The East Carolinian, February 24, 1994






4M"nni
Pirates grab 4th straight
Mike Sanburn has another fine
pitching performance for the
Pirates in a 6-1 victory over
Virginia Commonwealth. Story
on page 11.
Lifestyle
Education and Entertainment
Last Saturday the Black
Thespians performed
Reginald Watson's play,
Black Voices From the
Past. Story on page 8.
Today
Tomorrc
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 14
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, February 24,1994
14 Pages
Due date for professors:One year
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
"April 9,1994. "That is what
the "date due" reminder might
say for a book in Joyner Library.
Can a student check out a book
for that long? No, but a professor
can.
Joyner Library will not di-
vulge the name of a professor
who has a book checked out be-
cause of state law, said Dr. Ken-
neth Marks, director of Joyner
Library. The policy to have a fac-
ulty book returned is to send a
letter, wait a week, send a letter,
wait a week, call.
There are no overdue fines
for ECU faculty, said Anna
Daugherty, head of circulation at
Joyner. According to the circula-
tion desk at N.C. State Univer-
sity, State faculty may check out
books for three months. The re-
trieval policy is the same with
one exception; after the final re-
turn notice, faculty are charged
three dollars for every day the
book is late.
Daugherty said that in a
worst-case scenario, the book
could take over a month to be
returned.
"In almost all cases, we send
a letter and the book comes back
and you get the book within a
week Daugherty said. "There
are some people who abuse the
svstem, but we think a week is a
reasonable amount of time to al-
low people to get tneir materials
back to the library after they have
been recalled
Hundreds of books are re-
called each week. If a book is not
returned after a few phone calls,
Daugherty calls herself. If she
cannot provoke action, she calls
the faculty member's chair of the
department.
Marks believes most of the
student frustration comes from
procrastinating, and that some
students are unhappy with the
faculty check-out policy.
"I think it is unfortunate the
way individuals use the library's
circulation policies to build pri-
vate collections Marks said
Senior Jason Williams re-
cently had an opportunity to test
the recall policy. "I requested a
book during the first week of class
for a paper that was due the last
week in January. The library sent
me a letter saying that the book
was available a week ago.
"What I don't understand is
why they can't call the professor
immediately. And then why can't
they call me instead of wasting
their money paying for a stamp to
mail me a letter Williams said.
Faculty books are due at the
end of the year, said Daugherty. If
an instructor were to check out a
book today, it would have to be
returned in two months.
UNC-Wilmington students
may have it even harder. Sharon
Connelly, of the circulation desk
at UNC-Wilmington, said that
three letters are sent. If a student
still wants a book after waiting,
the library will call. Wilmington
faculty receive no fines for not
turning in a recalled book.
Individual library policies
are periodically re-examined by
the Policy Operations Review
Committee, made up of Joyner
facultv. Daugherty said it is un-
likely that any policies will change
soon because Joyner is working
on settling everyone into the new
Marquis system. She said that if
so much were to change at one
time, students and faculty may
feel alienated.
Not
Today!
High temperatures in the 70s
brought out the shorts and
sun glasses for an unusual
February day earlier in the
week. Today is a different
story, however, and the
weekend looks even worse.
Don't worry, spring is on the
way, and Spring Break is even
closer. Florida has weather
like this all the time!
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Former students
remember integration
Greenville not throwing it all away
By Jon Cawley
Staff Writer
The Greenville Public
Works curbside recycling pro-
gram is always expanding and
has grown increasingly success-
ful in improving the public's par-
ticipation in the project. The pro-
gram is, however, experiencing
some problems, especially in the
areas near campus.
The city of Greenville be-
gan it's recycling program in
August of 1993, in a two-part pro-
gram involving single-family
homes and apartment complexes.
said Tom Tysinger, director of
Public Works. In the single-fam-
ily portion of the program,
recyclables are placed in a desig-
nated receptacle and picked up
by the Public Works department
at the home. In apartment com-
plexes all recyclables for the en-
tire complex are placed in one
designated blue dumpster for
pick-up by the department,
Tysinger said.
"Apartment dwellers
throw garbage in with the recy-
clable materials Tysinger said.
"When that happens, and you
get to a certain point where you
actually have more garbage in
there than you have recycling,
they can't accept it as recyclable
materials and it gets dumped in
the land fill
The Public Work depart-
ment wants to find out what they
can do to increase participation
with multi-family complexes.
Tysinger said education is part of
the problem and he hopes that
the department can better edu-
cate those people in the com-
plexes on how to properly dis-
pose of recyclables.
See RECYCLE page 3
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
The chancellor was inter-
rupted three times as he told stu-
dents, "force will be met with
force, and lawlessness shall be
prosecuted to the full extent of
the law Afterwards, the group
of about fifty black students
walked out. Several hours later,
they staged demonstrations near
the entrance of two administra-
tion buildings. They left peace-
ably on the orders of campus
police.
Is this a scene from the fight
lor a black cultural center at UNC-
Chapel Hill? No this is a descrip-
tion of one of the many demon-
strations that took place on ECU's
campus during the late 60s after
integration.
For 56 years, ECU's charter
read, a school for "white men
and women" until it was
amended in 1957 in conjunction
with the 1954 Supreme Court
decision.
East Carolina University
was one of the few major institu-
tions that integrated without a
court order. It came about as a
result of the forward thinking of
Dr. Andrew A. Best and ECU
Chancellor Leo Jenkins.
"If you look at the rest of
the universities, what they did
and when they did it, it was much
later than the time table that ECU
did it Ray Rogers, a 1972 gradu-
ate, said.
Integration began during
the summers of 1961 and 1962.
Black students attended summer
sessions along with black teach-
ers who were renewing their cer-
tification.
In the fall of 1963, ECU ad-
mitted it's first full-time black
student, Laura Marie Leary, who
became the first black student to
graduate from ECU.
Leary, a native of
Vanceboro, was facilitated in her
enrollment by Dr. Andrew Best,
a local physician.
Leary attended ECU a full
academic year as the only black
student. The following year she
was joined by ten other blacks
students. She graduated in 1966
with a Bachelor of Science degree
in business administration.
By 1966, there were 50
other black students in residence
See INTEGRATION page 4
Worth noting
By order of the Greenville City
Council, parking on Ninth Street
between Cotanche and Charles is
prohibited, effective Tuesday, Feb.
22nd. Violators will be ticketed.
Library
suffers
heat wave
By Tina Chiwona
Staff Writer
"It's like a heat
wave. Burning in my
heart
For the past two
weeks, patrons of Joyner
Library have been sing-
ing this song, because of
the unusually high tem-
peratures in the west
wing. Meanwhile on the
south side of the library,
contractors can be seen at
work.
"The contractors are
replacing the chillers
said Dr. Kenneth Marks,
the academic library di-
rector. "The chillers, or the
HVAC, (Heating, Venti-
lation and Air Condition-
ing), are part of the sys-
tem that keep the build-
ing at an appropriate tem-
pera ture
Last week the west
wing experienced very
high temperatures as the
chillers were being
changed. Marks said rea-
sons for the building's el-
evated temperature in-
clude above normal sea-
sonal temperatures. As
the seasons change, the li-
brary has problems ad-
justing to a suitable tem-
perature.
"During this pro-
cess, we have been with-
out an acceptable level of
ventilation, heating or
cooling Marks said.
"When the temperatures
got as warm as last week,
it became much hotter and
intolerable inside.
"You can be assured
that the library faculty
and staff were just as un-
comfortable as anyone
who entered the library
he said.
Tammy Ridouttand
Mollie Floyd are student
employees who work
downstairs in the North
Carolina collection. "It
was sickly hot and diffi-
cult to work in Ridoutt
said. "I saw students
asleep
"It dried my eyes
and contacts, but I'm glad
that they got it fixed said
Floyd.
The chillers tha t con-
See HEAT page 4
Do you use
ECU's Transit
System? What
changes
would you
like to see ?
People on the Street
1B3hb JR


ww
Photos by Leslie Petty
Rachael Bufort, senior. "The bus
route should go to more places. It
should go into town all day, not just
til 5, and it should run until 12
Jay Berry, junior. "I never use it
because I've always lived close to
campus. "
Leva "Beans"Chevis, senior. "I
think it should take us wherever
we needed to go
Mark Lampe, graduate student.
"Their music choice is so lame.
They play too much country
nicu





2 The East Carolinian
February 24, 1994
Cease fire holds in Bosnia
February 16
East of Flanagan � 9 p.m. Larceny of a bike.
February 17
Third and Reade Parking Lot � 3:12 p.m. Damage to
personal property (vehicle) by throwing rocks.
Third and Reade Parking Lot�5:17 p.m. Damage to back
glass of vehicle by throwing rocks at vehicle.
North Lobby of Minges � 5:27 p.m. Breaking and enter-
ing a coin operated machine.
February 18
Ficklen and Charles Parking Lot � 1:15 a.m. Breaking
and entering of a motor vehicle.
Weight room at Garrett Hall � 5:38 p.m. Report of disor-
derly conduct.
February 19
East of Fletcher � 1:05 a.m. Arrest of ECU student for
DWI.
Wright Auditorium � 8:50 p.m. Larceny of a wallet.
February 20
Fletcher Hall � 3:05 a.m. Trespassing on female's floor
without an escort.
Tenth and College Hill Drive � 4:03 a.m. Arrest of non-
student for DWI.
Fletcher Hall �11 a.m. Alleged rape.
February 21
Student Publications Building Parking Lot � 6 p.m.
Illegal parking for university-owned vehicle.
Correction:
ECU'S core campus was identified to have
34 parking spaces per 100 tickets sold. This
number should read 34 spaces for every 100
persons at ECU.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from official ECU
police reports.
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-
Herzegovina (AP) � American,
Russian and European diplo-
mats decided the cease-fire
model that has allowed Sarajevo
residents to walk city streets
again should be extended to
other beleaguered Bosnian
towns.
Russia blocked consider-
ation of any new NATO ultima-
tums to enforce the truces. But
German Foreign Minister Klaus
Kinkel said further ultimatums
may be needed.
And a U.S. official said
Washington hadn't ruled out
force.
The diplomats met Tues-
day in Bonn, Germany, where
they also agreed to push
Bosnia's three warring factions
� Muslims, Serbs and Croats �
toward an agreement to end the
22-month war by dividing
Bosnia into three states.
The talks move today to
Zagreb, the capital of Croatia,
where Bosnian government
military commander, Rasim
Delic, and the Bosnian Croat
commander, Ante Roso, were
expected to sign a cease-fire,
U.N. sources in Zagreb said.
In Moscow, President Boris
Yeltsin proposed a meeting with
leaders of the United States,
France, Britain and Germany to
work out a political settlement
in Bosnia. There was no imme-
diate response from those coun-
tries.
Artillery fire wounded five
U.N. peacekeepers Tuesday
near the besieged city of Tuzla.
The five Swedish peace-
keepers were patrolling in U.N.
armored personnel carriers in
Ribnica, 20 miles southwest of
Tuzla.
The wounds were not life-
threatening, a U.N. spokesman
said. It was not known who fired
the shells.
Held by Muslim-led gov-
mjWJWJWilJU
m
DOWNTOWN
Sports
Pad
Sports Pad
18 and Over
Sports Pad Sharky's Splash
Sptash Sports Bar
EVERY THURSDAY
Dollar
Nite
All Bars
Dollar m
Nite 2
All Bars �
Sharky's
Ewa Mataya
Billiards Champion
Sharky's
ernment forces, Tuzla is one of
several places where fighting
continues while Sarajevo, 50
miles to the south, is quiet.
Thousands of Sarajevans
were out on the slushy streets
Tuesday, while NATO war-
planes flew overhead to enforce
NATO's threat to bomb any ar-
tillery positions that shelled the
capital. U.N. spokesmen said all
arHllery not removed by Serb
troops besieging the city was
under U.N. control or inoper-
able.
"The main thing is the
Serbs stopped shelling, so we
can freely walk out on the
streets. Other things will be
solved step by step, but peace is
most important said one resi-
dent out for a stroll, Enver
Huseinovic, 58.
Relief convoys and flights
resumed Tuesday in Bosnia.
They were stopped last week in
case NATO air strikes were or-
dered and fighting escalated.
The United Nations said 13
planes dropped 99 tons of food
into Gorazde, a besieged Mus-
lim town in eastern Bosnia.
U.N. troops hoped to open
Tuzla airport March 7 for aid
flights to central Bosnia, said
Kofi Annan, the head of U.N.
peacekeeping operations.
But Serb-led Yugoslavia
objected, saying the airport is
too close to Yugoslavia. Tuzla is
25 miles west of the Yugoslav
border.
Diplomatic efforts have in-
tensified since the NATO ulti-
matum forced Serbs to pull their
heavy guns away from Sarajevo
and brought Russia strongly
into the picture. Russian troops
joined U.N. peacekeepers in
Sarajevo, and Moscow quickly
claimed a leading role in peace
efforts.
Diplomats said Tuesday
they would seek relief for Serb-
besieged Muslim enclaves and
pressure Muslims and Croats for
a cease-fire in central Bosnia and
the southern city of Mostar.
"For now, I would say, we
give peace a chance said
Juergen Chrobog, a deputy Ger-
man foreign minister and host
of the meeting.
Stephen Oxman, a State
Department assistant secretary
who took part in the meeting,
said the United States did not
rule out force, but would pro-
ceed on a "case-by-case" basis
while trying to bring peace to
new areas.
Wine and cheese social
p.m Bring your own
wine and bring your
own cheese.
Mideast
talks peace
CAIRO, Egypt (AP) � Is-
raeli and PLO negotiators re-
ported progress Wednesday to-
ward implementing their accord
on limited Palestinian self-rule
in the occupied territories.
In a joint statement issued
at the end of three days of talks,
negotiators said they still need
more time to resolve security and
administrative issues and hoped
for further progress when talks
resume next week.
The negotiators gave no
specifics on what was decided
during the latest round, which
focused on security arrange-
ments for the Gaza Strip and
West Bank town of Jericho, the
size of the Palestinian police force
and where the Palestinian police
will be deployed.
IF YOU WANT TO MAKE IT
IN THE REAL WORLD,
SPEND A SEMESTER IN OURS.
f�W$
stfpp
World Co.
Walt Disney World Co. representatives will be on campus to present
an information session for Undergraduate Students on the
WALT DISNEY WORLD SUMMERFALL '94 College Program.
WHEN: Tuesday, March 1,1994
7:00 pm
WHERE: Room 1028 General
Classroom Bldg.
Attendance at this presentation is
required to interview for the
SummerFall 94 College Program.
Interviews will foe held (in Wednesday.
March 2. 1994. The following
majors are encouraged to attend:
Business, Communication. Recreation
Leisure Studies and TheatreDrama
preferred.
For more information
Contact: Cooperative Education
Phone: 757-6979
An Equal Opportunity Employer
The Walt Disney Co
SGA JUDICIAL
BRANCH
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FREE COVER TILL 10:00PM
Come into any club entrance Thursday and then
feel free to roam from club to club!
FREE MEMBERSHIPS
DANCE 8iWARDS- ROCK H ROLL
BLOCK PARTY
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The following Positions are available:
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD MEMBER
All applicants will be screened
by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average
Good Standing with the University
Applications Available At:
Secretary's Office (262 Mendenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (255 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
TUE MARCH 15, 1994
5:00 pm
IWIIIMIW� lip�
mam-smm�"MM-





February 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Second-hand
smoke harmful
NEWYORK(AP)�Scientists
found chemical evidence that nico-
tine can reach a nonsmoking preg-
nant woman's fetus if she is rou-
tinelyexposedtosecondhandsmoke.
Theevidence turned up in hair
samples from newboms, suggest-
ing long-term exposure to nicotine
and other potentially harmful com-
ponents of tobacco smoke, said re-
searcher Dr. Gideon Koren.
The study didn't investigate
whether the exposure affected the
babies' health. But previous research
suggests children of womenexposed
to secondhand smoke two to three
hours a day while pregnant might
haveanincreased riskof subtleprob-
lems with speech, language, intelli-
gence and attention span.
Prior research also shows that
when a pregnant woman smokes
during pregnancy, risks to a fetus
include low birthweight, prematu-
rity and possible long-term effects
on mental development, Koren and
his co-authors said in Wednesday's
issue of the Journal of the American
Medical Association.
Koren, a professorof pediatics,
pharmacology and medicine at the
University of Toronto, spoke in an
interview before presenting his re-
sults Tuesday at an AMA newsbrief-
ing.
Dr. Neal Benowitz of the Uni-
versity of California, San Francisco,
said the study's result was convinc-
ing but not surprising.
"It's really unclear what it
means, if anything, in terms of ba-
bies' health said Benowitz, who
was not involved in the study and
also researches the effects of nico-
tine.
Koren said he suspected sec-
ondhand smoke may harm fetal
health only if combined with other
risk factors like an inadequate oxy-
gen supply. Carbon monoxide from
smoke may itself reduce the supply
of oxygen to fetuses, he said.
SeeSMOKEpageA
RECYCLE
Continued from page 1
Tysinger said the Public
Works program makes recycling
as simple as it can be. "All resi-
dents are required to do is sepa-
rate their garbage from the
recyclables which all go in the
same container co-mingled
Tysinger said. "The recyclables
are then taken to the Pitt County
Materials Recovery Facility
(MRV)
Once the recyclables reach
the facility, they are separated by
facility employees leaving none
of that responsibility with the resi-
dent, Tysinger said.
Another problem with the
program is that people get con-
fused about what kind of card-
board is recyclable, Tysingersaid.
Corrugated boxes with air spaces
are recyclable, while cardboard
like in cereal boxes is not, he
added.
"What we get is a lot of
people throwing away cereal
boxes and detergent boxes and
things like that in the recycling
bins, and they need to not do
that he said.
The Styrofoam and plastics
grocery stores use to wrap meat
is not recyclable, Tysinger said.
He added that steel food cans are
now recyclable if they are rinsed
out so the food does not spoil.
When recycling plastic drink
bottles, Tysinger said the tops
should be removed to prevent
heat from building up and caus-
ing the bottle to explode from the
pressure.
Other plastics are recyclable
if they have the number one or
two on the bottom, however oth-
ers like oil or antifreeze contain-
ers are not acceptable because
they are considered hazardous
waste, Tysinger said. Right now
there is no recycling program for
hazardous materials in the
county; however, Joy Hudson,
recycling coordinator for Pitt
County expects to soe one in the
future.
Tires must be taken directly
to the landfill where they are
shredded and used for various
projects, Hutson said. One ex-
ample of this, is the rubberized
asphalt mix track at ECU's
Harrington Field, Tysinger said.
He added that contract bids for
the Northwest Bypass construc-
tion project must include this mix
for the road construction, and a
Greenway project is being
planned for a similar bike path
from College Hill Drive to Fifth
Street.
Paint cans can be taken at
the landfill, but Hudson said if
the paint is not totally used, the
lid should be removed to let the
paint become a solid. She empha-
sized that people should find
some way to "use up the materi-
als you buy
Newspapersand magazines
are recyclable and can be put to-
gether, Tysinger said. The depart-
ment asks tha t people place these
kinds of paper products in a gro-
cery bag and tie the handles to-
gether to keep the papers con-
tained while in the bin and to
keep them from getting wet.
The department also picks
up white goods and lawn waste.
All white goods, or appliances
such as refrigerators, water heat-
ers and stoves can be left on the
curb, however Tysinger said resi-
dents should call Public Works
first and set up a date that the
appliances can be picked up.
Since Jan. 1, 1993, all yard
waste has been requ ired to be sepa-
rated in the land fill, Hudson said.
All vegetative materials such as
leaves and limbs are now recy-
clable in the curbside program,
Tysinger added. He emphasized
that the department would like
people to separate leaves and grass
clippings from limbs and branches
into two piles when leaving them
on the curbside.
Garbage is picked up by the
city on Mondays and recyclables
are picked up on each Thursday,
Tysinger said. He believes that
close to 100,000 pounds of
recyclables are being picked up
and delivered to the recovery fa-
cility a week. Tysinger said this is
"pretty good" and represents
about 15 percent to 20 percent of
the total amount of refuse picked
up, depending on how the week
goes.
The problem with separat-
ing recyclables is occurring espe-
cially at the Tar River apartments
and others located near the cam-
pus. "For people that stay busy
and on the go all the time, recy-
cling is not foremost on their
minds Tysinger said.
"It does take a few minutes
of time, but it really doesn't take
that long, and once you get in the
practice of doing it, it becomes
real simple to do Tysinger said.
" It also makes you feel good about
what you are doing, you're now
part of trying to improve the
Earth's resources
Neither the city of Green-
ville nor Pitt County receive rev-
enue from the recycling projects.
Money gained from recycling used
to go to the site attendant at the
landfill, however that has since
changed, Hudson said. "Now all
money from the Eastern Carolina
Vocational Center (EC VC), where
most recyclables are taken, goes to
fund the MRV
The Pitt County program is
seeking to increase participation
in recycling to comply with Sen-
ate Bill 111 which was passed in
'90 or '91, Tysinger said. The bill
requires that local governments
reduce the amount of refuse go-
ing into their landfills by 25 per-
cent in 1993. Tysinger said the
number is going to increase to 40
percent by 2001, including such
items as tires which are now re-
cyclable. "The county is well over
25 percent and on the way to
clearing 40 percent he said.
In order to increase knowl-
edge of the recycling program,
presentations have been made
to the Inter-Fraternity Council
and also at the PanhellenicCoun-
sel, Tysinger said. The SGA has
also been approached concern-
ing the program, but Tysinger
said he is waiting to hear from
them.
Make
PERSONAL PROTECTION
ATTACK ALARMS
Everyone needs a PAAL
� High School College Students
� Business people commuting or traveling
� Shoppers walking through parking lots
� Apartment Dwellers
joggers andValkers
� Late shift.
Quorum
BIG BUCKS
Average profit from summer work: $5643.00
"based on average profit of all first-year dealers.
CALL 757-2753
FOR MORE INFORMATION
free dm
10 Discount with Student I.D.
CALL:
John Ord or Vernon Carawan
(919)830-5166 (919)321-1190
ELBO
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XTI
Cent Thu
admission $5.00 members
$6.00 Guests 11 I jj
10 tf Domestics All Nite (your choice)
75tf Shot Specials
Be A Winner!
Work on Campus
Free Admission from 7-9pm
for Members and Greeks
$1 admission for ECU Guest til 9pm
$2.75 pitchers
$2.00 Teas and Bahama Mamas
University Housing Services is currently hiring residential students for Fall 1994
part-time employment. Candidates must be full-time students who live
on campus, must be in good academic and judicial standing with the University
and must be friendly, customer-oriented people.
Positions available include: office assistants, gameroom assistants, mail clerks,
front desk workers and paint crew. To apply, go to 214 Whichard and fill out an
application form. The deadline for applications is March 4th.
For more information call University Housing Services at 757-6450





4 The East Carolinian
February 24. 1994
SMOKE
Continued from page 3
The studv included babies of
36 mothers who smoked, 23 non-
smoking mothers whosaid they were
regularly exposed to secondhand
smoke and 35 nonsmoking mothers
who reported no regular exposure
td secondhand smoke.
t Using hair samples from the
newborns, researchers looked both
far nicotine and cotinine, which the
body creates from nicotine. Because
nicotine is eliminated quickly from
the body, the longer-lasting cotinine
is the more reliable indicator of ex-
tent of exposure to smoke, research-
ers said.
For infants of women exposed
to secondhand smoke, levels of
cotinine were about twice those
found for infants of non-exposed
mothers.
infants of non-exposed moth-
ers showed some cotinine because
of small amounts of nicotine in foods,
Koren said.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
209 S. Evans St.
Pittman Bldg.
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
INTEGRATION
Continued from page 1
Central Book &
YOU LOSE WHAT
YOU DON'T USE
DR.ROBERT ANTHONY
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Outer (next to Kmart)
on a campus of nearly 8000 white
students and faculty.
"When I was here, there
were about 16 of us and we knew
each other intimately. We had to
have that type of bond and cama-
raderie Rogers said.
Being black on a predomi-
nately white campus during the
sixties had its difficulties, Rogers
said.
"There were Klan meetings
held on or near campus Rogers
said, "And we had teachers who
resented the fact that we were
there and felt that we were being
shoved down their throats
There weren't any mecha-
nisms to police discrimination on
campus.
According to Rogers, there
were issues around health care
that were mandated by the uni-
versity that caused problems to
minorities.
"I never really had the op-
portunity to have dental care, so
I ended up having cavities which
in the opinion of the infirmary, 1
had to have extracted or filled
Rogers said. "I was literally pulled
out of class and told I couldn't
come back until I had those teeth
extracted. You can say that's not
racial, but I don't think there were
too many white kids pulled out
of class over a tooth issue
The black student popula-
tion grew during the '70s and
their campus participation in-
creased along with it.
Black students established
the Society of United Liberal Stu-
dents (SOULS), which was the
forerunner of Allied Blacks of
Leadershipand Equality (ABLE).
SOULS helped to convert
the "Y" hut into the Afro-Ameri-
can Cultural Center in 1975.
"When the black students
first eyed that center it was the
campus Christian group meeting
place. We were looking for a place
that was a separate entity or struc-
ture Jackie Hawkins, a 1974
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graduate, said.
In 1976, theCenterwasdedi-
cated to Ledonia Wright, a pro-
fessor of social work who served
as faculty advisor for SOULS.
"Things have changed and
what was appropriate then isn't
really appropriate now, it's not
enough Hawkins said.
ECU's curriculum during
the early years of integration did
not respond to the change in stu-
dent population diversity.
"I think that at that time they
were getting used to having Afri-
can-American students on cam-
pus. There wasn't a lot of thought
given to integrating us into the
curriculum in terms of course
work Hawkins said.
During theearly '70s, a black
literature class and a black his-
tory class were added to ECU's
curriculum.
ECU was beginning to meet
the academic needs of blacks, but
not the social needs, which could
be fulfilled through fraternity and
sorority life.
The problem with establish-
ing social organizations was that
no student receiving financial aid
could join a fraternity or sorority.
The majority of black students
were receiving financial aid.
The problem was solved
when Zeta Eta Lambda, a local
graduate chapter of Eta Nu Inc
pr . ided monetary funds for stu-
dents wanting to join a fraternity
or sorority.
This led to the establishment
of Alpha Phi Alpha in 1971.
"I feel, and I'm sure other
people who were in school when
I was here feel, like the things we
did while we were here have re-
ally made the difference in the
way things are for students to-
day Hawkins said.
"It's a part of our lives that
we still talk about every single
solitary time we get together
Rogers said. "It was just a phe-
nomenal experience
trol the temperatures in the west
wing were installed last Friday.
"We should now be feeling an
appropriate temperature in the
west end of the library Marks
said.
The process of changing the
chillers began shortly after the
new year, and has been under-
way- for about six weeks. The de-
cision and scheduling of the
project was made by the Physical
Plant. The Plant is responsible for
the maintenance and functions of
campus buildings. Similar plans
are expected for the east wing of
Joyner library.
"We've been told that they
are going to replace the chillers
for the east wing Marks said.
Marks hopes that the spring cli-
mate will remain normal so that
patrons using the library in the
east wing will not feel the same
discomfort as that of the west
wing last week.
Jason Kempton, a senior,
said, "It was too hot to study. I
couldn't even stay in here be-
cause the heat was unbearable on
the top floor or any floor
Other students had similar
complaints and took them to the
librarv assistants who explained
the situation. "It was very hot for
a solid week said Dan Shouse, a
reference librarian. "The chillers
were not operating properly at
the time, and were fixed on Fri-
day.
"It was extremely hot and a
lot of people were miserable and
wanted to know why it was so
hot he said.
The library has posted a sign
that savs, "We are having a heat
wave To reduce the amount of
heat in the building, the main
doors are opened, so long as there
are no dogs outside.
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The East Carolinian
February 24, 1994
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Primed on
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
100
recycled
paper
Jodi Connelly, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary-
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Marugtr
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 cop.es every Tuesday and Thursday The
mastheadI editorial m each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters limited to 250
words, whtch may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville N C 27858-4353
For more information, call (919) 757-6366. ' ' " OJ�JJJ-
Revamped faculty book return policy overdue
It seems like a library should be a trust-
worthy place.
It ought to be a dependable, usable
resource for the development of studies.
This is necessary on the collegiate level
because of extensive research assignments.
It i absolutely essential at Joyner, and more
often than not, an impossible ideal to ob-
tain.
Joyner, aside from not having enough
volumes (approximately 929,956 bound) or
space in which to house those they have, also
participates in a policy wherein a professor
can check out books as long as she wants
for up to a year.
Let's develop a little scenario here: You,
the student, after a pained search on the
insufficient Marquis system (that locates
items more effectively by subject than by au-
thor or title), finally find that oh-so-impor-
tant-book for that oh-so-important-paper.
Except you then discover that the vol-
ume has been checked out. Drats! Standard
policy dicta tes that this volume of work can
be recalled. If the patron is a professor,
however, you find yourself up that prover-
bial creek without a paddle (the river Styx,
maybe?).
This policy, while certainly not more
disruptive than the new computer system,
can create a lot of problems for a young
student researcher. Joyner's ineffective,
lackadasical retrieval method is unaccept-
able. By the time you receive the book you
requested (if you ever do), usually your
paper or project is completed.
And what help is the book then? The
library might as well have never retrieved it
in the first place.
Honestly, the faculty allowances are
primarily understandable. It's like a job
perk. Every person that has a job knows what
their perks are. Maybe you get to use the
copier for personal business, or you have
access to free beverages, and possibly even
paper clips galore!
Whatever it is, you know (or should know)
not to abuse the system. When you cross that
line, the perks are no more.
These professors deserve some perks. We're
not denying them that. But maybe Joyner should
make this return policy stricter and the time
period should be set somew here around a month
or two. Not too unreasonable.
We're not saying that all professors are
abusing this system, either. We're not even
suggesting that most do. But the occassion
does arise when students need research items
and professors � relishing in their privilege
� ignore and or forget written requests.
And since there are no overdue fines for
professors, why should they care?
To all those professors who make stu-
dents' lives that much more difficult by bas-
tardizing this policy, we'll tell you why you
should care: This policy is not here for you to
build up your own private, take-home li-
brary. We need these books. We aren't kid-
ding.
So Joyner isn't the Library of Congress.
So they don't have enough volumes for a
student body of around 18,000 and the com-
puter system leaves a lot to be desired. But
the least they could do is implement a loan
and return system that doesn't hinder stu-
dents from studying properly and effectively.
That's what we're here for, aren't we?
If students are bound by sacred Joyner
return policy, then professors should at least
have a similar system. Either that, or let students
check out books for months on end. Imagine all
the money they'd lose
By John P. Adams
Animal activists SETA provide valid service
A couple of weeks ago I
saw a flyer in Brewster an-
nouncing the first meeting of
Students for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals. I had been
wondering when they were
going to meet because I wanted
to write a
piece about
them. To be
honest, I've
wanted to
write a piece
on animal ac-
tivism for sev-
eral years.
At my
alma mater
(UNC-G) �-�
People for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals used to stage
demonstrations about every
four months because one of
the professors there was do-
ing research on cats. PETA
marched around carrying
signs which proclaimed that
this professor was guilty of
terrible crimes against ani-
mals. They claimed that he set
traps for stray cats around the
campus and that he tortured
them.
Needless to say, this an-
gered me a great deal. Not that
cats were being tortured, but
rather, that a serious profes-
sional performing valuable re-
search was being harassed by
a group of people who had
nothing better to do.
Don't get me wrong. I'm
a cat lover myself. I own a
tabby named Bernie. I took her
off the street six years ago and
I was going to tell
you how they were
just a bunch of
bleeding heart, tree
hugging, puppy-
loving, vegetarian
freaks.
we've been companions ever
since. However, as much as I
care about Bernie, she's just a
cat (and a lazy one at that).
What angered me about
PETA was not that they were
protesting, but the fact that all
���mHi �f these
people (usu-
ally about
50), with all
of their en-
ergy and re-
sources
were devot-
ing so much
time to ani-
mal rights
when there
were, and still are, literally thou-
sands of more important issues
which needed to be addressed.
Last Thursday I attended
this semester's first meeting of
SETA (not to be confused with
PETA as I learned during the
meeting). Having read this far
you realize that I was not at-
tending this meeting with what
one might refer to as an objec-
tive frame of mind.
Let's face it, I was there to
get a little fodder for my can-
non. I was planning to really let
these people have it.
I was going to write about
how they were wasting their
time on an unimportant issue. I
was going to tell you how they
were just a bunch of bleeding
heart, tree-hugging, puppy-lov-
ing, vegetarian freaks.
I can't do it though. Not
because I'm afraid to, but be-
cause it's not true.
The most important thing
to know about SETA is that they
are not associated with PETA.
SETA consider themselves an
educational group whereas
PETA would be considered an
activist group.
SETAs goals were clearly
stated at the meeting. First, they
hope to advance vegetarianism
by promoting a high protein,
non-meat diet to be served at
Mendenhall. This is a legitimate
issue which should be addressed
because of the growing number
of vegetarians.
Secondly, they are against
testing on animals for cosmetic
type products. Who can argue
this point? With modern tech-
nologies there is no need to keep
performing tests on animals so
that we can look and smell bet-
ter.
Thirdly, SETA is against
overpopulation of animals. They
are in favor of spaying and neu-
tering pets to promote this.
Finally, they are not as
judgmental as PETA about the
testing on animals for medical
research when necessary. I think
everyone will agree that this is a
sensible stance.
I still think that there are
more important issues to be ad-
dressed, but at the same time I
think the issues which SETA
bring up are valid and impor-
tant.
For anyone interested,
SETA's next meeting is Thurs-
day, March 3, at 6:30 in the Gen-
eral Classroom Building, room
1001.
By Laura Wright
Snapple may conflict with your morality
Not too long ago, there was
a debate about whether or not it
is ethical to use fetal tissue trans-
plants to treat patients with
Alzheimer's disease. The debate
stems from the fact that the tis-
sue is obtained from aborted fe-
tuses and this fact, of course, pre-
sents a moral dilemma to any-
one who has a problem with
abortion. Basically, I feel that if
the transplants are beneficial,
then it is absurd to deny treat-
ment to anyone. Then again, I
am pro-choice and my grandfa-
ther had Alzheimer's disease.
The question that arises
from this and similar situations
is, do the ends justify the means
and how do we process informa-
tion that arises from sources that
we do not approve of? On a some-
what less controversial note, sev-
eral months ago, I read a story in
Ms. magazine that was written
by a woman who had been a big
Miles Davis fan. She claimed that
Davis's music was soothing and
therapeutic to her until she found
out that the singer physically
abused Cecily Tyson. After she
found out about this side of
Davis, she was not able, in good
conscience, to support him by
listening to his music. Michael
Jackson provides a similar situa-
tion.
While deciding whether of
not to listen to Miles Davis may
seem to be a trivial matter com-
pared to deciding whether or not
to use fetal tissue transplants,
both situations are based upon
ethical assumptions. Davis's abil-
ity as a musician doesn't matter
in the decision and neither does
the success or failure rate of us-
ing fetal tissue as a treatment for
a disease.
I mention these situations
because we are all faced with
similar dilemmas�probably
more along the lines of the Davis
incident�on a day to day basis.
It is often hard to see the good in
the accomplishments of an indi-
vidual when that individual be-
haves in a way that conflicts with
our moral code. It is difficult to
approve of information, no mat-
ter how helpful it may be, if we
disagree with the way it is ob-
tained.
Take, for example, Bill
Clinton's affair with Gennifer
Flowers. Regardless of Clinton's
qualifications to be president,
this affair damaged his political
standing, and would probably
have ruined him if (luckily for
Bill) Gary Hart hadn't paved the
way for him a few years ago.
Even more complicated is
the question of whether or not
the information that was ob-
tained through medical experi-
ments on the Jews by the Ger-
mans during World War II
should be used. While some of
the data obtained through these
experiments may allow for bet-
ter treatment of specific illnesses,
the manner by which the in-
formation was obtained is al-
most too horrible to be be-
lieved. This example seems to
be the most difficult to rec-
tify. There is no middle
ground; what was done to the
Jews was morally deplorable.
I guess that each situa-
tion provides a different set
of questions and it is up to the
individual to decide what is
right and wrong. Morality is a
complicated matter and im-
moral behavior often pro-
duces beneficial results. It's a
matter of degrees and those
degrees are dependent upon
personal beliefs. I believe that
fetal tissue transplants should
be implemented and I never
listened to Miles Davis in the
first place. I do avoid Snapple
soft drinks because Howard
Stern (or is it Rush Limbaugh,
or are they the same person?)
drinks them and I boycott
Domino's pizza because it do
nates proceeds to pro-life or-I
ganizations. As far as politi
cians are concerned, I don't-
care who they sleep with.
I can't really say what I
think about the Nazi medical
experiments; I'm not sure.
Greenpeace prints pam-
phlets about recycling and
saving the rainforests. I think
that's great � too bad trees
had to die to make those pam-
phlets.


Letters to the Editor
'H
To the Editor:
Dr. Joel Brind, Professor of biology, chemistry
and endocrinology, Baruch College, City College of
New York, has written nationally concerning the
breast-cancer-abortion connection.
Professor Brind asks the question: Why don't
abortion providers tell pregnant young
women(especially those with a family history of
breast cancer) the news that having an abortion
increases their life-time breast cancer risk?
Byl970, when World Health Organization data
from four countries 'suggested increased risk asso-
ciated with abortion a red flag should have gone up
in front of the green light of Roe vs. Wade. Many
other studies (mostly on spontaneous abortion) also
suggested increased risk, and in 1981, a University of
Southern California study found a 140 increased
breast cancer risk among young women who had
elected to abort their first pregnancy.
On the East Coast, the 1989 computer registry
study by the New York Department of Health
showed a 90 risk increase for women with any
abortions and 300 for those with two consecutive
abortions! These findings were echoed by studies
in Russia, Japan, Denmark and France.
The theory here is consistent: Surging estro-
gen of early pregnancy makes breast tissue (nor-
mal and abnormal) grow. Late in pregnancy, other
hormones make the tissue permanently less sus-
ceptible to cancer, conferring the known protec-
tive effect of early first childbirth.
Why don't abortion providers tell pregnant
young women the facts?
I wonder if their reasons for withholding
information are purely for the sake of exploiting
women, their political agenda, and the money
they make at the expense of lives. Informed con-
sent should be passed in every state legislature in
the U.S. Women should be given the facts!
Alice Click
To the Editor:
Almost two thousand years have elapsed since
the Crucifixion and Dea th of My first-born son, Jesus;
Eugene Jesus are ONE combined SPIRIT�Reincar-
nated. My HOLY SPIRIT became entwined in My
Son's Body in a mental ward in 1941. This Revelation
was disclosed in detail in Our Autobiography, All
Souls Are Mine first published in 1959 by Our
Subsidy Publisher, Carlton Press, Inc. New York, NY.
Unfortunately this Book is out of circulation.
There is NO room, or margin for error by skep-
tics, who either believe or disbelieve that My HOLY
SPIRIT is Alive and Breathing in Mv Son's Body in
this DIMENSION of TIME and LIGHT. We cannot
falter but direct Our steps to move ever onward. The
DIE is cast to let future generations believe We were
(for the second time) here on Earth to give guidance to
multitudes upon our departure from this sin-
wracked World.
Time will NEVER cease to let LOVE and
guidance remain in the hearts of believers who
must know there is TRUE LOVE in a LIFE beyond
the dark horizon of fear where Tranquility reigns
in Our Heaven. There sin CANNOT penetrate Our
LOVE for forgiven sinners.
With LOVE and DEVOTION We bid you a
fond Anon, as My Son's pencil will cease to write
My Dictation. Only My Son will sign His SUR-
NAME as My Holy Name is VOID of form.
LOVE will always over-shadow fear so skeptics
wmbeUevemOur TRINITY FATHER (GREATER
SPIRIT) in Heaven, SON and HOLY GHOST, here
on Earth.
Eugene Changey
OK, so we weren't very clear. Applications are being accepted at
The East Carolinian for the position of Opinion Editor, which will be open-
ing summer session 94 and continuing in the fall. All interested persons
must still submit a one-page, single-spaced sample editorial.





:v
The East Carolinian
r " Page 6
Classifieds
February 24, 1994
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OUGH
SHELLEY FURL
RICH GURLEY
TONYA HEATH
SEAN MCLAUGHLIN
BRANDON PERRY
757-6366
For Sale
NINTENDO 8-BIT- 30
games(sports, strategy, Tetris) ,
Zapper, two controllers, hint book
and codes. $350 Or best offer. Call
931-8024 and leave message.
ervifces Offered
E
Personals
XQ
Greek
CONGRATULATIONS to Tiffani
Inman on the ACIU Billiards tourna-
ment. Good luck from the sisters of
Zeta Tau Alphaa.
JASON TWINE Happy Anniversary
sweetie! "I've had the time of my life
and 1 owe it all to you I love you
infinity mmmooii Melissa
EAST
CAROLINIAN
S1GEPB�0
yAv for 4-8 hours "7
When: Feb 26
Times: 8-12 noon
1-5 pm
Where: Your Doorstep
How: Call
Why: To build a study room
in our basement
How Much: $25.00 4 hrs
$50.00 8 hrs
Two brothers for the price of one
HE Greek
SPRING BREAK
MARCH MADNESS
CRAZY ZACK'S
MYRTLE BEACH, SC
1-800-645-3618
For Sale
SPRING BREAK SALE 1994! We
have the hottest destinations! Ja-
maica, Cancun, Bahamas, Florida.
All at the guaranteed lowest prices
with the ultimate party package. Or-
ganize small group and Travel free!
Call Sun Splash Tours 1 -800-426-7710
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Resi-
dency Status and Tuition is the bro-
chure by attorney Brad Lamb on the
in-state tuition residency process.
For sale: Student Stores Wright
Building.
'91 SUZUKI KATANA 600 Black,
matching shoe: helmet, Tank bra, pro
net, only 4600 miles, excellent condi-
tion $3500 call: 757-3236
ATTENTION: weight lifters and
watchers: let me help you fill those
New Year's resolutions. Sports
supplements at major discount
prices: Cybergenics, Quick Trim,
Cyberrrim, Super Fat Burners, Tri-
Chromelene, Super Chromoplex,
Weight Gain Powders (all), Amino
Acids, Creatine, Met-rx, Vanadyl
Sulfate, Yohimbe Bark, Hot Stuff,
Herbs, Multi-Vitamins, Super
Golden Seal, and many more! Call
Brad today at 931 -9097 for more info.
PROFESSIONAL GRADE S- VHS
VIDEO PRODUCTION SYSTEM.
Everything you need to generate
"Broadcast quality" videotapes from
camera to completion. Includes 2-
CCD Panasonic Camera and
accesories, plus Panasonic editing
package including two AG-1960
decks and monitors with EC 1000
Pro "Future Video" programmer and
effects generators, mixers and many
extras. This is an ideal opportunity
to enter into commercial
videography at less than half origi-
nal equipment cost. Entire package
is offered at $9,000. Call for complete
list of Equipment- 919-756-8106.
FOR SALE: Dream Machine '76
Volkswagon Microbus. Very clean.
Bed for 2, room for 8 with tons of
luggage. Rebuilt 2.0 liter motor. Ex-
tra quiet; insulatedcloth uphostery.
Excellent heat, KenwoodPioneer
sound. Many extras. $2500 neg. Call
830-6288.
1982 VOLKSWAGON
SCIRROCCO GL- 5 speed, amfm
cassette, well-maintained reliable car
good on gas must sell! $1,000 or best
756-2949
FOR SALE: Club for women only
membership, $29 a month for 11
months; Ladies Jenni-K Emerald ring
with gold lattice band. Call 355-3995
FOR SALE: Brother ZX-50 word pro-
cessor, Ex. condition, perfect for com-
position. $150.17th st. surf shop surf
board, Tri-fin, Astro-deck, leash incl.
6'2 Dane Endress Designer. $100
must sell. 758-0324, leave message.
FOR SALE: Brother word processor
WP-3400, CRT full screen display,
good shape, instruction booklet in-
cluded. $3500 OBO. 758-8591
TENNIS RACKETS- Two brand
new Pro-Kennex Presence 265. Never
been used! Acces. & covers included.
$130 or best offer. Call Sam at 758-
9960
ACCURATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resume
Secretarial work. Specializing in
resume composition w cover let-
ters- stored on disk, term papers,
general typing. Word Perfect or
Micro Soft Word for windows soft-
ware. Call today� Glenda Stevens
(8a-5p�752-9959) (evenings- 527-
9133)
FREE for all college students� up
to five free hours of long distance
calling! Call 355-3789.
AT STUD: AKC Chocolate Lab,
champion bloodline, excellent
pedigree, large muscular body,
large block head, well mannered,
excellent disposition. Call Scott:
757-3236
TYPING- Quick and accurate re-
sumes- letters - term papers, excel-
lent proofreading skills, satisfac-
tion guaranteed. Wed Fri. 9am-
5pm reasonable rates 321-1268
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies for
hire. Specializing in fraternity and
sorority socials and weddings. For
the widest selection of music and
unbeatable sound and profession-
alism. Except no imitations! Dis-
counts to all ECU students. Call
Rob @ 757-2658
DJ'S- DJ'S- DJ'S! Mobile Music
Productions is the Disc Jockey ser-
vice you need for your socials, par-
ties, weddings, and formals. We
play what you want when you want
to hear it . Highest quality and
professionalism. Call Lee at 758-
4644 for bookings.
4 B 1 1
( IS ui'tmint (I ).1H pc.v r 1, . In I) VIIlor uvttliltiri).i1i c tsill U( � ljl 11 LA ;s ;H,IVs l.i. k Slop
�TEH
THE BROTHERS OF DELTA CHI:
Grab your skis and your dates. I'll
see you in Winterplace for formal.
Don't forget to pack your bags!
ALPHA PHI: 1 know we're late,
but the night was great. Valentine's
Day has come and gone, even
though mother nature tried to pre-
vent the night from going on. We
had a great time let's do it again.
The Brothers and AM's of Delta
Chi
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Would like to
congratulate and welcome into our
fraternity Doug McCall
PIKE- Congratulations on a suc-
cessful Regional Conference last
weekend. We appreciate all the help
that Anthony Andujar, John
Grescler, Neal Smart and JR Bul-
lock gave. Thanks to the rest of the
brotherhood.
GREAT JOB ALPHA PHI for play-
ing your best at Basketball mon.
night. One more game- we can do
it! Love your sisters
KAPPA SIGMA- We are looking
forward to our pre-downtown to-
night. Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS Tanja
Dunn on your engagement. We
wish you the best! Love your Al-
pha sisters
SIGM A'S its a little bit late but not
forgotten, Thanks for the pre-
downtown last Thur. it was far from
rotten. Hope to do it again soon.
TEKE
DELTA SIGMA PHI- We all had a
great time! Look forward to seeing
you again! And also- "cheers" to
the bartender! Love, the sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta
PI LAMBDA PHI- Looking for-
ward to Fri. night's toga! See you
soon! Love, the sisters and pledges
of Pi Delta
JENNIFER W1NKLEMAN- Girl,
you sparkle almost as much as that
ring on your finger! Congrats on
your engagement! Love ya Pi Delta
PI KAPP- Can't wait until tonight!
-Sigmas
DELTA ZETA- Congratulations to
Personals
SPRING iiREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
�Shell Island Party Cruise
6S0' Gulf Beach Frontage
2 Outdoor Swimming Pools
1 Indoor Heated Pool
Restaurant, 2 & 3 Room Suites
SANDPIPER-BEACON
17403 Front Beach Road
Panama City Beach. FL 32413
RESERVATIONS
1-800-488-6828
�Beach Bonfire Parties
Tiki Beach BarVolleyball
Sailboats, letskis & Parasails
�Karaoke Beach Party
Area Discount Coupons
FROM $104 PER WEEK
TER PERSON
A PERSON OCCUPANCY
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-251 -4000 Ext, 1576
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting applications for
SYSTEMS MANAGER
The candidate's responsibilities and
qualifications would include:
A "Ensuring that computer hardware
yai
,and software are working, being
responsible for troubleshooting minor software problems, or
resolve problems by calling appropriate service personnel
�Be enrolled as a student at East Carolina University '9495
�Have and maintain a minimum of a 2.0 grade point average
while employed at The East Carolinian
�Able to keep an inventory of equipment, parts, and supplies
�Have extensive knowledge of Apple Macintosh hardware
(CPUs, LaserWriters, modems, scanners, monitors, wiring,
etc.) and software (networking, desktop publishing & word
processing applications, graphic & telecommunications
software)
Applications are available at The East
Carolinian office located on the second floor
i of the Students Pubs building
all of our Rho-Chi's for fall rush
'94. We are so proud of you. We
know your going to do a great job.
Love, your sisters
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES- Had so
much fun Sat. night- ooh our talks
were out of sight. Trust walk was
fun and the banner was cool, Lord
knows we talked about the guys
at this school. Crystal's big party-
sitting on the roof and the six inch
stain oh the things we'll do! I love
you guys more than you know-
just remember that the step is only
6 inches high! Love, Brooke
TO THE GUYS OF DELTA CHI
on 4th street on Fri. night-We just
came by to say hi, have a few
drinkc and put together a sepa-
rated link. We got in the car- with
one left behind- only to find that
the car was stuck in your muddy
drive. You pushed and you pulled
till the car was freed- you came to
our rescue your our hero's in-
deed. Thanks again- if it wasn't
for you the Honda would still be
stuck in the drive! Love, Andrea,
Cheryl, Colette & Katie.
SISTERS PREPARE for an
evening that will bring fun and
cheer who knows what's in store
for candlelight and roses in '94.
AOPI
LAST THURSDAY NIGHT was
such a delight. Thanks to all of the
strangers who made a perfect
mixer! AOPI
LAMBDA CHI- We are looking
forward to the pre-downtown to-
night! Love the sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi
SIGMA PI- WE had a kickin time
at Papa's Pub. Hope to carry on
the tradition next year. Love the
sisters of Alpha Delta PI.
SPRING BREAK 94'
HllWMOf m Mini RUMS! IIIHMl BMllSSt
PANAMA CITY $129
JAMAICA S469
CANCUN $469
DAYTONAS1291
SOUTH PADRE $279
BAHAMAS $389
iu,ffrviD.ii
GRUl LOCATOR
AinrciiwmiiH'Tiiii
Ail H)TU. 1B
FRUMtflkPAKTtD
JOE
1-800-234-7007
ENDLESS SUMMER T01RS
�0lbM4rtilf�Sf�iuw �(
Call JOE!
WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic
soul seeks like minded lady for
friendship and fun. Send photos and
correspondence to: Kane, Po Pox
8663, Greenville, NC 27835
TORI: Happy Birthday to my great
pal Vicki, Victoria, Tori! Have a great
day and hey have a coke! Love ya,
Jenna.
GET APPLICATIONS
NOW
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE. RENTING NOW, FOR SUMMER, AND
AUGUST. COST EFFICIENT AND CLOSE TO CAMPUS!
FREE WATERSEWER,
LAUNDRY FACILITY & ECU BUS SERVICE.
REASONABLE RENT.
CALL 752-8320 FROM 9:00AM TO 5:00PM
FOR SALE
PRE-0WNED
Tommv EM tiger � Polo � I Crew � Naiitica �� oloun
IZOD- Bugle Boy � I HV1 � rind all name brand
men's clothing and shoes
in 1 CHLI ENT CONDITION.
(FOR EXAMPLE - S7500TOMMY" forS16.00)
'l ALSO BUY.STEREO. TV, MICROWAVE;ETC
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
(THE ESTATE SHOP)
Downtown Walking Mall
414 Evans St.
752-3866
Come into tin
Downtown, c
w.tKohm Mon-Fri 10-12, K
hH.k Kigx. c i. in
kk packs, waist 33t 1U-
pack.x, etc. . �
kine Lot in front oi Wachovia Bank





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This Friday, Feb. 25th, aM cartoonists report
to 7ie �asf Carolinian for a meeting! So hop
in your PHILRDELPHIR-MOBILE� and haul yer
ink stained carcass ouer here by 5 o'clock!
find don't forget about the Nostalgia
Newsstands uihopin1 comic
conuention this Sunday, Feb. 27th,
from 9 AM to 5 PM at the Ramada Inn!
There will be tons o comics, toys,
collectables and maybe a special guest or
tuio. So if you're cool, be there.
Or be fired.





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The East Carolinian
Page 8
Lifestyle
February 24, 1994
Posthumous book honors young poet
Photo courtesy of the Rishel family
Walt Rishel
By Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
OnNov. 29,1990 James Walter
Rishel III died in a tragic car crash at
age 23. He had already published a
book of poetry before his death but
never got to send the second one to
publishers. Three years later,
Rishel's family had done just that.
EntitledWiM Rodent Strikes Again,
the book is on sale for $10. The
money will go into a scholarship
fund made available to students
from Orange High School and East
Carolina University to attend a fall
writing conference held in different
parts of North Carolina each year.
WhileastudentatOrangeHigh
Walter Rishel was involved in sev-
eral activities. He was a cross coun-
try runner for the school, and also
wrote several sports stories for The
News of Orange County, Tlie Nezvs
and Observer, and Vie Cfmpel Hill
Newspaper. Rishel continued writ-
ing while majoring in history at
ECU, where he was poetry editor
for a literary magazine at the uni-
versity. In 1989 his first poetry col-
lection, Ascending Liabilities, was
published. The poems in Wild Ro-
dent Strikes Again are dated from Jan.
1989 to Oct. 1990.
After deciding to publish the
collection after Walt's death, Mrs.
Rishel and other members of the
family contributed to the final prod-
uct. His sister Shana added some
verses and drawings in memory of
her late brother.
"Waltloved to write shesaid.
"By creating this fund, we're put-
ting something back into the writ-
ing community that Walt got so
much out of. When someone dies,
it's very hard to let go; this scholar-
ship is a way of keeping him around.
We've put several writers through
the program and have received
many thank-you letters in return
"This is something Walt would
definitely appreciate. It also gives
my mom and dad something to
do�it keeps them busy. Having
everyone add something, united the
family more. I wish Walt were here
to see this happen
As with Ascending Liabilities,
Walt dedicated the book to "Mom
& Dad & Jesus He explained the
dedication in an East Carolinian in-
terview in 1990. "It's their book,
written by their son. I needed some-
thing in there to acknowledge the
fact that I wouldn't have this talent
if it weren't for themEverything
that I am, they made me. Jesus, of
course, made us all, and I owe ev-
erything to Him
Copies of Wild Rodent Strikes
Again are being sold at area book-
stores such as the Intimate Bookshop
in Chapel Hill. Anyone wanting a
copy through the mail send S10
plus postage and handling to Jim
Rishel, 6614 Meadow View Rd
Hillsborough, NC 27278.
Nolte, O' Neal hit the court for Blue Chips
By Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
ThenewmovieBlueQiips should
be the ultimate basketball film. The
film breaks new ground by using real
athletic talent to portray talented ath-
letes. The film not only has many
basketball stars but it also stars Nick
Nolte as the coach of the team.
The story is about a college bas-
ketball team, the Western University
Dolphins, who were former national
championsbutnowhaveslippedout
of the national rankings in recent
years. Thecoachof the team, Nolte,is
underpressuretoform another cham-
pionshipteam. Nolte and theathletic
director begin a search for "bluechips"
which are the best of high school
basketball, the finest amateur ath-
letes money can buy. Playing the
"blue chip" prospects are Shaquille
JO' Neal and Anfemee Hardaway
from the Orlando Magic and Matt
Nover from the University of Indi-
ana.
The director of Blue Chips, Will-
iam Friedkin, arranged a four-game
seriesof some of the most impressive
former and current college stars to
compete in the movie. Executive
producer, Ron Shelton said, "The
competi tion in this movie had to be a t
a very high level. We needed college
players who could hold up their end
of a game against Shaquille O' Neal.
The result of these games was high
caliber basketball played in an un-
likely venue: the movie theater
Nick Nolte prepared for his role
as a coach by spending two weeks
inside and outside the gym with Indi-
ana coach Bobby Knight Nolte says,
"The key to coaching is being able to
use your imagination. Read, react,
create. What separates the master
craftsman from the average coach is
his creativity. It's a thinking man's
game Participation in the film from
individuals like Bobby Knight and
other college notables is evidence that
the themes addressed in Blue Chips are
of importance to the majority of
coaches who ran clear programs.
Thestory wasfirstwritten 12years
ago by Ron Shelton. Blue Chips deals
with themes of corruption, morality
and ambition, much of what director
Friedkin deals with in his movies.
Friedkin said, "The story is probably
timelier today than it was when Ron
Shelton first wrote it. The competition
for these athletes has become much
sharper as the price has gone up with
television revenues and product en-
dorsements being so lucrative Blue
Oiips was released on Feb. 18.
Photo Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
Coach Pete Bell (Nick Nolte) recruits "blue chip" athlete Neon Bodeaux
(Shaquille O'Neal) to the Wetsern University Dolphins in Blue Chips.
Thespians earn
raves, money
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
Last Wednesday the Black
Thespians of ECU performed
the play, "Black Voices from
the Past to over 200 people,
but many students still don't
know what the Thespians are
all about.
The group was formed last
year and is
ii
comprised
of about 15
members,
mostly stu-
dents, and
is under the
advise-
ment of En-
glish pro-
f e s s o r
Reginald
Watson.
Watson
wrote the
play with the hope that it would
"educate and entertain at the
same time
After last year's positive re-
sponse to the production, the
group decided to continue with
it as long as the demand was
there. And the demand is
present. Just last weekend the
Thespians traveled to
Campbell University to per-
form excerpts from the play.
"It was very successful said
Watson, "people learned a
lot
Although the Thespians
are not an official student or-
ganization, they plan to ap-
ply through the Student
Union in hopes of receiving
funds to help take the pro-
duction on the road.
"We're very community
oriented said Watson. "Last
Wednes-
I day pro-
duction
raised
over $300
for the
Ledonia
S. Wright
Scholar-
s h i p
Fund, so
our goal
was
reached
With
every program the Thespians
perform, they try to add new
pieces to it, to keep it interest-
ing. The group hopes to keep
performing and to keep rais-
ing money for good causes.
If you missed last week's
performance, you can still see
an abridged version of it this
weekend at the Army Reserve
in Greenville. For more infor-
mation, contact Reginald
Watson at 355-3380.
Last Wednesday's
production raised
over $300 for the
Ledonia S. Wright
Scholarship Fund
Reginald Watson
Author of Black Voices from the Past
Hunt happy to be "Mad"
NEW YORK (AP) � Helen
Hunt figures it this way: Not only
can you can keep a marriage inter-
esting for a lifetime, you also can
keep a sitcom marriage interesting
for the life of your five-year con-
tract.
Providing, of course, it's
the right marriage. And the right
sitcom.
"There is limitless confu-
sion to work through in a marriage
Hunt says with unconfused plea-
sure. "I've never been married, but
I know enough about relationships
to know that five years wouldn't
BEGIN to help someone figure out
how to get it right.
"So even if the show runs
that long, it will keep me on my
toes
She's talking about "Mad
About You which, in its second
season, keeps its viewers on their
toes, too. Not to mention laughing.
Granted, lots of sitcoms are
about marriage. But "Mad" (which
airs at 8 p.m. EDT Thursdays on
NBC) is wed to a fresh approach.
CD Reviews
S
0fDon't Buy
9 m Take Your Chances
0f0 0 Worth A Try
s s s s
9 f0 TS m Definite Purchase
The Veldt
Afrodisiac
m m 0
On Feb. 22 the Veldt re-
leased their first full-length album
titled Afrodisiac on the Mercury la-
bel. They're from the Raleigh-
Durham-Chapel Hill Triangle.
This album was produced
by Ray Shulman who hns worked
with The Sundays, Sugar Cubes and
Ian McCulloch.
The firstsinglereleased will
be titled "Soul In A Jar It features
two remixes by Diamond D. and
Jesus and Mary Chain.
This album contains a lot
of range, from melancholy dance
songs to political issues to ordinary
love songs. But sometimes you're
left wondering if the mood they're
setting fits with the subjects they're
singing about.
This is the case in "You
Take The World This song talks
about standing up and succeeding
in the face of ghetto despair. The
lyrics are really insightful, but the
repetition of the song almost makes
light of the whole subject.
One track on the album is
titled "RevolutionarySister which
is dedicated to the black female. It
points out the strife they continu-
ally endure, but even that issue
seems like it's over simplified.
The album is patched with
a couple of tracks that are interludes
or remixes between songs that range
in length from 27 seconds to one
minute and 17seconds. They're kind
of interesting, but they can hardly
be called songs.
The Veldt seems to have
many different influences, ranging
from the Cocteau Twins to Public
Enemy to the Cure. They've toured
with such bands as Catherine Wheel
and Jesus and Mary Chain. In North
Carolina they toured with rap acts
Seventh Tribe and YaggFu Front.
Afrodisiac combines hip-
hop with drawn-out solos, and adds
light-hearted humor. This is good,
but sometimes you wonder when
they want to be taken seriously.
Afrodisiac has a lot of variety, but
not much focus.
� Daniel
Willis
Book Kaisho skips the facts
(AP)-His publisher calls
Eric Lustbader, author of The
Kaisho (Pocket, $22), the Master of
the Orient with an "authoritative
vision of the Japanese
As a portrayal of Japan
or the Orient, however, this novel
is no more authentic than the kids'
film, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.
Even the title, The Kaisho, is wrong.
It's supposed to be a Japanese
word, but no native will recog-
nize it as such. Inaccurate usages
of the Japanese language and ab-
surd Japanese names abound.
The absence of authen-
ticity is not the novel's only flaw.
Even more fatal is that the book
lacksa coherent and dynamically
evolving story. There are a lot of
violent scenes, but they all fall
flat without building suspense or
moving the plot along.
The protagonist is Nicho-
las Linnear, son of a Chinese
woman and a British colonel, who
appeared in Lustbader's previ-
ous novels, The Miko and The
Ninja. Although he is a foreigner
in Japan's xenophobic business
world, Linnear co-owns a con-
glomerate. He obtained this au-
gust position, the author writes,
because his father "held a special
place in the hearts of the older
generation of Japanese, for he had
been seconded to Douglas
MacArthur's SCAP headquar-
ters
This is preposterous even
for fiction. During the Occupa-
tion, MacArthur and those con-
nected with him sequestered
themselves in a building strictly
off-limits to the Japanese. Given
that kind of atmosphere, it is hard
to imagine the Japanese getting
to know any of them personally,
let alone loving him. MacArthur
likely wouldn't have permitted
it.
The story begins with a
Japanese gangster asking Linnear
to protect him from an assassin.
An interesting enough premise,
but Linnear soon disappears from
center stage and doesn't re-emerge
in any significant way until to-
ward the end, when he has a tame
confrontation with the assassin.
Books like The Kaisho
demonstrate one thing: Despite
theageof global communications,
Japan is still a great mystery to the
West. Some Western writers use it
as a blank screen on which to
project their own fears and anxi-
eties.
There are no gimmicks or high
concepts. No "he's a Republican,
she's a Democrat No "he's a
reincarnated buffalo from Park
Avenue, she's a robot from the
poor side of town
"It's just these two people
in an apartment says Hunt, echo-
ing how the show was pitched to
her.
An actress since child-
hood, Hunt has appeared in a
number ofTV films and lately in
thea trical fea hires tha t include Tlie
WaterdanceandMr.Saturday Night.
She was on Broadway in "Our
Town" and in the Shakespeare in
the Park prod uction of' The Tam-
ing of the Shrew" with Morgan
Freeman and Tracey Ullman.
Bu t i t is as Jamie Buchman
that Hunt has come into her own,
leaving viewers mad about her in
me bargain.
Recently fired from her
public relations job, Jamiesharesa
Greenwich Village apartment
See HELEN page 10
Texas' True
Women tells
family's tale
ELPASOJexas(AP)�When
Janice Woods Windle first
stumbled across the cookbook con-
taining the writings of the women
who dominated her family leg-
ends, she was inspired to tell their
stories.
Her whim town tea mod-
estsummary of her ancestors' lives
eventually led to a 10-year quest to
uncover her past. True Woniai, an
acclaimed first novel based on ac-
counts of Windle's family history,
is the result of her expedition.
"This is just one of those
unexpected miracles in life said
Windle, whose normally reserved,
slightly twanged voice almost
bubbles when she mentions the
novel which lias garnered her ac-
colades from critics, noted authors
and even TexasGov.Ann Richards.
The book covers six gen-
erations of Windle's family tree�
spanningmorethan 100 years from
Texas' war of independence to
World War LI � and revolves
around the lives of three women:
See WOMAN page 10





HHPMHHHHKHH
February 24, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
Midnight Cowboy still strong after 25 years
(AFyWnmMidnightCow-
boy opened in 19, it drew atten-
tion because it so boldly went
where nootherstudioreleasedared
to go. Its themes of homosexuality,
hustling and drug use, and its ca-
sual nudity and raw language
madea potentbrew for those times.
Twenty-five years later,
much of what is seen in the Acad-
emy Award-winning movie is per-
ceived as tame: Two decades of
naked bodies, copulating couples
and four-letter words has anesthe-
tized us.
No matter. The painful re-
alism and universality of a human
bond make this a film for all ages.
With joe Buck (John
Voight), a bright-eyed but dim
Texas country boy who hopes to
make his fame and fortune by hus-
tling women in New York, and
"Ratso" Rizzo (Dustin Hoffman),
a gimpv, seedy littlecon man, Brit-
ish director John Schlesinger etches
an uncomfortable and harsh tab-
leau of despairand dashed dreams.
The print made to cel-
ebrate the 25th anniversary of
Midnight Cowboy has been refur-
bished to brighten some of the
watered colors and tone down
some of the scratchiness. The
soundtrack, with Harry Nilsson's
marvelous theme song,
"Everybody's Talkin has been
converted to Dolby Stereo.
There is an almost docu-
mentary quality to it, a gritty but
timeless ride through the 1960s;
downtown bohemia meets Times
Square squalor.
Ratso gives us one of the
earliest portrayals of urban
homelessness, and with Joe, he
shows us the creativity that goes
into day to day survival. It is an
odd coupling, one of those incred-
ible screen friendships that both
touchs and repels us at the same
time.
Schlesinger's pacing al-
lows their friendship to develop
slowly. By the end of the movie,
Joe and Ratso form a special and
lovely bond, one that gives the film
its immense humanity.
Voight has the right bal-
ance between naivete and male
swagger. But he never utters the
obscenities the Joe Bucks of today
use with such abandon.
After leaping to stardom in
The Graduate as the aimless and
pampered Benjamin, Hoffman cre-
ated another character of great di-
mension with Ratso.
There are wonderful sup-
port performances by Brenda
Vacarro as a wild lover and Svlvia
Miles as a brassy Eastside matron
who has an afternoon fling with
Joe. Miles is Joe's first "client
and in a memorable scene, she
gets him to pay her $20 for a cab so
she can meet her husband for din-
ner.
When first released, Mid-
night Cowboy was given an x-rat-
ing by the newly created MPA A's
Rating Board. There's nudity and
drug use, and also love-making
scenes that reveal little and a ho-
mosexual encounter in a movie
theater that focuses on John
Voight's face. The rating was
amended a few years later to R,
reflecting how the times were a-
changing.
The MGM-UA release
was prod uced by Jerome Hellman.
Talent in limbo
Memories of Vietnam War exorcised through art
HANOI, Vietnam (AP)
Through works by American art-
ists, some of them veterans trying
to exorcise demons, Vietnamese
are learning thev were not the only
ones who suffered from the gro-
tesque aberration of war.
A young woman gasped aloud,
her hand tohermouth, upon seeing
"War Baby a mangled black-red
body in the hand of an anguished,
imploring soldier. It was painted
by a Vietnam War protester, Benny
Andrews, who said the war "just
bled into my work
The painting is one of 82 works
in theshow, "AsSeenby BothSides:
American and Vietnamese Artists
LookattheWarTheshow opened
on the faded ochre walls of Hanoi's
National Fine Arts Museum injanu-
102 SALE
ORANGES
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M-Sat 8-6:30 pm
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ary after a widely attended three-
year tour in the United States. "
There are other reminders of the
fighting in the 1960s and 1970s: the
rubble of U.S. bombing, the tail of a
U.S. warplane protruding from a
pond, an Army museum, the air raid
sirens that still daily sound at noon.
Still, dusters of people come to
see theexhibit: veteransof years in the
battlefields, voung couples who spent
days of childhood in bomb shelters,
ki ds who weren' t born when the war
ended. Each paid an admission fee of
about $1, very expensive for most
Vietnamese.
"Just as in the United States, we
need a lot of education about them,
the Vietnamese need to know more
about us said curatorC. David Tho-
mas, a veteran and artist. "Theshow's
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reallv not about war. It's about hu-
manity and the insanity of war, and
the Vietnamese need to see that, too
Almost all the Vietnamese work
wasdoneby veterans. Butmany of the
paintingsweredoneduringthewarto
rally people to the cause, and they
romanticize the conflict. They show
sentimental landscapes, a woman sol-
dier arranging flowers in a trench, a
soldier getting a haircut under the
shade of bamboo trees.
The Vietnamese are the heroes.
By contrast, the American works
are explosions of blood and fire: a
"Napalmed Head" with its searing,
black screams; "Peace a bloody
Christ-like figure hanging from the
blades of a helicopter gunship.
The Vietnamese are thevictims.
Through these works, ordinary
Vietnamese for the first time have
the chance to see the extent to which
a war that their leaders had taught
them to accept was so passionately
andpainfullyrepudiatedbytheother
side.
One recent morning, museum
researcher Nguyen Binh Ninh, 38,
who fled U.S. bombings in her
youth, said she preferred "War
Baby" to a Vietnamese painting dis-
played next to it. In bright colors,
the latter shows a woman soldier
holding up her child, hr.ppy in the
glow of Vietnam's victory.
BRANSON, Mo. (AP) �
Armed with a diploma from a pres-
tigious music school and deep in
debt, Don Correu moved to this
Ozarks music center in October to
find a job as a professional drum-
mer.
Months later, he's still search-
ing for a steady gig.
Correu, 27, works in a conve-
nience store for $6.25 an hour, stock-
ing beer and soda, washing win-
dows and manning the cash regis-
ter. But he hasn't lost sight of his
goal of making it big in America's
new country-music mecca.
"There is potential for being
able to make money here, if you
market yourself right Correu
said. "Anything in this world is
possible. Itdependshowmuchyou
want to struggle
Right now, Correu is definitely
struggling.
Correu (pronounced Cuh-
ROO) graduated in May from the
renowned Berklee College of Mu-
sic in Boston. Trained in jazz and
contemporary music, he figured
Branson and its 30-plus theaters
offered the best chance to launch
his drumming career with a
"name" entertainer�and to help
pay off $40,000 in college loans.
Correu grew up in St. Jo-
seph, Mo and knew of Branson's
reputation as an entertainment
showplace. With theaters featur
ingsuch performers as Mel Till is
Kenny Rogers, Andy William-
and Wayne Newton, and rug-
ged mountain scenery and lakes.
Branson draws 5 million visitors
a year.
"Everybody was talking
about Branson booming, that
there's so much work there as a
musician Correu said as he
wiped fingerprints from the glass
doorsofabeercoolerat the Rapid
Roberts store where he works.
But Correu soon learned the
disheartening truth: Minimum-
wage jobs are plentiful here. Jobs
for musicians are scarce.
His shift over, Correu passes
aMoe Bandy billboard as he walk-
across the street to his weathered
See JOB page 10
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10 The East Carolinian
February 24, 1994
JOB
Continued from page 8
trailer home. Rent is $200 a month
�a steal in Branson, which faces a
desperate shortage of affordable
housing for hundreds of people
like Correu who moved here seek-
ing high-paying jobs, only to settle
for near minimum wage.
He greets his German shep-
herd puppy, Shotzie, changes
out of his pin-striped smock
and begins another full-time
task � trying to find a drum-
ming job with an entertainer
such as Bobby Vinton or Shoji
Tabuchi.
Drummers at the top the-
aters earn around $1,000 a week
for the nine-month tourist sea-
son.
"I hand out business cards
to all the musicians who come
in the store, people who I know
are players on the scene
Correu said. "You've got to do
a lot of talking, a lot of network-
ing
He also attends weekly jam
sessions at area honky-tonks,
where aspiring musicians such
as himself are invited to sit in
for a few songs.
Correu hopes someone from
the theaters is in the audience
and takes note of his talent. So
far, he's met plenty of other mu-
sicians but not many theater
representatives.
Theater officials say they are
inundated with resumes, demo
tapes and videos from would-
be performers from across the
country hoping to land a job.
WOMAN
Continued from page 8
Euphemia Texas Ashby King,
Windle'smatemal great-great-grand-
mother; Bertie Moss King, Windle's
maternal great-grandmother; and
Georgia Lawshe Woods, Windle's
paternal great-grandmother.
Thebookhaditsbegjnninga
decade ago in Windle's attempts to
compile a family cookbook as a wed-
ding gift for her eldest son, Wayne
Windlejr.
She was gathering recipes
when her mother, Virginia Woods,
told her of an oldnotebook containing
recipes and remedies that had been
started by Euphemia King around the
time of the Texas revolution. Thenote-
book sparked something.
"I turned to my mother and
said, t think 111 write a one-page sum-
mary of these women's lives and 451
pages later, here I am Windle said
with a laugh.
Duringadecade,Windleoon-
stantly shuttled back and forth be-
tween El Paso and the family home in
Seguin and other areas featured in the
book to conduct research, assisted by
her mother and others.
Her tripsofteninvolved leav-
ing El Paso after work on a Friday,
spending all weekend digging for his-
tory, returning on Sunday night and
thenextdayresumingherdunesasrhe
head of a multimillion-dollar commu-
nity fund-raising organization.
She found her research hin-
dered by the frequent omissions of
women in the historical records that
shecombedthroughtogleandetailsof
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6. Abba "Dancing Queen
7. Green Day "Welcome to Paradise"
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9. Cracker "No Salt"
10. Gin Blossoms "Found Out About You"
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THE PERILS OF LOVE, SEX
ANDDIGSNTHE
Rarely in human history has a culture been more obsessed with sex
than our society. INDECENT EXPOSURE is a shocking multi-media
expose on the "Sexual Revolution Featuring topics such as Love vs
Infatuation, Pornography, AIDS, and much more.
Date: Thursday Feb. 24,1994
Time: 7:00pm
PldCe: GC 1018 NewLifeChristianFellowship
the past.
The history of the women
had to come from oral history she
said.
She was turned down by
three literary agents, but persevered
because she wanted to avoid the cycle
of rejection often experienced by
unrepresented authors submitting
unsolicited works to publishers.
A search for the agent who
represented Roots author Alex Haley
was unsuccessful, but lead her to an
agent who eventually landed a deal
with G.P. Putnam's Sons.
The narrative is of a story-
teUerpractidnghercraftwhilerecount-
ing events such as Euphemia's flight,
along with 5,000 women and children,
from the Mexican army, and Georgia
HELEN
Woods' plot to kill a Yankeecaptain
who was ferrorLzing her family.
Historical figures likeSam Houston
and Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna,
leader of the Mexican army during
the revolution, are also woven into
the mix.
Thebook'stiflecoinesfrom
a 1868 report to the Texas Recon-
struction convention advising
against giving women the right to
vote because "the good sense of
every True Woman" teaches her
that doing so would be an insult to
their sex by implying they are so
"unwomanly as to desire the privi-
lege
True Women is published
by GP. Putnam's Sons and has a
suggested retail price of $2295.
Continued from page 8
with Paul (Paul Reiser), her docu-
mentary filmmaker-husband of two
years, and their out-to-lunch dog
Murray.
These young marrieds ki ss,
quibble and rush around a lot. They
do their income taxes, visit his fa-
ther in the hospital, fix her sister up
with guys and fight over brownies.
They push each other's buttons like
a kid on an elevator.
Like' "Seinfeld with which
it is sometimes compared, "Mad
About You" is about little things.
But unlike "Seinfeld "Mad About
You" doesn't make a big thing out
of it.
Hunt says that while Reiser
and series co-creator Danny
Jacobson always wanted to stay
small, "my fear was that we would
get bigger and bigger, wackier and
wackier
"Instead, we've stayed true
to our goal, which is to get smaller
and smaller, where we can get into
stickier territory with these two char-
acters, just as you do in a relation-
ship as it goes along.
"Sometimes, we get so
small she adds, smiling, "that
it's almost not there at all
Key to the series is the
goofy, circular exchanges that
could come only from soul-mates
who, before anything is said, al-
ready know what the other means
(even if the viewer doesn't always):
Jaimie: "I'll be home by
the time you're done
Paul: "Well, I don't know
what time I'm gonna be done
Jaimie: "Well, I don't
know what time I'm gonna be
home
AN EVENING WITH PHILOSOPHER,
STORYTELLER,
AND BEST SELLING AUTHOR
Wf�l�
3:00 F.IVI
ar-nr auditorium
JS
e
TICKETS
are on sale at the
Central Ticket Office
located In Mendenhall
Student Center,
East Carolina University:
S5.00 - STUDENTS
S7.50 - ADVANCE
TICKET SALES
SIO.OO - AT THE DOOR
For Information,
esx
ill
757-4788
AUTHOR 0F:
"Maybe - Maybe Not"
"It was on Fire Wr�en I
Lay Down on It"
"Uh-Oh IW"
"All I Really Need to
Know I Learnsd
In Kindergart






The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 11
What's On Tap?
Thursday, Feb. 24
W. Basketball, home
vs. Richmond at 7 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 25
Softball, home
First Annual Invitational
Saturday, Feb. 26
M. Basketball, away
at UNC-Wilmington,
Wilmington, N.C at7:30 p.m.
Baseball, home
vs. Howard (DH), at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 27
W. Basketball, away
at James Madison,
Harrisonburg, V.a at 3 p.m.
Tennis, away
at South Carolina, Columbia,
S.Cat10AM
Baseball, home
vs. Howard, 2 p.m.
Softball, home
First Annual Invitational
The 411
Tuesday, Feb.22
Baseball, away
beat VCU 3-2
Men's'CAA leaders
STANDINGS
Team Conference GBOverall
ODU 9-3 .750 �17-7 .708
JMU 9-3 .750 �16-7 .696
UR 8-4 .667 113-11 .542
UNCW 7-5 .583 214-9 .333
ECU 6-6 .500 314-10 .583
AU 4-8 .333 57-17 .292
GMU 3-9 .250 68-16 .333
W&M 2-10 .167 74-20 .167
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Tim Fudd, AU18.9
Odell Hodge, ODU18.6
Kent Culuko. JMU18.0
Donald Ross, GMU17.6
Clayton Ritter, JMU17.6
Rebounding Avg
David Cully, W&M8.9
Sherif El-Sanadily, UNCW 8.6
Odell Hodge, ODU8.6
Clayton Ritter, JMU7.7
Mike Hedges UR7.5
Assist Avg
Troy Manns, GMU6.2
Kevin Swann, ODU5.0
Kevin Larkin, ODU4.9
David Cox, W&M4.6
Curtis McCants, GMU4.4
Field Goal
Clayton Ritter, JMU.638
Anton Gllll, ECU.576
Odell Hodge, ODU.542
Kevin Swann, ODU.532
Kass Weaver, UR.531
Free Throw
Kent Culuko, JMU.934
Lester Lyons, ECU.843
Petey Sessoms, ODU.812
Matt Verkey, W&M.806
Mike Jones, ODU.803
3-pt Field Goal
Kent Culuko, JMU.469
Corey Stewart, UNCW.450
Darren McLinton, JMU.449
Darryl Franklin, AU.430
Skipp Schaefbauer, ECU .425
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
Old Dominion10.0
James Madison47
East Carolina4.6
Richmond3.0
UNC-Wilmington1.3
American-7.1
George Mason-7.2
William & Mary-9.4
Rebounding Margin
UNC-Wilmington4.9
East Carolina2.8
Old Dominion2.1
Richmond3.0
George Mason0.0
James Madison-1.2
American-2.3
William & Mary-3.5
Field Goal
James Madison50.7
UNC Wilmington45.6
Old Dominion45.6
Richmond45.6
William & Mary43.7
East Carolina43.4
American41.8
George Mason41.7
Def. Field Goal
Old Dominion43.4
UNC Wilmingon43.6
East Carolina43.9
Richmond45.3
James Madison45.5
William & Mary46.4
George Mason46.7
American48.6
Compiled by Brad Oldham
Pirates put clamps on Rams again
Photo by Mary North Davis
Centerfielder Jamie Borel went one-for-four with an RBI yesterday. The
game marked the beginning of a 27-game homestand.
Tae Kwon Do
club takes exams
By Cedric Van Buren
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Tae
Kwon Do Club, in conjunction
with Byung Lee's Tae Kwon
Do, sponsored a Tae Kwon Do
exhibition and black belt exam
this past Saturday.
Members of the East Caro-
lina Tae Kwon Do Cl ub partici-
pated well and gave the crowd
of around three hundred some-
thing very exciting to watch.
To the audience it was just ka-
rate, but to the testing black
be'ts, it has become a way of
life.
Each testing black belt was
put through grueling tests con-
sisting of everything from dif-
ferent forms, live contact, self-
defense, breaking wood and
centerblocks, to answering
questions from an array of
judges.
If the black belts were suc-
cessful at passing their tests,
then they would earn their first-
degree black belts.
The night was full of ex-
citement.
The two parts most fans
The Tae
Kwon Do
Club is just
one of many
clubs that
ECU offers.
To get
involved just
contact the
Recreation
Dept. in
Christenbury.
Photo by
Cedric Van
Buren
enjoyed themost were thespar-
ring and breaking exhibitions.
The sparring was very exciting
because in each match the test-
ing black belts had to spar
against non-testing black belts.
The action was very heated and
lightning quick.
The breaking was very ex-
citing because students got to
see someone about the same
size as the average student
break through four or five
centerblocks.
A lot of talent was dis-
played in this area; one testing
black belt from an area high
school broke a board while do-
ing a flip in the air.
In order to get a full feeling
of this Tae Kwon Do exhibition
one must first know the true
purpose of this Korean art.
Tae Kwon Do means
"hand, foot art" or "art of the
hand and foot This is the defi-
nition of Tae Kwon Do, but
Master Byung Leemakes it
plainer when he says that "Tae
Kwon Do is not learning how
to win a fight, but rather to win
against oneself not against oth-
ers.
Jordan passes up boxing offer
u
(AP)�Michael Jordan is con-
centrating on hitting these days.
Baseballs, not punching bags.
Jordan said he's not interested
in boxing promoter Dan Duva's
offerof$15mil- �����1
lion to fight the
E v a n d e r
Holyfield-
Michael
Moorer winner
for the world
heavyweight
title.
The former
Chicago Bulls
superstar is try-
I would like to
offer Michael the
ultimate
individual sports
challenge
ing to make a second career in base-
ball, taking batting cage swings
with the Chicago White Sox in
Sarasota, Fla.
When told of Duva's offer, pre-
sented to his agent David Falk in a
letter, Jordan laughed it off.
"Yeah, where are my gloves?"
Jordan asked. "I wouldn't fight
those guys if I had a gun in my
hand. No way. That's crazy
������ But Duva
said the proposal
was on the level.
"This offer is
not a joke. We are
100 percent seri-
ous Duva said.
"ItseemsthatMr.
Jordan loves the
challenge of
proving he is the
best, regard! essof
Dan Duva
Boxing Promoter
the sport. I would like to offer
Michael the ultimate individual
sport challenge, an opportunity to
fight for the heavyweight champi-
See JORDAN page 14
By Steve
Staff Writer
Lienert
The Pirates completed a home
and home series sweep of the
Rams of Virginia Commonwealth
Uni versi ty by defea ting them yes-
terday at Harrington Field 6-1.
"We knew the winner of
yesterday's game would be the
catalyst today, and our kids went
out and tried to put them away
early head coach Gary Overton
said.
It was the excellent pitching
of Mike Sanburn coupled with
some timely two-out, two-strike
hitting by Chad Triplett (two RBIs)
and Jamie Borel (RBI, SB) that pro-
pelled the Pirates.
The frosty, rainy, overcast day
did nothing to slow down the Pi-
rate attack as they scored early
and often, with three runs in
thesecond inning, two runs in the
third, and another run in the fourth.
Scott Bermingham scored twice
and Jason Head added another
RBI to lead ECU to the win.
Sanburn had a no-hitter
through 4 13 innings, and gave
up only four hits throughout the
game. ,
He struck out the side in the
fifth, giving him four strikeouts
with only one walk for the game.
The Pirates also threw some
leather at the Rams. Third
baseman Rick Britton and short-
stop Chad Puckett combined for
nine pu touts, some of which killed
a few Ram rallies.
VCU starter Michael Henke
had some control problems early
on, throwing two wild pitches that
led to two Pirate runs. Addition-
ally, the Pirates also stole on him
with relative ease.
Four different Pira tes had sto-
len bases, setting themselves up
in scoring position and executing
perfectly Coach Overton's aggres-
sive style of play.
The Rams only run of the day
came after a 30-minute rain delay
before the start of the seventh
VCU appeared pumped up com-
ing out of the delay, feeling that
the game was not yet out of hand.
Sanburn, who had already
thrown 97 pitches, was a little er-
ratic , giving up a single and
double to consecutive VCU hit-
ters.
ECU's coaches were con-
cerned about a Ram comeback,
but were soon relieved when
Sanburn settled down to retire
the side and kept ECU's lead
atfive.
Sanburn got the win for the
Pirates, while Henke took the loss
for the Rams.
The win was East Carolina's
fourth in a row, while VCU fell to
1-2, with both losses coming at
the hands of the Pirates.
ECU adds three new coaches
(SID) � Jim Fleming, Cliff
Yoshida and Willie Scott have
joined the Fast Carolina University
football coaching staff, school offi-
cials announced Tuesday.
Fleming, 34, will coach the out-
side linebackers, Yoshida, 54, will
coach the defensive line, and Scott,
35, will coach the tight ends.
The three new coaches will re-
place Bob Babich, who left ECU to
join the football staff at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, ChrisThurmond
and Theo Lemon, who have to pur-
sue other business interests.
"These three coaches are expe-
rienced teachers and proven
coaches said Pirate coach Steve
Logan. "I couldn't be more pleased
with that these group of men have
joined us
Jim Fleming comes to East
Carolina after spending last season
at Brown University as defensive
coordinator. Before joining the staff
of the Ivy League school, Fleming
was the defensive coordinator for
three seasons at Boise State Univer-
sity.
Fleming's Boise State's de-
fenses led the Big Sky Conference
in scoring defense in 1990 while
advancing to the NCAA Division I-
AA playoffs. His 1991 defense
ranked first in the Big Sky in all
major statistical categories and fin-
ished first nationally in rushing
defense. In 1992, the Broncos led
the league in forced turnovers.
Prior to coming to Boise State,
Fleming served as a gradua te assis-
tant coach for two years at the Uni-
versity of South Carolina, working
the Gamecocks' wide receivers.
A1982 graduate of the Univer-
sity of the South, Fleming and his
wife, Leslie, have three children,
Jimmy, Will and Kate.
A 24-year college coaching vet-
eran, Cliff Yoshida joins the Pirate
staff after serving as defensive co-
ordinatoratSouthern University at
Baton Rouge, La. last season. Be-
fore joining thejaguar staff, Yoshida
spent six years at Wake Forest Uni-
versity (1987-92), and six years at
Virginia Tech (1981-86), coaching
thedefensive line, under head coach
Bill Dooley.
While at Virginia Tech, Yoshida
played a key role in a Hokie de-
fense that ranked among the na-
tional leaders in both rushing and
scoring defense. His most well-
known pupil during that time was
BruceSmith, the 19840utland Tro-
phy winner, and the number one
pick in the 1985 NFL Draft by the
Buffalo Bills, his current team.
Yoshida was also an assistant
coach at Duke for three seasons
(1978-80) and Wake Forest for five
seasons (1973-77). He was the de-
fensivecoordinator for each of those
seasons with the exception of the
1974 campaign, where he coached
the defensive line.
The 1963 graduate of Cal Poly
Pitino suspends players
(AP) � Kentucky coach Rick
Pitino did not find any humor in
learning that three of his players
wereinvolved ina free-throwswap-
ping scheme against Vanderbilt.
"They thought it was funny
after the game, but it's anything but
funny Pitino said Tuesday. "And
now they look at it and don't think
it's funny
The players � guard
Travis Ford, center Gimel Martinez
and forward JaredPrickett�were
hit with one-game suspensions.
They will not travel with the sev-
enth-ranked Wildcats to play at Ten-
nessee tonight.
"I would rather go to Tennes-
see knowing that we did the right
thing than to go down there just
thinking about winning or losing
Pitino said.
The players were not aval lable
for comment.
"This type of behavior cannot
be tolerated from a Kentucky
ballplayer Pitino said. "It's im-
portant that all the kids that look up
to Kentucky players as role models
understand that they made a mis-
take, a spontaneous mistake.
"These three menareoutstand-
ing young men who work very,
very hard, but they made a mis-
take
Ford is averaging 12pointsand
6.3 assists and Prickett averages 8.6
points and 7.1 rebounds, and both
are starters. Martinez averages 7.1
points and 2.8 rebounds.
The Southeastern Conference
also admonished the officiating
crew of Don Rutledge, Kerry Sitton
and Gerald Boudreaux on Tues-
day, after a review of tapes and
reports from Saturday's game at
Nashville, Term.
"Although this was a correct-
able error, the game officials did
not recognize the error during the
correctable time period accord-
ing to an SEC news release from its
Birmingham, Ala office. "It has
been stressed totheofficiatingcrew
that although it was an inadvertent
error, their administration of the
free throws was unacceptable
The conference said "correc-
tive action will be taken with this
officiating crew by the conference
office to ensure that errors of this
nature do not reoccur
Ford had acknowledged that
players who were fouled in the 77-
69 victory over Vanderbilt allowed
another player with a better free-
throw percentage to go to the line in
their place, apparently when offi-
cials were confused about who
should shoot.
Pitino said he called Vanderbilt
coach Jan van Breda Kolff and
apologized for the incident, and
that both agreed the free throws
didn't influence the outcome of the
game.
"We built this program over
the last five years where we believe
there is solid integrity � winning
and losing the correct way Pitino
said.
On one occasion late in the
See KENTUCKY page 14
File Photo
Bob Babich
Pomona entered the coaching
ranks in 1970 as an assistant coach
at Utah State University, where
he coached for three seasons. Fol-
lowing college graduation,
Yoshida served five years with
the U.S. Marine Corps, attaining
the rank of captain, and also
helped coach the Quantico Ma-
rine squad in 1969.
Yoshida has a son, Chris, a
junior at Wake Forest.
Willie Scott joins the Pirate
coaching staff after working as a
graduate assistant on the Univer-
sity of South Carolina staff last
season.
A 1981 graduate of South
Carolina and a standout tight end
See COACHES page 14
Bucs stun
VCU in 12
innings
(VC SID)�In a pitch-
ers' dual from start to fin-
ish on Tuesday, the Pirates
of East Carolina scored the
go ahead and eventual
winning run on a sacrifice
fly by first basemen Brian
Yerys in the top of the
twelth inning, scoring
leftfielder Jason Head,
who had reached on a
walk.
Erik Sauve led the way
for the Rams, going 3-3 on
the day with an RBI double
that scored leftfielder
Larry Porter in the sixth,
to tie the game at one
apiece.
VCU starting pitcher
Mike Ketterman pitched
into the 10th inning, al-
lowing just two runs in a
strong early season out-
ing.
East Carolina's Head
had a strong day for the
Pirates, as he went 4-5 at
the plate, with an RBI.
East Carolina reliever
Johnny Beck got the win
in relief, while VCU re-
liever Tommy Nuckols
took the loss.
ECU would prevail
again yesterday against
VCU 6-1.
.���





z
12 The East Carolinian
February 24. 1994
Radinsky sidelined
(AP) � While the fans flocked
to see Michael Jordan hit, the Chi-
cago White Sox focused on a player
who wasn't on the field.
On Tuesday, the team an-
nounced thatrelieverScott Radinsky
likely will miss the season while un-
dergoing treatment to prevent the
spread of Hodgkin's disease.
- Radinsky, 25, had a malignant
lymph node removed from his neck
Monday. He has returned home to
California to begin chemotherapy
and radiation treatments that could
last six to eight months.
"The cure rate on this type of
cancer is 80 to90 percent White Sox
general manager Ron Schueler said.
"Thedoctorsare real optimistic. They
think he will be fine and even to the
point that hell be weakened by all
this treatment, but at times will be
able to do little physical therapy to
keep his muscle structure up
The attention at Ed Smith Sta-
dium in Sarasota, Fla was on Jor-
dan, who faced major league pitch-
ing for the first time.
Jordan saw 30 pitches from Jose
DeLeon and took 16 of them. He
bunted twice and swing 12 times,
fouling off four.
Of the eight balls Jordan put in
play, one was hit well to left-center
and one was lined over DeLeon.
Jordan took all four curveballs from
DeLeon, and also broke his bat on a
grounder.
"I was very happy with the way
I stood in there Jordan said. "I
didn't think I stepped out. I stayed
withmy strideand everything. Isaw
the ball very well and was very
pleased with it
At Clearwater, Ha Philadel-
phia pitcher Curt Schilling left a
workout after straining a muscle
while running. The Phillies expected
Schilling, MVP of the NL playoffs,
would be able to pitch today in
practice.
"It doesn't appear to be any-
thing significant team physician
Dr. Phillip Marone said after exam-
ining Schilling's injured left
Conferences on verge of change
quadricep. "It'sa first-degreestrain,
with that being the mildest form.
He'll cut out his running for a while
and we'll evaluate him each day
At Scottsdale, Ariz Oakland
outfielder Rickey Henderson did
not hurt himself. Then, again,
Henderson is not yet in camp.
Athletics manager Tony La
Russa said he expects Henderson to
be in camp Thursday, when the full
team is due. In the past, Henderson
has paid attention to the mandatory
reporting date (March 2 this year)
rather than the voluntary date.
"I talked to Rickey last week
and I think there's an excellent
chance that he will be here Thurs-
day La Russa said. "After talking
to him, I'd be disappointed if he
wasn't here.
"If Rickey is here on Thursday,
that would besignificant La Russa
said. "He's always been a March
arrival. But he knows that on this
club, our veteran everyday players
have to step forward
At Fort Lauderdale, Ha New
York Yankees outfielder Danny
Tartabull said his arm will be ready
by mid-March. Tartabull delayed
offseason should er surgery�some
said because he had cosmetic sur-
gery �displeasing New York offi-
cials.
"I could pick up and fire a ball
right now he said. "1 don't want
to. I want to make sure my arm is
strong April 4. Probably the middle
of spring training I'll be full strength.
That's what spring training is for
At Melbourne, Fla Marlins re-
liever Joe Klink was released from
the hospital, but was to return to-
day for a stress test as doctors try to
determine what caused him chest
pains.
Marlins trainer Larry Starr said
other tests the past two days indi-
cate Klink's condition is improv-
ing. He was admitted to the hospi-
tal Sunday after he felt tightness in
his chest and had troublebreathing
during a workout. Klink, 32, is out
for an indefinite period.
(AP) � The I3ig Southwest? The
Big 12? The Big Eight and Southwest
Four?
Some sort of new name may be
needed if Southwest Conference
sdioolsTexas,TexasA&M,TexasTech
and Baylor accept reported offers to
join the Big Eight to form one big
made-for-televison conference.
Many newspapers published sto-
ries today saying the offer was on the
table.
"We've had some informal con-
versations University ofTexaspresi-
dent Robert Berdahl told The Associ-
ated Press Monday night from his
Austin home. "I guess one could say
that it amounts to (an offer)
The fourschooLs reportedly must
decide by Friday whether to head
north,amovethatlikelywouldciipple
the nearly 80-year-old SWC.
Officials for Baylor, Texas and
Texas A&M say they'll meet later this
week to discuss proposals. There was
no immediate word on plans for a
meeting by Texas Tech regents.
TheSWCwouldbe hard-pressed
to survive with only Southern Meth-
odist, TexasChrisfJan, Rice andHous-
ton. Those four reportedly were told
by the Big Eight in a conference call
Monday that they will not be invited.
A Big Fight expansion involving
Texas, A&M, Tech and Baylor would
put the league in a better position to
negotiate a television contract � the
original reason the twoleaguesbegan
bilking about getting together.
Talks sped up the last several
weeks once it became obvious there
was no way to continue any form of
the College Football Association, the
affiliation of conferences that negoti-
ated the current television deal that
expires after the 1995- season.
With the breakup of theCFA, the
SWC and Big Eight are doing what
they can to wrangle the most lucrative
contract possible beginning with the
1996-97 season, officials said. The first
step may be forming a new confer-
ence, then negotiating TV deals with
the networks.
At this point, officials are tight-
lipped about what exactly is going on
between the conferences.
"Wehaven'tgotanyfirmarrange-
mentsyet'ColoradochancellorJames
Corbridge, president of the Associa-
tion of Big Eight Universities, told the
AP late Monday from his Boulder,
Colo home.
"We've got feelers out and we're
waiting to see what the position is in
the Southwest Conference
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February 24. 1994
The East Carolinian 13
Williams may lose eyesight
(AP)�Doctors sayit'stooearly
to predict if Ted Williams will suffer
permanent eyesight damage from a
recent stroke, but they're confident
he'll regain strength lost in this left
side.
"He's still very alert and has
been sitting up, talking and joking
around a lot Daniel Moore, a hos-
pital spokesman said. "The physi-
cians are encouraged by hisattitude
The Hall of Famer remained in
fair condition Tuesdav. Officials at
Shands Hospital said there were
some signs of overall improvement
in the former Boston Red Sox star.
Moore said Williams, 75, has a
limited field of vision but stressed he
had not lost his sight completely.
Williams was treated at Shands two
years ago for a mild stroke.
Amongthefriendsand fanswho
have called to wish Williams well
are former heavyweight boxing
champion Muhammad Ali and Los
Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy
Lasorda.
Williams was admitted to Cit-
rus Memorial Hospital on Saturday
after his mild stroke at home in
nearby Hernando. He was trans-
ferred Monday from Citrus Memo-
rial to Shands.
Williams, the last major leaguer
to hit .400 for an entire season, un-
derwent surgery on his neck to clear
a blockage in a carotid artery in early
1992. The procedure was to prevent
future strokes.
Panthers still on the prowl for Gibbs
(AP)�The Carolina Panthers
aren't looking at anyone else right
now as a coach except Joe Gibbs,
according to the team's owner.
"We aren't out seeking any
information about any (other)
coaches Jerry Richardson said
Monday, the same day the NFL's
other expansion team, the Jackson-
ville Jaguars, hired its first coach in
Boston College coach Tom
Coughlin.
"Our first choice is to get an
opportunity to talk to Joe Gibbs
Richardson said.
The Panthers are awaiting a
ruling on Gibbs' availability from
NFL Commissioner Paul
Tagliabue, who is in the process of
answering the club's request for a
clarification of Gibbs' contractual
status with the Washington
Redskins.
Greg Aiello, the league's di-
rector of communications, said to-
day he expected Tagliabue would
reach a decision before the college
draft in AprilWe would certainly
anticipate a decision before that
but it's doubtful it would be this
week Aiello said. "I'm sure ev-
eryone feels a certain amount of
urgency in the matter
Montross upset about teen-ager's death
(AP) � The teen-ager suffering
from cancer who was befriended by
North Carolina center Eric Montross
has died.
Jason Clark, 16, died at his home
in Durham on Monday. He was dis-
charged from UNC Hospitals at 6
p.m. Monday, a hospital spokesper-
son said.
He had been readmitted to the
hospital last month after doctors dis-
covered more tumors throughout his
body.
"The cancer started in his stom-
ach,butitspreadsaid Brent Weston,
Clark's physician. "It moved incred-
ibly fast. There wasnothingthatcould
be done
Montross met Clark while
Montross was making a visit to the
pediatric unit at UNC Hospitals in
November.
Clark suffered from Burkirt's
lvmphoma, a form of cancer that at-
tacks the stomach. Although experi-
mental drugs stalled the cancer last
fall, more rumors appeared.
Clark's mother called Montross
Monday night.
Steve Kirschner told Vw Heraki-
SunofDurluvn. "He just walked in and
told us. Eric knows, he just doesn't
want to talk about it"
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Jacksonville plucks Coughlin from Eagles
(AP) � Boston College coach
Tom Coughlin agreed to coach the
Jacksonville Jaguars because of the
unique opportunity" "of establish-
ing a team from the ground up
'This is once in a lifetime op-
portunity Coughlin said Monday
at a news conference.
"I'm very excited about being
named the Jaguars head coach. I
have studied the opportunity in
great depth and look forward to the
challenges of establishing a team
from the ground upCoughlinsaid,
adding he was offered the job Sat-
urday morning and accepted i tSun-
day afternoon.
Terms of Coughlin's contract
were not revealed, although the
Boston Globe reported Monday that
Coughlin will receive $4 million
over five years, making him the
highest paid rookie coach in NFL
history.
"Wehave a long-term commit-
ment to Tom Coughlin and his lead-
ership for our Jaguars said team
president David Seldin, who de-
clined commentonCoughlin'scon-
tract.
Coughlin said he will move to
Jacksonville as soon as he can finish
his work at Boston College. He said
it is a "good possibility" he may
hire some of his current assistant
coaches to work with the Jaguars.
Coughlin held assistant coach-
ing jobs with the NFL's Philadel-
phia Eagles, Green Bay Packers and
New York Giants before going to
Boston College. Last year, he turned
dowTi an offer to coach the Giants.
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14
The East Carolinian
February 24, ! 994
Olsons Trivia Quiz
Q. In 1993 the CAA baseball conference
was ranked what in the nation?
�saDusiaJUCO jsaMifjnog put? majseaq:jnos 'JJV atppuiipq q-pnoj v
The East Carolinian is now taking applications
for Sports' writers. A Journalism major is not a
requirement There will be a mandatory
meeting today at at 5:30.
JORDAN
onship of the world
"While this idea might seem
crazy, remember, in the 60's
Muhammad h and Wilt Cham-
berlain were dose to finalizing ar-
rangements tor Wilt to challenge
Ah tor the world heavyweight
championship. The deal fell apart
when Ali not Wilt backed out
Duva said.
Duva said the proposed bout
would take place this November in
KENTUCKY
Las Vegas. Along with a guaran-
teed $15 million, 1 uva said Jordan
could negotiate for a percentage of
the gross revenue which, the pro-
moter claimed, could be worth a
over $25 million.
Duva is 1 lolyfield's promoter.
Holyfield and Moorer will fight
April 22 in Las Vegas for the IBI
and WBA title belts.
1 loh field, in Detroit on a pro-
motional tour tor the tight, kidded
Continued from page 11
Jordan.
"Idon'twanttobeat up Michael
i rdan because I like him. Frankly,
I'd rather tight Shaq (Shaquille
O'Neal) Holyfield said.
ordan, 6-foot-6 and about 200
pounds, did not get into many
scuffles in his NBA career. But he
was suspended for one game and
fined $10,000 after a fight with
Indiana's Reggie Miller last Febru-
game Martinez (SO.5 percent) shot
free throws even though Prickett
(54.9 percent) had been fouled.
Pitino said lie was told ot the
switch at a team meeting Monday
night
"1 lewasreallv upset forward
left" Brassow said. "It was probably
the most upset that I've seen him
Martinez's free throws came
with 2:44 left in the game. He made
one ot t w o to gi e Kentucky a 63-55
lead.
lord confirmed to a television
reporter alter the game that he set
up another sw a p when he motioned
Waiter McCarty (51.2 percent) to
shoot for Andre Riddick (31.8 per-
cent). McCarty made both to give
Kentucky at 3-47 lead with 6:26
Continued from page 11
left. .
Neither McCarty nor Riddick
received sanctions
"(McCarty) told me he didn't
know whether he was fouled on
theplav, TitinosaidHedidnot
know he was not shooting. He
thought he was the shooter be-
cause he was told that (by Ford).
Riddick didn't know it either
COACHES
Continued from page 11
with the Gamecocks, Scott enjoyed
a stellar career in the National Foot-
ball League. Scott was the 14th
playersekcted inthe 1981 NFL Draft
btheKansasCitChiefs.Heplayed
for the Chiefs for five seasons be-
fore finishing his career in 184 af-
ter a three-vear stay with the New
England Patriots.
i ollowing his retirement
from professional football, Scott
served one year on the coaching
staff at Newberry College. In 1992,
Scott worked as the assistant
ticket manager at Sou th Carolina.
Scott is man ied to the former
Mamie Martin of Columbia.
With these changes ind the
announcement of Faul lette as
defensive coordinator earlier this
month, the coaching staff foi the
1494 Pirates is as follows:
Steve Logan, Head Coach
Todd Berry, Offensive Coor-
dinator Running Backs
Paul lette, DefensiveCoordi-
nator Inside Linebackers
Jim Fleming, Outside Line-
backers
Dale Steele, Assistant Wad
Coach
left Jagodinski, Offensive
Line
Doug Martin, Wide Receiv-
ers
Chuck Pagano, Defensive
Backs
Willie Scott, Tight Ends
CliffYoshida, Defensive Line
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 24, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 24, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.994
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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