The East Carolinian, February 3, 1994






Pirate Comics, la-la-la!
Phoebe schmoozin' with
leeches, contemplative shrooms
in The Snoring Planet, and
Kemple Boy, SUPERHUMAN
Consult page 6.
4Pf
Lifestyle
Music Galore!
See reviews of live shows by
Cry of Love, The Heaters, and
Everything. Check out
commentary on new releases by
Chainsaw Kittens and The
Nudes. See page 7.
Today
SPPH
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 8
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, February 3, 1994
12 Pages
Assessment team checks out Public Safety
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
Teresa Crocker wants to
know "the good, the bad, and the
ugly" about ECU's Public Safety,
she said yesterday.
The new director of ECU's
Public Safety has asked an inde-
pendent assessment team to ana-
lyze operations and present rec-
ommendations on how the de-
partment can improve service. The
three-member-team, made up of
directors of campus police at area
universities, is wrapping up its
visit today.
"This is a common practice
when new directors are brought
in Crocker said. "My reason for
bringing them in is that it is a lot
easier for an assessment team to
go through and tal k to people and
. . . find areas that we need to
improve on
Ralph Harper, director of
Public Safety at N.C. State; Regina
Lawson, Director at Wake Forest;
and Anthony B. Purcell, Director
at N.C. Central spent the last two
days interviewing student groups,
university officials and police of-
ficers to gain input about ECU's
Public Safety.
"The purpose of the assess-
ment is to make sure we're sensi-
Women sought for
nafl conference
By Jon Cawley
Staff Writer
The Washington Center
and the Sears Merchandise
Group seek ECU women for par-
ticipation in a national leader-
ship conference. The program
will be held May 16-18.
The "Women as Leaders"
conference will provide 200 fe-
male students from across the
country with an opportunity to
develop leadership skills
through extensive workshops,
lectures and a "Mentor for a
Day" program.
The conference is spon-
sored by the Washington Cen-
ter, a non-profit organization
that functions mainly to assist
with internships for students in
the District of Columbia, said
Laura Hudson of the center.
The Sears Merchandise
Group is also sponsoring the
conference through funding in
the form of tuition and lodging,
therefore making it possible for
the selected participants to at-
tend while paying only travel
and living expenses.
The community relations
program of the company has an
extensive budget to provide S20
million to worthy causes, most
of which are educational in na-
ture, said Janice R. Drummond,
a representative from Sears.
Sears does not intend to re-
cruit women employees through
the conference, but feels women
are the most important custom-
ers at Sears and therefore wishes
to assist in providing opportu-
nities for them, Drummond said.
The conference will be "so-
lution, instead of problem, ori-
ented" in exposing participants
to issues of diversity and how
these issues affect women in the
workplace, said Hudson. The
program will provide site visits
to offices in the Washington area,
including the National Organi-
zation of Women (NOW), the
Department of Defense and The
Supreme Court, said Hudson.
Small group discussions
and forums will be used to dis-
cuss issues and provide interac-
tion among the participants.
Each morning of the conference
will also include keynote lectures
by such speakers as Sen. Carol
Moseley-Braun, D-Ill and Rep.
Susan Molinari, R-N.Y both
honorary co-chairwomen of the
SeeWOMENpage3
Sorority's "Bowl for Breath"
campaign battles cystic fibrosis
By Kim Russell
Staff Writer
On Feb. 20, Gamma Sigma
Sigma, a national service sorority,
is sponsoring "Bowl for Breath"
at East Carolina Bowl. The benefit
lasts from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m and is
intended to raise money for the
National Cystic Fibrosis Founda-
tion.
"Since there is no cure for
this disease we figured we could
raise money for a good cause
said Jenny Cambell, vice presi-
dent of service. "We named it
"Bowl for Breath" because each
penny that is donated for this
causeenables one patient a greater
chance tobreatheand live longer
Cystic fibrosis is a common
genetic killer among young
people. This fatal disease has no
cure; it attacks its prey by an ab-
normal increase in the amount of
fibrous connective tissue in the
lungs. This eventually leads to
death.
Gamma Sigma Sigma has
challenged a group of employees
from Pitt Memorial Hospital to
several bowling games. Anyone
can come to see the game and
make a donation. The organiza-
tion is also raising money by seek-
ing community sponsors who will
give a specified amountpf money
for each pin knocked down dur-
ing the games.
Gamma Sigma Sigma is a
national service sorority. It spon-
sors several activities throughout
the school year to raise monev for
various causes.
"We are a service organiza-
tion based on helping the com-
munity around us as well as rec-
ognized organizations Cambell
said.
Gamma Sigma Sigma is not
a member of Panhellenic and does
not hold a formal rush.
"When people hear the word
sorority, they automatically have
a preconception of typical greek
life and that is not what we are
about Lynda McCormick, vice
president of membership, said.
"We don't turn down anybody
who wants to be a part of our
group. You choose us, we don't
choose vou
tive in areas that we should be,
that we're doing things that we
should be Crocker said. "It's for
the university, but it is also for the
department.
"I think we're going to find
areas in which we need to do
things differently Crocker said.
"It will tell us two things. It will
tell us things we are doing right,
and the areas that we need to im-
prove Crocker said.
"I think it makes my job a lot
easier, than if I had to spend the
next year trying to determine all
these things myself she said.
The assessors are conduct-
ing the assessment in two phases.
On Tuesday, they tried to gauge
public opinion about PublicSafetv
by talking to people around cam-
pus. They spent Wednesday ex-
amining different departments in
Public Safety and interviewing
officers.
During the assessment pro-
cess the assessors spoke to repre-
sentatives from resident life, stu-
dent development, the physical
plant, members of the campus
media, the deans of various de-
partments and the chancellor and
his staff.
As Lawson pointed out, the
team also spoke to regular stu-
dents "Something I think was
very important: we also spent a
lot of time talking with students,
leadership from Student Govern-
ment, graduate students and
former students she said.
Lawson explained the mis-
sion of the assessment team as a
tool. "You invite an assessment
teamintoevaluatetheoperations,
service . . . you collect informa-
tion about a depa rtment, and then
you use that to see where you
are
"We examine every aspect
of a department and determine
what their relationship is with the
university community Harper
said. "In other departments we
Quick!
Deposit
it!
L i n s a y
Fernandez, Kelly
Kellis, Thomas
Marc inow ski and
the Regional
Director for The
American Heart
Association hold
the check ECU's
Phi Sigma Pi
national honor
fraternity
recently
donated.
Photo by
Cedric Van Buren
Feb. hosts exceptional children week
By Jennifer Jenkins
Staff Writer
The week of Feb. 4-18 is
the first Exceptional Children's
Week. Throughout the week,
the Student Council for Excep-
tional Children will be hosting
the university with different
activities.
The main focus of the week
is to make the students, faculty
and community aware of the
organization. In the student
stores, there will be a display in
the window to remind every-
one of the organization. "This
week will be a great opportu-
nity to get students involved
and enlighten more people
about the Student Council for
Exceptional Children said Lisa
Yates, president for the Student
Council for Exceptional Chil-
dren and Student Governor for
the state federation of the Coun-
cil for Exceptional Children.
In the past, there had been
a small number of people at-
tending meetings and activities,
but this year has been packed
with activities and involvement
is making a rapid increase said
Dr. Nickolas Radeka, faculty ad-
visor for Student Council for
Exceptional Children.
The organization started
the year with a cookout to lead
into many more activities. They
also sold candy to help support
the Special Olvmpics held a can
drive for the holidays to donate
to area organizations serving
holiday dinners. The organiza-
tion also helped the Association
for Retarded Citizens with their
annual Tootsie Roll Drive.
In addition to all of the
events this fall, they will be in-
volved in many activities this
spring. On Feb. 17, the organi-
zation will be at Burger King on
Greenville Boulevard for a fund-
raiser. From 3 p.m. until 7 p.m
the Student Council for Excep-
tional Children will be greeting
people and explaining the pur-
pose of the organization to the
customers. Burger King will be
donating a percentage of their
profits to the organization.
The Kids on the Block, a
puppet show, will be acted out
on March 31 at 7 p.m. in the
Willis Building. Sponsored by
the Association for Retarded
Citizens, the show will have dis-
abled puppets with a panel dis-
cussion afterwards. This dis-
cussion should get children in-
terested in asking questions per-
taining to the disabled.
There will also be students
attending conferences this
spring. This weekend is the state
conference in Raleigh. In April,
the international conference is
in Denver, Col. "This gets stu-
dents involved in learning about
exceptional students in areas
broader than our community
Yates said.
Though the Council for Ex-
ceptional Children focuses
mostly with disabled children,
it also deals with all exceptional
people. "We do not onlv in-
volve disabled students, we in-
volve gifted students also
Radeka said.
have found situations in which
they needed to increase man-
power, or found that their tech-
nology was inadequate.
"We make recommenda-
tions and make suggestions
based on those recommenda-
tions about how to implement
them, and then we go back and
take a look a year later, and usu-
ally see a marked improve-
ment Harper said.
The assessment team will
complete their work by meeting
with Chancellor Eakin today.
The team plans to present Pub-
lic Safety with a report of their
findings in a couple of weeks.
Get away
from it all
By Tina Chiwona
Staff Writer
Tired of the same scen-
ery
How about going on the
Student Exchange Program?
You will have the opportu-
nity to see new sites in Eu-
rope, Asia, Canada and Aus-
tralia or on a different US
campus.
The Student Exchange
Program is open to all stu-
dents, with an established
GPA of 2.5 for American stu-
dents and 2.7 for Interna-
tional students. Stephanie
Evancho, the Student Ex-
change Coordinator empha-
sizes that the exchange pro-
gram "brightens a student's
horizons, and is easy and very
affordable.
"They come back self-
confident and sure of them-
selves. They are ready to take
on new challenges, as they
have had to adapt to a new
environment However,
Evancho's strongest empha-
sis is that exchange students
make a lot of new friends.
On Monday, Jan. 31, at
the International House, all
exchange students currently
enrolled at ECU were invited
to a reception held on their
behalf. "This is the best way
for students to meet others
on the exchange program
Evancho said. At the moment
the majority of the foreign
exchange students, including
the following three are Aus-
tralian.
Brett Bacon, a graduate
student is studying urban and
regional planning I wanted
See STUDENTS page 2
People on the Street
What do
you think
about
ECU's
Public
Safety
department,
and what
changes
would you
like to see?
mm
K � ��� Vjj1
i3
Randy Farmer, senior: "I
think they are doing a
good joh, but sometimes I
feel that when me and my
friends are walking
together at night they tend
to pay us more attention:
they seem to be a little
racial
Kerry Rich, sophomore:
"They need to be less
concerned about minor
issues and more
concerned about students
walking to and from class
at night. Sometimes I
don't feel safe
Greg Melton, junior: "In
the past, they have done a
fair job. I have heard that
it is going to improve, so
I'm just waiting and
hoping for the best
Lisa Carter, sophomore:
"They need to stop writing
so many parking tickets,
and start making campus
feel safer
Photos by Leslie Petty





. wammmmma
MDTIfiii ml ilWWMai
2 The East Carolinian
February 3, 1994
Bfflj
January 25
12:57 p.m.
Harassing phone calls; Cotten Hall.
5:00 p.m.
Larceny of bicycle part; Southeast of Clement Hall.
11:03 p.m.
Larceny of wallet; Fletcher Music Building.
11:58 p.m.
Larceny of truck bed cover; Parking lot at Fourth and
Reade.
January 26
10:28 a.m.
Larceny of bicycle from rack; Northeast of Clement Hall.
7:50 a.m.
Annoying phone calls; General Classroom Building.
6:50 p.m.
Larceny of bicycle brakes; Northwest of Jarvis Hall.
January 27
2:30 a.m.
Arrest for D.W.I, and overcrowded vehicle; College Hill
Drive.
5:19 p.m.
Arrest for soliciting phony magazine subscriptions; Tyler
Hall.
January 28
10:30 a.m.
Harassing phone calls; Aycock Hall.
January 29
1:37 p.m.
Damage to personal property (vehicle); Mendenhall park
ing lot.
11:20 p.m.
Arrest for possession of drug paraphernalia, possession
of pyrotechnics; Scott Hall.
January 30
3:30 a.m.
Arrest for D.W.I Southwest of Memorial Gym.
5:15 a.m.
Arrest for trespassing, visitation violation; Tyler Hall.
7.A5 p.m.
Damage to personal property, scratches on truck;
Scott Hall parking lot.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
STUDENTS
Continued from page 1
to studv elsewhere Bacon saiu,
"and ECU was my first choice
Bernadette Cranston, a se-
nior, chose ECU because it has a
good health information man-
agement program. "That's my
field of study, and ECU is the
best place to study it Cranston
said .
Anna Wischer is a real es-
tate major The best thing she
likes about ECU is that "it is so
close to downtown
A junior from Los Ange-
les, Dalila Boussaid, is on the
national exchange program and
has several reasons why she
chose ECU.
"First, because I have
jwffofc m fcKUty
never been past the west coast,
and 1 just wanted to see what
the east coast was like
Boussaid said. "And ECU was
affordable compared to the New
England states
Two national students,
Dina Davies from Fayetteville,
N.C. and Deidra Biggs from
Fairfax, Va are both art history
majors and would like to study
in the Netherlands They have
the opportunity to see the art
that they are studying, travel
and, as Davis said, "utilize my
foreign language skills
According to Stephanie
Evancho, a student pays ECU
tuition and pays for their own
transportation, students on fi-
nancial aid or scholarship, have
that applied to their exchange
program. However the Interna-
tional Student Exchange Pro-
gram (ISEP) is the best package.
"The ISEP is the most af-
fordable and is a great deal
Evancho said. "You don't have
to worry about the cost of liv-
ing, because everything is paid
You just pay for transportation
and personal expenses.
If you are interested and
would like more information,
contact International Programs,
306 E. Third St or call 757-6769.
ECU buttles ODU
iu round two on
Feb. 12 at Miiiges,
HE THERE!
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Turn Off Your TV
and Pick up A Book!
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Outer (next to Kmart)
We deliver to Dorms
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Come into any club entrance Thursday and then
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When you need to stretch
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February 3, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
WOMEN
Continued from page 1
conference.
Past speakers such as Judy
Woodruff of CNN; Alexis
Herman, Public Liaison for the
White House; and Sara Brady, of
Hand Gun Control Incorporated
(H.G.C.I) will all be asked to at-
tend again, however, confirma-
tions are still in the process,
Hudson said.
Speakers including Sen.
Moselev-Braun and Rep.
Molinari will act as mentors as
well as keynote speakers.
The leadership conference
has proven a success in the past
for all those involved,
Drummond said. She reported
that thev have received many
letters from past participants
thanking Sears for the opportu-
nity to attend the conference.
Hudson added that several
past attendants have gone on to
successful careers in leadership
positions. Linda Stensland, a con-
ference alum it. now a state sena-
tor in South Dakota. One stu-
dent was offered a job with the
Congressional Office, at the con-
NEWS
WRITERS!
Thank you for
all your hard
work, hut you
still need to
attend today's
meeting at
3:30 p.m.
(And the ECU-
ODU game on
the 12th!)
elusion of the conference and an-
other is now chief lobbyist for
the Kennedy Center.
Participant selection will
include three women from each
state, the District of Columbia
and Puerto Rico. An additional
44 students, chosen on a national
at-large basis, will be selected to
comprise the 200 participants in
the program.
Leadership on and off cam-
pus and the endorsement of the
college or university president
are criteria for selection. Hudson
added that those who have over-
come obstacles such as discrimi-
nation, single parenthood, and
physical disabilities will be given
strong consideration.
Applications are available
in the mainframe departments
of Sears retail stores and inter-
ested female students can call
(800)486-8921 for more informa-
tion. The deadline for submit-
ting applications is Feb. 15, and
applicants may expect to hear
results by the first week of March,
Hudson said.
'atalog
. Connection
WAREHOUSE SALE
Just received - truckload of your
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Thursday, ieb 3 9-7 �Vr-
Friday, Feb 4 9-7 ifr$Vb�v
Saturday, Feb 5 8-6 HSrP
This includes sommer and winter fashions
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758-8612
210 East 5th St.
10-6 Monday-Friday
atalog �
connection
(Formerly T(JIF)
a division of
Managers
Trip Little
Judy Edwards
The Newman Catholic Student Center
Would like to Welcome
New & Returning Students
and Invite You tojoin Us In Worship
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm at the Newman Center
followed by a fellowship meal
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For More Information about these and other programs sponsored bv the Newman Center,
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am & 11pm.
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MONOAY
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Scrambled Eggs on Toast $1.79
Scrambled Eggs & Ham $2.19
Scrambled Eggs & Ham wCheese $2.39
Scrambled Eggs & Bacon $2.19
Scrambled Eggs & Bacon wCheese $2.39
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BET $2.59
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irifini
The East Carolinian
Page 4
Opinion
February 3, 1994
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Printed on
100 recycled paper
Sean Mc Laughlin, Account Executive
Kelly KelHs, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burl Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Ant Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving ilie ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C. 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Chlorine concerns overhaul EPA policies J
In the wake of a rather unsuccessful pitch
for health care reform last week, the Clinton
administration has switched to a topic that is
considerably more troubling. They are now
smack-dab in the middle of their own self-
proclaimed environmental week, focusing on
proposals to toughen the decidedly inadequate
Clean Water Act and overhaul the troubled
Superfund cleanup program. Though a re-
freshing change, attention paid to environ-
mental projects generally frighten Washing-
ton-ites and those Americans that consider
themselves immune to environmental prob-
lems.
Well, to those that think as such: Wake
up. Consider the fact that cancer rates are at an
all-time high. Any educated person knows
that this is directly linked to (among other
pollutants being dumped into the atmosphere,
the water, the soil) the increase of chlorine use
in the United States.
According to the USA Today research
group, 12 million tons of chlorine are pro-
duced annually. Not only that, but sales of
chlorine-dependant products brought in an
estimated $71.4 billion in 1990, mostly in the
plastics industry. Chlorine use has been attrib-
uted to an increase in memory problems and
stunted growth, in addition to cancer, and
that's just in humans alone. Other species in
the animal kingdom have suffered worse con-
sequences. Things like eggshell thinning in
bald eagles, reproductive problems in trout,
mink and otter and embryo abnormalities in
snapping turtles a re only a few instances of the
effects.
And since most reports are too hush-
hushed so as not to cause a big to-do, we may
never know the true effects. Prostate cancer is at
an all-time high. So is breast cancer. Thousands
have died while the o er-consumption raged
out of control and only now have officials taken
a step towards the possible elimination of cases
such as the ones mentioned before.
Tuesday, Environmental Protection
Agency Administrator Carol Browner unveiled
a comprehensive plan to overhaul the Clean
Water Act. Included in the proposal: an even-
tual ban on the most troublesome chlorine-based
chemicals, a plan favored by environmentals
and opposed by industry. Among the chlorine-
based products are such seeming necessaries as:
plastics, paper, pesticides, drugs and disinfec-
tants. A ban would require industry to find
alternatives � something the most technologi-
cally- 3dvanced society certainly could do.
1 oday, Browner unveils proposed changes
in the Superfund, a $12 billion program to clean
up the USA's abandoned chemical waste sites.
Superfund is an expensive, complex and unfair
program. Of the 1,289 sites currently identified
as needing actions, only 220 have been cleaned.
The fund is largely financed by a tax on the
petrochemical industry. In addition to these
two programs are plans to enact a Safe Drinking
Water Act, a Resource Conservation and Recov -
ery Act, and an Endangered Species Act � no
small potatoes for a Congress that already has
its collective hands full. (Did someone say
"gridlock"?)
But for all of this, there still remains a
cynicism in the average American. They are
appalled and baffled in the increasing rates of
disease in this period we call the Industrial Age,
and yet they're blind to the source � their own
demand for the very products they cherish.
By John P. Adams
Precious few are masters of their own domain
It's 1994 in America, per-
haps the most open society in
he world and yet there is still
one subject that is taboo. In
fact, the stigma attached to this
subject is such that to talk about
it brings on
jeers and to
write about it
brings on criti-
cism of being
sophmoric.
Yet, it's
amazing, Ma-
donna can
simulate sexu-
ally deviant
acts during
prime time,
and Prince can make more
erotic gestures wth his hands
than most of us can with our
whole bodies and hardly any-
one bats an eye.As adults we
can casually sit around and
discuss a man's severed penis
without laughing (sometimes),
while the words "anal sex" no
longer provoke some sort of
neo-McCarthyite grimace.
I don't want to get into a
debate about whether or not
these things are good or bad,
though. What I'm trying to
Show is that in our society we
are very willing to openly dis-
cuss anything that is even
vaguely related to sex. In fact,
we're obsessed with sex. I
know I am.
However, there is one
sexual subject which the mere
mention of causes 300-pound
football players to become de-
fensive, college professors to
snicker, television commenta-
tors to stutter, women to blush,
and just about everyone else to
lower their heads and raise
their hand as if a bright light
has suddenly been shone in their
eyes.
You know what I'm talk-
ing about. The most taboo sub-
ject on the planet, which is of
course well you know
masturbation.
around 90 of all
men and about 50 of
all women masturbate
on a regular basis. With
numbers like these I
think we can safely say
that baseball is no
longer America's
national pasttime.
Jeez! I
feel guilty
just typing
the letters
that spell
you know.
Why is
this,
though?
Why
is mastur-
b a t i o n
such a touchy subject with ev-
eryone?
Most studies agree that
around 90 of all men and about
50 of all women masturbate
on a regular basis. With num-
bers like these I think we can
safely say that baseball is no
longer America's national
pasttime.
So, here we have this act, if
you will, which just about ev-
eryone participates in, but yet,
no one can talk about with the
exception of making crude jokes.
Perhaps if we take a closer look
at the definition of masturba-
tion we can discern the esoteric
nature of it.
Webster's defines mastur-
bation as erotic stimulation of
the genital organs (no problems
so far) commonly resulting in
orgasm (sounds good) and
achieved by manual or other
bodily contact exclusive of
sexual intercourse (uh-oh), by
instrumental manipulation (I
don't even know what this
means), occasioned by sexual
fantasies (I think "dominated"
probably fits better than "occa-
sioned"). Let's be honest, if you
read this definition without the
manual part you wouldn't think
anything was wrong with it, but
that one word changes every-
thing.
I think the main problem
with talking about masturbation
is overcoming the years of igno-
rance and paranoia associated
with it. As recently as the 1920s
doctors were telling parents that
if their kids were masturbating,
the kids would grow up to be
weak or that they would never
have any energy. Some doctors
even thought there was an asso-
ciation betweeen masturbation
and acne!
Even writers as great as
D.H. Lawrence were not im-
mune to the ignorance of the
day. In his short essay, "Por-
nography and Obscenity
Lawrence calls masturbation the
"dirty litttle secret and further,
goes so far as to say that mastur-
bation is the "deepest and most
dangerous cancer of our civili-
zation I think that, perhaps,
D.H. Lawrence had a little can-
cer eating away at his brain
when he wrote that.
I don't think we need to
vitiate masturbation like doc-
tors did in the past or debase it
like Lawrence does. However,
if we just use the "little secret"
part of Lawrence's phrase, I
think everything becomes clear.
For most people, mastur-
bation is a little secret they carry
around with them, not to be
shared with anyone else. Not
that this secret is so dark and
deep, but it is private and should
be respected as such. By the way,
did I mention that I fall into the
10 category?
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By Laura Wright
Professor-dating creates unequal power situation
I am an English graduate
student, and I teach composi-
tion to first-year college stu-
dents. Last semester, a student
asked me if 1 thought that it was
all right for students to date their
professors. I responded by tell-
ing her that I thought that it was
probably all right as long as the
student wasn't in the professor's
class at the time.
I answered this way for ob-
vious reasons: When a student
dates a teacher and has to re-
ceive grades from that person,
there can be no certainty that
the grading process is fair. Does
the person get an "A" because
the work that she or he (most
likely she, I'm afraid) does is
"A" work or because she is dat-
ing her teacher? This presents
problems for the teacher as well.
How does he or she (most likely-
he) know if he is being fair or if
his feelings towards his student
are interfering with his percep-
tion of her work?
I've thought about writing
an article on the topic of rela-
tionships between students and
professors for a while but until
recently, I hadn't formed a solid
opinion on the subject. But since
I responded to my student's
question, I have come to realize
that such relationships present
more complex problems�espe-
cially for a female student who
becomes involved with a male
professor. To illustrate my
points, I will use the example of
"Lily a sophomore English
major.
Lily has just ended her first
serious relationship with a guy
that she met in high school. They
went to different colleges, and
he met someone else. Lily's self-
esteem is at an all-time low, and
she is very vulnerable. She con-
fides in a professor that she had
for a previous class and, before
long, the two become romanti-
cally involved. She is excited,
scared, happy and confused all
at the same time. The reason?
This person, while not her
teacher at present, had first in-
teracted with her in a situation
where he had some power and
authority over her.
Lily gets confused as to
what she feels: Is it love? Self-
worth (that someone so smart
and so influential could be in-
terested in her)? Suppose that
she becomes uncomfortable
with the situation or suppose he
wants to keep her a secret. How
does she tell him that this is not
fair, if she even is unable to per-
ceive it as unfair in the first
place? What does his initial po-
sition of power have to do with
this situation? Everything. Re-
jecting him could be really
frightening for Lily, and being
rejected by him could be devas-
tating.
I hate to use English de-
partments as the stereotype, but
these are the only departments
that I've had any contact with,
so bear in mind that my view is
somewhat limited. I do believe,
however, that it is easy for those
individuals who are "well-read"
to confuse life and art and to
romanticize things that are
simply not romantic in the
least.
If they're lucky, women
come to rea lize that they didn't
come to college to get hit on
and that it's OK to say no to
anyone�especially in in-
stances where the situation is
one of fundamental inequal-
ity. Unfortuately, the realiza-
tion that we didn't come here
to be picked up doesn't mean
that the advances will stop.
For a lot of aging professors,
the chase is a challenge and an
"unformed" mind holds great
promise.
While it is important for
students to view the situation
clearly�that is to realize that
this person is just a person (and
not some sort of godlike en-
tity for gosh sakes), it is
equally important for profes-
sors to realize the influence
that they have over their stu-
dents, both by virtue of their
age and their positions of au-
thority.
While having an affair
with a student might be a
stroke for the ego, the fact that
the relationship is based on an
unequal power situation, may
eventually be recognized as
unfair by the student in-
volved. Things may tend to
get messy.
After all, reality and fan-
tasy are two seperate relms,
no matter how much you've
read to the contrary.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
The East Carolinian recently printed a story
on a local attorney announcing his bid for Con-
gress. However, Walter Jones, Junior is not a
lawyer. He never attended law school. The story
did not touch on the point that Jones does not
even live in the district he is running for Congress
in.
In his speech, Jones railed on the creation of
the new minority congressional district. He even
emphasized how unfair it is that he lives in the
First District. However, Jones was one of the very
people who drew these district lines. He served
on the Congressional Redistricting Committee in
the N.C. House. On Jan. 23,1992 he voted for the
very legislation that created what he calls today
"political pornography
Jones even submitted an amendment to move
four Pitt County precincts, including his own,
into this minoi ity district he now complains about.
Walter Jones, Junior proclaimed on the court-
house steps that opposing taxes is the bedrock of
his belief system. Yet Walter Junior has consis-
tently voted for and even proprosed raising our
taxes. His position seems to have changed now
he is running for Congress.
Now that Walter Jones, Junior has a high
paid Republican consultant from the Congres-
sional Club running his campaign, he is talking
about "family values
This seems to be a far cry from the liberal
legislation Jones is noted for introducing in the
N.C. House. Considering his past history, it
seems ironic his media consultant planned Jesse
Helms' campaign in 1990.
Just a few months ago Walter was singing
the praises of affirmative action and minority
districts. Yet today he is spouting just the op-
posite. He campaigns against political action
committees, but takes contributions from labor
unions and other special interests.
Walter Junior changed parties, changed
districts, and even changed positions. But, for
pome reason his reputation just won't change.
Thomas W. Blue
Junior
Biology
With all of the wonderful things happening out there (global warming,
drug abuse, famine, inflating educational costs, hangnails, war, death and
destruction, the absence of good Chinese food in Greenville) what could
you possibly have to write about? We're still here: Letters to the Editor, The
The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C, 27858-
4353.





The East Carolinian
February 3. 1994
For Rent
Classifieds
Rage 5
El Help Wanted I El Help Wanted
For Sale EH Services Offered! gg Greek
NEW DUPLEX FOR RENT. Wyndham
Court. S525 per month 2 br, 2 bath with
fireplace. First month rent free. 1 year
lease call 355-6171 or 321-3233.
. ROOMMATE wanted. House, $170
mo. 13 utlilities and deposit. 5-10
min. walk from campus, washer, dryer
dog ok, prefer non-smoker, must be
social, male or female, 830-6703, ASAP
FEMALE ROOMMATE $155, own
bedroom 13 utilities. Walking dis-
tance to campus. Responsible, social
drinker. Call 752-0874 leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for2bedroom
townhouse, non-smoker, $235month
12 utilities-752-5257
AVAILABLE FEB. 15: 1 bedroom in
Sheraton Village. 3 bedroom
townhouse. Mature, responsible female
NS only. Quiet environment, nicely
decorated with all major appliances.
$2301 3bills. 756-8459 (Sara or Angie).
FOR RENT: Nags Head, NC- Get your
group together early. Two relatively
new houses; fully furnished; washer
drver; dishwasher; central AC; avail-
able May 1 through August 31; sleeps
7- $1500.00 per month; sleeps 9- $2000
per month (804)850-1532
GEORGETOWN APT. Best location
in Greenville. Roommate(s) needed to
share 2 bedroom apt or possibly sub-
lease entirely. Available as of Feb. 1st.
Call 758-5961
WANTED: Private two or three bed-
room cottage for married field biolo-
gists. Trees, screened porch fireplace,
and convenience to ECU disired (by 2-
1-94). References available, call 757-
6307
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom, 2 bath apt
water, sewer, basic cable included. 2
bedroom, 1 bath, water, sewer, basic
cable, heat air included 2 blocks from
campus. Call 752-8900
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share a two bedroom apartment lo-
cated near campus on bus route. Rent
$185 & 12 utilities nonsmoker pre-
ferred. Call Jeri or Hilary at 758-8836.
GEORGETOWN APT. Best location
ir Green vile. Roommates) needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. or possibly sub-
lease entirely. Available as of Feb. 1st
Call 758-5961.
H Help Wanted
$10-$400AJP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! SparefuUtime. Set own hours!
Rush Stamped envelope: Publishers (GI)
1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705
COPY EDITOR NEEDED If you are an
English, Comm. or journalism student
looking for experience with AP style or
newspaper production, apply at the East
Carolinian (Student Pubs, building).
HELP WANTED Ladies earn $500 a
week full-time part-time daily payout
Playmates Adult Entertainment Snow
Hill, NC. Call for interview 747-7686
"�SPRING BREAK 94"
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida
Cancun,
& Padre!
110 lowest price guarantee! Organize
15 friends and your trip is free! Take a
Break Student Travel (800)328-7283.
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS
of North Carolina (Nags Head) this sum-
mer? For summer employment infor-
mation please call Pat or Lea at 1-800-
833-5233.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Dep. is
recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicantsmustpossesssome
knowledge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicantsmustbeabletocoach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3pm to 7pm
with some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from the first
of March to the first of May. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For more info
please call Ben James or Michael Daly at
8304550.
POSTAL FOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great Benefits. Call 1-800-
4364365 ext. P-3712
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $85 phr
escorting in the Greenville area. You
must be 18 yrs. old, have own phone
and transportation. Escorts and exotic
dancers needed. For more info, call
Diamond Escorts at 758-0896
ATTENTION STUDENTS: earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west Mailers PO Box 395, Oathe KS
66051. Immediate response.
NEED EXTRA CASH. Tutor needed to
tutor student for Acct. 2401. Tue Wed
Sup. Sessions to be scheduled at your
convenience during the pm hours. 355-
4678 leave message.
HEAD LIFEGUARDS. Positions avail-
able in following areas: Goldsboro,
Greenville, Plymouth, Tarboro. Must
have supervising experience. Call Bob,
758-1088.
EXPERIENCED WAITSTAFF. Apply
at Greenville Country Club between 2-
4pm only- Tues-Fri.
�"� SPRING BREAK '94�" Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida & Padre!
110 lowest price guarantee! Orga-
nize 15 friends and your trip is Free!
Take a Break Student Travel (800) 328-
7283.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT-
Make up to $2000-4000 mo teaching
basic conversational English abroad.
Japan, Taiwan, and S. Korea. Many
employers provide room board
other benefits. Noteachingbackground
or Asian Languages required. For more
info, call: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362
BRODY'S is accepting applications for
clericaloffice associate Work with
buying and operation staff in computer
data entry, generating computer mail-
ing list, and light office duties. Must be
available early afternoons. Apply
Brody's The Plaza Monday and Thurs-
day l-4pm.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for Part-Time sales Associates, flex-
ible scheduling options: 10-2,12-9 or
6-9 interview Monday and Thursday
Brody's The Plaza l-4pm
GREEKS CLUBS earn $50-$250 for
yourself plus up to $500 for your club!
This fundraiser cos tsnothingand lasts
one week. Call now and receive a free
gift. J-800-932-0528 ext. 65
EARN $500 or more weekly stuffing
envelopes at home. Send long SASE
to: Country Living Shoppers, Dept.
532, PO Box 1779, Denham Springs
LA 70727.
WE NEED A DJ! Sigma Alpha Iota
needs a DJ for our Spring formal in
April. Latest dance, rave, line dance
music. We are a non-profit organiza-
tion and have limited funds but can
afford $200-$300. Replies 757-0040.
Sigma Alpha Iota
VALENTINE HELP NEEDED driv-
ers and in-store help. Apply in per-
son, Cynthia's Flowers 1318 E. 10th st.
For Sale
SPRING BREAK SALE 1994! We have
the hottest destinations! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas, Florida. All at the
guaranteed lowest prices with the ulti-
mate party package. Organize small
group and Travel free! Call Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710
descented, has all shots. Must sell,
moving. Call 830-4052 ask for Aaron.
FOR SALE: Harvest Gold dryer, excel-
lent conditionl Asking $75 but will
negotiate! Call Kelly 752-6109
FOR SALE: slate blue camelback sofa-
very good condition, $125. Hot tub-
motor needs work, make an offer. Call
756-7506
FOR SALE: Bar and bar fridge. Very
sturdy with plenty of space underneath.
Graduating and must get rid of these.
Both for $80. Will sell dorm refrigera-
tor bar seperate. Brian at 321-2426.
KENWOOD ?ullout tape deck. CD
changer compatable with tapeadvance,
music skip, and many other features.
$200neg. Call Ron at 931-8817
MEMBERSHIP FOR SALE: The club
for women only- take over payments,
no enrollment fee- 16 months left on
contract. Call Ann 8-5 @ 752-5101 after
6pm and weekends 747-5088
LAB PUPPIES for sale. Not mixed!
Great V. Day's gift. $50 Call 830-6765.
Lave message if not at home.
UNIQUE ADULT CANDIES and Val-
entine candies especially for you.
Chocolates and hard candies in gift
baskets, mugsorindividually sold. Call
321-1428.
MEMBERSHIP: club for women only.
$29.99 per month. Call Angie 931-9768
PAYIN-STATETUmON? Residency
Status and Tuition is the brochure by
attorney Brad Lamb on the in-state tu-
ition residency process. For sale: Stu-
dent Stores Wright Building.
dows software. Call today� Glenda
Stevens (8a-5p�752-9959) (evenings-
527-9133)
FREE for all college students� up to
five free hours of long distance calling!
Call 355-3789.
IBS Personals
HELLROSE PLACE Christa Farmer,
you are a great friend that I love and
trust. I hope you have a terrrific 22
years. Happy Birthday from the "old
guy" upstairs.
ODE TO CHRISTA Be-boppin' Sean,
the first of the crowd, throwin' kisses &
presents & Happy Birthdays aloud.
Next comes Denney & probably Kyle,
alcohol toting in some large vile.
Meredith is there, of course No doubt
with an outdoor voice (we'll forgive
her!). Ginny close by with the "Rock
World Crew & Brian is there with a
joke or two. Let's not forget Neil with a
"toke" & a smile or our newest un-dad,
father Van Zyle. At last the "tomata's"
will be sorely be there along with fat
Doug from a door downstairs. We all
will be gathered; our respects we will
pay to sing & to drink & to celebrate
your Birthday. Happy Birthday
Christa From Hellrose Place
gg Greek
SPRING BREAK Bahamas party
cruise! 6 days $279! Trip includes
Cruise room, 12 meals 6 free par-
ties! Hurry! This will seU out! 1-800-
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SPRING BREAK! Cancun Jamaica!
Fly out of Raleigh and spend 8 days on
the Beach! We have the best trips
prices! Includes air hotel parties
from $429! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8days
oceanview room with kitchen $119!
Walk to best bars! Includes free dis-
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1-800-678-6386
FLORIDA'S new Spring Break
hotspots! Cocoa Beach Key West!
More upscale than Panama City
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$159! Key West $249! 1-800-678-6386
8-BIT NINTENDO with 33 games, in-
cludes 11 sports, Tetris, Chess; two con-
trols and zapper, hint book and codes.
$300OBO. 931-8024, leave message
GOVERNMENT SEIZEDcars, trucks,
boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE FERRET. 10 months old,
EH Services Offered
i ;in paiu tor usi'ti t s,
All types: Alternative, a.
(.otuitrV. (.lassskal, RiSck. Slop
bv or tall
(1) Alley 758-S026
COOMBS wordprocessing spread-
sheets and graphs. Low prices, pick-
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355-5043 anytime.
SPRING MEANS GET SERIOUS
Get the body you always wanted with
Flex Appeal. Specializing in toning,
weight loss, body building, and per-
sonal training. Initial consultation free!
830-1380
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSONS:
Special offer for ECU students. Great
way to get in shape! Experienced train-
ing, 3 miles from campus, beginner to
advanced. Call Debbie at 756-8236.
ACCRATE, FAST, CONFIDENT! AL,
PROFESSION AL ResumeSecretarial
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term papers, general typing. Word
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CONGRATULATIONS to all fraterni-
ties on your new pledges! Love, Chi
Omega
KAPPA SIGMA thanks fora greatsocial
on Sat. night. Lets do it again soon. Love,
Chi Omega
TO THE BROTHERS OF KAPPA AL-
PHA: Friday's bid party was lots of fun.
Weallhadagreattime. Looking forward
to getting together again. Love, Chi
Omega
CONGRATULATIONS Alpha Phi on
your win Mon. night Keep up the good
work.
THETA CHI Thanks for a good time
on Fri. night. Congratulations to your
new members. Looking forward to next
time. Love, Alpha Phi
ZETAS, Thank you for the use of your
house during rush. Your cooperation
helped make this rush very successful.
Love, Phi Psi
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA: congratu-
lations to all those who received awards
at founders day! Service with a smile-
DarcyBeasley,GammaGal-KellySchelle
and Catherine Bright, Most dependable-
Randi Gibbons, Gamma Sig "mama
Catherine Bright, Best pledge- Kara
Permisohn and Sharon Price, Most
Athletic- Lynda McCormick, Biggest
flirt- Cherie Montgomery, "Stumble
Penquin Joelle Sevio, Tardiness
award- Beth Sullivan. Love, the sis-
ters.
LPSILON SIGMA ALPHA-a service
sorority will hold spring rush Feb. 7-9.
Please come any of these days to Gen-
eraiaassroom2006between5:00-6:30.
Refreshments will beservedeach night,
for further info, please call 758-8126.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA- The broth-
ers and pledges of Pi Kappa Alpha
thark you for helping us with rush
and a wonderful wedding and di-
vorce. Love, PUCE!
ALPHA XI DELTA- strap on those
fishnets ladiesand we'll meet you with
Zodiac medallions a gleamin. Pike
PI KAPPA ALPHA would proudly
like to announce the Tau pledge class:
Greg Longworth, Chris Cromwell,
KaleOlson, Matt Francis, PhillipGrose,
Carson Barham, Jym Baker, and Bill
Klein, congratulations gentlemen!
SIGMA BASKETBALL congratula-
tionsonyourwinMon. Good jobgirls!
PIKA, we enjoyed Fri. night. It was a
blast. Thanks again. Love, Sigma
DELTA ZETA congratulates their
new officers: Pres. Kim Dyson, VP-
membership Lori Martin, VP- new
member educ. Brooke Batchelor,
Treas. Christi Radull, Ass. Treas.
Cheryl Byers, Record. Sec. Andrea
Parham, Corr. Sec. Katie Hassett,
House Manager Christine Taylor,
Chaplain Beth Benton, Academics
Jennifer Eddleman, Programming
Board Dir. Katherine Bailey, Sor.
Educ. Leigh Whitehurst, Social
Colette Lombardo, Philanthropy
Dana Creech, Historian Delores
Wood, Ways & Means Rebecca
Holloman, Activities Amanda Will-
iams, Choices Sara Leggett, Guard I
Tina Hoke, Guard II Holly Walter,
Risk Management Tina Hoke,
Panhellenic Delegate Randi Jordan,
Panhellenic Alt. Julie Cooper,
Colonade Laura Tillet, Alumni
Cheryl Byers, Songleadef Katie
Hassett, Personals Janice Santucci,
Parliamentarian Jennifer Seaford,
Greek council Candee Blanton, Niki
Schrippa, Lamp Ed. Sara Legged,
ECU Pacesetters Caryn Moser,
Intramurals Tricia Chappell, Cour-
tesy Tricia Chappell, Province Day
Dir.DeniseBaldree,StandardsAnna
Porter.
DELTA ZETA keep up the good
work in basketball!
SPRING BREAK
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA
�Shell Island Party Cruise
650' Gulf Beach Frontage
2 Outdoor Swimming Pools
1 Indoor Healed Pool
Restaurant. 2 & 3 Room Suites
SANDPIPER-BEACON
17403 Front Beach Road
Panama Dry Beach, f I 32413
RESERVATIONS
1-800-488-8828
�Beach Bonfire Parties
Tiki Beach BarVolleyball
Sailboats, letskis & Parasaiis
'Karaoke Beach Party
Area Discount Coupons
FROM $104 PER WEEK
�ER PERSON
A PERSON OCCUPANCY
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special Olym-
pics is recruiting for volunteer coaches
in the following sports: basketball, soft-
ball, volleyball, track and field, bowl-
ing, gymnafMcs, swimming and
rollerskating. No experience is neces-
sary�Just a willingness to work with
children and adults with mental retar-
dation. Special training sessions for
coaches will be held. The last day to
volunteer for these spring sports is
Jan. 31. Volunteer hours may be used
as part of practicum requirements for
several ECU courses. For more infor-
mation, contact Connie Sappenfield
or Mark Mallette at 830-4541 or 830-
4551.
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS PEP.
is now making preparation for the
upcoming adult soccer program. The
organizational meeting will be held
on Thur. Feb. 17,7:30 pm at Elm street
gym. The program is open to men and
women ages 16 and over, and will be
held at West Meadowbrook Park.
Games and practices will be held on
Sundays from 1:00-4:00pm beginning
in March. All coaches, managers or
individuals wishing to participate on
a team should attend the organiza-
tional meeting. A small registration
fee will be charged. For more info call
Ben James or Michael Daly at 830-4550
or 830-4567.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MINISTRIES
will be holding elections for the 1994
spring and fall semesters. This will
take place on Sun. Feb. 6th at 6:00pm
at the Lutheran Student Center be-
hind Our Redeemer Lutheran Church.
Any new members are welcome. For
more info, or rides please contact Skip
Lilly at 931-8999, or LSM Campus
Center at 756-4852, leave message.
ECU POETRY FORUM
will meet on Thurs Feb. 3rd in
Mendenhall Student Center, room 248
at 8pm. Open to the general public,
the forum is a free workshop. Those
planning to attend and wanting criti-
cal feedback on their work should
bring 8 or 10 copies of each poem.
Listeners welcome.
ATTENTION ECONOMICS
STUDENTS!
The ECU Economics Society will hold
elections on Tues. Feb. 8th at 7pm in
Brewster C wing room 305. any per-
sons interested in running for an office
must attend, In addition planning for
upcoming events will be discussed.
For questions, please call the ECON
Dept. 757-6006
THE CAREGIVER SUPPORT
GROUP
A support group for persons respon-
sible for the care of an older or dis-
abled adult will meet at St. James
United Methodist Church, 2000 East
6th street, Greenville, at 7:30pm on
Tues, Feb. 8, 1994. For more info,
please call Freda Wilkins at 758-5932
or Susan Redding at 758-4622.
MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE
Nawlins comes to ECU Mardi Gras
'94- ECU style is coming to campus
Feb. 11 from 9:00pm -2:00am at
Mendenhall Student Center. The sec-
ond annual event will be highlighted
by the "Lady Luck" parade beginning
at Tyler Residence Hall. All faculty,
staff, and students are welcome to en-
joy Jazz music, free bowling, billiards
and table tennis, video Karaoke, the
Bourbon Street Bingo parlor and gam-
ing establishment, the virtual reality
Alpha experience, a free cajun buffet,
and a bite from the authentic King
Cake. Valid ECU IDs are required for
admission. To enter the best carnival
mask contest or Lady Luck parade,
contact the Mard. Gras float commit-
tee at 757-4796.
CRIMINAL IUSTICESOCIAL
WORK ALLIANCE
attention members! Our next meeting
will be held on Feb. 7,1994 in Rawl 130
at 11:30am. We will be discussing
volunteer work, our next social, T-
shirts and whatever else comes up.
Members are encouraged to bring
someone new. All will be welcomed.
Don't forget to bring your spring se-
mester dues See ya there!
ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB
will hold a meeting on Thur. Feb. 3 at
5:00 in GCB 3009. All majors are wel-
come.
RELATIONSHIPS GROUP
for men and women who want to
understand the challenges and confu-
sions experienced in relationships
with others. This group begins Feb. 9.
Register early- limited enrollment call
757-6661.
TALENT SHOW
Zeta Phi Beta sorority and Phi Beta
Sigma fraternity will be co-sponsor-
inga talent show on Tues. Feb. 8,1994;
at the Hendrix Theatre Mendenhall
StudentCenter,7pm. Admission is $2
for students wID. and S3 for non-
students. Anyone interested in par-
ticipating, please call Holland at 931-
9690 or Dealton at 355-8796.
ECU NATIVE AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION
the next meeting of the ECNAO will
be held at the house of Belinda Jacobs
at 7pm on Mon. Feb. 7. If you need
directions please call Belinda at 830-
6966. All members encouraged to
attend!
THE EASTERN CAROLINA
CHAPTER OF THE INSTITUTE
OF MANAGEMENT
ACCOUNTANTS
invites students to the chapter's Feb.
16th meeting which is student night.
The meeting will be held at the Three
Steers Restaurant on Memorial Drive
and begins at 6:30 pm. For more info,
call our student director Joe Kraus
(756-9064).
ECU MEN'S LACROSSE CLUB
is now practicing from 3:30-5:30 Mon.
through Thur. near Minges Coli-
seum. For more info, call Ward Tay-
lor at 830-3735. All students wel-
comed.
ATTENTION MUSICIANS
Introducing a great way to get free
publicity. The Treasure Chest ECU's
Video Yearbook. The yearbook staff
is now screeningyouroriginal works
for the 93-94 Treasure Chest. I f se-
lected vour music will be used in this
year tape and your name will be in
thecredits. Bring your Cassette. Reel,
or CD by the Communication Dept.
124 Ragsdale or call 757-6501 for
information. Hurry, last day for en-
try is February 18,1994.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be
paid
pre-
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public tvvo
times freeof charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursdav's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may
be cancelled before 10 a.m. the
day prior to publication
however, no refunds will be
given.
For more
information
call 757-6366.





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PIRATE
Adventures of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
last EFisove: kemPlE B?y uPph
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The Snoring Planet
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ALAS, ARIEL WAS NoT YANKED DOWN INTo
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Anyway, if you faithful readers out there like or don't like what you see
on your trusty old Pirate Comics page, drop us a line at The East
Carolinian, Publications BIdg ECU, Greenville, 27858-4353. And if your
letters are well-written, concise, and just, well, there, well print em.
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The East Carolinian
February 3, 1994
Lifestyle
Page 7
New Ice Draft
introduced
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
The American Marketing
Association on campus held a
meeting on Jan. 27 with two guest
speakers, Leigh Jeffreys, of
Jeffrey's Beer and Wine, and
Steve Whalen, district sales man-
ager for Busch, to introduce a
new beer product. They dis-
cussed the new product, called
Ice Draft, which was introduced
into bars before being launched
into stores.
This "new taste in beer" is
now available in North Carolina
with the first shipments of Ice
Draft from Budweiser which just
arrived on Jan. 31.
In Budweiser's ice brewing
method, beer flows through a
special ice chamber, where ice
crystals are formed. Then the beer
rests in ultra cold storage�at 28
C�for several days prior to be-
ing cold filtered and packaged.
This process results in a rich,
smooth taste that brewmasters
describe as "remarkably easy to
drink
"Ice Draft's exclusive pro-
cess combines our classic brew-
ing methods with the newest
technology in the brewing in-
dustry said August A. Busch
IV, vice president of Budweiser
Brands. "It is the future of cold
filtered draft beers
Ice Draft from Budweiser, the
first American draft beer to be ice
brewed, was introduced in the
western United States in October
of 1993. National distribution
should be complete in the first
quarter of this year. "Ice Draft
from Budweiser is an excellent
addition to the premium family
of beers brewed by Anheuser-
Busch said Leigh Jeffreys. "This
brand offers a new experience
with a unique taste
The new beer's unique pack-
aging has painted labels, clear,
longneck bottles and was intro-
duced in restaurants and bars on
Oct. 4, in 13 western states�
California, Alaska, Arizona, Colo-
rado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana,
New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon,
Utah, Washington and Wyo-
ming. Ice Draft proved to be suc-
cessful, and now Ice Draft is ready
for national distribution.
Ice Draft from Budweiser will
be available locally in bars, restau-
rants, convenience and grocery
stores on Jan. 31. Ice Draft will be
sold in a number of packages, in-
cluding clear bottles and fluted
cans, featuring distinctive graph-
ics and labeling.
Cry of Love impresses eager Attic crowd
By Cindy Hawkins
Staff Writer
Jason Patterson, drummer for
the band Cry of Love, has stated
thatWe're interested in the
groove and the vibe. This isn't
the kind of thing where you
should be flinging your guitar
around your neck or doing back-
flips on stage or throwing drum
sticks twenty feet into the air and
catch them with your ass To be
sure, Cry of Love's Jan. 29 show
at the Attic featured none of that
frivolous activity.
This reporter walked into an
environment charged with rock
'n' roll and rebel yells, but upon
approaching the stage was sur-
prised to find that there was no
band playing. This was a clear
indication that these folks were
all too ready to rock out. They
were head-banging before the
show even started (Beavis and
Butthead would be proud).
When the band finally did
come on, they were received with
a massive, drunken holler that
sent up to the sky the fury that
rock 'n' roll is famous for. The
music was obviously rooted in
southern rock and was reminis-
cent of the Black Crowes at times.
The band even wore clothing that
stank of the 70s�tight, patterned
Gui to-shirts buttoned down to re-
veal a calculated amount of chest
hair.
But to say the least, this
band was tight. There was
enough chemistry between
the members to light the
whole place up. Their songs
are volatile, churning into the
depths of southern experi-
ence. All four members of the
band are from North Caro-
lina which, explains the affin-
ity in their music towards
their heritage. Cry of Love put
on a gracious show, giving
back to the crowd enthusiasm
and energy. The crowd loved
them and the house was
packed.
The band is getting ready
to go on the road with
Aerosmith, so there's a good
chance you'll be seeing them
again and rightly so. They're
talented young gentlemen
and by the looks of the show,
they just might be able to
hang with a truly classic
band and hit the big time.
Heaters bring new sound to Corrigans
Lead vocalist
Chuck Rhodes of
The Heaters is seen
playing one of the
great tunes
performed last
Saturday night at
Wrong Way
Corrigans.
Photo by
Stephanie Tullo
By Stephanie Tullo
Lifestyle Editor
Music that makes you get up,
dance, clap and holler is definitely
entertainment. The Heaters enter-
tained last Saturday night at
Wrong Way Corrigans. They
heated the steamy atmosphere,
filling the air with a blues that was
well worth remembering.
Each of their sets was as ener-
getic as the last. The band has five
members: Chuck Rhodes, lead vo-
calsguitar; Lynn Green, B3pi-
ano; Dave Kniphfer, drums; Greg
Mitchell, harmonicavocals; and
Thomas (Tip) Iuliucci, bass. Lynn
Green is relatively new to the band.
He played with Rhodes in 1986
and 1987 and returned later to front
The Heaters.
Mitchell, who can play the heck
out of a harmonica, is the newest
member of the band. He was in a
band called Red Mountain T, a
local Fayetteville band. In an in-
Attenborough misses
with Shadowlands
terview, Tip Iuliucci said they
had known Greg for years and
that he started sitting down with
them and eventually joined in
At Saturday's show they
played songs both from their 90
MPH album as well as songs
from their new album, which is
tenatively called Ruff Stuff.
"We spent 12 months
working on this album to get
the sound we wanted said Tip
Iuliucci. At the heart of the band
is lead vocalist Chuck Rhodes.
"He is a natural songwriter. He's
the creative end. He writes
about things that happen to
him said Iuliucci.
Their sound has changed
from their 90JAPH album, with
the addition of Green on key-
boards, and Mitchell on har-
monica. Joe Boylandmanager
of Lynyrd Skynyrd, is part of
The Heaters' "team Boyland
See HEATERS page 9
By Ike Shibley
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
Don't Buy mmToke Your Chances $Worth A Try )Definite Purchase
Staff Writer
The latest film of the recent Brit-
ish invasion, which includes The Re-
mains cf the Day, Much Ado About
Nothing and Howard's End, is
Shadowlands, starring Anthony
Hopkins and Debra Winger.
Sliadowlands deals with a year of
immense change in the life of writer
C.S. Lewis (Hopkins), whose Chris-
tianphilosophieswereacentral theme
in much of his work, including The
Screwtape Letters, a fictional collection
of letters from an elder devil to one of
his juniors describing the fine art of
temptation. Lewis also authored Ihe
popularNarniachronicles, the known
of which is 77k Lion, The Witch and the
Wardmbe.
In 1952, a 54-year old Lewis met
an English woman, named Joy
Gresham (Winger), who knew him
through his books. Joy, on a trip to
England, asks tc visit with Lewis,
calledJackbyhisfriends.Lewisagrees,
andalife-changmgfriendshipbegins
in a quaint hotel lounge.
Becuase Joy desires to become
an English atizen, she divorces her
husband and marries Lewis. Lewis
describes the union as being mar-
riage in the technical sense, sincehe
neither lives with Joy nor loves her.
Joy develops cancer which
forces Lewis to reconsider his feel-
ings for her. Whether the cancer is
fortunate or unfortunate will de-
pend on each viewer's interpreta-
tion of the story. Since cancer pro-
vided the impetus for great joy,
Lewis, as depicted in Sliadowlands,
may have actually viewed the dis-
ease withsomeamount of ambiva-
lence.
Joy describes the pain of sepa-
ration looming in the near future
by saying, "The pain then is part of
the happiness now Lewis seems
to welcome the forthcoming suf-
fering.
Many may view Shadowlands
as a simple love story, but much
more seems to happen within the
soulofLewis'soul. Hisideas prove
extremely interesting, and his reac-
tions in the film lead to speculation
about his motive for falling in love
with Joy Gresham. Lewis seems to
fall in love with Joy because of the
See MOVIE page 9
Chainsaw Kittens
Pop Heiress
My review copy of the
Chainsaw Kittens' Pop Heiress has a
plain white cover with the song titles
typed on it. Perfect. A generic cover
for a generic album. Having enjoyed
the Chainsaw Kittens live a couple of
years ago, I was a bit surprised. Their
energeticgarage-band guitarpop was
impressive, and it earned them spots
opening for both Smashing Pump-
kins and Public Image Limited. Ap-
parently, they're much better live.
Pop Heiress is a collection of
music thaf s not so much lousy as it is
forgettable. If sfheirthirdalbum, and
it was intended, according to singer
Tyson Meade, to be their best work to
date. While their devotion to heavy
pop is clear, I sincerely hope they can
do better than this. Nothing on side
one of Pop Heiress stands out, despite
some really promising song tides. So,
alas, "Pop Heiress Dies" and "Lone-
liest China Place" languish in guitar-
pop mediocrity.
Side two is a bit better. The first
track, "I Ride Free reminds me of
Steppenwolf somehow. The guitar
finally grabbed my ear on this one,
breaking the monotonous drone
Chainsaw Kittens had worked them-
selves into. Another standout is "Me-
dia Star Hymn which has some
more interesting guitar work and a
chorus that goes, "A new world or-
der with no order While that's not
as catchy as it could be, I get the same
feelingallthe time watching thenews.
Anothertrack, "SoldieronMyShoul-
der sticks in my mind mainly be-
cause it's acoustic, and therefore dif-
ferent. And difference is a scarce com-
modity here.
Pop Heiress is boring. I've heard
these riffs before, and the lyrics aren't
quite strong enough�or the band
quite energeticenough�tocoverfhat
up. The Chainsaw Kittens are some
talented guys, and I'd recommend
seeing them live. But give Pop Heiress
amiss. �Mark Brett
The Nudes
The Piudes
m m m
Ah, subtle meanderings of the
impotent mind. Goaway lest I fondle
thee. How else toexpress theidiosyn-
craticafterglowpermeatingmysmall
two-room plywood and tarpaper
haciendaafterlisteningtoTheNudes?
It's like eating a York Peppermint
Patty while leaning on a glass in-
clinedplane and looking at the lights
of the Aurora Borealis. Are you with
me?
The self-titled debut album from
The Nudes is, quite simply, a beauti-
ful thing. This eclectic duo is com-
prised of Walter Parks, vocalist
guitaristsongwriter and Stephanie
Winters,cellistvocalLst.That'sright.
That's it. These songs all sound like
they're dying for power chords and
stuff but POW! They deliver as is, rife
with happenin' cello riffs and acous-
tic harrtmertrummin' and harmo-
nies that reach out like the inner jaws
of the Alien and just grab you, man, I
mean grab you!
Butyouknowwhafsreallycool?
Youcan listen to them liveatPeasant's
Cafe! If you want to skip the review
portion and just hear about the con-
cert, skip to the last paragraph. But
you'll miss some cool metaphors!
One of the highlights for me is
'Tango in Love a powerful little
number that kicks like a mule at a
hoedown. What's itabout? Whatelse
butthatlovethang: "Nolwon'thang
my head over you1 hear what you
say, I see what you do You'll be
counting the days till I'm through
As I tango in love, love over you
See NUDES page 8
NOTICE:
The date for the
Louisville
Orchestra has beetr
changed to Sat.
Feb. 5th.
Band Every thing has it all
By Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
The band Everything en-
tertained an ecstatic crowd on
Friday night by playing every
type of music imaginable in one
show. This band is from the
Washington, D. C. area and has
become popular among the col-
lege crowd up and down the
East Coast. Their lead singer,
Craig (first name only), said,
"We try to do a complete circle
of music at every show Just
listen tc all the different in-
struments that they play: Steve
(again first name only) plays
lead guitar, alto sax and clari-
net; Rich Dudley plays tenor
sax and guitar; and Mark
Rynharolt plays keyboards,
trombone and trumpet�and
these are j ust some of the mem-
bers of the band.
The Attic had a big concert
See EVERYTHING page 8
(
I





8 The East Carolinian
EVERYTHING
February 3, 1994
Continued from page 7
feel to it on Fridav night with
main people wearing Everything
t-hirt and most people down in
front it the stage 1 he band plays
men energ
roove miMi
is easy to dance oi toslamto. The
lead singer, Craig, even had the
crowd singing along to some oi
their songs, and this doesn't hap-
pen often at the ttit with out-of-
town bands. Craig and guitarist,
Steve, said, "we have had some
good times in Greenville espe-
Cont'd
from
page 7
ciallv Hallow eon last year when tentatively being called Labrador,
they played at the Attic The band they hope to travel o er to Europe
lust got back from Colorado to plav at some clubs and tour
where they "had an amazing re- some more of the I S
sponse Theband has also done some
rhe band is also coming out charil for an organization
with a new C D sometime in the called N( "M i �the National
spring. This will be their third, Organization for Reform oi Mari-
and they recorded it full-length juana Laws They did a big show
on a farm. Craig said, "there are at the Mall in D. C. for the organi-
good clean sounds doing it in our zation recenth and said they plan
farm instead of a studio We pro- on doing more events like this one
duceallof it With this new CD, in the future
NUDES
That "love over you" part is deliv-
ered with one i it those stat cato things
that bursts through the speakers like
a rabid howlermonkev trapped in an
elevator
Butmv favorite soi ig, I think! not
really cause 1 dig 'em all ). is Far and
the Few " Tin- song is ab( � about the
ol'lovegambit, and, (ui know, if vou
fhinkaboutit,aren'talmost all songs?
1 mean, they re either about love or
sex or partying or some store about a
cool dude but mostly love is every-
where. Even in Abba songs. Dig this
deep final verse from "Far and the
Few "So it I ever sav that Hove vou.
Yeah, a oullhavetobesurethatldo
'Cause I'll promise mestars up above
vou But I'll bring vou the far and the
tew "
Dig it, L)ot-da man.
THE NAVIGATOR
OFFICIAL PIRATE
BASEBALL TABLOIO
1994
Ad Deadline will be February 3rd.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Advertising Department
Office 919-757-6366
Fax 919-757-6558
Texas-2-StepThe Club
Adv Tickets $7 The World Famous
Door
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BOURBON STREET BINGO PARLOR � GAMING EST.
ALPHA EXPERIENCE (VIRTUAL REALITY)
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FREE CAJUN BUFFET
Friday, February II
9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
THE PARADE BEGINS AT 830 VM. AT TYLER RESIDENCE HALL.
FOR
-iVTS,
1 jt ��
Sponsored by the ECU Major Events Committee � NO ONE UNDER THE DWLUENCE WILL BE ADMITTED-
Admission by valid ECU ID � One guest per person.





MOVIE
Continued from page 7
cancel she develops.
rhroughout the film Lewis is
shown giving the same lecture on
suffering. 1 v describes suffering as
the meansof perfecting thesouL Like
the blows from a sculptor's hammer
and chisel the pain people experi-
ence serves to better define them. In
o, I ewis sees a ready means at in-
Bictmgsufferingurxmnirnsetfbyfall-
ingmkwewimsomeoneheknowshe
will kist
Shadowlands is directed by Rich-
ard Attenborough, whotriestobrmg
an artistic meaning to the story. 1 -ike
so many of his other biographical
works indudingQiflMdi, Cry I reedom
and Chaplin, Attenborough tells an
interesting story with almost no flair.
1 Gs films, quite bluntly, are dull.
In Shadowlands, Attenborough
begins by eloquently expressing on
film the sotemnness of the world in
which Lewis lives. A church choir
sings beautifully as tire camera lo -
inglyshowsOxtotdandtheintenorot
thechurch Facesol reverenthhappy
choir members slowly pass across the
screen. The mood tor the film gets set
by this opening sequence.
Unfortunately, Attenborough
feels the need h rem ind the audience
ofthisquietaweLewisexperiencesby
continually showing somber choir
members and regal processions
throughout the film, making the film
much longer and much duller than
necessary.
Attenbi m nigh began working in
tire world of cinema as an actor and is
perhaps best known as an actor espe-
ciaUvafterhLsimpressiveperformance
this summer as John Hammond, the
curator oi Jurassic Park. If he contin-
ues directing, he will probably con-
tinue to produce biographies, many
with a social conscience that interest,
but rarely move, the viewer.
The few scene's in Shadowlands
that do produce touching moments
result from the inherent sentimental-
ity involved in dying and from re-
markable actingbv Anthony Hopkins.
As he did in The Remains of the Day, he
evokes tears with a pained expression
better than most actors can do with
sobbing cries of anguish.
Debra Winger seems to want to
fashion a career out of cancer patient
roles. Shedoes manage to realistkallv
portrav the pain that cancer causes,
but she spends the earlier part of the
film practicing her Brookhn accent,
which comes and goes at will as she
alternates between battered wife and
spunky imp. Joy Gresham never gets
defined as a person. The only reason
evident for Lewis' love for her is the
fact that she develops cancer.
Though S'aadcrwland tells a fine
story and will evoke more than a few
tears from the audience, the film may
never pass as a work of art.
On a scale of one to 10,
Sfiadou'laiids rates a six.
February 3, 1994
HEATERS
The East Carolinian 9
Cont'd
from
page 7
has been working with Doyle
Wood, producer for this album.
The band is working to go interna-
tional. Mitchell said. "1 hope we
get to Europe
This band has the confidence
and musical talent to make it inter-
nationally�their sound is unique
and sensational.
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The East Carolinian
Page 10
What's On Tap?
Thursday, Feb. 3
W. Basketball, home
vs. UNC Wilmington, 7:00 p.m
Rec. Services
Weight Training Workshop,
8-10 p.m Christenbury Weighl
Room.
Saturday, Feb. 5
M. Basketball, away
at George Mason. Fairfax, Va
7:30 p.m.
W. Indoor Track, away
at Virginia Tech Women's
Relays, Blacksburg, Va.
Baseball, away
at Florida (DH), Gainesville, Fla
1 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 6
M. Indoor Track, away
at Mobile 1 Invit GMU,
Fairfax, Va.
Baseball, away
at Florida, Gainesville, Fla
1:30 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 7
M. Basketball, away
at American, Washington,
D.C7p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 3
Rec. Services
BB Shooting Triathalon,
Christenbury Gym, 8:30 p.m.
Men's CAA Leaders
STANDINGS
Team Conference GBOverall
JMU 6-1 .85712-5 .706
UNCW 5-2 714 111-6 .647
ODU 4-2 .667 1.512-6 .667
ECU 3-4 .429 311-7 .611
GMU 3-4 429 38-11 .421
UR 3-4 429 37-11 389
AU 2-5 286 45-14 .263
W&M 1-5 .167 52-15 118
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Kent Culuko. JMU19.8
Tim Fudd. AU19.6
Donald Ross. GMU19.1
Odell Hodge. ODU18.1
Petey Sessoms, UR17.7
Rebounding Avg
David Cully, W&M94
Odell Hodge, ODU8.3
Shenf El-Sanadily. UNCW 8.3
Clayton Ritter. JMU7.7
Michael Sharp. GMU7.7
Assist Avg
Troy Manns. GMU67
Kevin Swann, ODU5.1
Kevin Larkin, ODU4.7
Drew Phillips. UNCW4.2
Curtis McCants. GMU4.2
Field Goal
Clayton Ritter. JMU612
Carl Parker, W&M.563
Anton Gill, ECU.541
Kass Weaver, UR.524
Odell Hodge. ODU.519
Free Throw
Kent Culuko, JMU.923
Lester Lyons, ECU.846
Christian Ast, AU.830
Kevin Swann, ODU.828
Petey Sessoms. ODU.808
3-pt Field Goal
Kent Culuko, JMU.507
Darren Mcbnton, JMU.467
Gerald Jarmon, UR.424
Corey Stewart, UNCW.421
Petey Sessoms. ODU.419
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
Old Dominion8.2
James Madison5.2
East Carolina4.8
UNC Wilmington1.6
Richmond-03
George Mason-3.7
American-8.5
William & Mary-8.8
Rebounding Margin
UNC Wilmington52
East Carolina2.8
Old Dominion1.9
George Mason1.3
Richmond1.1
James Madison-1.1
American-2.4
William & Mary-5.3
Field Goal
James Madison499
UNC Wilmington45.7
Old Dominion44.7
Richmond43.9
East Carolina43.5
William & Mary429
George Mason42.8
American42.3
Def. Field Goal
UNC Wilmington42.8
Old Dominion43.1
East Carolina43.8
James Madison44.7
Richmond46.4
George Mason466
William & Mary46.7
American496
Compiled by Brad Oldham
Sports
February 3, 1994
Pirates hope to improve on road
Photo by Harold Wise
Freshman Skipp Schaefbauer, seen here earlier this year, has been a big contributor for the Pirates coming
off the bench this year. The Pirates need to take home enthusiasim on the road for the next two games.
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
After a Wednesday night
warm-up against Furman inGreen-
ville, S.C the ECU men's basket-
ball team will have to step up their
intensity of gameplay,because they
will be playing over halt of their
remaining games awav from the
friendly confines of Minges Coli-
seum.
Playing at home, Eddie Payne's
squad has earned themselves an 8-
1 record, but they are only 4-6 on
the road, including conference
losses toOld Dominion, Richmond
arid William & Mary. ECU gave the
Tribe their first and only confer-
ence win to date when they dropped
an 86-82 matchup on Jan. 19.
"We need to take the emotion
we had here at Minges and take it
on the road with us center Anton
Gill said. "We need to take this
emotion and pump us up on the
road like we do here at home, to get
tighter as a unit and pick up our
intensity because we won't have
the home crowd
East Carolina travels to
Fairfax, Va. on Saturday to take
on the high-octane offense of the
George Mason Patriots. Tlie Pi-
rates managed to slow down the
Mason onslaught enough to take
an 86-72 victory in Minges earl ier
this season, but when they play
on the road, anything could hap-
pen.
George Mason has lost seven
of their last 10 games, but could
break their slump during any
game. Playing at home in front of
an average of 3,244 friend ly Patri-
ots fans should help them on Sat-
urday night, and a win against
ECU would bring Westhead's
conference record to 4-4, possibly
putting them third in the CAA.
After the GMU game, Payne
will lead his squad to the nation's
capital for a Monday night
matchup against American Uni-
versity. The Eagles lost to ECU in
Minges Coliseum 77-65 on Jan.
8th, and will be looking to avenge
the defeat.
See SEASON page 12
ECU club
competes in
Azalea open
(RS) � On Saturday, January
22,1994, the ECU Gojo-Shorin Mar-
tial Arts Club went to Wilmington,
NC to compete at the 4th Annual
Azalea Open National Karate
Championships.
The club did very well at the
event, coming away with 13 tro-
phies
The results of the competition
were: Kim Brinson- 1st place spar-
ring and 2nd place in forms; Chris
Richards- 3rd place Black BeltOpen
Forms; Denisede la Sierra- 3rd place
Women's Black Belt forms; Heather
Bradley-4th place in forms; Michael
Schertzinger- 5th place sparring;
Michelle Trant-2nd place sparring;
Paul Rogers- 2nd place sparring;
Ryan Barclay- 2nd place sparring,
and Keesha Kerns- 3rd place forms.
The ECU Gojo-Shorin Martial
Arts club is a division of the Recre-
ational Services Club Sports pro-
gram. For more information on this
club or any other clubs around call
Recreational Services at 757-6387,
or stop by 204 Christenbury Gym-
nasium.
Jones faces
challenge of
free agency
(AP) � How far can the Dal-
las Cowboys carry this champi-
onship thing? As far as loyalty
and free agency will allow.
The Cowboys, as presently
constituted, will be heavy favor-
ites to become the first team to
win three straight Super Bowls.
Not only are they supremely tal-
ented and superbly coached, but
the Cowboys are a young team.
Except for Jim Jeffcoat, Mark
Tuinei, Bill Bates, Elvis Patterson
and Eddie Murray, they have no
one with as much as 10 years
experience. Only tackle Tuinei
and placekicker Murray are
fulltimers.
But the makeup of the new
NFL already is causing rum-
blings. Most of the blockers are
free agents, as is middle line-
backer Ken Norton. If the rest of
the league, particularly the Buf-
falo Bills, can't stop the Cow-
boys, maybe lucrative contract
offers from the competition can.
"I know that we did some-
thing that very few teams have
done, and that's win back-to-back
Super Bowls Troy Aikman said
after the 30-13 victory Sunday
over the unfortunate Bills, who
have lost the last four NFI. title
games. And if we're able to keep
all our guys in place and go into
See COWBOYS page 11
Hunter accomplishes goals at ECU
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
Wilbert Hunter had many
goals when he transfered here to
East Carolina. One of those goals
was to work hard and find a spot in
the starting line-up. That goal is
completed.
Prior to this 1993-94 season
there were many
doubts that
Hunter would
have a chance to
start, and it ap-
peared he would
be coming off the
bench.
He was ex-
pected to be
shoved over by
C h uc kit
Robinson and
Curley Young,
but Hunter has
been such a physi-
cal force thathead
coach Eddie
Payne was forced
to put him in as a
starter.
"I started the first half of last
season so 1 knew I could be a starter
Hunter said. "It basically took a lot
of hard practice and playing up to
my capabilities and I got the start-
ing position back
He certainly has. He is tied for
second on the team with a 5.0 re-
bounding average against CiA
opponents and is averaging 6.3
points a game in the CAA.
Hehasstartedallbutonegame
this season and Young has started
in all games at the second forward
spot. Robinson has yet to get a start
for the Pirates.
Wilbert played his first season
at ECU last year after transferring
from Chowan College and had a
seesaw season. He started the first
13 games for the Pirates last season
and then ended
up seeing playing
time from the
bench.
"That hap-
pens to junior col-
lege players.
Thevhaveadjust-
ment periods just
like freshman
players do
Coach Payne
said. "We made a
conservative ef-
fort to stick with
him during those
times when he
wasn'tplayingas
well as we
thought he could
andashethought
he could
Hunter averaged six points a
game last year and collected three
rebounds per game. Hunter broke
loose against Tennessee lech last
season and collected a personal ca-
reer high 22 points.
"1 want to exceed my expecta-
tions from last year Hunter said,
"My transition was a little harder
than I thought it was going to be. I
Wilbert Hunter
finally started coming around and
getting used to the system here
Playing the University of North
Carolina last season in the NCAA
tournament was really a taste of
reality for himself. He grew up in
Raleigh, N.Casa Tar Heel fan and
found himself on the court last sea-
son playing against his favorite
team.
Before he even came to ECU,
he already had some playing ex-
perience with his teammates. He
played against Anton Gill in high
school and hooked up with Lester
Lyons on the same All-Star team.
One of his biggest thrills
was not just playing with his
See HUNTER page 12
Redskins look to Dallas's Turner for solutions
(AP) � The Washington
Redskins are looking to Dallas offen-
sive coordinator Norv Turner to be
another JoeGibbs and turn their for-
tunes around.
Tvyo years after winning the
Super Bowl, Washing n plummeted
to a 4-12 record this past season
The Redskins scheduled a news
conference today to formally an-
nounce a successor to fired coach
Richie Petitbon after Turner met for
more than five hours Tuesday with
team owner Jack Kent Cooke and
general manager Charley Casserly.
"We'll see you all tomorrow
Turner said cheerfully, departing in
a car with Casserlv Tuesday night
from the Redskins' headquarters
here, 35 miles west of the nation's
capital
Turner and C( xike shcx)k hands
on a multi-year contract, The Wash-
ffigtowRBttreportedquotrngsources.
The length of the contract and salary
were not mentioned, although three
vearsisnoimal for NFL head coaches.
Petitbon, the Redskins' defen-
sive coordinator for 14 years before
succeeding Gibbs last March, had a
two-year contract with an annual
salary of $450,000.
Upon firing him Jan. 4 at the
conclusion of the Redskins' worst
season in three decades, Ccxike said
he would honor the terms of that
contract, which calls for Petitbon to
be paid a second year if he dix-sn't
take a job elsewhere.
Qxike and Casserlv were both
mum when questioned after their
meetings with Turner, as were other
Redskins officials. But both were all
smiles leaving their offices Tuesday
after NFL commissioner Paul
Tagliabue'sinterventionamonthago
prevented them from finalizing the
deal then
Less than 36 hours after Turner
helped take the Cowboys to their
second straightSuperBowl titlewith
a 30-13 win Sunday night over the
BuffaloBills.hewasonaplaneheaded
here.
"I guess it might be I m ready
to go Turner said before his depar-
ture from Dallas when he was asked
ifbecoming Washington's new coach
wasadonedeaL
The Redskins' hiring of Turner
was all but completed four weeks
ago whenTagliabue inv oked a league
rule that forbids the interviewing of
coaching candidates until their last
game has been played. No other
names were even floated.
. Cowboys owner Jerry fortes
had earlier given the Redskins for-
mal permission to talk with and
hireTurnerd uring Dallas' bye wet -k
between the end of the regularsea-
son and their first postseason game
as long as it didn't interfere with his
team's playoff preparations.
"Norv had a window of about
two or three days and they had
abouta day and a half of communi-
cations before tlie league called
Jones said last week. "There's a
$500,000 fine, so it's not in the best
interest of either side to talk about
it
The PhoenixCardinalsalsohad
expressed an interest in Turner af-
ter firing Jtx1 Bugel last week, but
Jones said they never made the re-
quired formal request to interview
him.
ECU football receives more oral commitments
Staff reports
The East Carolinian
ECU football recruits are add-
ing up.
The Bucs got three more oral
commitments from outofstateplay-
ers. DairyleJones ol Rockledge, Fl.
gave another oral running ba k
commitment. Jones, 5-11, 197
pounds vs ill be competing with two
other freshmen backs. Thev will be
battling for back-up time behind
senior Junior Smith.
The other two oral commit-
ments were from transfers.
lerrnaine Smith, 6- 3, 230 pounds is
a linebacker from Northeastern
Oklahoma A&M.
Darnell Gilliard is 6-7, 290
pounds and will be looking for a
spot on the defensive line. Gilliard
is from Butler County Community
College in Kansas.
The other two running back
oral commitments are Scott 1 larley

of Neptune, N.J and Rip Kendrick
of Athens, C.a. Harlev set All-Shore
Conference records for toal yards
in a season and total yards in a
single game.
Jones chose ECU over Louis-
ville and Georgia.
1 oyd chose ECU over
Mississsippi State, Mississippi
Maryland and Clemson.





February 3. 1994
The Hast Carolinian 11
COWBOYS
Continued from page 10
next year with the players we
have not � so at least there's
some continuity and there's some
guvs who have learned � then I
think we've a chance to do some
special things in Dallas.
"But it's hard to say with free
agencv and who is going to take
oft tor the monev and they
should. You know, there are a lot
of guys who deserved to be paid
and, hopefully, we'll be able to
keep them all. But it will be
tough
The Cowboys already went
through tough times in contract
dealings.
Emmitt Smith missed all of
training camp and the first two
games of the season in a pro-
tracted holdout. When he finally
signed, theCowboysbegan play-
ing like champions. Smith was
the league MVP, then won most
valuable player honors in the Su-
per Bowl.
Aikman emptied the vaults,
too,includinganSl 1 millionsign-
ing bonus in December.
But how well can they oper-
ate behind a patchwork line,
which could be their lot if the
Cowboys can't sign Pro Bowl cen-
ter Mark Stepnoski, Pro Bowl
guard Nate Newton, plus John
Gesek and Kevin Cogan, who
started in the Super Bowl?
"Of course I want all those
guys back said Smith, who won
his third straight rushing crown
this season. "It's kind of prema-
ture to sav what kind of team
we're going to have next year,
considering that we have a num
her of tree agents, including the
offensive linemen who will be
testing the market
One man who almost cer-
tainly is gone is offensive coordi-
nator Norv Turner. He headed to
Washington today for what ap-
pears to be a go-through-the-
motions interview before he is
offered the Redskins' head coach-
ing position.
"We're still going to have ba-
sically the same players tight
end lav Novacek said, "but any-
time you miss a key person like
that, a person that ran the of-
fense, a person that made us do
what we did, you're going to miss
that. We wish him all the best of
luck.
"Unfortunately, the way it
sounds, he'll probably go to
Washington. We'd just as soon
have him someplace else "
America apparently would
prefer seeing the Bills anvwheie
but the next Super Bowl. I low-
ever, most of their key players
are signed and the Bills have dis-
played a level of perserverance
unmatched in professional
sports; they are the first team to
lose four straight championships
in any port
"Sometimesyou feel like you
aicheating your head against the
wall Steve Tasker said. "But as
, long as there's a chance for us to
come back, we are going to keep
fighting
Olson's Trivia Quiz
Q: Who was the highest drafted ECU baseball player?
tpmuputj .ni fiq iiu.uao puz� uxjvi sW2H 'll!WM V'd :V
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757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
Eight two-hour-sessions designed to prepare you
for the format and content of the
March 19,1994 GMAT Exam
GMAT
Review
Course
CftUfME .Nclii-diile:
TucMlay Ii:bru;iry S
ThursdayIchniary III
TuesdayFebruary 13
ThursdayI'thruar y 17
TuesdayFebruary 22
ThursdayFebruary 24
TuesdayMarch I
ThursdayMarch "S
Course lime:
o.Wp.m 8:30 p.m.
ONLY $150
I'nr l.arly Itigi Unit inn
llcfure January 25
$170 Hi��ginning January 26
Verbal and M.ilh Topics lo lie Reviewed!
!� Sentence Correction
!� Heading Comprehension
? Lnhcal Kcasonine.
? Problem Iving(Ariihmelic. Algebra, (ieomclryl
? Dala Sufficiency
Location:
General Classroom Dulldlng. Hoom l()2o
Instructors:
Dr. I'alrick Diiaro. Associate I'rofcssoi. Knglish
Dr. Mark A Coffin. Assistant I'rofcssor. Decision Sciences
Texts:
The Prim cum Review; Crmking the System: The GMAT
The Official Guide for GMAT Review
(Ci�kI of leKIt itttlixlcri in rrgislrilinii ftcl
I'rcsenti'fl ly
ECUStlimil nflusinesi � I'riifexsiiinal Prvgrtltto
I2IHI General Clnxriu�n (Untiling
(V19) 757 � 0.177
i w� htaf wmu . tmmttam �i" aha omu . mmh tWkt i oi.wMirr
5i
entry form for
Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
Name of BandContact Person:
Address:
Phone numbers:
TO AUDITION FOR THE BATTLE OF THE BANDS, PLEASE SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE CONTAINING THREE
SONGS AND THE ABOVE FORM TO STUDENT UNION OFFICE, ROOM 236, ON THE TOP FLOOR OF
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER OR MAIL TO:
-DEADLINE FOR DEMO TAPES IS MARCH 18, 1994.
-FIVE BANDS WILL BE CHOSEN TO
PERFORM AT BATTLE OF THE BANDS.
-PA WILL BE PROVIDED BY:
THE POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE.
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU I
GRAND PRIZE: OPENING BAND AT BAREFOOT ON THE MALL, APRIL 21, 1994
SECOND PRIZE:100.00 IN CASH (winners will be determined by judges).





12 The East Carolinian
February 3. 1994
Continued from page 10
HUNTER
new teammates, but against now last season was, you know how cations and hopes to find a career
pro Bobby Hurley when he at- bad I struggled, they were still in it after basketball,
tended a five-star summer bas- there supporting me Hunter Hunter would like to go into
ketball camp I lunter was only a said rhat showed me how much prodw Hon. le is possibly think
sophomore in high school then they really cared about what I ing of heading into commercials,
and really had no idea who was doing. My family made me "Can't tell what's going to
Hurley was. feel real good about everything happen .liter school Hunter
When things are no) always When this season is over, it said. I'll have to sit down at the
going so well for I lunter, he can will come time for I lunter to de- endoftheseasonandthinkabout
look to his famil) for support. cide on his future. mat
"What was real special about I le is majoring LnCommuni-
Continued from page 10
SEASON
American is in seventh place in sonflastWed guard Lester Lyons help mem because, by looking at
tlu' CAA, losers ol three straight said "WestUl played the way we the current records and possible
and tourot their last five games. A wanted to, and l think if we keep seedings tor the March 5-7 CAA
win could help them gain momen- playinglikethatweTlgetsomewins Championship Tournament, they
turn going into the final stretch ol on the road could easily faceGMU or AU again,
the regular season mthementalaspectofthegame, and a ECU regular-season sweep
"Coming ott from the last two aweekendsweepontheroadwouki could heavy the hearts ol Eagles'
homegamesweplayed,we'vebeen greatly help the Pirates, bringing and Patriots'players, making it dif-
playingthewaywehavewantedto back the confidence that they had ficult for mem to "get up" for those
eventhouehwelosttoJamesMadi- earlier in the season. It would also games.
The Washington Toyota
East Carolina
Cheerleading and Dance
Team
Championships
High School & Junior High
Saturday, February 5,1994
Start time is 10a.m. at Minges Coliseum
ECU Students admitted
for $1 wStudent I.D.
Hair is feeler
COMING SOON
FOR YOUR
CONVENIENCE WE
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ACCEPTING
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Prices Effective Through February 8, 1994
Prices In The Ad Effective Thursday, Februaiy 3 Through Tuesday, February 8, 1994. In Greenville Store Only
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps





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Title
The East Carolinian, February 3, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 03, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.988
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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