The East Carolinian, February 17, 1994






Comics
Pirate Comics there, Sweetbuns!
A new installment of Fun and
Games, a big Yeti in Nick O'Time,
and the sort of return of Wang TV.
Consult page 6 of this issue for
further enlightenment.
Lifestyle
Rebels With Artistic Causes
The results of the 1994
Rebel literary and art
competition are in. See
story on page 7.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 12
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, February 17,1994
12 Pages
Ruptured water line leaves some high and dry
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
Water, water everywhere,
but not a drop to drink. Not even
at the hospital. Greenville resi-
dents awoke Tuesday to find low
water pressure and a I looded Me-
morial Drive after a 10-inch wa-
ter main ruptured, threatening
the eitv's water supply.
The pipe broke around 7:15
a.m washing away a section of
Memorial Drive at the intersec-
tion of N.C. Highway 33 and
Highway ll.TheGreenville Utili-
ties Commission shut oft a sec-
ond water line in order to make
repairs, causing a water shortage
to PittCountv Memorial Hospi-
tal.
The ECU School of Medi-
cine was largely unaffected by
the water line break, said Tom
United Way
serves local
community
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
Greenville may not have the
num ber of problems that largeci tics
such as Washington, DC, or even
Charlotte. N.C but our i itv dix's
haveitsshareof calamities that mem-
bers of the community mast deal
with each day. Fortunately, pro-
grams exist aimed specifically at al-
leviating or eliminating such hard-
ships.
The United Way and its mem-
ber agencies form a partnership to
serve the community.
"The United Way works with
our member agencies to problem-
solve, to promote non-duplicated
services that meet the needs of the
people saidGregg Allinson, direc-
tor of the United Way of I'ittCounh-
Community Services.
"The 33 member-agencies are
loosely divided into categories,
based on the needs they meet he
said. "In order to join the United
Way, agencies must meet a need
that is not being met by another
member
The United Way is run by five
paid employees and a team of vol-
unteers. These volunteers decide it
applicants are meeting required cri-
teria, review budgets and ensure
fundsarespent effect! v eh 'for a cross-
section of sen ices, acc tiding ti bi th
Allinsmandl993campaigncohair
John FerrenThe United Way has
admitted only two agencies in the
last three or four years Allinson
said. "Anybody can apply,but few
agencies are accepted "The pro-
cess for acceptance includes a Strin-
gentlist of criteria becauseof limited
resources Ferren said.
"New agencies equal greater
needs, but the 34 agencies can only
deal with so many problems he
added. "Othercommunity agencies
must meet the needs that the U ni ted
Way cannot Youth agencies, like
the Boys and (. iris Club and Project
Sunsh i ne, meet the need s of the chil-
dren of PittCountv.
Programs such as Picaso, for
HIV-positive Pitt County reader's,
and Meals On Wheels, tor
housebound elderlv residents, serve
specific needs of the Pitt County
community.
The Red Cross and the Salva-
tion Army help meet the
community's basic emergency
needs, while the Rl AlrisisC enter
and mental health center provide
education for the ictimsand survi
vors ol sun ui and mental htalth
afflictions
Former, director ol MedicalC en-
ter news and information.
"We didn't tare too badlv
Fortner said. "From our stand-
point at the Med School, it was
metre of an inconvenience
Fort tier said that water pres-
sure for the Brody Building was
low and employees were asked
to conserve water. "We noticed
that the water fountains didn't
have their usual pressure, he
said. "We were also asked not to
flush the toilets or get water from
the water fountains.
"Had it gone on tor much
longer, we would have had a se-
rious problem Fortner said.
"We do have a plan for when the
water shuts down, but fortu-
nately we didn't have to use it
The Medical School was not
the only part of ECU that experi-
enced water problems fuesday.
Low pressure was repotted on
Main Campus, and some build-
ings were without water com-
pletely,
"We had very low pressure
in some of the high-rise dorms,
and also in some of the older
buildings on campus said Ricky
Hill, manager ot the facilities
Service Center.
"We also had a report that
the Whichard Building had no
water at all I lill said. "I can't
viv that it was actually out; it
might have been that it was so
low that someone thought it was
out
Repairs to the water line
were completed by 12 p.m. on
Tuesday, but water pressure was
slow to return to normal levels
Hill said Main Campus was back
to full pressure by 2 p.m. but
pressure in the Medical School
did not return to normal until
Wednesday.
Pitt Memorial Hospital
fared much worse in the ordeal
than most of the city.
Fire trucks shuttled in 1,200
to 2,000 gallons of water at a time
and the Greenville Fire-Rescue
Department pumped 1,000 gal-
lons a minute into the hospital's
water system after it lost all wa-
ter pressure.
Some elective surgery was
affected by the lack of water, but
most other operations in the hos-
pital continued as usual, said Sue
Bizzaro, spokesperson for the
( reenville Utilities Commission.
During the six hours in
which the hospital was shut off
from the city's water supply, it
received an estimated 330,000
gallons ot water. Pitt Memorial
uses an estimated 200 to 300 gal-
lons ot water a minute.
Commuter1- in northeastern
( iteenville had other problems
on their ride to work, as the rup-
ture caused two southbound
lanes o! Memorial I )riv e to col-
lapse, closing the road completely
for se eral hours.
"It was like a gevser com
ing up out ot the road Bizzaro
said. " I he IK M 1 lepartment of
transportation losed the road
early in the morning, soon alter
the- road ollapsed
1 he Greenville Police I e
partmenl reported that Memo-
rial reopened to traffic Wednes-
day, however the road will re-
quire extensive repairs.
A loo loot section of the
highway will probablj need to
be replai ed, a DO man
said.
What
hams!
Children at
the Little
Willie
Center,
located at
807 West
Fifth St
apparently
hate getting
their pictures
taken. Cant
you tell?
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
Departmental Profile
School of Business offers five separate majors
By Tina Chiwona
Staff Writer
"ECU'sSchool ot Business
is the second-oldest and con-
tinuously credited in the state
of NX at both the graduate
and undergraduate level said
Dr. Robert Schellenberger,
C hair of the Decision Science
department. The oldest School
ot Business is UNC-Chapel 1 lill.
I hesc liool of business has
five departments: Accounting,
Decision Scieni e, Finance, Man-
agement and Marketing. " The
accounting department has the
largest number ot majors said
Larry Hagler, Chair ot the Ac-
counting department. There are
three types of programs avail-
able in this field. The Bachelor of
Science in Business Administra-
tion (BSBA) is a four-year pro-
gram with a concentration in
management accounting, for stu-
dents who do not intend of re-
ceive professional certification,
such as that of a certified public
accountant (CP A).
I he Bachelor of Science
Master of Science in accounting
(BSAMSA) is a combined five-
year program, and a student re-
ceives both degrees when the re-
quirements ot the program have
been achieved. The third program
is the master of science in ac-
counting (MSA).
The MSA is for students
who received an undergradu-
ate degree in a field other that
accounting or accounting it-
self Hagler said. Hagler em-
phasized that the program a
student studies is dependent
upon their aptitude.
"It's simply that some
people can do well in math-
ematics and others cannot he
said. "We try to be flexible and
do what's best for the student.
We see what their career goal
and objectives are
Decision Science is the
See PROFILE page 3
If you don't run, ROTC can't dance
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
ECU's Army ROTC is hop-
ing to attract more than 300
Greenvilk residents, students,
faculty, Creeks and even a lew
military units tor the first annual
k race sponsored In I CU's mili-
tary si ience department.
' 1 his is a picturesque part
of town said Sgt. Rodney
I low aril, coordinator ot the
event. "Normally races are at the
commons or at the Piratelub
. this is a new track tor them
Pre registration costs $10.
Registration begins at 9:30 a.m.
on the iLi ol the ra e and will
i ost Sill hree ra� - w ill set male.
female and team runners aparl
Men will begin at 11 a.m women
at 11:30 and teams run .it noon.
Teams consist of three to five run-
ners.
"You could even bring out
a sorority or fraternity and run as
a cooperate team 1 lovvard said.
All runners w ill receivea 1 -
shirt tor their participation. Prizes
will be awarded to the top three
males and females, top two male
and female EC I tat ultyand staff,
top two male ,n. female ECL
students, top two male and fe-
male ECU alumni and tin1 top
two corporate teams. Runners
will win gift certificatesand other
merchandise rather than the tra
ditiimal tiiphies
"You'll notice that they ath
letesdon'1 normal!) puttrophies
use w ate" from the large tanks
located on Greenville Boule-
vard (with the Pirate painted
on it)and on 14thStreet in place
ol the normal water pumps.
She said the tanks were almost
empty by the time the water
mam was repaired.
Bizzaro said that out of
20,000 customers, no one was
without water completely. "We
did ask customers to curtail
water usage luesday morn-
ing A number of ECU stu-
dents reported water shortages
lor several hours Tuesday,
however.
Maureen Rich, resident ol
Wedgewood .Arms Apartments
near Redbanks Road, said she
did not have water between 11
a.m. and 12 p.m. "I'm not sure
how lone it was off, but it defi-
Bizzaro said the cit) had to niteb was off completely
Bands play for
homeless cause
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
I hi Kapp i Psi, the
group Bad Brains
Greenville's homeless shelter
have in common? Apparently a
lot. The cold weather we suffered
last month caused Greenville's
homeless shelter to keep doors
open 24 hours a day. Phi Kappa
Psi is sponsoring a fund-raiser to
help pay the shelter's electric bill,
said Rommi I hrozdov, director of
theGreem illeCommunity Shel-
ter.
Pipe will open tor .n
Brains Thursday night at the At-
tic. Greenville's homeless shelter
will receive a donation from tii ket
sales and all proceeds generated
by shirts being sold attheevent
by Pin Kappa Psi, said Chris War-
ren, president of Phi Kappa Psi.
"We had been looking tor
ways to hav e fund-raisers our
problem is a lack ot stall
Drodov said. "When they (Pi
Kappa Phi) approached us and
said they were going to take care
of everything, it was great new s
to us
Phi Kappa Psi is sponsor-
ing the fund-raiser, known as
Cool-aid, as part of their annual
celebration.
" 1 he 19th is our founder's
day celebration Warren said.
re . . trying to help out
someone in the ommunity
Fhe fraternity has been
seeking endorsements from
Greenville area businesses to
CO er the cost of printing shirts,
Warren said. All proceeds will
then be given to the shelter.
The Attic will open at 9 p.m.
ITiursday. Phi Kappa Psi is
hoping to raise $700.
Alternative music is
the way to go around here
Warren said. "We're expecting
to sell the place the Attic j out
Kelly Ray, operations
manager tor the shelter, is look-
ing forward to seeing the show.
Raj and Drodov will both be
present to hear the alternative
sounds ol Bad Brains. They are
also very grateful to Pi Kappa
Phi for all ot their effort in the
project.
"I've been really im-
pressed with the Greenville
community . . . how many
people call in to volunteer, the
amount ot donations and the
supplies we recei e Ray said.
See PKP page 3
up in their office Howard said.
" Ihev Ilusethemerchandiseand
gift certificates and talk about us
after the fact
Proceeds from the race will
benefit the Army ROTC annual
military ball Howard also has
other reasons for sponsoring the
race.
"It puts the word out that
1 C U is here and it puts out the
word that Armv R MC is here
I toward said.
1 e feels that publicity is cru-
cial because ECU's military sci-
ence department is faith new
"I'm always hoping for new
recruitment Howard said
"I'm always looking lor the
one's students who want to be
leaders "
Free
Willy?
Squirrels run
rampant on
campus, and
they're not
the onlv
ones. While
this dog is
secured,
many other
pets roam
across
campus
freely, much
to the
chagrin of
many
students,
staff and
faculty.
File Photo





2 The East Carolinian
February 17, 1994
RINSES
People on the Street
What do you think about ECU's Stu-
dent Health Services, and what
would you like to see changed?
February 8
Tyler Hall � 2:50 p.m. Assault on a female.
February 12
Aycock Hall � 8:24 p.m. Simple possession of marijuana.
February 14
Parking lot north of Scott Hall � 2:15 a.m. Damage to
personal property (vehicle).
Howell Science Complex �10:05 a.m. Report of assault on
a student.
South of Garret Hall � 5:45 p.m. Larceny of bicycle.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from official ECU
police i eports.
Astronauts to visit Russia
Cosmonaut training begins next week
Florida slayer may face death
Mike Gerics, senior: "My previous
university did not have an on-
campus pharmacy. We ought to
recognize how lucky we are � the
only other place to get good free
medical service would be prison
Kineka Hull, freshman: "I have had
a positive experience with Student
Health Services, but they do need
more variety of medicines
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) �
A Louisiana drifter faces the death
penaltv following his unexpected
confession to the mutilation mur-
ders of five college students.
"We know now what hap-
pened . We are about to emba rk on
a process to show how it hap-
pened State Attorney Rod Smith
said.
Prosecutors seeking the
death penalty for Danny Harold
Rolling, 39, plan to release mas-
sive amounts of previously undis-
closed evidence collected at the
murder scenes.
The evidence includes de-
tails of how Rolling targeted his
female victims, bound them with
tape, raped them, stabbed them
and arranged their bodies in lewd
poses.
Rolling pleaded guilty Tues-
day to five counts of first-degree
murder, and three each of sexual
battery and armed burglary.
He is already serving three
life terms for burglary and rob-
bery, and now faces another life
term or death in the electric chair.
Jury selection for the pen-
altv phase of the trial was sched-
uled to begin Wednesday.
Rolling's lawyer, Rick
Parker, said he will argue that his
client was mentally ill when he
killed the students and should not
be executed.
"This evidence will be help-
ful in understanding how thesame
person can rape and murder, then
later regret these acts and feel com-
passion for the living loved ones
surviving his violence Parker
said.
Rolling told Circuit Judge
Stan Morris, "I have been running
from first one thing and then an-
See GAINESVILLE page 3
Holly Martin, junior: "I just hate it
when I call for an appointment and
I get that awful answering machine
message. Sometimes there is long
waiting, but overall they are doing
a great job
Edith Smith, freshman: "They are
doing a good job. I have not had to
wait very long for an appointment.
Medical prices are inexpensive
Photos by Leslie Petty
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
(AP) � They're pros at traveling
Light. But for this trip � a space
program first � they want to be
prepared.
When astronauts Norman
Thagard and Bonnie Dunbar leave
next week for a year of cosmonaut
training in Russia, they'll be taking
along some of the comforts of home.
For Thagard, 50, a physician
who designs amplifiers in his spare
time, that means a stereo, TV and
VCR.
For Dunbar, 44, a biomedical
engineer, that means a tool kit, bat-
teries, film and � oh yes � instant
oatmeal.
"There are no 7-Eleven stores
over there Dunbar explained
Tuesday.
Thagard and Dunbar are the
first Americans assigned to Russia's
cosmonaut training program. It's
part of thesameagreement that had
RussiancosmonautSergei Krikalev
flying last week on space shuttle
Discovery.
Under the astronaut-cosmo-
naut exchange program, Thagard
will be rocketed into orbit aboard a
Russian Soyuz in March 1995 and
willspend three months on Russia's
space station Mir, conducting
mostly medical experiments.
Dunbar is his backup.
Neither volunteered to go.
NASA asked them, and they hap-
pilv obliged.
"Being the first American to
fly in the Russian program offsets
any disadvantages Thagard said
Tuesday. "Since I'll have my family
there, the thing I would miss most
won't be missing he added.
Only about a dozen or so of
the 100 astronauts expressed a
strong desire to go to Russia; many
were reluctant for family reasons.
The National Aeronautics and Space
Administration announced its final
selection on Feb. 3.
The Russian Space Agency is
handling all the arrangements, just
as NASA did for Krikalev and his
backup, Russian cosmonaut
Vladimir Titov, when the two ar-
rived at Johnson Space Center in
Houston in 1992.
Thagard and Dunbar, who
plan to leave Monday, will have
their own furnished apartments
at the cosmonaut quarters in Star
City just outside Moscow. That's
qui te a change from the ear ly 1970s
when the Soviet Union built a
high-security hotel inStarCity for
occasional visits by the three
American astronauts assigned to
the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz docking
mission and their NASA entou-
rage.
Thagard will be joined by
his wife, Rex, a teacher, and their
youngest son, Daniel. 14, as soon
as school is out. Dunbar's hus-
band, astronaut Ronald Sega,
who's just back from space, will
visit as often as he can; they have
no children.
Dunbar anticipates there
will be "a lot of rough edges to
smooth out just because it's a new
program Identifying those
rough edges will be an important
part of their job � four American
astronauts are to follow Thagard
to Mir and up to 10 shuttle-Mir
dockings are planned before the
two countries start building a joint
space station in 1997.
Thagard and Dunbarexpect
language to be their biggest chal-
lenge, even though they have been
studying Russian since 1992.
Living in a country with po-
litical and economic instability
doesn't worry them. Neither does
spending three months in space.
Thagard, a four-time shuttle
flier, has never spent more than
eight days in space at a time.
Dunbar's longest space trip, her
third, lasted 13 days.
"Three months is not so ter-
ribly long Thagard said. "If we
were talking a year, I'd probably
have different thoughts about it
ELBO
IGHT
I Admission $5.00 members
$6.00 Guests
lOtf Domestics All Nite (your choice)
75t Shot Specials
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Free Admission from 7-9pm
for Members and Greeks
$1 admission for ECU Guest til 9pm
$2.75 pitchers
$2.00 Teas and Bahama Mamas
3
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ATTIC ii
20 1 752-7303 "
E. 5th St. 1
presents
Benefit for Greenville
Homeless Shelter With
bd brains
Thursday February 17
994 Highballs � 994 Memberships � 994 32oz Draft
Doors Open at 9pm
Tickets Only $8 in Advance at the
following ticket locations:
Quicksilver � East Coast Music & Video
Wash Pub � The Attic
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�immai&lm&
February 17, 1994
The Fast Carolinian 3
PROFILE
Continued from page 1
study of decision-making in a
manager's context. "There three
parts to this process said Dr.
Robert Schellenberger, chair of
the Decision Science Department.
"The first part of the pro-
cess is to understand the goals
and objectives of organization,
and specific goals of making any
decision. Secondly, when mak-
ing the decision, look for infor-
mation, arrange the information
so it's meaningful and get the
information statistically and
mathematically. Once that's done,
you're in a position to make a
decision
Schellenberger points out
that the role of Decision Sciences
is not to mak e decisions, but to
aid the decision-maker in mak-
ing the decision. "1 his course is
known as management informa-
tion system (MIS). MIS was pre-
viously called computer informa-
tion system, and is an under-
graduate program with approxi-
mately 80 juniors and seniors
Schellenberger said.
Production management is
another undergraduate program,
and it is an application of deci-
sion-making tools and under-
standing of a manufacturing en-
vironment. This used to be an
area in the management depart-
ment, and as Schellenberger said,
"We shifted in hope of increas-
ing the student population A
graduate program is also offered,
and there is no concentration.
The Decision Science de-
partment provides the opportu-
nity for people to interact. "We
do this with class projects
Schellenberger sa id Projects for
industry, and we try to have
people from industries come to
the classroom According to
Schellenberger, the department
also encourages industries to hire
ECU students in Co-Op and full-
time employment.
Banking, real estate and co-
operate finance are the tree areas
offered in the department of fi-
nance. Banking is for students
with financial and banking inter-
' ests; real estates deals with sell-
ing and real estate investments or
appraisals;
and coop-
erate fi-
nance is for
students
interested
in financial
analysis
with
manufac-
t u r i n g
firms.
"The
key is for
anyone
tf
This allows people
to get a view of
being in
management
from a hands on
approach. '
:
Fresh Florida
vine ripe
Tomatoes
99J lb
M-Sat 8-6:30 pm
Sun 12-5:00 pm
with an in-
terest in accounting; finance
would be a natural consideration
said Dr. Ronald Sprecher, Chair
of the Finance department. "Be-
cause in finance, we apply eco-
nomic theory and accounting
data
About 15 to 20 percent of
business students are in finance,
and most of those students are
studying cooperate finance.
"The management depart-
ment is the third largest in the
School of Business and is looking
at the possibility of offering a new
management concentration said
California
navel
Oranges
3 for$l
Dr. Joseph Tomkiewicz, depart-
ment chair, who has been with
ECU for 13 years.
"This program will be for
students who do not desire to
study the two programs that are
currently being offered
Tomkiewicz said. The two pro-
grams currently offered are hu-
man resources management
which emphasizes behavioral
courses; and entrepreneurship
and small business, for people
who want to start their own busi-
nessorgointo
the family
business.
Tonkcwicz
stresses that
being a man-
agement major
gives a person
a lot of flexibil-
ity. "I think
that's why
many people
like manage-
ment, because
it gives them a
� lot of flexibil-
GAINESVILLE
Continued from page 2
Dr. Joseph Tomkiewicz
Management
Department Chair
itv Tomkiewicz said.
SAM or Society for Advance-
ment of Management is the
department'sclub.Studentsgoon
plant tours and the group spon-
sors guest speakers that come to
campus. Tomkiewicz said "This
allows people to get a view of
being in management from a
hands on approach ECU's chap-
ter of SAM won a national case
competition last year.
Dr. Edward Wheatley, Chair
of the Marketing department ad-
vises students in the field to come
to the department and talk about
their major, and recommends that
thev take the first marketing course
(MKTG 3832).
"The reason 1 say that is that
the field is so broad, and this course
is very useful as students can lea rn
what interests and aptitudes they
have in marketing Wheatley
said.
There are about 175 majors
in marketing and about 80 percent
study marketing management.
This gives the student an ex-
tremely broad perspective in mar-
keting. The other 20 percent study
retail management.
"This is ideal for students
who come from a family business
or those who want to work in a
chain store or specialty store
Wheatley said.
Student activities in market-
ing include the award winning
collegiate chapter of the Ameri-
can Marketing Association
(AMA), a professional organiza-
tion, operated by students. AMA
allows students to interact with
other student majors, faculty and
business executives. Students have
the advantage of being profession-
ally and socially involved with
the marketing world.
As Wheatley said, "Yes,
there are good job opportunities
for those in the field of business
For more information contact the
school of BusinessProfessional
programs, GCB1200 A or call 757-
6377.
other all my life. Whether from
problems at home or with the law,
or from myself. Bu t there a re some
things that you just can't run
from
The mutilated bodies of
Christina Powell, 17, and Sonja
Larson, 18, both University of
Florida students, were found on
Aug. 26,1990, in their tovvnhouse.
The decapitated body of
Christa Hoyt, 18, a student at
Santa Fe Community College,
was found early the next day.
A day later, the bodies of
Tracy Paules and Manuel
Taboada, both 23 and Univer-
sity- of Florida students, were
found in the apartment they
shared on Aug. 28.
To those writers bearing food from
McDonalds go all the really cool
stories. No joke.
PKP
Continued from page 1
The shelter averages 52
people a night and always needs
volunteer and collection help,
Drozdov said.
"The shelter's purpose, we
are affiliated with the United
Way, is helping others to help
themselves Ray said. "We of-
fer a bed to anyone who needs
one . . . we offer programs . . .
basic referral services and give
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��-
Page 4
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
February 17,1994
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
'Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
-Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
rteye led
paper
Jodi Connelly, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The
masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
Letters should be addressed to: Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.
For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Warmer weather ushers in animal neglect j
The defintion given in The American
Heritage Dictionary for "pet" is "an animal
kept for amusement or companionship
Obviously, the editors of this most illustri-
ous dictionary hold the same unfortunate
view of pets as the growing number of ECU
students with pets hold.
To own a pet is an interesting concept.
As the supposed "highest" member of the
animal kingdom, humans hold the Puritan
thought that God gave us the power to rule
over all the beasts on land and in the sea.
And while it is true that we are reasoning
creatures and have the ability to hold that
position in the universe, we certainly don't
have the right to abuse that privilege. In the
vyords of Stan Lee, "With great power comes
great responsibility
When someone aquires an animal �
whether as a gift from someone or for your-
self � they aquire along with the furry
little beast a sort of contract for the remain-
der of the animal's life. The owner is the
guardian, the sole provider and the com-
panion for the animal. It's not just a play-
thing when it's convenient � in fact � it's
very much like a child.
Animals should never be bought, sold
or kept for entertainment purposes. If that
is your intent when you stand with your
face pressed up against the window of the
pet store, gazing into a puppy's sad little
take-me-home-with-you eyes, then you
should be bodily dragged from the pre-
-mises and barred from ever stepping foot
in any pet store, animal shelter, puppy farm
or pound again. Rent Lassie Comes Home or
Beethoven if you're that irresponsible �
people with bad attitudes deserve to watch
bad movies.
This all comes down to one point. Un-
doubtedly, with the onset of decent weather,
you have noticed unleashed dogs on your
way to class. They wander free, sticking their
noses in your food as you sit at Student
Stores and follow behind you as you walk
out of the library.
To dispel the argument that someone is
sure to bring up about dogs loving to be
outside unleashed, consider when other fac-
tors are figured in: The animal could get
stolen, run-over, shot at (don't laugh, it's
happened), hurt, lost or just plain hungry
and thirsty.
Now ask yourself, is that really fair to
the animal? Would you do that to your child?
Of course not. And while animals enjoy ihe
freedom, their owners must realize that they
are met with situations that may harm them.
So what's the solution to these neglected
dogs? Should there be a regular round-up of
all such animals, wherein they would be taken
to the pound and their owners notified
(maybe even fined), or should an area be set
up where they could be "lodged" during the
time students are in class? Maybe ECU could
set aside space in the mall area like many
parks have, with water dishes and plenty of
room to run.
With that idea, we are met with the chal-
lenge of who will watch the animals, what if
they don't get along, etc. And to that, we suggest
that if you have taken on the responsibility (a
very important word here, folks) of a pet, then it
is your responsibility to provide the necessary
home for said animal to roam while you are in
class.
Ma.ybe now these dog owners will look
into the little concept called responsibility
and stop leaving their pets for everyone else
to take care of while they're in class. Believe
that if the dog could, it would thank you for it.
By John P. Adams
Advertisements lie about worthless products
Walking to class the last
couple of days 1 couldn't help
but notice a banner hanging
between two trees across from
the library. I'm sure you've
seen it too. It's hard to miss.
The banner reads, "Enjoy
Qoca-Cola ���������
billboards advertising every-
thing from douche to fabric soft-
ener. It might look something
like the final scene from Terry
Gilliam's brilliant movie Brazil.
I think this could be what
puts ECU on the map. They
MMMHMHMB could make
Classic. Value
menus now at
all campus
snackbars. In-
troductory
special; all
Coke 20 oz.
bottles 69
cents
At first,
in my haste to
"get to class, I hardly noticed
this seemingly innocuous ban-
ner. However, the more I
passed it, the more it started to
irritate me.
Are we not inundated
with advertising enough in
our day-to-day existence that
we need to be subjected to ban-
ners hung between trees ad-
vertising Coca-Cola, the
mothership of commercialism ?
� Who is responsible for
this trash? The university?
Some marketing representa-
tive for Coca-Cola? Some peon
manager fiom the campus
snackbar? Who? Identify thy-
self. Stand up so we can ap-
plaud your capitalist cunning.
Hey, why stop at banners
in trees? Maybe we could lami-
nate desk tops with advertise-
ments. Maybe we could put
ads on lunch trays in the caf-
eteria. I know! We could line
the sidewalks with miniature
Are we not inundated
with advertising
enough in our day-to-
day existence that we
need to be subjected
to banners between
trees ?
some slick
little promo-
tional video
like the ones
they show
on televi-
sion during
halftime of
college
sporting
events.
They could come up with a
catchy slogan like, "ECU, edu-
cating tomorrow's consumers
today" or, "ECU, leading
America's universities into the
21st century of campus adver-
tising Nice, eh?
Maybe I'm getting a little
carried away. It's just a little
banner. The fraternities and so-
rorities hang their crude, dis-
tasteful banners from the trees
at the beginning of every se-
mester and no one seems to care.
So, why should I care about
some paltry Coca-Cola adver-
tisement?
The difference is simple.
While the Greeks are doing us
all a service by recruiting the
puerile automatons of our es-
teemed university into their
cliques, the Coca-Cola adver-
tisement is trying to dupe us
into believing that for 69 cents,
we can obtain all the benefits
Coca-Cola has to offer.
Benefits which include caf-
feine addiction. Caffeine hap-
pens to be one of the most ad-
dictive substances known to
man. If you don't believe me
and drink Coca-Cola on a regu-
lar basis, try quitting for a few
days. You may get light-headed,
experience headaches and be-
come quite obstinate. Caffeine
also dehydrates the body. Have
you ever noticed that no matter
how much Coca-Cola you drink,
your thirst is never satisfied?
What's really outrageous
is that the banner insinuates that
a 20 oz. Coca-Cola for 69 cents is
a bargain. For 69 cents you could
go to the grocery store and get a
2-litre of some generic brand.
The total cost for producing that
one 20 oz. Coca-Cola is prob-
ably around 5 cents! Most of that
5 cents being for the plastic
bottle.
The point is that advertis-
ing is a lie, or, as Edward S.
Herman wrote, "Advertising is
value creation Taking some-
thing worthless and making it
important to us is what adver-
tisements try to do, but we all
know this.
The danger of advertising
is its continuous lying, which, if
unchecked, begins to seem like
the truth. In our society what
you say is not as important as
how often you iay it.
Whoever put that banner
up, I think you should take it
down. We all pay a lot of money
to go to this school, and I think
we should be able to walk across
the campus without having ad-
vertisements thrown in ou r face
By Laura Wright
Piggish pet owners put pooches in a pinch
Last semester I wrote an ar-
ticle about college students and
their responsibilities as pet own-
ers. In case you don't remember
the column, let me refresh your
memory with a few of my key
points.
First of all, college students
are transients. Our stay here is
temporary and we don't know
where we may be after we gradu-
ate. If you get a pet when you're a
sophomore, chances are you'll still
have it when you're ready to move
on. If you were lucky enough to
live in an apartment or a house
where you could have a pet, you
may not be so lucky at your next
destination.
Second, animals need to be
outside some of the time; they need
to get exercise and they need fresh
air. At the other end of the spec-
trum, if you can't have a pet inside
where you live then, by gum, don't
get one. No animal deserves to be
tied down or caged in.
And finally, baby animals
grow up and become less cute. If
they are unwanted, they may be
abandoned.
1 bring all of this back up
again because I have become the
somewhat reluctant and hopefully
temporary owner of one white
stray cat whom I refer to with
immense affection as "Expense I
found said cat wandering around
outside of the library last Satur-
day and I couldn't leave him there.
After much contemplative agony,
I decided to take the kitty to my
apartment in spite of the fact that
I am not allowed to have pets and
will most likely get evicted if Ex-
pense is discovered.
I have placed ads in newspa-
pers, made flyers and basically
hounded all of my friends, neigh-
bors and colleagues in the hopes
that I will be able to find a home
for my wayward friend. So far, no
luck. I did receive one call from a
nice person�let's call her Beth�
who told me that she knew the
previous owner of the cat (my fly-
ers had photos). Apparently,
Expense's previous owner outed
him and Beth looked after him for
a while but unfortunately she is
not allowed to have pets where
she lives either.
So I'm stuck because, basi-
cally, I'm a nice person who can't
leave well enough alone. Butdon't
get me wrong; I really like this cat
and, if circumstances were differ-
ent, I would keep him. He hasn't
been too much trouble either aside
from the fact that he set my house
on fire the other night but that's
another story.
OK, I'll tell it.
I put a foam rubber-filled
pillow on the window sill to keep
the cat from perching in the win-
dow and perhaps being seen by
my landlord. The cat, while I was
sleeping, knocked the pillow off
the sill and on to the radiator. Tech-
nicallv, it wasn't his fault. The
poor thing nearly died before I
woke up. In case you're won-
dering, we are both fine now.
My apartment, on the other
hand, is basically uninhabitible
and my smoke alarms don't
work.
Just an aside: Check the
batteries in your smoke alarms.
You never know when you
might nearly kill a cat because
they aren't functioning prop-
erly.
So what I'm saying is that
I can't keep this cat. It's not fair
to either one of us but I know
that there has got to be some-
one out there who would be
good to this creature. He'sbeau-
tiful: solid white�only slightly
smoke stained � with big blue
eyes. I took him to the vet after
the fire incident and he was
given a clean bill of health. And
he is a true sweetheart and re-
ally starved for affection.
If you want to take him off
of my hands, please give me a
call. I can be reached at 757-
6366 or 757-4282, or you can
leave a message for me and I'll
call you back. I'll throw in a bag
of litter, some cat chow and a
small litter box.
Do I sound like an adver-
tisement? Well, if you take him,
you can even rename him free
of charge. I don't think that he'll
notice.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
I am writing in response to the article in the Feb.
10th paper, "Health Services May Need Some First
Aid I agreed with your article in that the services it
provides are not only sufficient but superior for the
cost imposed to the students. However, I would like to
address another issue regarding Student Health Ser-
vices.
I am a senior this year and am prepared to
graduate this May. To this day, I have still never
received a kind, word, a smile or a simple "thank you"
from any office employee in Health Services. Don't get
me wrong, the nurses, nurse practitioners and doctors
have all been extremely pleasant but the receptionist,
appointment secretary, pharmacy employees, and
my personal favority, the cashier, have been nothing
short of rude. I hate to point the finger at any indi-
vidual but, every single time 1 have been to Student
Health Services to pay a bill, the cashier is not in her
office but instead down the hall laughing and talking,
late returning from her lunch hour, at the vending
machines or on several occasions, eating cake or some
other dessert that she brings up from some room in the
back. By the time she decides to serve the people who
pay her salary, a line is backed up into the waiting
room which makes everyone late for class. Correct me
if I'm wrong but isn't she there for our convenience
and disposal? Speaking of disposal, maybe there
should be mention of hers in the next Health Ser-
vices meeting
She has never granted me the respect of simple
eye contact or responded to my questions with
answers and, most frequently, she has left me
waiting in line while she accepted a personal phone
call and remained on the line for ten minutes. She
has a disrespectful, rude, bitter and arrogant disre-
gard for the students (a.k.a her employer) and
while I'm at it, does she or does she not realize that
she is obligated to an eight hour work day just like
everybody else? Maybe someone needs to inform
her that she is not excluded from the concept of "a
full day's work for a full day's pay And because
I, along with other paying students at this school,
have a legitimate interest in how money is allo-
cated. I motion to suggest time cards for employees
who insist on "riding the clock
I have never written a letter to any public
media source before because, believe me, it takes
time I desparately need, however I feel very strongly
about this and feel I have right to this opinion after
four years of inconvenience and disregard.
Mary Lucas
Senior
Elementary Education
To the Editor:
Jones has switched parties, districts in which
he is campaigning, religions, his opinion on issues. He
was for affirmative action, but now denies it to try and
fool us conservatives. He talks about family values, but
used to run a liquor store. He received PAC money after
his father passed away back in the summer of 1992. You
see, a congress person can receive PAC money if he or she
retires or dies. He did vote for the voting districts hoping
this would help him win in the first district. As a Repub-
lican, I am very disAppointed with the Republican
partv. Is not there anyone in the third district who
could run besides Mr. Jones?
I can't believe I'm saying this, but, I actually
agree witha Democrat. Mr. Blue, my hats off to you for
unveiling the truth to average Joes like myself. I usu-
ally vote for Republicans, but this time I will be voting
for a Democrat. By the way, I heard Waffle House is
serving signature Walter B. Jones, Jr. waffles, since he
likes to waffle on the issues.
David Richmond
Political Science
Applications are now being accepted at The East Carolinian offices for
the position of Opinion Editor, for summer session '94. All interested persons
must also submit a one-page, single-spaced sample editorial.





BTrr- �i rr-r �i itjm fmrimi�im�irniT"� "
V-V4"
February 17, 1994
For Rent
�The East Carolinian
Classifieds
H Help Wanted
For Sale
For Sale
Page 5
EH Services Offered
IQ
Greek
FOR RENT: Nags Head, NC- Get your
group together early. Two relatively
new houses; fully furnished; washer
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
7- $1500.00 per month; sleeps 9- $2000
per month (804)850-1532
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. washerdryer.
Walking distance from campus, rent
S177&1 futilities. Available immedi-
ately call Susan 752-9465.
GEORGETOWN AFT. best location
in Greenville. Roommate(s) needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. or to sublease
entirely. Available immediately call
758-5961
NEEDED NONSMOKING FEMALE
roommate move in April 1st to Tar
River. Private room, pay 1 4 rent and
utiltites, call 931-8342 immediately.
MALEFEMALE nonsmoker needed
to share townhouse. AU appliances,
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AVAILABLE FEB. 15: 1 bedroom in
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$10-$40OUP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
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ATTENTION STUDENTS: earn ex-
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after 3:00
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VIDEO PRODUCTION SYSTEM.
Everything you need to generate
"Broadcast quality" videotapes from
camera to completion. Includes 2-
CCD Panasonic Camera and
accesories, plus Panasonic editing
package including two AG-1960
decks and monitors with EC 1000 Pro
"Future Video" programmer and ef-
fects generators, mixers and many
extras. This is an ideal opportunity to
enter into commercial videography
at less than half original equipment
cost. Entire package is offered at
$9,000. Call for complete list of Equip-
ment-919-756-8106.
FOR SALE- Apple Macintosh SE with
some word processing and graphics
programs Expandable modem w
software. Carrying case for portabil-
ity. Must sell. $450 neg. Call Mike at
758-8469 or leave a message.
FOR SALE: Dream Machine '76
Volkswagon Microbus. Very clean.
Bed for 2, room for 8 with tons of
luggage. Rebuilt 2.0 liter motor. Extra
quiet; insulated cloth uphostery. Ex-
cellent heat, KenwoodPioneer
sound. Many extras. $2500 neg. Call
830-6288.
five free hours of long distance call-
ing! Call 355-3789.
AT STUr: AKC Chocolate Lab,
champion bloodline, excellent pedi-
gree, large muscular body, largeblock
head, well mannered, excellent dis-
position. Call Scott: 757-3236
TYPING- Quick and accurate re-
sumes- letters - term papers, excel-
lent proofreading skills, satisfaction
guaranteed. Wed Fri. 9am- 5pm rea-
sonable rates 321-1268
W Services Offered
SPRING BREAK 94'
PANAMA CITY $129
JAMAICA $469
CANCUN $469
DAYTONA $129Lu�
SOUTH PADRE $279
BAHAMAS $389
-Mi.HTvlD.U6 :
iprtitirH)Kmu 1
lilii. tK.I"�:rtfci!U-
JOE
1-800-234-7007I
ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS
Call JOE!
Gfi�flT LOCATION!
2 BEDROOM RPRRTMENTS
$4BBMonth Includes
Basic Cable
$575Month wo Cable
Laundry Facility in Complex
Call 758-8394
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-251 -4000 Ext. 1576
Announcements
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All types: Alternative, a.
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EZ0
Personals
HEY CARROT TOP FANS, Carrot
Top was recently nominated for
Stand-up comedian of the year
award. The winner will be an-
nounced at the 8th annual Ameri-
can Comedy Awards show on ABC
in April. Voting will take place in
Feb. So, if you think Carrot Top is
one of the funniest & hippest dudes
around, vote for him by calling: 1-
800-545-8683 anytime of the day
between Feb. 11-19. Thanks for your
support, the Carrot Top Fan Club.
WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic
soul seeks like minded lady for
friendship and fun. Send photos
and correspondence to: Kane, PO
Box 8663, Greenville, NC 27835
HEY THERE, honey baby. Howya
doin' there? Lookit, gimme a call some-
time and we'll hook up or some'in JB
Lost & Found
FOUND! White male cat. 21294. Is
he yours? Call 321-1163. Must ID
PI KAPPA ALPHA- Hope everyone
had a great time at the Valentines
dance.
ALPHA PI PLEDGES- Keep up the
good work- you've only just begun.
Give it 100 and pledging can be so
much fun Love, the brothers of Phi
Sigma Pi.
PHI KAPPA TAU- We had a peat
time Friday. Letsdosomething again
soon. Love Alpha Xi Delta
DELTA ZETA- Valentines Day 1994
started out the wrong way. Dates
were brought and drinks were hard,
but Cheryl how much did you have?
Kisses were stolen by all those who
showed and the night ended before
weall did know. Hope everyone had
a great Valentines Day can t wait to,
see what happens next year
PHI KAPPA TAU- The date was set,
the plans were made out little did we
know that mother nature didn't want
it that way, sorry about last week.
Looking forward to Fri. night. Love
the sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta.
TKE, we are excited for our pre-
downtown Thur. night at 7:00 sharp!
-Sigmas
PHI KAPPA TAU can't wait until
tonight. Alpha Phi
ALPHA PHI AND VALENTINES
Clifford struck Sat. night and filled
the air with love. The dancing was
endless and so was the mac. We
rocked the Ramada all night long.
Looking forward to formal, Alpha
Phi
SISTERS, it's time to mix now that
the strangers have been picked, so all
be prepared for the one night affair
downtown at Corrigan's, There's no
time to spare. For it's a week before
the big date, so good luck to all may
you find your perfect mate! AOPI
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
ACCRATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resume
Secretarial work. Specializing in re-
sume composition w cover letters-
stored on disk, term papers, general
typing. Word Perfect or Micro Soft
Word for windows software. Call
today� Glenda Stevens (8a-5p�752-
9959) (evenings- 527-9133)
FREE for all college students� up to
�Shell Island Party Cruise
6S0' Cult Beach Frontage
2 Outdoor Swimming Pools
1 Indoor Healed Pool
Restaurant, 2 & 3 Room Suites
SANDPIPER-BEACON
17403 Fran! Beach Road
Panama Gty Beach, Ft 32413
RESERVATIONS
1-800-488-8828
Beach Bonfire Parties
Tiki Beach BarVolleyball
Sailboats, letskis & Parasails
Karaoke Beach Party
Area Discount Coupons
FROM $104 PER WEEK
TER POISON
A PERSON OCCUPANCY
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
$We Will Pav You $
CASH
On The Spot For Your
USED CLOTHES!
Tommy Hilfiger � Polo � J Crew � Nautica � Colours
� IZOD � Bugle Boy � LEVI � and all name brand
men's clothing and shoes
in GOOD CONDITION.
WE ALSO BUY STEREO, TV, MICROWAVE, ETC
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
(THE ESTATE SHOP)
Downtown Walking Mall
414 Evans St.
752-3866
Mon- Fri 10-12,1-3
Sat 10-1
Come into the City Parking Lot in front of Wachovia Bank
Downtown, drive to our back door, park,and ring buzzer.
FCU LAW SOCIETY
all students interested in the practice of
law or a law related career are invited to
attend the ECU Law Society meeting on
Feb. 14,1994 at 5:15pm in Ragsdale 218-
A. We will discuss upcoming events,
take suggestions on desired legal issues
to be heard and plan visits by legal
professionals. Students wishing to gain
membership should inquire about the
annual dues. Refreshments will be of-
fered.
I INIVERSiTY STUDENT
MARSHALS
any student interested in serving as a
university marshal for the 1994 spring
commencement may obtain an applica-
tion from room A-12 Minges. Students
must be classified as a junior by the end
of fall semester 1993 and have a 3.0
academic average to be eligible. Return
completed application to Carol-Ann
Tucker, Advisor, A-12 Minges by Feb.
25,1994. For more info, call 757-4661.
DFPT OF 1 F1SURE SYSTEMS
STUDIES
is currently accepting applications for
admission to the major. The deadline to
submit an application is Feb. 25,1994.
Pick up an application from the LSS dep.
office(174Minges). Application require-
ments: Min.GPA of 2.0;lessthan lOshof
general educ. left;completed ENGL1100,
1200; Math 1065or 1066;Soci 2110; Psyc
1000 with a c grade or better. Students
oirrenUymeetingtheadmission require-
ments will schedule an interview Feb.
28- March4 or March 14- 18. Studenb
seeking conditional acceptance will
schedule an interview during April 4-8.
F.riJ POETRY FORUM
will meet on Thur. Feb. 17th in
Mendenhall Student Center, rm 248 at
8pm. Open to the general public, the
forum is a free workshop. Those plan-
ning to attend and wanting critical feed-
back on their work should bring 8 or 10
copies of each poem. Listeners welcome.
APPLICATION FOR SOCIAL
WORKCRIMINAL 1USTICE
Applicationsdue for Spring Admissions:
March 4, 1994. Applications may be
picked up in Ragsdale rm. 104-B.
UNIV. FOLK t COUNTRY DANCE
CLUB,
Feb. square and contra dance, at the
Ledonia Wright Bldg. (Behind Student
Health). Feb. 18,7-10pm. Free! Live mu-
sicbyOld-TimeStringBand.Comealone
or bring a friend!
THF PRF-PHYSICAL THERAPY
CLUB
will meet on Feb. 17, 1994 in the
MendenhallUndergroundat5:00pm All
are welcome. Questions? call Dawn 757-
0573.
THE C.RFENV1LLE AREA
BISEXUAL.
lesbian and gay community group spon-
sors discussions and activities, meetings
are closed. For Info. 758-8619
BBBBIOLOGYCLUB
There will bea meeting Mon. 221 in Rm.
BN-109in the Biology Building. Dr. BellLs
will be speaking on the Costa Rica Sum-
mer Educational Program. There will
also be discussion on other upcoming
events including: NECA research con-
ference, induction ceremony, and other
events anyone would like to suggest.
FCI1 INVESTMENT CLUB
We will be holding a meeting at 5:00 in
3007GCB.l3onutsvvillbeavailableThurs.
Don't forget to pick them up All those
interested an' encouraged to attend the
meeting.
PRF.PROFFSSIONAL HEALTH
ASSOCIATION
Attention all PPH A members and execu-
tive members. There will be a meeting
Feb. 22 at 5:30 in room 212 Mendenhall.
Our tentative speaker is Mrs. Sharon
Molett. Please attend we look forward to
seeing all intended health professionals.
MASSAGE CIINIC
given by: ECU Physical Therapy Students
DateTues. Feb.22Time:6:00pm-10:00pm
Place: Allied Health Building Physical
Therapy Lab) Price: Advanced tickets-
$1.5010min. At the door-$2.0010 min.
For advanced tickets contact Physical
Therapy Students
COMF n 1MB WITH US!
Join Recreational Services outdoor ad-
vnture pngvam on Thur. Feb. 24 from 3-
6pm for a 3 hour workshop to introduce
youtothebasicsofrockclimbing.Foronly
$5 leam the art of belaying, knots and
various rockdimbingmovements. This
workshop is a great introduction to this
fast and growing sport. Class size is
limited to 6 in order to assure indi-
vidual attention, so be sure to register
today. For more info, or to register, call
RecreationalSericesat757-6387orstop
by 204 Christenbury Gym.
n IMR FVFRY MOUNTAIN!
Come join Recreational Services out-
door adventure program on Feb. 25-27
for a weekend filled with Rock Climb-
ing Fun. This is a weekend trip to some
of North Carolina's best crags. This
workshop is a more holisic approach to
the sport of rock climbing. It will cover
knots, protection and anchor systems,
rappeling and more advanced move-
ment. A pre-trip meeting is scheduled
for Wed. Feb. 16 at 5:00pm in Brewster
D101. Formore info.call Rec.Servicesat
757-6387 or stop by 204 Christenbury
Gym.





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Fun n' Games
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The East Carolinian
February 17, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 7
Travel film displays native charms
By Kris Hoffler
Photo courtesy of ECU Film Series
Poets and Kings shows Monday at Mendenhall. There will be two
showings, at 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m Dinner will be served at 6:15 p.m
Staff Writer
The Department of Uni-
versity Unions in conjunction
with the Department of Dining
Services offers you a chance to
see and taste the world. The 1993-
1994 Travel-Adventure Film Se-
ries gives you a chance to see a
film on a foreign country, the
people of that country and the
regional curiosities that are
unique to that area. Dining Ser-
vices enhance the film with a
theme dinner that features cui-
sine of each region visited.
The response to last
year's season was so great that
this year they have booked two
showings of each film�a mati-
nee at 4:00 p.m. and an evening
show at 8:00 p.m Dinner is
served at 6:15 p.m which makes
it convenient for both afternoon
and evening audiences. The meal
will feature some delicious cul-
tural cuisine and the chef will
even share some of the secrets to
preparing a featured item.
This Monday, Feb. 21, the
film will be Ireland�Poets and
Kings. You will get to meet the
Irish people as the film takes you
through peat bogs, the Burrin be-
decked in wildflowers, the dra-
matic cliffs of Moher and rocky
Connemara. Meet the Irish Kings
in the Boyne valley and travel
south of County Wicklow where
the beautiful Glendalough in-
spired Thomas Moore and St.
Kevin, poet of the church. Abbey
ruins, castles, neighborhoods and
uniquely Irish traditions will be
explored in this general audience
film.
This film is a product of
Lynn and Julie Bramkamp who
have been making and showing
travelogues since the early '80s.
The Bramkamps have been inter-
ested in history and the way
people live. Their travel films
and lectures reflect these inter-
ests.
The film will be shown at
Mendenhall Student Center in
Hendrix theatre. Tickets are $4
for all patrons, ECU students are
free with ID and group rates are
available.
For more information, con-
tact the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center or
call 757- 7788, or toll-free at 1-
800-ECU-ARTS, 8:30 a.m6:30
p.m MonFri This is a unique
chance to see some foreign cul-
tures and get a delicious cultural
dinner for much less than a plane
ticket.
Congratulations
to Rebel winners
In the painting category,
Caroline Rust tookfirst place in
the Rebel competition.
BaldwinBasinger movie provides getaway
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
One of the many factors that
makes cinema so likeable is the
variety of options available to a
student of film to build a cinematic
literacy. So many different strings
can be followed from one film to
another.
For example, TJie Getaway stars
Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger. I
liked the film so much that I looked
up all the other films both stars
have made and now want to see
more of them. I also liked the way
director Roger Donaldson (who
directed the much underrated
White Sands) told the story so I the
next time I go to the video store I
Madness hits
New Orleans
NEW ORLEANS (AP) �
Louisiana's French Catholics �
and hundreds of thousands of tourists
�jamrnedstreetsMondaynightdanc-
ing to the jazz of rolling bands and
screamingforbeadsand trinkets tossed
by float riders.
Morethanl millioncelebrantswere
expected bade at the French Quarter for
Fat Tuesday, when the biggest, most
extravagant parades roll and people fill
up at cookouts and revel in other as-
sorted debaucheries.
The city's Carnival parties began
Jan 6, building toward today's frenzy,
the final fling before Lent
aomerevelersalreadyw'erezonked,
stretching out Monday on the grassy
banks of the Mississippi River. Jazz
groups plaved and members cf Zulu,
ttepredominatehhlackCarnivalgroup,
mingled with the crowd.
"That's the tourists sleeping all
aroundheresakiJorinNdson,aMardi
Gras veteran
"The natives understand how to
pace themselves. The big time's still to
come he said.
On Monday night crooner Ham
Connick Jr. led his huge new Orpheus
parade,featuring25floatssalutingCajun,
jazz, zydeco and swing musk. NBC's
'Tonight Show" band leader Branford
Marsalis, Little Richard and Vanessa
Williams were the celebrity royalty on
board.
Rex, the king of Carnival, arrived
on a Mississippi River boat and Mayor
Sidney Barthelemyreadaproclamation
turning the city over to him, which he
must do, according to tradition Rex's
identity remains secret until tonight at
one of Mardi Gras' biggest balls.
On Bourbon Street, people
swappedbeadsforkissesorforaglimpse
of exposed flesh.
"Beads are worth more than gold
around heresaid BobGilmerof Hous-
ton
may try to watch another
Donaldson film.
As I read recent press about
The Getaway I learned that the film
is a remake of a 1972 film starring
Steve McQueen and Ali MacGraw.
I liked the newest film so much
that I decided to see the original.
The strings I could follow from
that film include the other films of
the two leads or perhaps other film
of director Sam Peckinpah. The
original screenplay of The Getaway
was written by Walter Hill who
later went on to direct The Outsid-
ers, 48 Hours, and most recently
Geronimo.
The Getaway is a fast-paced,
action-packed, witty, engrossing
crime story and leaves one realiz-
ing that the feelings elicited by the
film could have be gotten in no
other medium�not books, not
music not theater.
Tlie Getaway starts with Carter
"Doc" McCoy (Alec Baldwin) tar-
geting shooting with his wife Carol
(Kim Basinger). The love that Doc
and Carol feel for each, becomes
evident in the opening scene. When
Doc ends up in a Mexican prison
only a few days later, the audience
understands that Carol will do any-
thing to get her husband free, even
sleep with a shifty lawyer named
Jack Benyon (James Woods) who
can help free Doc.
Benyon wants Doc's help to
rob a racetrack once he gets free.
But Benyon also wants to spend
time with Carol before Doc is re-
leased. When Doc later learns what
Carol had to do to free him his
temper flares and tension rises be-
tween them.
Doc and Carol also have to
contend with a two-bit hood named
Rudy (Michael Madsen) who
wants to kill Doc. Rudy kidnaps a
veterinarian and his dim-witted
wife Fran (Jennifer Tilly). Fran takes
a liking to Rudy to the grave dis-
pleasure of her husband.
All this tension on screen oc-
curs during an extended chase
across Texas toward the Mexican
border where Doc and Carol hope
to make their getaway.
See GETAWAY page 9
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Congratulations to the '94 Rebel
award winners. Awards were given
in a wide variety of categories rang-
ing from ceramics, communication
arts, poetry and children's litera-
ture.
In the art
category,bestin
show was
awarded to
John Bateman.
In the ce-
ramics cat-
egory, firstplace
went to Ray
Kaylor, second
place to Jamie
Kirpa trick, third
place to Jerry
Jackson and
honorable men-
tions were
awarded to
Jeannette Stevenson, David Grahek
and Ray Kaylor.
The 1993 production class was
awarded first place in the commu-
nication arts cat-
egory. Brian
Woodlief won
second place and
D a r 1 e n e
Pelliccio, third
place. Pelliccio
also received a
honorable men-
tion, along with
Keith Hodgood.
In the draw-
ing category,
Sean
Livingstone re-
ceived first place
and an honor-
able for another
of his entries.
Sophia Allison
won second
place, and John Bateman won third
place.
Stormy Averitte won first place
in the metals category, and Sheri
Maffiore was awarded second place.
In the painting group, Caroline
Rust won first place, Irene Baily
second place and Dietrich Maune,
third place. Honorable mentions
were awarded to Keith Hobgood
and John Bateman. The editor's
choices were Rebecca Putze,
Fabrizio Bianchi and Matthew
Reynolds.
In photography, Melia Elliot
won first and
third place.
Cliff Coffey
won second
place.
Carrie
Plank was
awarded first
place in
printmaking.
Marcia Sanders
won second
place, arid
Todd Robert
won third
In fiie
sculpture'eat-
egory, Tay
Kaylor was awarded first place,
Donna Laufer took second, and J.
K. Dowdee took third.
Jeanne Brady won first place
in textiles,
while Alice
Swart had
both the.first
and second
place awards.
In the cat-
egory of wood
work, Tamara
Feedder won
top honors.
In the lit-
erature sec-
tion, awards
weregivenout
for prose, po-
e t r y
children's lit-
erature fiction,
children's -Ut-
eraturenonficl-
tion and children's literature po-
etry. -
In the prose category, An-
gela Bacon Reid won first arid
second and was awarded two
See REBEL page 9
With his portrait, John Bateman
was chosen as best in show fo r
the competition.
Family Channel premieres
story on 19th century slavery
LOS ANGELES (AP) �
Friend of a friend.
The poignant phrase is
used by runaway slaves to identify
those willing to help them flee the
South in "Race to Freedom: The
Underground Railroad a Family
Channel movie premiering Satur-
day.
For actor-producer Tim
Reid, it was a struggle to get the
project made: Television is no friend
to blacks or their history, he says,
even when it's as compelling as the
19thcentury
freedom
You get these
consistently polite
"Race to Freedom star-
ring Courtney Vance, Janet Bailey,
Dawnn Lewis and Glynn Turman,
will be seen on both the Family
Channel and Black Entertainment
Television at 8 p.m. EST Saturday.
It will be repeated Feb. 20
and 27 on the Family Channel.
The movie chronicles the
desperate flight of four slaves from
a North Carolina plantation and the
help they get from courageous
blacks and whites who made up the
so-called railroad.
Alamo film competition for $20,000
By Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
On Jan. 19, in Ft. Lauderdale,
Fla Alamo Rent-A-Car, thenation's
largest independently owned and
operated car rental company, un-
veiled the Alamo American Film
CompennonforStudents.Thiscom-
petition will award more than
$20,000 to winning student film-
makers. Although the competition
is already accepting entries, the of-
ficial announcement will be made
by award-winning filmmakers Ed-
ward James Olmos and Peter
Bogdanovich, members of the Board
of Advisors, at a special press con-
ference on Feb. 24 in Santa Monica.
"This is an exciting world pre-
miere for America's next genera-
tion of filmmakers who will be
tomorrow'sGeorgeLucases,Steven
Spielbergs and Jonathan Demmes
said Charles D. Platt, president and
chief operating officer of Alamo
Rent-a-Car. "What we're unveiling
is a new national platform that will
provide the recognition and en-
couragement that America's most
promising student filmmakers
need to excel in their art forrrC
The student filmmakers of today
are the future leaders of America's
great motion picture industry
Platt continued. "We are proud to
recognize their pursuit of excel-
lence in an art form so deeply
ingrained in America's culture as
the motion picture
See FILM page 9
railroad.
reasons to reject
anything of substance
that deals with the
heritage of black
Americans
i
took it to ev-
ery network
in existence,
everv cable
company
that I
thought
would pos-
sibly air this,
and every-
body turned
me down, save Family Channel
recounts Reid.
"You get these consistently
polite reasons to reject anything of
substance that deals with the heri-
tage or true nature of black Ameri-
cans.
"In this case, they said,
'Well, we've done that with 'Roots
They think 'Roots' is the quintes-
sential story of black America
(television'sattitudeis)'We'vedone
our black history story "
Even the Family Channel
wavered until Reid struck upa part-
nership with a Canadian company,
Atlantis Films Limited, which was
planning a similar movie.
99
Tim Reid,
Actor-producer
Schooi-
books tell us
there was no
train, of course,
and no set route
to freedom out
of the South. But
the terminology
was all railroad-
flavored�fugi-
tives were pas-
sengers, the
benefactors
Di�r were conduc-
tors, and the
houses and barns that provided
shelter along the way were known
as stations.
"Race to Freedom" is set in
1850, the year Congress passed the
Fugitive Slave Act. The act made it
illegal to aid or abet an escaped
slave, even in non-slave states, un-
der risk of fine or imprisonment.
Sympathetic Canadians
offered their country as a haven,
and it became the final "station" of
the railroad for as many as 40,000
people.
But for every black who
managed to escape, an equal num-
See SLAVE page 9
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
J Don't Buy
JTake Your Chances
.WWorthATry
AWU Definite Purchase
Kristin flersh
Hips and Makers
� 0
From the edgy, electric sound
of the Throwing Muses, Kristin
Hersh finally steps forward and
stands alone with her newly re-
leased album, Hips and Makers. Sur-
prisingly, the entire album is acous-
tic, although certain guitar riffs are
vaguely reminiscent of older
Throwing Muses songs.
Most of the songs on Hips and
Makers are excellent, filled with in-
trospective lyrics that Hersh' s voice
carries into the soul of the listener.
"Your Ghost a song Hersh sings
with Michael Stipe from R.E.M is
especially beautiful. Their voices
blend to create a hauntingly emo-
tional effect that sends chills down
one's spine. This song, which de-
buted on MTV's "120 Minutes"
three weeks ago, is reason enough
to purchase the album. However,
This is not the only great song on the
album. " Teeth" and "A Loon" are
aiso excellent. Hersh's voice and
her skillful guitar playing combine
to create music that is both power-
ful and exciting. However, a few
songs don't quite meet the high
standard set by "Your Ghost" and
others.
Two of these lesser songs are
"Beestung" and "Hips and Mak-
ers These songs simply don't seem
to fit in with the rest of the album.
Although the lyrics are still flowing
and poetic, the accompanying
music is disappointing. "Beestung
for example, has elementary and
redundant piano accompaniment
that makes the song seem long
and boring. "Hips and Makers
also with poor accompaniment,
is performed on guitar and has an
entirely different sound than
"Beestung The notes played are
short and choppy and, although
it is rythnuc, the music does not
seem to suit Hersh's voice or her
lyrics. Fortunately, these songs are
few in number, and the rest of the
album is well written and per-
formed.
As a whole, Hersh's album
displays her knowledge of music
with its variety and her talent as
lyricist with phrases like, "you're
so tall its like climbing a water-
fall Her words are both pictur-
esque and original, her music is
touching. If you enjoy the passion
and energy of the Throwing
Muses, this album is worth a try.
� Jodi
Connelly





8 The East Carolinian
February 17, 1994
Viacom wins battle with QVC
NEW YORK (AP) �
Viacom said today it had won its
five-month battle againstQVC Net-
work for Paramount Communica-
tions Inc the entertainment con-
cern that has been the focus of the
most fiercely fought takeover con-
test in years.
Viacom Inc the owner of
MTV, Showtime and other cable
channels, said nearly 91.7 million
Paramount shares, or about 74.6
� percent of the total, were tendered
as of midnight under terms of its
nearly S10 billion cash and stock
buyout offer.
That was well above the
50.1 percent required for Viacom
to gain control of Paramount, which
owns a movie studio, Simon &
Schuster books, Madison Square
Garden and the New York Knicks
basketball and Ranger hockey
teams.
There was no immediate
comment on the Viacom announce-
ment from either QVC or Para-
mount.
Under bidding rules it
agreed on with Paramount and
QVC, Viacom said QVC would be
required to terminate its offer.
Viacom was ottering SI07
a share in cash for 50.1 percent of
Paramount's shares, and securities
tor the remainder. QVC had of-
fered SHU a share in cash for 50.1
percent of Paramount stock, and
securities for the rest.
Viacom and Paramount
signed an $8.2 billion merger deal
in September, but QVC made a
counteroffer for Paramount shortly
afterward, touching off the bid-
ding war.
In the end, Viacom wound
up sweetening its initial bid by
nearly S2 billion.
The contest featured two
charismatic leaders, the billionaire
Sumner Redstone of Viacom
against former Paramount Pictures
boss Bam Diller of QVC, and at-
tracted well-known media and tele-
phone companies into the fray.
The battle came to stand as
a symbol of the high stakes involved
as technology promises to trans-
form how entertainment, informa-
tion and services are delivered to
consumers.
Paramount is believed to
be the last major studio that will
come available anytime soon.
Viacom and QVC each argued they
would make the better partner.
Redstone said the deal was
part of Viacom's ambition to "cre-
ate a global media powerhouse of
unparallelled proportions in theen-
tertainment industry Viacom has
a separatedeal to merge with Block-
buster Entertainment Corp the
nation's biggest video retailer.
QVC Network, based in
West Chester, Pa operates a home
shoppingchannel and Diller hoped
to use that company's expertise in
dealing directly with customers in
developing a broad-based multi-
media company.
Why so much violence on TV?
LOS ANGELES (AP) � More
violence is coming to television. But
the networks sav they're frying to
examine the issue, not exploit it.
In news specials, movies, series
�both dramas and comedies�and
publicsendce messages,TV networks
are holding a crime-battered America
up to the light.
CyTiicscallitanobviousattempt
to blunt criticism of television's own
violent instincts and to derail efforts
to legislate TV gore. Others say the
networksareonlyaddingtotheemo-
tional overload felt by many.
ButexecurJvesatarecentgather-
ing of the Television Critics Associa-
tion said the programs are justified
and their motives pure.
' T think v iolence is such an over-
whelmingly important topic and is-
sue facing America that I don't think
we come anywhere dose to having
done enough said CBS News Presi-
dent Eric Ober.
"We at Fox Broadcasting are try-
ing to be part of the solution to the
problem said its chairman, Lucie
Salhany. "We're not going to simply
avoid dealing with violent issues, as
some critics propose. I believe we
have to deal with problems in order
to solve them
Ober announced a three-hour
"CBS Reports" news special on vio-
lence, a documentary by filmmakers
Paul and Holly Fine that is scheduled
to air later this year.
The prime-time special is not in-
tended simply to rehash the alarming
rise in crime, he said; the goal is to
examine trie impact on individuals
and find answers.
"Reporting on violence is half
the story Ober said. "I think that
looking for solutions to it is the story
that will help culturally
Ontheseriesside,theCBSdrama
"Picket Fences" offered a recent epi-
sode that showed how theeasy avail-
ability of firearms can have a tragic
impact on children.
CBS also isplanningaprimetime
airing of "Kids Killing Kids a new
one-hour show initially commis-
sioned asaday'timeXBSSchoolbreak
Special
"Kids Killing Kids" will offer a
series of vignettes of children in
trouble, such as a suicidal teen-ager
or a youth who wants a weapon
because of gang harassment.
The program will offer two reso-
lutions of each problem, one involv-
ing violence and the other a rtonvio-
lentaltemative.Abroadcastdatewas
not announced.
Salhanv said Fox will join with
CBS in airing the program in a rare
network teaming. The networks also
are sponsoring formation of a na-
tional coalitionagaiast violence, link-
ing broadcasters with community
groups, she said.
Fox'santi-violenceeffortextends
through its regular programming,
Salhany noted. A recent episode of
the si tcom Roc' 'add ressed the issue
of black-on-black violence, while
"Beverly Hills, 90210" took on date
rape and the dangers of handguns.
A series of public service an-
nouncements also is airing on Fox.
One features "Roc" star Charles S.
Dutton, who turned his life around
after serving time in Maryland for a
manslaughter conviction.
"These are our own kids killing
each other an impassioned Dutton
says in the spot, standing among a
roomful of black youngsters. "Our
own kids doing what 3(X) years of
slavery couldn't do
NBC's weeklong effort in Janu-
ary to highlight anti-violence themes
included news program segments
examining the roots of violence and
focusing on people and programs
working to solve the problem.
Thesitcom "Empty Nest" focused
on the dangers of children and guns,
and 20 public service spots focusing
on violence prevention were sched-
uled.
On March 4, NBC will air "Lives
in Hazard a one-hour special on gang
See TV page 9
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February 17, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
TV
Continued from page 8
violence from actor-director Edward
JamesOlmos, whoproduced thepro-
gram and serves as narrator.
ABC President Robert Iger,
whose network had aired several
news specials on various aspects of
violence, said TV has the responsibil-
ity to probe the issue.
"We have tremendous power.
What we should be doing now is not
focusing on.now many acts of vio-
lence are on our airwaves. What we
should be doing is somehow or an-
other harnessing thatpower" to solve
the problem of real violence, he said.
One vocal critic of TV violence is
unimpressed by the networks' show
of social responsibility. William
Abbott, president of the Boston-based
Foundation To Improve Television,
said he's sure they'll try to use such
efforts to their advantage.
"Every time you go after them
(aboutviolence)they'Upointtl-usout
he said. "Somehow, they feel if they
put on a program like this, it excul-
pates them tocontinueproducingthe
other stuff
An hour of analysis doesn't ne-
gate bloody made-for-TV movies, he
said, or the unchecked violence of
syndicated or cable programming that
is separate from network broadcast-
ing.
Who
Thursday
Peasant's Cafe The Nudes
There
Friday
The Other People
Saturday
Headstone Circus
Corrigan's
Attic
Hard Times
Double Aught Tlxe Lightning WlialeBad Bob The Tliomas Bros
Bad BrainsPipe
Dillon Fence
Tree Huggers
Cold Sweat
Take 5
FILM
SLAVE
Continued from page 7
The competition will present
cash awards in June totaling $10,500
from Alamo Rent-A-Car including
SI ,000 toeach first-place winner; $500
for second place and $250 for third-
place winners. First-place winners
will also receive$i,000 Eastman Prod-
uct Grants from the Kodak World-
wide Student Program, plus thou-
sandsof dollars worth of prizes from
co-sponsors, including six portable
digital cellular phones from Cellular
One.
The five categories are narra-
tive, documentary and experimen-
tal film, music video and public ser-
vice announcement.
GETAWAY
According to Linda D'Olympio,
Alamo manager of community af-
fairs, winning entries will be distrib-
uted to major film industry execu-
tives and studios "so that outstand-
ing student filmmakers can receive
the recognition they deserve, in ad-
dition to the awards that will help
themtocontinuewiththeircareers
On Feb. 24, the competition will
hold a special commemorative cer-
emony featuring Mr. Olmos and
Mr. Bogdanovich during the Ameri-
can Film Market. More than 100,000
bookmarks, posters, entry forms and
other materials are being distrib-
uted on campuses.
Entries must be submitted on
NTSC VHS half-inch videocassettes
accompanied by a completed, offi-
cial entry form. Submissions must
becompleted withoutany assistance
from professional filmmakers. En-
trants must be currently enrolled in
a U.S. college or university. Dead-
line for entries is April 30,1994. The
entrv fee is $25 or $35 if entrants
want an of ficial competition T-shirt.
For more information, write, call or
fax The Alamo American Film Com-
petition for Students, 1700 N. Dixie
Hwv. Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL
33432; phone (407) 392-4988; fax (407)
750-8175.
Continued from page 7
ber are believed to have been cap-
tured and either returned to their
owners or killed in exchange for
bounty.
The idea for "Race to Free-
dom" was born out of frustration,
says Reid, whose IV series credits
include "WKRP in Cincinnati
"Snoops" and the critically ac-
claimed "Frank's Place
"Roughly eight years ago, I
got fed up with watching the gar-
bage 1 saw portrayed as the culture
of my people on television and said,
'I've got to do something about this
" Reid said.
"So I started doing research
to find concepts and projects, things
I wanted to do. This (movie) was
one of them, 'Frank's Place' was
one, 'Snoops' was one. I just de-
cided to try to come up with differ-
ent images
The Emmv Award-win-
Continued from page 7
ning "Frank's Place" starred Reid
as a New England professor who
inherits a New Orleans eatery. In
"Snoops he and wife Daphne
Maxwell Reid played sophisti-
cated amateur sleuths.
(Reid is costarring with
Jackee Harry in an upcoming ABC
sitcom, "Sister, Sister He's taken
off his producer's mantle for the
series, which he describes as
"good, old-fashioned family fun)
All the actors do an incredible
job in this fine film. Alec Baldwin
has managed to make his cockiness
sexy. He has developed into a fine
actor of smug self-assurance who
can dominate a film. With Malice
and now The Getaway he seems
poised at the brink of super-star-
dom that eluded him after The Hunt
for Red October.
Kim Basinger (Baldwin's
offscreen wife) can make me cringe
but in The Getaway she manages to
seem sexy and smart at the same
time. She may wind up benefitting
from her refusal to make Boxing
Helena because The Getaway opened
well during its first weekend while
last year the former film bombed.
Basinger lacks Baldwin's charisma
but together their chemistry works
well.
Michael Madsen seems ready
to fashion a career out of despi-
cable scum He provides as fright-
ening a menace in The Getaway as
he did in The Reservoir Dogs. In the
latter film, he managed to leave an
indelible mark amidst a bevy of
top-notch performances.
The Getaway provides first-rate
entertainment. The love between
Doc and Carol provides a striking
contrast to their lifeof crime. A film
capableof making two thieves seem
so likeable deserves praise Doc and
Carol may be outlaws, but the au-
dience cheers for them to make it to
Mexico.
The action in The Getaway pro-
pels the film. Many great scenes
including one in a garbage truck
and one on a train will leave audi-
ences breathless. Donaldson con-
ducts the action scenes with obvi-
ous skill.
The Getaway is just that. Spend-
ing a night with this film provides
a great getaway from the rigors of
daily living. It also provides sev-
eral strings to follow on the road to
cinematic literacy.
On a scale of one to 10, The
Getaway rates a seven.
Continued from page 7
honorable mentions. Joseph
Elchehabi won third place. The
editor's choices were given to An-
gela Raper, John W. Nicklas and
Steve Randolph.
In poetry, James Casey won first
place, Kelle Lawrence won second,
and John McManus won third.
Wayne Robbins and Jane C. Sabatini
were awarded honorable mentions.
The editor's choices were Wayne
Robbins, Chandra Speight and J. E.
Boyette.
' Elizabeth McDavid won first
place in children's literature fiction,
and first and second place in
children's literature nonfiction. Sec-
ond place in children's literature fic-
tion went to Laura McKay. J. E.
Boyette was the editor's choice.
In children's literature poetry,
David Lemonwon top honors, Wayne
Robbins won second place, and Eric The event was a huge success
Honeycutt won third. The editor's and the Rebel encourages people to
choicesweregiventoDarlenePeliiccio enter the "Written and Illustrated By"
and J.E. Boyette. celebration that will be held in April.
Mark D. Pabst, DDS
East Carolina Graduate
announces the opening of his
office for the practice of
Family Dentistry
(near intersection of Arlington & Evans St.)
2207 B S. Evans St.
Greenville, NC
321-1622
2
The University Media Bo Bird
eeks editofs mid general managers
The University Media Board is seeking fulltime
students interested in serving in the following
stipended posts for the 1994-1995 academic year:
? Editor - Expressions minority students magazine ($175month)
? Editor - The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
? General Manager The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1993-1994 stipend $5260) ?
? General Manager WZMB student radio station ($200month)
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 23
i
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The East Carolim
Page !0
Sports
February 17, 1994
What's On Tap?
Thursday, Feb. 17
M.&W. Swimming, home
CAA Championships, at ECU
Friday, Feb. 18
W. Basketball
iam & Mary. 7 p.m.
M.&W. Swimming
� A Championships, at ECU
Baseball, away
at VCU Richmond, V a at 3
p m.
M.&W. Tennis, away
. I ion, Davidson. NC.
Saturday, Feb. 19
M. Basketball, away
mes Madison.
Harnsonburg. V a . 7:30 p.m.
M.&W. Swimming
CAA Championships, at ECU
M.&W. Track, away
IU Invitational Fairfax.
Va.
W. Tennis, away
vs. UNC-Chariotte, N.C 1:30
M. Tennis, away
vs. UNC-Chartotte. N.C 10
AM.
Sunday, Feb. 20
W. Basketball
vs Oid Dominion, at 3 p.m.
W. Tennis, away
at UNC Greensboro. NC. at
noon
M. Tennis, away
IVA, Davidson. NC. 10
a.m.
Men's CAA Leaders
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB Overall
15-6 714
0 5 16-7 696
15 14-8 636
2 11 -11 500
3.5 U-9 .609
5 8-14 364
6 5-17 227
65 4-19 174
Pirate defense lands Paul Jette
jette vill take over a voting improv
ed ECU defense. His 1" vears of experience should benefit the team.
hasbeen
dinatorand
- coach for the
!tlvi!l
irtment officia
ed Mono
ette i omes
ensiv�
went to rCl
ali 5teel ,w I ohasbeen ot VVisconsii
on the
elastl
will become assisstant head coa h tutoi
and handle recruiting and various Pla
administrative matters HevviHnot and current M
be involved on any of the on-the- tor.
field coaching, but will be consid- Bad
ered one ol I Cl - nine full-time intheBig
passefficii
i carries an impressive ve-
il- ordii
md stints in the Uni'
Southwest Conference, Big Ten sons
nd the Big Eight Con- Fred avid
McWilliams He also coached the
replaces 1 am i ho I onghon
nedihedefensivelinecoach He .
the New York Jets earlier this
,th See JETTE page 12
d(
Overton brings
success to baseball
Schick Hoops comes to ECU
3-on-3 basketball ads
By Steven Lienert
Staff Writer
JMU 8-2 800
� - 727
' I 636
ECU 6-5 .545
AU
2-8 200
185
9 1
8.7
8 3
8 1
69
90
86
8.5
78
75
65
5.0
49
44
44
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Tin Fu id AU
Ode-l Hodge. ODU
Donald Ross, GMU
Kent Culuko. JMU
Clayor Ritter. JMU
Rebounding Avg
David Cully W&M
Shenf EL-Sanadily. UNCW
Odell Hodge. ODU
�or Ritter. JMU
Mike H clges. UR
Assist Avg
Troy Manns. GMU
Kevm Swann, ODU
irkin, ODU
David Cox. W&M
. Phillips. UNCW
Field Goal �o
lyl R "er JMU 630
Anton Gill. ECU .570
Parker W&M 558
Olell Hodge. ODU 544
Kass Weaver. UR 542
Free Throw
Kent Culuko. JMU 931
Lester Lyons. ECU 843
Petey Sessoms. ODU 806
� i Jones. ODU 803
Verkey. W&M 800
3-D? Field Goal "
487
ntoi JMU 469
� in INCW 459
,rryl Franklu AU -34
Skipp Schaefbauer. ECU 418
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
9 3
James Madison 5 1
East Carolina 5.0
1 8
1.5
successful 22straightwinningsea-
sons is because the i oaching staff
and the players have no tolerance
It someone were looking tor for mediocrity,
the personification of the Pirate for C oach Baird would not be the
astCarolina the wouldn't have only coach to agree In 1993, C oach
to lookany further than head base- Overton received theEast Region
ballcoachGan Overton.� rtonoach of the Year Award. What
practically bleedspurpleand gold, makes this award so special is that
rhis 42-vear-old native of the recipient must be voted on b
North Carolina not only has other coaches in the region,
coached baseball ins. ' nthelOyearshehascoached
forth) Pirat thi the Pirates,Overton has led them
Vu; . to311 wins, makii the 18th
Education hereat F.( I winningest active Division I base
Coach Overton's father was a ball coach in America Also.hel
successful baseball coach at the taken his team to hveColonial Ath-
li ti Associa-
tion Htlesand
NCAA tour-
naments. In
1990, the Pi-
rates were sta
tistical Div i-
sion I baseball
champions in
vvon-lost per-
centage, I hat
vear the Pi-
rates went 47-
9, and estab-
lished tluili-
highschool level,
so he has been
around baseball
throughout his
lifetime. Overton
came to 1 C I in
1969, when he
played baseball
tin coa hes Earl
Smith and
(JeorgeW illiams.
These people in-
stilled in Overton
a tradition, onv
that has helped to
make Pirate base-
ball so successful
todav.
twist to sport
File photo
Minges will be the site for the regional tournament
this v ear. W inners move to div isional tournament.
iRSi She Department
Sen i esat I astC arolina Univ i i
the official host for the 1994S
3-on-3 Basketball Atlanta I nent
onSaturda Feb.26,1994.Thetou twill
nductedatt hi I
Mingest olesium w itl
approximately 10:00a m
Schick Super! loo
rgest collegiate extramural sport
in the country with com il
institute ns leading to Regi
different sites
For the first tin
will advance to div �-
sites, leading to a i hampionship The
program is sponsor)
Starter and the National B kel
(NBA).
The Atlantk Coast region 'I �'� -
institution- from North Caroline
(. arolina that are registered with the
and v nducl tournamentsi
Winners in th
then qualify to advance to tht regionals
See HOOPS page 12
Garxf Overtoil
es as pe
rennial threats
totheC A championship and the
In 1977, a former teammate of NC VA tournament 1 urthermore
Overton's called him ,w asked K i wenl
him to become an assistant coach the i Metro and Southeast co
at 1 ast c arolina fhe il lei
Hal Band, the head coa
Pirates until I'M, ivhei
h at Auburn In
Softball getting ready for opener
-�
Staff W riter
u es, v hii h exemplify
c haracterand resi ilv eoi traditional
� � the modest man that he
�igton
ison
Rebounding Margin
East Carolina
"
Field Go;
oal '
-5 2
-8 4
-9 5
50
2.7
1 4
1.1
09
-1 0
-2 6
-3 8
50 5
45 7
45 7
44 9
43.1
42 7
42 0
43 6
.i.l i
.
U 7
lls,4 Overton took over heac
D ui bin lutii md ista
the success ol Pirate baseball e
since.
"I think the reason we'rt
is t ,i,u h v K ert m attributes hi
neti n
� � � ��
detens
will st,
I Oil!I
See OVERTON page 12
Lacrosse team has pre-season
makings to be better than ever
By Beau Schilhto
a lew n
Manal
tioH till
Staff Writer
I �ist year - Pirate I a
went to the '(. I I I
tht wen - h ' the I
Pittsburgh
"his vear h
schedule includes N( StateHd I o
minion, Appaku hian Si il
( ireensb iro I N( V
( hapelHill uki
Mik. M
i mi rung the team i
1 �
iw i t at theattai k p isiru n int 111
. : aylorJohnMix
IDei - � janes Midfieldi
in laihv lford and standout
ITodd -haw
� will be manning
msini lude team cap
tarn Mike Marshall, I: ei
ionand the hard-hitting vi
m to pn
"I think we'll have a real success-
ful vear this vear, veteran ! 'ana
lach Manahan pro-
. iplineand motiva-
. � � ahead &
one i 'Ise
.1 ad Pirateshada position
uld rather
vhi to ���' B �'�
rnendt-signatedtopbv'shiirtstopvvere
tablished me team's cliagrin, they
n ijn owith a 1-7 record.
Evei tua l a third plaver settled the
nedahealrhystatus.
was a defin I
iroundoncewesertledthatposition
ihansaid.
Manahan hopes to avoid
- last sea � ulty with
iai SeeSOFTE-dLpage12
GeorgeannW ilkewill beamajoi
contributor to this year's team.
Kentucky sets NCAA record with comeback
.one stepped up theii
Waltei !S
.
i points tor k
me deficit


All
itines-
. -
KENTUCKY





February 17. 1994
The East Carolinian 11
Orr suffers second fatality in Daytona
(AP) � People in the town
where Rodney Orr helped get his
start in racing are mourning fol-
lowing his fatal crash at Daytona
International Speedway.
Orr's Ford Thunderbird went
out of control Monday and flipped
in turn two on the high-banked
2.5-mile oval. His car smashed into
the concrete wall at the top of the
banking, the roof over the driver's
side of the car taking the initial
impact.
Orr lived in Florida, but he
kept close ties to Robbinsville in
Graham County, where he visited
family and friends frequently.
Fie had racing sponsors in the
town of 750 people, displayed his
Dash cars at a local service station
and showcased his new Winston
Cup Ford Thunderbird there
shortly after Christmas.
"Most all the sports fans in
town and his friends tried to keep
up with his racing career
Robbinsville Mayor Bishop Holder
told the Asheville Citizen-Times.
Orr, 31, the defending Goody's
Dash (4-cylinder) series champion,
had hoped to enter his first Win-
ston Cup race Sunday in the
Daytona 500. He was one of only
seven drivers who had been above
190 mph in practice runs.
He was the second person to
dieat Daytona in 1994. Neil Borinett
was killed in a one-car crash at
Davtona's rum four on Friday.
His mother, Jane Collis, who
operates a Robbinsville beauty
shop, was at work when the news
of Orr's death broke, said friend
Kevin Brooks.
The Brooks family Exxon ser-
vice station helped sponsor Orr's
career from his 1991 Dash start.
Brooks said the service station
took up a collection to help Orr's
career, raising $8,000 to 510,000.
"We bought his tires, that kind
of thing Brooks said.
Brooks' father, Bobby, was in
Davtona Monday when Orr was
killed. He had brought Orr sup-
plies for the race.
Brooks said Orr got his start
racing motorcycles.
"After getting banged up some
he decided he'd try his luck at cars.
He was a competitive person. He
justwantedtomoveonup.Itdidn't
matter what the purse was. He
raced to win
Harding getting ready for 'hammer time'
(AP) � Tonya Harding hit the
grouiid in Norway Tuesday and
headed for the Lillehammer Winter
Games,completinga trip of triumph
that seemed all but impossible a
week ago.
She was whisked away in a
blue van and headed for Hamar,
where she will live, practice and
compete with Nancy Kerrigan.
Asked as she changed planes
in Copenhagen if she was confi-
dent, Harding replied, "Yes
"I'm very excited she said,
"I'm very excited to be here. I'm
very excited to have the opportu-
nity to compete in the Olympic
Games once more
The SAS flight that brought
Harding to Norway was no ordi-
nary journey. She was on her way to
the Lillehammer Games, and that
alone was a victory.
"It feels really good she told
The Associated Press aboard her
flight. "I'm tired, but I'm glad I'm
KENTUCKY
going.
Asshe padded around in stock-
ing feet in the Euroclass cabin, the 5-
foot-1 figure skater hardly seemed
someone who has caused such a
monumental stir.
And if she was worried that the
already glar- jmmmm
of the passengers. Harding smiled
and waved to about 100 reporters
waiting for her and then was led off
by a U.S. team official.
In Hamar, site of next week's
women's figure skating competi-
tion, she will receive her official
Olympic cre-
H I'm very excited to
have the
opportunity to
compete in the
Olympic Games
ing spotlight
was about to
get much
brighter, she
didn't show it.
"No she
said when
asked if she
was con-
cerned with
the intense at-
tention she
would get at ������(������
the Games. "I mean, I'm going to
Norway
She got to Norway at
midmorning and was taken down
a side stairway away from the rest
Continued from page 10
99
dential and get
her housing in-
formation.
"She's
very comfort-
able said Gale
Tanger,theU.S.
skating team
leader in
Hamar. "She
was ready to
come. It's a
�����������i good training
atmosphere here. We just wanted
to get her acclimated as soon as
possible
Harding and Kerrigan will live
in the same building � though on
Tonya Harding
US Figure Skater
opposite ends of different floor
and practice on the ice at the same
time.
Thev will skate competitively
against each other Feb. 23, the first
night of women's figure skating.
There was a time when that
Olympic showdown seemed un-
likelv for the 23-year-old national
champions who left a ton of trouble
behind in Portland, Ore troubles
that will still be there when she
returns.
It took a $25 million lawsuit
against the U.S. Olympic Commit-
tee to ensure that Harding would
be skating in Norway. Before she
filed the suit, the USOC had sched-
uled a hearing in Oslo to consider
her role in the attack on Kerrigan.
That hearing could have resulted in
her expulsion from the U.S. Olym-
pic team.
But, in a deal cut-Saturday, the
USOC canceled the hearing and
Harding dropped the lawsuit.
ting 12 of 23 in the second half to
rally from a 68-37 deficit.
"We made a lot of mistakes,
missing free throws and turning
the ball over. It's a hurting feel-
ing said LSU guard Jamie Bran-
don, who had 13 points but six
turnovers. "We were up by 30
We worked so hard this week;
everybody's very hurt
The loss was especially heart-
breaking for the Tigers because it
followed a 28-point loss to an Au-
burn team that hadn't won an SEC
game all season.
"Somewhere along the line,
good has to come out of bad
LSU coach Dale Brown said. "It
was a magnificent effort by our
team; it just came down to free
throws. We weren't able to hit
them at the end
"I can't believe it. I know I've
never, ever witnessed anything
like it Pitino said. "It's the most
character I've ever seen in a bas-
ketball team. It's the most unbe-
lievable thing I've ever witnessed.
"I coached about 200 NBA
games and I've coached about 16
years of college and I have never,
ever seen a comeback on the road
like that in my life: Nothing has
ever come close to this
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Jordan a big hit with media
from all over world in baseball
(AP)�Michael Jordan needed
to get avva v horn all this four months
ago when he retired from basket-
ball. No cameras, no recorders, no
questions.
Just tee times and quality time
with his family.
But Tuesday, for the second
time in eight days, he put his base-
ball skills on display and about 250
media members, some from as far
away as England, France and Ja-
pan, were there to analyze his every
move and twitch.
Smiling and looking at ease in
the warm sun, Jordan didn't ex-
actly put on a hitting display during
several turns in thebattingcage. He
met the ball, butnotwithmuch pop
against batting practice pitching.
Next week he'll be facing real major
league hurlers.
"Look at the people, look at the
media. Imagine the pressure said
one big Jordan fan, Chuck Black,
who along with a dozen other fol-
lowers was lying on his stomach
behind the left field fence, trying to
peer in under a billboard and catch
a glimpse of the White Sox' rookie,
No. 45. The general public wasn't
allowed into Ed Smith Stadium on
Tuesday.
VictorCarranza,sportingaNo.
23 Chicago Bulls ha t inscribed "The
single greatest player of all time
was more than willing to get dirty
to see Jordan run the bases, shag
flies, take grounders and makepegs
to the infield � even if his view
under the fence was lLnited.
"He's the greatest athlete in
the world. We're diehards said
Carranza.
"Yeah, we're lying in the dirt.
It's electrifying. He's not even a
baseball player, he's a basketball
player added Black.
Ryan Sherman, 15, decided
to miss some school, hoping to
get a Jordan autograph on either
a copy of the pictorial "Rare Air"
or on a baseball he had shoved in
his right pocket.
Another man held a basket-
ball when Jordan zipped past
onlookers into the parking lot in
his red Corvette. A young girl
held up a sign 'Hey Mike, Please
Sign Other waded through
bushes covering the fence near
the team headquarters, hoping
to catch a glimpse of one of the
most popular sports figure in the
world.
"He's seen the book three
times. 1 don'tknow why he hasn't
stopped. He stopped for one of
my friends Sherman said hope-
fully.
Jordan did sign last week, a
minor league contract with the
White Sox's Class AAA affiliate
atNashville. And managerGene
Lamont said Tuesday that Jor-
dan would probably play in the
team's March 3 intrasquad game,
one day before the exhibition
opener.
The swarm of cameras and
See JORDAN page 12
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12 The East Carolinian
JORDAN
February 17. 1994
Continued from pagel 1
reporters "uesdaj made it neces-
ian for ordanand I amonttohold
a news briefing v hile sitting on top
of the first-base dugout on chairs
with their backs to the field.
Bui ordan might have to be-
come at customed to roughing it a
bit, espe ially it he agrees to go to
the minors to work on his game.
I'm not too adjusted to royalt)
can't rideabus ordansaid with
one of Ins big smiles. "As long as it
is a luxury bus
Ii irdan also told the press he's
not scared of pitches that will be
comingat90mphand will mo em
several directions, something he
hasn't experienced to date.
Ho reiterated that he's not try-
ing baseball as a gimmick and
doesn'tfeelhiserfort is compromis-
ing the game's integrity.
'I don't think it's damaging the
5por1 he said.
But he promises he won't over-
stay the welcome if hisabilitiesdon't
match the competition.
"The last thing 1 want to do is
bo a sideshow he said. "It's fun,
but there is a sense of pride, too
White s batting coach Walt
1 Iriniak got his tirst look at the lor-
dan swing, one he s,is is too long
It could be a little shorter. 1 lope-
tu II v that will give him the bat speed
In- needs he said.
I iriniak said he liked Jordan's
stance and his balance but wouldn't
venture a guess it he'll ever be n
accomplished major league hitter.
I e'swiirked very hard, and it
a man is a great athlete � and he
certainly is that � anything is pos-
sible said I Iriniak.
SOFTBALL
Continued from pagel 0
Olson's Trivia Quiz
Q:Who led the CAA in strikeouts
last season?
88 WV flD3J� VW AuuqoJ :y
substitutions by ensuring players are
competent in playing several posi-
tions. She further depends on vocal
team loader, sherri Allen to keep mt-
rale high during practice and games.
Manahan attributes the other return-
ing plaversas girls who lead well by
example.
" All plavers are w or king erv.
very hard Coach Manahan said.
" ITiev have decided that this team is
going to be the best it can be '
HOOPS
Manahan spre seasonrosterex-
emplihes the team's depth bv listing
several players under more than one
position, and if all goes well, her
I ady Pirates could have a very suc-
cessful season.
I think we have a lot ot talent
and potential assistant coachjenny
Parsons said.
"It's just a matter of coming to-
gether and working hard in this pre-
season
Continued from pagel0
last c arolina University will
be represented by men's champi-
ons " The I ongtellows consisting
oi players f odd Moser, Eric Foley,
Neil Torrev and Andy Whisnat" KB
3" captured the women's division
and will be composed of Kristen
Rosignolo, Arm Williamson,
Katrina Evans and Angela Carroll.
All participants will also be eligible
to compete in a Reebok Spot Shot
Contest which will be conducted
during the event
Three-on-three basketball is a
fast-paced action-oriented game fea-
turing high scoring and wide-open
JETTE
play. Traditionally, the caliber of
the athlete who has participated
has been outstanding. At the t993
regional, the University of North
Carolina-Chapel I till (Men) and
North Carolina State (Women (cap-
tured their respectivedivisionscul-
minating an intense day of compe-
tition at Chapel Hill.
A team from East Carolina won
the men's division in both 1988 and
1992.
Spectators are invited and may
attend at no charge. For more infor-
mation, pleasecall Recreational Ser-
vices at 757-6387.
Continued from page 10
Cont'd
OVERTON �
An help but think that it all starts
with the man in charge Overtoil's
teams always come ready to play,
and play hard. That philosophy
has become the trademark of the
Pirates.
Overtoil's largest source ot
pride is surprisingly not the 12 ma-
jor league draft picks he has
coached It is in observing the de-
velopment of former plavers who
did not make to the major leagues
but have exceeded in their chosen
field of study. I le tells his teams.
"Play hard and winning will take
i are c t itselt I le wants to feel that
he has made an impact on his play-
ers' lives. When he sees former
plavers applying the knowledge
he has given them on the field to
things that happen in evervdav life,
Overtoil is proud. That's not only
the mark of a great coach, but the
mark of a great man as well.
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757-9389 (leave message)
i oordinatoranddefensh ebackfield
coach tor the University ot Miami
(1 la. i during the L985 season. 1 hat
yearjettecoached All-America and
current 1 Vtroit I ion,BennieBlades.
The I lurricanes finished in the top
10 in every major poll.
1 Ih 1977 rexasgraduateserved
two years as a graduate' assistant at
his alma mater before going toGkla-
homa state in 1979. IK' coached
I lebackers from 1979-82 before
moving to the defensive backs in
1983. In his final ear at Sl in
1MS4, ette also was the defensive
coordinator arul defensive backs
coach. Among his pupils at Okla-
homa State was All-America line-
backers Matt Monger and John
C i irker. etteandCoach I ogan were
on thesamecoachingstaffin 1980 at
(Oklahoma State.
lettehascoachedinsev en bowl
game's including the I987Bluebon-
net Bowl, 1986 USF&G Sugar Bowl,
1984 Gator Bowl, 1983 Bluebonnet
Bowl, 1981 Independence Bowl,
1V78 Cotton fknvl and 1978 Sun
Bowl
A three-year starter at defen
sice back at Texas under coach
Darrell Royal, Jette played in the
Cotton Bowl, Gator Bowl and
Bluebonnett bowl.
Jetteand his wife, Vicki Wallace,
have five children-three sons,
Quinn, Will and David, and two
daughters, Allison and Katharyn.
There mill be a sports' writers
meeting today at 5:30. Rll
must attend.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 17, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 17, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.992
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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