The East Carolinian, February 10, 1994






Sports 1
Lady Pirates fall The ECU Women's basketball team fell tc 2-15 overall losing to North Carolina State last night 78-49 in Minges Coliseum. Story on page 13.l�f
Lifestyle
Spend the summer abroad
Would you like to spend
this summer studying in
London? Find out how
in the story on page 9.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 10
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, February 10,1994
16 Pages
Health Services
By Mary Phelan
Staff Writer
Whether students are suffer-
ing from a cold, trying to prevent a
breakdown or anticipating a new
baby, the Student Health Center
offers assistance and advice with a
price tag far lower than many people
pay outside the university.
"Our goal is to provide the
best health care available for he
lowestcost'saidKayVannortwick,
director of ECU Student Health
Services. "We also want to provide
diversity in our services we want
students to come in here for other
thansimple problems she added.
So what exactly does Student
Health treat? Anything from emo-
tional problems and common non-
emergency illnesses to pregnancy
testing and allergy shots.
Most health care for students
is free of charge. Vannortwick ex-
plained that students are only
charged in order to cover the
university's cost of the service they
are receiving; no profit is made. Fl u
shots and X-rays would run a stu-
dent $5 - $15 dollars at the health
center, whereas in a normal doctor's
office such services could cost two
or three times as much.
Medical costs included in tu-
ition are presently $130 dollars.
Vannortwick explained that the
money mainly pays for personnel
costs. In comparison to other UNC
schools, ECU's medical costs fall
within the median.
Students at North Carolina
State University pay $126 in medi-
cal fees, while UNC-Chapel Hill
students pay $222.
ECU senior Deborah Booth
feels Student Health "does a won-
derful job providing ECU students
with the services they need
u
"As for having to pay for pre-
scriptions, it doesn't really please
me, but i t's cheaper than drug store
costs she added. "I think that
medical costs should be included
in our tu- ���mmimmbb
ition
Stu-
dent Health
operates like
a family out-
patient clinic.
Students can
usually call
in and sched-
ule an ap-
pointment
within the
next 24
hours.
in
As for having to
pay for
prescriptions, it
doesn't really
please me. 99
Graduate student Barry
Whitehead was able to get an ap-
pointment within two and a half
hours after calling in. "This is my
first time in here, but so tar so good
he said. "I haven't had any prob-
lems yet
Student Health provides Ur-
gentCareforemergencies,a "walk-
service available every dav of
�HHHBHK the week. Ur-
gent Care
treats broken
bones, cuts or
high fevers.
They use
whatiscalled
the triage sys-
tem � the
most serious
problem
takes prior-
ity.
Many
ECU stu-
Oeborah Booth
ECU Senior
dents are not aware that they can
use Urgent Care when needed,
however.
"I wasn't aware of how the
Urgent Care system worked; there-
fore, I wasn't able to take advan-
tage of it when I needed it said
freshman Katherine Budrow.
Many times students who
call in are not sure if they need
Urgent Care or a regular appoint-
ment, explained Willette Darder,
appointment operator.
She also said that with only
one operator, it is difficult for stu-
dents to get through, because the
line is often busy. Now another
operator and phone line have been
added, as well as another nurse.
Vannortwick explained that
when problems arise, the center's
staff tries to find quick solutions,
and when they see that there is a
need for something, they will try to
meet that need as best as they can.
Jolene Jemagan, nurse practi-
tioner and clinical coordinator, feels
tha t having a nurse on a phone line
was a very positive addition to the
center.
"Any thing that helps facili-
ta te students moving through the
system more quickly is a good
thing she said.
Many problems still exist
within the Student Health Ser-
vices system, however, accord-
ing to some students.
"Every time I try to get an
appointment there is never any-
thing availablesaid freshman
Katherine Budrow. "Last week I
had to go to a private practice
doctor in Greenville and pay $65
dollars to get help, because I
couldn't be seen at Student
Health
The problem of getting stu-
dents through the system quickly
does not arise from lack of staff
members, Vannortwick said.
Three family doctors, one inter-
nal medicine doctor, one pedia-
See HEALTH page 4
Who?
Who?
just when
you thought
the squirrel
situation
was getting a
bit out of
hand, more
animal
moves
least
guy
taking
park
spaces
life
in. At
this
isn't
up
i n g
Photo by
Cedric Van Buren
ECU PD protects campus
Medical student
receives fellowship
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Medical student Maria J.
Small is the first ECU student to
receive a fellowship from the Fel-
lowship Program in Academic
Medicine for Minority Students,
sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb
Company. In her fourth year of
medical school, Small learned a lot
from the program and encourages
other medical students to apply
for the grant.
The Commonwealth Fund,
a national philanthropy, estab-
lished the Fellowship Program in
Academic Medicine for Minority
Students in 1983 to encourage
gifted minorities to prepare for
careers in academic medicine and
biomedical research. Bristol-Myers
Squibb Company has given close
to$l million since 1990. Thisyear's
$350,000 grant funds 35 fellow-
ships of $6,000 each and sponsors
the scientific symposium.
The Fellowship Program
tries to increase the number of Af-
rican-Americans, Mexican-Ameri-
cans, mainland Puerto Ricans and
Native Americans on the United
States' medical school faculties and
in biomedical research laborato-
ries. Over 200 minority students
have participated in the program.
Small said that students in-
terested in the fellowship must
apply during November of the year
prior to the year they do their re-
search. They must submit a pro-
posal expressing interest in their
given project by January, and ac-
tually begin their research during
May or June.
Mid-way through the
projects, fellows must prepare an
abstract of their findings and the
nature of their work. Finally, they
present their research during a
symposium held the following year
for fellows and their mentors.
"The experience was invalu-
able Small said. "It was scary
initially, but now that I've done it,
I feel more experienced and confi-
dent. I went through the process of
writing a grant and preparing an
abstract, and then presenting my
work. I can apply this experience
to anything I do in the medical
field
Biomedical scientists in ma-
jor biomedical research laborato-
ries mentor the fellows for eight to
12 weeks as they work on specific
research projects. The fellows then
present their research at an annual
symposium.
Small's project was on the
Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and
regulation of glucose transporter
MPNA gene expression. Basically,
her research has applications for
wound healing. TNF is released
during infections and fol lowing an
injury. The lab where Small con-
ducted her research found tha t TNF
causes the cells that repair wounds
(fibro blasts) to increase the amount
of glucose they use. She also re-
searched what mechanism was
involved in the increase in glucose
usage.
"The project was frustrat-
ing at times, but there was a very
See MED STUDENT page 3
By Phebe Toler
Staff Writer
As Rodney Dangerfield
might say, they get no respect.
Vested with full law enforcement
powers and responsibilities,
ECU's campus police have all the
authority of the Greenville Po-
lice Department.
Yetstudents frequently con-
sider them glorified security
guards. Similar to those in a small
city or county, ECU police offic-
ers have jurisdiction over all uni-
versity property and adjacent
streets. They take their jobs seri-
ously just like Greenville city po-
lice, and their main concern is the
safety and well-being of ECU stu-
dents and faculty.
"Those guys are clowns
said Scott Wagner, a senior Com-
munications major. "All they do
is give out parking tickets
Wagner's attitude reflects
that of many students. Many mis-
conceptions exist as to the actual
roles of campus police. For one,
they are not responsible for issu-
ing parking tickets.
"We have very little to do
with parking violations one pa-
trol officer said. "That task is
handled by the reserve officers
over at the parking and traffic
division
Sophomore Christine
Behan mockingly refers to
campus police as "keystone
cops" and admits that she is
not sure whether they go
through legitimate police
training.
A university pamphlet
on campus security and safety
states that "all sworn officers
receive identical training and
certification as other North
Carolina police officers It
also says that they obtain ad-
ditional training in first aid,
CPR, firearms, defensive tac-
tics and communication skills
continuously to better handle
See SAFETY page 4
ECU's jazz ensemble records first CD
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
For those with a taste for
big band swing or contempo-
rary jazz, ECU's Jazz
Ensemble's new compact disc.
Jazz Directions One may come as
a pleasant surprise.
azz Directions One, re-
corded in April of '93, was di-
rected by Carroll V. Dashiell,
head of the ECU School of Mu-
sic Jazz Program.
Dashijill is not new to the
recording business. He main-
tains an active performance and
recording schedule of his own.
Dashiell is also a nationally rec-
ognized bassist, composerar-
ranger and director.
Recorded on the campus
of ECU, Jazz Directions One in-
cludes works by Count Basie,
George Gershwin, Hoagy
Carmichael, Benny Golson and
the Yellow Jackets.
"One of the concepts we
have with the jazz program is
versatility and diversity
Dashiell said. "We like to say
that we do music from Duke
Ellington to Michael Jackson
Amp ig the contemporary
compositions included on the
CD is the popular tune, "Beauty
and the Beast
"At the time we recorded,
one of the hot tunes on the com-
mercial circuit was the Beauty
and the Beast theme which is also
a lighter jazz Dashiell said.
"We wanted to do some heavy
jazz along with some lighter
jazz
One of the first obstacles
the jazz ensemble undertook
was transforming their prac-
tice room 101 into studio 101.
"I think the CD was good
considering the circum-
stances said Bruce Erickson,
a member of the ensemble's
horn section. "We didn't
record in an actual studio, but
I'm satisfied with it
Jazz Directions One was
an interdepartmental effort.
Many of the compositions in-
corporated the faculty vocal
department, string depart-
ment and the jazz combo.
See JAZZ page 4
Litigators take on Medicators
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
From patient to opponent,
from in the court to on the court,
Greenville area doctors and law-
yers are gearing up to tip off the
second annual Med-Law Classic
basketball game. This charity
fund-raiser begins at 6 p.m in
Minges Coliseum on Mar. 8.
The PittCounty Health Edu-
cation Foundation (PCHEF), a
non-profit charitable organiza-
tion, is sponsoring this year's
match-up between the med icators
and the litigators. Founded in
1985, the PCHEF strives to im-
prove the health status for Pitt
County citizens.
"The idea isn't new said
Kymberly Arana, coordinator of
the event. "Several other commu-
nities have been successful We
just incorporated on the idea
The physicians were victo-
rious in last year's game, but Pitt
County's homeless were the real
winners. Over $40,000 was raised,
mainly from private donations, to
benefit homeless shelters and or-
ganizations in Greenville. This
year, PCHEF is hoping to raise
$50,000, Arana said.
"The Health Education
Board decides what area of need
they want to address said Arana.
"This year we are addressing
children's needs
Two games will be played,
one for the male physicians and
attorneys, and one for the females.
Each game will be highlighted by
cheerleaders in the professions.
Last year, male cheerleaders for
the medicators, the sweet thangs,
featured Tahitian-style dresses,
said Arana. Litigator coach Steve
Stephenson was unavailable for
comment.
See LITIGATORS page 3
Spring
cleaning?
Cotanche
Street means
one big
detour for
all of us, and
one really
convenient
lunch hour
for all the
workers,
since The
Golden
Arches
two
away.
career
anyone;
are
steps
New
goal,
Photo by
Cedric Van Buren
tm-jm





MM MMMMW
2 7Vie East Carolinian
February 10. 1994
February 2
3:15 p.m. Damage to personal property by scratching a vehicle;
between Jones and Aycock Hall.
3:15 p.m. Breaking and entering and larceny of checks, forgery;
Aycock Hall.
6:17 p.m. Arrest for serious injury; Fletcher Hall.
February 3
12:00 p.m. Larceny of bicycle from bike rack; East of Greene Hall.
8:20 p.m. Arrest for DVV.I ECU campus.
8:36 p.m. Reported hit and run; Northwest of English Annex.
11:30 p.m. Larceny of rear tire from a secured bike; West of Jarvis
Hall.
February 4
8:35 a.m. Larceny of computer printer from endocrinology lab;
School of Medicine.
10:15 a.m. Larceny of cash from a pocketbook in an unlocked
office; Austin Building.
4:25 p.m. Damage to personal property, scratches on car; College
Hill Drive.
11:36 p.m. Possession of drug paraphernalia, possession with
intent to sell and deliver; Fifth and Reade Street parking lot.
February 5
2:35 a.m. Injury to real property, breaking glass door; Greene
Hall.
1:35 p.m. Weapon on school grounds, Western seven-inch fillet
knife; WZMB, Mendenhall Student Center.
February 6
2:44 a.m. "Peeping Tom" watching female shower; Jones Hall.
2:50 p.m. Larceny of compact disc; Clement Hall.
February 7
1:15 a.m. Harassing phone calls; Tyler Hall.
1:36 a.m. Harassing phone calls: Tyler Hall.
8:47 p.m. Assault on a female; Second floor of Rawl Building.
February 8
1:10 a.m. Arrest for the assault on a female that occurred on
Feb. 7.
People on the Street
Do you read The East Carolinian,
and what would you like to see
added or taken away?
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of
John Sandidge, sophomore: "Yes.
More coupons for students, and a
'Job Outlook' column
CK-UF IN ONLY
10MIN
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from official ECU
Public Safety police reports.
Kim Strickland, freshman: "Yes.
More opinion articles. I tend to
like the shortest and most direct
articles
Cheryl Singer, freshman: "Yes.
Overall, the paper is doing a great
job. I would like to see less
advertisements and more student-
oriented articles
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The University Media Board
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The University Media Board is seeking a full-time
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All applicants should have at least a
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Contact: University Media Board
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Telephone 757-6009
mrmm- � mmmmmmmmm





February 10. 1994
The East Carolinian
Bush attacks Clinton
ONfCINNATl(AP)�Geoige
Bush blasted President Clint m's
"stop-and-start leadership" in for-
eign policy, and said the country
lost face when Clinton hesitated to
use the military overseas.
"The United States can't wait
for someone else to decide Bush
said at a fund-raiser for a Republi-
can congressman Tuesday.
Clinton sent soldiers to Haiti,
but "a group of thugs showed up
on the dock and the American ship
did a 180 (degree turn) and disap-
peared over the horizon Bush said.
"Thattinv incidentsenta mes-
sage around the world the former
president said. "We cannot have
stop-and-start leadership
LITIGATORS
In contrast. Bush said, his mili-
tary response- when Iraqi troops
poured over the Kuwait border
saved Saudi Arabia from invasion.
"If I'd have sat around and
waited forsomebodyelse todecide,
Saddam Hussein would have been
in Rivadh now and we'd be paying
$ 10 a gallon tor gasoline, "Bush said.
White House spokeswoman
Lisa Mortmandid not return phone
calls seeking comment.
Bush spoke at a fund-raiser
for the re-election of Rep. Rob
Peatman, R-Ohio.
Portman served the Bush
White House as a lawyer and liai-
son to Congress.
Continued from page 1
MED STUDENT
Continued from page 1
A brochure distributed by
PCHEF states that along with the
Med-Law Classic, two other cam-
paigns, Lights of Love and Guess
Who's Coming to Dinner, have
also been successful fund-raisers.
PCHEF goals for 1994 are to
raise money for the foundation
and to allocate funds to organiza-
tions that promote health educa-
tion. Improving children's health
needs is the foundation's primary
target this year.
Tickets cost S3 for adults and
S3 for children.
supportive atmosphere in the lab
Small said. "We worked hard, but
we had fun too
Small chose Dr. Phillip
Rekala, professor of biochemistry,
to mentor her project. " I le was cine
of my first-year professors, and I
really enjoyed working with him
Small said. "I le is a good person as
far as asking questions and stimu-
lating mv uriositv and encourag-
ing me to think critically
Rekala accompanied Small
when she gave her talk about her
project in Princeton, N. during
January.
Ninety candidates competed
for the 1993 Fellowship Program.
Deans from 55 medical schools
nominated students who demon-
strated academic achievement,
leadership skills and the potential
tor playing a responsible role in
academic medicine.
"These fellows represent a
highly underutilized resource
which must be enhanced it this
country is to remain the world
leader in biomedical research and
academic medicine said Leon E.
Rosenberg, M.D president of
Bristol-Myers Squibb Pharmaceu-
tical Research Institute.
Rosenberg also said that the
Fellows Program advances the
quality of education and broad-
ens educational opportunities for
students. Bristol-Myers Squibb is
strongly oriented tow aid research
and is committed to supporting
programs like this.
Small received her under-
graduate degree from Brown Uni-
versity in Providence, R. I in Latin
American Studies. She studied in
Brazil through a Study Abroad
program. When she finished un-
dergraduate school. Small trav-
eled to Mexico and worked as a
volunteer with a development or-
ganization. She taught family gar-
dening and nutrition, primarily to
women and poor communities, as
well as a course in environmental
science.
When she was ready to at-
tend medical school. Small chose
ECU because it was one of the few
schools with a mission that states
its com mi tment to training minor-
ity physicians and helping medi-
cally under-served communities.
ihe school's commitment to mi
nority students is also consistent
with the Fellowship Program's
commitment to minority students.
Small is concentrating in ob-
stetrics and gynecology. She
graduates in May and begins her
residency during the summer.
She has an interest m commu-
nity health and academic medi-
cine. She eventuallj wants to
work in an area that will allow
her to teach and research, yel
also serve her community.
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$2.00 Teas and Bahama Mamas





4 The East Carolinian
February 10, 1994
i-
JAZZ
Continued from page 1
The result is a CD that will
appeal toall audiences,jazz lov-
ers and beginners alike.
Going into the studio is be-
coming more of a trend for all
jazz programs, and Dashiell
Mopes that it becomes a trend
for ECU.
"I hope this is going to be
something of an annual event. If
riot-annual, at least every other
yiear Dashiell said.
'� Jazz Directions One, which
was financed through the ECU
School of Music and Jazz En-
semble funds, will receive air
tjme on radio stations in New
York, Washington, D.C. and Ra-
leigh.
31 "The air time we're receiv-
ing-is actually ironic, because
wetiidn't do it so much for ra-
djoplay as we were just using it
fOrpromotional material for the
jazz program Dashiell said.
Dashiell said the jazz en-
semble has receiv ed a great deal
of notoriety in the last three
years.
They have been invited to
do international tours and festi-
vals. Presently, the ensemble is
negotiating with a couple of jazz
festivals in Europe.
"This will help to promote
the university along with the
music department Dashiell
said.
Jazz Directions One will
only be available through the
ECU School of Music and en-
semble members.
The CD will not be sold in
stores because of copyright
laws. All the profits will go to-
wards funding the project, but
the School of Music may market
subsequent CDs in the future.
HEALTH
Continued from page 1
trician, three mental health doctors,
four nurse practitioners, a
physician's assistant and approxi-
mately 15 nurses make up the medi-
cal staff. The problem comes from
lack of space.
"We are simply flat out of
space Vannortwick said. A pro-
posal for a new wing on the back of
SAFETY
the Student Health Building is long
overdue, according to many staff
members.
The Student Health Center is
open for regular a ppointments from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Satur-
day and Sunday for Urgent Care
only.
Continued from page 1
a university environment.
A statistical chart in the
pamphlet lists the different types
and quantity of arrests that cam-
pus police made throughout the
years of 1989-92. Larceny tops the
list in all four years with 448 oc-
currences in 1992. Burglary rates
second with 111 arrests reported
the same year. Simple assault fol-
lows with 49 arrests, then 31 drug
possessions, 26 D.W.I, offenses,
15 aggravated assaults, 5 rapes
and zero murders.
With more than 600 arrests
made in 1992, the campus police
are doing more than preying on
overtime parkers. One patrol of-
ficer estimated that there are 25-
30 patrol officers that constitute
the ECU police force. The officer
said they chose to work within a
college atmosphere to be univer-
sity protectors.
kU
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February 10 & 11,8am - 5pm
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The East Carolinian
February 10. 1994
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
100� recycled paper
Maureen Rich, Hews Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Sean Mc Laughlin, Account Executive
Richard Gurley, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Bmmaa Htmager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Avcock, Lax,nit Manager
Franco Sacchi, 4�; Laxout Manager
Mike Ashley, Cn atne Director
Elain Calmon, At. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
CdleRtHie'd 2)cuj: xMt'� jitll 0 Be-ljeaRea gocmiieaa

Valentine's Day. The most bizarre holi-
day ever. It ranks right up there with Easter,
which celebrates the death of someone, and it's
more bizarre than New Year's Eve, which is
really just an excuse to get drunk. Valentine's
Day serves much the same purpose � as an
excuse to buy cards, flowers and chocolates
(something the greeting card industry, the flo-
rists and the confectioners just looove).
Love. The really ironic thing about St.
Valentine's Day (it's official name) is that it is
thought to commemorate the execution of two
Roman priests who lived in the third century.
Two beheaded priests. Now, in their honor, we
give long stemmed roses and Fanny Farmer
candies. Nope. Sorry � that just isn't a plau-
sible reason to celebrate romantic love.
It is possible that the holiday comes from
the Feb 15th celebration in ancient Rome,
known as Lupercalia. This festival celebrated
the pastoral god Lupercus, a fertility god. Or
Valentine's Day may even come from the prac-
tice in medieval times of sending love letters
on the second fortnight of the second month,
since it was a belief that birds began to mate at
that time. Any way you look at it (two Roman
beheadings, fertility rites or bird matings), the
goofy, romantic ideal that we cherish
Valentine's Day to be, has no significance to
the history that lies behind the day.
So there seems to be a messy, patchwork
of justifications for celebrating this holiday,
but no substanial reason for doing it. In true
profit-making, capitalistic form, America has
turned this supposed holiday into a tool. And
they (the same greeting card people, florists
and confectioners) do it through guilt. If you
don't participate, they make you feel like you
are the most worthless, selfish, loveless jerk on
the planet. And if you happen to be an
independant, perf ectly-happy-you-don' t-have-
a-mate kind of a person, you're a bigger loser,
because you should. Just so you can buy cards
(and flowers and chocolates).
But they don't stop there. If you're not in a
relationship, there are cards to be bought for
your mom, dad, grandmother, cousin, sister,
mailman Come on! Somehow, the day that
has been ingrained in our psyche to signify
romantic love cannot be substituted with valen-
tines to mom and pop. Patronizing? You bet.
Even if vou're in a relationship, it isn't any
better. Here, vou are cornered by duty to your
significant other. Talk about mind games�just
what is expected of the other can erupt into
numerous yelling matches, crying fits and cold
silences, if the errant lover happens to forget this
precious holiday. There's where the loser stands
� the one who puts so much significance on this
holiday that represents love, and retaliates with
selfishness and snobbishness. Besides, love
should be central in a relationship all year round.
Not just in a stinkin' holiday.
It's just plain aggravating. And who needs
it? Kissy-kissy actions on one day of the year just
because it happens to be that day is pretty
ridiculous. Maybe we should all rethink this
holiday. Don't let marketing people and adver-
tisers decide when you should express your
feelings. This includes Father's Day, Mother's
Day and Secretaries Day.
Besides, roses just die in a few days anyway.
By John P. Adams
ATF raided peaceful Branch Davidian families
The trial for the nine surviv-
ing Branch Davidian cult mem-
bers began a few weeks ago. Basi-
cally the government has no case
against the nine surviving cult
members. However, even though
they will lose the trial, it will still
serve their pur- gggB
poses. As any
true Orwellian
knows, if you
can success-
fully accuse
your victims of
crimes which
you yourself are
guilty of, then
you absolve
yourself of these
crimes.
More than a year later there
are still two questions which re-
main unanswered. Why did the
Federal Bureauof Alcohol, Tobacco
and Firearms lay siege upon a
peaceful group of families? And
why did the ATF and the Federal
Bureau of Investigations try to end
the standoff the way they did?
The ATF on Sunday Feb.
28, 1993, went to the Branch
Davidian compound in order to
arrest David Koresh on weapons
charges and to search the com-
pound for other aJlegationsof mis-
conduct by cult members. Making
no attempt to identify themselves,
the ATF raided the compound and
were met with heavy resistance.
David Koresh, as recently as
three days before the raid went
into Waco by himself. Why didn't
the ATF take this opportunity to
arrest Koresh? With Koresh incus-
tody, my guess is tha t the cult mem-
bers would have submitted to a
peaceful search of their facilities.
Even if they put up resistance, it
probably wouldn' t ha ve been any-
where near as ferocious or deter-
mined without their leader.
I think the reason the ATF
waited was purely political. If you
recall, the AIT had been severely
criticized by the media in the months
rightbeforethecompoundraid.They
had been receiving a lot of bad pub-
licity due to sexual harassment and
racial discrimination charges. I think
wmmmmmmmmmm the ATF
wanted to stif
I would be willing to
bet that about 95
percent of the
households in this
country possess
chemicals which, if
combined, could create
explosives.
up some good
PR for them-
selves.
Since
when do you
inform the
media and in-
vite them to
attend an un-
�,�� dertaking of
thismagnitude?TheATFwas grand-
standing. They thought they could
go into thecompound, arrest Koresh,
seize some weapons and be big he-
roes for a day. Instead, two hours
after they started, 4 agjnts were
killed, 6 Branch Davidians (includ-
ingababy) were killed and the stand-
off had begun.
Some of the allegations lev-
eled against the cult members are
just plain ridiculous. The ATF al-
leged thattheBranchDavidiariswere
guilty of sexual and physical abuse
to minors. This allegation was being
used profusely by every major me-
dia outlet. However, of the 17 chil-
dren (ranging from 3 to 12 years of
age) who got out of the compound
alive, not one has indicated any sort
of sexual or physical abuse.
Another ridiculous allegation
leveled against thecult members was
tha t they were in possession of chemi-
cals which, if combined, could create
explosives. I would be willing to bet
that about 95 percentof the house-
holds in this country possess chemi-
cals which, if combined,could create
explosives.
The most absurd allegation
brought against the cult members by
the ATF was that the Branch
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Davidians were in possession of
books, documents and videotapes
on the use of guns and explosives. I
hope you all will agree with me that
thepossessionof these materialsdoes
notconstituteaviolationofany law.
However, removal of these materi-
als I believe would be in gross viola-
tion of the First and Fourth Amend-
ments. Yet, this is what the ATF
wanted to do.
In order to answer the second
question, I think again we must look
at political motives. After 51 days,
the standoff was becoming a major
embarassment for the ATF, FBI Janet
Reno and the justice department,
and even the President. Theone thing
the Branch Davidians didn't count
on was the repercussions of making
all these people look bad.
Public opinion was beginning
toturnagainstthe ATF inspiteof the
concerted propaganda campaign of
the media and the government. I
believe this was their true motive for
the final assault against the Branch
Davidians. They could have
outwaited the cult members.
Yes, it was expensive keeping
the compound surrounded, but the
cost of lives lost far outweighs any
monetary expense. The fact remains
that Janet Reno approved the ATF
FBI plan to raid the compound and
she should be held solely respon-
sible for the deaths of all the cult
members.
Everyone jokes about how the
government screws everything up,
but when they start attacking their
own people, the word "despotism"
immediately comes to mind. Every
phase of our government is out of
control and the ATF raid on the
Branch Davidian compound is an
event that history may well remem-
ber as the beginning of a new period
in American government � a pe-
riod in which individual rights are
continuously under assault and
eventually eradicated.
By Laura Wright
Football teamwork, tasteless beer commercials
At one point during my night
class the other evening, theconver-
sation turned to the subject of foot-
ball. I always get uncomfortable
when people start talking about
football because I know absolutely
nothing about the subject.
Call me un-American, call me
inhuman (call me un-ECU), but I
have never cared about football. I
used to go to games when I was in
high school, but I never actually
watched. At that time, everything
was a social event and I was more
interested in socializing than in
watching a game that I didn't un-
derstand.
I had a really bad attitude
about football and couldn't figure
cut what people like about watch-
ing men enact violence upon one
another. I used to roll my eyes when
friends of mine got defensive about
their favorite teams and when they
went crazy over home runs (I'm
only kidding. I mean touchdowns,
of course).
Just recently, I found some-
thing valuable in football. I still
don't like watching the game, but I
now realize that there is something
positive about people working to-
gether as a team in order to accom-
plish a specific goal. Men get this
sort of training from the time that
they are children. Male children
are encouraged to play team sports,
like football, and they are encour-
aged to work together and to be
agressive in competition. Female
children, while they are sometimes
encouraged to participate in team
sports, also participate in individu-
ally competitive sports like gym-
nastics. They learn to compete with
one another and are discouraged
from overtly aggressive behavior.
Let me redirect. A friend
pointed out to me that she was
really sick of hearing her female
friends criticize other women. I got
to thinking about the way women
take inventory of one another, be-
come jealous of one another and
stab one another in the back, and I
decided that the negativity comes
from a learned notion of appropri-
ate female competition. While men
are taught to compete as a team,
women are taught to compete with
one another�often for men.
Before I start to sound like a
psychology experiment gone hay-
wire, let me say that I don't mean to
imply that we're all bitches or that
we can't get along with one an-
other because we can and very of-
ten do, we just need to learn how to
support each other's achievements
rather than be jealous of them. Oth-
erwise, we remain divided and,
therefore, conquered. We need to
actively participate rather than
stand on the sidelines and cheer.
(Now I sound like a pep rally,
but sports analogies seem to work
well in discussions of human be-
havior�ever refered to sex as a
"home run?")
Speaking of cheerleading,
remember a few years ago when
the mother of a high school
cheerleader attempted to have
another cheerleader murdered ?
How about this thing with
Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya
Harding? If we observe the way
competition functions when
there is no sense of teamwork,
we see its potential danger.
Anyway, in light of learn-
ing skills that are necessary to
function in the business world,
to compromise and work with
others, I have begun to see some
value in football and the mili-
tary because I feel that partici-
pants in these institutions learn
how to support one another and ;
how to work together.
But since women have
generally been excluded from '
participation in arenas where a - J
teamwork ethos is instilled, we �
-
need to learn to be supportive
of one another's actions rather
than jealous and critical of them.
Back to football, I am a
little more tolerant than I used
to be, but I still hate the beer
commercials that air during
football games and I couldn't
tell you the name of a single
NFL team. The lack of knowlege,
though, is not really something
that I perceive as a weakness; I
hope that you support me in my
descision not to be a sports fan
Oh yeah, happy"
Valentine's Day.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
There's nothing more exciting (or nerve-rackng)
about waiting for the outcome of the test you just
completed. If we are like the good little androids we
should be, then we all scored one-hundred percent on
the test.
No? You mean we are really human beings with
feelings, commitments, and (dare I say it) other respon-
sibilities not related with school in any way. so we're
not really computers which can be fed data and transfer
it back at the proper time with no information lost.
Then what good are we? God forbid that you
should do something so human as to make a less-than-
perf ect grade on a test, because if you do, then you must
be faulty in some way and you might as well drop the
class or just quit. Sounds a bit harsh doesn't it? Well in
our instructions of 'higher' learning, as colleges are
often called, if you mess up just once, advisers and
instructors encourage you to drop the class. Long dead
is the saying, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try
again May it rest in peace.
You can imagine it came as quite a shock to my
system that the lessons from the book The Little Engine
That Could were in vain.
These so-called higher learning institutions
have taught me a thing or two. They have taught
me that the 'educators' of this system knowing very
little about you or the effort that you put forward,
judge your entire performance in a course from one
test. Just ONE
If this isn't true, then why do almost all in-
structors in college have their first exam BEFORE
the last drop date? Hmmm? Is the picture coming
in clear yet?
Suppose you got sick and were unable to go
to the doctor, or maybe your young children kept
you up all night, or maybe you just had a week
wherenothingwentright.Thatshould matter right?
WRONG Let's be real and get with the program.
This isn't an education system, nor is it a learning
institution, it's a testing system where one test can
make or break you. Let's not be bashful about it,
whether you call it feces or crap, it still stinks.
So boys and girls get out your number 2
pencils and open your booklets because the test is
about to begin.
William White
Education
To the Editor:
In response to your January 17th editorial on
Clinton's State of the Union Address, I would like to
question where The East Carolinian arrives at the num-
ber 38.5 million uninsured Americans. While the issue
of health care was being forced into the spotlight,
PresidentClin ton enjoyed using thenumber 37 million,
yet in his own book, "Putting People First he sights
that number at 60 million! Why the change in numbers
Mr. President? How did some 23 million people sud-
denly get health care? Even the number 37 million is
erroneous. In fact, according to the latest CBO
study, of those supposed 37 million uninsured
Americans 51 percent were uninsured for less then
four months, and 72 percent for less then a year!
Even the 1990 census agrees that there are less then
10 million "long-term" uninsured Americans. So I
am VERY curious as to how The East Carolinian
came up with 1.5 million more "uninsured" Ameri-
cans than the President of the United States.
JohnT.Dillardlll
Undeclared

i
i
:
3
2
Editor's note: Political writer Jill Lawrence cites "38.5 million people without insurance In the Jan.
26 edition of USA Today, Clinton speaks of 58 million Americans that 1 have no coverage at all for some
time each year" (in other words, college graduates and those who simply cannot afford insurance). Do theless
than W million people you speak ofnot deserve health insurance, simply because they happen to be m the minority?
jit inmm





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ADMITTED � Admission by vaBd ECU ID � One gusst par person.
WJMPWMI ��





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Adventures of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
Hachiro
By Jonathan Peedin
Seigfreid and Barth
By Murphy & Davis
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In Memo hum
The comics industry lost one of its most influen-
tial creators Sunday. Jack "King" Kirby, who was
best known for being a primary figure in the ush-
ering in of the "Marvel Age" of comics, was 76. In
the early '60s, Kirby created such comic staples
as the X-Men, The Fantastic Four, Mister Miracle,
The New Gods, Thor, The Hulk, The Silver
Surfer, and countless others. His dynamic and
gestural drawing and inking style seeped its way
into the consciousness of a generation, and he
will be missed by many.





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The East Carolinian
February 10. 1994
Lifestyle
Page 9
Mardi Gras overtakes Mendenhall
Photo by Jeanette Roth
Two party goers display their face masks at last year's Mardi Cras celebration. The free celebration was
enjoyed by students last year and many hope this year is as great. Festivities start at 9:00 p.m.
By Bridget Hemenway
Staff Writer
On Friday, Feb. 11, ECU will
hold its second annual Mardi Gras
festival in Mendenhall StudentCen-
ter.
A festival parade will kick off
the event at 8:30 p.m. Students are
encouraged to dress in the tradi-
tional Mardi Gras costumes which
range from boxes of crayons to enor-
mous headdresseswith feathers. This
year's theme will be "Lady Luck
which is taken from the real Mardi
Gras festival in New Orleans.
Traditionally, costume balls or
masquarade parties are thrown af-
ter the parade. So at 9:00 p.m
Mendenhall willbeginitsownparty.
This year students, faculty and staff
will be able to enjoy a variety of
acti vitiesstarting with New Orleans
stylebingoand gambling. Fivethou-
sand dollars in play money will be
distributed among those who enter.
The money can be used at the life-
sized roulette tables, slot machines
and dice games, or at the miniature
craps andblackjack tables oratbingo.
Free events include virtual reality,
gambling, Cajun cooking
Authentic Mardi Gras prizes
will be given out throughout the
evening. Starting at 9:30, the Mardi
Gras dance will be held until 1:30
a.m. with DJ Mr. Lee from ECU's
own WZMB. There will alsobe video
karaoke, free bowling and billiards.
A Mardi Gras tattoo parlor will pro-
vide a semi-per-
66 We feel it will be
pretty neat, and I
highly encourage
m a n e n t
memory of this
year's events. A
cajun dinner
will be pro-
vided by the
ECU campus
dining hall, and
Mardi Gras re-
freshments will
be provided at
various loca-
tions throughout the building.
Whenaskedaboutexpectations
of this year's parade, Steven Gray,
chair of the major events committee
anddirectorofstudentactivities,said,
"We tried to organize a campaign
that would bring the clubs and orga-
nizations together. I think that it w ill
be very popular and will be held
every year to form an ECU tradi-
tion. We feel it will be pretty neat,
and I highly encourage people to
come out
For the first time, Mardi Gras
will highlight the "Alpha Experi-
ence a virtual reality simulator
that combines 3-D laser disc video,
surround-
tKmfammaKmmiM sound au-
dio and an
exact rec-
reation of
actual
physical
� �experi-
people to come out. � Par
ticipants
will see
and feel
the thrill of
Steven Gray
Major Events Chairperson
high adventure excitement.
This year's Mardi Gras will be
quite an experience with seven
krewes joining the parade, and a
king and queen presiding over a
night full of activities. The events
are free to all individuals with a
valid ECU ID and one guest per
person is permitted.
Valentine gifts sold
by School of Art
By Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
Everyone has a sweetie or a
special someone in his or her life
be it known or secret. Now is
your chance to show that certain
person you appreciate just how
much you care! (I'm not talking
Hallmark cards) The ECU School
of Art will be having their annual
Valentines Sale Thursday and Fri-
day, Feb. 10 11 from8am-5pm
and Saturday, Feb. 12
from 10 am-2 pm. Not
only is the sale open to
students, but to the
whole community so
tell all your Greenville
friends about it!
There are many
school organizations in-
volved in the sale like Craftsmen
East (which includes metals,
woods, and textiles), Ceramics
Guild, Painting Guild, and De-
sign Associates. All of these sepa-
rate organizations are joined un-
der the Visual Arts Forum which
includes the whole art school. I
had a chat with Lynn Strucinski,
vice president of Craftsmen East,
about the Valentine's Day Sale.
Strucinski said, "There are
two main reasons behind having
this Valentine's Sale. First of all,
by selling the original items, 20-
30 of the profits will go to the
designated guild for that media.
That money will pay for new
equipment and visiting artists for
workshops. The rest of the profits
will go to the individual creator
of the handcrafted items to pay
for art supplies. So both the stu-
dents and the organizations ben-
efit Strucinski went on to say,
"The other reason is to help stu-
dents learn to market their work
for the so-called, "real world
Final remarks? "There's a little
bit of something for ev-
eryone and at afford-
able prices for stu-
dents' budgets
The Valentines
Sale will take place in
the main downstairs
lobby of the Jenkins
Fine Art Center on the
ECU campus across from the
chancellor's house on Fifth Street.
All items for sale are handcrafted
by those wonderfully talented
ECU School of Art students. Shop-
pers can choose from a wide vari-
ety of gifts including jewelry,
cards, ceramics, scarves, prints,
and even foods. The proceeds will
go to developing programs of-
fered in the school to further art
education. The School of Art wel-
comes all to come and purchase
for that special someone a unique,
handcrafted item for Valentine's
Day.
Travel to London and get class credit
By Laura Wright
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Students may think that they
have the rest of their lives to travel,
to get out of the country and to
experience othercultures. The truth
of the matter is, whether they be-
lieve it or not, they will never have
as much free time�in the form of
breaks and summers off�as they
do as a college student.
Students can spend a month in
London this summer and receive
up to four hours of college credit.
All that is required is that students
are enrolled at ECU and that they
have a GPA�it matters not how
low. Travelers that partake of this
offer will leave from Raleigh on
July 1 and return on July 23. Not
enough time, you say? A ten-day
tour of Europe is optional and al-
lows you to leave Raleigh on June
22 and see Paris, Brussells and
Amsterdam. And for$50exrra, stu-
dents can leave from any city in
Europe and stay even longer.
In London, students will stay
in Kensington Gardens in Hyde
Park and can take classes through
the University of Richmond.
Courses, like Literary London and
History of London, will be offered
and students can also take classes
in English, humanities, social sci-
ences, history and performing
arts. The British Museum and
Library will be accessible to stu-
dents and there will be a special
focus on the African and Carib-
bean populations in London. Stu-
dents will be allowed to visit the
Africa Center and the Caribbean
Market. Dr. Gay Wilentz, who is
organizing the trip, wants to fa-
See LONDON page 11
Club 757 hosts comic, dinner
By Stephanie Tullo
Lifestyle Editor
There is a special treat
planned for this Valentine's Day.
The student union is hosting a
dinner and show "For the Love of
Laughs" featuring comedian Troy
Thirdgill. The show is free and
will be held at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
Dinner will begin at 6:00 p.m.
in the Social Room in Mendenhall.
The dinner includes tossed green
salad, herb baked chicken, green
beans almondine, rice pilaf and,
for dessert, assorted fruit pies.
The Residence Hall Association
has planned this special
Valentine's dinner. "The food is
good and reasonably priced said
Michael Preston, the student
union president here at ECU.
The show begins at 7:57 p.m.
at "Club 757" in the social room
in Mendenhall. The comedian,
Troy Thirdgill, is originally from
Portland, Ore and he is becom-
ing one of the country's hottest
new comics. Thirdgill had his
first experience on stage at the
age of 23 at the world famous
Melrose Improv. That evening the
owner Budd Friedman booked
him on the show "An Evening at
the Improv
At his appearance on BET's
"Comic View the audience re-
sponded enthusiastically with a
demand for an encore perfor-
mance at the end of the show. His
vivacity and insight take on life in
the '90s and keep audiences yell-
ing for more. "We wanted to break
from tradition. We are trying to
make it fun where people can get
together said Michael Preston.
Tickets are on sale now at the
Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center. Tick-
ets are $6 for students and $8 for
faculty and staff, for the dinner.
Rafting offered for Spring Break
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
If you are looking for an excit-
ing alternative to the usual beach
this Spring Break, then West Vir-
ginia might have just what you're
looking for.
Mountain River Tours is one of
the oldest Whitewater outfitters in
West Virginia, and it has put to-
gether a Spring Mountain Ad-
venture two-day special. During
March and April, you can enjoy
one day of guided mountain bik-
ing, one day of Whitewater raft-
ing, two nights of camping, two
riverside buffet lunches, a
barbeque dinner and a Saturday
night party at the tour's head-
See BREAK page 10
c
o
ri
ti
Pholo by Whltew�t�r Photography
atMjer
CD Reviews
CDRevlews
CD Reviews
I for r.JX4Ho�ecr Day Vn he held
at Mzndenh.&n intdtjaOnter on February H,
lMf frarrt-sjn now.
J Don't Buy Xs Worth A Try M Take Your Chances AfeW Definite Purchase
Don't Ww Thi Opptfdpftiy to Meet Reps Face-
it you a 4 Msri-ig�d'jate Education, Social
Work CWR, UBS, Prhool Psychology,
yTheatreArts,OTor
rhihffcjyto vispgally
lany school. yiuti They
available career O
I Vl��t Ration Car
js from
tECU
eluded wake Courtly
SerxL, NO Suffolk Publk &�. V Highland
School Diatfkt, SC; Chartes CWnty PuM School
Md.
Yagglii Front
Yaggfu Front
WeamrltM.r
C3vx�dmervat�vccdii�pniriial
Jes.
JJW
From the land of tobacco, ACC
basketball and Jesse Helms comes
YAGGFU Front�an acronym that
states "You Are (ionna (let Fucked
Up (if you) Front This trio from
North Carolina came together, after
being disillusioned with college, to
pursue their mutual, music-related
interests.
YAGGFU Front made waves on
last year's club scene with their first
singles, "Lookin' for a Contract" and
"Basted Loop Now they ha vecome
back with their first full-length re-
lease, Action Packed Adventure Tlie
MotionPicturcS(ntndtrack,whv'hsan
adventurebu t not really a soundtrack
in the traditional sense. Most of the
songs form a narrative of the group's
adventures bumming around and
playingrecordsinN.Cgettingadeal
and finally making a record of their
own.
Lyrically, these guys have es-
caped theworn-out, gangs ta garbage:
no "bitch bashing "blunt baking
ghetto struggling or overt male pos-
turing and pimpology. Any type of
unique storytelling used to be con-
fined togroupslikethecerebral IX1 La
Sotd, Tribe Called Quest and merest
of Native longue. YAGGFU tells their
stories in an energetic and refreshing
styleindmostamainglv,tluvshow
weaknesses, which is sometimes a
rare thing in the rap world.
Thegroupconsistsofthreeyoung
men who go by the names D'ranged
& Damaged, Spin 4th, and jingle Bel.
Innovation is the idea behind both
their lyrics and music. They have the
standard head-nodding beats and
plenty of funk. Then they add jazz,
bigband, cartoon blurbsand obscure
novelty records. In addition,Spin4th
and Jingle Bel excel in their upright
bass and brass skills, while Damaged
holds his own on the paino.
For all N.C. natives, some as-
pectsof thisalbum will seem familiar,
from the mentioning of many N.C.
colleges, to Interstate 95 to Lenoir
County.They even giveprops to their
old station, 8K.H WKNC, out of N.C.
State, which is where they met and
got Started Even the liner notes are
written on a map of J.C.
"Fruitless-Moot" is a great m ng
about being too shy and generally
tonguitied around themon-aesthetk
members o( the opposite sex. Then
tin ieis"Slappin'SuckasSillya piece
that flexes their verbal skills and
gives mention to such towns as
Kinston and Micro. The lastsongon
the CD is some really great satire.
"My DickisSo Large" isa farceof all
the other rap songs that brag on
suchsubjects;itisover-exaggerated
to the point of silliness.
I have heard some people say
that all rap sounds the same, but
anyone who really listens knows
that to be untrue. Rap music as a
genre evolves and shape-shifts
much faster than any other kind of
music. The styles, subject matter,
beats, samples, catch phrases and
angleof the tilted baseball cap are in
a constant flux. On one end of the
spectrum, you ha vegun-totingdogs
and chronic-smoking doctors, and
on the other end, you have
YAGGFU Front who gives "shout
outs" to their grandparents.
� Kris
Moffler
!MM��






10 The East Carolinian
February 10, 1994
Blink: just another thriller on the big screen
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The newest thriller playing at
vour local movie multiplex goes by
the name of Blink. Like many other
suspense stories, Blink bills itself as
different from other films becauseof
some ingenious plot hook.
Theplot contrivance, whichpur-
ports to separate Blink from the mul-
titude of other potboilers cranked
out by HoUyw(X)d each year, con-
cerns theblindnessof its lead charac-
ter. Emma Brody (MadeleineStowe)
wasblindedateightyearsofagedue
to trauma to both corneas caused
when her mother smashed her face
BREAK
intoamirroraspunishmentforplay-
ing with make-up.
Twenty years later Emma gets
the opportunity to regain her eye-
sight via a COXIiea transplant. At first
Emma can see very little, and what
she does see sometimes only regis-
ters in her brain minutes or hours
later.
The plot twist, which amounts
to not much of a twist at all, comes
when Emma catches sight of a mur-
derer exiting her building only a few
days after her operation. To make
the story somewhat more compel-
ling, Emma only sees the killer clearly
the next day in flashback and even
then she doubts whether she could
Continued from page 9
pick him out from a police line-up.
Part of the appeal of Blink is not
just the murder that takes place but
also the change that takes place in
Emma during the course of the film.
Madeleine Stowe manages to
make Emma extremely tough yet vul-
nerable. She plays a violin and recog-
nizes lines from Longfellow yet main-
tainsan ironexteriorwhich keeps her
fiercely independent. Sparks begin to
fly between a detective investigating
the case (Aidan Quinn),and Emma is
forced to confront feelings of attach-
ment to another person.
Quinn fills his role with so much
tenderness that he is never really con-
vincing as a hard-boiled detective.
He and Stowe do play nicely off each
other though and Quinn's charac-
ter brings a little humor to the film.
James Remar, as another hard-
nosed Chicagodetective,adds great
support. Though saddled with a
thankless role, Remar emotes as
much as the proscenium arch will
allow. It vould be great to see him
with some bigger, meatier roles in
the future.
Blink was directed by Michael
Apted whobegan his career in Brit-
ish television and has prod uced the
much acclaimed films 28 Up and 35
Up, which interview a group of
people at seven-year intervals be-
ginning at age seven.
See BLINK page 11
a�9nnnnnnnnnnnnni�nnn�v�ni'
Fresh Florida
vine ripe
Tomatoes
99tflb
California
navel
Oranges
3 for $1
quarters. The cost of the adventure
package is $89.95 per student, and
equipment is included.
Mountainbikingand Whitewater
rafting have increased in popularity,
especially with younger adults who
are seeking new forms of excitement.
"Combining the two outdoor activi-
ties seemed like the natural thing to
do said Ridge Rider, who hardies
the biking portion of the adventure.
Youdon'tneed any special skills
to enjoy this adventure, not even the
ability to swim. The raft boats are
equipped withCoastGuard approved
life vests that are designed to keep
even non-swimmers afloat. And the
bike tours aregeared towardsall types
of riders, from novice to advanced.
Mountain River Tours lias been
rafting down the New River in Hico,
W.V. for over 21 seasons. It isalsoone
of the first companies to incorporate
both rafting and biking in one pack-
age, which is being offered for a third
season, has become greatly sought-
after.
"We are always looking for a
new way to enhance a person's out-
door adventure said Paul Breuer,
the owner of Mountain River Tours.
"This will be a great way for students
to try something new and realize the
many outdoor opportunities the New
River Gorge area has to offer
"We welcome anyone that has
neverdone anything like this before
said Stacie Gray, sales director at
Mountain River Tours.
For more information on High
Adventure Outdoor Spring Break
trips from Mountain River Toursand
Ridge Rider Mountain Bikes, call 1-
800-822-1386.
or "The Lover"
Of Fine Coffee . .
Valentine's Day baskets tilled with coffee,
Valentine's Day Mugs, chocolates plus
other goodies.
GRAND SIM
BATTING CHALLENGE
tome m an work m that SWING for flu SPRING
february 21 & 22 6:00pm-10:00pm poole play
february 23, 24. 28, 29, 30 6:00pm-10:00pm
single Rumination tournament
Teams consist of two players of any combination:
Co-Rec - Men's - Women s
Two different levels of competition:
Slow pitch softball andor Medium pitch baseball
Bring just FIVE DOLLARS to Christenbury Gym Rm 204
by Thursday February 17,1994 or call 757-6387
Teams of two battle it out in the cages. 6 innings of
7 pitches per team for the best overall batting rating.
Scores are determined by where you hit the ball.
FCR MORE INFORMATION C0ITWT RECREATIONAL SUMOS AT 757-4M7
WHO CAM
PtAY?
WHERE DO
I SIGN UP?
WHAT
IS IT?
I start iimiimj NOW
- STUDENT SPECIALS -
IMlllHltUIUlllllMIUHUll��I�M3IJ9IMIIMJlttIMtfW
� MOST ADVANCED TANNING SYSTEMS
ON THE MARKET TODAY
� ADVANCED BOOKING
� FULL SERVICE UNISEX SALON
� ACRYLIC NAILS
� WALK-INS WELCOME
Scortroi
� Hwy33Easl
PROFESSIONAL
HAIHCU1TERS �
tOm STREET
HWY 33 EAST
757-1464
32
DAILY SPECIALS
Monday - $3.50 Wings & $X.f 0 Pitcher
Tuesday � Xs price Appetizers J til 6
$X Juice Drinks & Hi Balls
Wednesday � $2.50 Margaritas &j Potato Skins
Thursday � $i.x$ Domestics & $1.75 Imports
Friday - $2 Hi Balls & $3 Wings
Saturday - Managers Choice
Daily Specials are subject to change due to
Sporting Events
Book your next social event down at Big Dai's
or Dal will cater it Sor you!
STUDENT UNION � KIIA
INVITES YOU TO JOIN US
.COMIiDIAN: THOY TIIIKDC.IU
.music wii j. nil provided
�rnizuxwiixnucivLN
AWAY
laJMIUiJilWh
Friday - Wyatt Staton 9-12
Saturday - Craig Antonucci O-ix
Monday - Wyatt Staton
Valentine's Day $2.50 Pitchers 8-12
706 South Evans
758-3188
Old Margaux Building
Next to Marathon
DAY -�
TOIl TUB LOVK or LAUGHS"
MONDAY
FEDRUAnY U.1M4
TIME 6.OOpm.0.OOpm
MENDIvMIAU. STUDENT CSJfllR
SOCIAL UOOM
'COMB QiSK-COME ALL
COME ONE
COME ALL
WANTED:
LOOKING FOR STUDENT LEADERS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS
- MINORITY ARTS CHAIR
- MARKETING COMMITTEE CHAIR
- POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT CHAIR
- FORUM COMMITTEE CHAIR
-VISUAL ARTS CHAIR
-FILMS CHAIR
IF YOU ARE A LEADER AND WANT A VOICE IN THE FUTURE OF
ENTERTAINMENT AT EAST CAROLINA THEN WE NEED YOU!
THE REQUIREMENTS INCLUDE A MINIMUM 2.25 GPA AND BE A
FULL-TIME STUDENT FOR THE 1994-95 ACADEMIC YEAR. APPLICATIONS
ARE DUE BY FEBUARY 14, 1994 IN MENDENHALL ROOM 236.
THANK YOU AND GOOD LUCK!
MICHAEL PRESTON
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
LAST CHANCE
to enroll in and complete a five-part
MAJORCAREER
DECISION MAKING WORKSHOP
before early registration!
Section 5: Mondays 9am 214 221 228 314 321
Section 6: Tuesdays 3pm 215 222 301 315 322
Section 7: Wednesdays 1pm 216 223 302 316 323
Section 8: Thursdays 2pm 217 224 303 317 324
Section 9: Fridays ' 11am 218 225 304 318 325
You must register at least one day before your section begins. Call
the Counseling Center for more information; 757-6661
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU





February 10, 1994
1. Counting Crows
"Mr. Jones"
2. Smashing Pumkins
"Disarm"
3. US3 "Cantaloop"
4. Samples Taxi"
5. The Connells "74-
75"
6. Afghan Whigs
"What Jail Is Like"
7. Beck "Loser"
8. Nirvana "No
Apologies"
9. Candlebox "You"
10. Gin Blossoms
"Found Out About
You"
Compiled by Chris Beattj
Continued from page 10
BLINK
ptedhasruid mixed success in much that nothing anyonedoes in
HoUv-wood,bothcriticalh and com- maketheston interesting fnepub
merciallyl lehasdirec ted some fine li seems to be noti ing the similar
films including '�' ity-in all these stories because thrill
fcT and Class Action He had done ers have had a tough time at tl
admirably will in dealing with con- office recently I ven the mat hing
troversial subjects like the death ol o( Julia Roberts and Denzel Wash
DianFosseyinGon7�JSiHKMsfand ington in ohn Crisham's Hie I
me mistreatment ol Native Ameri
cansin rfcHnArawrfandinhisdocu audiences Recenth filmslikemn
mentary of the same story Incidental fa 8,Guilty Sin, Rising Sim, and
Ovlala. now Bmc(judging from itsopening
Still Apted is not a major name week receipts) havedone miserably
in film. Part of the reason ma be his .it the box office. I lopefully 1 lolh
decisions to make such picturesas wood will get the message but I
Continental Dwide and the atrocious doubt it, at least not for a few more
Critical Condition. Directing Blinkwiii years
not help his reputation because, On a scale ol one tolO, Blink
though not .i bad film, nothing in r,itti six
this movie distinguishes it from
other thrillers
A.s a genre the suspense thriller
needs some time off, much likr the
Western got during the 80s the
thriller has been overworked so
LONDON
The East Carolinian 11
Continued from page 9
mitic
side
with tin "other
I i totra el out ol I ondon
on the v eekendsand students will
unfa
miliai ten iti �r II the should I
to ,i in the citv, London offers a
varieb ol inexpensive cultural ex
vvsmallerthanexpected periences According to Di Rick
loi hohaso erseen the trip in
I ondon theater is the best
inthj ��� - ; d ind tickets are heap
I he theater is governmenl
sored so it is possible to sei lots of
plays ithout going broke
i M, i iurse there isalsothe pub
scene which offers a wide range of
music, and there are plenty ol op-
portunities for "museum hopping
Reductions Up To 90
- �
atalog
Studi
1 I
and ithei
tofthetrij I
" ii iih lude:
:i and .iii fare Ii students are
interested I I
Central Book &
b t
o
V7
UJalk-lns Anytime
ELTORO
men's hair styling shoppo
Formerly TGIF
210 E. 5th St.
Downtown
onnection
' a division of UBE
Judy Edwards Trlpp Little �8n8f
LOVE IS THE ATTEMPT
O FORM A FREINDSHIP
INSPIRED BY BEAUTY
-CICERO-
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
28BBE.10th.Street
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across from Highuiay Patrol
Behind Car-Quest
752-3318
MON-FRI. 9-6
$6.00
Haircut
WITH E.C.U. I.D.
? Sweetie on a Diet? ?
Handcrafted jewelry - earrings,
pin, pendent or bracelet -
is the solution!
75 off sale - starts Thursday Feb. 10
414 Redbanks Rd. fa) fftbn'ffttHfi
Arlington Village
756-1058
STUDENTS
Enjoy the
convenience of
your Check Cashing
Card at all locations
Apply today
Fraternities &
Sororities
Call NOW for a
CHARGE ACCOUNT
and Plan ahead for you
Big Events
Frosty Mom
.fftc
Mon-Sat 10-6
Thurs 10-8
Prices Good February 09 Thru February 13
Starkist Tuna
In oil or water 6 14 oz.
3S2.00
Maola Homogenized
Milk
99C
12 Gal
Bright N' Early
Orange Breakfast
Drink
12 Gal.
69C
IMaola Ice Milk Bars
cr Eudoe Bars
s
Shoestring
French Fries
3$ 1.00
it) oz.
Budweiser
Bud Light
Bud Dry
-u-
Ofr
1
$11.88 y
24 pak Suitcase 1 2 oz. cans
Fresh
.Ground Beef
3 lbs. or more
99C1H.
ershey Single
Candy Bars
All Varieties
3$l
Buv one Get one FREE
2512 S. Memorial Drive 756-0110
1112 . Greene Street 752-4111
1204 N. Memorial Drive 758-2501
Bell's Fork Square 765-6105
2520 E.lOth Street 757-1880
This Week's Special Savings
uddic
Thin Sliced Deli Meats
alt varieties
49
Trend
Laundry
Detergent
32 oz. box
79 C
SUPERMARKETS
Fresh Fryer
Legs
39C lb.
Quarters
"
MasterCard.
L
J
I Mom Accepted MBett's Fork & Wth Sl Locations I





�The East Carolinian
Page 12
Classifieds
February 10, 1994
For Rent
FEMALE ROOMMATE SI 55, own
bedroom 13 utilities. Walking
distance to campus. Responsible,
social drinker. Call 752-0874 leave
message.
AVAILABLE FEB. 15:1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village. 3 bedroom
townhouse. Mature, responsible fe-
male NS only. Quiet environment,
"nicely decorated with all major appli-
ances. $230 13 bills. 756-8459
(Sara or Angie).
FOR RENT: Nags Head, NC- Get
your group together early. Two rela-
tively new houses; fully furnished;
washer dryer; dishwasher; central
AC; available May 1 through Au-
gust 31; sleeps 7- $1500.00 per month;
sleeps 9- $2000 per month (804)850-
1532
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a two bedroom apartment lo-
catednearcampusonbusroute. Rent
$185 & 12 utilities nonsmoker pre-
ferred. Call Jeri or Hilary at 758-8836.
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED Imme-
diately To share 2 bedroom, 2 bath
duplex in Wyndham Circle. Close to
' campus $137.50 a month 14 utili-
ties. Call Karen or Mary-Lee, 752-
2693
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for
apt. 12 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, 2 blocks from su-
permarket. Rent includes phone, utili-
ties, cable. Call 757-1947.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Modern
duplex, min. from campusdaily bus
pick-up , responsible, $250 mon.
12 utilities. Call Chris after 2pm
758-4119.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom apt. washerdryer.
Walking distance from campus, rent
$177 & 12 utilities. Available imme-
diately call Susan 752-9465.
Help Wanted
H Help Wanted
For Sale
Golden Corral
Hiring all positions
Apply Mon-Fri
2-4pm
Financial needs? Or just
looking for a better way?
Professional business
opportunity available for
highly motivated
individuals! Bonus
potential outstanding!
Training provided. To
schedule appointment,
call 756-0977.
510-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
RushStamped envelope: Publishers (GI)
1821 HillandaleRd. 1B-295 DurhamNC
27705
pi
HELP WANTED Ladies earn $500 a
week full-time part-time daily payout
Playmates Adult Entertainment Snow
Hill, NC. Call for interview 747-7686
�"SPRING BREAK '94 Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida & Padre!
110 lowest price guarantee! Organize
15 friends and your trip is free! Take a
Break Student Travel (800)328-7283.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
; .Greenville Recreation & Parks Dep. is
recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicantsmustpossesssome
knowledge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm
with some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from the first
ofMarchtothefirstofMay. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For more info
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
83O4550.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great Benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $85 phr
escorting in the Greenville area. You
must be 18 yrs. old, have own phone
and transportation. Escorts and exotic
dancers needed. For more info, call
Diamond Escorts at 758-08
ATTENTION STUDENTS: earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west Mailers PO Box 395, Olathe Ks
66051. Immediate response.
EXPERIENCED WAITSTAFF. Apply
at Greenville Country Club between 2-
4pm only. Tues-Fri.
SPRING BREAK '94 Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida & Padre!
110lowestpriceguarantee! Organize
15 friends and your trip is Free! Take a
Break Student Travel (800) 328-7283.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT-
Make up to $2000-4000 mo teaching
basic conversational English abroad.
Japan, Taiwan, and S. Korea. Many
employers provide roomboardother
benefits. No teaching background or
Asian Languages required. For more
info.call: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362
BRODY'S and Brody's for men, two
names synonymous with fashion are
accepting applications for additional
Part-Time sales Associates. Flexible
scheduling options: 10am-2pm, 12pm-
9pm or 6pm-9pm. Salary and doming
discounts. Interview Monday's and
Thursday's l-4pm, Brody's The Plaza.
BRODY'S is accepting applications for
receiving room associates. Unpack and
verify shipments. Some lifting required.
If you are sitting out of school this se-
mester or are available 8am-5pm sev-
eral days, then we would like to talk
with you! Interview Monday's and
Thursdays l-4pm Brody's at the Plaza.
EARN $500 OR MORE weekly stuffing
envelopes at home. Send long SASE to:
Country Living Shoppers, Dep. 532, Po
Box 1779, Denham Springs LA 70727.
GREEKS CLUBS earn $50-$250 for
yourself plus up to $500 for your club!
This fundraiser costs nothing and lasts
one week. Call now and receive a free
gift. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 65
group and Travel free! Call Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710
SPRING BREAK Bahamas party
cruise! 6 days $279! Trip includes
Cruise room, 12 meals 6 free par-
ties! Hurry! This will sell out! 1-800-
678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Cancun Jamaica!
Fly out of Raleigh and spend 8 days on
the Beach! We have the best trips
prices! Includes air hotel parties
from $429! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8 days
oceanview room with kitchen $119!
Walk to best bars! Includes free dis-
count card- save $50 on cover charges!
1-800-678-6386
FLORIDA'S new Spring Break
hotspots! Cocoa Beach Key West!
More upscale than Panama City
Daytona! Great beaches nightlife! 8
days in 27 acre Cocoa Beachfront resort
$159! Key West $249! 1-800-678-6386
8-BIT NINTENDO with 33 games, in-
cludes 11 sports, Tetris, Chess; two con-
trols and zapper, hint book and codes.
S300OBO. 931-8024, leave message
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars, trucks,
boats,4 wheelers, motorhomes,by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
UNIQUE ADULT CANDIES and Val-
entine candies especially for you.
Chocolates and hard candies in gift
baskets, mugsorindividually sold. Call
321-1428.
MEMBERSHIP: club for women only.
$29.99 per month. Call Angie 931-9768
PAYIN-STATETUITION? Residency
Status and Tuition is the brochure by
attorney Brad Lamb on the in-state tu-
ition residency process. For sale: Stu-
dent Stores Wright Building.
1YR OLD IGUANA, hot rock, heat
lamp, flourescent light 30 gal. tank
wstand. Washer, dryer $50. Bench
wrought iron table. 952-3349
FOR SALE: club for women only mem-
bership, $29 a month for 11 months;
Jenni-K emerald ring with gold lattice
band, price neg. call Marian at 355-
3995.
ATTENTION weight lifters and watch-
ers: let me help you fill those New
Years resolutions. Sports supplements
at major discount prices: Cybergenics,
Quick Trim,Cybertrim,SuperFatBum-
ers, Tri-Chromelene, Super
Chromoplex, Weight gain powders
(all), Amino Acids, Creatine, Met-rx,
Vanadyl Sulfate, Yohimbe Bark, Hot
Stuff, Herbs, Multi-Vitamins, Super
Golden Seal, and many more! Call
Brad today at 931-9097 for more info.
WATER BED-Queen, soft side. Only
5 months old. Great wave maker. Ex-
cellent condition. $400 call 830-0934.
PERFORMANCE Aspen mountain
bike. Deore LxExage components,
rapid fire shifters, Ritchey Competi-
tion rims, gel saddle, and more $250
obo. Call Kevin at 752-0525.
For Sale
CJ7 $800, 2 Sony amps and Kenwood
speaker box with 10" subs, $300. Call
758-8174
ATTENTION: weight lifters and
watchers: let me help you fill those
New Years resolutions. Sports supple-
ments at major discount prices:
Cybergenics, Quick Trim, Cybertrim,
Super Fat Burners, Tri-Chromelene,
Super Chromoplex, Weight gain pow-
ders (all), Amino Acids, Creatine, Met-
rx, Vanadyl Sulfate, Yohimbe Bark, Hot
Stuff, Herbs, Multi-Vitamins, Super
Golden Seal, and many more! Call
Brad today at 931-9097 for more info.
For Sale
SPRING BREAK SALE 1994! We have
the hottest destinations! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas, Florida. All at the
guaranteed lowest prices with the ulti-
mate party package. Organize small
ID Services Offered
E
LIKE ON MTV Native American
Chokers. Handmade-authentic-made
from real bone and horn in traditional
Cherokee style. Reasonably priced-
Call Kris 931-1607
JEEP FIBERGLASS HARD TOP for
I
i i

Personals
(
Personals
SB Greek
3rd floor of Wright Annex from 5:30-
6:30. Look for the signs or call 355-9695
for more info.
WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks like minded lady for friendship
and fun. Send photos and correspon-
dence to: Kane, Po Box 8663, Greenville
NC 27835
LAH: Be careful not to get caught in the
kitchen with no explanation. Can't
wait for the weekend. The Little Os
ANDREA: Thanks for all you've done
now thanks to you I can keep having
fun. If I had to pay that fee, I'd be dead!
Not anymore, because you took my
bed! Love, A.
sh i.ncl for usedUs.
vpes: VlUrriativc, .i,
;r .1 issskal. Rock Stop
In or tall
( 1) lk' Z.SK-Sl)2
COOMBS wordprocessing spread-
sheets and graphs. Low prices, pick-
up and delivery available, call Juliann
355-5043 anytime.
SPRING MEANS GET SERIOUS
Get the body you always wanted
with Flex Appeal. Specializing in ton-
ing, weight loss, body building, and
personal training. Initial consulta-
tion free! 830-1380
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS:
Special offer for ECU students. Great
way to get in shape! Experienced
training, 3 miles from campus, begin-
ner to advanced. Call Debbie at 756-
8236.
ACCRATE, FAST, CONFIDEN-
TIAL, PROFESSIONAL Resume
Secretarial work. Specializing in re-
sume composition w cover letters-
stored on disk, term papers, general
typing. Word Perfect or Micro Soft
Word for windows software. Call
today� Glenda Stevens (8a-5p�
752-9959) (evenings- 527-9133)
FREE for all college students� up to
five free hours of long distance call-
ing! Call 355-3789.
D.JS-DJS-D.JS! Mobile Music
Productions is the disc jockey service
you need for your socials, parties,
weddings and formals. Weplay what
vou want, when you want to here it.
Highest quality and profesionalism.
Call Lee at 758-4644 for bookings.
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies for
hire. Specializing in fraternity and
sorority socials and weddings. For
the widest selection of music and
unbeatable sound and professional-
ism. Except no imitations! Discounts
to all ECU students. Call Rob @ 757-
2658
ARE YOU READY to take charge of
your financial life?? Money 101: a
breakthrough seminar for women.
Sun. Feb. 13 or Tues. Feb. 15, 7-8:30,
$20 to register call 355-5150.
1Q
Greek
DELTA ZETA: Thanks for inviting
us to your pref. night. It was a lot of
fun. Looking forward to seeing
vou guys in the future. The Broth-
ers and AMs of Delta Chi
DELTA CHI would like to intro-
duce the spring 1994 Zeta pledge
class. Marc Gainey, Kurt Hudson,
Tyler McAdams, Tommy Poole,
Chris Roberson. Good luck guys.
The Brothers of Delta Chi.
TO THE SISTERS OF ALPHA
DELTA PI. The social was great!
We enjoyed it. The brothers of
Lambda Chi Alpha.
TO THE SIGMAS- Looking for-
ward to the Valentines social. We
know it will be great. Come be our
Valentines! The brothers of Lambda
Chi Alpha.
WAY TO GO, CHI OMEGA bas-
ketball team! Still undefeated! keep
up the great work. We're so proud
of you. Thanks coaches!
TO THE BROTHERS and new
pledges of Delta Chi: The week-
end started off with a blast, i t was
just too bad it couldn't last. Kim
took a dive into the pool, the
musdemen carried in refresh-
ments that kept us cool. Friday
night was really great, but that
was only the first date. Saturday
began with roses, and who could
forget those photo poses. Thanks
for the ride and to all those guys
in ties. We had a great weekend!
Looking forward to the next one.
Love, the sisters and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta
PHI KAPPA TAU: Looking for-
ward to our pre-downtown to-
night! Love, the sisters and new
members of Delta Zeta.
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: Wed.
night was anything but lame
thanks to you guys and all the
game. We'll all see you at the
pre-downtown, so don't forget
to come around! Love, the sisters
and new members of Delta Zeta.
WE LOVE OUR SIGMA SIS-
TERS with a deep dark purple
passion.
LAMBDA CHI-We are looking
forward to our social Thurs.
night Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS Sigma
basketball on your win Mon.
night. You go girls!
DELTA CHI can't wait for to-
night! Love, the Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHI- Cupids arrows are
ready to strike so watch out Al-
pha Phis and dates this Sat. night.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA-
wants to thank everyone who
came out for rush. Hope all of
you can make the brunch on Sun.
Love, ESA sisters
$
I
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
We Will Pay You
CASH ON THE SPOT
FOR
YOUR USED CLOTHES!
Tommy Hifiger - Polo - J Crew - Nautica - Colours -
IZOD - Bugle Boy - LEVI - and all name brand
men's clothing and shoes
in GOOD, CLEAN CONDITION.
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
(THE ESTATE SHOP)
On the Downtown Walking Mall
414 Evans St. Mon-Fri 10-12,1-3
752-3866 Sat 10-1
Come into the City Parking Lot in front of Wachovia Bank
Downtown, drive to our back door, park, and ring buzzer.
WE ALSO BUY STEREO, TV, MICROWAVE, ETC
RUSH Angel-Flight Silver Wings,
non-profit service organization that is
a refreshing alternative to Greek life.
Rush is Mon-Thurs. Feb. 7-10 on the
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
�Shell Island Party Cruise
650' Cull Beach Frontage
2 Outdoor Swimming Pools
1 Indoor Healed Pool
Restaurant. 2 4 3 Room Suites
SANDPIPER-BEACON
17403 Front Beach Road
Panama City Beach. FL 32413
RESERVATIONS
1-800-488-8828
-�Beach Bonfire Parties
Tiki Beach BarVolleyball
Sailboats, (etskis & Parasails
'Karaoke Beach Party
Area Discount Coupons
FROM $104 PER WEEK
PER PERSON
� PERSON OCCUPANCY
Announcements
.
HORA PF CONVERSACION!
Spanish club meeting and conversa-
tional hour at Filibuster's Restau-
rant, Tues. Feb. 15 at 8:00pm. Come
out and enjoy practicing your Span-
ish skills! Venga a charlar! For more
info, contact Ramon Serrano (931-
8542)orKarina Collentine (757-4129).
BALLOON-A-GRAM
send a balloon to your valentine!
PUSH will be selling balloons for $1
each at the student stores Mon. 27-
Fri. 211 from 10:00am-2:00pm. All
balloons will be delivered on Valen-
tines day. Mon.214tobuildingson
campus. All proceeds will benefit
the PUSH organization.
SETA
ECU Students for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals will be having their
first meeting of the semester Thurs.
Feb. 10, 6:30pm in General Class-
room Building room 1005. Everyone
is welcome.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
invites you to the Chinese New Year.
There will be food, entertainment
and prizes. Bring your friends, ev-
eryone is welcome. The Chinese New
Year will be held on Feb. 12,7-1 lpm
in Mendenhall Great Room. Tickets
will be available at the door. Tickets
will cost $3 for students and $5 for
general public. If you have any ques-
tions please call Patricia Steffen, 931-
9809 or Peng 752-9125.
WHAT MAIOR? WHAT CA-
RFFR? HOW DO I DECIDE?
A five session workshop is being
offered by the Counseling Center to
help you answer these questions.
Take assessment instruments. Learn
career research skills, and find out
how personality affects careerchoice.
Classes begin the week of Feb. 14.
Register early- limited enrollment
call 757-6661.
VALENTINES FLOWERS
sold by the LSS Society for fundraiser
will be sold in front of Mendenhall
and Tyler lobby Wed. Feb. 10-
through-Fri. Feb. 12, from 11:00-
2:00pm SI. Will be delivered Valen-
tines Day (on campus address only
please) Remember friends as well as
sweethearts!
PUSH THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work towards
reducing the architectural, as well as
the attitudinal barriers that students
with special needs are faced with
every day, then come to the next
meeting of PUSH (People United to
Support the Handicapped). Meet-
ings are Thurs. at 5:30pm in the
Greene Hall Lobby. If you are a
service organization looking for a
new project�this is a great opportu-
nity Be looking for the Rock-a-
thon on Feb. 19, 12noon-l 1:00pm.
Get involved
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
will be celebrating their 11th choir
anniversary Sat. Feb. 12,1994 at 6pm
in the Wright Auditorium on the
campus of ECU. Admission for Gen-
eral Public $2, students with ID $1.
Featured choirs will be Barton Col-
lege, Greensboro College, UNC-
Chapel Hill, Children of the Sun
(UNC-Charlotte), Fayetteville St.
Univ and Roanoke High School.
ECU SCHOOL OF ART
will be having their annuai Valen-
tines sale Thurs. Feb. 10, Fri. Feb.
11s and Sat. Feb. 12. The hours of
the sale are: Thur. and Fri. 8am-
5pm and Sat. 10am to 2pm. The sale
will take place in the main down-
stairs lobby of the Jenkins Fine Art
Center on the ECU campus across
from the chancellor's house on 5th
street. All items for sale are
handcrafted by ECU school of art
students. Items available for sale
include jewelry, cards, ceramics,
scarves, prints, foods. The school of
art welcomes all to come and pur-
chase for that special someone a
unique, handcrafted item for Val-
entines Day.
CONDOM WEEK
Feb. 14-19. Stop by the Student
Store on Feb. 14 for a condom valen-
tine available with a $.25 donation
toPICASO. Come by on Wed. 16th
and tell iis all that you know about
safe sex. It might earn vou a free
condom.
PROTECT PALS
(Preparing for Life Skills) is an adult
volunteer program which matches
responsible adults with troubled
youth between the ages of 7-17 in
Pitt County. Volunteers must be
atleas 18 and have their own trans-
portation. If you are interested in
becoming a PALS volunteer, please
call Sarah Newton at 758-3554. We
need caring adults to make a differ-
ence in a child's life, so please call
today!
THE NEXT MEETING OF
GAMMA BETA PHI
will be held on Feb. 15 at 5:00pm in
room 244 Mendenhall. All mem-
bers who signed up on the service
project committee need to plan on
remaining after the meeting for a
few minutes, all members are en-
couraged to attend For more info,
contact Allison at 931-8285.
MODELS WANTED
a fashion show will be held to ben-
efit the Greenville Community
Shelter on March 24, 1994 at the
Mendenhall Student Center. If
interested please contact the Belk
Residence Hall at 757-6119 by
Feb. 28,1994.
ATTENTION HORSE LOV-
ERS!
Spring will soon be in the air, it's
a great time for horseback riding.
The ECU Equestrian club mem-
bers and staff would like to in-
vite you and any new comers out
for a meeting at Rock Springs
Stables, to see various horse
riding lessons and meet w train-
ers. (Loc. approx. 7 miles out on
N43 past Hospital on rt.) Date:
Sat. Feb. 19at l:30info. 355-1515
MFWMAN CATHOLIC
CENTER
Lent begins Ash Wed. Feb. 16. A
special Ash Wed. masses: 12 noon
in Great Room of mendenhall Stu-
dent Center and 5:30pm at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th St.
at the foot of College Hill Drive.
MtHHMMMMlHi
�4
�"�PWPHPPP





The East Carolinian
February 10, 1994
What's On Tap?
Friday, Feb. 11
W. Basketball, away
at American. Washington, D.C.
7:00 p.m.
M. Indoor Track, away
at Husker Invit Lincoln. Neb
M. Tennis, away
at VCU Invitational. Richmond.
Va 1 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 12
M. Basketball, home
vs. Old Dominion, 7 p.m.
Indoor Track, away
at Husker Invit Lincoln, Neb.
M. Tennis, away
at VCU Invitational. Richmond,
Va at 1 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 13
W. Basketball, away
at George Mason. Fairfax, Va
3 p.m.
Baseball, home
vs. Virginia State (DH). 2 p.m.
M. Tennis, away
at VCU Invit Richmond. Va
1p.m.
The 411
Monday, Jan. 24
W. Basketball, away
lost to Old Dominion. 87-53
Tuesday, Jan. 25
M&W swimming, home
men lost to UNC, 132-98
women lost to UNC. 143-92
Men's CAA Leaders
STANDINGS
Team Conference GBOverall
JMU 7-2 77814-6 700
UNCW 7-2 .77814-6 .700
ODU 6-2 .750 1.514-6 .700
ECU 5-4 556 213-8 .619
UR 4-4 .500 39-11 .450
GMU 3-6 .333 58-13
381AU2-5 286 45-14 .263
W&M 1-5 .167 52-15 .118
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Kent Culuko. JMU20.5
Tim Fudd. AU18.8
Odell Hodge. ODU187
Donald Ross. GMU18 1
Lester Lyons, ECU17.1
Rebounding Avg
David Cully. W&M96
Shent EL-Sanadily. UNCW 8.3
Odell Hodge. ODU8.1
Kenwan Alford. GMU7.6
Clayton Ritter. JMU76
Assist Avg
Troy Manns. GMU7.1
Kevin Larkin. ODU4.9
Kevin Swann. ODU48
Drew Phillips. UNCW4.4
Curtis McCants. GMU4.1
Field Goal
Clayton Ritter, JMU610
Anton CHI, ECU.539
Kass Weaver. UR.535
Odell Hodge. ODU.527
Kevin Swann, ODU.504
Free Throw
Kent Cuiuko. JMU920
Kevin Swann. ODU.865
Christian Ast. AU.833
Lester Lyons, ECU.825
Matt Verkey. W&M816
3-pt Field Goal
Kent Culuko. JMU521
Darren McLmton. JMU 436
Corey Stewart. UNCW .435
Skipp Schaefbauer,ECU 419
Ds-ryl Franklin. AU.418
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
Old Dominion8.3
James Madison6 1
East Carolina5.4
UNC Wilmington2.0
Richmond-0.5
George Mason-48
American-7.1
William & Mary-87
Rebounding Margin
UNC Wilmington49
East Carolina3.0
Richmond1.9
Old Dominion1.4
George Mason0.9
James Madison-07
American-1.3
William & Mary-4.5
Field Goal
James Madison497
UNC Wilmington45.9
Old Dominion44 7
East Carolina44.3
Richmond43.7
William & Mary427
George Mason42 5
American41 5
Def. Field Goal
Old Dominion43 5
UNC Wilmington43 6
East Carolina43 7
James Madison44 6
George Mason45.9
Richmond45.9
William & Mary467
American496
Sports
Page 13
Wolfpack handle Lady Pirates
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Tomekia Fruky Blackmon, shown earlier this year, has been a bright
spot on a struggling Pirate roster. She is averaging 1 5 points per game.
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
The Lady Pirates were
soundh beaten78-49bytheN.C
State Wolfpack List night in
Minges Coiesium. Once again,
ECU played great defense early,
but a poor transition game and
sloppv shooting were their
downfall.
East Carolina shot a meager
23 6 percent tor the game, while
turning the ball over 16 times to
the Lady Pack. On the other
hand .C. State shot 51.7 per-
cent, and had tour players scor-
ing in double figures.
The Lady Wolfpack jumped
out to a 16-9 lead behind the
strom' earlv shooting of Nicole
Mitchell, who would finish the
game with 12 points on 6-9 shoot-
ing.
Howe er, with 7:17 remain-
ing in the halt, East Carolina tied
the game at lb on a Danielle
Charlesworth steal and ensuing
lav-up, ending a seven-point run.
The Lady Pirates would stay
within few points of the lead,
following up Lady Wolfpack bas-
kets from underneath,butlet the
lead slip away from them, and
found themseh es down 32-22 at
the half-time buzzer.
ECU was led in scoring by
"Frukv" Blackmon, Danielle
Charlesworth and Shay Haves,
who each scored four points in
the half.
In the halt, the Lady Pirates
shot only 22 percent on 9-of-41
shooting. Charlesworth also
added three steals and an assist.
N.C. State came out strong
behinf the excellent shooting of
center Kolleen Kreul.
The Ladv 'Pack would in-
crease their lead to 13 on another
Kreul layup from underneath
with 16:29 remaining.
Blackmon would match that
basket with a lav-up of her own.
then Tracy Kelley followed with
a 17-foot jumper to pull the Lady
Pirates within nine points of the
lead at 38-29.
With intense full-court pres-
sure, N.C. State methodically
took control of the game, steadily
increasing their lead, and led 53-
35 on a Kreul jumper with 10:13.
The Lady Pirates would tem-
porarily lose the services of
Belinda Cagle, who sat until the
4:57 mark.
"She had a badly sprained
ankle, and that might have been
it said Lady Pirate Head Coach
Rosie Thompson. "Plus, we're
used to plaving in here when it's
cold, we're not used to the heat
The punishment was just be-
ginning, and the Lady Pirate fans
sank slowly into their seats,
watching Kolleen Kreul domi-
nate on 8-11 second-half shoot-
ing.
A Kolleen Kreul lav-in at 5:16
See WOMEN oaae 16
Gators chomp Pirates over weekend
Dave Ponci
Assistant Sports Editor
Who wouldn't want to go to
Florida during the winter1 The sun,
warm weather and palm trees make
it an great place to visit to get away
from those dreary Greenville days.
However, after two days in
Gainesville, ECL's baseball team
was more than happy to come
home, after being swept in a three-
game series against the Florida
Gators.
In the season opener, Florida
rallied from being down 2-1 to take
the 4-2 victorv behind the strong
pitching of Rob Bonanno (1 -0),who
went eight innings, allowing two
earned runs on just five hits. Danny
Wheeler pitched the ninth inning
and collected his first save of the
season.
I thought we played very hard
and very aggressive coach
Overtonsaid. 'It w as a well played
game by both clubs. We just came
out on the short end.
Lvle Hartgrove (0-1) took the
loss tor the Pirates, pitching 713
inningsand givingup three-earned
runsand 11 hits. Billy I ayton threw
the final 23 inning for ECU.
The Pirates were led at the plate
bv catcher Chad Triplert, l-fbr-3
v ith a homerun, and center-fielder
amieBorel who went l-for-4atthe
plate.
The second half of the double
header also did not go as well.
East Carolina jumped out to an
earlv three-run lead against Florida
starter lohn Kaufman (1-0),scatter-
ing nine hits in 2 3 innings against
the hurler. Once again, the Pirates
failed tohold the lead as L F whittled
away at the lead, eventually win-
ning the contest 5-4.
The lethal blow was dealt by
Gator PI 1 fames Eidam, who's two-
run double in the eighth inning
was more than Coach Overtoil's
Gill leads
ECU over
American
(AP)�Anton Gill scored
17and LesterLvonsadded 13
to lead East Carolina Univer-
sity to a 73-62 Colonial Ath-
letic Association victor over
American University on Mon-
day.
The Pirates improved to
13-8 and 5-4 in conference
play, while American fell to
5-16,2-7.
After dueling to a 31-31
halftime tie, the Eagles opened
the second period by scoring
eight ot the first 11 points in-
cluding two three-pointers by
Christian Ast. From thatpoint,
the Pirates posted a 14-0 run
culminated by a Chuckie
Robinson lay up with 12:44 re-
maining to lead 48-38.
American weathered the
Pirates' barrage of low-post
scoring and crawled back into
the game switching from a
zone to a man-to-man de-
fense. When Duane Gilliam
hit two free-throws with 3:48
remaining, the Eagles had cut
the Pirate lead to 60-58.
But the swarming East
Carolina defense stymied
.American on offense espe-
ciallv in the post. The Pirates
held the Eagle's usual scoring
leader, Tim Fudd, to a sea-
son-low eight points.
Leading by 62-58 with
3:02 remaining, the Pirates
held on, hitting nine of 10 free-
throws down the stretch for
the win.
Ast and Gilliam led the
Eagles with 18 each.
File Photo
Chad Triplett, seen here last year, moves into the siarting catcher
position tor the Pirates this spring. ECUs home opener is Sunday.
Left-fielder Jason Head swiped
two bases for the Pirates, while
transfer 1B Scott Bermingham went
See BASEBALL page 15
squad could overcome. ECL man-
aged one run in theninth,but it was
all they could muster off of Darren
McClellan, who relieved Kaufman
in the sixth inning.
Schueler
gets Jordan
(AP) � Even though Michael
Jordan may have no chance of mak-
ing the Chicago White Sox, general
manager Ron Schueler felt he had no
choice but to bring him to spring
training.
"As much improvement as he
has made, it's still a million-in-one
shot Schueler said Monday after
Jordan signed a minor league con-
tract followinga workoutata packed,
made-for-media event.
But Schueler, a former major
See JORDAN page 14
Pirates face tough challenge
in Old Dominion on Sat.
Compiled by Brad Oldham
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
Minges Coliseum has been a
very tough place to play for visit-
ing teams this year. ThePiratesare
8-1 at home and hope ?i keep the
success going when they host Old
Dominion on Saturday night.
"Minges has been great head
coach Eddie Payne said. It's not
just that people are showing, but
how loud and helpful they have
been. Thev have given us that extra
lift when we have needed it
The team is coming off a three-
game road trip in which the Hues
went 2-1. Both wins came from
CAA opponents George Mason
(,S3-7i) and American (71-62). The
loss on the trip came to 1 urman,
85-80.
ECU point guard Kareem
Richardson went down against the
Patriots with a sprained ankle and
sat out the American game, but is
expected back tor Saturday.
As of Wednesday the Men
archs (6-2, 14-6) were only a halt
game out of first behind leaders
lames Madison and UNC
Wilmington.
()DU has som explosive weap-
ons that the Pirates will have to
contend with. Sophomore center
andC A A pla it i it the week,Odell
Odge, will bring his conference
Petey Sessoms, seen
here last year, had 22
points and five rebounds
against ECU earlier this
year. Hodge had 19
points and a leam-high
10 rebounds against
the Pirates.
Sports world mourns death
(AP) � Two days after
Livingstone College quarterback
Darrell Ardrey died in a head-on
collision witha truck,oneofhis friends
cannot believe Ardrey is gone.
"I called his home in Winston,
just so 1 could hear his voice on the
answering machine said George
Washington, who played football
with Ardrev since their sophomore
vear in high school.
Ardrev, thequarterback who led
the Livingstone College Fighting
Bears for the past four years, drove to
Concord Friday night to meet Wash-
ington and others for Barber Scotia
College's homecoming party.
He drove separately so he could
leave earlv Saturday morning and
return to his Winston-Salem apart-
ment, Washington said.
He was killed in a wreck about
7:30 a.m. on U.S. 601 bypass in Con-
cord, said Sgt. T.R. Templeton of the
Concord Police Department.
Ardrey, who was trying to pass
inhis 1989 Acura Legend,hita 50,000-
pound truck head-on, Templeton
said.
Wilbert Ben Dow, 48, of High
Point, drove the truck owned by
Hvdro Conduit Corp. of
Thomasville. He was treated and
released atCabamis Memorial Hos-
pital.
Templeton estimated that at
impact, the truck driver was travel-
ing about 20 mph and Ardrey about
50 mph. 1 he speed limit was 55, but
driving conditions were poor,
Templeton said.
Washington, an of tensive tickle,
had blocked for Ardrey since 1987,
whenthevueresophomoresatWest
CharlotteHigh School. After gradu-
ation, they decided to attend
Livingstone and play for the Bears.
Ardrev was the only child of
Gwendolyn Perry of Charlotte.
The funeral was at 1 p.m.
Wednesday at Pleasant Flill Baptist
Church in Charlotte.
leading 21.4 points per game with
him. Odge leads the league in
blocked shots with 2.9 per game,
and is second in rebounds with 9.6
per game.
Guard Petey Sessoms will be a
ton e for I ester I yons and
Richardson to contend with
Sessoms is tilth iii the i onfereni i
in sidimg, with 17.1 pour
File Photo
game.
"Thev Hodge, Sessomsare
certainly two of the premiere play-
ers in the league Pa vne said. "Thev
compliment their other players so
well that it is tough to double them
up
I he Pirates play their last two
home games against William &
M.ii v md Ri hmond.
Student tickets available
(SID) � Student ticket pick-
up is Friday, Feb. 11 forSaturday's
basketball game.
The Athletic Ticket Office in
Minges Coliseum will be open
Friday, 8 a.m5 p.m. for student
pick-up. Students must present a
valid ECU ID for the opportunity
to receive a free ticket on a first-
come, first-serve basis. A limited
number of 1 2 price guest tick-
ets are available. On Saturday,
any remaining tickets will be
made available for sale begin-
ning at 5:30 p.m. on a first-come,
first-serve basis. A capacity
crowd is expected for this game.
Tip-off is at 7 p.m. Student
ticket holders must present their
ECU ID at the gates.





14 The East Carolinian
February 10, 1994
JORDAN
Continued from page 13
league pitcher, said there was little
-doubtaboutinvitingtheworld'smost
famous basketball player � albeit a
retired one�to spring training next
week in Sarasota, Fla.
"If I don't give him the opportu-
nity, 27 other general managers
would. In a second
Why?Jordanhasn'tplayed base-
ball since he was in high school and is
30yearsold, trying toplay a sport that
those at the highest level have been
playing most of their lives.
"Because of who he is and his
athleticability'Schuelersaid. "We're
talking about the top athlete in the
world
And one who would draw
crowds wherever he went, as he did
Monday during a 90-minute work-
out at the Illinois Institute of Technol-
ogy, not far from Comiskey Park.
Jordan took more than 50 cuts in
the batting cage and hit only several
line drives. Healso fielded grounders
and shagged fly balls in, of all places,
a gym.
Baskets that he reached so easily
in leading the Chicago Bulls to three
straight NBA titles were raised to the
roof. And the baseball made a strange
thud as it hit the wood floor. One
grounderwentrightthroughjordan's
legs.
But it's hitting that will deter-
mine how far Jordan will go in this
improbable quest.
"He can hit pitches in the mid-
80s said Ed Gottfried, an Illinois
Institute of Technology pitcher, who
threw to Jordan on Monday. "I don't
knowaboutaguylikeRogeraemens.
Attention:
EditorialMeetingat 5:00. Iadmit
I can't bribe you to show up with
cakes and ale, but I can guarantee
that all who show up will not be
marked absent and therefore no
bad karma will be set upon you
and ,hey, we all need one less thing
to worry about.
With love and no cakes,
Q
But I think he has a better than aver-
age shot of making it
The prevailing feeling is that Jor-
dan will not be able to handle the 90
mph pitches in the majors, despite his
athletic ability. But the challenge for
Jordan is proving those who doubt
him wrong.
'If sgoingtobe tough reacting to
the ball. But he can leam said White
Sox second basemanjoey Cora, who
has worked out with Jordan the last
two weeks.
"I've never been afraid to fail
said Jordan, who retired from the
Bulls last October, claiming he had
nothing left to prove and wanted to
spend more time with his family and
away from the spotlight.
"That's something you have to
deal with in reality. You're not al-
ways going to be successful. I think
I'm strong enough as a person to
accept failure. But I can't accept not
trying
Not that Jordan expects to fail at
his newest venture.
LEASED PARKING AVAILABLE
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"I think I've improved tremen-
dously said Jordan, who's been
working out underneath Comiskey
Park for the last two months with
some White Sox players and person-
nel. "My motto has been, 'It's no
gimmick
Jordan told a gathering of 200
reporters and photographers he
would consider going to the minor
leagues if the White Sox thought he
had the potential to make it to the
majors.
"The level of competition will
dictate how far he goes, whether he
would make the big league club or
hastogototheminors'saidSchueler.
Jordan's contract is with the
Nashville Sounds of the Triple-A
American Association
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SPORTS
SUPPLEMENTS
AVAILABLE
CALL
752-3880
j





February 10. 1994
The East Carolinian 15
Williams getting ready for return
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) � Top-
ranked North Carolina must guard
against feeling too confident with
the return of leading scorer Donald
Williams, coach Dean Smith says.
"There is a tendency to think
we have Williams back and we're
back to normal and that could be a
real problem said Smith.
Williams, sidelined for six
games with a slightly separated left
shoulder, mav return Thursday
night against Maryland.
The Tar Heels (19-3) have won
six straight since Williams, averag-
ing 16.2 points, went down in an 81 -
77 loss at Virginia on Jan. 19.
The MVP of last year's Final
BASEBALL
Four also missed three games in
early January with a foot injury.
Smith said Williams practiced
early in the week for the first time
without pain and, if he continues to
progress, he could play about 15
minutes � most likely as a reserve
� against the Terrapins (12-b).
"His conditioning isn't what
wewould likeSmithsaid. "1 think
it will be slow getting him back in
A bigger question is will Will-
iams' shooting touch return?
He scored just five points in 2
1 2 games after the foot injury. He
was averaging 20.5 a game.
Williams is the team's top 3-
point threat, and opponents have
been using sagging defenses with
him out of the lineup. But replace-
ment Dante Calabria has filled in
well, averaging 9.6 points and lead-
ing the team with 30 3-pointers.
Smith's hardest coaching job
now will begetting the playing time
for Williams, point guard Derrick
Phelps, Calabria and freshman Jeff
Mclnnis, who has been playing with
more confidence the last month.
"The first time Donald came
back from the toe injury) Dante felt
he didn't play real well, "Smith said.
"We'll trv to get him time in any
game the rest of the year because
he's a very important part of the
team
Continued from page 13
2-for-2 in the losing effort.
Rich Rosenberger(0-1) took the
loss for ECU, giving up one run in
relief of Pirate starter Johnny Beck.
Two right-handers, Mikejacobsand
Billy Lay ton also saw action for ECU
in the contest.
The final gameof the threegame
series was played on Sunday.
Florida finished off the Pirates
on Sunday with a 7-3 victory be-
hind the strong pitching of south-
Olson's Trivia Quiz
Q. According to Sports
Illustrated, which major league
team is worth the most
money?
saa(UEA V�A M3N Ml "V
paw Robert Dodd (1-0), who pi tched
a gem, giving up only two earned
runs in eight innings of work. Dodd
struckoutseven Pirateswhile walk-
ing one.
"We saw some very positive
signs Overton said. "We are
pleased with the way each of our
three starters pitched. We just have
to keep builing on that
ECU starter Mike Sanbum (0-1)
struggled, giving up six earned runs
and 10 hits in seven innings of work.
Leftie Richie Blackwell and Ja-
son Mills pitched in relief for the
Pirates.
Rightfielder Lamont Edwards
led the way for the Pirates with a 2-
for-3 afternoon at the plate.
ECU (0-3) will look to rebound
from the losses on Sunday, Feb. 13
during a doubleheader against Vir-
ginia State at Harrington Field. The
first pilch is at 2 p.m.
Two Full-Time Artists
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than you were.

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Starting Feb.23rd
1994 we will also
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Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. .We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.





mmmmmmmmm
KRIS P I
but bet
MIKE, rnvear,yflMrave nothing to
gh you iffu' el from hell
when we sf&Ujxieet'JKain is never to tell I
e wfth cajajbck;
istftUJ
j this VlTefiftnes t?HF Lo- Kris
That's Amore
4 �.
I can,
aPP
TOILET PAPFR.
and the
.

TRACEDi de.
i
No matti
it all comes back Ii
Schoolmv rtmeb i pr .rit
but nothing .� me.
1 love you
JERROD: Thanks foi
� mere. This is our first V-
Day together and I knoi
have main more! i li
;
TO DOUGLAS BARRETT CLINE: Roses
� the man ot
mv dreams, and I o i
Amy
JHI
are you? TH
TO BRIAN PATRICK POW-
ERS: the greatest day
I've ever known" that was the
day I ft in love with you!
Love Kriscina
BURT, You arelhe wiriajeneal4) mv wings. I have
met hactgirfg tlext to my bed so that
i ma fe together on that breathing
; tne) Flotrt (and Kemple)
SCOTr,vo.iv
and 1 care mo
DEAR GOTH
times, v. hat w
but, baby, youj
shark-repellent, fl
.ib-TUtvou than I
can express. Let's.nvke t a great
Valentine s Dav, Lft;? and Kisses,
-
Lvnn l
EE A OV irhes,
i all haven't parried til you've had
nartini in a hot rub with m-H'l-
ddit ens and
cock.
ino
me some rough
th loonies and all,
wn. Love and bat
CHLRIE, roses are red violets are
blue its be n 6 yrs. and ! still love
py Valentines Day. Love,
Bill
ARlYN, ROBIN, LEAH, AMY AND
TRISHA. Ill be your valentine So
in Cancun. Be love
�squirrel.
PHI SIGIA ptAou-nienth world to
' nirrv fce be brothers
raj AiV VVfiSETrffilDNLY
COED fmxORERA'TF.RTY' Q
CAMPUS Happy,ValrfttrnftS �
FraternalK. I idvr. Si
DEMETRIL
was i
soul. I
v. as unhap
joy for er
-your cool
urheart would
me. If I
body and
. aJKTR. vour Strong arms vsoula'protect me. And if i
Mdpne, you would be my dowry, my sunshine
Happy iSii Sharon
3

WOMEN
continued from page 13
N.C. State (78)
k
m ro-a
M.lchell33 6-9
Howard36 5-11
Webb27 3-9
OConnell15 0-1
Floyd26 2-5
Hodges12 4-5
Davis19 1-3
Kreul25 9-i6
McLeod7 1-1
made the score 59-45, and started
the Lady Wolfpack on a 19-4 run
that would continue until the end
of the game.
In that span, small forward
Lisa Hodges, who was playing
with a broken nose, added a three-
pointer and a lay-up, finishing
the game with 10 points.
When asked about the 78-49
loss, Thompson simply said, "We
did not play smart defensively
on the post, and early, when you
are shooting 22 percent, you're
not going to beat many people
The Lady Pirates travel to the
Washington D.C. area to play
American and George Mason on
the 11th and 13th, respectively.
� "The kids have confidence
going into American since they
can beat them (ECU beat Ameri-
can 81-74 on Jan.l6th) said
Coach Thompson. "But if the
team that showed up today, in
terms of shooting, it'll be a real
difficult time at American. They
have nowhere to go but up
it
ma
M
4-
0-0
0-0
�2
0-0
i 2
3-4
0-0
rb
o a
M 2
2-76
1-7 2
1-3 2
0-4
1-3
3-i:
5-9
0-1
12
17
7
0
6
10
3
21
Tolals 200 31-60 10-12 14-51 19 22 7?
Percentages: FG5I7. FT .833. 3-Point Goals-6 .
750 (Howard 3. Hodges 2. Webb). Team re-
bounds: I. Blocked ilaMif II Webb 2. Floyd. Kreul).
Turnovers: 22 (Davis 6. Howard 4. Webb 3. Floyd
3. Mitchell 2. Kreul 2.OConnell. Hodges). Steals: 8
(Mitchell 4. Webb4).
ECU (49)
�ftrb
mm-am-ao-tato tp
Charlesworth392-92-22-350 6
Cagle161-61-21-200 3
Baker320-121-21-318 1
Rodgerson81-51-10-0'00 3
James71-40-00-001 2
Sutton92-70-00-000 4
Hayes182-31-24-502 5
Walierstrom120-60-0l-l01 0
Allpress102-50-01-100 6
Blackmon322-84-86-801 8
Kellev174-73-43-913 11
Totals200 17-7213-2123-37716 49
Percentages:FG-236. FT6193-PointGoals2-l3,
154 (Allpreis 2-4). Team rebounds
UNC-W3038�68
ECU2337�60
Compiled by Davc Pond
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a mandatory
sports
winters
meeting
today at
5:30. All
those people
who cannot
attend must
have a
written
excuse from
Epstein's
mother.
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FRI FEB 18 Dillon Fence SAT FEB 18 Cold Sweat ?
?:
� G
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lNEEDYOURVOTEl
Hey Carrot Top Fans,
Carrot Top was recently nominated forSTAND-
UP COMEDIAN of the YEAR AWARD. The
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calling: 1-800-545-8683 anytime of the day
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The Carrot Top Fan Club
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Inside.��
Men's Section:
Opponent ProfilesP-l
Season (hitlookP-2
New lacesP-3
Relief AnalystsP- 3
Women's Section:
Season Outlookp. 7
Coach ProfileP-7
Schedule Outlookp. 8
Special:
Player featuresp 2-6
Bill JamesP-3
1993 hnai Statistic!P-3
� Mil, 'll wi��a��
A publication of The East Carolinian. Thursday, February 10,1994
Mar 19
Mar 2 i
Mar JS
Mar 26
Mai 27
Mar 10
Apr 2
Apr i
Apr j
Apr h
Apr 9
Apr 10
Apr 12
Apr 1 t
Apr 19
Apr Ji
Apr 24
Apr 2 7
Apr 10
May 1
Mav 4
May 7
May 8
Mav 14
May 18-
Virginia St. (DH)
al VCU
VCU
Howard (DH!
Howard
St. Augustine's (DH)
Virginia Tech
Virginia Tech
Temple
Temple
Temple
Yale
UNC-W (DH)
UNC-W
Yale
Erskine (DH)
Erskine
Georgia Southern
Georgia Southern
Georgia Southern
Towson State
ODU (DHS
ODU
Barton
at Richrrond DH
al Richmond
al Kinston Indians (EX i
at Camphrll
WiHiam&MarytDH)
William X Mary
Duke�
ONC-CH
ai NC State
ai MU (DHi
a! MU-
at UNCCH�
Hfe&it
Duke�
CarhpbefJ
at GMU 'DH)-
a! GMU
���. Wesieyan
12 CAA Championship�
� � �
Your guide to help map the course of the 1994 seasons on the diamond � � �
ok
��&


(DH)-Doubte Headers
"Colonial Athletii Assoi i ition
�Radio Broad asl on the Pirati
L





Pagf 1
NAVIGATOR IW4
"Baseball is fathers anb
sons. Baseball is ttjr grnrra-
tions. looping batUtoarb foreber
toith a million apparitions of
stubs anb balls, cricket anb
rounbrrs. anb tljf games the
Jriquois plareb before the (En-
glish tame. Baseball is fathers
anb sons planing tatrh. the
profounb archaic song of birth,
grotuth. age ant) beath. vine
biamonb encloses tutiat toe are
-Donalb 5)all
$)oct
Location. Fairfax. Va
Enrollment: 20.308
Nickname. Patriots
Colors: Green & Gold
Home Field. Spuhler Stadium
Coach: Bill Brown
Record at GMU. 341-274-2
Career Record. 341-274-2. 12th yr
Lettermen ReturningLost: 83
Players to Watch m 1994:
C J.J. Picollo11
6-1,215. Sr. 314. 10 HR. 38 RBI
LF: Bryan Phillips 9
5-10. 180. So. .300. 3 HR. 36 RBI
CF Jerry Frulio 8
5-8. 168. Sr, .284. 5 triples. 13 SB
RHP. Don Anderson 38
6-6, 220. Sr. 5-3. 4 94 ERA
RHP: Brian Grzelaczyk �12
205 Jr. 4-1 3.62 ERA
JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY
Location Harnsonburg. Va
Enrollment: 11.250
Nickname Dukes
Colors Purple & Gold
Home field Long Field Mauck Stadium
Coach. Kevirj Anderson
Record at J$HIF� Year
Career Recora ?"&&,
Lettermen fl$lwnrngo�LJ 7 6
Players to vaatch T994
2B Keviti Nerincj'14 ���
6-Li85Jr. .331,4 HR. 36 RBI
C. JasorTrotlp 19 : . . .
6-1 190. Sr. .304,7 HR. 27 RBI
CF JoeHigman18
6-2. 185. So. .277. 8 HR, 37 RBI
LHP: Greg Whiteman 13
6-2. 180, Jr. 2-3. 3.41 ERA
RHP Casey Brookens 17
6-0. 175. So. 4-2.3 71 ERA
UNC-WILMINGTON
CAA
TheC A looks to be as competi-
tive in 1M�4 .Is- ever. Rated the fourth
toughest conference in the nation, the
A-chami
onshipracew ill
be wide open,
withmost teams
By Dave
Pf)D
the ti'iinii
berth in ti
Location Wilmington N C
Enrollment. 8.000
Nickname: Seahawks
Colors. Green. Gold & Navy Blue
Home field Brooks Field
Coach Marc Scalf
Record at urC,4'3;f:
Career Rec&rr: 49:67; 3ra year
Lettermen ReltfiTtng7lost 16 6
Players to wafchw 1394
1B-P ChnsstSBr$e3
6-5. 20tS38� 30 RBI. 6-4 w
OF: Keith Barnhardt 7
6-1. 185. .258. 19 RBI
OF Chris Hoistad 21
6-2. 190 194. 12 RBI
RHP. Brian Smith 28
6-0. 185. Sr. 4-5. 4 09 ERA
3B Battle Holley 8
6-0 184 Sr. 290.22 Kin 217 AB
and gaining an auto
MCA tournament
George Mason I luversiry had
an excellent season in 1993, going 33-
15 and earning a berth in the C A
West Regional in Tempe V rhePa-
triots finished th son m
first place in the( it I
Carolina in the l A fburnamei
Howevei HeadC oachBillBrown
lost 12athletes from last .ear - squad,
with four players signing professional
baseball contracts, and it will be diffi-
� for him to continue his recent suc-
cess
The Patriots - starting relation is
ledb senior Don Anderson (5-3 4.94),
and junior Brian (, Irzelac zyk(4-1,3.62)
Commgoutoffhebullpenwillberight-
h r Me Roth and junior Steve
�� mster trom Ft Scott (
munity L ollege Fhe two hurlers will
be competing tor the role ot closer
The infield will be made up of
underclassmen who have seen little
action over the past twoseasons Some
favorites to win starting jobs in-
clude senior Brendon Pickett who is
battling tor first base. ,my junior amie
Rnnkwood ,vho in contention tor
Senior err In 284 sb) is
a two-year starter and should pla cen-
ter field tor the Pats while Br n
Phillips (.300. 3HR, 36 RBI) as bee
moved to left field from third base tor
the '94 seas, m
fter losing so man qualirv pla -
ers, it will be tough tor Brown s I All
squad to repeat as regular seasi m i ham-
pions. Thev'll probabh be bai k in the
race net season
Alter an a erage 24-24-1 seasi n in
1993, James Madison University is
1 ng to rebound and compete tor
firstplaceintheCAA New bead coach
Kevin Anderson w ill not have to search
for run prodiH tior for the offense that
he inherited is erv sound from top h
bottom, with a good mi of power,
speed, and bat control However, 1L
is a en young team o erall, and this
could be their downfall.
lop returnees, junior second
baseman Kevin Nehring I 331 4. 36)
andseniorcatcherJasonTmUol n ;
27), will anchor the infield, whik � i
ter field will again be the home I i
sophomore Joe Higman I 2 , B
The Ouke- pitching roster is
heavil) stacked with young talent The
most experienced hurlers are south-
juniors Sott Forster and.reg
Whiteman Forstei Vd the I993staffin
several categories mostnotabl) -tarts
(12), striki nd innings
pit. bed (68 - Hew ill -tart in most
it not allot bis 1994 outings. Before last
season, Whiteman moved fron "�
bullpen int i start rol
;tinnT�lli:i�h'IH,L'
Location Norfolk. Va.
Enrollment 16. 729
Nickname Monarchs
Colors: Slate Blue & Silver
Home field. Bud Metheny Complex
Coach Pat McMabon
Record at OD�fff T
Career RecorliiiUiiffl, 4th year
Lettermen Rem�n" 169
Players to �� '
OF Kevin G: D
6-? " ' o :$�$.apRBI 45 SB
2B Jude D �.o�$
5-7, 165. SV344 1 HR.36RBI
3B Ryan Beard 7
6-0. 180, Jr. .339 16 RBI
LHP. John Smith 32
6-0. 195. 7-2. 2.44 ERA. 88 K
RHP Anthony Eannacony 31
6-3. 220. 2-0. 2 03 :
UNIVERSITY OF RICHMON
Location Richmond
Enrollment 2,800
Nickname Spiders
Colors Blue& Red
Home field: Pitt Field
Coactr. Ron Attons
Records! UFI 233 r
Career Record 233216-3. 9 years
Lettermen Returning, Lest 13 4
Players 10 watch in f994'
1B Sean Casey 20
6-3. 200, So. 386. 2 HR 31 RBI
RF Tom Scoscia 33
6-0. 190, Sr. 323 4 hR 37 RBI
C. Chris Piela7
5-10. 170. Sr. 281. 18 SB
RHP Wayne Hoy 22
6-4.215, Sr. 5-3, 3 17 ERA
RHP Bobby St Pierre 12
6-1. 190. So 6-2. 4.09 ERA
Photo courtesy of SID
The CAA is one of the toughest baseball conferences in the
nation. GMU took the regular season crown in 1993.
ished tremendously. Heisexpected to
start again in lgu4.
The team's overall laek of experi-
ence will hurt Anderson's chances at a
1LW4 conference title but the Dukes
will get better as tile year progresses,
and. ould make some noise late in the
season
Third ear UNC-W ilmington
head coach Marc Seal! willbecounting
on a deeper pitching staff and an im-
proved defense in 1994 after finishing
last season with a sub- .erall
record
I he Seahawks pit. lung start will
be led b veteran rigbt-handei !
smith, who came back from elbow
surgery to have a respectable si
I 09 ERA) joining Smith i
�seahawk rotation u ill beC hrisMcBride
(M 4.61 I R Keith Petrus(4-5 4 4s
I freshman southpaw ason
M. Bride, on his non-pit. banc
days, v. ill man tirst base lor L C W,
where be has started since be was a
freshman fhe intu lei
last summer's Virgjnia'sVa
batted 281 with 30 RBI last year and
should continue to improve.
The Seahawks face
Mar in the outfield, and will look to
junior Keith Barnhardt I 258 I" RBI)
,nd senior Chris I
tor leadership
tter losing their 1993 statistical
leaders in virtual!) every categon to
graduation, the Seahawks will prob-
ably not be a factor in the conference
.ace
Old Dominion University tin
ished second in the. onfereru e lasl eat
w itba 31-11 overall record I leadcoach
Pat McMahon lost three ke play ers to
the pro ranks alter the 1993 season, but
qualib recruiting should offset those
244 1 RA, 72 k, 5CG) will lead a tal-
ented Monarch staff into battle in 1994.
He will be backed b) right-hand.
.was 2-0 with a
ERAii Brett
Wheeler, who went 12-0 and had 177
strikeout- tor Kecoughtan I Is last sea-
son
I senior 2B
udel ' � � ii nd junior 3B
Ryan � BI l reshman
lommv staples � , at (iranbv
1 IS) and sophomore Dan Almonte will
i ompete tor the shortstop position
!i i outfielder Kevin Gibbs
185, 22 RBI, 45 SI Iv a sopho-
more and will to ti
, tpposing tear
See CAA page 11
WILLIAM & MARY
Location. Williamsburc
Enrollment 5.300
Nickname Tribe
Colors Green, Gold & Silver
Home field. Cary Field
CoacftvdirnsHr
Recorrkt 219-1
dm � .��
LettprmeiJfn l
Players fo watch. In 1994
SS StKrtfgRt !2
5-li:7� MlgflB, 481 OP'
1B MikeRubierti 13
6-1, 195. ,322, 9 hr. 46 RBI
LF, Matt Bestick 36
6-2,205, 293.30RBI. 12 SB
RHP Mike Ragsdale 14
6-0. 200.8-1, 3 59 ERA
LHP Adam Butler 23
6-2 225 2-3 2 92 ERA
NAVIGATOR STAFF
Volume I, Issue 2
Circulation: 12.000
General
Lindsay Fernandez
Aryrttslrfei Direa.
MattHege
Managing Editor
Gregory Dteken
Burl Aypock
EJjlt
Brian Olson
Assistant-Editor
Dave Pond
Special Thant
Robert S. Todd





NAVIGATOR 1994
Page 2
Pirates hope to continue winning tradition
East Carolina's winning tradi-
tion continued last season with
Head Coach Gary Overton's squad
going 41-19,
their 22nd I By DAVE
straight win- I POND
ning season. I Assistant Editor
However, the
Pirates will have to change their
game plan to stay competitive and
return to the NCAAs. The top three
power hitters from the '93 squad,
Pat Watkins, Lee Kushner, and
Chris West, are gone, along with
their combined 41 homers and 160
RBls.
On the mound, Overton will
again look to veteran Johnny Beck
to lead his staff. Last year Beck was
named a Second Team All-CAA se-
lection, and led the league in
strikeouts, with 88. He is consid-
ered as a pick for the 1994 pro draft.
Lyle Hartgrove and Mike
Sandburn, along with Beck, will
combine for most of ECU's starts,
which they gave Overton last sea-
son, going a combined 29-10 while
throwing over 325 quality innings
in 1993. The fourth and fifth start-
ers will be junior southpaw Richie
THE NAVIGATOR S CAA
PRESEASON RANKINGS
1. East Carolina
2. Old Dominion
3. George Mason
4. William & Mary
5. James Madison
6. Richmond
7. UNC-Wilmington
1992-3 IN REVIEW
STANDINGS
Team
Conference Overall
GMU 10-1 .909 33-15 .688
ODU 9-3 .750 31-11 738
ECU 11-7.611 41-19.683
UNCW 6-8 .429 26-29 .481
JMU 3-7-1 .300 24-24-1 .500
UR 3-8-1 .273 29-18-1 608
W&M 3-11 .214 24-19-1 .556
All-Colonial First Team Pos
File Photo
ers will be junior southpaw Richie -u;�� ctff and pxrellent
Blackwell andsemor Bob wharton p. most of their offensive power, but the quality of the.rp.tch.ns staff and excellent
�m ,r� i,cr � a umhnmore. � �-� xf- mm ��-m atr�n thp CAA Standings.
"Last year, as a sophomore,
Richie gave us some big wins
Overton said. "He won the second
game we played against UNC, and
also won the conference champion-
ship for us, against George Mason
the nraies iom musi �� ��� ��� r c�anftinc;
recruiting will keep coach Overton's 1994 team atop the CAA stand.n8s.
Jacobs, a two-sport athlete, re-
cently decided to take the spring
off from football to try out college
rorus, d�dm:icji5- .��� .
Relievers coming out of the baseball, which he starred at in
bullpen for ECU will include fresh- Smithfield-Selma High School,
man Ryan Kraft, sophomore Mike "Mike has an element o tough-
Jacobs! junior Billy Layton and se- ness about him which will make
nior Rich Rosenberger. h,m a very good relief pitcher
"Billv Layton, to us, may be the Overton said. There s no doubt
most underrated player on our that he's got the strongest arm on
staff Overton said. "He's a tough the team
compet.tor with a good breaking Beh.nd the plate, pffiMW 1�
ball Rogan is battling with Eddie
Loesner and Grant Harmon for the
starting position. Rogan has the job
going into Opening Day.
"The thing about Rogan that
stands out is his arm Overton said.
"And as we all know, that is where
catching begins
First base will be the new home
for junior college transfer Scott
Bermingham, and he will be backed
up by sophomore Jeff Causey. Sec-
ond base will once again for the
fourth year, belong to senior Green-
ville native Heath Clark. Backing
up Clark at second base could be
freshman Josh Constable if he is
not redshirted.
"Heath is the catalyst on de-
fense Overton said He's the kind
of player who makes things hap-
pen Clark started 50 games for
the Pirates last season, and drove in
four runs in the CAA tournament.
The closest race for a starting
job may very well be that at the
shortstop position. There are three
See PIRATES page 10
Geoff Edsell (ODU)
Lee Kushner (ECU)
Lonnie Goldberg (GMU)
Rob Mummau (JMU)
Alex Creighton (W&M)
Corey Broome (UNCW)
Greg Deares (GMU)
Kevin Gibbs (ODU)
Pat Watkins (ECU)
Steve Pitt (ECU)
Geoff Edsell (ODU)
John Smith (ODU)
Wayne Gomes (ODU)
Pat Watkins (ECU)
Bill Brown (GMU) Coach of Yr
Gary Overton (ECU) Coach of Yr
vine native hmui ����� �o - .
Beck will anchor Pirate pitching staff in 94
It has.
Johnny Beck's love for base-
ball began like most youths. One
day his dad
By Ashley
Neal
Staff Writer
took him out
into a field,
gave him a
glove and
began toss-
ing the ball to
the younger Beck. That was 15
years ago.
Beck has compiled 77 to 80
strikeouts per season for the Pi-
rates. He needs just 33 more to
become ECU's all-time strikeout
leader.
Today, Johnny looks at his fi-
nal Pirate baseball season with en-
thusiasm. Despite his success as a
pitcher, Beck realizes certain as-
pects of his game could still use
improvement.
"I have to get it into my head
that I can't strike everyone out
Beck said. "There are times I need
to throw something other than
fastballs
Aside from the mound, Beck
has made another contribution to
Pirate Athlet-
ics. Beck, dur-
ing his sopho-
more and jun-
ior years, rep-
resented the
baseball team
as a member of
ECU's Student
Athletic Advi-
sory Council.
The panel
helps athletes
stay abreast of
alterations and
improvements
concerning
university ath-
letics.
Origi-
nally, offers from Georgia, Vir-
ginia and Western Carolina caught
Beck's attention during high
Johnny Beck
allow him to play for a Division I
level university close to home.
"Honestly, I believe it was best
for me to come
here Beck said.
"I sat down with
my dad and we
decided it to-
gether
That conver-
sation gave Beck
the motivation to
play collegiate
baseball.
Johnny s dad
told him to sit
down and write
three things he
wanted to ac-
complish in base-
ball from that
day forward. He
told Johnny to
make the goals slightly unattain-
able because that would make him
work harder.
It has.
Beck's goals included making
All-State, attending a Division I
school and eventually playing at
the professional level.
Beck realized his first two as-
pirations shortly after compiling
the list.
However, success has not al-
ways been easy for this Garner
native. It was during baseball sea-
son of his sophomore year that Beck
lost his father.
"I still think back to all that
he's taught me Becksaid. "I block
everything out. When I step out on
the mound it's just me and the
catcher
Beck looks forward to break-
ing a college record and hopes for
a chance in the pros. But if a pro-
fessional career is not feasible, Beck
will be prepared.
"I'll be coaching and teach-
ing somewhere in this state at the
high school level Beck said.
1B
IB
2B
SS
3B
C
OF
OF
OF
DH
RH Starter
LH Starter
Reliever
Player of Yrl
Team Batting
1. Old Dominion
2. George Mason
3. James Madison
4. East Carolina
5. Richmond
6. William & Mary
7. UNC-Wilmington
Team Pitching
1. East Carolina
2. Old Dominion
3. Richmond
4. George Mason
5.William & Mary
6. UNC-Wilmington
7. James Madison
Ayg
.340
.295
.291
.286
.285
.267
.266
ERA
2.99
.324
4.05
4.06
4.40
4.41
4.71
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
BATTING
1. Pat Watkins (ECU)
2. Rob Mummau (JMU)
3. Sean Casey (UR)
HOME RUNS
1. Pat Watkins (ECU)
2. Lee Kushner (ECU)
3. Corey Broome (UNCW)
Ayg
.445
.416
.386
1
19
14
11
STRIKEOUTS
I.Johnny Beck (ECU)
2. Heath Altman (UNCW)
3. Hike Sanbum (ECU)
Comfjted by Dave Ptlnd
80
78





Page 3
ECU gains
quality recruits
for '94 season
The East Carolina baseball
team will add some pleasant ad-
ditions to the roster in 1994. As for
any college
team, players I By dRAO
must come I OlDHAM
and go, leav- I junior Writer
ing behind I
them thetask of leadership, which
the younger players must take re-
sponsibility for. When the
Watkins, Kushnets, and Wests of
ECU baseball move on from the
green grass of Harrington Field to
other challenges, its time for the
torch to be passed.
Coach Overton looked to the
junior college (JUCO) circuit to
recruit players for immediate im-
pact on his team. Six players have
been added to the Pirate roster,
and all of them could eventually
be starters this season. Three first-
year freshmen and a walk-on will
further strengthen the roster for
Coach Overton.
Scott Beimingham, who
comes to ECU as a junior transfer
from Brookdale Junior College in
New Jersey, will likely be the start-
ing first baseman for the Pirates
msm&
tiawie c�me to U
during tht winter ��� tM
strength the Pirate catching
depth, and wifl be vying for the
starting position with R.J. Stagas.
Rogaa hails from the San
Francwe�re, whew he played
foTtheCi�o,$�- - -�-
NAVIGATOR 1994
Jacobs pursues second sport at ECU
,�u f.� . �� olav football and baseball the sport of baseball. He played
Mike Jacobs comes from a rare
breed of athletes. He plays football
in the fall for
By Brian
Olson
Editor
coach Steve
Logan and hits
the diamond in
the spring for
coach Gary
Overton. Two-sport athletes are
seldom seen, and Jacobs has
planned to make an impact in both
sports.
Jacobs was recruited out of
high school to be a quarterback by
former ECU football coach Bill
Lewis but his dreams of someday
playing college baseball were still
present.
"At the time I was playing
(baseball in high school), 1 was told
by Coach Lewis that I could play
both sports here Jacobs said. "So,
that's what my plans were. I de-
cided to come to East Carolina to
play football and baseball.
His quarterback dreams were
flushed away when he was
switched to a punter during his
sophomore season. He became the
starting punter for the Pirates in six
of the team's games duringthe 1992
season.
The job of being a punter did
not work out to Jacobs either, and
this past football season, Jacobs was
used solely on special teams.
"I probably have more of a
chance of having a career in base-
ball than I do in football with just
snapping and holding Jacobs
said.
"If I was still playing quarter-
back, that might be a different
thing, but that is out the window
he said Right now 1 have a better
chance of making it in baseball than
I do in football
Jacobs is definitely not new to
the sport of baseball. He played at
the varsity level for three years at
Smithfield-Selma High School and
also played American Legion base-
ball over his past summers.
During his senior season in
high school, professional scouts
came out in the spring to watch
him play baseball, even though
Jacobs had already made a com-
mitment to play college football in
the fall for the Pirates.
The N.Y. Mets and Montreal
Expos both came to see him play
and they both teams urged him to
not give up baseball.
"He is a hard worker head
coach Gary Overton said. "His ethic
is very strong. We feel very fortu-
nate to have him with us because
he came to school here as a football
player. We are very happy he has
bolstered an already strong pitch-
ing staff
Michael Jacobs
The main reason Jacobs took
the football scholarship was be-
cause football was the first sport
played during the school year and
he did not feel like waiting around
for the other sports to begin. He
basically took what he could get at
the time.
See JACOBS page 10
1993 STATS
PUyer
BA
GS AB
� � '� .t-H:
:
Watkins
Kushner
Borel
Fedak
Edwards
Pitt
West
Harman
Head
Obholz
Triplett
Clark
Puckett
Cronan
Peters
Wilhoit
Sanburn
Causey
Hines
Liles
I ECU
Pitcher
Davis
Sanburn
Blackwell
Whitfield
Beck
Layton
Mills
Morse
Hartgrove
Tunnell
Mohr
.445 60
.361 60
.298 60
.292 49
.286 8
.281 50
.253 56
.2S0 5
.250 55
.247 33
.230 20
.226 53
.186 20
181 38
.103 16
.000 1
.000 1
.000 5
.000 1
.000 7
60
60
60
48
4
49
54
1
53
23
19
50
12
30
12
0
0
1
0
1
220
205
218
168
14
167
190
4
184
85
61
159
43
105
29
0
1
5
0
2

63
58
52
30
3
30
36
0
37
10
5
17
8
13
5
0
0
1
0
1
H RBI 2B 3BHRSBIS
SB
BB
SO HBP SISF TBSLG Bases OB CWH HSTK
98
74
65
49
4
47
48
1
45
21
14
36
8
19
3
0
0
0
0
0
57
57
23
17
1
36
46
1
30
9
6
23
1
10
2
0
0
0
0
0
7 3
17 1
11 3
5 0
0 1
8 2
10 0
1 0
9 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
19
14
2
1
0
6
8
0
7
0
0
1
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
2940
01
2634
33
22
12
13
00
13
33
1 1
58
13
33
00
00
00
00
00
01
.725
.000
.765
1.000
1.000
.500
.333
.000
.333
1.000
1.000
.625
.333
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
17
38
39
19
2
16
25
1
22
8
12
23
6
9
8
0
0
3
0
2
24
31
32
30
4
52
41
1
40
19
17
34
13
26
15
0
0
2
0
1
2
6
5
1
0
4
1
0
6
2
1
6
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
03
0 3
42
6 1
00
70
09
oo
43
10
3 1
11
10
3 1
10
00
00
00
00
00
168 .764
135659
88 .404
57 .339
6 .429
77 .461
82 .432
2 .500
80 .435
25294
14 .230
54 .340
10 .233
31 .295
4.138
0 .000
0 .000
0.000
0 .000
0 .000
117235
118248
109 263
69 188
616
66 187
74217
25
74212
3195
2776
64 187
1552
29 112
1238
00
01
38
00
35
.498
.476
.414
.367
.37S
.353
.341
.400
.349
.326
.355
.342
.288
.259
.316
.000
.000
.375
.000
.600
3
12
4
4
0
0
5
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
6
5
0
8
0
0
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o
0
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.286 60 60 1885 374 539 327 87 15 63 76 107 .710 252 3H8 38 31, 24 8451 .448
82712172 .381 33





NAVIGATOR 1994
Page 4
Pitching myth dispelled by James
(Editor's note: This is selected text
from Bill ames' book This Time Let's
Not Eat the Bones, copyright 1989, by
Bill James. He has authored several
books, and is a renowned statistician.)
Let's ta ke the sta temen t tha t base-
ball is 75 percent pitching. First off, it
is nearly impossible to know what is
meant by this. "Baseball" is a lot of
things- you got your games, you got
your pennant races, your personali-
ties, your box scores, your anecdotes,
vour hot dogs you've got your Hot
Stove league and your televised games,
your All-Star game and your World
Series. Does this mean that 75 percent
of ball games are determined by what
the pitcher does? Does it mean that 75
percent of ball games are determined
by who the pitcher is? Does it refer to
75 percent of pennant races? Seventy-
five percent of short series? Seventy-
fivepercent of batterpitcher confron-
tations? Does it mean that 75 percent
of all hot dogs are eaten when the
pitcher has the ball? What?
It doesn't mean any of those
things; it's just a number picked out of
midair and plunked down in the
middle of a bunch of words in a way
that seems to make sense, provided
that you don't think too hard about it.
It's a bit like saying that "Philosophy
is seventy-five percent God "Mov-
ies are seventy-five percent acting or
"Sex is seventy-five percent physical
Or "That statement that baseball is
seventv-fi ve percent pitching is ninety-
percent nonsense.
However, to the extent that it is
meaningful, it's false. We don't know
what it docs mean, but there are
many things that it might mean.
If pitching were the dominant
part of the game, then there are
manv other, more specific state-
ments which we would expect
to be true. None of them are true.
For example:
Tlie teams tliat have the better
pitcher starting would win 75 per-
cent of the time. Doesn't happen.
On a very rare occasion, you
mighthavea pitcher, like Dwight
Gooden in 1985, who wins 75
percent of his starts-but it is a
very rare occasion, indeed. If you
are saying that "Pitching is 75 percent
of baseball when Dwight Gooden is
on the mound, as long as Babe Ruth
isn't hitting I might buy it.
In a free market economy, pitcliers
would make the most money, since they
would be the most sought after play-
ers. Hasn't happened. In fact, on the
averagepitchers make less money than
players at almost every other position.
Teams uvuld never trade a regular
pitcher for a regular player. Think about
it-if you' vegot a twenty-five-man ros-
ter with nine pitchers, who represent
75 percent of the total value, and six-
teen other players who have 25 per-
cent of the value, are you going to
trade one pitcher for one hitter? Of
course not-but teams do trade pitch-
ers for hitters every winter.
Vic standard deviation of runs al-
lowed would be larger tlian tlie standard
dei'iation of runs scored. If pitching were
75 percent of the game, then one would
expect the differences between teams
created by pitching to be larger than
thosecreated by hitting. But they aren't;
the standard deviations of runs scored
and runs allowed are the same.
Pitchers would monopolize theaward
voting. If people really believes that
baseball was 75 percent pitching, then
one might expect 75 percent of the
players in the Hall of Fame to be pitch-
ers. They aren't. One might expect 75
percent of Most Valuable Players to be
pitchers. They aren't. Even in the era
before the Cy Young Award began to
siphon off votes, pitchers won less than
40 percent of Most Valuable Player
Awards. Pitchers don't win 75 percent
of Rookie of the Year Awards.
The most accurate formulas for pre-
dicting zvins and losses from runs scored
and runs allowed uvuld have to give more
-weight to runs allouvd-rcprescnting the
team's pitching-than to runs scored.
Again, it doesn't happen that way; in
fact, the most accurate methods for
predicting wins and losses from runs
scored and runs allowed weight the
two elements evenly-and no formula
can be developed which retains a simi-
lar degree of accuracy while empha-
sizing one element over another.
Trams would put most of their efforts
into dcivloping strong pitching staffs.
Managers would spend most of their
time working with their pitchers. Clubs
would employ more pitching coaches
than any other type of coaches. Indeed,
if baseball were 75 percent pitching,
then one would expect that most man-
I
64'
The argument that
baseball is 75
percent pitching
betrays the
fundamental
nature of the game.
15?
agers and most coaches would be
former pitchers, since they would be
best qualified to deal with the most
important p rt of the game.
Doesn'thappen. Managers spend
as much of their time working with
hitters as they do with pitchers. Teams
employ as many hitting coaches as
they do pitching coaches. Ex-pitchers
are rarely hired as mangers; most man-
agers were infielders or catchers.
Almost all first round draft picks
�would be pitchers. Less than half of first
round draft picks are pitchers.
Pitchers would be the dominant force
in determining whereaiuiwhen each offen-
sive event occurs. In fact, the identity of
the pitcher is the recessive element of
any such determination; the identity of
the hitter is the dominant element.
What I mean by that is the "spread
of occurrence" for anv offensive inci-
dent is greater for hitters than it is
for pitchers.
No pitcher allows home
runs as often as Dale Murphy hit
home runs. No pitcher allows home
runs as seldom as (Ozzie Smith) hits
home runs. No pitcher allows hits as
often as Wade Boggs gets hits. No
pitcher, not even (Tom Glavine),
allows hits as infrequently
(Sid Bream) will get a hit
No pitcher strikes
out hitters as often as
Rob Deer strikes out.
No pitcherstrikesout
hitters as rarely as
Bill Buckner strikes
out.
This is trueof ev-
ery significant area of
performance, includ-
ing those things like
walks and hit bats- J
men which are usu-
ally considered to be
controlled by the
pitcher.
That means that in or-
der to create a working model
or simulation of a baseball
game, you must allow the
hitter to be the dominant, j
shaping force ill the game. i
And if baseball were 75 j
percent pitching, one would j;
not expect that to be true. K
The general manager I:
who says that baseball is 75
percent pitching will turn
around and trade his number-
two starting pitcher to get an
outfielder. The man-
��� agerwhosaysthatbase-
ball is 75 percent pitch-
ing will spend an hour a
day figuring out batting
orders and an hour a
week lining out his pitch-
ing plans.
The reporter who
says thatbaseball is 75 per-
cent pitching will still vote
for (Barry Bonds) over
(GregMaddux)astheMost
Valuable Player. No one in
baseball acts as if he really
believes that baseball is 75
percent pitching.
In a sense, the argument that
baseball is 75 percent pitching be-
trays the fundamental nature of
the game, which is that it is circu-
lar. Every run scored is also a run
allowed. Whenever the offense suc-
ceeds, the defense fails at precisely
the same moment and to precisely
the same extent.
To say that baseball is 75 per-
cent pitching is, in a sense, like say-
ing that the head of a coin is worth
more than the tail, or like saying that
a room is bigger if you enter it from
the left than from the right. A base-
ball game is created by the joining of
the pitcher and the hitter into a single
act.
The problem with the old bro-
mide is that it attempts to tear apart
that which is in fact indissolvable.
Relief comes
quick from
bullpen
ECU has an excellent starting
rotation, but if they should ever
falter, head coach Gary
Overton has a slew of
young, strong relievers
waiting in the wings.
As a team, in
1993, the Pirates
were outstand-
ing on the
mound. They
compiled a
2.99 ERA and
went 41-19.
The relievers gathered seven saves
and six wins while assisting the ECU
starting rotation.
By Dave
Pond
Assistant Editor
H
J
1
wB
' �
m
The quality of
this help should
continue in 1994.
The closers
for East Carolina look to be 6-5 sopho-
more Mike Jacobs and 6-4 senior who
also plavs varsity football and Rich
Rosenberger. Jacobs is taking the spring
off from football to pitch for Overton.
"There's no question that he's got the
strongest arm on the team Overton said.
"We feel he's a pro prospect, a Goose
Gossage-type of pitcher. He comes at you
with a lot of velocity and a lot of toughness"
Rosenberger is a senior transfer from
George Washington University. The right-
hander has good velocity and is prepared to
show it off.
Setting up the two fireballers will be
junior Billy Layton, and freshman Ryan Kraft.
Layton, a right-hander, "may be the most
underrated player on our pitching staff ac-
cording to Overton.
Kraft is a right-hander from Clayton
High School (10-10.44 ERA, 169 K). "We look
to him to be a starter as early as next year
Overton said.
Also in the bullpen will be freshman
Brent Billingsley, a southpaw who comes
from California armed with a good-breaking
ball.Heshouldseelimitedplayingtime,need-
ing to gain experience pitching in college
baseball.
Kenneth Collins, a redshirt freshman,
has been plagued with arm and knee prob-
lems, but if hestays healthy, hecould see some
time on the mound in 1994.
Junior walk-on Dan Forson transferred
from St. Petersburg Junior College to come
play for ECU. The 6-foot southpaw probably
won't see much playing time this season
Right-hander Jason Mills had some very
good relief performances last season and could
complement Billy Layton in a middle relief
role.
Sophomore right-hander Brandon Mohr
will see slightlv more time on the mound than
hedid last vearbut.aawdingtoCoach Overton,
has become, "a victim of a deep and talented
pitching staff
In 1994, Overton will have many options
� to go with in relief pitching situations. There-
fore, the Pirates should have an excellent
year on the mound, leading them back to
the NCAA's.






Page 5
NAVIGATOR 1994
Borel brings Midwestern speed to Pirates
Baseball is much more than just
performing the physical aspects of
the game. A great percentage of base-
ball is in the
By Brian
Olson
Editor
player's mind.
A player's
head can be a
major impact
whether a team is successful.
ECU's senior center fielder
Jamie Borel credits his performance
to his mental game.
"I'm into sports psychology and
stuff like that, the mental part of the
game Borel said. "I like to visual-
ize the different pitches I'm going to
see. I try and picture myself taking
the right cut and see myself hit the
ball hard
Borel is a threat from anywhere
on the field. Offensively he has the
gift of speed. Last season he stole 26-
34 bases for an .765 average. Catch-
ers fear him on the base paths; he
had an on base percentage of .414
lastseason. Hecan not only hit.com-
piling a .298 batting average last sea-
son, but he manages to get on base.
He led the Pirates in walks with 39.
His position in the lineup this year
will be crucial to ECU scoring runs.
"A player like Borel is what we
call a 'flyer Head Coach Gary
Overton said. "There's no question
his speed is his best asset. His on-
base percentage will predicate a lot
of our running game this year be-
cause he is one of the few players we
have with speed in the offensive
lineup. It will be important for Jamie
to get on base frequently
Borel came to ECU from Over-
land Park, Kan. He transferred here
last season from Johnson County
Community College. ECU has had a
good amount of success from JUCO
players and Borel was a good pickup.
"I like itbetter here (North Caro-
lina) Borel said. "I plan on living
here when I get older. There's no
way I'll go back to Kansas. I got
recruited by most of the Big Eight
schools, but for some reason I just
fell in love with the east coast. I like
to be around where I can go skiing
and where I can go to the beach. I
like the warmer weather
North Carolina is very appeal-
ing to many people and is a main
reason why ECU has so many out of
state students. The area also attracts
many athletes in all campus sports.
"I love the beach Borel said.
"Being from Kansas there wasn't any
beaches around. Sometimes, when I
get time off from baseball, I go down
on the weekends. I like to go to
Wrightsville beach. I go with my
parents a lot
Going along with his mental
part of the game is his hard work
ethic. Borel will always be giving his
best in the classroom, weight room,
and especially on the field.
"I take pride at going at every-
"itll
Jamie Borel
thing hard Borel added. "In base-
ball, I try and make everyday as
though it were my last. I'm doing
everything as hard as I can so in the
future I don't look back and say 'If I
would have only gave a 100 percent
doing this I like to do everything as
hard as I can so I don't have any
regrets later on in my life. I try and
do that with everything
Being all the way from Kansas
and playing baseball during much
of the year, it is tough to see your
family as much as you would like to.
Jamie was very pleased that his fa-
ther got a job in Raleigh and he was
able to be closer to his family and
could go home whenever he wanted
to.
Borel is not only a baseball fan.
Heenjoys football as well and grow-
ing up near Kansas City made him a
die hard Chiefs fan. Jamie is a big
Joe Montana fan and his heart was
crushed when the Chiefs lost their
AFC Championship game to the
Buffalo Bills recently. He said he
still gets mad when he thinks about
it.
Borel is in his final year at ECU
and his getting ready to graduate
next fall with a degree in Health and
Fitness. East Carolina has a pro-
gram in that field and it coincided
with his choice to attend the school.
"I saw an opportunity for a de-
gree in health and fitness here, which
was a bonus, and everything worked
out nicely Borel said. "I liked the
program and I knew we would have
some winning teams. There have
been a lot of winning teams at ECU
and I wanted to carry on the tradi-
tion. I hope to keep it going this
year
1 f he does not get a chance to play
baseball after college, Borel has hopes
of staying close to the game he loves.
"Iliketotakethat(love)intocoach-
ingatthecollege level somedav Borel
said smiling. "I would like to teach the
mental part of the game
The Pirate baseball team has been
oneofthemost successfu 1 p rogra ms a t
ECU. As with any senior, Borel wants
this season to be the best and most
memorable to him.
"I would like to see the team get
some national recognition, which
means a lot of wins. That means every-
one is doing their job Borel said. "I
like to see a winning atmosphere If
you're having a winning vear, that
means everyone is doing well
Borel will be staring in center field
for the Pirates this year and will be the
leader in the outfield. The Pirates have
been better than thought of so far in
practice defensively so far, according
to Coach Overton. It looks as if the
outfield will be secure in the glove of
Borel.
"His defense gives a boost in the
outfield Overton said. "He can run
down balls in the gap as well as any
college center fielder. His defensive
play is sometimes overlooked by the
fact that he steals bases. Offensively,
he is what other teams call a 'pest
'Normal' Hartgrove enters final season at ECU
Pitcher named
2nd team All-
East in 1993
Normal guys are everywhere.
If you take a walk through a busy
ECU campus, you will probably
walk by hun-
By Brian
Olson
Editor
dreds of these
type.
One of
those normal
guys you might pass is Lyle
Hartgrove.
"I like to be by myself or just
with a few people a lot Hartgrove
said. "When I'm around other
people, I'll laugh and have fun and
cut up and all, but I reallv like time
to myself
That's the way he likes to clas-
sify himself. The senior from
Asheboro, N.C. was a three-time
letterman in baseball for Asheboro
H.S and was selected to the 1990
All-State team. He also holds the
school record with a 0.46 career
earned run average.
Hartgrove is looking for con-
tinued success at ECU. He is close
to graduating and getting on with
his life after college.
"All I want to do right now is
graduate Hartgrove said. "I've
gone this far and I need to get my
diploma and graduate and get a
job. Baseball has been good to me,
it's been fun
"If it doesn't go any further
than this, it helped pay for four
years of school
Hartgrove said.
Baseball sure has
treated him right.
Last season he was 11-
2 in 20 appearances
and 15 starts. He was
named to the second-
team All-East.
Hartgrove hurled
eight complete games
last year and was
named as the CAA
tournament MVP af-
ter a relief appearance
and a complete game
victory.
Through three
seasons for the Pirates,
Hartgrove has com-
piled a 19-10 record
with seven saves. He
has struck 105 batters
in his career compared
to only 15 walks.
"Lyle Hartgrove
is one of the finest young men that's
been through the East Carolina
University baseball program
coach Gary Overton said. "He is an
excellent role model for many
young aspiring players
Hartgrove likes to keep to him-
self more than most other players.
He is very laid back and calm off
the field, which might reflect how
he has matured here at ECU since
he was a freshman.
has just graduated last semester.
He likes to spend a lot of his
time with her and says maybe they
could be hearing wedding bells af-
ter graduation.
Hartgrove is trying to finish
off his communication
management degree
and will look for a job
in that field if a base-
ball career falls
through.
"I think that ev-
erybody that gets to
this level would like
to think that they have
a chance to be
drafted Hartgrove
said. "If it happens, it
would be great. If it
doesn't, it doesn't
Lyle is not really
known has an over-
powering fastball
pitcher. He credits his
success to keeping the
hitters off- balance.
Hartgrove spots
his fastball, change-
up, and off- speed
pitches. He likes to
make the batter hit his
Hartgrove got that party stuff pitch and just tries not to walk any-
body.
" Lyle tends to be given the ball
in our tougher games Overton
said. "It's not designed that way,
but, for some odd reason, he seems
Photo courtesy of SID
Lyle Hartgrove is expected to be a pitching ace for ECU.
out of his system when he was a
freshman and sophomore. He is
not really big on going to the down-
town part of Greenville.
He has a serious girlfriend who
to end up with the ball in his hands
in the games that are tough
"He locates as well as any
pitcher that I have seen in a while.
There's no question that that is his
strength
"I try to lead by example on
the field Hartgrove said. "I'm not
asking everyone to be like me off
the field.
"They don't have to stay at
home and do their own thing off
the field he said. "On the field we
can cut up and all and have fun,
but when you're playing, it is time
to get serious. That's the percep-
tion I want to give
Lyle also enjoys listening to
music and watching movies, but
he really loves to play cards. He
plays spades every Thursday night
with the fellows. He says it is just a
given.
He also calls himself a
Nintendo buff because he plays it
all the time.
When Hartgrove just started
out in high school he was the key
player on the football team because
he was so much bigger than all of
the other boys.
"When I broke my thumb in
the 10th grade, my baseball coach
told me it was time to make a
choice Hartgrove said. "There re-
ally wasn't that much of a choice to
be made.
Hartgrove made the right choice.





NAVIGATOR 1994
Page 6
Greenville native
stars at second base
It is not very often that a person
growing up in their hometown would
want to spend their whole f" there.
For ECU senior
Heath Clark he II By BRIAN
would have it no I OLSON
other way. j Editor
Most high
school kids like to go to college away
from their home town, but Clark was
one of those exceptions.
When I wasyoungerand grow-
ing up, I always looked up to East
Carolina Clark said. "It just started
from the.e. I got offers from to go other
places but 1 was committed here and
signed on the first signing day
Clark attended J. H. Rose High
School and was selected team MVP in
1990. His older brother played base-
ball for the Rampants, and his younger
brother is hoping to follow in Heath's
footsteps.
It was a good thing he decided to
stav around town because Clark has
Sandburn
enjoys east
coast success
The stereotype of a college guy
livingin California mightbe somewhat
distorted. That type of dude might be a
surfer with
been one of the defensive anchors for
the Pirates. He started in 50 games for
ECU last season and missed only three
starts.
His connections with his family in
Greenville might not ever slow down
because after graduation he might join
up with his father as a local contractor.
He is currently completing his busi-
ness ma rketing degree. While school is
not one of his favorite things, Clark
will graduate with respectable grade
point average of a 2.8 or 2.7.
Clark also has other options if he
is not drafted or does not go to work
with his father.
"I'm not expecting toplay profes-
sional baseball in my mind, if it comes,
itcomes. I'll take it. but if not, I'll cam
on mv life in baseball and try and
coach somewhere Clark said.
Thatcould be enough to keep him
here in Greenville. He might have a
See CLARK page 9
File Photo
Heath Clark has been a starter at second base since he was a freshman. Now entering his final
season, Clark wants to continue anchoring the Pirate infield with his steady defensive play.
By Brian
Olson
Editor
blond hair and
a person with
some unusual
vocabulary.
ECU pitcher Mike Sandbum does not
fit into that category at all.
He only lived about 10 miles from
the beach and never really was a beach
bum kind of guy. He never got into
surfing or anything like that. The only
water sport he got into was water polo
in high school.
He resides in Foster City which is
near the S.F. bay area. The city has a
unique location because he could drive
one direction and be at the warm beach
or drive in another direction for about
an hour and the temperature could
change another 30 degrees.
Sandbum came to ECU as a col-
lege transfer before last season and had
a very good year. The statistics speak
for themselves.
He had the Pirates' lowest ERA
with a 2.26 average and that was good
enough to be 30th in the nation. Mike
was named first team All-East Region
by the ABC A and was third in strikeouts
intheCAA
"He makes an art of pitching
coach Gary Overton said. "He is a joy
and pleasure not just to coach, but to
watch as a coach because of what he
does with the baseball. There's a term
we use called carving for a guy that
locatesand can mix his pitches up well
Edwards gives up ECU football
career to concentrate on baseball
File Photo
Mike Sandburn came to ECU before the 1993 season, and
compiled a 10-2 record and 2.26 ERA, 30th in the nation.
When I ,ie Pirates won the C AA a pitched a shutout against Liberty. His
tournament ast vear and moved on to best stretch of last season probably was
theNCAAto.rnamenthegotthewin SANDJURN page o
Sometimes when one sport is not
working so well for a person, he can
look to other sports for success. Meet
Lamonti
Edwards. 1 By BRIAN
Thiswillbe I OLSON
just his second I Editor
season playing I
baseball for ECU and from now on it
will be his first choice. Edwards quit
the ECU football team during the '93
season because it was not working
out for him.
" I went home and thought about
what would be best for me in the
future Edwards said. "I feel if 1 stay
with baseball, I'll have my best
chance
Edwards was used as a backup
wide receiver for the football team
and saw very limited action.
He came to ECU as an outstand-
ing high school athlete. He earned
two letters in football, three in basket-
ball and four in baseball.
"I love sports Edwards said. "I
was brought up watching and play-
ing sports all my life
You might think he is here on a
sports scholarship, but he has an aca-
demic scholarship. He likes to work
with computers and is majoring in
information processing. He is a junior
with academics, but only a sopho-
more on the field.
He made All-State playing sec-
ond base in high school and during
winter practice, Lamont was moved
back to the infield. This time, at prob-
ablv the most difficult position, short-
stop. He is trying to adjust to the
switch and shorten his throw to first
base.
"You want a leader at shortstop
Edwards said. "You want someone
that is going to keep the team up
When he is not throwing and hit-
ting baseballs he likes to fish. He really
doesn't know too many places around
Greenville, but when he goes home to
Clinton, N.C. one of the first things he
does is reach for his fishing pole.
Lamont is young and shows a
good amount of talent and it is prob-
abl v too early to see how far he can take
it. He had only 18 at-bats last season
and will be thrown into many more
this year.
'Hopefullv, 1 have some kind of
chance of going on to the next level
Edwards said. "If that chance doesn't
come I want to get a good job working
with computers
This vear's team has many differ-
ent plavers this year and Lamont is
very excited about this season.
"You could compare this year's
team to last season's Philadelphia
Phillies because of all of the different
personalities. I think it is going to be
verv exciting, not only to us, but the
coaches and fans as well
Last vear's Phillies were known
as outcasts and the guys on the team
didn't even look like they should be
plavmg baseball. They had long hair,
big bellies, and I-don't-care attitudes.
That team went on to the World Series.
Now the Pirate players do not
have long hair or look like truck driv-
ers, but they do possess many different
personalities. Maybe when the season
ends they can also look back and say
that they had a great season.





Page 7
NAVIGATOR 1994
Lady Pirates enter 1994 season with high hopes
East Carolina softball head coach
Sue Manahan enters into her 13th
season here at ECU with high hopes
of success. Af-
By Brad
Oldham
Semor Writer
ter compiling a
record of 34-22
last season,
earning her first
ever post-season tournament bid,
Coach Manahan looks to be putting
together another talented team for
the 1994 season. The Lady Pirates
have recentlv hit the practice fields
ror the upcoming season, and so far,
all looks well.
"Practice is going pretty good so
far said Jenny Parsons, pitching
coach for the Pirates. "We are work-
ing real hard out there and preparing
for our first game on February 23
The Pirate infield will be with-
out the help of Cheryl Hobson, last
season's first baseman, and her sister
Stephanie, who played third base.
The rest of the infield is fairly experi-
enced, with senior Lisa Corprew
starting again at catcher. Corprew
will be looked at as a leader on the
field and a key batter in the Pirate
lineup. Corprew has been an impres-
sive hitter in the clutch during her
career with the Pirates, hitting eight
game-winning RBIs in the 1992 sea-
son alone.
The second base position will
probably be filled by sophomore Jolin
Eckman. Eckman won the Most Im-
proved Player award for the 1993
season, and tied the 1993 mark for
most doubles with seven.
Senior Sherri Allen enters her
third vear here at ECU after playing
a season at Towson State. Allen per-
formed well as the designated hitter
last vear, but will see the majc irity of
her playing time this season in right
field.
The designated hitter position
will be filled by junior Dana Crosby.
Crosbv was a solid hitter for Coach
Manahan last year. She played two
seasons at UNC-Wilmington before
transferring to East Carolina.
Leann Myers will play first base
this vear after seeing time at third
last season. The senior from King,
NC. came to ECU in the fall of 1992
after playing at UN'C-Asheville.
Sophomore Heather Smith was
a very versatile player for the Lady
Pirates last year. Smith started some
preseason games at shortstop and
saw some regular-season playing
time at shortstop in 1993, the posi-
tion which she will be vying for along
with redshirt freshman Sharolyn
Strickland, who was slowed by a
broken ankle last season.
One pla ver who will certainly be
looked to for leadership this season
is senior Georgeann Wilke. Wilke is
one of the Ladv Pirates' finest ath-
letes, and was named
to the UNC All-Tour-
nament team in 1993.
She started in 54 of 56
games last season,
and won both the
1993 Female
TexasGulf Outstand-
ing Scholar-Athlete
of the Year award and
the GTE District III
Academic All-
America team for her
performance in the
classroom.
The center field
position will be filled
bv senior Michelle
Ward. Ward returns
this season as the
nation's leading base
stealer for 1993 with
73. She also led the
Ladv Pirates in bat-
ting average, hitting
.450. Ward was named to the UNC
All-Tournament team, the Frost Cut-
lerv All-Tournament team, and was
named Most Valuable Player at the
Lady Pirate Classic.
She earned First Team honors in
the All-South Region, and for the
EC AC All-Star Team. Ward will likely
be an All-American candidate this
season.
Some newcomers who should
see plaving time this year include
junior Dana Lewis, who transferred
here after playing two seasons at
Chowan college. Lewis will probably
see time at either first base or out-
field.
Another new player that will
help in the outfield is freshman
Theresa Fischer from Farmingdale,
NY. Freshman Dana Hulings and
sophomore Mary Dunlap will help
out at the catcher position.
The pitching staff will be the
weakest part of the Pirates defense.
Manahan will look to two freshman,
Teryn Ford and Jill Rowlands, along
with sophomore TraciePodratsky to
take control on the mound.
Coach Manahan will dip into
her well-stocked pool of talent hop-
ing to put together another winning
season in 1994.
Manahan takes coaching
skills to international level
With 13 vears of coaching experi-
ence and an experienced team to back
her up, ECU softball coach Sue Manahan
is readv to meet
By Jeb
Brookshire
Stff Writer
the upcoming
softball season
head-on.
Manahan
leadthewomen's
softball team to a winning season last
vear. During the off-season, Manahan
was coaching as well. Over the summer
she traveled to Russia with Athletes in
Action, a group that involves athletes
leading seminarsabout their sport, play-
ing games with the local teams from the
host country, while sharing their Chris-
tian faith with the people that they play.
During the Christmas break, Manahan
coached a team that went to Guate-
mala.
"Thev came from all over, and the
plavers that went toGuatemala with us
were mainlv from California says
Manahan.
Manahan's team that went to Rus-
sia had a 9-1 record. Manahan attrib-
uted the one loss to her shortstop who
"was trving to be polite and ate some
onions, which she was allergic to. She
had to sit out the game because of that,
and we were without one of our best players
Also, while in Russia, Manahan had the opportunity to be
a plaver-coach, because one of the team members got injured
right before the trip.
"It was moredifficultbeinga player andacoachat the same
time recalls Manahan.
The team that she traveled with to Guatemala earned a 6-
1 record. "The loss there she said, "came from the fact that
everv team, no matter how good, will always have a day when
nothing seems to go tl ieir way. This is what happened; the other
team was reall von top of their game that day Manahan's team
also had a chance to play against theGuatemalan national team.
"Traveling is something that I have found that I like and I
want to be able to it more often. With Athletes in Action, I got to
travel as well as present the Gospel in very unique settings and
wavs Manahan said. "For example, in Guatemala, we had a
talented group that could sing; so we sang together one day in
a park
Manahan started coaching softball at Douglas Freeman
High School in Virginia. She coached there for seven years
before coming to ECU. During that time, she led her team to
several district championships, one regional and one state
championship. She began her coaching career here as a gradu-
ate student at ECU about 13 years ago.
Manahan has definitely earned the respect of her team.
Jennv Parsons, an East Carolina pitcher under Manahan for the
last four seasons, is now the pitching coach of the team.
She summed up her memories of plaving for Manahan
best when she said, "I enjoyed playing for her. She is a great
motivator and she always knows what to say to get the best out
of the players
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NAVIGATOR 1994
Pace 8
Women's schedule favors
Lady Pirates early in season
Head softball coach Sue
Manahan feels that her team's 1994
schedule could put her team in
position for
By Brad
Oldham
Senior Writer
national
ranking.
"A year
ago I felt that
we were in
over our heads at the start of the
season Manahan said. "To change
this 1 didn't water down the sched-
ule, I arranged it so that we play
more at home at the start of the sea-
son. This gives our pitchers more
time to adjust to pitching well, not
worrying about traveling
Since the Lady Pirates are not in
a particular conference, they must
look to multi-team tournaments for
most of their games. After opening
up the season in Greenville against
Barton on Feb. 23, the Pirates will
host the Lady Pirate Invitational on
the 25th, when they will play Penn
State, Eastern Michigan, Radford,
Robert Morris, Campbell and the
University of Maryland-Baltimore
County. The Lady Pirates will also
host a round-robin tournament on
March 5-6 against in-state rivals
UNC-VVilmington and UNC-Greens-
boro, along with Canisius and
Purdue.
East Carolina has its first major
tournament in Tampa, Fl. on March
11-13. The Lady Pirates will face top-
ranked teams such as Texas A&M
and UCLA, as well as teams from
around the country such as Florida
State, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, UNC,
Notre Dame, UVa and Oklahoma
State.
ECU will then return to Green-
ville for much of the middle part of
March. After games against Rutgers
and GMU, the Hampton Inn
Shoney's Lady PirateClassic will take
place from March 18-20. They will
remain in Greenville that week to
play Bucknell and Colgate on the
22nd and 23rd.
ECU will be on the road nearly
the entire month of April. The Pirates
play at the Tar Heel Invitational from
April 8-10, then travel to Chatta-
nooga, Tennessee to play in the Frost
Cutlery Tournament, where they will
play against Furman, Texas A&M,
Georgia Tech and South Florida.
The Lady Pirates will play their
last home game of the season against
North Carolina on April 26 at 3 p.m.
The final tourney of the regular sea-
son will be the Virginia Classic in
Charlottesville, Va
"Our 1994 schedule is strong and
competitive. It will put us in position
to be ranked. The April 8-10 UNC
Tournament is big, and the April 15-
17 Frost Cutlery Tournament is tre-
mendous. At the April 30th Virginia
Tournament, there is the possibility
that we could play two nationally-
ranked teams Coach Manahan said.
Tracy Podratsky will be a key player on the '94 pitching staff.
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Page 9
CLARK
NAVIGATOR 1994
Continued from page 6
SANDBURN
good shotatpossibly coaching a little
league team. He has instructed some
kids already over past summers tor
tree and he has earned a great deal of
respect from parents and friends.
"I love kids. I love working with
kidsand teaching them to play Clark
smiled. "Iranv-
46
one wants to
learn. I'm going
to teach them all
they need to
know that I
have learned
through mv
high school and
w h e n
Heath is able to
� away from
school he likes
to ?pend most
of his time in
the wonderful
outdoors He likes to hunt, fish, golf
and ski, according to whatever stj-
s n is in.
Being a baseball player, much of
your time during the normal dav can
be very busy and tiring and that's
u hy Clark really bel ie es in getting a
lot of sleep. He considers it one of his
favorite things to do
Clark is small compared to your
average ball player. He stands at onlv
5-6. This does not slow him down at
all. He goes lights out all the time and
will always give 100 percent.
When you're as
short as I am,
you have to do a
little hit more.
"When your as short as I am, you
have to do a little bit more Clark
said " Professional scouts look forath-
letic abilitv with size, speed, arm
strength and hand speed. I possess
some of those skills, but one thing
holding me back a lot is mv sie. It
keeps me out
������ on the field
longer and in
t h e
weigh troom
longer. !ut
maybe I can
get an extra
edge and
maybe 1 can
get good
enough to
play profes-
sional base-
when he did not allow an earned run in
23consecutive innings from Feb. 23 to
March 21.
The ear round weather inCalifor-
nia helps benefit the players I cause
thev get to play outside all sear round.
"This helps step up the competition and
causes players to maybe not get as no-
ticed. Even when he was selected bv
the LA Dodgers in the June '91 ama-
teur baseball draft, that was -till not
enough attention. When he got the op-
portunity to come to ECU, he jumped
on the chance.
vebeen looking forward to col-
lege baseball mv wh � 6 Sandbum
said ' I was really disaprx �nted when 1
Continued from page S
had to go to a junior college to play
baseball. I really, really wanted to plav
division I baseball bad. That made it
even sweeter when I got here and had
the year I did last year. I was so happy
with that
HecametoECUwirhoutevereven
visiting Greenville. He says he really
likes North Carolina and the friendly
atmosphere.
"I came out here with an open
mind, real open mind, and I wasn't
worried at all Sandbum said. I was
ready to leave home and get readv tor
college life
Iburn is a Health and i
major and is considering graduate

W h e n
the Pirate- go
to battle with other teams, thev al-
ways are keeping an extra eve out tor
Clark. He drove in four runs in the
CAA tournament last year, including
two key runs in a 7-4 win over George
Mason.
"1 have heard him termed mam-
ways in the last four vears coach
Can Overt n said. From 'pepper
pot to a 'catalyst to 'a thorn in the
side of other teams. The thing that
stands out is that we don't think that
Heath has shown his best vet
Hopefully his best is yet to come.
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He would also like to do an internship
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The starting rotation might place
Sandbum third or fourth. He will battle
Richie Blackwell for those spots
"Hopefully 1 can be a big part of it
and get as many innings in as 1 did last
year Sandbum said.
The ECU pitching staff should not
miss a beat because thev did not lose
anybody from last season. -
"I don't think that we have the
offense we did last year, but we have
the potential Sandbum added. "We
just have to get there like we did last
war
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The Pirates will play a total of 37
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NAVIGATOR 1994
Page 10
PIRATES
Continued from page 2
JACOBS
Continued from page 3
players that all have a legitimate
chance at starting, but sophomore
Lamont Edwards, a former two-
sport athlete who quit football to
pursue a baseball career, has the
edge and is headed for the starting
lineup. If Edwards starts, he will be
backed up by senior Frank Fedak
and junior Chad Puckett.
Rick Britton, a transfer from
Florida, will be the opening day-
third baseman, and brings with him
a bad ly needed dose of power to the
ECU lineup. He hit .266 wi th 8 home
runs in 46 games for the Gators in
1993. Puckett will also be ready to
take over at third if needed.
Starting in left field for the Pi-
rates will once again be sophomore
Jason Head. He will be joined in the
ECU outfield by Jamie Borel in cen-
ter and either Kyle Billingsley or
Brian Yerys in right field.
"A player like Borel is what we
call a 'flyer There is no question
that his speed is his best asset
Overton said. "His on-base percent-
age will predicate a lot of our run-
ning game this year
The designated hitter role will
be filled by senior Chad Triplett.
He will be backed up by Billingsley
or Yerys, whomever isn't starting
in right field.
"If we have a player who is a
'jack-of-all-trades it's Chad
FACES
Triplett Overton said. "The only
position that he hasn't played for
us is pitcher, and he could do that
Yerys joined the Pirates during
the winter break, transferring from
Louisburg where he led Louisburg
to the Junior College World Series.
He was also named a two-time all-
conference player and all-regional
selection.
All in all, Coach Overton has
put together a squad that is deter-
mined to repeat as CAA champions,
a goal that is definitely attainable.
He has a balanced roster to work
with, and a historv of excellent
coaching behind him. Look for the
Pirates to be in the title hunt in May.
Continued from page 3
pitching staff this season is sopho-
more Mike Jacobs. Jacobs is a two-
sport athlete who is taking the
spring off from football in order to
concentrate on baseball.
He is capable of being a pro
prospect, for at 6-5, 225 pounds, he
possesses both size and, without
question, the strongest arm on the
team.
He throws at better velocity
than any other pitcher on the staff,
and will be Overton's primary
closer. A freshman who will see
limited action this season is pitcher
Brent Billingsley. Billingsley comes
from Chino Hills, Ca and possesses
a good breaking-ball. Brent is joined
by big brother junior Kyle
Billingsley, who transfers here
from Chaffey Junior College. Kyle
will be vying for the right field po-
sition, and could also see time at
the designated hitter position.
Senior Rick Britton transferred
to ECU from the University of
Florida. Britton will be the starting
at third-base for the Pirates.
Britton's bat will likely place him at
the third or fourth spot in the lineup,
opposite of Brian Yerys.
Ryan Kraft is a freshman
pitcher with a lot of promise. He
will see some playing time on the
hill this season, probably in a relief
role.
Dan Forson is a left-handed
pitcher who walked on to the team
this season after playing JLCO ball
in Florida. Forson will not see much
playing time this season.
Josh Constable is a freshman
who will probably be redshirted this
season. He is a hard-working
player, who wiil use this season to
develophisskillsand try tobecome
a better player.
The newcoming players will
hopefully add strength to an already
tough CAA-powerhouse Pirate
baseball team.
Jacobs was also recruited for
basketball as well. He received filler
letters from both Duke and Virginia.
The main reason Jacobs decided
to play college baseball was an inci-
dent that occurred over the summer
of 1993.
He went to a professional trv-
out camp with the Pittsburgh Pi-
rates at Five County Stadium in
Zebulon, NIC. He was not taking
the tryout too seriously because he
was just going with a friend who
asked him to go.
"1 performed pretty well
Jacobs said. "The scout told me that
I had the potential to be a profes-
sional baseball player and that I
should look into pursuing this. I
would be crazy not to
"After seeing the results and
hearing the scout tell me I had real
potential and he told me I could
only help himself by playing here
(ECU) Jacobs said.
"I'll be able to be drafted this
year if I have a good season Jacobs
said. "They said they would prob-
ably take a real late -round pick even
if I didn't play, and I could only
help myself by playing
This will be his first season as a
college baseball player and there are
great hopes that he will be a quality-
pitcher at this level.
Jacobs' fastball was clocked at
a high of 91 m.p.h. over the summer
and said he was averaging around
88 m.p.h when he was not even in
shape. He will probably be looked
at by Coach Overton as the main
man out of the bullpen in a closer
role.
As do many other athletes
when they are growing up, Jacobs
seems to just be interested in the
sport that is currentlv in season.
He had no real preference when he
was young of either being an NFL
quarterback or a major league
pitcher.
Jacobs came here as a fresh-
man in 1991 from Smithfield, NI.C.
and is currently majoring in his-
tory.
He grewup in Smithfield play-
ing sports in his neighborhood and
would like to go on and be a coach
for whatever sport comes around.
Jacobs likes golfing a lot and
would even consider becoming a
golf coach. Jacobs would prefer to
teach at the high school level be-
cause he could still have time to spend
with the family that he desires to
have.
Sports, sports and more sports
is what Jacobs loves. Besides play-
ing sports, he also watches sports
on the TV as much as possible. His
favorite show is ESPN's
Sportscenter and turns it on every
morning as soon as he wakes up.
"Da, Da, Da, Da, Da, Da
Jacobs sounds off laughing as he
sings the show's popular jingle.
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Page 11
NAVIGATOR 1994
CAA
Continued from page 1
The Monarchs could easilv have the same
type of season they did in 1993, as long as they
stay hea.th and competitive. Look for them to
challenge ECU for the '94 CAA title.
"Tie Richmond Spiders, after a sixth-place
conference finish in
1993, return a strong e �
nucleus for the 1994
season. Ronnie
Atkins' squad will
be experienced on
the mound as well
as at the plate, but
hispiiyers will need
to step up their indi-
vidual and team
jrlav to be competi-
tive in the CAA.
Freshman All-
America team mem-
Rated the fourth
toughest conference
in the nation, the
CAA-championship
race will be wide
open.
ber Sean Casey was UR's top hitter in 1993, and
he will once again play first base. Senior Jeff
Dausch (.327,6, 35) has moved from left field to
second base, where he will be an even day player.
Experience will be plentiful in the Spider
outfield. Senior RF Tom Scioscia (.323 4,37) and
junior CF Mark Budzinski will return, with
Budzmski also moving to first base in late-inning
situation. They will be backed up by juniors
Gerald Dorman and Scott Mealey.
The Richmond pitching staff is adequate.
There are no superstars, but each member of
their staff is capable of pitching in any situation.
The staff is led by senior Wayne Hoy (5-3, 3.17)
and sophomore Bobby St. Pierre (6-2,4.09).
The biggest challenge for Atkins will be to
keep his team close in ball games throughout
their difficult schedule. The Spiders' bats will tell
the storv throughout the season. They could fin-
ish in upper half of the CAA pack in 1994.
William & Mary, according to Head Coach
Jim Farr, will be in every game we play
Although they play a demanding schedule, the
Tribe could easily im-
������ proveonlastyear's24-
19-1 record.
Pitching looks to
be the only area where
W&M is inexperi-
enced, yet the staff is
still good. Their rota-
tion is led by junior
right-hander Mike
Ragsdale and south-
paw senior Erik
Sandvig, who com-
bined to go 11-7 for the
Tribe in 1993. Behind
them, the rotation is
Greenville Toyota
-99
shaky. The strong W&M bullpen hopes to offset
anv problems due to the inexperience of the
starters, and Coach Farr will look to closer Adam
Butler (2-3,2.92,4 saves) to be his "ace in the hole
The Tribe offense is an intense mix of speed
and power. William & Mary finished ninth in the
counrrv in stolen bases last season, and will run
early and often in '94. Meanwhile, Second Team
All-CAA member Mike Ruberti hopes to add on
his nine home run, 46 RBI performance of 1993.
He will be backed in the lineup by shortstop
Shawn Knight and Greg Zulli, who each batted
over .315.
William & Mary is the team on the rise in the
CAA. If they stay healthy, look for the Tribe to
drasticallv improve on last season's record and
possibly make a run at the conference title.
SHOW YOUR
PIRATE PRIDE
SHOP THE ECU
STUDENT STORE FOR
SWEATSHIRTS
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Mon-Fri,7:30am-6:00pm
Sat, 9:00 am-l:00pm
I � includes up to 5 quarts of Genuine Toyota oil.
� � Install Genuine Toyota double-filtering oil tilter.
� � Lubrication (when applicable).
� Check all fluid levels. & 4 f fCic
I -Turbos . 4x4s and diesels may be siigmiy higher Musi
. present coupon at lime of purchase Expires 2'2&94 �
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J �Check caster, camber and adjust toe-in, if necessary .
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top 10 dealers
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. Must present coupon at time ot purchase Expires "2894 �
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 10, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 10, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.990
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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