The East Carolinian, February 8, 1994






- II ifpl, '���M
Big Loss
The ECU football team loses a
valuable member of the
defensive coaching staff to the
New York Jets.
Story on page 8.
Lifestyle
It's Play Time! ! !
"A Servant and Two Masters"
will be performed Feb. 10 thru
Feb. 15 at 8:00pm each night
with a 2:00 matinee on Sunday
the 13th. Story on page 6.
The East Carolinian
Wr&XvrSb-DKveqM.tJ Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, February 8,1994
10 Pages
Shared Visions campaign off and running
a
VERSITY
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Max Ray Joyner, the president of Shared Visions, and ECU Chancellor
Richard Eakin take great pride in the accomplishments of the campaign.
By Jon Cawley
Staff Writer"
Last Thursday night,
Chancellor Eakin kicked off the
first Shared Visions campaign
at the Greenville Country Club.
The Pitt County campaign is the
largest and first to begin, out of
15 regional campaigns in North
Carolina and the Southeast.
Max Ray Joyner, the presi-
dent of Shared Visions, opened
the evening's program with a
short speech concerning Shared
Visions and their goals for ECU.
The program began three years
ago, and it's biggest previous
campaign raised $2.5 million for
the School of Business � much
less than the $50 million cur-
rent goal, joyner said.
He added that the current
campaign has raised $37 mil-
ECU's way is Inf oHighway
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
ECU is determined to be-
come more than road kill on
North Carolina's new informa-
tion highway, as the School of
Medicine and other sections of
the university will be important
parts of the network.
ECU was one of 106 sites
around the state selected to par-
ticipate in the information high-
way. The sites range from high
schools and community colleges
in rural areas to major research
universities. ECU will offer two
sites initially at the medical school
and in Joyner Library.
"We are at the forefront of
the development of medical ap-
plications for use on the informa-
tion network said David C.
Balch, director of the Center for
Health Sciences Communication
in the ECU School of Medicine.
Balch is currently working on an
application called
"telemedicine in which doctors
can use communications equip-
ment such as telephone lines, mi-
crowave relays and video cam-
eras to examine patients at dis-
tant locations. The Medical
School already has telemedicine
links with sites in Ahoskie, Jack-
sonville and Central Prison in
Raleigh.
"Telemedicine is a leading
application that will drive the
highway Balch said. "ECU is in
an important position because we
are involved in the development
of these applications
ECU and Pitt County Me-
morial Hospital were among the
first to develop an electronic data
system that allows hospitals to
share information about patients'
records, Balch said.
Dr. Diana M. Henshaw, di-
rector of Continuing Education
and Summer School, is coordi-
nating the hookup in Joyner Li-
brary. She is a member of the
N.C. Information Highway
Training Subcommittee and
serves as the chairperson for
ECU's Telecommunications
Committee.
"I think the information
highway is going to be a won-
derful thing she said. "It will
provide advancements to health
care and distance learning, and
will help establish links with
business and industry that we've
never had before
The highway will offer two-
way, interactive teaching from
See ECU page 3
Justice serves ECU student
By Jeb Brookshire
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Rick Lappin, ECU criminal justice
major and scholarship recipient.
Staff Writer
Every year the North Caro-
lina Sheriff's Association awards
10 academic scholarships in the
amount of $2,000 to criminal jus-
tice majors. This year, Richard
"Rick" Lappin Jr a junior at ECU
fromRoxboro,N.C,received this
honor.
Recipients of the scholar-
ships must be criminal justice
majors and have a recommenda-
tion from the sheriff of their
county.
"I recommended Rick be-
cause he has always worked hard
in school, and if anybody wanted
it the scholarship, he did said
Dennis Oakley, the Person County
Sheriff. "Good people deserve
breaks, too
The scholarships are open
to anyone majoring in criminal
justice, but it is helpful if one of
the applicant's parents works for
the sheriff's department. In
Lappin's case, neither of his par-
ents do.
"It was a real surprise to get
the scholarship, because only 10
people get it, and their parents
are usually working for the
sheriff's department Lappin
said.
Although Lappin's parents
did not work for the sheriff, his
father did drive an ambulance.
Through that job, Lappin's father
See JUSTICE page 3
ECU fraternity gears up for 124-mile work-out
Bylaura Allard
Staff Writer
While Friday afternoon may
traditionally consist of rest and relax-
ation for many ECU students, mem-
bersof the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity
are planning to get in a little exercise
�124 miles, to be exact � to raise
money for the Ronald McDonald
House.
"We decided to contribute to
them financially because a lot of
people don't know how to help the
community said "Walk to
Wilmington" Chairman Mike
Cames. "This gives them the chance,
and to make the community aware
thatfratemitiesaren'tallaboutparty-
ing, but development into a better
person
The planned hike stretches
from the Student Stores at ECU to
Trask Coliseum at the University of
North Carolina-Wilmington.
The members will divide into
three groups, and each group will
altematemilesastheydribblebasket-
balls in the third annual Walk to
Wilmington.
Once they arrive in
Wilmington, the grou p will present a
check to Ronald McDonald House
Public Relatioas Director Stephanie
Barnard.
"We hope to donate about
$5,000 after expenses Carnes said.
"We'reexpectingeachbrothertoraise
$120
The brothers will leave ECU
on Feb.25at 12:30p.m. withPi Kappa
Alpha President Anthony Andujar,
Barnard, Mike Carnes, Chancellor
Richard Eakin, Dean of Students Ron
Speier and Assistant Athletic Direc-
tor Lee Workman, who will join the
group for the first steps of the trip.
Atleastoneperson will be drib-
bling the basketball at all times as the
unlikely team jogs to Wilmington for
Saturdaynight'sECUUNC-Wbas-
ketball game. The group will leave
See HIKING page 2
lion so far. Joyner acknowl-
edged that "the last dollars are
the hardest to raise but he
"feels confident for the rest
Joyner promoted the
Shared Visions campaign by la-
menting ECU's fine points and
its benefits for the surrounding
area. Joyner called ECU a "cul-
tural center
"The location of ECU con-
tributes much to the gradua-
tion rate Joyner said. He
added that many students from
the surrounding area would not
have the educational opportu-
nity otherwise.
Joyner cited ECU as the
"biggest employer east of Ra-
leigh" and said that there is
more building going on now
than ever as proof of ECU's
continued search for excel-
lence. Chancellor Eakin later
set the total amount of current
contruction on campus capital
projects at over $100 million
A short video was shown
following Joyner's opening,
which exposed ECU's tradition
of excellence to those in the au-
dience. In keeping with the
evening's message, the video
highlighted such events as the
$50,000 pledge from the city of
Greenville that got the college
started.
The video's conclusion
also listed Shared Vision's cam-
paign strategies for distinction.
The goals of the campaign list
the endowment, facilities and
annual support as the highest
areas for growth.
Within the endowment,
$26.5 milllion is marked for
three major areas. The first is
student development. Merit-
based scholarships make up
$5 million of that monev,
graduate fellowships $3 mil-
lion, personal development
program for athletes $1 mil-
lion and $500,000 for minor-
ity leadership awards.
The second area desig-
nated for improvement is fac-
ulty enrichment. Under fac-
ulty enrichment, professor-
ships and distinguished pro-
fessorships account for $4.5
million, research initiatives
and teaching enhancement
$1.5 million and endowed lec-
tureships $1.5 million.
The final endowment
area is program enhancement.
Within this program an en-
dov ment for the visual and
performing arts accounts for
See VISIONS page 3
Problems abound on campus
By Tina Chiwona
Staff Writer
Across campus, theft and
mutilation hamper the conve-
nience of ECU services, and re-
sult in higher prices and greater
aggravation for students, fac-
ulty and staff.
"Mutilation of materials is
a major problem (at the Joyner
Library) said Gordon Barbour,
the night supervisor. People tear
pages from books, magazines
and periodicals because they
think that they will not get
caught. The reason why this be-
havior occurs is that people do
not want to make their own cop-
ies.
This behavior happens of-
ten, and the library assistants
are alerted of this problem only
when other patrons wish to bor-
row a book or copy certain
pages, only to find that pages
are missing.
"This is very common with
the serials and the periodicals
Barbour said. "It happens on a
daily basis
However, since the warn-
ing sign has been up by the exit,
the number of unchecked mate-
rials have reduced considerably.
"I feel like the sign has
helped so far Barbour said. The
sign was erected last December
and in the summer of '93, a
policy was put in effect that per-
mits the library assistants to
check IDs and take down a
patron's ID number each time
the theft protection system is
activated.
Van Vanhorne, a student
assistant, agrees with Barbour
and said, "With the policy of
recording names and ID num-
bers of the students of patrons
caught taking unchecked mate-
rials, the frequency has gone
down
According to Vanhorne,
even though it is not a big prob-
lem, it is still there. Students try
to take out magazines and other
periodicals in hope of not get-
ting caught.
People attempt to do this
by sneaking out materials that
are small enough to slip into
their notebooks. Again
Vanhorne emphasizes that,
"they believe that they will not
get caught, when in fact they
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
do
Trudy McGlohon, a li-
brary assistant, has worked
at Joyner Library for 12 years.
See THIEVES page 2
Video yearbook needs local sound
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Strike up the band and sub-
mit your music to be used in this
year's Treasure Chest, ECU's video
yearbook. Tra?sureCa?sf editorsare
seeking different varieties of mu-
sic � country, rock, classical or
even instrumental � to fit in with
the hours of video they have taped
throughout the past year.
Time is running out; music
must be entered by Feb. 18.
"We found out this year that
we cannot have any copyrighted
music in our tape the Treasure
Chest unless we pay for their roy-
alties said Stephen Lewis, execu-
tive producer for the Treasure Cliest.
Using copyrighted music
would cost an estimated $5,000,
even though the tape is non-profit,
Lewis said.
"We wantto be sure that we're
not violating the law said Greg
Brown, TrcasureChest class ins true-
tor. "We don't want to get the Uni-
versity into any trouble, but we
want to do something creative and
original
"Talking to people last year,
they wanted more local bands or
our own music department in the
video yearbook L,ewis said. "It
would be a great way for them
local bands and musicians to get
free publicity, by having 5,000 tapes
distributed throughout ECU and
possibly other schools
Bands or m usicians played
in the video yearbook must sign
a paper staring that the Treasure
Chest has permission to use their
music. Credit will be given for
performances or clips at the end
of the tape. All submitted music
will be returned.
"Musicians over at the
school of music and some of the
local musicians here in town
they've really impressed the stu-
dents, they've impressed me and
we would like to hear from them
Brown said.
See BANDS page 3
Devastation cripples war-torn Bosnia-Herzegovina
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-
Herzegovina (AP) � Victims of a
weekend of carnage were hur-
riedly buried today because the
cemeteries were exposed to snip-
ers and shell fire.
Gravediggers laid the cof-
fins of many of the 68 bombing
victims in the ground at dawn.
Mourners were only able to spend
a few minutes in the mist at the
gravesites before leaving. The soc-
cer field-turned-cemetery on the
north side of Sarajevo is danger-
ously exposed to Serb positions.
The U.N. chief has asked for
the authority to order NATO
bombing runs on Serb mortar
positions around Sarajevo, al-
though President Clinton played
down the prospect of retaliation
for the shelling Saturday that
killed 68 and wounded 200 in the
deadliest attack on the Bosnian
capital in the 22-month-old war.
In an apparent policy shift,
Britain todav called for "more
muscular action than hitherto by
the United Nations" to end the
killings in Sarajevo. "Its purpose
must be not merely to punish or
retaliate but to improve the situa-
tion in Sarajevo said an official
from Prime Minister John Major's
office. He spoke onlv on condi-
tion of anonymity.
I
��- -





2 The East Carolinian
February 8, 1994
THIEVES
Continued from page 1
Students pay to keep library open
The Student Government Association at Chabot College in
Pleasonton, Calif has donated $12,754 to keep the library open an
additional 10 hours every week. The hours were cut in 1993 as a
budget reduction. The donation will allow the library to pay staff to
keep the facility and computer labs open until 9 p.m. Monday
through Thursday, instead of closing at 7:30 p.m and to resume
Saturday service. "Budget cuts have affected not only our fees and
opportunities as students, but some of the valued services we may
have taken for granted, such as the library-learning resource cen-
ter said Luis Molina, president of the Associated Students of
Chabot College. Last year, the student government at Solano
Collegemadeadona tion to keep open sever al sections of university
transfer courses that had been scheduled for elimination because of
budget cuts.
No news is not always good news
The student newspaper at Ferris State University published a
nearly blank edition to protest budget cuts that would eliminate the
school's journalism department. The staff of the bi-weekly paper,
The Torch, published the edition late last year to show students what
the university will be like without a journalism program. The 12-
page paper contained only two small cartoons denouncing the cuts
and an editorial explaining the blank pages. The paper's opinion
editor, Ron Woycehoski, said the edition was published to express
dismay about the university cutting $7.9 million from its budget by
eliminating 17 academic programs. According to Woycehoski, the
paper received some critcism about their action, but response from
students has been mostly positive.
Professor receives mail bomb
Investigators are still working to determine who sent a bomb
to the home of a Harvard University Medical School faculty mem-
ber in December, authorities said. Dr. Paul Rosenberg, an assistant
professor of neurology at the Medical School, unwittingly averted
the detonation of two six-inch pipe bombs contained in a package
sent to his home in Newton, Mass The Harvard Crimson reported.
On Dec. 19, after Rosenberg and his wife returned from a vacation,
he cut open the top of a box with a knife rather than opening the
flaps, which would have activated the bombs. When he saw a metal
cylinder and wires in the package, he and his wife ran out of the
house and he called police. The state fire Marshall's office disarmed
both of the bombs. Police said the explosion "would have killed
anyone in the immediate vicinity
Compiled by Jason Wil'iams. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
"Definitely, people try and take
books out, but take out maga-
zines more. In fact, magazines
are more of a daily event
McGlohon said, "while all oth-
ers are sporadic
McGlohon adds that even
when people are studying at the
library and get up to use the rest
rooms, they return to find that
their books and bags have been
stolen.
The assistants at Joyner Li-
brary want people to know that
if they are caught with un-
checked or mutilated materials
when leaving the library, seri-
ous measures will be taken. The
Warning sign is there to discour-
age such unfavorable behavior
from any patron using the li-
brary.
This problem of theft does
not apply only to Joyner Library,
but also to other parts of cam-
pus. At the Student Store, text
book theft is a serious concern.
The store installed a security
camera last Spring.
"The camera helps, espe-
cially when there are a lot of
people shopping said Mike
Coston, the store manager.
"With the camera you can see
the actual crime taking place and
the person he said. The store is
hoping to install a new security
system that will sound an alarm
when someone tries to exit with
unpaid items.
Stolen books are usually
sold back to the book stores in
hope of acquiring some quick
cash. However, a valid picture
ID is required to sell books back
to the stores.
Students have tried to sell
back books and could not when
their IDs did not match their face.
"If it doesn't look like them, we
won't take it Coston said.
Reporting stolen books is
an action that the student store
encourages. Students have had
their books stolen while shop-
ping in the store and Coston
Has the following positions available:
Business Manager- responsible for
keeping the station's financial
records in order; and Promotions
Manager- responsible for station
PR and increasing station
listenership. Contact A. Lee Judge
at WZMB at 757-4751
HIKING
Continued from page 1
from the Student Stores, cross the
campus to Charles Street and take
Evans Street out of town.
"The route runs on roads with
less traffic to keep the brothers safe as
they dribble down the highway
Carnessaid.
"The Ronald McDonald House
serves as a home away from home
for the families of children who
have been hospitalized said
Ronald McDonald House Director
Suzy Walker.
"Thehouse has 18 family bed-
rooms and families can stay for $10
a night she said.
NEEE
mmm
rfcm
1109 Charles Blvd
758-4251
We need
USED CDs,
Sega Genesis &
Super Nintendo
Games k Players!
golden
urges them to write their ID
number somewhere in the book
so that when the book is sold
back, they will know who sold
it.
"I have caught people
stealing text books, pencils and
answer sh ts, and those who
are caught go to the Dean of
Students office said Coston.
The store does have the power
of having the thieves arrested.
Approximately $27,000 is
lost annually due to theft at the
Wright Place. According to Tony
Sloan, the location manager, the
WP loses about $120 a day.
"People steal anything!
They eat doughnuts and pizzas
while walking around the sec-
tion, they remove labels oft
sandwiches to make the sand-
IT
wich unknown in order to pay a
lower price Sloan said.
Another problem is that
students actually pocket goods.
Employers have seen baked
goods and bottled drinks
quickly stashed into nap sacks
and big heavy coats. There have
been times when other students,
staff and faculty have alerted
the managers at the Wright Place
that they have seen someone
stealing or eating something and
is in the process of leaving.
"That's the most common
way of finding out that people
are stealing, because at the time
we are usually very busy said
Rodrick Parker, the location su-
pervisor.
Parker says tha t the Wright
Place tries to prevent further
theft by stationing it's peopleat
the front 90 percent of the time.
"Some people try and walk out
with a whole meal. They jump
over chains or pass the cash reg-
isters said Parker.
In order to sell certain
items, the Wright Place has to
display them for high visibility
purposes. However people need
to know that all these unfavor-
able actions fall under the de-
frauding law and people can be
detained if necessary, Sloan
said.
"We are trying to provide
a service with a huge variety of
products to satisfy our custom-
ers, but theft only results in
higher prices Sloan said.
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IF YOU ARE A LEADER AND WANT A VOICE IN THE FUTURE OF
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(





February 8, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
BANDS
Continued from page 1
JUSTICE
Continued from page 1
"We hope to have a huge re-
sponse so Uiat we have to listen to
tapes for hours upon hours of pick-
ing music out Lewis said.
The Treasure Chest is taking
on a slightly different format this
year.
"We're not going to be using
100 music in our yearbook
Lewis said. "We're trying to in-
corporate more interviews
Students and group leaders
will be highlighted in order to take
the ECU community back to events
which occurredaa throughout the
year, Lewis said.
"That's something the print
ECU
yearbooks can't do print year-
books can't actually take you to
that place, they can show you a
snapshot Lewis said. "With the
new video yearbook you're get-
ting five seconds of 'Hey, I remem-
ber that
The Treasure Chest will be
available in April. Provided music
be credited in the video yearbook,
and reserved a spot in ECU's his-
tory.
CD's, reel-to-reels or quality
cassettes can be given to the com-
munications department in 124
Ragsdale, or call Treasure Chest at
757-6501 for more information.
Cont'nued from page 1
universities and high schools. For
example, students at rural Manteo
High School will be able to link
up electronically with classes
taught at the School of Science
and Math in Durham, or even
ECU.
University sites will also be
used for in-service trainingof school
teachers and for consultations with
local agencies, Henshaw said.
"I expect our faculty to take a
new look at ways to use this tech-
nology shesaid. "I think you'll see
universities doing some things they
haven't done before
Each site will have comput-
ers, television sets and video cam-
eras connected to other sites using
fiber optic cable. The fiber optics
will give the sites in the network the
capability to send and receive text,
sound and motion pictures at high
speeds.
Last summer the General As-
sembly appropriated $4.1 million
to purchase equipment such as the
fiber optic cable needed for the first
round of users. The state will choose
80 more sites in January 1995, and
hopes to hookup all state-run pub-
lic facilities in 10 years.
and Sheriff Oakley got to know
each other.
"I worked real close with his
father for a number of years, and 1
got to see Rick grow up into a fine
young man said Oakley.
Lappin was not the only one
who was surprised about the
scholarship. His parents, Richard
and Diane Lappin, were equally
surprised.
"We are extremely proud of
Rick his father said. "He has al-
ways been an 'A' student, and it is
nice to see all of his hard work pay
off
The only relative that Lappin
has in law enforcement is his uncle
who is a deputy sheriff in Person
county.
"He was really proud of me,
too Lappin said. "He helped me
out a lot as far as helping me with
the application process
Lappin is an active member
of the ECU Criminal Justice and
Social Work Alliance, an organi-
zation for criminal justice majors
and intended majors. The Alliance
is one of the most active groups on
campus, and they are involved in
many social events for the mem-
bers and also participate in sev-
eral service projects within the
community, such as collecting
books for local prisons.
Lappin does not plan to be
on the enforcing side of the law.
After he completes iaw school, he
intends to work as a legal aide.
With some experience as an aide
behind him, he hopes to eventu-
ally work for a law firm.
"I would like to work a few
years as a legal aide not only for
the experience, but to help people
out who can't afford a high priced
attorney Lappin said. "I want to
help people out and I think that
would be a good way to
Lappin plans to graduate
this December with a degree in
criminal justice. After school, he
plans to pursue his law degree at
either UNC-Chapel Hill, or
Campbell University.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-251 -4000 Ext. 1576
News Writers! Don't forget our meeting
Thursday � new time: 4:00 p.m. Thanks
for meeting those deadlines this week!
VISIONS
ECU SCHOOL OF ART
VAE-EftmNtf
SALE
� textiles
� wood
� cards
� ceramics
� jewelry
� other 'love' stuff
February 10 & 11,8am - 5pm
February 12,10am - 2pm
Jenkins Fine Ait Buili
Continued from page 1
S2miIlion, library collection$l.5
million, initiatives to improve
public schools $1.5 million and
the international studies pro-
gram is awarded 5300,000.
The second portion of the
Shared Vision's campaign is to
provide for campus develop-
ment. Within campus develop-
ment the Ficklen stadium ex-
pansion and the Minges coli-
seum renovation receives $9
million, Joyner library addition
$1.8 million, Leo W. Jenkins
Cancer Center $1.5 million, the
center for Alcohol and Drug
Abuse $1.5 million and campus
beautification receives $200,000.
The final portion of the
Shared Vision's campaign is an-
nual support which accounts for
$7.5 million, and comprises the
rest of the campaign's total goal
of $50 million.
Following the video pre-
sentation, Chancellor Eakin took
the podium to further attempt
to solicit donations from poten-
tial contributors in the audience.
Eakin began his speech by an-
nouncing the current pledge to-
tal of $37 million, what he called
a "new milestone in the cam-
paign
Eakin said he is very
pleased that the campaign
needed to try to raise $35 mil-
lion before December 1993 and
in fact had raised $36 million by
thattimeand had$37millionby
the end of January.
The campaign is required
to raise $1 million a month to
meet the goal in the next eleven
months, which is "not possible
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through tuition, grants and con-
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Eakin used the example of
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sixty students in the nation, se-
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the need for scholarships. The
scholars award gave her a
chance to be a student, Eakin
said.
Eakin said that the faculty
and staff campaign is in its in-
fancy and that "anything and ev-
erything is possible
"During the first week,
$52,000 was pledged to the cam-
paign within the nucleus of
twenty people Eakin said, and
"the best is still to come
The program closed with
two short addresses from Mrs.
Elaine Garner Denton and Mr.
Walter L. Williams. Denton'sson
is autistic, and is named in the
Benjamin Scott Denton Fellow-
ship. Williams is an ECU alum-
nus who recently donated a $1
million gift to the university.
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HFACMWG OUT TO SERVE VOU I





The East Carolinian
Page 4
Opinion
February 8, 1994
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
100� recycled paper
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tllllo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Sean Mc Laughiin, Account Executive
Richard Gurley, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt AycOCk, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary-
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
United Nations: peacekeepers to Bosnia
ryoE I 'blow THfS
VieTNAM&eT6
tmt0 To HL-L,
l CAN6�T0U�nlAS
lOUTTA He&AMP
NATO faces quite a challenge. Actually,
NATO's been facing the challenge all along,
they've just chosen not to step up to it.
In Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Saturday,
Serbian shelling killed 68 and wounded 200 in
the deadliest attack on the capital since the war
began. The siege, which has been on-going for 22
months, has brought about many a furrowed
brow with leaders and everyday citizens alike.
The United Nations and NATO have
avoided a confrontation while threatening air
strikes for more than a year now. Many people
have reacted to this, questioning how the world
powers could just stand by and watch the hor-
rors without interfering. After an attack like the
one this weekend however, even some of the
most pacifistic are asking if steps should be
taken to try and end the fighting. Even with that,
it seems as if the conclusion is still split.
The U.N. Secretary-General Boutros
Boutros-Ghali asked for the power to order
NATO bombing runs on Serb mortar positions
around Sarajevo. Clinton played down the pros-
pect, saying, "The appropriate thing now is to
see if this horrible incident can be the spur to a
vigorous effort to a peace agreement. That's
what we ought to focus on now Boutros-Ghali
wants NATO members to give him permission
to call for bombing runs "against artillery or
mortar positions in or around Sarajevo which
are responsible for attacks on civilian targets
NATO foreign ministers will meet today in
an emergency session to consider the bombing
request.
The solution to a problem like Bosnia is not
an easy one. What leaders must be careful with
is getting "caught up in the action so to speak.
When something as chaotic as war comes along,
these leaders of the world (NATO, the United
Nations) must take it upon themselves to ratio-
nally discuss viable solutions in a way that the
warring factions cannot. They must become the
peacekeepers and must support that ideal to the
furthest extent.
What has been known to happen, more than
once, is for these leaders to become trigger happy
and jump into a seeming solution before it can be
rationally thought out. In the case of Bosnia, while
it is true that fighting has gone on for an excess of
22 months, there have been no real plans as to how
intervening will stop the killing. Senator Phil
Gramm, a Republican from Texas, agrees with
this line of thinking: "Nobody in the military has
told me that bombing would be decisive
Coupled with the numerous views within
the U.N. as to how to end the fighting, the end
result is an indecisiveness that most apparent to
the Serbs, who use it to their advantage. Since the
war began in April 1992, the U.N. has sent in
peacekeeping forces, authorized a naval blockade
and economic sanctions on Serbia, as well as set up
a war-crimes tribunal and authorized NATO jets
to enforce a U.N. no-fly zone over Bosnia. None
seem to have helped.
Continuing on this path of sanctioning means
that peacekeeping forces will have to remain to
protect those that cannot protect themselves. Just
how much further the U .N. takes it will be decided
upon in one way or another. Hopefully these
decision makers will remember that statesman-
ship is all about keeping a clear line of vision on the
world's problems.
By Brian Hall
By Barbara Irwin
Lifting trade embargo manipulates emotions
Environmental education radical in its scope
Since my fiance has an 11-
year-old sister, occasionally I get
�te'see what sort of silliness the
public school system is teaching
these days. However, I was not
aware, until reading a report by
Jonathan Adler, an environmen-
tal policy ana- MHMMHBHi
lyst, how silly
gome of this
stuff hasgotten,
especially
about environ-
mental issues.
Most class-
room materials
areprovidedby
the radical en-
vironmental
groups, whose political agenda in-
fluences the information theysup-
ply. This is roughly equivalent to
allowing most sex education ma-
terials to besupplied by Operation
Rescue. There are many big envi-
ronmental myths being pushed
on the youth of America.
Recycling is always good. Re-
cycling is sweeping America's
schools (including ECU). Guides
like the EPA's "Let's Reduce and
Recycle" teaches elementary
school children that recycling re-
duces pollution and saves natural
resources, energy, money and land
fill space. The truth is that recy-
cling can actually be worse for the
environment. Bleaching recycling
paper causes more water pollu-
tion than bleaching virgin pulp.
Cleaning cloth diapers uses mas-
sive amounts of water, energy and
detergent. Recydingpaper willnot
even save many trees. About 87
percent of all paper in the United
States is from trees specifically
planted for that purpose by the
paper industry. Thus recycling
paper may actually reverse the
trend of an increase in U.S. forest-
land of the past 40 years.
Plastic is bad. Children are told
that paper is better for the environ-
ment than plastic, that "plastic foam
is made with chemicals that make
the ozone hole bigger (50 Simple
Things Kids Can Do to Save the Earth)
Plastics are attacked because they
MaHMMHHMi an be diffi-
cult to recycle.
The truth is that
recycling can
actually be worse
for the
environment.
Yet this non-
biodegrad-
abilityisapro-
tectionfor hu-
man health.
Plastic is also
preferablebe-
causeitcanbe
produced
with less than
one-tenth of the energy of other ma-
terials.
Contrary to popular opinion,
the production of polystyrene has
not required theuseof chlorofluoro-
carbons (CFCs) for years, and thus
poses no threat to the ozone layer.
John Ruston of the Environmental
DefenseFundadmitted "Idon'tthink
that we have strong evidence that
one is better than the other
We produce too much garbage.
Many texts state that we are facing a
garbage crisis, that we are running
out of places to dump our trash.
However, should landfilling be de-
sired, there is ample space for our
trash. Research by Resources for the
Future has demonstrated that all of
the solid waste produced in America
in the next 1,000 years could easily fit
in a landfill less than one-tenth the
size of the United States. Also, new
technology is discovering how to
convert trash into energy, further
reducing the need for landfills.
Acid rain. Students are repeat-
edly told that acid rain is killing fish
and trees. Butthecongressional-com-
missioned $700 mill ion study by the
National Acid Precipitation Assess-
ment Program concluded that not
only is it not a problem for eastern
forests, it actually helps provide ni-
trogen, an important nutrient.
Air pollution is growing worse.
This Planet is Mine states that "the
airpollutionproblemsarehereand
they aregmwingatanalarming rate
There is almost no recognition that,
by most measurements, air quality is
improving. According to EPA data,
ground-level ozone (smog) is de-
clining significantly in most urban
areas.
Global warming. Books like Tfie
Greenhouse Effect: Life on a Warmer
Planet state thatscientistsbelieve that
theworld'sfoodsupplywilldwindle
away, and entire islands be flooded.
It is put forward as scientific fact that
global warming is a threat tociviliza-
tion. But even a poll of scientists
conductedbyGreenpeacefound that
more climatologists felt that there
was no crisis presented by the cur-
rent situation.
Tlieozone layer. This is theother
"threat" whichenvironmentalistsare
using to try to scare our children,
who are told that skin cancer and
cataracts will soon increasedramati-
caify. Even Vice President Gore said
that we should teach our children to
fear the sky. Children, and the rest of
us, are never told that even a worst
case scenario of a 10 percent deple-
tion of the ozone would result in a
rise of UV-B radiation to the same
levels one sees 100 miles closer to the
equator, or that some upper atmo-
sphere ozone readings in the 80s
were higher than those in the 50s.
Maintainingour environment
is important and should be taught in
the public school system. That does
not mean, however, that children
should be indoctrinated with theo-
ries and halt-truths. Children should
most definitely not be exposed the
the sort of virulent anti-progress
message espoused by most of these
radical environmental groups.
Last Thursday, President
Clinton announced that the 19-year-
old trade embargo against Vietnam
would be lifted as an attempt to gain
further knowledge about the 2,238
U.S. servicemen still listed at "miss-
ing in action And, oh yeah, it will
also help to reduce our $115 billion
trade deficit. Well, well. Will the real
President Clinton, with the real rea-
son for lifting this trade embargo,
please stand?
Is the President really trying to
spoon F" :d the American public this
line of crap? I mean, c'mon. After 19
years, some supreme being of Viet-
nam finally says, "Okay, okay. You
guys lift the trade embargo, and we'll
tell you all about the MIA-POWs
and we agree? Please.
Vietnam officials have tried for
years to tell the American people
that they are so busy trying to find
their own 330,000 MlAs that they
cannot possibly locate our 2300. The
whole reason for America's involve-
ment in Vietnam is to this day so
controversial, but a fact that seems
more evident is that some of our
own fighting heroes were indeed
shot down or buried and it is time to
accept this dreadful fate and move
on.
President Clinton has given
several excellent reasons for lifting
this tradeembargo, and I believe the
American public is mature and wise
enough to concur. First, lifting the
embargo would help the U.S. to de-
crease its $115 billion trade deficit,
because until now, most American
products have been smuggled into
Vietnam or purchased from other
third world countries which do not
have trade embargoes with the US
Also, Vietnam is rich in natural re-
sources, including a South China
Sea oil field that oil-giant Mobile
discovered in 1975 and hopes to be
able to explore and drill. Finally,
American big businessman, James
Rockwell, chimes in that "lifting the
embargo will assist in the effort to
find our MlAs because the more
Americans on the ground, the better
our chances for finding out exactly
' what happened
Okay, Jimmy, so are you say-
ing thatafter 16-hour days of negoti-
ating multi-billion dollar deals with
a poverty-stricken country, you and
your staff are going to don a pair of
cammiesand go wandering through
the brush and bamboo in hopes of
re-enacting a Chuck Norris survi val
search? Really
So far, however, it seems we
are making a sound investment
based on sound advice. Pretty safe,
huh? Well, perhaps not. With any
business venture come business
risks. Linda Lim, the editor of the
Journal of Asian Business says "there
is no gold mine just waiting to be
tapped in Vietnam. Since the U.S.
held out much longer than countries
such as Japan, France and Germany,
just getting established among the
many more experienced competi-
tors will be difficult
Yet, with thereasonsPresident
Clintonhasoutlined,Americanbusi-
ness is not going to resist the tempta-
tion. So good for them, and us.
However, President Clinton
can t let it end there because, well,
uh, he's the President, and try as he
must, his goal is to satisfy as many as
possible. So he brings in the big,
dangling piece of meat to tease
the MIA-POW families in their
hungry quest for truth. Many of
these families say President
Clintonhasnow takenaway their
only bit of leverage for forcing
Vietnam to disclose evidence of
MIA-POWs. To this, President
Clinton redefines leverage by
withholding "most favored na-
tion" status, full diplomatic rela-
tions, the exchange of ambassa-
dors and low tariffs.
Oh,pooh,pooh,B.C!What
about the idea of reestablishing
the embargo if this long-awaited
light of truth does not surface?
Which it will not, and which is
why a compromising claim like
this was not offered.
By the time an action like
that would emerge, American
businesses will have already been
established, the deficit will be
dropping and jobs will havebeen
secured. Try telling a few billion
thatthesepositivedevelopments
have to end so as to cradle a
couple thousand. The country
would be in an uproar.
So, Mr. Clinton, job well
done,kinda. Ibelieveif you want
to lift this trade embargo for the
profit-hungry businessmen and
reduce our trade deficit, fine.
Most Americans will agree that
in the long run, we will prosper.
But don't try to thrust an old,
crusty pacifier into our mouths
so that we will stop bawling for
truth by telling us that this move
will eventually uncover all the
secrets of the MIA-POWs.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor.
The 3 February 1994 edition of Vie East Carolinian
contained a letter written by Thomas W. Blue. In this
letter Mr. Blue correctly pointed out that Walter B. Jones
Jr Republican candidate for the 3rd Congressional Dis-
trict, is not an attorney, nor has he ever attended law
school. What Mr. Blue failed to point out is that Mr. Jones
has never claimed to be an attorney, or to have attended
law school.
Mr. Jones voted for the plan that changed the lines
of the 1st Congressional District. Mr. Jones voted for the
redistricting plan only after the plan which he favored
was rejected. And then Mr. Jones voted for the plan only
after he submitted amendments that would keep his
hometown of Farmville from being split into two sepa-
rate districts.
Mr. Blue attempts to portray Mr. Jones as a liberal.
On this point Mr. Blue is obviously confused, misin-
formed, or does not know how to identify a liberal. A
To the Editor:
Mr. Blue has little knowledge of the United
StatesConstitution,especiallyArticleI,SectionIl,second
paragraph, which reads, "No person shall be a Repre-
sentative who shall not have attained to the age of
twenty-five years, and been seven years a citizen of the
United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an
inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen
Walter B. Jones Jr. did submit an amendment and
voted for the Congressional district plan for NorthCaro-
lina to (A) keep Pitt County in two U.S. Congressional
districts instead of three and (B) to keep the town city of
Farmville, his hometown, and other voting precincN in
one district instead of splitting the Farmville voting
townshipintotwodifferentdistrictsand precincts. Tobe
honest, the districts layouts are politically pornographic.
Many citizens of the Old North State both Democrats
and Republicans truly think that the N.C General As-
sembly hired several schizophrenics to draw these con-
gressional district lines.
Mr. Blue needs to re-research Jones Jrs voting
record on all issues. Walter B.JonesJr. hasnot hired some
simple review of Mr. Jones' voting record from his
days in the North Carolina House will prove Mr.
Blue wrong here.
Mr. Blue is also confused, misinformed, or
simply lying about several other things. Mr. Jones has
not received contributions from labor unions. It is
impossible for any challenger to receive PAC funds.
The Congressional club lias not hired a consultant for,
or donated any funds to, Mr. Jones.
Mr. Blue is, as I have pointed out, very con-
fused about the record of Mr. Jones. In such a short
letter it is impossible for me to properly address all of
the falsehoods that Mr. Blue has stated. However, if
he would like to discuss the record of Mr. Jones, learn
to identify a liberal, or discuss any of the other issues
surrounding this campaign, I am readily available!
Tony W. Joyner
Junior
Political Science
high priced Republican consultant from the Con-
gressional Club to run his campaign. If I remember
correctly, on Friday, January 14,1994, you did not
bother to listen to Walter B. Jones Jrs announcement
speech on the Pitt County Courthouse steps because
of your constant and rude behavior.
Mr. Blue, if you had listened, you would have
heard that Walter Jones Jr. was asked by many citi-
zens to run in the Third U.S. Congressional district
(Jones Jr. has stacks of letters to prove it). Also, Jones
Jr. clearly stated that he lives in the First U.S. Congres-
sional district and that he was offered an apartment
in the City of Greenville for $10.00 a month, but he
made it known by stating, "That is not what Walter B.
Jones Jr. stands for
Mr. Blue, if you had paid close attention to his
speech, you might have been more knowlegeable
abou t Jones Jr. 's voting record and his campaign but
you decided to lower your own reputation instead.
Steve Tyndall
Senior
History
�"�.





Him fy . rir
The East Carolinian
February �. 1994
Classifieds
For Rent
ROOMMATE wanted. House, $170
mo. 13 utlilities and deposit. 5-10
min. walk from campus, washer, dryer,
dog ok, prefer non-smoker, must be
social, male or female, 830-6703, ASAP
FEMALE ROOMMATE $155, own
bedroom 13 utilities. Walking dis-
tance to campus. Responsible, social
drinker. Call 752-0874 leave message.
AVAILABLE FEB. 15: 1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village. 3 bedroom
townhouse. Mature, responsible fe-
male NS only. Quiet environment,
nicely decorated with all major appli-
ances. $230 1 3 bills. 756-8459 (Sara
or Angie).
FOR RENT: Nags Head, NC-Getyour
group together early. Two relatively
new houses; fully furnished; washer
dryer; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
7- $1500.00 per month; sleeps 9- $2000
per month (804)850-1532
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, 2 bath apt
water, sewer, basic cable included. 2
bedroom, 1 bath, water, sewer, basic
cable, heat air included 2 blocks from
campus. Call 752-8900
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a two bedroom apartment lo-
cated near campus on bus route. Rent
$185 & 12 utilities nonsmoker pre-
ferred. Call Jeri or Hilary at 758-8836.
LOOK Furnished 1 bedroom $250
or2bedroom$395,bothavailablenow
Hey! Check this 1 bedroom house $255
or this 2 bedroom house $375, pets ok!
We are starting our Pre-registration for
May, June, July and August listing
Now Call us and tell us your needs.
Anytime 752-1375 Homelocators Fee!
2 ROOMMATES NEEDED Immedi-
ately To share 2 bedroom, 2 bath
duplex in Wyndham Circle. Close to
campus $137.50 a month 1 4 utilities.
Call Karen or Mary-Lee, 752-2693
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for
apt. 12 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, 2 blocks from super-
market. Rent includes phone, utilities,
cable. Call 757-1947.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Modern
duplex, min. from campusdaily bus
pick-up, responsible, $250mon. 1
2 utilities. Call Chris after 2pm 758-
4119.
E'l Help Wanted
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
Rush Stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham NC 27705
HELP WANTED Ladies earn $500 a
week full-time part-time daily payout.
Playmates Adult Entertainment Snow
Hill, NC. Call for interview 747-7686
QMIBECEIIISD 1 liHiTVjfflTffn
�"SPRING BREAK '94"� Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida & Padre!
110 lowest price guarantee! Orga-
nize 15 friends and your trip is free
Take a Break Student Travel (800)328-
7283.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Dep. is
recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3pm to 7pm with somenightand week-
end coaching. This program will run
from the first of March to the first of
May. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour. For more info please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great Benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $85 phr
escorting in the Greenville area. You
must be 18 yrs. old, have own phone
and transportation. Escorts and exotic
dancers needed. For more info, call
Diamond Escorts at 758-0896
ATTENTION STUDENTS: earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Midwest Mailers PO Box 395, Olathe
Ks 66051. Immediate response.
HEAD LIFEGUARDS. Positions avail-
able in following areas: Goldsboro,
Greenville, Plymouth, Tarboro. Must
have supervising experience. Call Bob,
758-1088.
EXPERIENCED WAITSTAFF. Ap-
plyatGreenvilleCountryClubbetween
2-4pmonly. Tues-Fri.
SPRING BREAK '94�� Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida & Padre!
110 lowest price guarantee! Orga-
nize 15 friends and your trip is Free!
Take a Break Student Travel (800) 328-
7283.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT-
Make up to $20004000 mo teaching
basic conversational English abroad.
Japan, Taiwan, and S. Korea. Many
employers provide room board
other benefits. No teaching background
or Asian Languages required. For more
info, call: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362
BRODY'S and Brody's for men, two
names synonymous with fashion are
accepting applications for additional
Part-Time sales Associates. Flexible
scheduling options: 10am-2pm, 12pm-
9pm or 6pm-9pm. Salary and clothing
discounts. Interview Monday's and
Thursday's l-4pm, Brody's The Plaza.
VALENTINE HELP NEEDED driv-
ers and in-store help. Apply in person,
Cynthia's Flowers 1318 E. 10th st
BRODY'S isacceptingapplications for
receiving room associates. Unpackand
verify shipments. Somelifting required.
If you are sitting out of school this
semester or areavailable 8am-5pm sev-
eral days, then we would like to talk
with you! Interview Monday's and
Thursdays l-4pm Brody's at the Plaza.
Financial needs? Or just
looking for a better way?
Professional business
opportunity available for
highly motivated
individuals! Bonus
potential outstanding!
Training provided. To
schedule appointment,
call 756-0977.
(9 For Sale
H9U ffll
National Political Science
Honor Society
is having a
25(Mk
Feb 8,9 & 10
Brewster C-105
12:00-4:00
Great Books Real
Cheap
SPRING BREAK SA LE1994! We have
the hottest destinations! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas, Florida. All at the
guaranteed lowest prices with the ul-
timate party package. Organize small
group and Travel free! CallSun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710
SPRING BREAK Bahamas party
cruise! 6 days $279! Trip includes
Cruise room, 12 meals 6 free par-
ties! Hurry! This will sell out! 1-800-
678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Cancun Jamaica!
Fly out of Raleigh and spend 8 days on
the Beach! We have the best trips
prices! Includes air hotel parties
from $429! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8
days oceanview room with kitchen
$119! Walk to best bars! Includes free
discount card- save $50 on cover
charges! 1-800-678-6386
For Sale
FLORIDA'S new Spring Break
hotspots! Cocoa Beach Key West!
More upscale than Panama City
Daytona! Great beaches nightlife! 8
days in 27 acre Cocoa Beachfront re-
sort $159! Key West $249! 1-800-678-
6386
8-BIT NINTENDO with 33 games,
includes 11 sports, Terris, Chess; two
controls and zapper, hint book and
codes. $300OBO. 931-8024, leave
message
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: Bar and bar fridge. Very
sturdy with plenty of space under-
neath. Graduating and must get rid of
these. Both for $80. Will sell dorm
refrigerator bar seperate. Brian at
321-2426.
KENWOOD pullout tape deck. CD
changer compatable with tape ad-
vance, music skip, and many other
features. $200neg. Call Ron at 931-
8817
LAB PUPPIES for sale. Not mixed!
Great V. Day's gift. $50 Call 830-6765.
Leave message if not at home.
UNIQUE ADULT CANDIES and
Valentine candies especially for you.
Chocolates and hard candies in gift
baskets, mugs or individually sold.
Call 321-1428.
MEMBERSHIP:clubforwomenonly.
$29.99 per month. Call Angie 931-
9768
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Resi-
dency Status and Tuition is the bro-
chure by attorney Brad Lamb on the
in-state tuition residency process. For
sale: Student Stores Wright Building.
TICKET TO COLORADO for sale!
From Saturday Feb. 12 to Saturday
Feb. 19 $344.95. If interested, call
Kim ASAP at 931-9787.
1YR OLD IGUANA, hot rock, heat
lamp, flourescent light 30 gal. tank
wstand. Washer, dryer $50. Bench
wrought iron table. 952-3349
COUCHCHAIR: creme w mauve
and green, excellent condition! $220,
call 830-1518.
AQUARIUM. 45 gallon Hex saltwa-
ter tank. Comes with matching cabi-
net and the best equipment available
for saltwater tanks. Paid $375, sell
$200. Call 830-5108.
FOR SALE: club for women only mem-
bership, $29 a month for 11 months;
Jenni-K emerald ring with gold lattice
band, price neg. call Marian at 355-
3995.
ATTENTION weight lifters and
Page 5
For Sale
watchers: let me help you fill those
New Years resolutions. Sports supple-
ments at major discount prices:
Cybergenics, Quick Trim, Cybertrim,
Super Fat Burners, Tri-Chromelene,
Super Chromoplex, Weight gain pow-
ders (all), Amino Acids, Creatine, Met-
rx, Vanadyl Sulfate, Yohimbe Bark,
Hot Stuff, Herbs, Multi-Vitamins, Su-
perGoldenSeal,andmanymore! Call
Brad today at 931-9097 for more info.
FOR SALE: 3 piece living room set
including sofa, love seat and wing
back chair (Queen Ann style). Mint
E Services Offered
COOMBS wordprocessing spread-
sheets and graphs. Low prices, pick-
up and delivery available, call Juliann
355-5043 anytime.
SPRING MEANS GET SERIOUS
Get the body you always wanted with
Flex Appeal. Specializing in toning,
weight loss, body building, and per-
sonal training. Initial consultation free!
830-1380
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS:
Special offer for ECU students. Great
way to get in shape! Experienced train-
ing, 3 miles from campus, beginner to
advanced. Call Debbie at 756-8236.
ACCRATE, FAST, CONFIDENTIAL,
PROFESSION AL ResumeSecretarial
work. Specializing in resume compo-
sition w cover letters- stored on disk,
term papers, general typing. Word
Perfect or Micro Soft Word for win-
dows software. Call today� Glenda
Stevens (8a-5p�752-9959) (evenings-
527-9133)
FREE for all college students� up to
five free hours of long distance calling!
Call 355-3789.
D.JS-D.JS-D.JS! Mobile Music Pro-
ductions is the disc jockey service you
need for your socials, parties, wed-
dings and formals. We play what you
want, when you want to here it. High-
est quality and profesionalism. Call
Lee at 758-4644 for bookings.
BE

Personals
RUSH Angel-Flight Silver Wings,
non-profit service organization that
E
Personals
is a refreshing alternative to Greek
life. Rush is Mon-Thurs. Feb. 7-10
on the 3rd floor of Wright Annex
from 5:30-6 30. Look for the signs
or call 355-9695 for more info.
STEPHANIE: It would have been
easier to remember if your hair
were green. Yet I'll never forget
your Rage Against The Machine -
You're beautiful! Me
HEY PEE-PEE We love you on
Thur. nights! You need to calm
down, your out of control! Really!
That looks fun! Love, Slow Girl,
Boss, and the other Hoochies. '
IQ
Greek
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA- a ser-
vice sorority, will hold spring rush
Feb. 7-9. Please come any of these
days to General Classroom 2006
between 5:00-6:30. Refreshments
will be served each night. For fur-
ther info, please call 758-8126.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new members of Delta Zeta: Crys-
tal Brinn, Kelly Grav, and Susan
Scott!
SIGMA NU-The Superbowl party
was fun! We all had a great time!
Go Cowboys! Love, the sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta
SIG PI- The Peasant's Cafe was
rockin Thanks to Sig Pi! Love,
the sisters and pledges of Pi Delta.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON- We had a
blast last Fri. night! Sorry about
the tambourine! Looking forward
to the next time! Love, the sisters
and pledges of Pi Delta.
PI KAPPA PHI The fall out Thurs.
night was a lot of fun. Thanks for
a good time. Love Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS Jenny
Vest on your engagement! Love,
your sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
newly initiated sisters of AOPI: An-
gel Byrd, Kristen Ingling, Amy
Mohr, Roxanne O'Ferrell, Kate
Sharp, Debbie Smith and Kristen
Sierocki.
GR�fiT LOCATION!
2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS
$488Month Includes
Basic Cable
$375Month wo Cable
Laundry Facility in Complex
Call 758-8394
Announcements
ATTENTION ECONOMICS
STUDENTS!
The ECU Economics Society will hold
elections on Tues. Feb. 8th at 7pm in
Brewster C wing room 305. any per-
sons interested in running for an office
must attend, In addition planning for
upcoming events will be discussed.
For Questions, please call the ECON
Dept. 757-6006
MAIOR EVENTS COMMiTTFF
Nawlins comes to ECU Mardi Gras
'94- ECU style is coming to campus
Feb. 11 from 9:00pm -2:00am at
Mendenhall Student Center. The sec-
ond annual event will be highlighted
bythe"LadyLuck"paradebeginning
at Tyler Residence Hall. All faculty,
staff, and students are welcome to
enjoy Jazz music, free bowling, bil-
liards and table tennis, video Karaoke,
the Bourbon Street Bingo parlor and
gaming establishment, the virtual re-
ality Alpha experience, a free cajun
buffet, and a bite from the authentic
KingCake. Valid ECI IDs are required
foradmission. Toenterthebestcami-
val mask contest or Lady Luck pa-
rade, contact the Mard. Gras floatcom-
mittee at 757-47.
RELATIONSHIPS GROUP
for men and women who want to
understand the challenges and confu-
sionsexperienced in relationships with
others. ThisgroupbeginsFeb.9. Reg-
isterearly-limited enrollment call 757-
6661.
.Zeta Phi Beta sorority and Phi Beta
Sigma fraternity will be co-sponsor-
ing a talent show on Tues. Feb. 8,1994;
at the Hendrix Theatre Mendenhall
StudentCenter,7pm. Admission is $2
for students wId. and $3 for non-
students. Anyone interested in par-
ticipating, please call Holland at 931-
9690 or Dealton at 355-8796.
HORA DE CONVERSACION!
Spanish club meeting and conversa-
tional hour at Filibuster's Restaurant,
Tues. Feb. 15 at 8:00pm. Comeoutand
enjoy practicing your Spanish skills!
Venga a charlar! For more info, con-
tact Ramon Serrano (931-8542) or
Karina Collentine (757-4129).
BALLOON-A-GRAM
send a balloon to your valentine!
PUSH will be selling balloons for $1
each at the student stores Mon. 27-
Fri. 211 from 10:00am-2:00pm. All
balloons will be delivered on Valen-
tines day. Mon. 214 to buildings on
campus. All proceeds will benefit the
PUSH organization.
ECU LAW SOCIETY
All students interested in the practice
of law or a law related career are in-
vited to attend the ECU Law Society
meeting on Feb. 14,1994 at 5:15pm in
Ragsdale218-A. We will discuss up-
coming events, take suggestions on
desired legal issues to be heard, and
plan visits by legal professionals. Stu-
dents wishing to gain membership
should inquireabouttheannualdues.
Refreshments will be offered.
SETA
ECU Students for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals will be having their
first meeting of the semester Thurs.
Feb. 10,6:30pm in General Classroom
Buildingroom 1005. Everyone is wel-
come.
FUTURE EDUCATORS!
The meeting for you! Wed. Feb. 9 in
Speight 301 at 4:00. SNCAE speakers
to answer the 1st year questions you
have! All come!
INTERNATIONAL STIJDFNT
ASSOCIATION
invites you to the Chinese New Year.
There will be food, entertainment and
prizes. Bring your friends, everyone is
welcome. The Chinese New Year will
be held on Feb. 12, 7-llpm in
Mendenhall Great Room. Tickets will
be available at the door. Tickets will
cost $3 for students and $5 for general
public. If you have any questions
pleasecall Patricia Steffen, 931-9809 or
Peng 752-9125.
WHAT MAIOR? WHAT CA-
REER? HOW DO I DECIDF?
A five session workshop is being of-
fered by the Counseling Center to help
you answer these questions. Take
assessment instruments. Learn career
research skills, and find out how per-
sonality affects career choice. Classes
begin the week of Feb. 14 Register
early- limi ted enrollmentcall 757-6661.
VALENTINES FLOWERS
sold by the LSS Society for fundraiser
will be sold in front of Mendenhall
and Tyler lobby Wed. Feb. 10-through-
Fri. Feb. 12, from ll:00-2:00pm $1.
Will be delivered Valentines Day (on
campus address only please) Remem-
ber friends as well as sweethearts!
WORKSHOP ON
CO-DEPENDENCY-
This three session educational work-
shop for men and women will focus
on identity and intimacy problems
and dysfunctional behaviors that are
rooted in early development and our
culture. Family behaviors, rules, and
individual roles will be identified, with
particular attention to how these af-
fect current personality styles and re-
lationships. Members are expected to
attend all three meetings. Time: Tues.
1:30-3pm Feb. 8,22,329 Wright Build-
ing.
lOINTHEECUCOIIFr.F
REPUBLICANS
Meeting every Wed. at 7pm, General
Classroom Building, rm. 1030. Dis-
cussing current events and issues con-
cerning North Carolina and our great
country, the USA. Come and find out
why the GOP is growing bigger and
faster in NC during the '90's.
PUSH THROUGH THF
BARRIERS
If you would like to work towards
reducing the architectural, as well as
the attitudinal barriers that students
with special needs are faced with ev-
ery day, then come to the next meet-
ing of PUSH (People United to Sup-
porttheHandicapped). Meetingsare
Thurs. at 5:30pm in the Greene Hall
Lobby. If you are a service organiza-
tion looking for a new project�this is
a great opportunity Be looking for
the Rock-a-thon on Feb. 19,12noon-
11:00pm. Get involved
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
will be celebrating their 11th choir
anniversary Sat. Feb. 12,1994 at 6pm
in the Wright Auditorium on thecam-
pus of ECU. Admission for General
Public $2, students with ID $1. Fea-
tured choirs will be Barton College,
Greensboro College, UNC-Chapel
HiIl,Childrenof theSun (UNC-Char-
lotte), Fayetteville St. Univ and
Roanoke High School.
ECU SCHOOL OF ART
will be having their annual Valen-
tines sale Thurs. Feb. 10, Fri. Feb. 11s
and Sat. Feb. 12. The hours of the sale
are: Thur. and Fri. 8am-5pm and Sat.
10am to 2pm. The sale will take place
in the main downstairs lobby of the
Jenkins Fine Art Center on the ECU
campus across from the chancellor's
house on 5th street. All items for sale
are handcrafted bv ECU school of art
students. Items available for sale
include jewelry, cards, ceramics,
scarves, prints, foods. The school
of art welcomes all to come and
purchase for that special someone
a unique,handcrafted item for Val-
entines Day.
CONDOM WEEK
Feb. 14-19. Stop by the Student
Store on Feb. 14 for a condom val-
entine available with a S.25 dona-
tion to PIC ASO. Come by on Wed.
16th and tell us all that you know
about safe sex. It might earn you a
free condom.
PROJECT PALS
(Preparing for Life Skills) is an adult
volunteerprogram which matches
responsible adults with troubled
youth between the ages of 7-17 in
Pitt County. Volunteers must be
atleast 18 and ha ve their own trans-
portation. If you are interested in
becominga PALS volunteer, please
callSarahNewtonat 758-3554. We
need caring adults to makea differ-
ence in a child's life, so please call
today!
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
a service sorority is having spring
rusl i Feb. 7-9 in General Classroom
2006 from 5-6:30. Mon. night will
be info, night with snacks being
served Tues. night we will have
subs and Wed. night we will have
an Italian Feast, so please "Be our
guest





-� -�
�iimwMill IT miiii.i r'tiiwiim
The East Carolinian
Page 6
Lifestyle
February 8, 1994
Mardi Gras celebration takes place at ECU
Photo courtesy of Jeanette Roth
By Bridget Hemenway
Staff Writer
Mardi Gras season is upon us
once again and the great celebra-
tion that has taken place in the streets
of NewOrleansforover 135 years is
coming to ECU for the second con-
secutive year.
Mardi Gras, which is French
for "Fat Tuesday refers to the
single-day culmina tion of the carrti-
valseason. TheMardiGrascelebra-
tion in New Orleans is always sched-
uled 46 days before Easter. This
means that the season of merriment
in New Orleans begins annually on
Jan. 6 and ends at midnight on Fat
Tuesday. During this season, orga-
nizations known as krewes hold
their own masquerade balls, pa-
rades and other celebrations. The
carnival season leads up to the
Catholic season of Lent, which be-
gins on Ash Wednesday. The name
"Fat Tuesday" comes in because,
during Lent, Catholics do not eat
IFC makes new changes, reaches goal
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
The Interfraternity Council
(IFC) is only one month into its
new term, but it is already achiev-
ing a goal that was set up last
December. Together with Career
Services, IFC is implementing a
mentor program in hopes of bring-
ing alumni and pledges closer to-
pher.
The idea for the program
stemmed from the fact that there
isn't much involvement from fra-
ternity alumni outside of mon-
etary donations.
The way the mentor program
works is that all new pledges from
every fraternity will be paired up
with alumni within their frater-
nity. In addition to the fraternity
mentors, pledges receive big
brothers who are current ECU stu-
dents.
"The objective is to give
pledges a more experienced view
of Greek life while providing some
direction on how to achieve their
individuals goals said John
Ezzell, IFC president.
Pledges will be required to
contact their mentors and ask a
series of questions pertaining to
the graduates' lives during and
following college. The mentor
should be seen as a source of first-
hand knowledgeof lifeafter ECU.
Career Services director, Dr.
Jim Westmoreland, hopes the pro-
gram will make a big difference
for alumni, fraternities and stu-
dents as a whole. "We are hoping
to create a network that will branch
outtootherorganizationsatECU
said Westmoreland. "So many
good things can happen from this
program
Colonial Taverns discussed by UNC-W professor
By Daniel Witis
Staff Writer
1 On Friday, Feb. 11, at
11:00 a.m. "Bit Of History" Lec-
ture Series visits Colonial Tav-
erns. UNC-W history professor
Dr. Alan Watson will perform
"More Than Just a Bed and Break-
fast: The Role of Taverns in Colo-
nial Society"
Colonial Taverns has pro-
vided people with food, lodging
and drink. They also offer a place
where people can meet and com-
pare gossip. In certain circum-
stances, taverns were even used
as post offices for the commu-
nity, and many times they offered
a forum for political discussion.
Most travelers
have discovered that
taverns differ greatly in
quality. Some provide
a primitive or crude at-
mosphere, while others
provide laid back cozy
surroundings.
Dr. Watson has taught at
UNC-W for the last 23 years. He
has also written several books and
articles such as Society in North
r
CapiiFi-ar
MUSEUM
Carolina, The North Carolina Expe-
rience: An Interpretive and Docu-
mentary History and A History of
Neiv Bern and Craven Counties. Dr.
Watson is a member
of the North Carolina
Historical Commis-
sion, and the N.C. Na-
tional Advisory Com-
mittee.
The "A Bit Of
History "lecture series
is scheduled on the second Friday
of every month. It provides a
humourous look at North Caro-
lina and lower Cape Fear History.
Lectures are free and open to the
public.
Cape Fear Museum is lo-
cated at 814 Market Street,
Wilmington, N.C. Museum hours
are Tuesday through Saturday 9
a.m. through 5 p.m and Sunday 2
to 5 p.m. Admission is $2.00 for
adults, $1.00 for children 5-17, col-
lege students with valid I.D. and
senior citizens. Admission is free
to children under five and mem-
bers of the Cape Fear Museum
Association. The first day of each
month, and the first and third Sun-
days are considered free days.



�J
j j j Worth A Try
JDon'tBuy
JO Take Your Chances J J J Definite Purchase
Course of Empire
Initiation
S i
0 m m
This music is vaguely familiar.
It sounds like the sort of music
one might encounter upon entering
Alfredo's on a cold, rainy Tuesday
night. Its flavor is guitar-angst, alter-
native rage, industrial core. Picture
yourself with a pitcher and greasy
pizza and you're looking out onto a
lonelyGreenville highway. There isa
fluorescent glare on the window and
orange neon pierces your peripheral
vision YouhavebeenwatchingCNN
all day and have talked to no one.
This picture is the mood, head-
ache and disillusionment that de-
scribes Course of Empire's music on
their second album, Initiation. The
sound is fundamental, which is why
it is this reviewer's opinion that most
twenty-somethings willidentify with
it.
The first few songs are tiring be-
cause they melodically and philo-
sophically drone with messages like:
"this is the voice that lives in your
head these are the years you've
taken to bed open your arms andl'll
give them to you we're all in the
chopping grounds The fifth song,
"Apparition virtually kicks the
music to you, and the experience be-
gire.StrikmgresemblaiKetothestyles
of Pearl Jam, T.S.O.L. and Ministry
that occurred in the earlier songs dis-
appears. With "Apparition an au-
rhenticsoundemerges.Ithasaslower
tempo and conveys a haunting feel-
ing of dread rather than thecellar-like
feelingof a typical, dark, underground
club.
The band begins to go off on an
instrumental tangent, but it is un-
clear where or when since there are
no songbreaks. The instrumental
tracks are futuristic, forbidding and
hypnotic, but they are also thought-
provoking. Each song builds upon
the last and creates a powerful, col-
lective force of violently reactive
music.
Enoughdescribingthe album�
go out and experience it. But be
warned: The vibe is disturbing. As
the song "Infested" states, "the oil
oozes out, into the veins and out of
the mouth look Darwin straight in
the eye; he says 'evolve or die
Imagine the sonic dimension of these
words. Nuff' said.
� Cindy
Hawkins
Highlights boast Python
funnyman John Cleese
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP)�
He is acclaimed as England's premier
funn vman, he has starred on the clas-
sic "Monty Python" and "Fawlty
Towers" TV series, he wrote and
starred in the hit movie A Fish Qilled
Wanda and he won an Emmy for a
"Cheers" episode.
Yet John Cleese may be best-
known in the United States for his
silly TV commercials.
"They seem to play those
Magnavox commercials endlessly
he observed. "I get in cabs, and the
drivers say, 'Oh, not you again
"I think I know why peopleseem
to know me more from the commer-
cials. They play a lot on the football
broadcasts. So they get to a whole
audience (hat a lot of my stuff hasn't
gotten to. I had a level of notoriety
here that was very nice. Wanda raised
it a lot. But the commercials have
been extraordinary
The towering comedian was here
to receive the Jack Oakie Award for
Comedy in Motion Pictures, a charity
dinner for the Screen Actors Guild
Foundation. HerecalledseeingOakie
forthe first time in 1957 when he went
to London as a student to play in a
football game.
"I happened to have a free after-
noon, and I went to see Vie Great
Dictator, he said. "I stayed through
the movie three times. I haven't seen
it since, but I still remember Oakie as
Mussolini
Qeeseand hissecond wife, Alyce
Faye, have been "taking a break after
abusyyear in Englandof doing lotsof
smalland unimportantthingsThey
had a family reunion in Big Sur, and
they are driving back to Northern
California.
"I think in a couple of years' time
we'll get a house up north he re-
marked. "The English winters de-
press me too much. All those long
days with no light
Cleese is writing another Fish
Called Wanda, but not a sequel. There
willbedifferentcharactersandanew
story with the same cast � Kevin
Kline, JamieLeeCurtis, Michael Palin
and himself.
Many TV viewerscherish Cleese
as the churlish hotel proprietor in
"Fawlty Towers which he and his
first wife, Connie Booth, wrote and
appeared in during the 1970s. They
have been rerun endlessly since.
Cleeseearned a law degree from
Cambridge University, but his work
with the Cambridge Footlights, an
amateur stage group, led to appear-
ances in several BBC comedy shows
including "Monty Python's Hying
Circus
The 1969 series was exported to
the United States and introduced
American viewers to the absurd and
irreverent dead pan humor of Cleese,
Palin, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Terry
Gilliam and the late Graham
Chapman.
The TV program spun off a se-
ries of Python stage shows, books,
records and films that served as
launching pads for solo careers for
the troupe's members.
Although he won an Emmv in
1987, for his guest performance as a
psychiatrist on the NBC-TV series
"Cheers Cleese views himself pri-
marily as a writer � and, he has a
mission of sorts:
"My aim in a comedy is terribly
simple: I really want to make people
laugh
meat until Easter. Therefor, Mardi
Gras is celebrated as a feast before
the fasting begins.
. Perhaps, the backbone of the
Mardi Gras celebration is carnival
Krewe. A krewe is aterm that refers
to the Carnival organizations in
New Orleans who participate as
groups in the carnival and Mardi
Gras celebrations. The clubs are
chartered as non-profit groups and
are usually involved in charitable
work. It is a tradition in New Orleans
that each krewe holds its own pa-
rade. The Mardi Gras parade char-
acterizes Mardi Gras celebration and
serves as a showcase for the various
krewes. The involvement by
Krewes in floats and costumes lends
a real carnival atmosphere to the
festivities. Parades normally fol-
low a standard format with the
captain of the carnival at the head of
the parade with the King, Queen
and Royal Court on their own floats
following the captain.
There is no overall theme for
Mardi Gras, but each individual
parade depicts a specific subject.
The themes depicted by the nu-
merous parades staged in New
Orleans since 1857 have included
history, children's stories, legends,
geography, famous people, enter-
tainment, mythology and litera-
ture. The official theme for the
1994 Mardi Gras celebration in
NewOreleans is "Lady Luck" and
will be used for the East Carolina
parade as well.
The krewe floats, which are
the most important part of the
parade, may reflect the krewes
theme for that year. Krewe mem-
bers are masked and costumed in
a manner that illustrates the over-
all parade theme and the indi-
vidual float title, keeping in mind
the official colors of purple, gold
and green. Although krewes have
great flexibility, float designs and
costumes tend to be very faithful
See MARDI GRAS page 7
Two Masters'
begins Thursday
By Joe Horst
Special to The East Carolinian
Elvis, Beavis ana Butthead
and the Marx Brothers. Sound
like too much MTV on top of too
much cold pizza and warm beer?
As a matter of fact, it's just a taste
of wha t you might see this week-
end if you watch the East Caro-
lina Playhouse's performances of
"The Servant of Two Masters
Written by Carlo Goldoni,
"The Servant of Two Masters"
opens Thursday, Feb. 10 and runs
until Feb. 15. The curtain rises
nightly at 8 p.m with the excep-
tion of a 2 p.m. matinee on Sun-
day, Feb. 13.
John Shearin, director of
"The Servant of Two Masters
calls the play, "a zany comedy, a
riotous farce The story centers
around three sets of sweethearts
and their comical antics as they
strive for attention. One perfect
example of the hilarity in store is
the couple of Florindo and
Beatrice.
Florindo meets Beatrice
while she is disguised as a man.
Thinking that this man�who is
in fact, Beatrice � is a rival for
Beatrice's love, the stage is set
right off the bat for comedy
hijinks and laughter that is sure
to bounce off the rafters. Throw
in sly servants (watch out for
Truffaldino!), two doddering fa-
thers and mischievous maidens,
and you get a recipe sure to
leave audiences laughing and
applauding as the curtain falls.
Set in 18th century Italy,
Shearin states that he has mod-
ernized the play for today's
audiences. "I've adapted the
play into a modern American
colloquial idiom Shearin
said. "There are a lot of mod-
ern, contemporary references
in the piece. We're trying to
capture the spirit of the
comedia, not have it as a mu-
seum piece
Shearinstates that the play
has "bawdy" references, but
that nothing is present that
should keep young children
away. "There's a lot of sex com-
edy in here, but nothing that I
think anybody would construe
as 'dirty I'm bringing my
children and I have no
qualms with them seeing this
Tickets for "The Servant of
Two Masters" are currently on
sale at the McGinnis Theater
box office. Prices for the gen-
eral public are $7.50 and $4.50
for students. Tickets can be
purchased either by person at
the box office Monday through
Friday, 10 a.m. till 4 p.m. (till
8:15 p.m. on performance
nights), by phone with a Visa
or MasterCard at 757-6829 or
by mail at the East Carolina
Playhouse, ECU, Greenville,
N.C. 27858-4353.
Film enters Oscar race
(AP)-The Scent of Green Papaya,
Vietnam's first entry in the Acad-
emy Awards, is a luxurious and
sensual film that gently and slowly
reveals its beauty and its tender-
ness, almost as slowly and as deli-
riously as a ripening fruit.
A homage of sorts to the
strength and serenity of women,
this isa lush, lush effort thatsoothes
the eye while stirring the soul. Di-
rector Tran Anh Hung imbues his
first fea hire-length film with a subtle
dignity while sparing no pain in
documenting the lonely life of a
Vietnamese servant girl.
It's hard to measure this work
with Western-film barometers. Plot?
There really isn't any. Character de-
velopment? There's little. Dia-
logue? It's spare and that's be-
ing generous.
What it does offer is a visual
testimony to the rituals that de-
fine the complex order of Viet-
namese hierarchy. Master and ser-
vant, husband and wife, man and
woman, parent and child, all find
their layers pulled away and ex-
amined.
It's 1951 and a 10-year-old
peasant girl named Mui has
walked all day to the home of her
new employer in Saigon, where
she is to work as a servant.
The radiantly adorable Mui
See FILM page 7
I





February 8, 1994
77 c Ea s t C a to tin ia n 7
FILM
Continued from page 6
(1 u Man San) quieth takes to her
chores with cheerful obedience She
smiles sweetl) throughout th
and happil) scrubs floors, learns
how tostir-fry vegetables and waits
on the famil).
Under the gentle guidance ol
the mother (Truong Thi 1 oc) and
the oider servant woman, "hi
(Nguv� " nh Hoai. Mm is taught
the intricate ways of the bourgeois
home.
One of the rituals she learns is
how to prepare the outer husk ol
the unripened green papaya for din-
ner. After she methodicalh shreds
the fleshy .white exterior, she slices
open the papava only to Be thrilled
u ith the tendei. fluffy v hite seed
lings inside.
Perhaps symbolic ol her own
situation asa servant with little pros-
pectot marriage.she marvelsat tins
nascent but unrealized fertility.
But Mm s contented devotion
quickly is cast in staik contrast to
the turmoil that wafts through the
houst "he husband sneaks off on
ga mbling sprees and squanders the
family riches The couple lost their
only daughter, who would be Mui's
age when she died, of a m stern his
illness during one of the lather's
episodes. I he two sons anger at
Attention ! ! !
There will be a meeting for
those interested in the
Summer Study
in London
(July 1-23)
When: Tues, Feb. 8
Where: English Faculty Lounge
General Classroom (2136)
Open to any student
despite GPA.
For more information, contact Dr. Gay Wilentz
at 795-5243.
their lather manifests in cruel and
sadistic ways.
In a graceful transition of ID
years, Mui (Iran u Yen-Khe) is
now a ravishing beauty of
cause o I family politics, she is sent to
workfora famih friend,therichand
handsome compose: Khuyen
(Vuong Hoa Hoi), whom Mui se-
cretly has adored for years.
Mui, who finds no shame in
being a ser ant. brings her joj i us
touch to the man's house, setting up
the film's somewhat enigma! it end-
ing.
riu ScentofGreeti Papaya,which
won the Camera d'Or prize at the
c annes Film Festival last year, is an
opulently beautiful film. Cinema-
tographer Benoit Delhomme finds
poetry with his shots of Mui and
her surroundingsthe tight close-
ups ni flora and fauna that are
both refreshing and stimulating.
But beneath this surface splen-
dor is a delicate, graceful film that
yields its contents as mysterioush
as the papava gives up its inner
seeds
Produced by Christophe
Kossignon. the film is released by
First I ook Pictures. It is unrated.
MARDIGRAS
Continued from page 6
to the parade title. Floats range
from a traditional "fixed" type of
float, such as displays using trail-
ers or flat-bed trucks, to human
floats�a procession of any num-
ber ol people dressed in costumes
and carrying props to illustrate a
particular theme. Examples in-
clude jugglers, magicians, "step"
processions, bicycles, clowns,
stiltwalkers in-line skaters, dance
teams and musicians.
During the parade krewe
members toss inexpensive trinkets
from the floats. These trinkets, or
baubles, have been a traditional
part of the parade ever since a
masked Santa Claus tossed gifts to
the crowd in 1871. Among the
more popular items are plastic
cups.iandv, plastic medallion neck
laces and krewe-emblemed dou-
bloons, which are aluminum coin-
like objects bearing the krewe's in-
signia on one side and the parade's
theme on the reverse
The rovalitv which presides over
the parade floats are decided by the
KingC ake traditionally in New Or-
leans there are several different ways
in whkh the King and Queen are
crowned. However,during the II
parate,candidatesforKingandQueen
willeata pieceof the KingCake, which
isa sugary pastrv-likecake with a doll
hidden inside. Theindividualsroceiv-
ing the dolls in their slices will be
crowned King and Queen. They will
both be awarded a scepter, crown and
$5,000plavmonevforiiseinthecasino
.1! Mendenhall. All other candidates
willbecomedukesandmaidensand
will join the parade as part of the
court
I he King and Queen will ridea
special float in the parade and will
presideover the Mari C Iras activities.
The East Carolina University
MardK .rasactivitiesvvillbeheldon
Friday, Feb. II, 1994. The parade
will begin at 8:30 p.m. on top of
college! fill KingundQueenwiBbe
111�' ned at 8:15. The parade route
will run from the top of college Hill
to the Mendenhall Student Center
where the entire Mardi Gras cel-
ebration will take place. For more
information, contact the Student
I. eadership t development IVograms
at 757-4791.
BOOKTRADER
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Mardi Gras News Bulletin!
I The deadline for applications to enter floats in
the Feb. 11th. parade has been extended to
noon on Thursday, Feb. 10. Applications may
be turned in at 109 Mendenhall.
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Page 8
What's On Tap?
Tuesday, Feb. 8
Rec. Services
BB Shooting Truthalon,
Christenbury Gym. 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 9
W. Basketball
vs. N.C. State. 7 p.m.
The 411
Thursday, Feb. 3
W. Basketball
lost to UNC-Wilmington 60-68
Saturday, Feb. 5
Baseball
lost to U. of Florida 2-4. 3-5
(DH).
M. Basketball, away
beat George Mason 83-75.
W. Indoor Track, away
placed 7th out of 15 teams.
Sunday, Feb. 6
Baseball
lost to U. of Florida 3-7.
Women's CAA Leaders
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB Overall
ODU 7-0 1.000 - 14-5 .737
W&M 5-2 714 2 13-4 .765
GMU 5-2 714 2 13-8 619
JMU 5-2 714 2 11-8 579
UR 3-4 .429 4 10-8 .556
All 1-6 .143 6 6-12 333
UNCW 1-6 143 6 3-14 .176
ECU 1-6 .143 6 2-14 .125
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Celeste Hill. ODU 17 9
Shonda Deberry. ODU 17.3
Ken Chaconas. GMU 16 9
Marilyn Gayton, W&M 16.4
Kara Rathff. JMU 15.0
Rebounding Avg
Ashleigh Akens. W&M 11.1
Celeste Hill. ODI i 10.3
Tracey Kelley. ECU 8.9
Marilyn Gayton. W&M 8.9
Nickie Hilton, GMU 8 6
Assist Avg.
Ken Chaconas. GMU 5 0
Marcell Harrison. GMU 4 7
Deanna Vander Plas. ODU 4.1
Sarah Schreib, JMU 3.9
Danielle Chariesworth, ECU 3.4
Field Goal
Nickie Hilton. GMU 600
Shonda Deberry. ODU 547
Ina Nicosia. UR 528
Marilyn Gayton. W&M 527
Celeste Hill. ODU 500
Free Throw
Myra Horton. UNCW 933
Laura Barnes. UR 909
Knssy Hembaugh. JMU 875
Ken Chaconas. GMU .857
Kelly Norton, UNCW 828
3-pt Field Goal
Shonda Deberry, ODU .476
Ken Chaconas. GMU 385
Justine Allpress, ECU .375
Angel Stanton. W&M .367
Yolanda Settles. W&M 351
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
William & Mary 12.4
George Mason 8.1
Old Dominion 7 8
James Madison 4 2
Richmond -0.8
American -7.6
UNC-Wilmington -9 5
East Carolina -17.9
Rebounding Margin
James Madison 5 2
Old Dominion 3.3
American 26
Wlliam & Mary 2.2
George Mason 1.1
UNC-Wilmington -0.2
Richmond -0.7
East Carolina -4.9
Field Goal
George Mason 44.7
William & Mary 43.1
Richmond 43 1
James Madison 42.0
Old Dominion 41.9
UNC-Wilmington 39 2
East Carolina 36.6
American 36 3
Def. Field Goal
William & Mary 37.2
James Madison 38 6
George Mason 39 2
Old Dominion 40 2
Richn 41 7
UNC-Wilmington 42.4
American 43.8
East Carolina 45.7
Steals (per game)
Old Dominion 12,4
William & Mary 12 0
Richmond 10 4
George Mason 10.3
East Carolina 9.4
American 94
James Madison 8.8
UNC-Wilmington 7 4
The East Carolinaii
Sports
February 8, 1994
ECU defensive coordinator takes off with N.Y. Jets

Staff V iitei


U eek.
tor I he v tO t �
now then'teim e line i oa
the N! I- '� irtunit) tl

am red to ha f th
hie Ii 'agues bed ire 11�- was �
tensive tor the USF1 Mich
nthers w I1" w on the I IS1 1 title
I ,n' � has i' ia hed in t�ur
bowl . � � ind has oa hed
players such asowboys' Ken
wn " Norton r.
c urrently he has already
toNA and will continue to
t ha u i eed on the next lev el. I he
Pirated team will certainU miss
tensive oyer and the smell of his pipe in
�hi clubhouse is already missed
,imii Ho � replacement will be tough
��� to fit
Head coach Steve 1 ogan w .is
fen- �� of available for comment.
Larry Coyer
Lyons paces Pirates over GMU
Coach Payne switches starting line-
up; team responds well
By Brian Cunningham
Staff Writer
On Saturday night, Lester
I yons showed why he is prubablv
the besl professional prospect in
lhe olonial Athletic Association.
f'1" senior guard trom Lewiston,
si ored I 3 ol his game-high 2
no
N.C
points in the final 5:56 as ECU
knot ked ott the Patriots of (ieorge
Mason University,83-75, in front of
5,233 in Fairfax, Va.
W ilberf Hunter added 12
points and I im Basham made his
presente telt as well, snatching a
team-high 10 rebounds to go along
with his five points. The win broke
a five-game losing streak tor the
Pirates as they improved their over-
all record to 12-8, and 4-4 in the
CAA
"We really needed this one
said head coach Eddie Payne. "Our
players now have restored confi-
dern e in their abilities to win cm the
road ow is the time of the season
when we really need to start cli k-
ing in all facets of our game
c iood defense combined with
poor Patriot shooting enabled ECU
to jump out to a quick 20-12 lead
midway through the first halt A
driving dunk bv 1 yons gave the
Pirates a 34-30 advantage with 427
to go. I lowever, C All used a trap-
ping style d(�tenseand hung tough,
trailing only by six at the half, 42-36.
( AH Fcameout aggressively to
start the second halt and forced the
Pirates into n array of turnovers.
Sophomore guard Kareem
Richardson then went down with
an injury to his left ankle, and the
Pirates clearly looked rattled.
Photo by H,irold Wise After cutting the lead to 48-45,
Center Anton Gill, seen here earlier this year, has been playing well on the road for the Pirates this year. ECU the Patriots began to import the
just got its second win on the road againstAA opponents on Sat. against Westhead's Patriots. run-and-gun stvie of offense that
Ladies fall to UNC-W
By Dave Pond
Assistant Spurts Editor
rhe! ad) Pirati felli
the I. IA ilmington I i :
Seahawks in a see-saw mad hut
on Thursday night, rhewii
thel adySeahawkstheii firsl
ference v i. , I � I
when thi ��
vs 73, also in (lreen i Ii
I tie I
on the bo
defen: i
(19 o
nd
tccessive Danielle
: tint � it 10:59
I 'irates held onto a
19 v ith6:48togo
mel
� I witha la) ipun-
. : �
: lid not score
k, when
thi ! ad)
'Mils hi
turniti
he i
stand
� �
be th.
the loi
at h.i

Seahaw 1
'
r thi
Jjg
LADIES
Photo by Harold Wise
Atier transl eason, point guard Danielle harlesworth,
has become a verv steady plaver.
has been the trademark of head
coach Paul Westphal,
The Patriots later switched to
a man-to-man defense, cau
the Pirates to force some ill
vised shots, factor that into the
Bucs missing some easv lay-ups
and ECU was simply out of s n
onoffense. AI vons3-pointergave
thePiratesa51-47edge,butGMl
went on a L0 run to take their first
lead of the ball game with 10:26
remaining. Coach Payne reluc-
tantly called a time-out.
Nevertheless, the break in the
action helped the Bucs regain thei r
focus as they went on their own 7-
0 run to recapture the lead, 58-56.
Poor rebounding kept the Patri-
ots in the game and allowed them
toeven upthescoreat60with6:1s
left to go. Then I ester 1 yons went
into overdrive.
On two consecutive posses
sions, I yons hit two treys to put
the Pirates up 66-60. The two
squads exchanged baskets before
the Patriots' .Andrew Fingall con-
nected on a Vpoint play to slice
the ECU lead to a single basket at
70-68 with just under four min-
utes to go. That was as close as
GMU would get the rest of the
way.
With two minutes to play,
Lyons hit an incredible, one-
handed, off-balance shot to give
the Bucs a 75-70 lead. Then.oti an
in-bounds screen from the left
wing, Lyons connected on his
fourth 3-pointer of the game to
increase the margin to 78-70 with
a minute left in the contest.
FreshmanSkipSchaefbauer s
thunderous tomahawk jam with
32 secondsleft in regulation gave
the Pirates an 82-70 advantage
and proved to be the icing on the
ca ke.
Lady's track
takes seventh
Macksburg, Va. (SID) -The
1 ast Carolina women's track team
competed and placed well last
Saturday at Virginia lech taking
seventh in a field of 15 with twi
ECU indoor school records tail-
ing.
Michelle Bullock not onl)
broke her triple ump record for
the third straight week going 11 I
meters but also qualified tor the
Eastern Collegiate .Athletic Asso-
ciation Indoorhampionships
coming up Man h 5-6
And in the 4 x son meter n
lav. the team of C mciv sv mansk
�leis Jacks, Marvina Hamilton
and (Jretchen I larley placed sei
ond behind I Hike I nix ersit) with
a time of 9 (8 s
e onl) took a few girls to
Blacksburg HeadCoachC h
Justice said Ihe last couple of
weeks h,i e seen some hea
travel and we gave mosl of the
girls a i eek ott I he girls that did
i om i i v er, did extremely
I he whole team gets a week
off with ti
' ison
I





��
February 8, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
Winter Olympics gearing up in Lillehammer in four days
(AP) � Let the Games begin.
Please.
The Olympic flame won't be lit
for another four days. Hopefully,
the torch-bearing ski-jumper will
land unsinged.
The Winter Games have had
enough tragedy and turmoil al-
ready.
An Olympic truce adopted in a
United Nations resolution has been
ignored in Bosnia and Northern Ire-
land.
The International Olympic
Committee scolded the Norwegian
media Sunday for a "negative atti-
tude" toward the IOC and its presi-
dent, Juan Antonio Samaranch.
In the United States, Nancy
Kerrigan and Tonya Hardingcooled
their skates while the controversy
simmered over whether Harding
should be allowed to compete in
the figure skating competition.
In suburban Cleveland, the
younger brother of Olympic ice
dancer Elizabeth Punsalan told po-
lice he stabbed his father to death.
She is expected to arrive in
Lillehammer on Thursday.
There is more:
� Austria's Ulrike Meier, a
two-time world champion in the
super-giant slalom and medal fa-
vorite, was killed in a World Cup
race in Germany last month.
� On Oct. 29, a gang of young
neo-Nazis in Oberhof, Germany,
harassed black American luger Rob-
ert Pipkins and beat up his white
teammate, Duncan Kennedy.
� The coach of the German
luge team, Sean Lepp, lost his leg
Dec. 17 when he slipped onto the
track in Winterberg, Germany, and
was struck by an oncoming sled
driven by an American woman.
� A hero of the host country,
cross-country skier Vegard Ulvang,
thinks his brother Ketil was killed.
Ketil Ulvang disappeared while jog-
ging in October and his body hasn 't
been found. Vegard Ulvang will try
to add to the three gold medals and
one silver he won at the 1992 Olym-
pics.
In Bosnia, murder is a daily
occurrence. But nothing in the 22-
month siege of Sarajevo, host of the
1984 Winter Games, could com-
pare with the 68 people killed Sat-
urday when a shell fell in the city's
central marketplace.
On Sunday, five members of
Bosnia's bobsled and luge teams
glued their eyes to a television in
the comfort of an athlete's lounge.
The screen showed the blood and
bodies left by the attack.
"I feel pain in my stomach
Nizar Zaciragic said, watching a
victim dragged away. "I feel help-
less and humiliated
"I feel a lot of revenge. I want to
make it even luger Verona
Marjanovic said. "If I'm not an ath-
lete, I could have been in the mar-
ketplace . I could have been killed
The massacre occurred the day
an Olympic truce � well-
intentioned but toothless � took
effect until March 5.
Armenia's president told
Samaranch his country will respect
the truce. The presidentof Angola's
national Olympic committee ex-
pressed hope the war in his coun-
try would end soon.
But in Northern Ireland, four
soldiers were injured in an IRA
mortar attack on their patrol ve-
hicle early Sunday.
Later in the day, the IOC said
Samaranch had met with leaders
of Bosnia-Herzegovina's national
Olympic committee to express his
condolences. He was thanked for
support given to Bosnian athletes.
The athletes.
It's time for them to reclaim
the spotlight and refresh the image
of a n international sports spectacle
already soiled by bloodshed and
bad aim.
In women's figure skating, the
favorites are Oksana Baiul of
Ukraine and Surya Bonaly of
France, not Kerrigan or Harding.
Kerrigan appears unhindered
by the smack on the knee, report-
edly by a man hired by Harding's
ex-husband. A U.S. Figure Skating
Association panel said Saturday it
found "reasonablegrounds" to be-
lieve she was invoked in the at-
tack on Kerrigan but passed the
decision onto the U.S. Olympic
Committee.
"It'sbeen a strange time said
Canadian figure skater Brian Orser.
"Hopefully now, the skating will
shine through
In Norway, all is in readiness
for the Olympics in a country proud
of its winter sports tradition.
Facilities have been complete
for some time. Shuttle buses to ven-
ues run on schedule despite nar-
row, snow-covered mountain
roads.
Samaranch says the ecological
planning was done so well that the
Olympics should be called the
"Green Games
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10 The East Carolinian
February 8, 1994
Former Gator football coach attempts suicide out of depression
(AP) � Depression fueled by
job setbacks led former Florida foot-
ball coach Charley Pell to attempt
suicide, Pell's doctor said.
"We are dealing with a medical
problem and I feel very optimistic
Dr. Carl S. Burak, a psychiatrist at
Baptist Medical Center, said at a
news conference Friday. "Charley
Pell has a "habit of landing on his
teet. I feel his prognosis is very
good
The coach, forced to resign a
decade ago because of NCAA vio-
la nons,attempted suicide Wednes-
day evening by running a hose
fromhisrunningcar'sexhaustpipe
through the passenger window.
Pell was found by state trooper
Malcolm Jowers, the head of the
Gator football team security and a
close friend, after the former coach
left him a suicide note and map of
where to find his body.
Pell, 52, has no lasting effects
from his exposure to carbon mon-
LADIES
oxide, the doctor said.
Burak said he expected Pell to
be released from the hospital in a
few days. Common treatment for
depression, he said, is "dealing with
the stresses in someone's life and
dealing with the appropriate medi-
cation
Burak and Pell's wife. Ward,
who released a statement, said Pell's
depression was the result of "pro-
fessional setbacks since departing
the University of Florida
Continued from page 8
her team by Myra Horton and UNC-W (68)
Kelly Norton, who each had 12
points, and Hannah Grady, who
gathered 10 points.
East Carolina was led by
LaShonda Baker's 14 points.
Blackmon followed with 13 and
Charlesworth with 10.
Blackmon, Baker and Norton
were the high rebounders for the
game, with nine each.
The Lady Pirates dropped
their sixth straight game, moving
them to 2-14 overall and 1-6 in the
CAA, while UNC-Wilmington
went to 3-14 overall and 1-6 in the ECU (60)
CAA.
Blank
Marsh
Horton
Bush
Chandler
Norton
Johnson
Longordo
Slarck
Grady
Young
30
24
33
23
111
31
9
3
2
29
I
ill a
5-13
2-4
4-9
2-4
2-3
22
1-1
0-0
0-0
2-9
0-0
ft
m-a
5-6
3-5
4-4
0-0
2-3
8-8
0-0
0-0
0-0
6-6
0-0
rb
o-t
1-5
0-3
0-4
0-2
l-l
0-9
2-4
0-0
(1-0
1-7
0-0
Charlesworth33
to
4
5
tp
15
7
12
4
6
12
T
0
0
10
0
Cagle
Baker
Rodgerson
James
Sutton
Hayes
Wallersirom 10
Allpress 9
Blackmon 31
Kellev 17
m-a
2-9
2-8
4-12
2-6
0-2
0-0
1-5
0-1
3-5
6-14
8
fl
m-a
4-4
0-1
t- 6
0-0
0-2
0-3
0-0
0-0
0-1
i
0-0
rh
o-l
1-3
2-3
5-9
1-3
1-1
0-0
o-i
o-o
0-0
3-9
5-7
to
4
4
14
4
0
0
t
0
9
13
4
Totals 200 20-45 28-32 5-40 10 T568
Percentages: FG .444. FT875 3-Poinl Goals- 0-3.
OCX). Team rebounds:5. Blocked shots:0. Turn-
overs: 18 (Marsh 5. Blank 4. Horton 2. Chandler 2.
Norton 2. Bush. Johnson. Stark I Steals: 8 (Blank 2.
Bush 2. Marsh. Horton. Chandler. Norton).
Totals 200 22-70 11-18 19-39 13 20 60
Percentages: FG- 314. FT61I PointGoals.SI2.
.417 (Allpress 3-3.Charlewonh 2-h.Cagle0-1. Baker
0-1. Wallersirom 0-1). Team rebounds:?. Blocked
shots (Rogerson 2. Hayes I). Turnovers: 20
(Charlesworth 4. Blackmon 3. Cagle 3. Baker 2.
Kellev 2. Sutton 2. Wallcrstrom 2. Allpress. Rogcrsi in i
Steals: 9 (Charlesworth 4. Baker 4. Blackmon 11
UNC-W
ECL
30
23
38
37
68
60
The phvsician said Pell and his
family agreed to the news confer-
ence because of the many calls of
concern about the former coach.
"He wanted everyone to know
he is really OK. I sincerely wish we
could have handled this with the
traditional privacy Buiak said.
Pell, one of the most successful
coaches in Gator history, was forced
to resign in 1984 during an NCAA
investigation into widespread re-
cruiting violations.
He later opened an insurance
company in Tampa. In 1991, he and
his wife moved his TeamStaf f man-
agement firm to Jacksonville.
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more information call CPN at:
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Be a Credit to Planet Earth!
Watch for The Navigator
published in Thursday's
edition of
The East Carolinian.
The East Carolinian J!aoe JlUt&i ff
p Special Page Appearing Feb 10th f
f � In Color BJTSffflTTiHWiTffif I 9M
2� Choice of Images mm&fmwimwmWmwmm -w
r � Send us your
P dedications
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Phone � Fax:757-6558 � Stop by M
m Located in the Student Pubs Bldg � 757-6366 mm
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GOSPEL CHOIR
llth ANNIVERSARY
"HALLELUJAH, LETS SHOUT
Featured Choirs Will Be:
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Fayetteville St. Univ Fayetteville, NC
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UNC-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC
Saturday, February 12,1994
6:00 PM
Wright Auditorium on the ECU campus
Admission: $2.00
WStudent ID $1.00
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February 10, 11, 12, 14 and 15, 1994
at 8:00 p.m.
February 13, 1994
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 8, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 08, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.989
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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