The East Carolinian, January 27, 1994






�aiilMHiiiini ' Hi
i�i"i� � -I .1 -
Comics
Pirate Comics, jerky
Kemple Boy in outer space,
Phoebe talks to plants,
robots in tuxedos in Nick
O'Time and much more.
All on page 11.
I
IJfestvk
Philadelphia
Golden Globe-winner Tom
Hanks and Denzel
Washington lead an
all-star cast in a four-star
movie about AIDS.
See page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 6
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, January 27,1994
16 Pages
Construction to affect area traffic
Red Cross
in need of
By Laura Allard
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Construction for the Recreation Center will require extensive ground work that
will detour drivers away from Cotanche Street beginning Feb. 7.
Staff Writer
Cotanche Street will be
closed on Feb. 7 from 10th
Street to Reade Circle, in order
to allow Kipco Contracting to
install water and sewer lines
for the new student Recreation
Center.
The placement of the wa-
ter line under Ninth Street and
the sewer line under Eighth
Street marks the beginning of
the f;rst phase of the 22 month
project. The 16,000 to 18,000
cars that cross Cotanche daily
will be rerouted one block to
Evans Street.
"The work will take about
two weeks, depending on the
weather said Kipco Contrac-
tor Craig Walton. This sched-
ule would have Cotanche Street
open again by Feb. 21.
"We just have to look at
the construction as growth and
opportunity. This may be a
time of frustration but the fin-
Wiretapping
scandal wraps
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
Remember the wiretapping
scandals several semesters ago?
Well, the story is not yet com-
plete. Former Director of Public
Safety James DePuy was accused
of "intentionally procuring an-
other person to use or endeavor to
use an elec- HMMM
tronic, me-
chanical or
other device
sued the following statement re-
garding the DePuy case Thurs-
day, Jan. 20:
"On the advice of the Uni-
versity Attorney and at the direc-
tion of the State Attorney
General's Office, I have authorized
a financialsettlementwithPatricia
Hair Bullock, a former employee
who had filed claims in the United
.States Dis-
to intercept
wire or oral
communica-
tions
Two
former em-
ployees of
ECU Public
Safety
brought civil
action
u The
settlement is
a reflection
of reality "
Herman Gaskins
Patricia Hair's Attorney
trict Court
for the East-
ern District
of North
Carolina al-
leging un-
authorized
intercep-
tions of tele-
phone con-
versations
by former
University
employees.
White Hi
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The ECU Department of
University Housing has made
another effort to upgrade on-cam-
pus housing. Beginning in the fall
of 1994, White Hall will become a
co-ed residence hall with single-
occupancy rooms.
"We are trying to create
more living options within our
system � including non-smok-
ing floors, quiet floors and honors
dormitories said Dr. Carla Jones,
director of resident education.
Many current White Hall
residents questioned why the larg-
est rooms on campus will be con-
verted to single rooms when
smaller rooms, such as those in
Gotten and Jarvis Halls, would be
more suitable for such an alter-
ation.
According to Jones, the de-
cision to convert White Hall was
based on the university's desire to
renovate a high-rise residence hall
on that particular end of campus.
Clement Hall was also under con-
sideration.
"I don't think the single
rooms will be worth the effort and
time that is being put into it said
ished product will be some-
thing to be proud of said Rec-
reational Services Director
Nancy Mize.
Loal traffic will be per-
mitted on Cotanche Street be-
tween Reade Circle and Sev-
enth Street, to allow access to
Ringgold Towers.
Ninth Street will be acces-
sible through Charles and
Lawrence Streets. The parking
lots behind Joyner Library will
remain open through the con-
struction process, although
part of Ninth Street will even-
tually be closed
Later in February, access
to Seventh Street may be re-
stricted for a few days, but
Walton said Ringgold Towers
will remain accessible.
"It's just going to make it
inconvenient for a couple of
weeks said Ringgold man-
ager Holly Simonowich. She
said students will probably
enter campus through the Fifth
Street entrance.
co-ed in fall
Sally Cave, a current White Hall
resident. "I don't think it would
change the crime rate, as far as
rape is concerned
The new rooms will be avail-
able only to upper-classpersons;
no first-year students will be al-
lowed to live in the renovated
residence halls. The rooms will
cost the standard rate for single
rooms, which is the regular rate
plus one-half of that rate.
"I like the idea and hope-
fully I will be able to live here next
year said Daveeta Nowlin, a
See WHITE page 3
donations
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
Give blood, please.
That has been the simple
motto of the American Red Cross
for years, but this time the orga-
nization is in dire need of blood.
Because the Mid-Atlantic Region
is facing its worst blood shortage
in seven years, emergency blood
drives have been scheduled for
ECU today and tomorrow.
"Whenyougiveblood,you
are saving four lives. You are
improving the quality of life
among the sick and injured in the
community Monroe said.
The Blood Mobile will be
set up in Mendenhall Student
Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
Thursday and Friday of this
week. All blood types are needed.
To give blood, you must be 17
years old or older, weigh at least
110 pounds and be in good heal th.
"If you're notsureyou meet
the requirements, come on out
and let the nurse there make that
determination said HelenMon-
roe, coordinator of the blood
drive.
Normally the Red Cross
needs about 2,000 units of blood
in reserve for the month. Cur-
rently, they have approximately
800 units and need to obtain 1,200
units by the end of the month�
Monday, Jan 31.
"We've been beating the
bushes, telling everyone about
our desperate shortage Mon-
roe said. "The fate of our blood
drive lies in the community
Greenville is a part of the
Mid-Atlantic Region that in-
cludes eastern North Carolina,
Old Austin cupola to be build by rec center and so on and so
By Tammy Zion
against DePuy, John Burrus and
Teddy Roberson Jr the univer-
sity officials who were accused of
facilitating the wiretapping. Spe-
cial Deputy to the Attorney Gen-
eral Tom Zeiko represented
DePuy in the matter.
Chancellor Richard Eakin is-
Under the terms of the settlement
agreement, the University will pay
a total of $16,747. This amount
resolves Ms Bullock's claims and
her attorney's claim for attorney's
fees.
See WIRE TAP page 4
Staff Writer
Many of today's students
and faculty recognize the tri-
column, or archway, as ECU's
symbol of excellence. Alumni
from years past and graduates
of the future will know a differ-
ent symbol.
A cupola that stood above
the old Austin building, ECU's
first instructional facility, will
begin reconstruction in 1995.
The cupola is a dome-shaped
object. The construction will be
twice the size of the former cu-
pola. Builders will use the origi-
nal plans, which have been pre-
served in Joyner library.
"The building came down
in the late '60s, but during the
time since then that replica has
returned on many things � on
covers of books and maga-
zines said Jim Lanier, vice
chancellor of academic affairs.
"The new cupola most as-
suredly will become a new sym-
bol for ECUit is already a sym-
bol that is well recognized by
people who were here many
years ago said ECU Chancel-
lor Richard Eakin.
The reconstruction will
cost an estimated $250,000,
made possible through the
Shared Visions fund raiser,
Lanier said. Brochures have
been printed, campaigns are
being launched and a video is
in production to let alumni in
on this once-in-a-lifetime
chance. With a $250 or more
donation, alumni may have a
brick in the cupola inscribed
with their name, the name of a
loved one or favorite faculty
membe Donations of $1,000 or
more will receive a different
type of brick.
"We are letting individu-
als put bricks into the bottom of
it because there are a lot of
people who remember the cu-
pola and would like to be a part
of it Lanier said.
The cupola's dimensions
will be 48 feet high and 20 feet
in diameter. The area will
have an amphitheater concept
with three or four steps lead-
ing to the center.
"If we wanted to have a
small band, entertainment or
somebody giving a speech in
there that could happen
Lanier said.
The construction site-
will be in a triangular area
from Mendenhall Student
Center and the new recreation
center behind Greene Resi-
dence Hall. Construction will
See CUPOLA page 3
People
on the
street
Here are four ECU stu-
dents' responses to one of
the several possible pricing
options that might just get a
parking deck built. ECU's
Parking Committee met last
Thursday to address the
parking situation on cam-
pus, although it did not
reach a solution.
Would you be willing to pay $230 for a parking decal if it
meant the construction of a parking deck?
Larry Marksberry
senior: "Yes, because it make:
more sense than paying $70 not
to park
Colette Sagar, junior: "Yes,
definitely. It would mean more
parking, because right now there
is hardly any
Marvina
junior: "No.
Hamilton,
Because fees and
tuition are already expensive, and
parking should be the school's
responsibility
Leondra Edwards, junior: "No, it
is too expensive. The school should
have decided to build more parking
instead of a Recreation Center
atmi





2 The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
Local lawyer announces candidacy
January 12
9:38 a.m.
An unknown person left a threatening note on a bulletin
board in Brewster C-105. The note read "I'm gonna get me a
gun and kill all the whites I see This quote is from SNL.
January 18
12:10 p.m.
An employee of the Brody School of Medicine reported
the unauthorized use of state property. On several occasions
an unknown person(s) entered the lab after hours and used or
tampered with lab equipment.
January 19
11:46 p.m.
Eight students were issued campus citations for disturb-
ing the peace. The students were having a loud party in Scott
Hall 410C.
January 21
11:45 a.m.
An unknown person mailed a student in Greene Hall an
unwanted love letter and cassette of love songs.
1:39 p.m.
A student reported the larceny of her rear wheel covers
from her vehicle. The vehicle was parked in the Freshmen
Parking Lot on 4th and Reade Streets. The estimated value of
the wheel covers is $100.
January 24
10:00 a.m.
An unknown subject smashed the front window and
stole the battery from The East Carolinian's van. The van �vas
parked in the Allied Health field.
2:24 a.m.
A non-student was arrested for driving while impaired,
driving while license revteked and speeding 60 mph in a 35-
mph zone. After a chase with campus police, the person was
charged with obstructing and delaying a police officer. He was
also found with a .357 Magnum under the driver's seat. He
was placed on $800 secured bond.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Richard Holt
Staff Writer
Walter Jones Jr a Goldsboro,
N.C businessman who served in
the N.C. state legislature for ten
years declared his candidacy for
Republican Congressional repre-
sentative of the Third District last
Wednesday.
In his recent announcement
speech Jones stressed the motiva-
tion for his candidacy. "I've lis-
tened to what people are saying
Jones said. "They are frustrated
and fed up, they are worried about
America.
"Over the past months the
people I have met and talked with
have encouraged me to consider
running for Congress Jones said.
"So, today lam officially announc-
ing that I will proudly stand as a
Republican candidate for the Third
Congressional District
Jones continued to empha-
size the selling points of his cam-
paign. "My campaign will focus
on the working people of the Third
District, our jobs, our children, our
future and Eastern North Caro-
lina Jones said.
Jones voiced strong convic-
tion in dealing with criminals. "I
endorse the idea of 'three strikes
and you are out a proposal under
Super Bowl comes to Scott
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
The Dallas Cowboys and the
Buffalo Bills are gearing up for the
biggest football game of the year
Sunday night, and residents of
Scott Hall are eagerly awaiting
their own Super Bowl celebration.
The Scott Council and resi-
dents of Scott Hall will be cheer-
ing for their favorite team in Scott's
basement Sunday night. Over 100
people are expected to attend, said
Scott Hall Coordinator Kenny
Jenkins.
"There seems to be a pretty
high energy level right now
Jenkins said.
The menu will consist of hot
dogs, chips and non-alcoholic
beer. The party is funded by the
Scott Hall Council vending ac-
count. T-shirts, with the Scott Hall
logo on the front and a Super Bowl
theme on the back, will be raffled
off.
"There are some people who
want to go so they can enjoy the
atmosphere and not have to get
drunk said Brian Burns, presi-
dent of the Scott Hall Council.
"We're supplying non-alcoholic
beer to everyone who comes
down
The Residence Hall Associa-
tion (RHA) has yet to decide
whether or not to allow residents
from neighboring halls to join in
the fun, Jenkins said, but guests of
Scott Hall residents are welcome.
Many of ECU's administra-
tion have been invited, including
the director of Housing, Dean of
Students Ron Speier, and other
department heads, said Richard
Pappas, assistant coordinator and
advisor for the Scott Hall Coun-
cil.
Posters adorn the bulletin
board in the lobby of Scott Hall
and fliers have been distributed
to all residents, Jenkins said.
"I think it's going to be one
of the biggest programs Scott Hall
has done in a while, and a pro-
gram we can use to give some-
thing back to the students
Pappas said.
Residents will meet at 5 p.m.
to watch the big game being
played in Atlanta, Ga.
"If this works, I want to see
it happen every year Burns said.
which three-time convicted felons
willbe removed from society, they
need to serve their sentences
Jones said. "Under our present
system, these people are not being
turned into productive citizens.
Present rehabilitation programs
are not working
Jones is opposed to the
Clinton administration's pro-
posed health care plan. "Hillary
Clinton's plan to nationalize the
health care system is the wrong
way to expand access to afford-
able care Jones said.
Additionally, Jones criti-
cized the recent congressional sal-
ary increase. "In 1987 Congress-
men and women earned at least
$89,500 a year and with the pay-
raise, salaries moved to $96,600
in 1990 and $125,100 in 1991
$129,000 in 1992 he said. "To-
day representatives make
$133,600
If elected, Jones pledges to
return $30,000 of his annual sal-
ary.
"I will return $30,000 each
year to the treasury, roughly
twice the per-capita income of
the people of this district to dem-
onstrate to you that I believe, as
many of you do, that the pay
raise Congress gave itself was
obscene
ECU Credit Union Members:
The Credit Union will hold its annual
meeting in Room 132 Austin at
10:00 A.M. Saturday, January 29.
Refreshments available at 9:30.
$ DOORPRIZES WILL BE AWARDED $
ylosi uJicgc (i)(�� Inter
the Juitl 'or,I As i V. 'h'pri.tat.iUi'i
After (, vtulh iiion
You need the experience AndrWf cap
help you gain that experience beforeyu graduate.
.ipplk , nllV
Qualifications:
�A fill-time student with no more
than 15 semester hours of classes �-
�At bast a 2.0 avetirge ' i
�Your own transportation �'
�An excellent work tthic and
a willingness to learn � j
�Available' to work about 20 hours
per week, Monday-Friday
�Previous sales experience is not required
��-
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is an equal opportunity employer
entry form for
Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee
Name of BandContact Person:
Address:
Phone numbers:
TO AUDITION FOR THE BATTLE OF THE BANDS, PLEASE SUBMIT A DEMO TAPE CONTAINING THREE
SONGS AND THE ABOVE FORM TO STUDENT UNION OFFICE, ROOM 236, ON THE TOP FLOOR OF
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER OR MAIL TO:
-DEADLINE FOR DEMO TAPES IS MARCH 18, 1994.
-FIVE BANDS WILL BE CHOSEN TO
PERFORM AT BATTLE OF THE BANDS.
-PA WILL BE PROVIDED BY:
THE POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE.
POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
236 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU I
GRAND PRIZE: OPENING BAND AT BAREFOOT ON THE MALL, APRIL 21, 1994
SECOND PRIZE:100.00 IN CASH (winners will be determined by judges).





�MnmUMMMMIWMBMi Hi - iMtMMttMMMM MMmHM0MMttMM
January 27, 1994
77i Easf Carolinian 3
NC locals critique Clinton's address
NORTH CAROLINA (AP)
� Members of North Carolina's
congressional delegation say the
liked President Clinton's State of
the Union message � except for
the part about a cigarette tax in-
crease.
Rep. Martin Lancaster, D-
N.C said the message about
fighting crime in America hit the
right note.
"With his emphasis on
greater punishment and his en-
dorsement of the 'three strikes
and you're out' concept, which I
have cosponsored, 1 have real
hope that it will be enacted into
law Lancaster said. "Persons
convicted of three violentoffenses
have no business being on the
street
Clinton promised in his
State of the Union address Tues-
day night to veto any health care
legislation that does not provide
every American private health in-
surance that can never be taken
away.
Clinton has said he is will-
ing to compromise on other de-
tails, which include helping fi-
nance the plan with a hike in the
federal tax on cigarettes.
U.S. Rep. Tim Valentine, D-
N.C said he liked the agenda
that Clinton laid out in his speech,
but that he will continue to op-
pose any health care reform plan
that unfairly treats tobacco and
the state of North Carolina.
"It is my hope that we can
turn the administration away
from an unfair tobacco tax to-
ward a more sensible financing
plan he said.
Clinton's health plan would
require all employers to pay 80
percent of average health care pre-
miums for their workers. Low-
wage worker ; and small busi-
nesses would get federal subsi-
dies to help pay their share. Com-
panies and individuals would
purchase their insurance from big
regional alliances that could not
refuse coverage to anyone based
on previous illnesses, age or other
WHITE
(actors.
I he North Carolina Medi-
cal Society, which represents
8,000 physicians and is the state's
largest physician organization,
continues to support most ele-
ments of the Clinton plan.
"We agree with the
president's concept of universal
coverage and comprehensive care
for all, and we acknowledge his
determination to veto anything
less said F.M. "Mac" Mauney
Jr an Asheville heart surgeon
and immediate past-president of
the medical society. "But physi-
cians insist on the need for au-
See CLINTON page 4
Continued from page 1
THE NAVIGATOR
OFFICIAL PIRATE
BASEBALL TABLOID
1994
Ad Deadline will be February 3rd.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Advertising Department
Office 919-757-6366
Fax 919-757-6558
nursing major and White Hall resi-
dent. "But, it is a disadvantage for
freshman or second year students
with not enough hours
Many students liked the idea
of an all single room dormitory,
but thought the price increase
would be too steep to pay for on-
campus housing.
"Ithinkitisaniceidea'said
CUPOLA
Andrea Luther, a White Hall resi-
dent. "I would like to live here
when it happens
However, Luther expressed
concern over the price increase,
the size of the rooms being wasted
on single-occupancy and whether
enough on-campus housing space
would remain for those students
who wished to maintain tradi-
Continued from page 1
tional arrangements.
Jones is working in conjunc-
tion with Emanuele Amaro, di-
rector of university housing. Jones
said that there had been some dis-
cussion of adding new carpeting
to White Hall and also installing a
microwave-refrigerator unit in
each room.
The change is still being con-
sidered by the Department of
University Housing.
"I believe it will be another
step in providing quality living
options for our students Jones
said.
begin during the summer of '95
and should be completed by
spring of '96, said Lanier. Bricks
cannot be added to the cupola
after this time, but may be added
to walkways around the plaza.
Two families have com-
pletely funded the reconstruction
project. Brick money will be used
for scholarships. ECU'S alumni
house gives around 40 scholar-
ships per year. The scholarship
amounts vary from $1,500 to
$5,000 and are merit based.
The construction is planned
to be dedicated as the old Austin
Cupola. The Austin building was
the first structure at ECU. The "old
main" Austin building was con-
demned in 1968 due to wear and
tear. The Jenkin's art building now
stands in Austin's place. East Caro-
lina University: The Formative Years,
a book distributed throughout
campus, describes the destruction
of Austin as, "a wrenching sight
as though the heart of the campus
had been cut out
"The original cupola was
going to be preserved, but it
crumbled as it was coming off
Lanier said.
The new cupola will be con-
structed using the exact same plans
and kinds of materials from the
original, Lanier said.
RESIDENT ADVISORS
NEEDED
for Summer Ventures in Science
and
Mathematics Program,
June 15-July 16,1994.
Information meeting on February 1,
1994,
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 221, 3:15 PM.
Interviews week of February 7th.
Summer Ventures office 757-6036.
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Come into any club entrance Thursday and then feel free to roam from club to club!
It is our big block party on Thursday!
We Cover One City Block!
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FRtl MttABtRSHIPS!





.
4 The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
WIRETAP
Continued from page 1
This settlement should not
be construed as an admission of
liability on the part of Jim DePuy,
the former employee represented
in this action by the Attorney
General's Office upon the recom-
mendations of the University. Mr.
DePuv specifically denies autho-
rizing the wiretapping of Ms.
Bullock's telephone. The Univer-
sity disputed the facts underlying
Ms. Bullock's claim against Mr.
DePuy, and the settlement is an
CLINTON
effort to resolve the dispute with-
out costly and protracted litiga-
tion
Initially, the suit asked that
DePuy pay $100,000 in compensa-
tory damages, $250,000 in punitive
damages and an award of
attorney's fees and other costs of
litigation. As a result of this settle-
ment, the civil action against DePuy
is completed.
HermanGaskins, attorney for
Bullock and 14 other individuals
involved in the case, said he was
pleased with the outcome. "We
demanded $10,000 plus attorney's
fees and we didn't believe a court
would give us any more
Gaskins said the $10,000 fig-
ure is provided for in federal wire-
tapping statutes.
"The settlement is a reflec-
tion of reality Gaskins said.
"ECU's employees did the wire-
tapping and they should be respon-
sible for it. The university paid
thcnisandsctf dollars in settlements
to other claimants. I didn't under-
stand why they were defending
this one
Bullock's is the last civil suit
to be resolved concerni ng the vv ire-
tapping case. F.CU has paid more
than $200,000 in settlements to 16
other individuals bringing suit
against DePuy and others.
University Attorney Ben
Irons refused to comment further
on the settlement.
Continued from page 3
tonomy, within certain limits, to
determine and deliver patient
care and to ensure patients have
reasonable choice in their own
care
Valentine, who has an-
nounced that he will not seek re-
election, said crime is the top con-
cern of Americans today.
"I am especially pleased to
see the president is ready to tackle
the tough issues like crime, welfare
reform and deficit reduction Val-
entine said. "For the first time in
more than a decade, we have the
opportunity to makea real and posi-
tive difference in the daily lives of
the American people
Rep. David Price, D-N.Cde-
scribed Clinton's agenda as "very
challenging
"We're making certain that
private health insurance is avail-
able to all of our peopleat an afford-
able price Pricesaid. "We'remak-
ing certain that we get this welfare
system repaired, and making cer-
tain that our streets are safe again
The News Department of The East Carolinian will hold meetings every
Thursday at 3:30 p.m. at the News desk. Today's meeting is mandatory �
we have a lot to discuss, If you cannot attend, I want to hear from you
prior to 3:00 p.m. Muchas gracias.
Mexican Restaurant
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FEBRUARY 11,1994
9JH pan. - 2:00 sum.
The parade starts at 8:30 P.M. in
front of Tyler residence hall.
Entries wig be judged according to the following;
Best Carnival Atmosphere
Closest to the Theme oE "Lady Luck"
Most Creative Use of Color
To enter complete a registration form in room 109
Mendenhall Student Center by February 4,1994
The theme is: J&Opp.
Lady Luck Eg
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�ft IITWii -
The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
Opinion
. -
Page" 5T
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
w
100 recycled paper
Maureen Rich, Una Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler, Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Clinton's State of the Union packs a punch 1
"Our work has just begun
With these words, PresidentClinton laid out
a spirited plan for his second year. Amidst the
usual applause that politicians are so good at
supplying (especially during televised speeches
and debates), William Jefferson Clinton mapped
out his goals for the next year. (A side note: It was
more than refreshing to watch the Republicans sit
defiantly during Clinton's speech with their arms
crossed, as if they were children in elementary
school, forced to listen to a lecture on dress-code
violations.)
The plans outlined in the State of the Union
included the much-debated health care system
that Clinton stressed must guarantee coverage for
all, along with welfare reform and a response to
the public's concern about violent crime.
In the 64-minute speech, Clinton emerged
the victor, mainly because his words were not
"Democratic" in nature, or "Republican" for that
matter. He took a rather conservative view in an
attempt to sway members of Congress to his side.
This is not to say that they will follow his lead
blindly. TheonestipulanonClintonhasnotbacked
down from with the health care plan is the
insistance for guaranteed coverageforeyenAmen-
can. And this one particular plea may just be the
molasses that will slow him.
The argument has been offered that most
Americans already have coverage, so it's not an
urgent concern. Well, sorry, but to say that 38.5
million people do not deserve coverage because
they aren't the rhajority is like saying that African-
Americans don't deserve fair representation in
government; that Asian-Americans don't deserve
therightto vote, orthatMexican- Americans should
be barred from jobs because of their national
heritage. Screw those less fortunate than "us
The fact is that college graduates are part of
this no-health coverage-group. We compromise a
large chunk of the 38.5 million uninsured. We are at
a major disadvantage. So, how do any of us know
what lies ahead in our medical future? What hap-
pens if we are seriously injured and hospitalized at
the age of, oh let's say, 23, with a job that pays
nothing and no health plan? How indignant would
we be then, stuck with unbelievable medical bills
and no way out? Now think of the future post
Clinton health care plan. True, cigarette prices
would be slightly higher, but those Americans
withoutthemeans that decided whether they could
afford coverage wouldn't have to take a gamble in
the game we call insurance.
Clinton, in an act of sheer, strong motiva tion,
has threatened to veto any bill that doesn't provide
the coverage. What the White House has offered to
counterbalance is a willingness to expand the num-
ber of companies that would be permitted to self-
insure rather than join huge region ll alliances.
Since many companies feel that the threshold for
joining regional alliances is too high, this may aide
the popularity of theplanwhenitis finally voted on.
This reform plan may just define his legacy.
And for all its breadth, Clinton's speech did one
thing � it provided a clear direction of where he
wants to go. He believes in what he's doing. That
was evident in his eyes and the inflections in his
voice (however hoarseitwas). Apure moment was
reached when he said the following: "Our prob-
lems go waybeyond die reachof government. They
are rooted in the loss of values The American
peoplehavegot to wantto change from within if we
are going to bring back work, family and commu-
nity
A little compassion for fellow man wouldn't
hurt, either.
By John P. Adams
Guitarist Django described as a great virtuoso
Who is the greatest gui-
tarist of all time?
How many times have
you had this conversation? I
bet quite a few times.
And probably after a few
beers, in the early morning
hours, sitting ���MBHBi
around listen-
ing to some
music. Sud-
denly you hear
Jimi Hendrix's
"Voodoo Chile
(slight return)
Someone says,
'Hendrix was
the greatest,
man �"
What about Jimmy Page,
though? You'll never convince
me that it's not Jimmy Page
playing the solo on the Who's,
"Run, Run, Run
Speaking of The Who, if
Pete Townsend's guitar work
on "Pictures of Lily" is not one
of the most defining moments
of rock 'n' roll guitar ever re-
corded, then I need to move to
a room with some padded
walls. However, we could go
on like this forever.
For every different mo-
ment or trend in rock 'n' roll
we could find a "greatest" gui-
tarist I ho defined the moment.
People like D. Boon, Will
Sargent, Steve Wynn, Stevie
Ray Vaughn, Paul Weller or Jim
and William Reid (especially
on "In A Hole and "Kill Surf
City"). My point is the list could
go on for quite a while.
In fact, why should we
limit our list to just rock 'n' roll
guitarist?
AH genres have their all-
time greats Jazz has such fa-
mous artist as Lonnie Johnson,
Charlie Christian and Grant
Green.
How could we not include
on our list such great blues gui-
tarist as Robert Johnson, Muddy
Waters or B.B. King?
don't
For every different
moment or trend in
rock 'n' roll we
could find a
'greatest' guitarist
who defined the
moment.
know a
great deal
about
country
music, but
I know
C h e t
Atkins is
an incred-
ible guitar-
ist.
If I knew anything about
classical music I'm sure our list
would continue to expand.
So here we are, back to
square one: Who is the greatest
guitarist of all-time? Of course,
this is a question which can only
really be answered on an indi-
vidual basis.
For me, though, I know
who the greatest guitar player
who ever lived is.
He was born on Jan. 23,
1910 in Belgium to a family of
nomadic gypsies and died in
Paris on May 16, 1954. In be-
tween, Django Reinhardt de-
fined the guitar with his daz-
zling virtuoso.
Not merely a speed demon
on the fretboard (although, I've
never heard anyone faster),
Django (pronounced jane-go)
had an impeccable ear for
melody.
What made Django unique
though was not merely the fact
that he was a great guitarist. We
have already seen that great gui-
tarist are a dime a dozen. What
made Django Reinhardt unique
was the fact that his left hand
(fretboard hand) was severely
burned when he was 18. His
pinky and ring finger were in
fact paralyzed.
Django only played with
two fingers.
Initially devastated by the
thought that his career as a mu-
sician was over at the age of 18,
Django, over the course of the
next year, invented his own
method of guitar fingering. This
tremendous technique has gone
unsurpassed to this day.
Django cannot be written
off just as master technician,
though. He played with an ex-
pressive quality that went be-
yond any sort of temporal soul-
fulness.
Dukt Ellington may have
expressed it best when he said,
"Django is all artist, unable to
play a note that's not pretty or
in good taste � he's a great vir-
tuoso
Django's recording career
was prolific. His greatest work,
arguably, was done with
Stephanie Grappelly and the
Quintet of the Hot Club of
France. Several of these record-
ings are still available and can
be ordered from any record
store.
Living in a time when mu-
sic is watched instead of listened
to, when bands and musicians
such as Pearl Jam, Aerosmith,
Janet Jackson and Metallica
mass-produce music aimed at
the common denominator, it's
refreshing to be able to pull out
a record or CD and listen to the
greatest guitar player ever,
Django Reinhardt.
By Gregory Dickens
Race relations handled with hypersensitivity j
A week ago today I had the
privilege to speak on a panel in
which the relationship between the
Civil Rights Movement and the
media was debated regarding con-
flict and compromise. Moderated
by Dr. Brian Haynes, the director
of minority student affairs, the
panel included guest-speaker and
columnist for the News and Observer,
Barry Saunders; Dr. T. Harrell
Allen, chair of Communications;
and James Rouse, the owner of the
local VVOOW 13.40 AM radio sta-
tion.
Lasting just over an hour and
a half, the discussion went well
because it all you could hope for�
recollections of past experiences,
expostulation and criticism of
present and future social move-
ments and media subjectivity, and
even a healthy dose of polite philo-
sophical disparity. As an occasional
Opinion Page writer, I have to ad-
mit how substantiating it was to
voice a viewpoint and receive in-
stant feedback, dissenting or con-
curring, i
But onto the point. There
seems to be a disturbing new trend
in society counteracting just what
the panel was designed for�open
and honest discussion of race
relations.The problem with intro-
ducing the subject into debate is
that many people don't wish to
speak about it for concern of being
misunderstood. The fear and dread
of being labeled a racist or fascist
for voicing an honest perspective
is a valid concern in today's society
i(and here's the assumption of too
many people these da$s) you're
talking to a group or individual
who presumes that if you have
something to say about race it must
be derogatory and inflammatory.
This means that unless you
are approaching the topic amongst
friends, or if you're invited to speak
in a formal, public forum, your
soapbox could be resting on mighty
thin ice. Obviously, this is debili-
tating to those who wish to speak
up and speak freely � a notion
that has more than a small role in a
representative democracy such as
ours. t
If someone doesn't feel able
to communicate their ideas, then
someone else will gladly do so for
them, with or without their per-
mission. This is how we get so
1
many public figures calling them-
selves "representatives of the si-
lent majority" in matters of politics
or morals (H. Ross Perot, Jim
Falwell and Al Sharpton come to
mind).
So why is a modicum of si-
lence under duress so popular? We
as a society went through a harsh
period of confrontation when the
90s began. Abortion was in full
combative swing with Operation
Rescue at its legal zenith ani1 mul-
tiple civil rulings ensued.
A fever of censorship swept
the land where CDs were being
labeled and prohibited for sale to
thosel6 and younger. A new mo-
tion picture rating was imple-
mented. Reality shows arrived.
Talk shows crawled out of the
woodwork. Editorial columns be-
came more important than actual
journalistic articles. Infommercials
pummeled the populace. America
became a talk-a-thon of informa-
tion both contradictory and aggres-
sive. We were assailed by differing
viewpoints at all times on all sub-
jects.
And then we started hearing
about a superhighway for constant
information and 500-channel TV.
This wave alone is explanation
enough for why people may not be
talking anymore. Either our jaws
or our ears are sore.
My theory as to why race
relations are becoming taboo is a
hyper-sensitivity to recent racial
incidents, primarily the aftermath
of the publication of the Rodney
King tape. That's a shame, because
the incident wasn't about black and
white hate as it was about police
brutality.
If a Spanish or German man
the size of Rodney King led police
on a high-speed chase, was drunk
at the time, was also suspected of
being on PCP and resisted arrest,
he'd get pounded, too. 'Course, if
you're drinking and driving, that
alone is sufficient criteria, in my
eyes, for you to get the hell beat out
of you, no matter what your skin
color is.
But the resulting riots after
the first trial and the ludicrous pro-
ceedings of the Reginald Denny
trial made people skittish of bring-
ing up any ethnic debate. The hun-
dreds of talk show episodes on the
two cases didn't help, either.
But we still talk of abortion;
(see Tuesday's Opinion Page)
gun control, violence on TV and
Clinton's economic and hor-l
monal involvements. So why
aren't we talking about race re- �
lations? �
Some would say there is J
nothing to talk about. No prob
lem exists. If that's so, why is the !
principal element of the Civil
Rights Movement being disre- �
garded? Our nation is segregate J
ing again � this time voluntar-
ily.
White and black fratemii �
ties and sororities, sitcoms with
eitherwhiteorblackfamilies(but �
not both) and commercials that ;
cater to separate ethnic groups
exemplify a definite schism
These all aim for a special inter-
est: cultural identity. This signi- j
ties something.
As a society, increasingly, J
we are seeking a role in which to
exist that deviates from the iden- ?
tity of fellow countrymen. It is ��
fashionable to hyphenate one's �
ethnic group to emphasize a jj
former allegiance. Asian-Ameri- 9
can, African-American, Euro- �
pean-American.
It's amazing how many �
people will use the Constitution I
to demand the right to consider 9
themselves anything they want, I
only to then denounce the coun- I
try that document supports. We �
are not a nation, we are a con- i
glomerate. We are not a melting I
pot. We are a microwave oven. J
Frankly, if you need to sup- t
port your identity on what your I
ancestors have done, you should �
to do something yourself to base I
an ego on. My point is that race I
relations as a topic may be moot J
due to the lack of relations.
By this, I mean security I
within all groups to sit down �
and talk frankly and listen qui- J
etly without fear of reproach for
sincerecomments.Thepanellast J
Thursday was a great idea, and
we need more of them. We have
to talk, and we ha e to listen.
Otherwise, our separate cultural
identities will continue to drift
apart. Then we won't be living
in a country anymore. We'll just
be living on the same continent.
And how well will we all get
along then?
Stuff you should know
� Telly Savalas, the man best known for muttering "Who loves ya, baby?" died Saturday
of prostate cancer. He was indelibly identified as police Lt. Kojak in the 1970s series with his
shiny bald head and trademark lollipops. Comedian Don Rickles said despite the actor's roles
as gruff hooligans and then as the tough detective that Savalas was a charming man.
Who loves ya, baby? We do, Telly.
In ancient Roman times, a forum was the public assembly place for ,
Judicial matte?s and other activities. Today, a forum Is a medium for
open discussion. So consider yourself one-up on, let's say people in
Communist China. They lack this inalienable right. Why not go crazy
with democracy and write a letter? All letters may be addressed to:
Opinion Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville,
N.C 27858-4353.






Page 6
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
January 27, 1994
For Rent
.ROOMMATE NEEDED 1 12 blks.
from ca'npus. 3 room house. Private
bathrocm,hardwood floors. $180per
month 13 utilities. Call 757-2419,
' ask for Al
RCOMMATE NEEDED: for 2 bdrm
tovn'iouse apartment. Rent is $170
, per month and 12 utilities. Includes
, on-site laundry, pool, and ECU transit.
, Callleave messageStacy Peterson321-
,1532
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
Tbom apartment two blocks from cam-
1 pus. $157 a month, plus 12 utilities,
heating. Call 830-5471.
ROOMMATE(S) To share brge house
at .the corner of 5th and Elm. Rent
Deposit. Call Scott 758-9604 leave mes-
sage.
ROOMMATE WANTED: to share
three bedroom duplex at Wesley Com-
�-mbns, washerdryer, 5 blocks from
ECU, $200 per month 13 utilities,
j-oall Dave at 830-4030.
i
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Immediately toshare2bedroom2bath
Jdyplex in Wyndham Circle. $137 1
utilities. Close to campus. Call 752-
J2693 Karen, Mary-Lee or Doug
i
ROOMMATE NEEDED for stylish
townhouse. Maleor female. $200
half utilities. Leave a message 758-3861
, APARTMENTFORRENT,Dogwood
Hollow Apts 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
$450 a month, $450 deposit, want to
rent by March 1, water sewer and basic
cable included in rent, 2 blocks from
-campus, call David or Paul 758-8912.
TWO BEDROOM HOUSt for rent
beside campus. One bath. Please call
.757-3191 for info.
NON-SMOKER ROOMMATE
NEEDED: for 2 bdrm. apt. immedi-
ately. Will take over 6 month lease
'withcurrentroommate. Rentincludes
'sewer, water and cable ($237.50
month.) Deposit required. Own room
and bath wrub. Quiet, partially fur-
rttshed, all major appliances. 3 blks
;from campus. Call Amy @ 757-6366.
Leave message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY- share 2 bedroom2 bath apt.
1 block from campus. Rent $225-$237
Deposit $2251 2 utilities. Prefer non-
smoker call 830-9595
NEW DUPLEX FOR RENT.
Wyndham Court. $525 per month 2
br, 2 bath with fireplace. First month
rent free. 1 year lease call 355-6171 or
.321-3233.
SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom apt. 2 full
b,aths, all major appliances, energy ef-
ficient, 2 blocks from campus. $450
"month plus security deposit. Avail-
able as soon as possible. 758-1295.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for
.apt. 1 2 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, 2 blocks from super-
s market, rent includes phone, utilities
,cable. Call 757-1947
FOR RENT: New apt. on first floor, 2
bedroom, 2 full-bath, dishwasher, gar-
bage disposal, cable, near campus. 6
u month lease. $450 call anytime. 758-
3219
v �
b ROOMMATE WANTED desperately
-at Village Green apts. Share w 2
other people only $120 month. Jan
Feb. are free Call 758-5809 for info.
For Rent
Help Wanted I & For Sale Services Offered
Greek
ROOMMATE wanted. House,$170
mo. 13 utlilities and deposit. 5-10
min. walk from campus, washer,
dryer, dog ok, prefer non-smoker,
must be social, male or female, 830-
6703, ASAP
El Help Wanted
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Setownhours!
Rush Stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham NC 27705
HELP WANTED Ladies earn $500 c
week full-time part-time daily payout.
Playmates Adult Entertainment Snow
Hill, NC. Call for interview 747-7686
"�SPRING BREAK '94"� Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Florida & Padre!
110 lowest price guarantee! Orga-
nize 15 friends and your trip is free!
Take a Break Student Travel (800)328-
7283.
DEPENDABLE PERSON needed to
care for infant in our home, 2 days a
week,7am-7pm. Referencesand trans-
portation required. Please call only
after 7:30pm 752-8710.
PROMOTE our Spring Break pack-
ages with our posters and flyers, or
sign up now for Spring Break rooms.
Daytona, Panama, Cancun, etc. $129
up Call CMIl-80fM23-5264
HEAD LIFEGUARD. Summer posi-
tions in Greenville area, Goldsboro,
Plymouth, Tarboro. Application dead-
line, Feb. 21. Supervisory experience
required. Call Bob Wendling, 758-
1088.
WANTED: female to tutor Organic
Chemistry 2760 to female student. $10
an hour. Need ASAP. Call 752-7409.
WEEKEND CHILDCARE: Mature,
responsible student wanted with prior
childcare experience to care for our
two children, ages 4 and 9, on weekend
evenings and occasional overnight
stays. Call 752-6372
EASY WORK! excellent pay! Assemble
products at home. Call toll free 1-800-
467-5566 ext 5920
BRODY'S is accepting applications for
part-time sales associates, flexible
scheduling options: 10-2, 12-9, or 6-9
interview Monday and Thursday
Brody's The Plaza l-4pm
BRODY'S is accepting applications for
clericaloffice associates. Work with
buyingand operation staff in computer
data entry, generating computer mail-
ing list, and light office duties. Must be
available early afternoons. Apply
Brody's The Plaza Mon. and Thur. 1-
4pm
MOVING TO THE OUTER BANKS
of North Carolina (Nags Head) this
summer? For summer employment
information please call Pat or Lea at 1-
800-833-5233.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Dep. is
recruiting 12 to 16 part-time youth soc-
cer coaches for the spring indoor soccer
program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skills
and have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must be
able tocoach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from
3pm to 7pm with some nightand week-
end coaching. This program will run
from the first of March to the first of
May. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour. For more info please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 830-4550.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great Benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext. P-3712
TWO PHYSICIANS seeking respon-
sible students) to care for child in our
home full or part time. Possibility of
shared shifts. References required. 321-
1410
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $85 hr
escorting in the Greenville area. You
must be 18 yrs. old, have own phone
and transportation. Escorts and exotic
dancers needed. For more info, call
Diamond Escorts at 758-08
ATTENTION STUDENTS: earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Midwest Mailers PO Box 395, Olathe
Ks 66051. Immediate response.
PIRATE FOOTBALL CLUB is look-
ing for an faculty advi&or and coaches.
For more info, contact Frankie Durham
at 931-8225, M-F 3pm-7pm.
CRUISE JOBS
Students Needed!
Earn up to $2,000aio. working for
Cruise Ships or Land-Tour companies.
World Travel. Summer and Full-Time
employment available. No experience
necessary. For more information call t
(206) 634-0468 ext. C5362
For Sale
SPRING BREAK SALE 1994! We ha ve
the hottest destinations! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas, Florida. All at the
guaranteed lowest prices with the ulti-
mate party package. Organize small
group and Travel free! Call Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710
SPRING BREAK Bahamas party
cruise! 6 days $279! Trip includes
Cruise room, 12 meals 6 free par-
ties! Hurry! This will sell out! 1-800-
678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Cancun Jamaica!
Fly out of Raleigh and spend 8 days on
the Beach! We have the best trips
prices! Includes air hotel parties
from $429! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8 days
oreanview room with kitchen $119!
Walk to best bars! Includes free dis-
count card- save $50 on cover charges!
1-800-678-6386
FLORIDA'S new Spring Break
hotspots! Cocoa Beach Key West!
More upscale than Panama City
Daytona! Great beaches nightlife! 8
days in 27 acre Cocoa Beachfront resort
$159! Key West $249! 1-800-678-6386
8-BIT NINTENDO with 33 games, in-
cludes 11 sports, Tetris, Chess; two con-
trols and zapper, hint book and codes.
$300OBO. 931-8024, leave message
FOR SALE: 12 string Oscar Schmidt
acoustic guitar. Mint cond. $225 neg.
Call Bruce at 758-4579
MUST SELL! Takamine acoustic elec-
tric guitar. Only 6 months old. $550call
LuAnri at 756-9209 evening & week-
ends.
ONE -YEAR -OLD Chinese Corn
Snake, 10-gallon tank, bowl, wood, rock
and undertank heaters for $60. 321-
4748 ask for Robin or John.
�"SPRING BREAK 1994!�" Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, South Padre, Florida
at 110 guaranteed lowest prices from
1 spring break company! Call John at
752-2992.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED ca rs, trucks,
boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: Trek 7000 mountain bike.
20 inch, aluminum frame; Mr. Tuffies;
excellent condition. $700 retail value,
asking only $450. 758-1295
FOR SALE FERRET. 10 months old,
descented, has all shots. Must sell,
moving. Call 830-4052 ask for Aaron.
FOR SALE: Baby S. American Cay-
man (Alligator). Approx. 13 inches
long. Great for a different pet! Bought
for $100, sell for $50. Call 758-8339 and
ask for Brad.
ID Services Offered
Tired of trying to
stretch Vour dollar?
We pay cash on the spot for:
�USED BRAND NAME
MEN'S CLOTHING
�STEREO & VIDEO
�EQUIPMENT
�MICROWAVES
�TELEVISIONS
�FURNITURE
If you are selling you must be 18 with a
picture 10.INCDL, ECU)
s
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
752-3866
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
Mon-fri 10-12 ki
Sat lOam-1 pin
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies for
hire. Specializing in fraternity soror-
ity socials and weddings. The widest
selection of music from the 50's to the
90's with unbeatable sound and pro
fessionalism. Discounts to all ECU stu-
dents! Call now Rob 757-2658
COOMBS wordprocessing spread-
sheets and graphs. Low prices, pick-
up and delivery available, call Juliann
355-5043 anytime.
HEY MR. DJ! Please play my favorite
song! It's time to plan for spring socials
and mobile music productions is gear-
ing up to meet its popular demand
with 2 complete systems and light
shows. Widest variety of music, best
DJs, most popular service with ECU
greeks. Call Lee at 758-4644 for book-
ings.
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Personals
WRITERMUSICIAN and poericsoul
seeks like minded lady for friendship
and fun. Send photos and correspon-
dence to: Kane, PO Box 8663,
Greenville NC 27835.
FOUND one necklace w senior key
charm on it. Must call to ID it. 931-
8530.
S AR AN- wasn't it great to talk to Nick
John on Larry King? Great Ques-
tion! Signed, the other Greenville
caller. 758-6343
HAPPY 21ST BIRTHDAY, Spuddy!
(What better way to say Happy B-day
to an aspiring journalist?) This week-
end is going to be a blast- as long as
you don't start speaking French again
while intoxicated! Love from all the
gang- Billie, Tracy, Chris, Robert.
CATHERINE-Welcome back
from your exotic locales and whirl-
wind escapades. Please write soon
with all the details. As always, pows
and kisses.
IQ
Greek
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like
to invite anyone interested in so-
rority life to ourspring rush "happy
hour Mon. Jan. 31 at 9pm. Rides
will be provided. For more info,
call 757-0769.
PIKA: Friday night we'll be mar-
ried for a few then divorced for a
few. We're going to say I do! To
you and you and you. Can't wait!
Love, Sigma.
GO SIGMA basketball, keep up
the hard work!
NEWMEMBERSOFAOPI. Hang
on just two more days. You have
all done a great job. We are all
looking forward to Sat. Love the
sisters of AOPI.
ALPHA DELTA PI looks forward
to a wonderful hall crawl with Pi
Kappa Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new officers of Alpha Delta Pi:
President Kelly Bailer; VP Rene
Smallwood; AEC Jelynn Kaplan;
MEVP Carrie Oleson; Rec Sec.
sherry Lang; Treasurer Jennifer
Byals; Assist Treas. Crissy Parker;
Pan. delegate Amy Seism; Rush
Laurie Oliphant; Assist Rush
Caroline Smith; Sr. Exec. Vicki
Johnson;Jr. Exec. Erin Dilley;Soph
Exec. Joy Ballard; House Anna
Zadeits; Guard DeAnne Waugh;
Corresponding Sec. Lee Neely;
Scholarship Tonya Poole; Stan-
dards Lara Baumgarten; Chaplin
Mandy Cox; Historian Lisa Pittard;
Social Amy Warren; Spirit Allison
Olwelier; Philanthropy Margaret
Johnson; Gift Mart. Kira Chapman;
Reporter Marcia Jacksorr; Intramu-
ral Cara Powers; Alumnae Stuart
Mabie; Music Carey Meadows; re-
cycling Ashley Moore.
DEAR SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI,
we the brothers of Delta Sigma Phi
want to thank you f jr the big turn
out and great time Thur. night. We
hope to do it again soon. Sincerely,
the brothers of Delta Sigma Phi.
PI DELTA would like to welcome
the new sisters of the Epsilon
pledge class Lisa Bannister,
Jeanette Bauer, Denise Blackmon,
Kim Cole, Kim Cary, Missy
Davison, Marge Gerber, Amy
Godwin, Lisa Haschert, Stephanie
Jefferson, Jennifer Keller, Lori
Legget, Christy Lentz, Michelle
Lewis, Nicole Mosteller, Angelina
Pavone, Stephanie Smithey, Jacque
Weir, and Jennifer Winkleman.
Congratulations!
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new sisters of Delta Zeta: Katherine
Bailey, Carrie Ann Barnett, Debra
Beaman, Beth Benton, Julie Coo-
per, Dana Creech, Jennifer
Eddleman, Jill Johnson, Sara
Leggett, Jessica Midgett, Caryn
Moser, Kristen Napier, Janice
Santucci, Julie Skrupa, Martha
Vaughn, Teri Warren, Amanda
Williams, and Delores Wood.
LAMBDA CHI- Looking forward
to bid night on Fri. Love the sisters
of Alpha Xi Delta.
SIGMA- We are looking forward
to bid night Fri Pike.
PI KAPPA ALPHA- Let's make a
strong finish in Intramurals.
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?ER PERSON
-4 PERSON OCCUPANCY
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
'The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
tlympics is recruiting for vol-
unteer coaches in the following
sports: basketball, softball, vol-
leyball, track and field, bowling,
gymnastics, swimming and
rollerskating. No experience is
"necessary�Just a willingness to
work with children and adults
With mental retardation. Special
training sessions for coaches will
be held. The last day to volunteer
'for these spring sports is Jan. 31.
Volunteer hours may be used as
ja:t of practicum requirements
Jor several ECU cou-ses. For
we information, contact Connie
penfield or Mark Mallette at
4541 or 830-4551.
fccU NATIONAL STUDENT
SPEECH LANGUAGE
HEARINGASSOC .
y i twenty fourth annual Speech
� 'guage and Hearing symposium
R , ngheldonFeb.3&4ajtthePitt
r inty Shrine Club in Greenville.
t speakers will share their
expertise on the following top-
ics: language disorders and com-
munication in adolescents, reha-
bilitative management of chil-
dren with cochlear implants and
current and newly emerging pro-
cedures forth clinical evaluation
of children and adults with sus-
pected central auditory process-
ing disorders. For more informa-
tion call 757-4405.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
ECHO is still alive! We will have
a meeting on Thur. Jan. 27th at
5:30 in Fleming basement. The
trash pick-up fundraiser will be
held Sat. Jan. 29 at 10:00am.
Sponshorship sheets can be
picked up in Fleming Room 262.
Participation is necessary for
ECHO to give scholarships.
NAT. POUnCAL SCIENCE
HONOR FRATERNITY
Pi Sigma Alpha will be having a
book sale soon. Watch for it.
Great books, real cheap!
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
semester kick off meeting pre-
sents Leigh Jeffrey's of Jeffrey's
Beer and Wine an Anheuser Busch
distributor "New product devel-
opment and marketing" 4:00pm
Thurs Jan. 27th General Class-
room building 1031 "Refresh-
ments" will be served.
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEP.
is now making preparations for
the upcoming adult soccer pro-
gram. The organizational meet-
ing will be held on Thur. Feb. 17,
7:30 pm at Elm Street gym. The
program is open to men and women
ages 16 and over, and will be held
at West Meadowbrook Park. Games
and practices will be held on
Sundays from l:00-4:00pm be-
ginning in March. All coaches,
managers or individuals wishing
to participate on a team should
attend the organizational meet-
ing. A small registration fee will
be charged. For more info call
Ben James or Michael Daly at
830-4550 or 830-4567.
THE GAY, LESBIAN.
BISEXUAL CAMPUS
GROUPj:
will begin meetingjan. 24 at ECU
Counseling center. Call 757-
6661 for confidential screening
interview. Previous members
need not schedule interview.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL
STUDENT-
this five part series is designed
for students who wish to sharpen
their study skills and for stu-
dents who wish to gain the neces-
sary tools for academic success.
The series will focus on time
management, note taking strate-
gies, test preparation, test tak-
ing strategies, as well as coping
with test anxiety. This vvork-
shop begins Feb. 1. Register
early-limited enrollment call
757-6661.
PHOTOGRAPHERS &
WRITERS
a national magazine that features
information on study, work, and
travel abroad, is seeking contri-
butions from student photogra-
phers and writers. Contributors
will be paid and a photograph
contest is offered. Please contact
International Programs, 757-
6769 for further info.
DOJ'OU LIKE TO
WATERSKI?
Come join the ECU water ski club.
First meeting will be on Feb. 1 at
9:00pm in MSC room 14. For
info, call Thomas or Jason at 7 5 8-
8215
JOB OPPORTUNITY
If you would like to be a campus
leader, be involved in campus
life and develop skills that will
be useful in future endeavors
Be a resident advisor Applica-
tions are due Feb. 11,1994 and
can be picked ip in each Resi-
dence hall office or in the Resi-
dent Education office, 100
Fletcher Residence Hall. Look
for signs about the RA info
sessions being held in the
halls. Any questions call 757-
6884. We look forward to hear-
ing from you!
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS:
Thur. Jan. 27�Scott Harris,
percussion, in graduate recital
(AJ Fletcher recital hall,
7:00pm, free). Fri Jan. 28�
Robert Knupp, organ in gradu-
ate recital (AJ Fletcher recital
hall, 9:00pm, free). Sat Jan.
29�Deena Reedy, flute in
graduate recital (AJ Fletcher
recital hall, 5:00pm, free).
Also on Jan. 29�the scholar-
ship benefit gala of the friends
of the school of music. For
further info, call 757-6851.
Sun Jan 30� Mike Biasi, clari-
net in senior recital (AJ
Fletcher recital hall, 7:00pm,
free).





The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
ityl
Page ;7
Calling all skiers, feel the
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
It's a rush.
You feel the cold wind against
your faceasyourbodypicks up speed
until you reach the bottom of the
mountain, then you turn your skis so
that they throw up a cloud of snow
behind you as you come to an abrupt
stop.
No matter where you decide to
skiyouget the same thrill fromflying
down the mountain. Butyoudohave
several options about where to ski,
and all of them are within seven to
nine hours of Greenville. Three op-
tions are Snowshoe and Winter Place
in West Virginia, and Sugar Moun-
tain in Boone, N. G.
Snowshoe sits on the top of a
mountain near Marlinto. It offers
many different slopes for all levels of
skiers. If you decide to ski Snowshoe
and stay in one of the resorts on the
mountain, you can step out the back
door and head straight down the
mountain
Beginner trails at Snowshoe are
marked withgreencircles.Oneof the
longest trails begins with the Upper
Flume, connects with Mid Flume and
ends with Lower Flume. Any of the
green trails offers a relaxing run that
does not pick up much speed but is
challenging for beginners.
Skiers whowantmorespeed and
wanttotesttheir skills willwantto try
the blue square trails that mark the
way for intermediates. These trails
have steeper inclines and more mo-
guls,ormounds.SkipJackand Lower
Ball Hooter trails give you that speed
rush without too much fear.
Finally, Snowshoe has several
black diamond trails for advanced
skiers. The trail names�
Widowmaker, Grab Hammer,
Choker�intimidate many interme-
diate skiers. These trails have very
steep inclines and largemoguls to test
even advanced abilities. One ad-
vanced trail, the Cupp Run, even has
a warning sign advising all but the
most advanced skiers to stay away.
This mile and a half run shakes up
even skillful skiers.
The lines for the ski lift at
Snowshoe move
quickly,even on week-
ends, and the lift
rideitself seems
fairly short be-
cause the runs are
long.
Winter Place is about an hour
or two below Snowshoe. While it is
not nearly as challenging as Snow-
shoe, it is a good place to test your
skills on different slopes. The trails
have the same symbols to differenti-
ate between beginner, intermediate
and advanced trails. However, the
intermediate slopesranged from very
easy to somewhat difficult.
One intermediate slope, the
Bowl, seems to change each time you
go down You can almost choose
how difficult it willbe. The advanced
slopes, while steeper and
more challeng-
ing, seem like
the intermedi-
ate slopes at
Snowshoe.
The lines
for the ski lift are
very slow on
week-
ends,
b u t
may
move more quickly
during the week The lift ride is short,
but so were the ski runs.
For skiers who want to test their
abilities but do not want to leave the
state, Sugar Mountain in Boone is a
good slope to try. While it does not
have as many trails as Snowshoe or
Winter Place, it is a good ski moun-
tain It has one beginner trail that is
gentleand relaxing, ltalsohasacouple
of good intermediate slopes that are
challenging for people who want a
little more excitement.
It has a couple of advanced
trails�which hardly ever seem to be
open. Onetrailbeginsatthetopof the
mountain. Itseemslikean intermedi-
ate at first, but quickly gets steeper to
challenge its skiers.
One good thing about Sugar
Mountain is the ski lift. The lines
move very quickly and the trail lasts
almost as long as the ride up the
mountain The lift that takes you up
to the advanced level has an added
advantage. Once you complete the
advanced part of the run, you can get
back on the lift before you hit the
intermediate part of the trail.
All three mountains offer a chal-
lenge to all levels of skiers. If you do
not know how to ski, you can take
lessons at any one you choose. All
three have ski rentals, and you can
ski at any of them for around $30-
$35 on the weekend. t
Yourbiggest expense will come
from resort prices. The resorts on
the mountain are more expensive
than those a few miles away, but
they offer the convenience of not
having to drive up the mountain
every day. You might want to take
somemunchies with you. The food
is expensive, but it is worth the
money if you don't have anything
with you.
There are other ski mountains
in North Carolina. These include
Appalachian, Beech and Hawk's
Nest. Their rates are comparable
with Sugar.
Wherever you choose to ski,
you will have a great time. Choose
your mountain carefully to meet
your needs and expenses. Then
bundle up and feel the rush

ECU gets first
official comm. club
3y Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
There is a new group
forming at ECU called the
Communications Society. The
society encompasses public
relations, journalism, print
and video. It was started as a
grassroots effort with the help
of three ECU students: Brandy
Ducher, Karen Permison and
Rick Miller. Communications
professor Mary Ann Leon also
assisted the students in get-
ting the society started by go-
ing through SGA and form-
ing the first official communi-
cations club at ECU.
The Communications
Society's vice president, Rick
Miller, said, "we realized
there was a need for more op-
portunities for communica-
tion majors and minors that
were not offered before at
ECU The main goals of the
Communications Society are
to provide campus involve-
ment for communication stu-
dents and to provide infor-
mation on internships and re-
sume-writing by having guest
speakers.
The society would also
like to plan some field trips to
radio and TV stations in Ra-
leigh. Another possible goal
is to bring in some represen-
tatives of professional societ-
ies, like the Public Relations
Society of America (PRSA) to
speak about their professions
as specialists in communica-
tion.
The society wants all com-
munication students to par-
ticipate. Miller said, "We are
here for the communication
students and to provide help
for the students in the work-
place The main purpose of
the society is to provide an
extra outlet to learn new tech-
nology and what companies
want from a graduating se-
See CLUB page 10
Philadelphia tackles AIDS epidemic
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Philadelphia,starringTom Hanks
and DenzelWashingtonand directed
by Jonathan Demme, is the first film
from a major Hollywood studio to
deal with AIDS.
The story opens as Andrew
Beckett (Hanks) wins a case which
allows a construction company to
continue with its work Later that
night, Beckett is summoned to his
firm's board room where the part-
ners assign him to an extremely im-
portantcase.Atthismeeting,thefirm's
satisfaction with Beckett's work is
clearly articulated.
At the same meeting, a senior
partner notices a lesion on Beckett's
forehead which Beckett offhandedly
claims came from a racquetball. A
month later, Beckett finds himself
unemployed for unsatisfactory work
at his firm.
A file from the huge case that
Beckett had been assigned islost,and
this allegedly forces the partners to
fire Beckett. Beckett feels he is re-
leased simply because he is a homo-
sexual with AIDS, and subsequently
decides to sue the firm.
Beckett can find no lawyer in
Philadelphia to take his case, so he
deddestofightthefirmhimself. While
studying in the library one night, a
clerk asks Beckett if he would feel
more comfortable in a private study
room Beckett appears to be sick and
is raggedly dressed. Beckett asks the
clerk pointedly if he would feel more
comfortable.
Before the uneasy clerk can find
words to respond, another lawyer,
who has seen the events transpire,
comes to sit with Beckett and dis-
misses theclerkThelawyer.IoeMiller
(Washington), originally refused to
take Beckett's case but has had sec-
ond thoughts. This chance meeting
forces Miller into an act of heroism.
He decides to take the case and fight
for justice.
WheriRonN)'Swaner,thescreen-
writer, developed the idea of Miller,
he found a way to punctuate his story
with an exclamation mark. Miller
gives the audience a character with
whom to relate, and as soon as the
audience acknowledges thisrelation,
then it must also feel the transforma-
tion that occurs in Miller.
When Miller and Beckett first
talk in the former's office, Miller un-
easily eyes all the objects that Beckett
touches in his office. His unease is
GoVt advises young against AIDS
By Kris Hoffler
6 y BaEggzal 6
J Don't Buy
JV Take Your Chances
MELA N l.�
5W1Tr
1w i J
i
RE f D G'MKNOWS MY'NAME
Mclanie
Freedom Knows My Name
Melanie is one of those '70s
singers who actually never
stopped singing. Point being,
she's back with her first album in
10 years, Freedom Knows My
Name. She's been all over the
place. She was at Woodstock, for
crying out loud!
But what about the music?
Well, it bears that protest-type
feeling a lot of that early '70s stuff
did. Lots of harmony. Lots of
acoustic stuff. Hey, there's a swell
acoustic cover of "Purple Haze
Now where else can you get that?
Speaking of covers, there's also a
cover of Dylan's "Hard Rain"
(Whooee! The Edie Brickell
tune!?).
I don't know though. A lot of
the songs are about life and loss
and love, etc. Just plain ol'
See MELANIE page 9
jJJ Worth A Try
j JJj Definite Purchase
Kevin Kinny
Down and Out Law
Kevin Kinny has just came
out with the interesting new re-
lease, Down and Out Law.
It's nothing like the fast-paced
electric music he's made with
Drivin' 'n' Cryin recently. This
album is almost exclusively
acoustic, and it contains a lot of
folk and blues. Some of it could
almost be mistaken for country.
The last couple of Drivin' 'n'
Cryin albums make me wonder
why - rery thing has been so hard
and fast. In the past they pro-
duced many really good acoustic
tracks, such as "Catch the Wind
and "Drop Your Tears At the
Door Fortunately, on Down and
Out Law, Kinny affirmed he
hadn't forgotten his foundation.
One thing this album is not is
a pick-me-upper: Most of the
songs deal with suffering.
Certain songs, such as the title
track, point out unfortunate
people. Other tracks, like "Save
For Me" and "Midwestern Blues
just speak of relationships gone
bad.
Kinny's voice is very rough
and rustic, and it's well-suited
for folk music although some
people could consider it whiny.
One of the few tracks that
contains any electric on it is titled
"ChattahoochieCoochie Man It
See KINNY page 8
Staff Writer
The government has an-
nounced that sexually active young
people between the ages of 18 and
25 are at extreme risk of being in-
fected by HIV. About 12 million
new cases of STDs, including HIV
infection, are reported each year in
the U.S two-thirds of which occur
in people under the age of 25.
In reaction to this information,
the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) have launched
their new Prevention Marketing
Initiative. On Tuesday, Jan. 4, the
federal government announced its
plan to reach young people with
information on how to prevent the
spread of HTV. The messages will
be in the form of television and
radio public service announcements
that convey two critical HTV pre-
vention messages: Delay sexual in-
tercourse, or use latex condoms cor-
rectly and consistently during sex.
Although thecampaignhasmet
some opposition from a few reli-
gious groups, it has received great
support from the government. The
Clinton Administration proposed
and guided through Congress sig-
nificant increases in discretionary
AIDS spending on all levels. The
CDC, on the prevention level, was
increased by 9; $543.3 million will
be spent in 1994 on education�a
good effort on the government's
part.
This age group that is being
targeted is famous�or infamous�
for the time it spends watching TV.
Therefore, much of this campaign
will logically be in the form of com-
mercials, including brochures and
radio ads. For TV the ads range in
ideas from a condom crawling
across the room to get to the unpro-
tected couple, to the turning down
ofsexbecausenocondomwasavail-
able, to the "let's wait" abstinence
theory. The radio public service
announcements have a popular
edge with skits by Anthony Kiedis
of the Chilli Peppers and other ce-
lebrities on the value of condoms.
Some of these ads will also be in
Spanish.
This program has received
much praise from many AIDS coa-
litions, medical and pharmaceuti-
cal associations, and religious and
youth organizations. There is no
doubt that HIV is a growing prob-
lem, and education is a step in the
right direction. Even if an audience
doesn't agree with their means, the
warnings should be heeded.
Daniel Bross, the executive di-
rector of the AIDS Action Council,
praises the CDC's program. "On
behalf of the AIDS Action Council,
I want to express our strong sup-
port for the new 'America Responds
to AIDS' public service announce-
ments Bross said. "The new cam-
paign, whichaggressively promotes
the use of latex condoms as an effec-
tive stragedy for preventing HTV, is
long overdue. We wholeheartedly
endorse this campaign and stand
ready to assist CDC in the battle
against the spread of HTV
conveyed brilliantly by Demme's
camera. Demme focuses for an un-
comfortable length of time on each
object Beckett touches. Miller ends
his day by stopping at his family
practitioner to find out informatibn
on AIDS. Miller, it seems, fears he
would take the virus home to his
family simply by having an AIDS
victim in his office.
The transformation of Miller
occurs only by degrees, which ren-
ders his change all the more believ-
able. Miller listens incredulously as
his wife tells Mm about me friends
she has who are homosexual, and
he almost hits a gay man who tries
to pick him up in a drug store. Yet,
by the end of this remarkable film,
Miller has become a friend as well
See PHILADELPHIA page 10
Networks
dump old
shows for new
Popular N.C Dance Theatre returns to Thalian Hall
By Stephanie Tullo
Lifestyle Editor
The North Carolina Dance
Theatre returns to Thalian Hall
on Jan. 29 to perform "The Rite Of
Spring" and other works. Thalian
Hall is in Wilmington, N.C. and
will hold two perfor-
mances on that day.
This particular
dance theater returns
by popular demand
with their classi-
cally-based con-
temporary
dance.
At2p.m.spe-
cial dance program
for children and their
families will be offered
There will be a narrated
performance of dance works
designed to reach the young at
heart. Tickets for this perfor-
mance are $5 per person. That
evening, at 8 p.m a full dance
concert will be presented which
will include the new ballet "The
Rite of Spring Tickets for the
evening performances are $17
$15$10 and include a free per-
formance preview with Artistic
Director Salvatore Aiello at 7 p.m.
Leading off the program are
two entertain-
ing perfor-
mances, "Al-
1 e g r o
Brillante" and
"Sundances
"Allegro
Brillante cho-
reographed by
George
Balanchine, dis-
plays the vivac-
ity and energy of
American classical
dance. The 10 perform-
ers move into complicated
and ever-changing dance patterns
to Tchaikowsky's powerful piano
work.
The second performance,
"Sundances is choreographed
by Greek Cypriot Lambros
Lambrou to the music of Yiannis
Markoupoulous. It is a rhythmic
celebration of the sun with classi-
cal movements drawn from Greek
folk dancing.
The grand finale for the
evening is Stravinsky's "The Rite
of Spring choreographed by
Salvatore Aiello. "The Rite of
Spring" is a sensuous ballet which
portrays primitive tribal rituals
celebrating the seasonal death
and renewal of the earth.
For tickets or reservations,
call or visit the Center Box Office
at Thalian Hall, 310 Chestnut
Street, 343-664. Long-distance
customers in N.C. may call toll-
free at 1-800-523-2820. These per-
formances are presented by
Thalian Hall Center for the Per-
forming Arts, Inc with financial
support from the North Carolina
Arts Council.
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Ifs
time for television's midseason
metamorphosis, when networks
dump their weak-witted sitcoms
and struggling dramas and intro-
duce well, more of the same.
OK, OK, let's give them a
chance; maybe a butterfly or two
will emerge among the new shows
to delight audiences.
A moment, however, fbf'a
couple of the dearly departed. The
big loss: NBC's fine family drama
"Against the Grain set in a foot-
ball-crazy Texas town. Despite
good reviews, it couldn't get, a
ratings first down.
Also gone is ABC's lightly
plotted but charmingly played
"Moon Over Miami a "Moon-
lighting" couldabeen. The net-
work claims it's on hiatus, but
expect that to be a permanent con-
dition.
Now, the contenders. �
Five new series are already
up and running, including ABC's
"Birdland" (10p.m. EST Wednes-
day), starring Brian Dennehy as a
hospital psychiatric director. CBS
has "Burke's Law with Gene
Barry picking up the sleuth rolehe
played 30 years ago (9 p.m. EST
Friday).
Fox Broadcasting Co. gave the
midseason nod to "The George
CarlinShow" (9:30 p.m. EST Sun-
day), featuringthecomedian's ver-
bal antics, and to Henry Winkler
as a Rush Limbaugh-type in
"Monty" (8 p.m. EST Tuesday)
A pack of other shows waits
in the wings. ABC is staking"its
hopes on a mix of sitcoms, dra-
mas, a news magazine and one
animated comedy series.
"The Critic a half-hour car-
toon from the producers of Fox's
"The Simpsons premieres 8:30
p.m. EST Wednesday. Jon Lovitz
provides thevoiceofJaySherman,
a pudgy, acerbic New York film
critic coping with a tough boss, a
See TV page 9





8 The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
Tahiti, Fiji featured in Travel- Adventure
By Danial Willis
Staff Writer
This past Monday, the ravel
dventure Film series came to E L
promoting the islands of lip and Ta-
hiti, rhe film pointed out rhatthetwo
nations have certain similarities, hut
thev are very different.
TTiev are both volcanic in origin,
theyhnithhaveiiUTediblesivnen and
they bom border the equator.
(ieot the first things pointed out
was that ancestorsof Fiji werebrought
to the West by the British, and ances-
tors of Tahiti were brought by the
i tench. During the presentation of
liji, the culture, and the people were
emphasized.Civilization in Fiji would
be considered primitive by our West-
ern standards.
Many ceremonial activities, such
as walkingonhotstonesand drinking
lertainnarcotic-likesubstancestopre-
serve the spin tot relatives which have
passed away, take place in FijiThe
people of Fiji seem very laid back and
were very eager to welcome visitors.
In the film, thev were depicted as
extremely generous people win icarred
little about material items.
The population in Fiji isn't ex-
tremely large. At one point in the
film the narrarator noted that traffic
lias gotten a lot worse in Fiji, but it's
still nothing compared to the traffic
in Greem ille.The price of living in
liii is considered very low by travel
s. ndardswhile the price of living in
Tahiti is considered very high.
Tahiti has a larger population
than Fiji. In the film, the traffic in
certain parts of Tahiti was com pi red
to large U.S. cities such as Chicago.
The section on Tahiti pointed
out more attractions, such as night
dubs and restaurants, that appeal
sped fica 11 v to tourists. Tahiti seemed
to be a much more modernized
area.The feature on Tahiti also
showed a little more tropical scen-
ery. In the Tahiti series, there was a
feature on scuba diving. The scuba
diving section showed sharks, reefs
and other aquatic element
Fiji seems like more ot a hidden
resort�agoodplacetogoinordor
explores different culture�butbet
ter known Tahiti is more of a tourist
attraction.
KINNY
Continued from page 7
soundsalmost likea Fop song.
In a Mammoth press release
Kinny said, "I've crisscrossed
America many times, and I am
keen to the human condition ot
the politically correct, the strip
malls, the yin, the vang, the un-
employed . the unappreciated the
hip, the down, the squares, the
hopeless, the poets, the realists
the dreamers, the skeptics, the
pessimists, the optimists, the
down and out, the law
t the end of the recording,
I think Kinny may reveal why
he made this album when he
s,is, A full cup of coffee, a lull
tank nt gas. an open road, and a
real good sense of humor will
always get you through This
isn't an album for the masses,
but it contains some ideas to
which most of us an relate
� Daniel
Willis
When a place gets crowded enough to
require IDs, social collapse is not far
away.lt is time to go elsewhere. The best
thing about space travel is that it made
it possible to go elsewhere.
-R. A. Heinlein
Time Enough For Love
Photo Courtesy of ECU Student Union
A native of Fiji performs the Dance of the Golden Sun, one of the
islanders and traditions featured in the Travel-Adventure Film.
1STEED
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January 27, 1994
The Fast Carolinian 19
TV
Continued from page 7
spiteful ex-wife md lousy novies.
The bright spot is his young son.
"Byrdsof Paradise" from pro-
ducer Steven Bochco (riding high
with NYPD Blue") stars
"thii -tysomething" alumnus 1 imo-
th Busfield.Heplajfsaii'aleprofes-
sor who moves with he three chil-
dren to 1 lawaii aftei his wife is
murdered
"Thunder Alley ' features Ed
Asner as a retired stock-car racer
who opens his Indianapolis home
to his newly divoced daughter and
her tnoot children. "Home Improve-
ment" produce' Matt Williams is
the behind-the-scenes talent.
Cornediar Ellen DeGeneres
stars in " nese Friends of Mine a
comedy created for her by the pro-
ducers of "The Wonder Years She's
a single woman in I os Angeles, a
Mary I lei Moore for the 'Llk, say
the producers.
ackee Harry and Tim Reid star
in "Sister, Sister" as the single par-
ents oi adopted twin girls. When the
girls discover each other at age 13,
Harry ana Reid decide to move in
together.
Premiere dates have vet to be
announced tor the four series.
Throw another news magazine
on the TV fire: "Turning Point
with correspondents Meredith
Vieira. John Donvan, Don Kladstnip
and Deborah Amos premieres It)
p.m. EST March 9. It features one
story and one reporter per outing.
CBS has three comedies and
twodramas in the wings, all but one
awaiting premiere dates.
"Tom Arnold" bows 8:30 p.m.
EST Wednesday, March 2. Arnold
stars as a working-class man who
tries to build a dreamh.iuse for his
family on a Kansas farm � next to a
city dump.
"Muddling Through" is an off-
beat comedy starrir.g Stephanie
Hodge as a woman who has spent
three years in jail for shooting her
unfaithful husband,and who now
wants her old life bark.
Producer Normin Lear is back
with "704 HauserTt's "All in the
Family" in reverse: he sitcom stars
John Amos as a bbe-collar liberal
bedeviled by an dtraconservahve
son.
The dranv "Traps" stars
George C. Scottas a veteran homi-
cide chief and Dan Cortese as his
nonconformist grandson, also a de-
tective. It's from producer Stephen
. Cannell ("The Commish "The
A-Team").
Karen Allen and Terence Knox
star as husband and wite in the
drama "Down I lome a chronicle
of an extended family living along
North Carolina's tide waters.
NBC has announced a single
midseason entry so far. " Winnetka
Road" comes from Aaron Spelling,
and stars Ed Beglev r Meg filly
and osh Brolin in a Midwestern
saga. A premiere date was unan-
nounced.
Air dates also weren't an-
nounced for a pair of Fox shows,
one a sober-mined sitcom and the
cither a reality-based series.
"South Central" is a half-hour
show that promises tocombinecom-
edy and drama in the struggle of a
single black mother trying to raise
her famil) in South (. entra
Angeles. I ina I ifford stars
"Cop Files hostedb) Ri
Roundtree, features re- reatii
memorable pol lift asesfeatui
the reality show "( Ops
1 i OS
hard
nsol
edon
"Recycle for
the good of
environment,
collect glassf
plastic and
other
recyclable
itemsr
MELANIE
workin'class songs, I guess. C he k
her out oil "Wear it 1 ike a Flag
"Who put tin- smile on my fa e
Somebody sounded alarm I go
to sleep now with one eye open ,
;hl dream with one lighton
What about the poetics ol the
title tra k: ' I o the i hild without a
promise t To the frightened and
thetame Althoughit'sjustawhis
Continued from page 7
per Freedom knows your name
. . Now that's, songwnting
That's like Billy Uu k
But folks, it's your all It's
not jams. It's not hardcore It is
what it is: songs I he voice and
the words and the meaning are
what this album is about, .md
that's the way roc k and roll used
to be.
� Andy
Sugg
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10 The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
PHILADELPHIA
Continued from page 7
as a lawyer to Beckett and has come to
terms with his own homophobia.
Philaiitiphni is as much Miller's
storv as Beckett's. One of the most
transfixing, scenes contains only these
two men. After a party that Beckett
throws, he and Miller sit down to
review thequestions tha twill beasked
of Beckett when he takes the witness
stand the following Monday.
Beckett dearly cares little about
the question, t le realizes that he is
nearing death and that he may not
live to see the outcome ot the trial. 1 le
talkstranklv with Miller whileMoart
plays in the background. When "1 a
Mamma Morta an ana from the
opera Andre Chenier, plays, Beckett
asks Miller if he likes opera. Upon
hearing a negative response, Beckett
relates his loveof opera and especially
of this particular aria.
�Cl
JANUARY
Campus Paperback Bestsellers
1. The Days Are Ju�t Packed, by Bill Watterson (Andrews
& McMeei. $12.95.) More "Calvin and Hcobes" cartoons.
2. The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan. (Ivy. $5.99Destinies ol
Chinese immigrant women and their Chinese-American daughters
3. The Age Of Innocence, by EdrSi Wharton. (CollierMacmillan.
$5.95.) New Yak society lite in the late 19th century.
4. The Way Things Ought To Be, by Rush Limbaugh
(Pocket Star, $6.50) Controversial issues - that's Umbaugh territory
5. Mixed Blessing, by Danielle Steel (Dell, $6.99.)
Having ohsdren creates tense relationships
6. Seven Habits ol Highly Etfecttve People, by Steven R Covey
(Fireside. $9.95.) Guide to personal tutfillment.
7. The Chickens are Restless, by Gary Larson
(Andrews & McMeei. $8.95.) New collection ol cartoons
8. Hare Ak, by Michael Jordan. (HarperCollins. $25.00.)
Autobiography by the retired basketball superstar.
9. The Pelican Brtet, by John Graham. (Den, $6.99.) Law studem
finds herself on the run from killers of two Supreme Court justices
10. The Killer Angels, by Michael Shaara (Ballantine. $5.99.)
Dramatic recreation of The Battle ot Gettysburg
� tm�al t cu�W, toM '
Tiew& Recommended
� Carnal OaWiT Hgi �
Anatomy of Love, Helen Fisher, Ph.D. (FawceH, $12.50.)
The mysteries of mating, marriage, and why we stray � explaining it
all in this four minion-year history of the human species.
Rediscoveries: American Short Stories by Women: 1832-1916.
by Barbara Solomon. (Mentor. $5.99.) Unique anthology by 21
American women writers encompassing the entire 19th century
Tha 100 Beat Companies to Work for In America,
by Robert Levering. (Plume. $12.95.) Up-to-date reference source
for anyone In pursuit of that rare commodity: the idea' ob.
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Beckett emotionallv tells Miller
what is being siici. Throughout the
scene, MiJler's face rerruinsdark while
Ih kett'siseerily illuminated asafire
flickers in the background. Near the
end of this powerful scene, firelight
flickers acn ss Miller's face, insinuat-
ing that Miller was finally seeing
Beckett a a human being instead of
ust a gay lawyer with AIDS. The
audience finally sees more to Beckett
than has previously been related.The
ind ign i ties vlsj ted upon him suddenly
become even more horrible and un-
conscionable.
Philadelphia, for all its many at-
tributes, still handles homosexuality
with Uo delicate a touch. Never once
does Beckett kiss his partner( Antonio
Banderas) on screen, although Miller
Lsstvn Ussinghb. wife.Though Beckett
and his partner dance together and
have se eral minor scenes together,
their compassion and love never gets
dearly related.
The horrors of A IDS only briefly
get shown asBeckett Rises weight and
once exposes his torso to reveal
Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) lesions.
Though not all AIDS victims suffer
severe KS lesions and severe thin-
ning, many do. Had Beckett wors-
ened moredrastically.orhad thecam-
era allowed the audience to see more
of his decline, then the ravages of
AIDS would have been more force-
fully evident.
Though many viewers will be
turned off, the truth needs to be fold.
Perhaps only documentaries, like the
harrowingoneofTomjoslinand Mark
Massi, two lovers who both died of
AIDS (Sihvrkke Life: Vie Vierv From
Here) will have the courage to un-
flincliingly show the horrors and the
sorrow associated with this disease.
Near the end of Philadelphia,
Beckett seems to lose interest in the
trial as his condition worsens. When
Rar lyShilts, an AIDS victim and the
author of Ami the Band Played On:
Politic. People, and the AIDS Epidemic,
was recently interviewed about the
success of his book and the HBO
movie made from it, he said: "The
acclaim Ls really exciting and really,
anally great, but let's face it HIV has a
wayofputtingeverything in perspec-
tive
So it does. So does Philadelphia.
On a scale of one to 10, Philadel-
phia rates a nine.
Why Ask Why?
PI LAMBDA PHI
RUSH DATES:25 28
Tuesday - Western Night
Wednesday - Basketball Night
Thursday - Pasta Night
Friday - Invitation Only
For Rides & Info Call 830 5196
(Ask for Jeremy, Stu or Jason) '
or 830 6129
(Ask for JB or Rich)
CLUB
Continued from page 7
nior. Jobs are not ety to find these
days for anyone coung straight
out of college and schis group is
trying to give stud&ts an extra
advantage above otlirs The so-
ciety hopes to orient U members
with equipment and tcget a bet-
ter understanding of r-vv tech-
nology.
The first meeting washeld at
Chico's restaurant, and metJngs
are usually held every ither
Wednesday. The officers a reresi-
dent Troy Drevfuss, vice presi-
dent Rick Miller, secretary Laura
Wirer and treasurer Karen
Permisoa MiUersaid they would
all like an organization that is
recognized by the university and
the town of C ireenville� one that
will continue after they are gone.
The society is an excellent
oppurtunitv for communication
students to learn moreabout their
profession and beat the competi-
tion in the future job market.
Eight two-hour sessions designed i prepare you
for the format and content of the
March 19,1994 GMAT Exam
GMAT
Review
Course
Cmir.sc Schedule:
TuesdayHcbniaryK
Thursdayl-chnial) 10
TuesdayFebruary is
ThursdayIchniary 17
TuesdayFebruary 22
ThursdayFebruary 24
TuesdayMarch I
ThursdayMarch 3
Course Time:
6:30 p.m8V)p m.
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$170 lleginmiig January 26
V crbal and Malli Topics in ll('Vifvr(:
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Problem Solving (Arithmetic A;cbra. Geometry)
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Locution:
General Classroom Duilding, Room ttkj
Instructors:
Dr. Patrick Ilizaro. Associate Professor,English
Dr. Mark A. Coffin. Assistant Professor, locisimi Sciences
Texts:
The Princeton Review. C'r.u king the System The GMAT
The Official Guide for GMAT Review
(Cm of lexis tadttdctl ill repMutnm fi-c)
Presented by
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The East Carolinian
Page 12
Sports
January 27, 1994
Wlmt's On Tap?
Thursday, Jan. 27
W. Basketball, away
at Richmond, Richmond Va at
7:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 28
W. Indoor Track, away
at Delaware, Penn & Lafayette,
Newark, DE
Saturday, Jan. 29
M. Basketball, home
vs. UNC-Wilmington, 4 p.m.
(HTS)
W. Indoor Track, away
at "Patriot Games George
Mason, Fairfax, Va.
M. Indoor Track, away
at "Patriot Games George
Mason, Fairfax, Va.
Tlie411
Monday, Jan. 24
W. Basketball, away
lost to Old Dominion, 87-53
Tuesday, Jan. 25
M&W swimming, home
men lost to UNC: 132-98
women lost to UNO, 143-92
Men's CAA Leuilcrs
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB
6-0 1.00
JMU
UNCW
ODU
UR
AU
ecu
GMU
W&M
4-1
3-2
2-3
2-3
2-4
1-4
1-4
.800
.600
.400
.400
.400
.200
.200
2
2.5
3.5
3.5
4
4.5
4.5
Overall
11-4 .733
10-5
10-6
6-10
5-11
10-7
6-10
2-11
.667
.625
.375
.313
588
.375
.133
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Kent Culuko, JMU
Tim Fudd, AU
Obeli Hodge ODU
Donald Ross. GMU
Lester Lyons, ECU
Rebounding Avg
David Cutty. W&M
205
18.8
187
181
17.1
96
Shenf EL-Sanadily. UNCW 8 3
Odeil Hodge. ODU 8.1
Kenwan Afford. GMU 7.6
Clayton Ritter, JMU 7.6
Assist Avg
Troy Manns, GMU 7.1
Kevin Larkin, ODU 4.9
Kevin Swann, ODU 4.8
Drew Phillips, UNCW 4.4
Curtis McCants, GMU 4.1
Field Goal
Clayton Ritter, JMU .610
Anton Gill, ECU .539
Kass Weaver, UR .535
Odell Hodge, ODU .527
Kevin Swann, ODU 504
Free Throw
Kent Culuko, JMU 920
Kevin Swann. ODU 865
Christian Ast, AU 833
Lester Lyons, ECU .825
Matt Verkey, W&M .816
3-pt Field Goat
Kent Culuko, JMU .521
Darren McLinton, JMU .436
Corey Stewart, UNCW .435
Skipp Schaefbauer, ECU .419
Darryl Franklin, AU .418
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
Old Dominion 8.3
James Madison 6.1
East Carolina 5.4
UNC Wilmington 2.0
Richmond -0.5
George Mason -4.8
American -7.1
William & Mary -8.7
Rebounding Margin
UNC Wilmington 4.9
East Carolina 3.0
Richmond 1 9
Old Dominion 1.4
George Mason 0.9
James Madison -0.7
American -1.3
William & Mary -4.5
Field Goal
James Madison 49.7
UNC Wilmington 45.9
Old Dominion 44.7
East Carolina 44.3
Richmond 43.7
William & Mary 42.7
George Mason 42.5
American 41.5
Def. Field Goal
Old Dominion 43.5
UNC Wilmington 43.6
East Carolina 43.7
James Madison 44.6
George Mason 45.9
Richmond 45.9
William & Mary 46 7
American 49.6
Compiled by Brad Oldham
Pirates drop first home loss to JMU
File Photo
Lester Lyons,
rebounds,six
seen here last season against JMU, has improved his overall game this year. Lyons grabbed 10
assist ,and four steals. He also slowed JMU s star Kent Culuko to just 11 points.
By Dave Pond
Assistant Sports Editor
East Carolina lost to confer
ence leader James Madison Uni-
versity in a close battle in Minges
Colesium last night. The Pirates fell
70-68 due to poor first-half shoot-
ing, from which they couldn't re-
cover.
Pirate fans (6,204) packed
Minges Colesium to see the tele-
vised ball game, and were rewarded
with one of the most exciting con-
ference matchups of the year.
ECU point guard Kareem
Richardson scored first, hitting a
14-foot jumper from the right side.
The Pirates held the lead at 8-5 until
they hit a scoring drought, not scor-
ing for almost six minutes. How-
ever, they continued to play hard-
nosed, tenacious defense which
kept them in the game.
Anton Gill's lay-up with five
minutes remaining in the first half
put ECU on top, but JMU stormed
back. Kent Culuko, the CAA's top
scorer, drove through the ECU de-
fense and hit a 7-foot jumper to put
the Dukes up by five at 35-30.
The first half was dominated
by exceptional team defense and
poor ECU shooting. The Pirates
ended the half shooting 33.3 per-
cent, with no points coming from
three-pointers.
Kareem Richardson's eight
points led the Pirates in scoring,
while the Dukes were led by guard
Dennis Leonard, who also had
eight. Early in the game, the two
guards exchanged heated words
and had to be separated by team-
mates and officiaLs.
ECU came out on fire in the
second half, and with three min-
utes gone, found themselves up by
two points, at 37-35. The Pirates
took control of the tempo, receiv-
ing hot shooting from Anton Gill,
who ended up with a team-high 16
points on 7-10 shooting.
"I was kind of passive during
the first half, so I tried to come out
and be more agressive he said.
"Also, the fans have really been
supporting us
The Pirates slowly lost control
of the lead, but held a 62-62 tie with
4:06 remaining. After ECU took a
time out, JMU forward Clayton
Ritter scored from underneath,
putting the Dukesupby two. Lester
Lyons came back and nailed a three-
pointer for the Pirates, giving ECU
See GAME page 16
Tarheels sweep
Pirate swimmers
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The ECU men's swim team
suffered their first defeat of the
season on Tuesday against the
North Carolina Tarheels. The
Tarheels won 132-98, while the
Lady Tarheels got the win as well,
1424-92. The Pirate men are now
10-1 on the season, while the
women are 9-2. Both teams are
undefeated in the CAA confer-
ence at 4-0.
"It was probably our closest
meet ever against UNC head
coach Rick Kobe said after the
loss. "We are very pleased with
our performance today. We had
hard practices both yesterday and
this morning to get ready for the
Tarheels
David Benson led the Pirate
men with two wins in the 200-
meter freestyle (1:45.41) and the
100-meter butterfly (57.85). ECU
also got help from senior Lance
Tate, who won the 100-meter
breaststroke with a time of 1:00.67.
The relay team of Brian Soltz, Pat
Cassidy, Chris Bembenek and
John Donovan placed first in the
200-meter free.
For the Lady Pirates, junior
Meg Lawton and senior
Jacqueline Silber both had first-
place finishes for the day. Lawton
got the win in the 50-meter
freestyle with a time of 26.08, while
Silber won the 100-meter freestyle
with a time of 56.38. Lawton also
finished second in the 100-meter
freestyle (57.26). Other runners-
up were: sophomore Jackie
Schmeider 200-meter freestyle
(1:58.24); junior Tracy Garrett 50-
meter freestyle (26.21); sophomore
Hilary Stokes 100-meter breast-
stroke (1:09.53); and the team of
Schmeider, freshman Elizabeth
Bradner, sophomore Beth
Humphrey, and freshman Christy
Winn in the 200-meter free relay
(1:43.91).
The Pirates have just one meet
left in the season before they host
the conference championships.
ECU will travel to Wilmington,
N.C.onJan.29at2p.m.tofacethe
SeahawksofUNC-W.
Home winning streak spoiled
By Brian Olson
Sports Editor
Minges Colesium has meant
everything to the Pirates this year
until last night.
The James Madison Dukes
snapped ECU's home unbeaten
streak with a 70-68 win. The Pirates
arenow7-latMingesandhavejust
one win on the road this year and
that did not come against a CAA
opponent. ECU just cannot seem to
bring thatwinningedge with them
when theyplayaway. ECU is just 1-
6 on the road.
The Pirates were heavy under-
dogs going into the game against
the Dukes, but the 6,204 fans and
home court advantage helped keep
the Bucs close.
"I just hope they the fans stick
with us and keep coming out head
coach Eddie Payne said
Minges only holds 6,500 and
the almost sell-out has shown how
the Pirates and the CAA confer-
ence has grown over the last few
years.
The game was also seen on the
Home Team Sports Network and
all of the crowd noise and enthusi-
asm was sure to impress many
viewers. Many fans waved yellow
Pirate sabers to cheer the Pirates on
and others waved annoying
signsatJMUplayersduringfoul
shots.
"The fans have really sup-
ported us so far this year and we
need the support of the fans to
really pick us up during the
game center Anton Gill said
"When we made a run at the
begjning of the second half the
fans really helped us out
This was the first of two
home games for the Pirates this
week after coming off road
losses to W&M and Richmond
ThePirates will host UNC-W at
home on Sat. at 4 p.m.
NFL rerun set for Sunday
Wallerstrom gives
ECU foreign aid
By Flame Deal
(AP) � What could be new?
Certainly not the teams, nor the
incentives nor the buildup.
Still, the Buffalo Bills and Dal-
las Cowboys have found a few
original ways of spicing up
Sunday's Super Bowl.
For one, they've given us the
first immediate rematch in the 28-
year history of the game.
"I expect this to be a great
Super Bowl Cowboys coach
Jimmy Johnson said, which means
he's looking for something rela-
tively new � there's only been a
handful of great Super Bowls.
"It's nice to be a part of his-
tory, but that's not the ultimate
goal said Bills linebacker Darryl
Talley of Buffalo's record fourth
consecutive trip to the big game.
"The ultimate goal is the thing
that's eluded us, something we
have to make up in our minds and
we've got to conquer and attack
and get it
Getting the NFL champion-
ship would be something very new
for a franchise that has managed to
be outscored 109-60 in the big
game.
Marv Levy's approach to the
game might be different after the
distractions of the last three, rang-
ing from the Gulf War in 1991 to
Bruce Smith's comments on rac-
ism in 1992 to Talley's nightclub
punchout with Magic Johnson's
bodyguard a year ago. The Bills
coach is thinking of placing a cur-
few on his players, something that
rarely has worked for other Super
Bowl teams.
"I have a player's committee,
which I'll confer with tomorrow
Levy said Monday. "We'll talk
about it. I'd like to get their reac-
tion and their experience in this
area.
"I think it can be a mistake to
have your players sitting in their
hotel rooms every night. We talk
to them about common sense
The Cowboys won't be fool-
ing with any curfews. It's simply
not necessary, guard Nate New-
ton said.
"Last year, we were just wild
he said, noting that they still won
52-17. "It didn't matter we were
just out there. This year, we're a
little bit more in control, we're
aware of the situation
The law of averages suggest
that something very rare should
happen in an upcoming Super
Bowl � an AFC victory. It has
been exactly a decade since the Los
Angeles Raiders beat Washington
for the last AFC win.
"If experience is any factor,
we know the highs and lows
Bills general manager John Butler
said. Butler, incidentally, is new to
his job, having replaced Bill Polian
last year. "When you look at the
See SUPERBOWL page 16
Staff Writer
It's a long way from the
quaint Swedish village of Solna
to the flourishing tobacco fields
of Eastern North Carolina. But
for six-foot East Carolina Lady
Pirate center Michaela
Wallerstrom, Tobacco Road is
the place she wanted to play
basketball.
The East Carolina women's
basketball team has become
truly international. This year,
the Lady Pirates have two play-
ers that have traveled across
the Atlantic Ocean hoping to
score here in the United States.
Along with Wallerstrom,
Staffordshire, England's Justine
Alipress will call Greenville, N.
C. home for the next four years.
ECU has already tasted the
sweet success of international
relations when it comes to
hoops. England's Gaynor
O'Donnell left the Lady Pi-
rates last year as the women's
NCAA career leader in assists.
For Wallerstrom and
Alipress, the teammates are
also roommates. When asked
about Wallerstrom, Alipress
says she is very impressed
with her new Swedish friend.
"I can relate to her says
Alipress. "We are a support
system for each other. I don't
know how I would have coped
in coming here to play bas-
ketball without her
Like her fellow country-
men Bjorn Borg and Stefan
Edberg, Wallerstrom emits a
See WALLERSTROM page 16
1
Cowboys are
super favorite
Michaela Wallerstrom
(AP)�Las Vegas sportsbooks
didn'tgetthedreammatxhup they'd
hoped for SanFrancisco vs. Kansas
City and former 49ers quarterback
Joe Montana.
Instead, they got Dallas vs. Buf-
faloandquicklymadetheCowboys
a 10-point favorite.
Most books reported betting
was light Sunday night, with The
Miragererx)rtingonebettorplacing
$100,000 on the Bills at 4-1. The Bills
failed to cover the point spread as
they lost the last three Super Bowls.
Tnelastthreeyears,themoney
has been on Buffalo said
oddsmaker Michael Roxborough
Consequentiy,thestate'ssports
books have won on the last three
Super Bowls.
Bookmakers say the)' are con-
cerned with the health of Cowboys
quarterback Troy Aikmart
"If Aikman's status changes,
thenumberwouldchange greatly
said Art Manteris, race and sports
rxwkdirectorattheLasVegasrlilton
Roxborough said Dallas
could drop to a 5-point favorite if
Aikman can't play.
Most sports books had been
pulling for San Franciscc, counting
on heavier betting action with a
California team in the Super BowL
A matchup between the 49ers and
KansasQty,whogottotheplayoffs
onMontana'samvwouldhavebeen
ideal
'It was kind of quiet Jimmy
Vaccaro,manageroftheNliragerace
andsportsbook,saidSundaynight
The Las Vegas Hilton put up its
Super Bowlnumberdunhgrhe third
quarterofrhe49ers-Cowboy5game,
opening Dallas as a 10-point favor-
ite.
Manteris said early money in-
cluded .several $20,000 bete on Buf-
falo, and he thought of moving the
line to 9 12 until Dallas money
began coming in
Vinny Magliulo, sports book
manager at Caesars Palace, opened
Dallas a 9 12-point favorite but
quickly moved the number to 10.





January 27. 1994
The East Carolinian 13
(AP) � The Atlantic Coast
Conference is revamping the way it
schedules football games, a change
that could bring in millions of dol-
lars in television money.
Traditionally, colleges have ar-
ranged football games several years
in advance. Some schedules, in fact,
are booked for a decade or longer.
With such lead time, hotels and
restaurants have been able to plan
ahead for home games, which can
draw tens of thousands of fans for a
weekend. They've also been able to
spread big business around by steer-
ing festivals, conventions and other
events to dates when the local team
is on the road.
Now that's changing, The hi exes
& Observer of Raleigh reported.
In search of lucrative television
contracts, the ACC has decideTto
wait until the last minute to firm up
its league pairings. The conference
will now announce gamedateseach
year in December, nine months be-
fore the season starts.
With the new policy, the ACC
figures it can capitalize on more
television deals with national net-
works such as ESPN and ABC.
With more flexibility, the
league hopes to be able to move
attractive matchups into slots that
have a better chance of getting on
the tube.
The ACC first revised itssched-
ules to suit television in 1993. The
result: 23 league games appeared
on na tional TV, more than twice the
number from the year before.
Each nationally televised game
Former boxing champ
loses another battle
(AP) � A television station's
report that a deal was in the works
that could free Mike Tyson was
denied yesterday by a spokes-
man for the prosecutor's office,
who said no such agreement
would even be considered.
Tyson, a former heavyweight
champion, was convicted of rap-
ing a beauty pageant contestant
in an Indianapolis hotel room in
1991. He is serving a six-year
prison sentence at the Indiana
Youth Center.
WTHR-TV of Indianapolis
first reported Monday night that
Tyson would admit the crime in
return for prosecutors agreeing
to cut his sentence to time served.
Both sides may be agreeable to
such a deal to avoid an upcoming
hearing in the Indiana Court of
Appeals on whether the
prosecutor's office withheld evi-
dence, the TV station said.
"That's not true. There is no
such deal Rob Smith, a spokes-
man for prosecutor Jeffrey
Modisett, said. "We're not enter-
taining any deal similar to that
from any party
WTHR said neither side was
talking publicly about the deal,
and it did not disclose its sources
for the report.
"To my knowledge we have
not been approached and if we
were approached we would not
entertain any such deal Smith
said. "No one from the office has
been approached" or offered a
deal, he said.
WTHR reported this morn-
ing that "prosecutors are said to
be waiting for the Tyson camp to
file their proposed deal with the
courts before a decision is made
Tyson attorney Alan
Dershowitz, reached at his home
in the Boston area late Monday,
said he could not comment on
whether any representatives for
Tyson were pursuing negotia-
tions that could lead to an early
release.
"I've had no discussions"
with the prosecutor's office,
Dershowitz said. "I am going
ahead and preparing for the hear-
ing
The Court of Appeals rejected
Tyson's first appeal to reverse his
1992 conviction. Dershowitz has
taken that appeal to the U.S. Su-
preme Court, but it has not de-
cided whether to hear the case.
The defense also pursued a
second round of appeals on its
contention that Tyson should
have a new trial because the
prosecutor's office withheld from
the defense team information that
the woman intended to sue Tyson
for civil damages. The defense
claimed that the information
showed she was motivated to by
a potentially large damage award
against the former heavyweight
boxing champion.
The woman, Desiree Wash-
ington, was a contestant in the
Miss Black America pageant held
in Indianapolis in July 1991.
;s for TV
brought in about $350,000, which
meant an extra $4 million above
1M42, not counting regionalTV. The
money was divided evenly among
the conference's nine schools.
"What we're trying to do, obvi-
ously, is maximize TV exposure
said Tom Mickle, assistant commis-
sioner for the ACC. "The benefits
could be huge
The financial boon will likely
grow more. For its 1993 and 1994
schedules, the ACC mostly tink-
ered with game dates that had been
set years in advance and most
schools had to change only two or
three home matchups.
But starting in 1995, the con-
ference will essentially start its
league schedule from scratch,
Mickle said.
Olson's
Trivial
Quiz
Q: Who holds the
record for most
points scored in a
regular season
CAA conference
game.
A: 45 by David Robinson
with Nazn versus James
Madison on Jan. 10,1987.
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14 The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
Dolphins could also go to Huizenga
Owner already has two other teams in Florida
(AP) � Before H. Wayne
Huizenga can complete his pur-
chase of the Miami Dolphins, he
must persuade the NFL to waive
a longstanding rule against cross-
ownership of other teams.
Huizenga, who already owns
baseball's Florida Marlins and the
NHL Florida Panthers,bought the
Dolphins from the family that
founded the franchise in 1966.
Thedeal announced Monday will
require approval from NFL own-
ers.
"It's not a slam dunk
Huizenga admitted.
Published reports quoted
unidentified sources as saying the
purchase price was $138 million.
Owning the Dolphins would
strengthen the 55-year-old
Huizenga's position as one of the
nation's most influential figures
in the sports and entertainment
fields. The head of Blockbuster
Entertainment said he had sev-
eral motivations for making the
deal.
"It was made as a fan, as a
businessman, and because my
wife told me she likes the Dol-
phins Huizenga said at a news
conference.
The sale was expected, and
there had been ongoing specula-
tion about Huizenga's interest.
The heirs of Dolphins founder
Joe Robbie, who died in 1990,
were forced to sell the team so
they could pay a $47 million es-
tate tax debt.
"I feel like I've been hit by a
truck said an emotional Janet
Robbie, one of the Dolphins' trust-
ees. "We'll always be proud of
our father for ha ving brought pro-
fessional sports to South Florida
Huizenga, a former Dolphins
season-ticket holder, began his
business career as a Fort Lauder-
dale garbage man in the 1950s.
He built Blockbuster into the
nation's largest video retailer be-
fore venturing into sports.
The purchase was
Huizenga's second major trans-
action this month. On Jan. 7, he
agreed to an S8.4 billion merger
between Blockbuster and cable
television giant Viacom Inc.
Huizenga will become vice chair-
man of the merged companies.
The mega-conglomerate is
trying to purchase Paramount
Communications Inc which
owns the New York Knicks and
Rangers.
That could complicate
Huizenga'scross-ownership situ-
ation.
"This would be a big change
in the rule said New Orleans
Saints owner Tom Benson, chair-
man of the NFL's finance com-
mittee. "It's not going to be an
easy task getting that done. But
I'm not saying it won't get done,
either
The finance committee, made
up of seven NFL owners, will
visit with Huizenga andsubmita
recommendation to the other 21
owners. Huizenga expects he can
persuade them to make an excep-
tion to the cross-ownership rule.
"A lot of things have changed
since they put that rule into ef-
fect Huizenga said.
"I've been told by the com-
missioner (Paul Tagliabue) that
they are looking at visiting that
subject themselves and perhaps
changing the rule
In a statement, the NFL said:
"We cannot speculate on the
league's final evaluation of these
matters
The league expects a final
vote on the sale prior to its annual
meeting March 20 in Orlando.
Dolphins coach Don Shula,
who has one year left of his con-
tract, will remain at least through
1994, Huizenga said.
CBS searching into Winston Cup
(AP) � A Nashville Network
executive expects the cable channel
to remain at the forefront of televis-
ing Winston Cup races even though
CBS is looking for new sports to
replace NFL games.
TheNashvilleNetworkdevotes
tnore time to NASCAR racing than
any of the major networks or cable
channels. The cable station w ill tele-
vise eight live Winston Cup races
IJtjs year, up one from 1993. Virtu-
ally all its Sunday schedule is about
rjiotorsports.
! CBS, which already has rights
ticjthe Daytona 500, recently lost its
IFL contract to the Fox network.
CBS executives said last week they
aire looking at various sports pro-
grams, including Winston Cup
races, as a replacement.
"I don't see them taking over
Winston Cup Patti Wheeler,
motorsports director for TNN, said
Tuesday.
"They can get nothing this year
because the contracts already are
signed. The NFL was a huge part of
their programming, and there are
not enough Winston Cup events to
fill that
She said there are four or five
open contracts for races in 1995.
TNN already has signed to televise
eight next year and could do more.
"We will look at all of them
said Wheeler, who has worked pre-
viously for ABC, ESPN, TBS and
Prime Network. "It depends on the
rights fees, the time of year, the
availability
Each of the 30 races negotiates
the television rights. It is not a pack-
age deal as is done with the NFL
and Major League Baseball.
"CBS does have an appetite for
racing Wheelersaid. "CBSalways
has been a force in the bidding.
Every racethat'sbeenavailable,CBS
takes a look at
TNN, which focuses its week-
day programming on country mu-
sic, switches to motor sports cover-
age on Sunday year round and pa rt
of every Saturday.
TNN's live Winston Cup races
this year include two from
Rockingham, N.C, two from Do-
ver, Dei, and one each from Con-
cord, N.C, Pocono, Pa Loudon,
N.H. and Phoenix.
The cable channel also will tele-
cast 18 Busch Grand National races
� more than 50 percent of the se-
ries.
TMN began televising live
NASCAR races in 1991. The chan-
nel is available in 59 million U.S.
households.
Come on out and keep up the great support of
men's basketball The Pirates will be taking on
rival UNC-W on Saturday at 4 p.m.
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PREVIEW '94
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity Available
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION STAFF
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN
ROOM 203 ERWIN
BEGINNING JANUARY 24, 1994
DEADLINE FOR COMPLETED APPLICATION
IS FEBRUARY 18, 1994
AT 4:00 PM
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INCLUDING TICKETS TO THE ROBERT FULGHUM LECTURE
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CLIMBING II
Let instructors Steve Goodwin, John Brown, Liam
Doran, & Sean McLaughlin take you on a physical
climb over real rock. Come prepared for a physical day
of top roping and bouldering. Climbing I is a
prerequisite.
Saturday, February 12
to Roxboro, NC
$15 for students & $20 for facultystaff
Introduction to
Backpacking
This introductory workshop let's you
experience first-hand what everyone
should know about packing for
success in the great outdoors. Let 4
C's share their expert knowledge.
Instruction and equipment are
provided.
February 10
at4Cs1011Char.es Blvd.
$2 for participants
Mountain Bike Maintenance
For the price of a tune up, learn everything you want
to know about your mountain bike. Bring your own
bike (please no department store bikes). Keep your
bike in top running condition.
Each Tuesday evening in February
at The Bicycle Post - 530 Cotanche St.
$45 for participants
Register for all spring adventure
workshops In The R.O.C
(Recreational Outdoor Center)
located In 117 Christenbury
Gym Call 757-6911 for details.
A
- r information regarding these programs or other services offered by ECU Recreational Services come by 204 Christenbury Gymnasium or call 75 7-6387





. - � a
January 27, 1994
The East Carolinian 15
Madden's deal
with Fox done
(AP) � John Madden walked
into a Cowbovs meeting room in
Dallas and defensive end Charles
Haley spotted him immediately.
"Quickly and quietly, huh?"
hesaid to Madden. "Quickly maybe,
but quietly, no way"
And you know what? " He was
right Madden said.
"Quickly and quietly" was the
way Madden said he wanted to
make his life change. The two Q's.
But it was with much fanfare Mon-
day that Madden became "the final
piece to the jigsaw puzzle" for Fox
Sports president David Hill's new
football machine.
Madden signed a four-year con-
tract worth a reported $32 million,
or $8 million a year, and will be
joined shortly by his CBS broadcast
mate of 13 years, Pat Summerall.
Summerall signed a four-year
contract with Fox "some weeks
ago according to a source close to
the network, and that announce-
ment, along with others, will be
made in the coming weeks.
"What we're doing in 28 weeks
is creating what CBS has had 38
years to put together, so there are
still one or two things outstand-
ing Hill said.
Fox'sannouncementcameone
day after Madden and Summerall
broadcast their last game for CBS,
the NFC championship in Dallas.
CBS, which had televised NFL
games since 1956, lost the NFC por-
tion of the contract last month to
Fox's bid of $1.58 billion for four
years.
"John is not only someone Fox
wanted, but needed Hill said in a
telephone interview.
Also reportedly on Fox's
agenda will be Ed Goren, senior
producer at CBS who will join Fox
as its executive producer, as well
as producer Bob Stenner and di-
rector Sandy Grossman, who
worked with the Madden-
Summerall crew.
Madden said that a chance to
continue working NFC games
played a part in his decision, along
with a chance to continue working
with Summerall and others.
"I worked with Pat for so long,
I couldn't see myself working wi th
anybody else Madden said in a
telephone interview.
� �
Smith leads Heat to sting Hornets
MIAMI (AP) � Steve Smith
has stepped into a leadership role
that has helped the Miami Heat
step out of a season-high, seven-
game losing streak.
The third-year point guard has
led the Heat to back-to-back blow-
out victories at home over the Wash-
ington Bullets and Charlotte Hor-
nets.
On Tuesday night, Smith
scored 25 points and handed out 10
assists as the Heat defeated the Hor-
nets, 119-98. On Sunday, he had 18
points and a career-high 15 assists
in Miami's 113-80 victory over
Washington.
"I'm the person who's going to
bring the ball upcourt Smith said.
"Point forward, point guard, point
two, that's the position I want to be
in, the leadership role
The combined 54-point mar-
gin of victory is Miami's largest
ever in back-to-back games.
"We hit a bottom low Heat
coach Kevin Loughery said of their
seven-game losing streak which
ended Sunday. "Steve has stepped
forward to take charge more, which
is necessary for us
Glen Rice, Miami's best pure-
shooter, has been the chief benefi-
ciary of Smith's generous passes.
He has scored 21 and 25 points
respectively in the past two games.
"Steve has taken over the lead-
ership role on this team Rice said.
"He is playing like the point guard
we need, directing everybody
Miami has taken control of the
past two games early with a huge
first quarter advantage � 36-22
against Washington and 41-30 over
Charlotte.
Smith and Rony Seikaly shot a
combined 9-for-9 against the Hor-
nets in the first quarter as only Char-
lotte center Alonzo Mourning of-
fered anv resistance with 15 points,
11 rebounds, and seven blocks in
the first halt.
Mourning, however, was not a
factor in the second half, totaling
only two points, four rebounds and
one block.
"Weneed to play harderif we're
going to improve Mourning said.
"We need to plav for a full 48 min-
utesand keep our composure when
things aren't going well
"When we play poorly, it's ob-
vious that we've got individual
agendas said Seikaly, who shot
10-for-l 2 from the field for 26 points
Tuesday and has grabbed 30 re-
bounds in the two games. "We
played w ell as a team for the second
game in a row and held our inten-
Quarterback position
does not concern Jones
(AP) � Inheriting a team with
only one quarterback under con-
tract � and that one's about to un-
dergo surgery to his throwing arm
� doesn't cause June Jones much
concern.
"That doesn't scare me. I know
we're going to move the ball with
the people we have no matter who
lines up at that position said Jones,
who was named coach of the At-
lanta Falcons on Monday, replac-
ing the fired Jerry Glanville.
Quarterback Bobby Hebert,
who suffered from tendinitis in his
throwing elbow much of last sea-
son, is scheduled to undergo sur-
gery next week to repair and reat-
tach a tendon in his right elbow.
Atlanta's other three quarter-
backs � Chris Miller, Billy Joe
Tolliver and Bob Giordano � are
free agents.
Last season, the Falcons ranked
second in the NFL with 28 touch-
down passes, were rated second in
passing and fifth in total offense in
the NFC.
Jones, 40, the Falcons assistant
headcoachforoffenseforthreeyears
under Glanville, was a backup for
the club when Steve Bartkowski
was the Atlanta quarterback in the
late 1970s.
Jones has not signed a contract
and terms were not disclosed, but
club president Taylor Smith said,
"We're thinking of three years
Smith said he interviewed five
or six other candidates, but that
Jones was the one he favored after
Glanville was fired Jan. 4 following
a second consecutive 6-10 season.
Glanville had one year left on a five-
year contract. He was 28-38 in his
four seasons.
"We felt June's the guy we'd
like to run our football team Smith
said.
The only other coach consid-
ered seriously was former Wash-
ington coach Joe Gibbs. But, Smith
said, the Redskins refused to allow
the Falcons to talk to Gibbs.
Jones, who initiated the run-
and-shoot offense for the Falcons
when he was hired in 1991, said the
team's first priority, however, will
be defense.
"He's right said free safety
Scott Case. "You can't get to the
place we want to get to without
having a solid defense. We played
real well sometimes last year, but
sometimes we played terrible
The Falcons were 25th in total
defense last season, and 28th and
last in points allowed � 365 � an
average of 24 points per game.
Jones has spent 11 years as an
assistant coach, the last seven in the
NFL with Houston, Detroit and the
Falcons.
The Super Bowl Party
12 Price Appetizers
The Whole Game
50C Draft
Promotional Giveaways
& Door Prizes
800 E 10th St.
752-1907
The Newman Catholic Student Center
Would like to Welcome
New & Returning Students
and Invite You tojoin Us In Worship
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm at the Newman Center
followed by a fellowship meal
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For More Information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am & 11pm.
sity
Hornets coach Allan Bristow
was surprised Smith had been
criticized in the past for his lead-
ershipabili ties and lowassistav-
erage.
"Steve has the ability to be
one of the better point guards in
the league Bristow said.
"People don't realize it some-
times takes four or five years to
get your confidence and become
a top point guard. Unless you're
Magic Johnson and you go in
and do it the first year
During Miami's 20-4, third-
quarter run, Seikaly scored 11
points, and Smith had four as-
sists.
' 'When we play together and
move the ball around like that,
we've proven that we can drill
just about any team Rice said.
Recreational Services
fib

BASKETBALL
H-0-R-S-E
Team
Bowling
men's, women's, co-rec
Register Tuesday.
February 1 at 5:00pm
in Biology 103
En's a women's division
� Tournament formal
� T shirts to champions
February 2 at 3:30 pm
in Christ en bury Gymnasium
Register it the Gym from 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Double header in February
Call Recreational Services at 757-6387 for more details.
Review Course
un
CAROLINA
UNTVLRSITY
Designed to prepare you for the format
and content of the April 9, 1994
GRE Exam
Course Schedule:
TuesdayMarch 15
ThursdayMarch 17
Tuesday March n
ThursdayMarch 24
Tuesday March 2'1
rhursdavMarch 31
Tuesday April S
ThursdayApril 7
Course Time:
6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Arv iwliviilu.il rwiuiiinR MCOnwdatiM uixlti
ADA shobltl conl.Hl llc Oflu t til llivil.ili'v
�wrvif.es 757-4B02
Topics to .lc Reviewed:
� Verhai Ability � includes sentence completion, analogy,
antonyms, and reading comprehension.
� Quantitative Ah.liiy � includes mathematical concepisond
reasoning using ariihmalic, algebra, and geometry.
� Analytical Ability � Includes analytical antl logical reasoning.
location:
General Classroom Building, Room 1010
Instructor:
Dr. Kick Niswander, Assistant Professor, Accounting
Texts:
The Princeton Review: Cracking she GRE
Practicing To T.ifce The GRE General Test
(CoM or Tex1 in. Iutkil in RfgiMr.Hioti I ��)
EARLY REGISTRATION DISCOUNT:
Only $150 before February 28! $170 Beginning March 1
Presented by
ECU School ot Business � Professional Programs
1200 General Classroom Building (919) 7S7 � 6377
WANTED
Self-Starter
High Energy Individual
Exceptiona! Leadership & Organizational Skills
Service Oriented
FOR
The Student Committee Chair Elect to work
with the 1994 Student Homecoming Committee
under the auspices of the ECU
Homecoming Steering Committee.
This position is highly visible and prestigious.
Application forms are available at the Information Desk , Mendenhall
Student Center. Please return the application and a letter detailing your
involvement in student organizations here at ECU by 5:00pm
Monday, January 31, 1994 to room 210, Mendenhall Student
Center. The top three candidates will be interviewed by the
Homecoming Steering Committee.
For further information, contact J. Marshall at 757-4711.
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752-5855 1 10 E. 4th St Downtown
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Sunday
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EVERY WEDNESDAY FREE PASS TO THE ATTIC'S COMEDY ZONE
WDINNER ENTREE. WE NOW RAVE TROUT ALE.





16 The East Carolinian
January 27, 1994
GIVE EM THE SILENT TREATMENT!
This Saturday afternoon at 4:00, The ECU Pirates meet the UNC-W Seahawks at Minges Coliseum in a
televised match-up. When the Seahawks take the court before the game, open up a copy of The East
Carolinian and give the 'Hawks "the silent treatment That's right; ignore em. Take the opportunity to
read our fine Opinion page, catch up on your favorite comic strip in Pirate Comics or flip to the Classifieds
and see how you can buy yourself a baby South American alligator (Honest! Check the For Sale col-
umn.) Not only will you be showing support for your 1993 CAA Champion Pirates, but you'll be showing
your good taste in collegiate newspapers to the audience watching at home (potentially thousands,
maybe millions; be sweet and wave to mom and dad). Thanks, and go Pirates!
Bradshaw also
leaves CBS
spot for Fox
(AP) � Terry Bradshaw, the
popular studio analyst for CBS on
"TheNFL Today wUljoinJohnMad-
den and Pat Summerail in leaving the
network todo football telecasts for the
Fox Network next season.
Bradshaw will be introduced
Thursday by Fox, The New York Times
reported in Wednesday editions. He
willsignafour-yearcontractexpected
todoublehisannual$650XX)salaryat
CBS.
Fox also is expected to announce
the hiring of new executive producer
Ed Goren, who has been a senior pro-
ducer at CBS Sports, the Times said.
CBS, whichrecentiy lost the NFC
portion of the NFL television contract
to Fox, plans to continue "The NFL
Today"nextseason,evenwithoutfoot-
baiL Greg Gumbel, Bradshaw's part-
ner on the show, has a contract with
CBS that runs through September.
On Monday, Madden signed a
four-year contract with Fox for a re-
ported $32milliorL Summerail, whois
aisosaid tohavesigned for four years,
is to be introduced as well Thursday
by Fox
Magic increase streak at Charlotte's expense
Orlando sets franchise shooting record
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) � If
they handed outOscars for an NBA
basketball game, the Orlando Magic
would have swept the Academy
Awards Wednesday night.
The Best Performance honor
would have been a shoe-in as the
Magic set franchise records by
shooting 65.3 percent and captur-
ing their fifth consecutive win with
a 145-120 romp over the Charlotte
Hornets.
As usual, the star of the Magic's
performance wasShaquilleONeal,
who scored a game-high 36 points
on 17-of-20 shooting. But with
AnferneeHardaway's32pointsand
Nick Anderson's 29, the Magic
would also have swept the Best
Supporting Cast honors.
"It's not a one-man show
Anderson said of the Magic pro-
duction. "One man can't beat five
other guys and we've learned that.
"A lot of teams focus on Shaq.
I just try to step in the hole. I think
that year of ma turity has set in with
Shaq. The first year he felt he had to
shoot it. Now he knows when teams
are collapsing around him he can
look for others
Anderson, Hardaway and
O'Neal all came close to posting
triple-doubles. Hardaway lacked
ting 10 of its first 12 shots from the
held and outscoring the Hornets
25-8 to grab an 89-69 lead.
Then the Hornets rallied,
outscoring the Magic 25-11 to close
the quarter and pull within 100-94
entering the fourth period. Curry
was the catalyst, hitting 6 of 7 shots
for 14 points in the quarter.
"Orlando is a verv dangerous
team Johnson said. "They have a
lot of guys thatcan play two or three
positions and they go nine deep
Hitting 13 of its first 16 shots in
the fourth quarter, Orlando pulled
ahead 129-109 with 3:28 remaining
in the game. O'Neal was particu-
UNC chancellor to represent ACC
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
The chancellor of the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill has
been chosen to represent the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference on the NCAA
Presidents Commission.
ACC presidents and chancel-
lors elected Paul Hardin, a charter
member of the 10-year-old com-
mission, to succeed Wake Forest
University President ThomasHearn
Jr. Hardin's four-year term will end
in January 1998.
"He is eminently qualified not
only becauseof his position at Caro-
lina, but also his past history said
ACC Commissioner GeneCorrigan.
"I think Paul has a wonderful grasp
of what intercollegiate athletics are
all about. He is both realistic and
highly principled
The 44-member commission
MALLERSTROM
includes 22 members from Divi-
sion I schools and 11 each from
Divisions II and III. Commission
members recommend major policy
changes with the NCAA and seek
toensure the proper roleof athletics
in U.S. higher education. Top pri-
orities include the integrity of ath-
letics programs, the welfare of stu-
dent-athletes and the balance be-
tween athletics and academics.
Continued from page 12
calm, strong Swedish nature. The
20-year-old says she was coaxed
into coming to East Carolina by
Lady Pirate Assistant Coach Ellen
Langhi. "Actually, the entire
coaching staff was very instru-
mental in my deciding to play
here says Wallerstrom. "But
Ellen has helped guide me the
most so far
Despite being a freshman,
ECU Head Coach Rosie Thomp-
son says Wallerstrom has the abil-
ity to be a fine player. "She has the
capability to shoot the three-
pointer, but she needs to have
more confidence in that shot
Thompson adds, "She just needs
to become more accustomed to
our rules That's because, in Swe-
den, basketball is played without
out-of-bounds rules. "It takes a
little getting used to for her says
Thompson.
Coach Thompson, though,
likes her newest recruit,
complimenting Wallerstrom on
her shot-making ability and over-
all court-awareness.
Wallerstrom was a reserve for
the Swedish National Team that
played in the most recent World
University Games. An excellent
athlete, Wallerstrom also was
named most valuable player for
the Solna Tennis Club where she
was ranked eighth in the Swedish
capitol of Stockholm.
This year, the Lady Pirates are
young, fielding a team of most
underclassmen. But Wallerstrom
says ECU's youthful inexperience
may surprise some teams. "We
nevergiveup,and no one expects
anything from us. We'll show that
we have a good team confides
Wallerstrom.
Off the court, Wallerstrom is
an above-average student major-
ing in Communications. But the
culture shock of being in a differ-
ent part of the world makes
Wallerstrom a little homesick. "I
do get homesick sometimes, and
it would be nice to go home. But
everybody here (in Greenville) is
so friendly
Sounds like a good start for
new East Carolina basketball in-
ternational relations.
larly effective in the final period,
making seven of nine shots.
Mourning was off to a quick
start. He scored four of Charlotte's
first six points in helping the Hor-
nets to a 6-0 lead.
The Hornets still cruised to a
36-18 lead without their leading
scorer as Hersey Hawkins poured
in 13 points. Orlando closed the
SUPERBOWL
quarter with a 12-0 run in the final
2:10 fueled by six points from Ander-
son to close within 36-30 entering
the second quarter.
Trailing 51-42, the Magic re-
covered when Anderson got hot
again, giving Orlando its first lead
of the game at 56-55 on a layup. The
Magic led 64-61 at intermission.
Continued from page 12
goals of this football team, that's
the only one that hasn't been ac-
complished
The Cowboys could become
just the third team with four Super
Bowl crowns, joining San Francisco
and Pittsburgh. But�and here's a
first � Johnson says he won't be
making any proclamations or guar-
antees this week.
Right. And he'll be getting a
buzz cut pretty soon, too.
"I wrote a check and the play-
ers paid it he said. "This week,
I'm not going to say a word, but
you know how I feel
He's concerned with how
quarterback Troy Aikman feels.
Aikman sustained a concussion in
GAME
Sunday's NFC Championship
game against the 49ers. It was
early morning before Aikman got
back his senses.
"I'm fine he said. "I don't
look fine, but I haven't slept in
about 20 hours
Aikman admitted the injury
and loss of memory was scary,
but not something that would
haunt him in future games.
"I've always had a real fear of
death, but after that incident I
realized that everything happens
so suddenly, so there's no sense
being worried about much
The ultraconfident Cowboys
worrying about things? That
would be new.
Continued from page 12
a one-point lead at 65-64.
With 1:11 remaining, forward
Curley Young was fouled, tied the
game with a free throw. After Ritter
scored again inside, Gill drained
two free throws, forcing JMU to
take a time out with 0:29 left in
regulation.
JMU,however,wasnot thinking
about overtime. With four seconds
remaining, guard Darren Mcdinton
hit a 14-foot baseline jumper to put
the Dukes up by two.
"Wewere running four-comers,
and Dennis (point guard Dennis
Leonard)isgcxxlatpenetrating"said
JMU head coach Lefty Dreiseli "He
would dish it off to whoever was
open, and (that was) Darren
EastCaroUna had one last chance,
butcould not capitalize. Lester Lyons
drove up die court, and with no time
remaining, shot an off-balance layup
that caromed off of the rim, making
the final score JMU 70, ECU 68.





Title
The East Carolinian, January 27, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 27, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.986
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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