ove
described it as sounding "like a
lettertotheeditor Shedidn tread
all of it, omitting parts addressed
to herbecause, she told thee rowd,
"it's none ot vour. . business
The problems ot Cobain,
Nirvana's lead singer, guitaristand
songwriter, were well documented:
heroin addiction, discomfort with
celebrity, domestic disputes and a
near-fatal ingestion ot drugs and
alcohol just last month.
One ot Nirvana's last songs,
recorded tor The Beavis and Butl-
liead i xperiencealbum, was titled "I
I late Myself and Want to Die
Love recorded the tape after
returning to Seattle following the
27-year-old Cobain's death Friday
from a self-inflicted shotgun blast
to the head. A one-page note was
found nearhv.
It hasn'tbeen madeclearwhere
I ove was when Cobain died, but
she told the crowd she wished she
had been with him
I feel the same w ay you guys
do. I teei so horrible I ove said on
the tape. "1 don't know how it hap-
pened. I knew it was going to hap-
pen but it could have happened
when he was 40
Then she called him an
"asshole" and asked the crowd to
shout. "You asshole It did.
When she later asked the crowd
to swear at Cobain using a stronger
word and tell him "that you line
him it was silent and tearful
I don't have the passion anj
See COBAIN pag3 7
ECU student wins top award
ECU-based guitarist
wins Wurlitzer.
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Guitarist Kenneth Meyer of
Patchogue, I ong Island, N.Y a
graduate student in the Fast Caro-
lina University School of Music, has
won the top award in a national
music i ompetition.
Meyer is the P�c'4 winner of the
Music. I e.ichors National Associa-
tion-Wurhter Collegiate Artist
Competition lie previously won
state and southeastern regional di-
vision competitions to qualify for
the national event.
A candidate for the Master of
Music degree in guitar performance,
Meyer studies guitar with Elliot
Frank of die ECU music faculty. His
previous honors include winning
E( U's 1993-94 Concerto Competi-
tion and two scholarship awards:
the I awrenceSchaufflerScholarship
and the Crino's Music Classic Gui-
tar .Award.
Me erreceived his undergradu-
ate degree Mom the State Univer-
sity ot New ork-1 redonia. I le has
performed extensively in the U.S
Rome and Venezuela, and some of
his performances have been broad-
i ast on television and radio.
Photo Courtesy of News Bureau
Ken Meyer, a graduate student at ECU's School of Music, won
the 1994 Wurlitzer Collegiate Artist Competion.
Carowinds
hosts
Christian
music festival
Staff Reports
The Fast Carolinian
I 'aramount's Carowinds hosts
Christian music's top performers
d unng S inburst '44, an entire day of
m usic, fellowship, and fun on Sa tu r-
day, April 30.
Hie largest Christian music fes-
6

"
CD Reviews CD Reviews CD Reviews
rival in the Carolinas, Sunburst "94
features daytime and evening per-
formances on multiple stages bv
award-winningChnstian artists, in-
d uding the a vk band I 'etra, 1 ichae!
Sweet(forrnerlyoftrtebandStryper),
vocalists Cindy Morgan and Bryan
Duncan and Age of Faith, an acous-
tic duo with local ties. Artists will
perform either in the Paladium
Amphitheatre or in the park.
"We are taking full advantage
of the park's resources as an enter-
lainirtent complex tooffer guests the
opportunity to see all these artists
perform live in one dav said Vice
President of Marketing Sharon
Bialock "Sunburst '94 is a great en-
tertainment val ue h r Christian m u-
sic fans, because the one-price ad-
mission allows concertgoers to at-
tend all of the performances and to
enjoy the theme park for an entire
day
Headlining the festival is Petra,
the na tion 's top-selling Christian rock
band. Petra takes the Paladium's
mains tageforashow featuringhigh-
lights from the band 's20-vearcareer
as well as singles from their latest
album, Wake-upCall.
Cind v N lorgan, an up-and -com-
lngsingervshowontheGospelMusic
Association's 1993 Dove Award for
New .Artist of the Year, will also
appear on the Paladium's mainstage.
Morgan has been busy the past two
years recording four new albums.
Another highlight in her young ca-
reer has been opening for Steven
Curtis Chapman's 1993 Great Ad-
venture Tour.
Ofnermainstageartistsinclude
Strvper veteran Michael Sweet, Billy
Sprague, Bryan Duncan and
Tamplin. Sweet, who left Strvper
two years ago to strike out on his
own with a new sell-titled solo al-
bum, was thefirstChristianrivkerto
carry his message to a secular audi-
See ROCK page 7
Dennis Miller back on TV
i
Don't Buy
� Take Your Chances
m
�m
Worth A Try
Definite Purchase
Spore
Giant
��
12
wish Sp ire was a great band
their favorite record emporium to
demand that they be allowed to
pun base this tine piet e ot music.
But, as you've probabh
guessed by now I did not. And
that's because, musically at least,
Spore is reall justokav-1 hey sound
a bit likeearh Sonk Youth in places,
a bit like( iid mothers But,o erall,
tin it sound isn't nearly varied
ei a 'Ugh I his should be a great al-
bum, ami I really wish it was. But
something goes wrong somewhere
Maybe it start with the first
tr.u k, "Paradise I his is the first in
a seriesof songsthatsound a lot like
early Sonic Youth, except fur then-
lack c if energy. Sp re tends to plod
alongataslow . heavy pac ethatgets
a I it tie ted it ms after a while found
I wish Giant, their first lull length mvsell zoning out on the album
album, was a towering regularh Iflwanttohearthisstuff,
at I iei cement I'd love to gush about I'll jn-t break out m copy ol Sonu
theirbrandof Boston-based punk routh ; mfusion 's Six.
alternative grunge labi I the (n the bright side, hovvi
month sound and the ni trasl Spore has picked up Sonic Youth's
ot the dirge like male female duet kii.n k lur brillianth twisted lyrics
� i�al i ' '� ' I lise fi n instant i . is
I really v nt t I dystopian piece with some
-SPOREi , 8
Otis Rush
Aint Enough
Comin' In
( )nsRush(l ittlet Hisimadehis
professional debut as a solo artist in
1953 I lis lust album in 1956 con-
tained the futureclassn tin I edep-
pelin to i over, "Ian f Quit You
Babe " (i erall tin ise years he made
si Hnew here an �und 20 albums and
now we tin.ilh have In latest major
label n min' In
on Men ur Records I li .lastalbum
was made nearly 10 years ago, but
this was well worth the wait.
Otis' new releasecontainssongs
from such artist as Sam Qxk, Ray
Charles, Albert King and Percy
Mavtield in addition to a number ot
Otis Rush originals. Like Robert
Cray's latest release, this is the blues
at its best: a stripped down, natural
sound without the sterile filters of
over production. Backing Otis is a
group which, features Ian Mel agan
(Small Faces), Bill Payne (Little Feat)
and the Texicali Horns.
Thisalbum weavesa mean spell
Rush's voice is a musical instrument
in itself and with his guitar he creates
the complementary mirror image
thatechoesand magnifies his vocals
Die horns provide a necessary, but
not overbearing background, and
help to sweeten this emotional roller
i oaster ride.
HiscoverofB.B. King's "It's Mj
Own Fault" is done in themost won-
derfully miserable way It is easy to
hear B.B. in most ot Otis' work, but
this song is done with -iu h honestA
it may gi eB.B. a run for his money.
See RUSH page 8
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Den-
nis Miller, whose 1LW2 syndicated
talk show was canceled after si
months, can spin tales of the unfor-
giving world ot late-night televi-
sion.
But the comedian is venturing
back into the fray, hosting a live,
half-hour Friday night show on
Home Box t tffice that reflets what
he calls his new perspective on life
and the FY industry.
rheonce-a-week schedule and
cable T environment are right for
him. Miller says: It's family and the
freedom to do the kind o( show he
really wants that matter now.
Another chance became less
important to me says Miller, re-
flecting on the end ot " 1 he 1 tennis
Miller Show" in Inly 1992.
"I'm 40 years old. I have chil-
drenanda wife that 1 love hesays.
"I don't want to be on I V live nights
a week anymore. I was in there. I
thought I was enjoying it � and
probably was � but as I decom-
pressed from it. I began to think I
was talking a lot about being a good
parent
Weekends with his wife, All.
and suns. I lolden, 3 I 2, and bab,
Marlon, weren't enough. Miller
sa s
' "here's a beautiful metro
nomii qualitv to true parenting,
when vou re in then space when
nothing happens, ' he says. "And
I was missing that. I wasn't being
a bad parent, but I wasn't there
enough "
Sitting in a Sunset Boulevard
oftice,withthecirv'ssmog-draped
skyline providing a backdrop.
Miller is several hours from the
town he now calls home: Santa
Barbara, on the coast north of I OS
Angeles.
I le was in Los Angeles for an
appearance on "The Arsenio Hall
Show one of the conventional
ta Ik shows that Miller doesn't con-
demn but would prefer not to
emulate in his IIBO effort, which,
debuts at midnight EST on Fri-
day.
Miller says, candidly, he was
not in the running during the
I i id 1 etterman-Jayl enoshuffle
involving "The Tonight Show'
and the 12:30a.m Fate Show" at
NBC, despite rumors that he was.
"I was never in consideration
foranvotthat, 'Miller savs I had
to go through a period where I
was passed on for all those things.
And I w ould say Am I note en in
the game?' and they would say,
'No.
And it hurt me But after a
while it's a silly w-a) toleadyour
life says Miller who gamed his
See MILLER page!





������ '�awi
April 12. 1994
The Hast Carolinian 7
MILLER
Continued from page 6
early fame as a cynical news an-
chorman on "Saturday Night Live
If NBC didn't want him, HBO
did. And Miller liked the channel.
He'd done two comedy specials tor
them, and found cable to be a better
fit than broadcast TV.
"I like doing it live he says. "I
think TV should have seams in it. So
much of TV is cut together
seamlessly, it's like looking at an art
piece. 11 should be bad some nights;
it should be great some nights
The format for "Dennis Miller"
may incorporate some standard
talk-show elemen ts, such as a mono-
logue, but strenuously avoid most
others, he says.
"It's just me, talking, like my
HBO specialsWe might have a
guest via the TV screen, like Ted
Koppel does, but it will be some-
body of consequence. It won't be
flack work. It won't be about prod-
uct; it will be about issues.
COBAIN frompn6
more Love read from Cobain's
note. Borrowing from a Neil Young
song, she said the note added, "It's
better to burn out than to fade
away
But Love added on tape to the
crowd: "Don't believe that, it's
bullshit
"In other words, it won't be
ycni've got a movie corning out. I'm
not demeaning that I'm just saying
that was one thing on mv old talk
show that I never felt great with
Guests might be well-known
or they might be unknowns, Miller
says, people who can talk about the
issues that viewers might want
"someclaritv and catharsis about
Laughter is still kev, he says:
"What I do is humor. It will be
predominantly funny. But I won't
be afraid to say things
Not necessarily the kind of
agenda you'd expect from the typi-
cal stand-up comedian. But Miller
has long had a reputation as being
smart. Some sav too smart for televi-
sion.
Despite its short life, Millersays
he remains as proud of his syndi-
cated talk show as anything he has
done. His aspirations now, he says,
are simple.
"I hope this (HBO) show works.
I used to be voracious to plant the
flag. But I'm older and wiser now
ROCK
Continued from page 6
ence. Hecontinuestodosobv writing
and singingsongs with messages that
appeal to both secular and Christian
music lovers.
Singer, songwriter, poet, painter
and author Billv Sprague combines
his rich literary background with his
musical talents to offer a uniqe per-
spective on Christian music. He will
perform songs on the Paladium's
mainstagelrom thesixalbumshehas
recorded.
Ken Tamplin, who uses heavy-
metal rock to communicate his mes-
sage, fills another musical niche at
Sonburst'94
Christian Research Report
named High Point native Bryan
Duncan Best Male Artist of 1993 and
rewarded Ins tecenteffort, A 1 vn, wi th
Album of the Year. He will perform
many cuts from bAercy, featuring his
trademark horn arrangements and a
series of soulful ballads, on the
mainstage.
Appearing on side stages in the
parkand thePaladium Plaza are Keith
Dudley, newcomer Greg Long,
techno-pop master EricChampion,
Charlotte native Ian Eskelin, the
acoustic guitar duo AgeofFaithand
the group Legend Seven.
Tickets are on sale now at a
variety of area Christian bookstojres
or by mail order through
Paramount's Carowinds Sonburst
'94, P.O. Box410289,Charlotte, N" C.
28241-0289.
Tickets may also be obtained
In callingTicketmasterat(704)55?2-
hXkirbvvisitinganvTicketmaSter
outlet.
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CARTER AT 757-0986
APPROPRIATIONS
CHAIRMAN.





8
The East Carolinian
April 12, 1994
RUSH
Continued from page 6
The rendition of Sam C ook's "Ain't
That Good News" is a jumpy little
tunevvitha lirt!eCrtspol flavorthrown
in, a perfect mixture. The cover ot
Rav Charles' "A Fool For You" is
doiiewimsuch gut-wrenching emo-
tion it's really hard to convey with
the written word. Actually, any
evaluation of this album is futile; it is
something that must beexperiertced
Luther Tucker once stated, 'Otis
Rush is one of the masters ot all time.
Vocallv and on guitar, and 1 mean
thissincerelv,nobodvcan touch him.
Nobody Although I think thereare
a tew that stand as equals, there are
none that surpass him. ihis man,
even at age 60, lias kept his talent
polished and fresh
Otis is one of the original
voices ot the blues who adheres to
the traditions ol the genre, and Ain't
Etwugh Comin' In is further testa-
ment to his perfected art
� Kris
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SPORE
Continued from page 6
nice lines like "Human consump-
tion, A liquidy thrill Senseless ex-
istence Tie need for a kill It's the
stuff likethis�thesickangry rants
that makes ()iani worth the effort.
I ater on down the line, we get
' Age a particularly deviant little
song about sex with the underage.
The groaning chorus ol " lastes like
age I'mkand raw � I tkeashivering
vein Underhard" brings to mind
some really disturbing images ol
junior high sexual expeii-mentation
Kindol makes you shudder, doesn't
C But remember, the music's still
boring.
The album's centerpiece, and
the best track csiGiant, is "Gunfire
an attack on greed, power and mind
control. In this one. Spore finally
cuts loose with some genuine
rhvthm that is recognizably then
own and the voca 1 dnet meshes per-
fectlv to sound spookily like X's
John Doe and ExeneCervenka.
Giant ends with "Flesh Eater
a meditation on cannibalism that
may make the meat lovers in the
audience turn a little green. "What's
the difference Spine asks, "He-
tu een that leg and this1 Beta een
my breast and this1 I toes that dif-
ference make it all right1" It's a
particularly n.istv comparison be-
tween eating animal meat and eat-
ing human meat that most vegetar-
ians are too polite to make.
but that preoccupation with
the ugly truthsof our society is what
makes Spore worthwhile. Giant is
not an album that will make you
forget your troubles; it's nasty and
depressing and even a little mean.
But it's so brilliantly deviant that
I've got to admire it. II the music
weren't so generally boring, Spore
would rate that fantastic review I
wanted to write. But as it is, I can
only recommend the words.
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Brett
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The East Carolinian
April 12, 1994
Sports
Page 9
OLDHAM'S CORNER
I want to talk today about
trends. As we enter the last
few years of the century, ev-
erybody and ev-
erything tends
to be focused on
certain trends.
You see
By Brad
Oldham
Staff writer
trends in everything these
days. Trends in clothing, with
your miniskirts and bikinis,
which I can somehow find a
place in my heart to deal with.
Trends in cars, trends in homes,
trends in movies, trends,
trends, trends. You can never
get away from them.
Alas, there are trends in
sports as well, because, hey, if
sports wasn't the theme of this
column, it would be in the opin-
ion page. Charles Barkley is
about as outspoken as his bald-
headed self can be about the
trend of athletes beingathletes
and not role models. Other ath-
letes, such as Karl Malone and
David Robinson, feel that their
place in society is to be role-
models, and they are perfectly
comfortable with that role.
With all the talk these days
about players receiving absurd
salaries, and who Jose Canseco
is sleeping with this week, the
true essence of the game of
baseball is being lost. Lost by
the businessmen that use the
game of baseball to capture the
mighty dollar-bill.
Baseball cards are the per
feet example. What happened
to the good old days, when
kids used to scrape up 35 cents
to buy a pack of baseball cards?
Then they would neatly place
their favorite players into old
"Zips" shoeboxes where they
would take them out for in
stance reassurance on who
their heroes were. Of course
the "scrub" players cards
would sadly be placed between
the rusty spokes of their hand
me-down Huffy dirt bike, imi-
tating the sound of a muffler
we wouldn't be caught dead
with today.
Now baseball cards cost
$10 a pack, because there's a
one in a million chance that
"Joe Prospect" might have his
glossy-compu terized-in-action
image lamented on one of the
cards inside the costly pack. Its
a sad trend on what was once a
great hobby.
Luckily, their is one trend
in baseball that, thank God, has
some sense to it. The trend in
new baseball ballparks has
now returned to the point that
it should have never left in the
first place. The baseball lords
above wept their eyes out in
the late 70' and through the
80's, when city after city felt
that domed stadiums were the
way to go. What a mistake that
was. Baseball is meant to be
played on natural grass, in the
outdoors, where you get the
sounds and smells of the city
to set the stage for what really
is baseball. The smell of hot
dogs, pretzels, popcorn, and
beer is meant to be experienced
in the wide-open fantasy land
of the ballpark.
When I look at beautiful
new ballparks today such as
Camden Yards in Baltimore,
the new Jacobs Field in Cleve
land, as well as the Rangers
new ballpark named The
Ballpark in Arlington, I have
to smile. Let's pray that this
will be a trend that will con-
tinue in years to come. Think
about it, the players will even
tually come and go. Who's here
today is gone tomorrow as each
generation raises the next on
the game of baseball.
"Root, root, root for the
home team is a saying I heard
a lot growing up. I'll never for-
get the days my father took my
two brothers and I to Wrigley
Field to see the Cubs play while
I was growing up in north Chi-
cago. It's a shame that some
poor kid in Toronto is being
raised on baseball being played
in something that resembles
more of a space station than a
See OLDHAM page 10
Pirates refuse to die, rally over W&M




P
I
; �


: .
:
x'm
SssSJJ
is
Photo by Cedrlc Van Buren
Jason Head is a sophomore from the local Greene Central High School. His game winning RBI helped the
Pirates reach the .500 mark in the CAA. This series was the last for CAA action at Harrington Field this season.
Qandell on target in practice
(SID) � East Carolina foot-
ball coach Steve Logan was pleased
with what he saw in the Pirates'
third major scrimmage of the
spring.
"It was a good scrimmage for
us said Logan of the two-hour,
108-play workout. "There was a
definiteebband flow on both sides
of the ball. Our kids have to learn
that when things don't go your
way, you have to dig in and when
things do go your way, you have
to take advantage of it
The Pirate offense was able to
score seven touchdowns, includ-
ing four through the air and three
on the ground. Chad Holcomb also
hit a 24-yard field goal to round
out the scoring.
Orlando Whitaker hit Allen
Williams with a six-yard strike for
the scrimmage's first touchdown.
The Pirates turned the ball
over only twice, both on intercep-
tions by sophomore Perez
Mattison
"We didn't turn the ball over
today said Logan. "That is fun-
damental to what we have to do
on offense. It is the essence of what
we've tried to do over the last two
years
Sophomore quarterback
Marcus Crandell continued his
fine spring, completing 16 of 33
passes for 303 yards with a touch-
Allen Williams -WR
down. Crandell hit redshirt fresh-
man Larry Shannon wi th a 10-yard
scoring strike for the scrimmage's
last score.
Logan credited sophomore
wide receiver Mitchell Galloway
with getting the scrimmage started
at a good pace.
On the second play of the
scrimmage, Galloway stretched
out on a 42-yard pass from
Crandell.
"It set the tone for the scrim-
mage said Logan.
Sophomore Chris Hester had
an excellent day statistically, com-
pleting 8 of 9 passes for 169 yards
and connecting with sophomore
tight end Sean Richardson, a
Durham native, on a 67-yard
scoring strike.
Dan Gonzalez hit Shannon
with a 17-yard pass for another
scoring strike of the day.
The three rushing touch-
downs were turned in on 3-yard
runs by Junior Smith, Chuck
Ingram and Damon Wilson.
Redshirt freshman John Pea-
cock led the Pirates in rushing,
gaining 77 yards on 13 carries.
With only one more work-
ou t left in the spring drills, Logan
is pleased with his squad's effort
during the spring.
"We got better every day be-
cause the kids gave us their at-
tention every day said Logan.
"We also were able to stay healthy
during the spring, because the
kids went full speed every day
The ony major injury the Pi-
rates had during the spring was
a sprained ankle by running back
Eric Blanton.
The Pirates will finish their
spring practice session with the
annual PurpleGold Game on
Saturday, Aprill6 at 3 p.m. in
Ficklen Stadium.
The game is part of the 11th
annualGreat Pirate PurpleGold
Pigskin Pig-Out Party, held at
East Carolina next weekend.
Adamski, Norstrand honored
(SID) � Cross country runner
Eric Adamski and Catherine
Norstrand have been named as the
recipients of the 1994 Texasgulf Out-
standing Scholar Athlete Awards.
The a wards will be presented during
the annual Texasgulf Breakfast of
Champions on Saturday Apr. 15, at
the Greenville Hilton Inn as part of
the 11 th annual Great Pirate Purple
Gold Pigskin Party.
The award is designed to be the
most prestigious award give by the
university'sathletic department. The
award winners were selected based
on stringent guidelines of academic
merit, community service and ath-
letic achievements.
This year marks the fifth year
Texasgulf has honored East
Carolina's Outstanding Male and
Female Scholar Athletes and the
fourth year it has named an All-Aca-
demic team.
Adamski, from Depew, N.Y
served as captain of the 1993 men's
cross country team. A two-year
letterman for the Pirates, Adamski
was ECU's second highest placer in
four meets during the 1993 season
and was ECU's top finisher in the
MethodistCollegein'itational.Inthat
meet, Adamski took second place,
his highest finish of the year.
A senior physical therapy ma-
jor, Adamski is a member of the
Golden Key NationalHonor Society.
Omicron Delta Kappa National Lead-
ership HonorSociety, and Phi Kappa
Phi National Honor Society. In 1993,
he was named as a Colonial Athletic
Associa tion Scholar A thlete and was
also a member of hte Texasgulf All-
American team. Adamski hasa 3.928
grade point average.
Adamski has been active in sev-
eral community services including
serving as a member of ECU's "Ath-
letes for Education" Speakers Bu-
reau since 1992 and as a volunteer for
the DreamFactory, ECUCrossCoun-
try Charity Run, Variety Club Tele-
thon and World University Games.
Norstand, a native of Eidsvaag,
Norwayalsocompeted in cross coun-
try and track for ECU. A three-year
letterman for the Lady Pirates,
Norstrand was named as the most
improved runner for the women's
track team in 1993. A member of the
1993 ECU women's team that fin-
ished third in the Colonial Athletic
Association Championship,
Nc rstrand was one of ECU's top five
See ATHLETES page 10
Sampras proves his No. 1 ranking in Japan
(AP) � Pete Sampras is the
best tennis player in the world. He's
also the hottest.
Sampras, theworld'stop-ranked
player, beat Michael Chang 6-4,6-2
in the Japan Open final Sunday to
extend his winning streak to 21
matches. Sampras served 10 aces
before a crowd of 9,400 at Ariake
Coliseum.
"He served very well today and
played consistently'Changsaid. "I
should play more aggressively on
his second service
Sampras earned $156,000 in
winning his second straight Japan
Open and sixth tournament of the
year. Chang received $82,100.
Sampras broke Chang's serve
in the third game of the first set.
Sampras squandered four break
points in the seventh game, and
Chang fired three straight aces to
pull to 5-4 before Sampras served
out the set.
Inthesecondset,Samprasbroke
in the first and seventh games, and
closed the 84-minute match with
two aces.
Japan's Kimiko Date lost the first
four games of the women's final be-
fore rallying to beat Amy Frazier 7-5,
6-0. It was Date's third consecutive
Japan Open championship.
"I am not in good shape this
vveekbut I tried my best and was able
to win the title Date said.
Date won $27,000, while Frazier
got $13,5ft).
The men's doubles title went to
the Swedish pair of Henrik Holm
and Anders Jarryd, who defeated
Patrick McEnroe of the United States
and Sebashen Lareau of Canada 7-6
(7-4), 6-1.
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
William & Mary was on the
way to winning their first-ever
baseball series against East Caro-
lina. After splitting the Saturday
doubleheader, W&M had a
seven-run lead in the sixth
inningofplayinSunday's
game. Unfortunately for
the Tribe, the Pirates got
hot both at the plate and
on the mound as ECU ral-
lied to beat W&M 13-12 in
10 innings at Harrington
Field.
East Carolina is now
26-11 overall, and has
moved up to .500 in the confer-
ence with a 6-6 record. The Tribe
now falls to 18-16 overall, 6-9 in
the CAA.
"Although elements of our
play weren't as good as what we
wanted, we certainly did what
was required to win the game
ECU head coach Gary Overton
said after Sunday's game. "We
had excellent bats in the situa-
tions we needed them in. In the
seven-run inning we had no
cheap hits. Jason Mills gets
credit for holding them until
our offense got started. It was a
weird, wacky game, and we just
happened to come out on top
The game was
filled with crucial situ-
ations for both teams
Just when it looked as'
if one team was cer
tain to ride the tide to
victory, the other team
would answer with
solid play.
ECU's big inning'
came in the sixth. Trail
ing 10-3, shortstop Chad"
Puckett started the comeback
with a double. Center-fielder
Jamie Borel walked, putting
men on first and second. Then,
Jason Head drove the ball over
the right field wall for a three-
run hqmer to pull the Pirates
See BASEBALL page 11
Jason Head
Softball splits again
Photo by Cedrlc Van Buren ��
The Lady Pirates are having another successful season under Coach
Manahan. The team has already played 46 games this season.
(SID)�The East Ca rolina soft-
ball team defeated UNC- Wilming-
ton, 3-1 and lost to Georgia Tech, 3-
0 on Friday afternoon, the first day
of the seventh annual Tar Heel In-
vitational Softball Tournament.
In the victory over UNC-Wilm-
ington, ECU scored three runs on
eight hits with no errors. Senior
standout Michelle Ward went 2-4
with two stolen bases and 1 RBI.
Freshman leftfielder Tonya
Oxendine went 2-3 with one stolen
base and one run scored. Freshman
pitcher Teryn Ford chalked up the
win, advancing her overall record
to 8-5. The Seahawks and the Lady
Pirates have met up three times this
year with ECU winning all three
meetings, including Friday's.
In its second game of the day,
EastCarolina was shutoutby Geor-
gia Tech, 3-0.
Michelle Ward recorded
ECU's only two hits of the game
and stole three bases giving her
five stolen bases for the day. Ward
is currently leading the NCAA in
stolen bases with 63.
Freshman pitcher Jill
Rowlands took her third loss of
the season, with her record drop-
ping to 15-3.
East Carolina's record after
46 games stands at 34-12.
In other action, ACC powers
Georgia Tech, North Carolina and
Florida State all won their first
two games.
The single elimination tour-
nament continued Saturday, with
action starting at 9 a.m. at the
Finley Softball Fields.
The results were not known
at the time of press, but will be in
Thursday's paper.
Vicario mentally strong
(AP) � Somehow, Arantxa
Sanchez Vicario said, she was able
to keep her mind on tennis.
Her father, hospitalized in
Spain after a heart attack, wanted
her to do just that, and she was
determined to abide by his wishes.
"I thought it would be better
to be with him, but he wanted me
to stay Sanchez Vicario said Sun-
day a fter beating Gabriela Sabatini
6-1,6-4 to win the Bausch & Lomb
Championships for the second
straight year.
"I tried not to let it bother me
too much. He's feeling much bet-
ter, and I'm sure he'll be proud of
me. He wanted me to stay and
win. I did it for him
Sanchez Vicario, the top seed,
kept the news of her father's ill-
ness to herself after learning he
had been stricken last Tuesday,
just before she played her open-
ing match at Amelia Island Plan-
tation.
When his condition improved
the following day, she decided to
remain in the $400,000 clay-court
event.
The title was the first of the
year for Sanchez Vicario, who won
four tournaments in 1993 but had
gone 0-5 in finals since last May,
including losses to Steffi Graf in
this year's Australian Open and
Virginia Slims of Florida.
After winning the singles
crown, Sanchez Vicario teamed
with Larisa Neiland to capture
the doubles title.
In beating Sabatini, Sanchez
Vicario stopped a streak of 15
tournaments in which she failed
to win a singles title.
An even more frustrating
string of disappointment con-
tinued forSabatini. A three-time
winner at Amelia Island, the
Argentine has now gone 33
tournaments � nearly two
years � without winning a
singles title.
Sanchez Vicario broke serve
in the first and third games for a
3-0 lead, then broke again to close
the first set in 37 minutes.
Sabatini committed only 18 un-
forced errors in Saturday's semi-
final victory over Lindsay Dav-
enport but had 14 in the opening
set against Sanchez Vicario.
Sabatini settled down to win
three straight games for a 3-1
lead in the second set but never
gained control of the match.
Sanchez Vicario won the next
three games, then finished off
her fatigued opponent by hold-
ing serve for a 5-4 lead and break-
ing Sabatini for the match.
"She didn't give me much
chance todoanything Sabatini
said.
� �







10 The East Carolinian
ATHLETES
April 12. 1994
Continued from page 9
scorers in each meet in 1W3. She had
two fourth place finishes during the
season and finished 28th at the CAA
Championship. Norstrand was also
one of five ECU women runners to
compete at the NCAA District in
meet. Sheserved asa team captain for
cross country in 1CW adn is captain of
the women's track team this spring.
A five-time Dean's List student
majoring in finance and production
management, Norstrand was the
recepient of the Umosh and Gulanti
Scholarship in theFallof 1992and the
Ward Real Estate Scholarship in the
Fall of 1993.
She Is a member of Omicron
Delta Kappa, Golden Key and was
elected for membership to Beta
Gamma Sigma in Febuary, 1994. She
has maintained a 3.6 GPA while at
ECU.
Norstrand is the ECU Represen-
tative for the Association for Norwe-
gian Students Abroad and Norwe-
gian Association for Business Stu-
dents and is a member of the Ameri-
can Production and Inventory and
the Financial management Associa-
tion. Norstrand serves as the trea-
surer of the FfMA.
ECU's Mike Sanbum and Meg
Watson will also be honored at the
Breakfast of Champions.
Sanburn, a senior exercise and
sport5sciencemajorfromHosterCity,
Cal, has been named as the recipient
of the Pat Draughton Postgraduate
Schoarship. A two-year member of
ECU's baseball team, Sanbum led
ECU in 1993 in earned run average
(226) which was the nation's 30th
best.
A first team All East Region se-
lection in 1993, Sanburn is currently
eighth in the CAA in ERA (2.81) and
is in the CAA's top-10 for strikeouts
with 14.
Watson will be honored as the
recipientof the KristiOvertonA ward.
The Freshman from Raleigh, N.C
was a versatile swimmer for ECU in
the 93-94 season, competing in six
different individual events and four
relays. Watson was one of 14 ECU
swimmers to qualify and compete in
the 1994 ECAC Championships.
Also included in the Breakfast of
Champions will be the 1993-94
Texasgulf All-Academic Team.
This year 18 student-athletes rep-
resent their respective sports with the
team's highest cumulative GPA.
The members of this year's team
are: Mike Sanburn (baseball, senior,
exerciseand sports science); Skipp
Schaefbauer (basketball, freshman);
Belinda Cagle (basketball, sopho-
more, industrial technology); Eric
Adamski (cross country, senior,
physical therapy);StacyGreen (cross
country, junior, elementary
OLDHAM
educarJon);RobWhitten(footbaU,se-
nior, biology); Rob Anderson (golf,
freshman, business); Drew Racine
(soccer, sophomore, occupational
therapv);GeorgeannWilke(softball,
senior, therapeutic recreation), Scott
Kupec (swimming, senior, physical
education); Elizabeth Sugg (swim-
ming, junior, accounting); Tommy
McDonald (tennis,senior,communi-
cations); Lisa Hadelman (tennis,
sophomore,nursing); Chris
McKinney (track, sophomore, nurs-
ing); Gretchen Harley (track, senior,
biologv); and Kathy Flick (volleyball,
senior, physical education).
Continued from page 9
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ballpark. Sure, theSkydome's got
your luxury features. Your fancy
hotels, your restaurants that you
have to pay $60 for a steak that
tastes and resembles something 1
once shared with my dog on a
dare. You don't go to a ballpark
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Leave that to the Hollywood
folks with gold teeth and fat wal-
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Keep baseball and its stadi-
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people what it is today.
The working class, the hon-
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the ballpark to getaway from the
stresses in life. The ballpark will
always be their. Like a statue in
the worst of storms.
The ballpark is now and al-
ways will be the ultimate field of
dreams. A trend that shall stand
the test of time.
IT'S BACK !
SEMI-ANNUAL
WRESTLING TOURNAMENT
APRIL 17
CHRISTENBURY GYM
REGISTER: APRIL 5 - 13
Sign -up at 204 Christenbury Gym
Attention
Returning Students
if you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and
possibly money. The following options are available:
SPONSORED BYt RECREATIONAL SERVICES
& BELK HAU. COUNCIL
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mailittoGUC.PO. Box !847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, alt: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a letter of
credit" from your parents' power cempany.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows:
with electric or
gas space heating
w out electric
or gas space heaing
Electric Only $100 S75
Electric & Water $100 S85
Electric. Water &. Gas SI 10 $85
Elcctric& Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior ;o your arrival at the service address.
Greenville fSi Utilities
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TUE
COPYRIGHT 1994-THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY: Each of these advertised items is required to be
PRICES GOOD SUN APRIL 10 THROUGH SAT readily available for sale in each Kroger Store, except as specifically noted in
APRIL 16,1994 IN GREENVILLE WE RESERVE this ad lf we d0 run out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice
THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD of a comparable item, when available, reflecting the savings or a raincheck
to DEALERS. which will entitle you to purchase the advertised item at the advertised price
within 30 days Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item purchased.
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FEATURING THE BEST IN
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-






April 12, 1994
The East Carolinian 11
BASEBALL
within four runs of the lead.
The inning was far from over.
ECU third-baseman Rick Britton
wa I ked. I his set the stage for left-
fielder Brian Yerys, who cranked
a double to right-center, scoring
Britton. Catcher Chad Triplett
kept the inning going with a two-
out double to score Yerys, mak-
ing it 10-8. Heath Clark came
through with a clutch single, scor-
ing Triplett in a close play at the
plate. With Clark on second after
a Puckett walk, right-fielder
Lamont Fdwards hit the Pirates'
fourth double of the inning, scor-
ing Clark and tying the game at
10.
However, the Tribe had no
quit in them, and answered the
Pirates seven-run inning by a tak-
ing the lead in the top of the sev-
enth on a wild pitch by Mills.
"Thev were a club that
showed that they were going to
battle back, but there was not one
time when we felt that we were
going to lose Overton said.
Britton tied the score once
again at 11 in the bottom of the
seventh, with a solo blast over
the right field wall. As well as
Continued from page 9
ECU was playing, they never took
the lead over the Tribe until the
end of the game.
It looked as if though W&M
were going to have their way in
the ninth. An error by second
baseman Heath Clark allowed the
Tribe's Rvan Kuester to score and
give the Tribe a 12-11 lead.
ECU went to the bottom of
the ninth and quickly found them-
selves with two outs and nobody
on base. The Tribe had northern
Virginia hurler Adam Butler on
the mound with just one out away
from victorv. Then, Head and
Britton both came to the plate for
the Pirates and both reached base
with walks. With men on first
and second, Yerys got a key single
to score Head and tie the game at
12.
The game went to extra in-
nings � familiar territory for
ECU, who have had three games
in the last week and six this sea-
son go past nine innings.
ECU kept the Tribe scoreless
in the top of the tenth. Clark
wasted no time getting the Pi-
rates in position to win the ball
game, placing a double in left-
field that fell between the short-
stop and left-fielder. It was a ball
that should have easily been
caught by the left-fielder, but
scored a double by the ECU offi-
cial scorekeeper. Puckett laid
down a picture-perfect sacrifice
bunt, moving Clark to third base
with one out in the tenth.
Interesting strategy came
from the Tribe coaches, who ca lied
for two intentional walks to
Edwards and Borel. Loading the
bases for the left-handed Head,
who homered earlier in the game,
was a gutsv call by the scholarly-
Tribe of W&M, whose coaches
were obviously playing for a
ground-ball and a double play.
" I wasn't nervous when I went
up to the plate because I knew if I
didn't get the hit, then Britton
would behind me Head said.
Head showed his poise with a
single to the right field fence, scor-
ing Clark and winning the game
13-12.
Mills got the win for the Pi-
rates, throwing five solid innings
in relief for Johnny Beck, who got
hammered from the get-go against
the Tribe. Mills, a junior, allowed
only one hit, two unearned runs
and struck out six batters en route
to improving his season record to
3-2. Butler took the loss for the
Tribe, and was their sixth pitchei
of the i y, switching from desig-
nated hitter to pitcher, throwing 3
23 innings, giving up three runs
and walking five.
"We had a team talk before
the game that was a huge factor in
us winning the game Overton
said. "The talk was about main-
taining a great amount of pride
from start to finish. We lose that
and its hard to regain. It's about
being aggressive from start to fin-
ish
The Pirates are going to need
that aggressiveness as they roll
into three ACC games in a row.
ECU hits the diamond again on
Tuesday, taking on Duke at
Zebulon's Five County Stadium
at 7 p.m.

TELEMARKETERS NEEDED Our Firm Has Several Positions Available On )ur Telemarketing Staff If you have good communication skills and you are available from the hours of-5 p.m. to 9 p.m. 1 onda - Friday and 9am to 2 p.m. Saturdays, then I would like to talk to you. These positions are perfect or daytime college students needing extra money. Starting pay is $5 an hour plus bonuses. If you are interested in one of our telemarketing positions: Call Wednesday, Thursday and Friday (413-15) only 1 Oam to 5pm only 355-2111 Ask for Telemarketing Mgr.Central1Bool(&
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REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU !
Sponsored by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
APRIL 14th
7:30 P.M.
Coffeehouse
PICASO
Featuring
Three Guest
Speakers.
I
This event will be an informal discussion in which
audience participation is encouraged.
The Evolution of the Couch Potato
&-
te
Vtf
:�fei
&
SecCS Sfrce
V�
o
$S� ws
a VS
n
st�s;e
B
ce
Gw
te
LC
ms
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VZs
:f
.
;�' ?.��
?ii
'

SCREENINGS:
Blood Pressure
Dental
Hearing
Body Fat
J c.
t
V
D
K(
Ss
t��
IP'
Say 9
SCREENINGS:
Flexibility
Muscular Strength
Tuberculosis
East Carolina Wellness Fair
Thursday, April 14 from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
� �.





I rr�
Panhellenic.
Fall
for Sisters
Zeta Tau Alpha
ZTA
Hounded Lixigwoixj College, Octuhei 15. WAS
Colors: Tun uoLse and Gray
Flower: While Violet
Mascot: Hunny
Nickname: Zeias
Philanthropy: Association for Retarded Citizen
tpd&Ltk,
m?
m
Fonnal Rush
�1994
EastCamlhui
University
Chi Omega
XQ
Founded: I niversity of Arkansas. April S. IWS
Colors: didinal ;ind Straw
Flower: While Carnation
Mascot: Owl
Nickname: Chi O's
I'hilanthmpy: Service Find for Social Services
ihJK
Sigma Sigma Sigma SZS
hounded: Lontcwuod College, April 20, IH9K
Colors: Royal l'urple and White
Flower: Purple Violet
Mascot Sailboat
Nickname: Siginas
Philanthropy: Robbie Page Memorial. Sigma Serves Children
Alpha OmicronPi A Oil
'founded: Barnaul College, Columbia I Iniversily. January 1. W)
Color: Cardinal
Flower: Jacuiminot Hose
Mascot: Panda Ik-ar
Niekname: AOPi's
Philanthropy: Anhrilis Research Founilaiion
'MiIiii Omknui I'i
H�M(v Ibf Inic
tinvb Ikititi&'iuitl
K'�i�t'i'� MM
luin'ii s�;W m
Alpha Phi
AO
Founckd: Syracuse University. October 19. IK?
Colors: Silver and bordeaux
Flowers: Lily ol the Valley and Forget-Me-Not
Mascot: Teddy bear
Nickname: Alpha Phi's
Philanthropy: Alpha Phi Foundation
Alpha Xi Delta
ASA
Bounded: bmb.ird College, April 17. 18$)
Colors. IXirk blue. Ughi blue, and Cold
Flower: I'ink Killarney Rose
Mascot Fuzzy Teddy Ik-ar
Nickname: Alpha Xi's
Philanthropy: American Lung Associalkn
a. w t
Alpha Delta Pi
AAn
Fcxinded: Wesleyan Female College, May 15, IKS I
Oilors: Azure Hluc and White
rlower: Wixxlland Violet
Mascot: Uon
Nicknanx ADPi's
Philanlhropy: Ronald McDonald House
Delta Zeta
AZ
Rounded: Miami University. October 21. 1902
Cok)is: Rose and (keen
Flower: Pink Killarney Rose
Mascot: Turtle
Nicknanx DZ's
Philanthropy: Calludet Sclxxl for the Deaf
A
�SO�
l u
f
Informal Convocation
April 13,1994
- 5;00RM.
Mendenhall Student Center
Bast Carolina University Rush Registration
Your registration must be accompanied with a check for $25, non-refundable, made payable to
the E.C.U. Panhellenic Association. Fall Formal Rush is prior to school start-up. Rush dates
are August 17 - August 22, 1994. For residence hall students, the residence halls will open
early for women going through rush. There is a residence hall fee for early arrival which
will be collected at sorority rush check-in and a meal plan fee. The established check-in
time for students registered to go through rush has been set for August 17 between 12:00 noon
and 4:00 p.m. at Mendenhall Student Center. Rush Orientation will beg'in at 3:00 p.m. for
parents and 5:00 p.m. for students. You Bust supply eight photos of yourself at the start
of rush. Registration deadline is August 9, 1994.
Sorority Rushee Data
LAST NAME
FATHER'S NAME:
MOTHER'S NAME:
HOME ADDRESS:
FIRST
MIDDLE
SOCIAL SECURITY
AGE
LAST
FIRST
MIDDLE
LAST
FIRST
STREET
HOME PHONE:( )
CITY
ST
MIDDLE
ZIP
HIGH SCHOOL:
NAME
HIGH SCHOOL GPA:
ADDRESS
RANK:
August 17-22,1994
attire
LOCAL ADDRESS:
OFF-CAMPUS ADDRESS:
ON-CAMPUS ADDRESS:
Phone
ROOM
CURRENT ACADEMIC STANDING:
HOURS:
DORM
GPA:
MAJOR:
IS THERE A SORORITY AFFILIATE IN YOUR FAMILY? (Y N)
RELATIONSHIP: NAME:SORORITY:
SORORITY:
HIGH SCHOOL ACTIVITIES
OTHER COLLEGES ATTENDED:
NAME:
GPA:
any questions?
call 757-4235
PREVIOUS COLLEGIATE ACTIVITIES:
HOBBIES:
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL INFORMATION RELEASE FORM
In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, I hereby grant the
Dean of Students at East Carolina University the right to release the needed academic
information for sorority pledging and initiation to Panhellenic or the appropriate sorority
when necessary. My termination from rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
STUDENT SIGNATURE
DATE
Return to: 204 Whichard By August 9





Title
The East Carolinian, April 12, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 12, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1004
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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