The East Carolinian, January 20, 1994






������
Sports
Stag Party!
Lester Lyons leads the
Pirates to their 10th win of
the season as ECU defeats
Fairfield University 77-65
UlVstvk
Depression or the 'Blues'
Break ups, failed tests,
bad feelings: All these
things are part of
college life, but
beware of depression
and its effects.
Pbday
The East Carolinian
Vd.69No.4
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, January 20,1994
14 Pages
ECU breaks ground for future Rec Center
By Laura Allard
Phot by Harold Wise
ECU students and administrators were on hand to witness the ground breaking ceremony Tuesday afternoon
for the new Rec Center beside Mendenhall. The center is expected to open in November of 1995.
Staff Writer
ECU officials broke ground
on the future 150,000 square foot
student recreation center, which
will cover the three and a half acre
ground west of Mendenhall.
At the sight of the future
swimming pool, Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin celebrated the begin-
ning of construction by shooting
the first basket.
Eakin thanked the students
and faculty who began work on
the project in 1987 and credited
them for making the project a re-
ality.
"Great things happen because
people dream, and great things
happen because people are com-
mitted he said.
Co-chair of the Planning Com-
mittee, Nance Mize, thanked ev-
eryone involved with the project
and said, "Today has been long
awaited and eagerly anticipated
Mize looks forward to No-
vember 8, 1995, when everyone
will gather again to open the new
building.
Eakin was thankful to former
SG A President Scott Thomas, who
explained to the crowd of faculty
members that he was the first to
approach Eakin with the need for
a new recreation center. Thomas
drafted a
shovel, appropriately matching
the trim of the future building.
The future building will in-
clude a large sports complex with
six basketball courts, accommo-
dations for volleyball and bad-
minton, seven handball
raquetball courts, one squash
court, an
resolution
introducing
it to other
student or-
ganizations.
S u c -
ceedingSGA
presidents
kept the
project alive.
Yester-
day, current
president
Keith Dyer � �
spoke on be-
half of the students saying, "The
current student body is very ex-
cited about the project
After speeches by Eakin, Mize,
Thomas, Dyer and Phil Dixon, each
broke the ground with a new teal
" The current
student body is
very excited
about the
project. "
Keith Dyer,
SGA President
11,000 square
foot weight
training and
fitness center,
three multi-
purpose
rooms for
aerobics,
dance and
martial arts.
Also
included will
be a compre-
hensive out-
door adven-
ture program area with an in-
door climbing wall, indoor and
outdoorswimmingpools,ajuice
bar and healthy snack area, a
fitness assessment center and an
administrative office complex.
Memory of King
lives on at ECU
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
"Even though the dreamer
was killed, the source of the
dream will never die These
were the inspiring words of Rev-
erend Ronald P. McDougal, the
guest speaker at the 10th An-
nual Martin Luther King, Jr.
Leadership Awards Ceremony
Monday night.
"King would not want us
to gather on his birthday with
mourning and sadness
McDougal reminded the audi-
ence, "but with service and cel-
ebration
The audience on Monday
night gathered in Mendenhall
Student Center, after a candle-
light march from Christenbury
Gymnasium "to celebrate the
man behind the dream
McDougal said.
Master of Ceremony, Eu-
gene Smith, introduced the cer-
emony and Rev. Sidney Locks
opened with the invocation.
Willie Joyner welcomed the a u-
dience.
Next, Demetrius Carter
gave the history of Alpha Phi
Alpha.
"Alpha Phi Alpha, the first
and oldest intercollegiate Black
Greek letter organization was
founded on Dec. 4,1906, on the
campus of Cornell University
in Ithaca, New York Carter
said.
Seven young men estab-
lished the organization, and
were later known as the "Seven
Jewels of Alpha Phi Alpha
"Our symbols are African.
Our traditions are African. Our
rituals are African. Our name is
African Carter stated. "From
its infancy to the present time,
Alpha has fought for equality
and advancement of the Afri-
can-American race
Carter went on to explain
how many successful black men
were members of Alpha Phi Al-
pha and how the fraternity en-
courages programs that pro-
mote the success of the African-
American male.
After the history of Alpha
Phi Alpha, the ECU gospel choir
sang several selections, after
which Chancellor Richard Eakin
introduced Rev. McDougal.
Dorothy Cotton, who was to be
Monday night's speaker, could
not be there due to the snow
See KING page 4
Students urged to help save environment
By Jason Williams
Assistant News Editor
From the narrow pine-cov-
ered ridge where I sit, I watch the
colors of the day fall across the marsh
and creek. It is easy to overlook the
marsh grasses that border the river
�the marsh grasses that are busily
converting energy into life, organic
matter into food, andfdtering pol-
lution out of the waters.
David McNaught, the au-
thor of the above words, wants
to make sure no one overlooks
those marsh grasses and the
wetlands in which they are con-
tained. That would explain why
he and others formed PTRF, the
Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, in
1981, dedicated to preserving
water quality in the Pamlico and
Tar River Basin.
PTRF is a grassroots envi-
ronmental organization made up
of residents from Pitt and Beau-
fort Counties. Many ECU faculty
and students count themselves
among its members. McNaught is
rheexecutivedirectorof PTRF and
he explained the mission of the
group.
"We do not exist to resist
development within our water-
shed; growth is inevitable. We
exist to insure that it occurs within
an aesthetic, ethical and ecologi-
cal framework
The group formed in reac-
tion to a Beaufort county
commissioner's plan to allow
Texasgulf Chemicals Company to
mine for the phosphate reserves
underlying the Pamlico River.
"The riverbed mining skir-
mish alerted us to two discreet
facts about river protection
McNaught said. "First, the prob-
lems of the river were multifac-
eted; the river would not be pro-
tected by a single action but would
demand long-term vigilance, and,
second, any efforts to protect the
river would be most effective on a
wa tershed-wide basis
McNaught says that the two
rivers, the Tar and the Pamlico,
are inextricably bound. "You
can't know one without con-
sidering the other he said.
In fact, the rivers are re-
ally one and the same. The
Tar, which flows around the
northern fringe of Greenville,
is exclusively a freshwater
river. It has its source in trie
Piedmont farmlands of Per-
son, Granville and Vance
counties and flows east
through Rocky Mount, Green-
ville and Little Washington,
N.C.
Around Little Washing-
See ENVRIONMENT page 4
Students volunteer time in Greenville
ECU students recognize the importance of surrounding community
By Stephanie Lassiter
Permits avoid fines, headaches
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
ECU students and faculty
who live in Greenville's con-
trolled parking areas need to buy
new stickers from the Public
Works Department by Feb. 14.
The stickers are five dollars,
much less than parking tickets
and towing fees.
Controlled parking stick-
ersalsoallow residents a luxury
that some commuters and stu-
dents living in dorms do not
have Thev may park in the fa-
miliar two-hour parking zones
located north of campus, all day
every day.
The controlled parking ar-
eas were put into effect mostly
because of the increased student
population over the past few
years, said Bob Ramey, Green-
ville city councilman.
Ramey also stressed that
ECU is long overdue for parking
decks like those found at UNC
and State.
"The parking situation is
very critical for the students of
ECU Ramey said. ECU contin-
ues to increase the number of
students without creating park-
ing spaces, Ramey said.
"Student parking costs
would pav for it he said.
Controlled parking areas
have two divisions, A and B.
Both stickers expired on Dec. 31,
new stickers can be obtained
through the Greenville Public
See PARKING page 3
T
Staff Writer
The cold weather has set
in, and right now you are prob-
ably wrapped up in a heavy
winter coat or you are enjoying
the warmth of your apartment
or dorm room.
Many Greenville residents
are not fortunate enough to have
heaters or even coats. Local
agencies continue this winter to
provide the poverty stricken
and homeless with warm coats,
cots and food.
The Soup Kitchen serves
warm food each day to the nu-
merous hungry who walk and
live on Greenville streets. But
the soup kitchen can not sur-
vive alone. Volunteers are
needed to serve lunch from 11
a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Agencies like the Soup
Kitchen rely on ECU'S Student
Volunteer Program to provide
workers for their cause. The Vol-
unteer Program, which began
in 1989, has flourished, increas-
ing from a handful of, volun-
teers to over 700 each semester.
"It has been from the ea-
gerness of our students to be of
service to the community that
the program has continued to
grow each year said Judy-
Baker, program director.
The program originally
drafted students from Health
1000 courses, as part of its cur-
riculum. Other students showed
interest, and today the program
is open to any individual or
group who wishes to volunteer
their time.
With over 46 agencies to
choose from, there is something
for everyone. Some of the more
popular agencies include: The
Ronald McDonald House,
which provides a place to stay
for families of seriously ill chil-
dren who are patients at Pitt
Memorial Hospital; The Little
Willie Center, an outreach pro-
gram for latchkey children; The
American Red Cross and The
Dream Factory, a group who
grants wishes to children with
terminal illnesses.
Baker added that many ad-
vanced study programs, such
as veterinary medicine and
health careers, require appli-
cants to complete hours of com-
munity service.
"Volunteerism should be
part of every student's educa-
tion and it will be important in
careers Baker said.
According to Baker, vol-
unteering offers reciprocal ben-
efits. You, as the volunteer, help
the agencies and the volunteer-
ing experience is beneficial to
you.
Originally, the program
was sponsored by a two-year
federal ACTION grant. After
that grant expired, a private
grant was donated by the Z.
Smith Reynolds Foundation.
Traditionally, that grant only
lasts a year, but the program
was given a continuation based
on its great progress.
"This is the first year our
program has been fully funded
by the university Baker said.
Currently, the ECU volun-
teer program is consulting with
seven other universities who
wish to begin their own pro-
grams.
Volunteering can make a
lasting impact on a person, ac-
cording to Baker.
"The ultimate goal of our
program is to get students in-
volved in volunteering very
early and, hopefully, they will
make lifelong commitments to
volunteerism she said.
Whatever a student learns
at ECU they will take with them.
"A good experience with
the ECU volunteer program can
make an impact on other com-
munities Baker said.
In addition to the Soup
See VOLUNTEERS page 3
Illiteracy
plagues
Greenville
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Over one quarter of adults
in Pitt County are illiterate. The
Literacy Volunteers of America
(LVA) are trying to reduce that
figure by teaching people in Pitt
County how to read.
OnThursdayJan. 13, over
30 volunteers came from all over
Pitt County to begin training
on teaching adults how to read.
Many volunteers are ECU stu-
dents, a few are ECU faculty
and others are new to the area
or come from such varied back-
grounds as nursing and public
works. The LVA center is lo-
cated on Third Street and all
literacy classes will be held
there.
"If you teach someone
how to read, you are teaching
them how to function said
Chris Brueckner, president of
LVA. "You are making such a
change, you're going to open
up the door to a whole new
world for these people
Classes will continue
weekly from 7 p.m. to9:30 p.m.
until Feb. 7. When training is
completed, each volunteer will
be matched with a student.
See ILLITERACY page 3





2 The East Carolinian
January 20, 1994
January 3
The department of R.O.C. (OBGYN), ECU School of
Medicine reported the theft of an electric thermometer
valued at $60 from their laboratory.
January 11
9:00 a.m.
An employee of the ECU Student Store reported that
her store purchased two texbooks from an unknown indi-
vidual. Later another student reported that the books pur-
chased were hers.
January 13
10:30 a.m.
An individual reported the larceny of her 1993-94
commuter parking decal from her car. It is unknown where
the vehicle was parked at the time of the theft.
1:00 p.m.
A staff member in Brewster A-440 reported receiving
harassing phone calls from an unknown person. The person
left several messages.
9:00 p.m.
A student reported that her jacket was taken from 102
Jenkins Art Building while she was on a break from her
class.
10:35 p.m.
An unknown individual left repeated harassing phone
calls on a student's answering machine in Ay cock Hall.
January 14
2:08 p.m.
An unknown individual scratched a student's car
with a sharp object and damaged her front bumper when
removing her license plate. The student's car was parked
south of Fleming Hall.
11:43 p.m.
A student reported the theft of his Blockbuster Video
Rental Card. On December 13, someone used the card to
rent property valued at $399.75 from Blockbuster Video on
Greenville Boulevard.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
People on the Street
The Wish Board traveled across campus last week, asking
students, "What do you wish for 1994?"
Teressa Harrison, Fletcher Hall
resident: "Unity among black
people
David Strickland, Scott Hall
resident: "Everybody be their own
person, and not a mirror of
someone else
Christy Isley, Jones Hall resident:
"Control the population, and for
people to mind their own business
Melinda Broome, arvis Hall
resident: "More education on
allowing children to view people
for who they are, not where
they're from
Do you have a question to which you would like to have ECU students respond?
Stop by The East Carolinian and talk to the News Editor. We want to hear from
you!
ROTC students guarantee themselves high salary
� t . in Ajt-c- �ri11 corvp in HrAtirni
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
For many students who are
soon to be graduating, the idea
of a $24,000 a year job sounds
very inviting.
Nine ECU students walked
straight from their exams into
jobs which started with an an-
nual salary of no less than $24,
688.32. The positions include
free health and dental care for a
year and 30 days paid vacation
each year.
Four more students will
follow in their footsteps by the
end of the summer. All 13 stu-
dents are Cadets of ECUArmy
ROTC.
"Once the cadets are ac-
cepted in upper level ROTC
courses, known as the Advanced
Course, and complete the Ad-
vanced Course, they are com-
missioned as 2nd Lieutenants
in either Active Duty or Re-
serve said Captain Bill Pitts,
associate professor of Military
Science.
Pitts said the cadets will
compete for active duty, which
is preferred over reserve duty.
This year's cadet group
was unusually exceptional be-
cause all cadets who requested
active duty, received active duty
assignments. Two cadets re-
quested reserve duty; both re-
quests were granted.
A board in Washington,
D.C. selects who will receive ac-
tive duty commission. Accord-
ing to the ECU ROTC press re-
lease, as 2nd Lieutenants, these
cadets will serve in branches
such as Infantry, Nursing
Corps, Field Artillery and
Military Intelligence.
The cadets will begin
their commissions at the time
of their graduation.
The following cadets
will be graduating by the end
of the summer: Paul T.
Campbell II, Quartermaster
Corps; Timothy Domke, In-
fantry; Nevin L. Gamble, Ar-
mor; and Kevin P. Leitch, Sig-
nal Corps.
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January 20, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
Nutrition majors beat naf 1 average
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
This fall nine ECU nutrition
and dietcdcs majors successfully
completed the Registration Exam
for Dietitians.
The exam has a national pass-
ingrateof88percent. Onehundred
percent of the ECU students passed
the exam.
"The national exam is about
300 questions, takes about four
hours and asks questions on basic,
clinical and community nutrition,
as well as food science, food service
and administrative dietetics said
Dr. Margie Gallagher, professor of
Nutrition and Hospitality Manage-
PARKING
ment.
All nine students have gradu-
ated and are pursuing careers as
dietitians.
The dietetics clinical practice
program was established in 1988.
All of its graduates have success-
fully completed the examination
which is necessary to register as a
dietitian.
Each of the graduates com-
pleted a pre-professional nutrition
dietetics program in an institutional
setting or a master's degree pro-
gram.
"This is a post-BS program
said Dr. Evelyn S. Farrior, former
program director and associa te pro-
fessor in the department of Nutri-
tion and Hospitality Management.
"The students are selectively ad-
mitted based on a high criteria. The
training program involves 1,000
hours of practical experience in
health care facili ties in eastern N .C
The current director of the
program is Janet Bryan, MSHE.
There are now 10 students in the
program.
"We are one of only four pro-
grams in North Carolina Farrior
said. "Our program has an excel-
lent reputation among programs of
this tvpe. The program was planned
with a lot of flexibility to accommo-
date students who are working part
time and who live in different North
Carolina towns
ILLITERACY
Continued from page 1
Currently over 20 are waiting.
Twoor three workshops are taught
throughout the year depending
on need.
During the session, volun-
teers were asked how they thou gh 11
some adults have gotten to adult-
hood without having learned to
read at an earlier age and how has
it affected their lives.
"lam mystified by this said
ECU biology professor Cindy
Evans. "I know this one student
who came from a very large fam-
ily, her older brothers and sisters
could read, they did not encour-
age her, thev just looked out for
her. 1 still don't understand how-
she graduated high school
Many reasons can be found
when trying to answer why a
person does not learn to read. The
class discussion centered around
living in a rural area and having
no reason to learn to read; recent
immigration, childhood abuse or
even frustration in school.
"A lot oi these people won't
admit the) don't know how to
read said Dilara Batca, a finan-
cial analyst "Thev probably pick
up skills in hiding that
"Think of the environment
that you live m, the opportunities
to get taken advantage of said
la rsha Ironsmith, psychology pro-
testor at ECU. "The first thing 1
think of is watching people at the
grocery store just hand their check-
book to theclerk to fill in the amount
for them
All students' names are con-
fidential, Brueckner stressed
Training is also catered around
rhestudentsneeds. Forexample,
it a student enjoys fishing, he or
she ma use a fishing magazine
for learning. If a student want to
learn to drive, a driving manual
would be good practice.
LVA began in 1962 and is
supported by the United Way.
The organization's mission state-
ment is committed to the per-
sonal growth of students, theef-
tectiveuseot volunteers, improv-
ing society and strengthening the
organization.
"I've always been volun-
teering said David Morgan, a
nursing student at ECU. " 1 hope
to stay involved with LVA as
long as I'm here
Continued from page 1
I
Works Department. Residents
may also drop by the office at
1500 Beatty street. New stickers
will be valid until Dec. 31 of this
year, Ramey said.
Controlled parking has
been in effect for more than 10
years. Residents must petition to
have controlled parking on their
street, said Glen Whisler, Green-
ville city engineer.
"Stickers are only necessary
if a resident desires to park on
the street for more than two
hours at a time Whisler said.
Currently, over 200 stick-
ers are bought per year. The
stickers are only va 1 id between 8
a.m. and 5 p.m while parking
regulations are in effect.
VOLUNTEERS
Kitchen, other volunteers are
needed throughout Greenville.
�The Bloodmobile, spon-
sored by the American Red
Cross, will be held Jan. 27 and
28 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. in
Mendenhall. Donors should be
17 years old, weigh at least 110
pounds and be in good health.
For more information, contact
Helen Monroe (758-1142).
� Training classes for regu-
lar volunteers will be held at the
Ronald McDonald House. Those
interested should contact
Stephanie Roberson (830-0062).
� Patient Playmates are
needed in the Pediatric Play-
room at Pitt Memorial Hospital.
A semester commitment of sev-
eral hours a week is required.
The hours are 9 a.m. until 12
p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and
Friday. Contact Jacque Sauls
(816-4676).
� Those interested in serv-
ing lunch at the Soup Kitchen
should call Brian McMillen (757-
1436) or (816-2758).
Volunteer opportunity
sheets, which list agencies and
needs, are avaiiame in tne vol-
unteer Program Office located
in 201 Christenbury Gym. Inter-
ested students can contact Judy
Baker at 757-6432 (24-hour
phone mail).
A calendar of upcoming
events is posted outside of the
office. Student volunteers need
If you are
aware of cir-
cumstances
that affect
the ECU com-
munity, let us
know. Some-
thing that
bothers you
may bother
the rest of the
campus. And
if you have
some good
news, we
would all love
to hear about
that, too! Call
757-6366 arid
talk to either
the News Edi-
tor or the As-
sistant News
Editor.
to contact Judy Baker to fill out
necessary forms in order to re-
ceive university insurance and
also to update the program's
records of volunteers.
Any volunteers should
contact Judy Baker before be-
ginning. Mrs. Baker can pro-
Residents often file peti-
tions to avoid being fined, Ramey
said.
Ramey mentioned one
problem that residents should
be aware of: Students parking in
front of houses many times block
in mailboxes. The U.S. postal ser-
vice may fine any resident who
has a blocked mailbox.
Continued from page 1
vide any information regarding
the 46 agencies and their needs.
TEC will print a bi-weekly
column featuring ECU volunteers
and the Greenville community.
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"Come and experience sorority life for yourself!
Alpha Omicron Pi would like to invite anyone
interested in Sorority Life to our Spring
Rush " Happy Hour Monday January 31
at 9pm. Rides will be provided. For more
information call 757-0769.






4 The East Carolinian
January 20, 1994
ENVIRONMENT
Continued from page 1
Z ton, the river widens and becomes
jn estuary � the place where a
-freshwater river meets the saltwa-
ferif the ocean. Here the name
;erjanges to the Pamlico River,
Xwtfikh empties into the Pamlico
ZSound.
��?; McNaught gave several rea-
�53tts why people should work to
�protect the Tar River. "First, there
;re the very basic reasons. We all
Iwant clean watet to drink, clean
-4ir to breathe. Most of us probably
'tfrant seafood to eat. We need ad-
-aquate fishery resources and a
;�(ace to enjoy water sports and
Mating.
Z- "But I also I believe we have
!iethical responsibility to be wise
Stewards of the natural system
�"�McNaught said. "Furthermore, it
3s; through the protection of our
�Natural resources that we preserve
igur place in the natural order
McNaughtcreditsPTRFwith
S&flliencing environmental policy,
5oth on the local and the national
;3eyel. "The inclusion of thePamlico
3rLlhe EPA's national estuarine pro
tgfam was the direct result of PTRF
convincing Representative Walter
B Jones, Sr. of the significance of
.tkePamlico watershed to the study
area he said.
In 1984 and 1986, PTRF re-
ceived grants from the Z. Smith
Reynolds Foundation and the Mary
Flagler Cary Trust of New York,
which were instrumental in the
group's early survival and success.
This money allowed the group to
hire Dr. Jaaothan Phillips as the
first full-time executive director
and to sponsor educational events
such as the Maritime Heritage Fes-
tival.
Phillips left PTRF in 1986 to
take a teaching position at Arizona
State University. The group then
turned to McNaught, who has
served as director ever since.
Under his leadership, PTRF
has grown to 2,000 members and
gone on to fight many environ-
mental battles.
"We are not a strident or radi-
cal organization McNaught said.
"However, we are not afraid to
oppose anyone who proposes prac-
tices that may worsen the Pamlico
or the Tar
Mostly though, PTRF spon-
sors educational efforts and scien-
tific research. The group has devel-
oped a citizen's monitoring pro-
gram to report polluters, and
McNaught has written many ar-
ticles and books about wetlands
and other coastal issues.
"There is much any indi-
vidual can do to protect his or her
environment McNaughtsaid. "If
enough of us unite our efforts, we
will form an effective grassroots
march to protect the Pamlico and
Tar Rivers
McNaught has a message
for students at ECU. "I would en-
courage everyone to find an active
organization, whether or not it is
an environmental organization, to
participate in and to volunteer
with he said. "I think they will
find that it is a very rewarding
activity
NEWS WRITERS! Our meetings are
Thursdays at 3:30p.m including
next Thurs. Potential writers are
urged to attend, and current writers
BETTER BE THERE. Thanks!
KING
storm in Charlotte. Fortunately,
Rev. McDougal happened to
have his Martin Luther King, Jr.
speech in his car.
McDougal preaches at
Clinton Chapel AME Zion
Church in New Bern. He was
born and raised in New York
and attended Livingstone Col-
lege in Salisbury, NC, where he
received his BA. He attended
seminary in Massachusetts and
has pastored in Rochester, NY,
and Providence, RI.
He always wanted to come
back to North Carolina, and was
appointed by the bishop of the
church 14 years ago. He only
planned to stay for four or five
years, but said that something
about the area must have kept
him here.
McDougal began his
speech by remembering Aug. 28,
1963, when people of all ages,
races, gender and religious af-
filiation gathered on the White
House mall to march and dem-
onstrate the need for equality,
justice and jobs. He said that
after hearing many speeches
throughout the hot afternoon,
the crowd turned to the Lincoln
Memorial where King spoke the
famous words, "I have a dream
"We must not let Dr. King's
dream die McDougal insisted.
"If America is to survive, free-
dom must ring from every
Continued from page 1
mountain to every molehill . . .
Not just for some people, but
for all people. I challenge you
not to get a degree just to make
a living, but a degree to help
somebody McDougal chal-r
lenged the audience.
After McDougal con-
cluded his message, the Eta Nu
Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity, Inc. showed the video
of King giving his "I Have a
Dream" speech.
Afterwards, Eta Nu pre-
sented the G.P.A. certificates for
the male and female in each class
with the highest G.P.A. They
are as follows: Freshmen Tavia
Gilbert and Michael Boney;
Sophomore Cherilynn Johns and
Toby Merrill; Juniors Julia
Evanson and Steven Cozark; and
Seniors Marisa Roach and
Roderick Batts. Ike Copeland
and Derek Batson presented the
certificates.
The MLK Leadership
Award was awarded to Robin
Wooten, and the Community
Service Award was presented
to William Shiver. After re-
marks by other people challeng-
ing the audience to live up to
King's dream, Michael Brooks
led the Negro National Anthem
and Reverend Sidney Locks
closed with the benediction and
blessing. Refreshments were
served after the ceremony.
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting applications for
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The East Carolinian
January 20, 1994
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Tullo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Brian Olson, Sports Editor
Dave Pond, Asst Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Printed on
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Mike Ashley, Creative Director
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Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Inman calls it quits before even beginning
Why is it that everytime good, investiga-
tive reporters do their job, people whip out the
ole' accusation of employing "modern
McCarthyism methods"?
When Retired Adm. Bobby Inman with-
drew as defense secretary nominee Tuesday,
saying he was "distressed and distracted" by
attacks on his character and reputation, the
media came alive. In actuality, many members
of the media enjoyed a typical game of "Let's
Investigate" long before this latest (and, we're
assuming, final) action by Inman. After all,
that's our job
He lashed out during the rambling,
hourlong news conference, accusing, in par-
ticular, New York Times columnist William Safire
and Senate Republican Leader Robert Dole of
plotting to undermine his nomination. He
stated that "there were reports, which both
will probably deny, that there was a trade
between Safire and Senator Dole, that if Sena-
tor Dole would turn up the heat on my nomi-
nation that Safire would turn up the heat on
Whitewater development
Safire was quoted in yesterday's editions
of Times as saying the allegations were "noth-
ing short of weird adding that he never talked
to Dole about Inman.
During the news conference, Inman also
talked about his failure to pay Social Security
taxes for his housekeeper and that his wife did
contribute to the family finances by inherit-
ance � topics that the media reported on but
hardly attacked like the hungry, sadistic wolves
Inman has made us out to be.
The accusation directed at Safire and Dole
marked the latest public glimpse into a cat and
mouse feud between Inman and ideological
conservatives that dates back nearly three de-
cades. Inman made his decision believing that
subsequent attacks would come with great regu-
larity if he accepted the post.
In his resignation letter to Clinton explain-
ing his decision, Inman wrote that he was fed up
with "rush-to-judgement distortions of my
record, my character and my reputation He
"sensed elements in the media and the political
leadership of the country who would rather
disparage or destroy reputations than work to
effectively govern the country Well, boo-hoo.
Talk about fragile egos! (poor, delicate
Bobby Ray Inman)
The White House is probably breathing a
collective sigh of relief that someone as wishy-
washy as Inman decided to resign now, instead
of pathetically floundering in the barbaric hands
ofnews media (not even the media on the whole,
but a lone journalist).
He demonstrated a Perot-like short fuse
and an intolerance for the sort of investigative
reporting that any public official must endure.
Not only that, but in an interview late
Tuesday on ABC-TV's "Nightline Inman said
four reporters had called him Tuesday asking if
he was gay. He went on to say that "if you can't
find any other way to destroy a reputation, try
that one As if being gay (or even accused of it)
is the most tragic, awful thing to be. Incredible.
Well, it's back to the old drawing table for
Clinton. As for Inman � good riddance.
By John P. Adams
Zhirinovsky signals change in U.S. relations
From the moment the fi-
nal votes were tallied in
Russia's most recent election it
became apparent that Boris
Yeltsin's days as president are
numbered.
With the
overwhelming ������H
victory by
Russia's Liberal
Democratic
Party, a "pro-
test" vote, the
ascent of
Vladimir
Zhirinovsky,
leader of the
Liberal Demo- ma�m
cratic Party and
likely next president of Russia,
signals an imminent change in
U.SRussian relations.
By labeling Zhirinovsky
as an ultranationalist or right-
wing conservative, the U.S. me-
dia seems to be grooming him
as America's next great threat
to grandmother, apple pie and
Chevrolet.
This leads us to what may
be America's biggest problem
over the next couple of years:
Is the cold war really over or
just in hibernation?
We must remember that
our primary interest in Russia
is still its nuclear threat. With
this understood, the U.S. faces
two possible scenarios. The one
thing they both have in com-
mon is that American tax dol-
lars will be lost.
The first scenario, and
most likely, is that Vladimir
Zhirinovsky will become
Russia's next president and the
U.S. and Russia will resume
cold war hostilities.
If this happens, billions
of American tax dollars will
again be pumped into our na-
tional defense and we will re-
turn to the threat of a nuclear
holocaust.
Of course our first scenario
does not have to pan out this
way. Russian expert and
Harvard
We must
remember that our
primary interest in
Russia is still its
nuclear threat.
professor,
Philip
Zelikow,
duly notes
"that,
Democrats
and advo-
cates of
greater
freedom
are often
the most
strident secular nationalists
Zhirinovsky has already
gone on record as saying that he
would be more than happy for
Russia to work with the U.S. as
an equal partner in world af-
fairs.
However, he is concerned
that the U.S. will try to exploit
Russia's natural resources, but
this is simply posturing since
the only really enticing com-
modity is their oil reserves.
With President Clinton's
snubbing of Zhirinovsky on his
recent trip to Russia, it appears
that the White House is not go-
ing to take Zhirinovsky seri-
ously.
Instead, U.S. foreign policy
makers are hoping that Boris
Yeltsin can somehow recapture
his lost popularity. This is a big
gamble considering that to date
most of Yeltsin's economic re-
forms have failed miserably.
Also, we should not forget
that Ye'Nin is no great promoter
of democracy. It has only been
three months since he seized dic-
tatorial power to rule Russia (an
act which President Clinton con-
doned!). Zelikow notes that,
"The adhesion to Yeltsin risks
encouraging within Russia ex-
actly the polarized, anti-Ameri-
can tendencies that Washington
fears
The White House knows
Yeltsin is committed to "eco-
nomic reform" and the western-
ization of Russia. Thus, they are
willing to sacrifice billions of
U.S. tax dollars, as well as demo-
cratic values, in order to keep
Yeltsin in power, provided he
can stave off Zhirinovsky.
Of course, Boris Yeltsin is
a survivor. He overthrew Mikail
Gorbachev because he felt that
Gorbachev was moving too
slowly on economic reform.
However, since Yeltsin's
ascent to power and his imple-
mentation of shock economics,
Russia's economy has steadily
worsened. A nation which at one
time was on the verge of joining
the first world is now on the
verge of falling back into the
third world.
Can Russia save itself from
economic ruin?
They can if they continue
to vote the way they did in their
last election. Yeltsin's reforms
are no good for Russia. Vladimir
Zhirinovsky knows this and so
do the Russian people.
They also know that when
you are knocked down, you can-
not expect to be helped up by
those who knocked you down.
You have to help yourself get
back up.
Hopefully when
Zhirinovsky becomes president,
the White House will try to work
with him and not simply dis-
miss him as some crazed dema-
gogue, or else we will again face
the threat of nuclear annihila-
tion.
By Laura Wright
Oppression and eggplant: spectrum opposites
I went to see a band with
some friends the other night and
we ended up � somehow or
other � discussing the cliches
that were administered to us by
our parents during our forma-
tive years.
Among familiar favorites
were "you'll catch your death of
cold unless you wear your coat
"I swear this will be the last
vacation we will ever take
"you better not even think about
leaving this house dressed like
that "you better be careful or
you face might freeze like that
"put a smile on your face this
instant and "you better eat that
food. There are people starving
in(fill in the blank: either
India, China or Africa)
I could never figure out
how eating my food would, in
any way, help people who were
starving in India or anywhere
else for that matter.
The one statement that
struck a nerve with all of us was
the ever popular "you should
just be thankful
Do you remember this one?
This phrase is used as a reminder
that no matter how big your
problems are, there are people
out there with bigger ones.
I will demonstrate the use
of this pacifying statement in
terms of the present parking
situation. Suppose you came up
to me and said, "Laura, I can't
find a parking place and it re-
ally sucks I would answer you
by saying, "You should just be
thankful that you have a car
I would never really say
that, of course � but enough
about parking.
If you have a zit, you
should just be thankful that you
don't have two zits. You have
two zits? You should just be
thankful that you have a head
upon which to have zits.
If you don't want to walk
the dog, you should just be
thankful that you have a pet that
can walk. You know that if you
had a goldfish, you would want
to take it for walks all the time
and then where would you be?
In certain situations, the
"just be thankful" phrase can
even be substituted for "there
are people starving" phrase. For
example: instead of "you had
better eat that eggplant. There
are people starving in a par-
ent might say "you should just
be thankful that you have egg-
plant. Think of all the people
who don't have eggplant
Consider the larger impli-
cations of this statement. Sure,
we should be thankful for the
things that we have but it's also
okay to complain and disagree
�actually, these two things are
often much more productive
than gratefulness.
Think of all of the peoples
that have been oppressed
throughout the history of the
United States who have been
told that they should just be
thankful for the injustices that
they have suffered.
Think of all of the women
who have remained in abusive
relationships just because
someone told them just to be
thankful that they had a rela-
tionship.
Maybe oppression and
eggplant are at different ends
of the issues spectrum but we
have to start small and work
our way up. The next time
someone tells you to eat your
eggplant because there are
people starving, maybe you
could remind them that there
are ways to aid people who
don't have enough to eat �r
and then maybe they could do
something to help.
The next time someone
tells you that you should just
be thankful, take it as an at-
tempt to pacify you and thefi
feel free to remain dissatisfied.
For example, if you tried
to use the library over the holr-
day weekend only to discover
that it was closed for two whole
days and you couldn't do the
research that you needed to do
by Tuesday, you don't have to
just be thankful that there is a
library on this campus (yo$
know, the place with all thfe
books?), or that you can read
(if you can indeed read), yon
can complain and try to do
away with unfair policies.
Or you can write an opiiv
ion column. And if you think it
has been cold here lately, you
should just be thankful that yoy
don't live in Minnesota.
Stuff you should know
� Do you care about parking? Are you ticked off that you paid $70 for a piece of plastic that
assures you nothing? And insteadof parking on campus with your on-campus parking sticker,
you have to park miles awayoff-campus and walk to class, grumbling all the way? Well guess
what? The price of those precious, little student parking stickers may increase.
So grab a friend and go the Parking Committee Meeting in room 212 of Mendenhall today
at 2:30 p.m. Issues discussed may include the possibility of raising those already over-priced
decals. Go and complain � this is a golden opportunity. You can't say we didn't warn you.
� White Residence Hall is going co-ed. As of now, the dorm (ooh, sorry, residence hall)
houses only women. But beginning in the summer of '94, White will be home to both men and
women in much the same way Fletcher operates � let's say, men on the second floor, women
on the third floor and so on. But the interesting twist in this alteration is that the rooms will be
single-occupancy only. The added perk comes in the form of a refrigerator and carpeting. You'll
pay for it, of course, but isn't a single room worth it? You decide.
� Starting yesterday, the drivers of most commercial trucks and buses operating in
North Carolina are banned from using radar detectors. The Federal Highway Administra-
tion (FHWA) officially banned radar detectors in most commercial motor vehicles
nationwide, citing the need for measures to save lives and reduce injuries on the high-
ways. Intrastate drivers in North Carolina are also banned from using radar detectors.
So if you're in North Carolina and you're using a radar detector, remember that if
Officer Friendly pulls you and discovers your precious fuzz-buster, that it will be
confiscated and a citation will be given (with fines for the first offense not more than $500
and not more than $2,000 for any subsequent offense). Incentive enough
� Patrick Stewart (Captain Jean-Luc Picard of "Star Trek" fame) will be hosting "Saturday
Night Live" on February 5. Guest band is Salt-n-Pepa. This is possibly one of the coolest men
walking the planet today, and unlike some guest hosts, a good actor. Watch with glee, Trekkies!
In accordance with the von cold temperatures that have plagued
most of the United States recently (and more specifically, Greenville), the
mailbox for the Opinion Editor at The East Carolinian has remained as cold
(and lonely). To help end this tragedy, send all letters with your name, class
rank and major to Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.

to





-�r-im �� � ii i mttm
The East Carolinian
Page 6
Classifieds
January 20, 1994
For Rent
THREE FEMALE ROOMMATES
needed to take over lease. 2bedrooms
112 bath. Close to campus, $128.75 a
month plus 1 4 utilities. Call Brookie
or Lone 758-6692.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: for 2 bdrm
townhouse apartment. Rent is $170.00
per month and 1 2 utilities. Includes
on-site laundry, pool, and ECU tran-
sit. Callleave message. Stacy
Peterson 321-1532
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED 3 bed-
room townhouse, 2 b's. Located 5
mins from campus. Furnished com-
pletely, except for yourbedroom. Only
$250per month, water, sewer, cable.
Please call 321-2379 and leave mes-
sage.
SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom apt 2 full
baths, 2 blocks from campus, all major
appliances,$450month security de-
posit, available as soon as possible.
758-1295.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. 4 blocks
.from campus. $200month and 12
utilities. Call 757-2780 leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: to share a 2
bedroom 1 1 2 bath condo. Close to
campus and on ECU bus route. Rent
$175 1II utilities. Call 752-2289
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 2 bed-
i room apartment. Two blocks from
. campus. $157 a month, plus 12 utili-
ties, heating. Call 830-5471.
: TWO BEDROOM HOUSE for rent
j beside campus. One bath. Please call
i 757-3191 for information.
: FREE DEPOSIT- Female roommate
; wanted 3-br. apt need ASAP, 13
j utilities, tennis court, pool, very nice.
; Call Stephanie or Candy @ 321-0026
; CHERRY OAKS HOUSE 2 story, 3
; bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large lot, fire-
place, fenced in back yard, Jacuzzi and
; large storage barn. Available Feb. 1.
; $800 per month, 321-3478
For Rent
cable, lOmindrive from campus. $175
mo 12 utility phone. 355-4678
FEMALE NON-SMOKER roommate
needed immediately for 3 br. house
only two doors off campus. Sublet
available through May. Deposit re-
quired. Rent �i200mo. plus 13 utili-
ties. Callleae message. 757-1001
2 BEDROOM 2 bath (1 story) down-
stairs unit completely furnished @
Kingston Place. Approximately 1100
S. F. with all major appliances. Has
pool and laundry room. Rent: $500
per month with $500 deposit (includes
cable, water and sewer) Call 756-1234
to set up appointment for seeing.
Available immediately. Unit C1 (no
pets)
LARGE HOUSE, 3BR, 2 bath, central
heat, stove, near fairgrounds, 6 month
lease, $500. 758-5250
FEMALE ROOMMATE Tar River Es-
tatesnear campus. $153 monthly,par-
tially furnished, pool. Must be re-
sponsible, fairly sociable 758-4031
WANTED: Private two or three bed-
room cottage for maried field biolo-
gists. Trees, screened porch, fireplace,
and convenience to ECU desired (by
2-1-94). References available. 609-
263-0759
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for
apt. 12 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, 2 blocks from super-
market. Rent includes phone, utilites,
cable. Call 757-1947
FEMALE ROOMMATE neded. Seri-
ous, gard. student preferred, Non
smoker. 2 bdrm 1 bath. Rent $205 plus
utilities (electr only). One block from
campus. Call Valerie at 830-4816.
El Help Wanted
Springs of North Carolina. ECU PO
box 1320 Pittsboro, NC 27312
SOCCER REFEREES USSF certifica-
tion clinic to be held in Greenville
Jan. 21 -23. Earn extraand get plenty
of exercise. Call 752-7914 for details
For Sale 3 Services Offered J Services Offered
Help Wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED- 2 story,
Cherry Oaks House. Own bedroom,
house furnished, room furnished or
Unfurnished. Storage barn, Jacuzzi,
cable, basic phone, water and utilities.
$300 a month 321-3478
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
br. apartment in Collegeview. $175
per month plus 1 2 utilities. Cable is
included in the rent. Call 830-3771
and leave a message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED 1 12 blks.
from campus. 3 room house. Private
bathroom, hard wood floors. $180 per
month 13 utilities. Call 757-2419,
ask for Al
MALEFEMALE to rent completely
furnished bedroom. Private bath. All
litchen appliances, washerdryer,
CRUISE JO B S
Students Needed!
Earn up to $2,000mo. working for
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Brody's The Plaza l-4pm.
DEPENDABLE PERSON needed to
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week, 7am-7pm. References and
transportation required. Please call
only after 7:30pm 752-8710.
PROMOTE our Spring Break pack-
ages with our posters and flyers, or
sign up now for Spring Break rooms.
Daytona, Panama, Cancun, etc. $129
up. Call CMI 1-800-423-5264
AGRICULTURAL RETAIL OUT-
LET: Merchandiser and sales posi-
tion This is a part-time position (up
to 30 hours per week). Prefer indi-
vidui' who can work afternoons and
rotating Saturdays. Previous retail
background preferred. Farm experi-
ence helpful. Apply in person at Agri
Supply Co Hwy 264 bypass,
Greenville. No phone calls. EOE
HEAD LIFEGUARD. Summer posi-
tions in Greenville area, Goldsboro,
Plymouth, Tarboro. Application
deadline, Feb. 21. Call Bob Wendling,
758-1088.
BABYSITTER needed Tues. and
Thur. mornings. No smokers. Refer-
ences and own transportation please.
355-2088
COCKTAIL WAITRESSESBAR-
TENDERS wanted. Rio! The club in
the Greenville Hilton Inn. Join the
fun and excitement of working at
Greenville's hottest dance club. In-
terviews at the Hilton 3:00-5:00pm
Saturday Jan. 22nd. See Bob Schultz.
TWOPHYSICIANSseekingrespon-
sible student(s) to care for child in our
homo full or part-time. Possibility of
shared shifts. References required.
321-1410
SPRING BREAK SALE 1994! We have
thehottestdestinations! Jamaica,Cancua
Bahamas, Florida. AH at the guaranteed
lowest prices with the ultimate party
package. Organize small group and
Travel free! Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710
SPRING BREAK Bahamasparty cruise!
6 days $279! Trip includes Cruise
room, 12 meals 6 free parties! Hurry!
This will sell out! 1-80078-6386
SPRING BREAK! Cancun Jamaica!
Fly out of Raleigh and spend 8 days on
the Beach! We have the best trips
prices! Includes airhotelparties from
$429! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City! 8 days
oceanview room with kitchen$119! Walk
to best bars! Includes free discount card-
save $50 on cover charges! 1-800-678-
6386
FLORIDA'S new Spring Break hotspots!
Cocoa Beach Key West! More upscale
than Panama CityDaytona! Great
beaches nightlife! 8 days in 27 acre
Cocoa Beachfront resort $159' Key West
$249! 1-800-678-6386
8-Brr NINTENDO with 33 games, in-
cludes 11 sports, Tetris, Chess; two con-
trols and zapper, hint book and codes.
$300OBO. 931-8024, leave message
"?SPRING BREAK 1994 Cancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, South Padre, Florida
at 110 Guaranteed Lowest Prices from
1 spnngbreakcompany! Call John 752-
2992.
ATTENTION Weight liftersand watch-
ers: Let me help you fill those New Year's
resolutions. Sports supplements at ma-
jor discount prices: Cybergenics, Quick
Trim, Cybertrim, Super Fat Burners, Tri-
Chromelene, weight gain powders (all),
Amino Acids, Creatine, OKG, Vanadyl
Sulfate, Yohimbe Bark, Hot Stuff, and
many more! Call Brad today at931-9097
for more info.
FOR SALE: Trek 7000 mountain bike. 20
inch, aluminum frame; Mr. Tuffies; ex-
cellent condition. $700 retail value, ask-
ing only $450. 758-1295.
FOR SALE: 12 string Oscar Schmidt
acoustic guitar. Mint cond. $225 neg.
Call Bruce at 7584579
ELEGANT WEDDING DRESS, size 6,
originally $900. Pearl studded, V neck
bodice, flowing triple layered organdy
skirt with lacey pearl accents. $300 call
355-3716 after 6:00pm
MUST SELL! Takamine acoustic elec-
tric guitar. Only 6 months old. $550 call
LuAnn at 756-9209 evening & week-
ends.
FOR SALE: Doc Martens shoes, black,
size 7. Asking $65, but will go down in
price. If interested call 931-8480, ask for
Jane.
Sight Seeing Tours- $20 or
$15 each wminimum of 3 persons
Flight Training-Intnxjuctory Right $20
Certified Right Instructor
-Jeff Johnson-
call 9am-10pm 752-8860
HORSEBACK RIDING LESSON:
Special offer for ECU students. Great
way to get in shape! Experienced train-
ing, fun atmosphere, 3 miles from cam-
pus,beginnertoadvanced. Call Debbie
at 756-8236.
EH Services Offered
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
RTH PADREMUSTANG ISLAND
r-L-O-B-I-D-A
DAYTONA BEACH
PANAMA CITY BEACH
ORLANDOWALT DISNEY WORLD
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STEAMBOAT
VAIUBEAVER CREEK
BRECKENRIDGEIKEYSTONE
N-E-V-A-D-A
LAS VEGAS
S'O-O-T-H C-A-n.O-I1-H.R
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE NOW
CALL TOLL FREE TOR FULL
DETAILS AND COLOR BROCHURE!
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lap Ubmy Mtmfen m U S
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11322 Idaho Ave 206 A Los AngeKs CA 90025
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Personals
EXPERIENCED DJ from Bogies tor
hire. Specializing in fraternity soror-
ity socials and weddings. The widest
selection of music from the 50's to the
90's with unbeatable sound and pro-
fessionalism. Discounts to all ECU stu-
dents! Call now Rob 757-2658
Tired of trying to
stretch your dollar?
We pay cash on the spot for.
� USED BRAND NAME
MEN'S CLOTHING
�STEREO & VIDEO
�EQUIPMENT
�MICROWAVES
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If you arc selling you must be 1H with a
picture IP (NCni ECU)
s
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
752-3866
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear enirance
MON-RI 10-12 rx 1-S,
, Sat 10 am-1 pm
FOUND: UBE bag near teller ma-
chine downtown. Call 752-2051 or
830-0364
POOKIE- Happy Birthday! I hope
you have a good time tonight. This
past year has been great and I hope
to spend many more with you. I
love you! Sweetie
ilg Greek
ORDER OF OMEGA: Congratula-
tions newly initiated members! Our
first meeting will be held Wed. Jan.
26 in Mendenhall at 5:30. Special
thanks to Yetta Robinson for bring-
ing it back to ECU!
SIGMA wishes all fraternities good
luck next week during fraternity
rush!
ATTENTION! Delta Epsilon Chi
invites all those students interested
in joining a new exciting organi-
zation to an orientation social Thurs.
Jan. 20th 6-7pm at GCB rm2014.
Delta LpsilonChi,a marketing, Edu-
cation, � Business fraternity. Open
to all majors For more info, con-
tact Skip Lilly, VP of Public Rela-
tions at 931-8999 or 757-6549
RUSH DELTA CHI
January 25-27
at the Alpha Phi House
Announcements
; - SPECIAL OLYMPLCS
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics is recruiting for vol-
unteer coaches in the following
sports: basketball, softball, vol-
leyball, track and field, bowl-
ing, gymnastics, swimming and
rollerskating. No experience is
"necessary�Just a willingness to
work with children and adults
with mental retardation, spe-
cial training sessions for coaches
will be held. The last day to
volunteer for these spring sports
is Jan. 31. Volunteer hours may
be used as part of practicum
requirements for several ECU
.courses, for more information,
6bntact Connie Sappenfield or
f Mark Mallette at 830-4541 or
I 830-4551.
GOT THE BLUES?
What's the difference between
the blues and depression? Am I
I just being weak or is this a real
: health issue? How can I change
; the way I feel? The Counseling
, Center is offering a 12 week pro-
; gram that includes assessment
and strategies to overcome de-
pression. This is a very treat-
able condition! The program
begins Feb. 1 and enrollment is
limited. Call 757-661 for more
information.
DEPARTMENT OF
SPEECH-LANGUAGE AND
AUDITORY PATHOLOGY
(SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for
students who are fulfilling re-
quirements for admission to
Upper Division on Jan. 24, 25 &
26 1994 from 5:00-6:00pm each
day. These are the only screen-
ing dates during the spring se-
mester. The screening will be
conducted in the Belk Annex
(ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic)
located next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Health Sci-
ences), near the intersection of
Charles Street and the 264 By-
pass. No appointment is needed�
Please do not call their office for
an appointment. Waiting is out
side the clinic waiting room. Sign
in begins at 4:50pm. Screenings
are conducted on a first come,
first serve basis.
ATTENTION STUDENTS;
It's not too early to begin the
application process for summer
jobs. In fact, the application
deadline for the State Govern-
ment Internship program is Jan.
25! Don't miss out on great ma-
jor-related work experience op-
portunities. Co-op information
seminars are offered each Mon.
and Thur. afternoon, contact the
ECU Co-op office today for infor-
mation at 7 57-6979 or 2300 Gen-
eral Classroom Building. We'll
be waiting for you!
PHI SIGMA PI
INVrTATIONAL
A smoker will be held Jan. 24,
1994 in GC Rm. 1031 at 7:00pm
for those interested in pledging
Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fra-
ternity. To be eligible to pledge
one must have between 32 and 96
semester hours with a 3.3 GPAor
better. One must also display
qualities of Scholarship, Lead-
ership and Fellowship. For more
information contact David Batts
at 931-8775 or Lindsay
Fernandez at 321-2577.
PSI CHI MEMBERS-
Let's decide best meeting time.
Please write down best times for
you and place it in Psi Chi box in
Rawl. Also, please pay attention
to information located in Rawl on
Psi Chi's glass case. Questions:
Lori, 355-2654
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
Attention members: Campus
Awareness: 18-20 Jan next
meeting: 27 Jan, 5:30, GC Rm
1015, Reception: 22 Feb, Poten-
tial members please come to this
meeting, Lori- 355-2654
ECUNATIONAL STUDENT
SPEECH LANGUAGE
HEARING ASSOC �
The twenty fourth annual Speech
Language and Hearing sympo-
sium being held on Feb. 3 &4 at
the Pitt County Shrine Club in
Greenville. Guest speakers will
share their expertise on the fol-
lowing topics: language disor-
ders and communication in ado-
lescents, rehabilitative manage-
ment of children with cochlear
implants and current and newly
emerging procedures forth clini-
cal evaluation of children and
adults with suspected central
auditory processing disorders.
For more information call 757-
4405.
ATTENTION
SOPHOMORES-
Apply now for six weeks of sum-
mer challenge and adventure
training, with pay and no com-
mitment. Call Army ROTC, Cpt.
Bill Pitts 757-69746967
MEN'S SOCCER CLUB
Anyone interested in partici-
pating on the men's soccer club
should meet Thur. Jan. 20 at
7:30 in rm. 102 Christenbury
Gym. For more info, contact
Kurt Markley at 931-7373.
THE DEP. OF DECISION
SOENCES
will offer a non-credit EXCEL
course at no cost. Classes are 2-
4pm Fridays from Jan. 21-Feb.
18, 1994. Enrollment is lim-
ited; preference will be given to
student that received transfer
credit for DSCI2223 (introduc-
tion to computers). To register
call (919) 757-6893 by Jan. 20,
1994. EXCEL is the spread-
sheet and graphics package used
in business courses.
CHI ALPHA OMEGA
There will be a meeting for ac-
tive members from 10pm until
11pm at the Ledonia Wright
Building. Please plan to attend.
Rush is planned for Feb. 1-3,
from 8:30pm to 10:30pm at
Ledonia. Anyone interested
please feel free to come anytime
between 8:30pm and 10:30pm
any or all of those days.
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
SORORITY, INC.
TheTheta Alpha chapter of Al-
pha Kappa Alpha sorority, Inc.
is sponsoring a year long project
called "Akademics The first
of these academic sessions will
begin on Thur. Jan. 20. 1994 at
8pm in the social room of MSC.
All willing to learn are wel-
come to attend.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SOCIAL WORK
ALLIANCE
Attention all members, and
those who are interested in
joining. We will hold our
first meeting of the spring
semester on Mon. Jan. 24, from
11:30-12:30 in GC 1028. We
will be discussing the events
of the upcoming semester, and
make final preparations for
CSWE in March. A bowling
social will be held on Fri.
Jan. 28 from 12:OOpm-2:OOam
at AMF. If you are unable to
attend, but would still like to
be a part of our organization
please contact Jason Shirt.
@355-4598 or Mario Disney
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-
paid
Announcements
An organizatior, may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may
be cancelled before 10 am. the
day prior to publication,
however, no refunds will be
given.
For more
information
call 757-6366.
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Seigfreid and Barth
By Murphy & Davis
Fred's Corner
By Parnell
�SoCTUNKiG
UV-L. Xo 3oKE.TUV�C.
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Omega Quest
By Childers
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
NOvJ.COKSECT ME IF I'M W�ONs)
THIS IS THC SAME HOSTSSS
WHOSE LAST LITTLE"
KAFFEEKLATCH WAS VISITED 8V
LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT'
WHO WAS ALMOST
THROWN IN JAIL
CO CALLING THEM
SHEEP, lemmings,
Plankton and ksill?
who lookf her g jests
thf next moaning
61 PLWING"0�LAD-
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VOLUME WHILE7
TAP-DANCING ON
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Nick O' Time
By Dickens
Hachiro
By Jonathan Peedin
Spare Time
By Farkas
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The East Carolinian
Page 8
Lifestyle
January 20, 1994
United Way seeks help
By Bridget Hemenway
Staff Writer
, The United Way of Pitt County
is currently recruiting volunteers
to assist in its yearly allocations
process.
The United Way of Pitt County
is a non-profit organization that
supports 33 member-agencies
ited to serving the human
� care needs of people of all
I and walks of life.
Agency allocations for the
Jed Way of Pitt County is an
emely valuable, once-a-year
process for this organization. The
volunteers involved in this process
are the ones who assure that a
donor's gift is well spent by deter-
mining the level of financial sup-
port United Way provides its 33
member-agencies.
Each year approximately 70
volunteers from thecommunity are
recruited, trained and assigned to
one of the five service committees
which help the less fortunate within
thecommunity. The five commit-
tees are: Special Needs, Emer-
gencyBasic Needs, Emerging
Needs, Education and Support Ser-
vices and Youth Services.
Volunteers within each com-
mittee visit their respective agen-
cies,review theorganizationalbud-
get and service information, and
hear a formal request from each
agency. From this informationeach
committee makes recommenda-
tions on funding.
The United Way of Pitt County
will not only benefit and support
its 33 local member-agencies in Pitt
County. The organization will also
be helping five additional agencies
in 1994. These five agencies will be
receiving "venturegrants" thisyear
to assist them in serving the needs
of their clients. The venture grant
funds are one-time start-up money
allocations totalling $33,810.
"This money will go to agen-
cies that are addressing emerging
and diverse needs and that have
immediate and significant impact
in this community said Bernita
Demery, venture grant committee
chair.
Mrs. Demery said that the
money is given to enhance the
organization's long-term plan to
be a community problem-solver
in Pitt County and to try to help
more people in Pitt County.
The agencies selected range
from those helping at-risk chil-
dren to adults who are unem-
ployed.
If you are interested in volun-
teering for the United Way of Pitt
County contact: Greg Allinson,
UWPC Community Service Direc-
tor, at 758-1604.
Matthau, Morgan
continue careers
Dahli
Llama
Coming to an attic
near you fin fact,
the Attic, tonight),
local favorite
Dahli Llama
performing with
Follow For Now.
Photo courtesy
of Earie Records
Who's There?
BEVERLY HIlLS, Calif. (AP)
�Walter Matthau has enjoyed his
share of on-screen romances, but
his movie and TV pairings with
fellow actors have produced more
second dates.
He has repeatedly hooked up
with Jack Lemmon for such clas-
sics as The Odd Couple and the cur-
rent Grumpy Old Men. On televi-
sion, Matthau and Harry Morgan
perform a hat trick with their third
"incident" movie.
In Incident in a Small Town
(CBS), Matthau reprises his role as
attorney HarmonCobb. Morgan is
back as Judge Stoddard Bell, this
time accused of murder and inneed
of his friend Cobb's help.
The two first appeared as the
rumpled lawyer and stem judge in
1991 's The Incident. That was fol-
lowed the next year by Against Her
Will: an Incident in Baltimore.
The veteran actors � sharing
salads, cappuccino ice cream and a
window table at a Beverly Hills
tennis club � look as if friendship
has emerged from their collabora-
tion.
"I love this guy says Mor-
gan. "Well, I'm very fond of him
he adds, amending his remark with
a smile.
"I wouldn't go to dinner with-
out him Matthau says, referring
to their daily evening meals while
filming Incident in Vancouver.
"He's the only one I can hear
Matthau, 73, and Morgan, 78,
play off each other easily, trading
memories and wisecracks.
"We had a director who un-
derstands the needs of geriatric per-
sonnel Matthau says of Incident
director Delbert Mann, also an in-
dustry veteran who worked with
Matthau in a 1952 production of
Othello.
What needs?
Matthau: "You gotta have a
toilet nearby
Morgan: "Air tank
Matthau: "It can't be too hot,
too cold. Got to have plenty of
orange juice around
Morgan: "Young girls. Walter
likes young girls
"I'm a naughty talker
Matthau says, demurring. "No ac-
tion. Even when I was young, no
action
Then he continues. "A sea-
soned professional like Mann says
'How do you feel?' once in a while.
And he has the intelligence to know
when the take is good
"Sometimes even the first
take says Morgan.
"There are some directors who
cannot believe it can be any good
because they don't understand
what they're doing unless they do
25 takes Matthau concludes.
Co-starring in Incident is
Stephanie Zimbalist. She plays
Judge Bell's estranged, unmarried
daughter Lily, mother of a teen-
age son (Nick Stahl of The Man
Without a Face). The return of the
boy's long-absent father triggers
violence.
Matthau and Morgan have
high praise for their co-stars, in-
cluding the young Stahl. "The boy
was very good says Morgan. "He
was like a grown-up to work with,
the instincts were all right on
The new generation of actors,
in general, is treated less kindly.
"They no longer have any re-
spect or regard or talent for speech
See MATTHAU page 10
Author
Conroy gives
readers Body
&Soul
(AP)-Frank Conroy has
written a w jnderfully seam-
less, old-fashioned book
about a musical prodigy and
his personal and profes-
sional travails in Body & Soul
(Houghton Mifflin, $24.95).
Somewhat autobio-
graphical from Conroy's
younger days of music ap-
prenticeship, Body & Soul
presents a New York much
like that in F. Scott
Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby
�parries by the rich on Long
Island and life among
Manhattan's elite�andE.L.
Doctorow's World's Fair.
Conroy, who is not pro-
lific but nonetheless has
written the commendable
Midair and Stop-Time, ap-
pears to have exorcised the
ghost of this story from his
literary soul. It is a fine read,
one of the best American
novels to appear in the past
couple of years.
Claude Rawlings is the
star of Body & Soul, plunk-
ing away at his mother's
little piano in their dingy,
walk-up apartment. His
mom is an overweight, hard-
drinking cab driver; his fa-
ther is unknown, thought to
be dead, little talked-about
but certainly the musical
gene donor for Claude.
The preschooler shows
up at a music shop, asking
for sheets of piano music and
books to teach himself. His
progress is amazing, even
See CONROY page 10
ATTIC
LOCAL
CORMGANS
Thurs. Follow For Now
I Fri. Little Sister
Sat Strutter
r
Acme Blues Co.
Essence
Big Bump & The Stun Guns
STATE
Tool (wFailure) The Ritz (Raleigh)
Meatloaf
Rush(wTBA)
Raleigh Memorial Aud.
Charlotte Coliseum
Tue Feb. 8
Tue.f Feb. 22
Fri Feb. 25
Today: Depression or The Blues'
QuestioruI'mfeelingdownand
have lost interest in the things that I
used to enjoy. How do I tell if I've
just got the "blues" or if I'm de-
pressed?
Answer Everyone experiences
unhappy times in their lives. Often,
it is possible to identify a spe-
cific reason for feeling .�
down: relationship
break-up, death, failed r
test. At other times you t� 1 23
may notbe able to point � Vv��:
to any one incident that
seems to have caused y
these feelings.
If you feel down for only a
week or two, and can pretty well
pinpoint the cause, you're probably
experiencing the 'Islues" and can
expect the situation to improve
rather quickly. However, if you've
felt down for a longer period of
time, or really can't say why you're
down, you may be suffering from
depression.
Depression is a real disorder
that affects your thoughts, feelings,
physical health and behaviors day
after day. About one in 20 Ameri-
cans (over 11 million people) get
depressed ever)' year. Depression
affects twice as many
women as men. The
good news is that de-
pression is often eas-
ily treated, and over
1 80 of people in treat-
ment improve signifi-
cantly in three to four
months.
Symptoms of depression
can include:
Persistent sad or empty mood
Loss of interest or pleasure in
ordinary activities, including sex
Decreased energy, fatigue,
being "slowed down"
Sleepdisrurbances(insomnia,
early-morningwakingoroversleep-
Eating disturbances (loss of
appetite and weight or weight
gains)
Difficulty concentrating, re-
membering, making decisions
Feelings of guilt, worthless-
ness, helplessness
Thoughts of death or sui-
cide or suicide attempts
Irritability
Excessive crying
Chronic aches and pains that
don't respond to treatment
An accurate diagnosis is im-
portant. The Counseling Center,
located in 316 Wright Building,
has free information about symp-
toms and treatments. Also, the
center will be offering a 12-week
therapy group, beginning Feb. 1,
for students dealing with depres-
sion. Call 757-6661 for more infor-
mation or to register for the pro-
gram.
Career Corner
Do Yourself a Favor
Register fagyggjeer Services:
It's Easier than ��u Think
Noli
for Care
perks o
idless hassles. Registering
ay think. Certainly the
returns. Among the benefits
ice employer interview
(if apppea!KB�ent
career sea
'AN and sooJW
fed your nfcunu uuAHrested
Bre.gc
CD Reviews CD Reviews CD Reviews
J' Don't Buy
JJJ worth A Try
At Take Your Chances
�WvV Definite Purchase
Muzza Chunka
Fishy Pants
mmm
Read through the list of the
Worst Band Names in the History
of Western Civilization, and down
towards the bottom, you'll find
something called Muzza Chunka.
But the fun doesn't stop there with
these guys. Muzza Chunka's major
label debut is called Fishy Pants, a
name that makes me giggle uncon-
trollably every time I hear it spoken
aloud. Foryour reading enjoyment,
I'll be repeating it several times
throughout the review.
Anyway, Fishy Pants is raw,
simple stuff. Muzza Chunka is not
the most accomplished group of
musicians you'll ever hear. Imagine
your brother's garage band with a
recording contract and a few extra
brain cells. But at least they're not
another boring, angst-ridden, "al-
ternative" band, or a bunch of
greedy, retro-hippy poseurs. No,
Fishy Pants features punk rock in all
its seedy grandeur. These boys are
really pissed off about something,
but they can't quite put their finger
on what. The closest they can come
to criticism is hypocrisy, which they
attack with lots of disgusting stuff
about pus and feces.
A song that rises out of Fishy
See FISHY PANTS page 10
Roily Gray & Sunfire
Let Your Body Move

If you have lived in Green-
ville for a while, you have prob-
ably seen Roily Gray and Sunfire
advertised to play at The Attic or
even last year's Barefoot on the
Mall. You can't really classify them
as a reggae band, because they
run the whole gamut of Carib-
-
bean music, including calypso
(sort of like speedy reggae) and
soca (calypso and funk).
Roily Gray's newest effort is
Let Your Body Move. Most of this
album is traditional reggae, but
there are a few tracks in the lesser
known sister forms of Caribbean
music which help to keep the
monotony away. Calypso tracks
like "I Need Your Love" are
jumpy, high-speed forms that
snap you out of the trance in-
duced bv the heavy bass of
reggae. Steel drums, horn sec-
tions and many layers of percus-
sion on the faster tracks are more
than enjoyable. There is even a
hint of some of the newer forms
of island music on "Song of
Love" which has a dance hall
type rap at the end. These guys
are more fun than a six-foot spice
rack.
See ROLLY GRAY page 10
�in 11� pimmini





January 20, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
Stamps created as tribute
to 20th century women
(AP)-ln tribute to "Great
Women of the 20th Century, "the
African nation of Tanzania (bor-
dering on the Indian Ocean) has
issued a set of eight new vertical
stamps and one souvenir sheet.
The 20 shillings depicts
Valentina Tereshkova of the
former Soviet Union, honored as
the first woman in space. The 40
shillings illustrates Dr. Marie Cu-
rie, Nobel Prize winning physi-
cist. The 50 shillings shows Indira
Gandhi, former prime minister
of India. The 70 shillings portrays
Wilma Rudolph of the United
States, who won three track med-
al? in the 1960 Olympic Games
held in Rome.
The 100 shillings pictures
Margaret Mead of the United
States, renowned anthropologist.
The 150 shillings depicts Golda
Meir, former prime minister of
Israel. The 200 shillings features
Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, who was
born in England but whose fam-
ily moved to the United States.
Blackwell received acclaim as the
first woman to gain a medical
degree in the United States. The
400 shillings shows Margaret
Thatcher, ex-prime minister of
Great Britain.
The souvenir sheet (500 shil-
lings) features portraits of Mother
Teresa, winner of a Nobel Peace
Prize for her work in helping the
poor in India.
The Tanzania stamps are
available from the Inter-Govern-
mental Philatelic Corp 460 West
34th St New York City, N.Y.
10001.
Sports fans and topical col-
lectors who specialize in "sports
on stamps" are looking forward
to a great 1994. In addition to the
Winter Olympics in Norway, the
World Cup of Football (soccer) �
which is held every four years in
a different country � will take
'Homicide' entertains viewers
Emmy-winning writer champions hour-long dramas vs. sitcoms
:

place this summer in the United
States. It will be the first time the
World Cup has been held in the
United States.
The U.S. Postal Service will
be releasing stamps for both oc-
casions to hail the sporting events.
Countries all over the world will
be issuing similar philatelic trib-
utes.
TheCentral American nation
of Nicaragua is honoring the
World Cup with seven new
stamps. Depicted on the Nicara-
guan set are famous players from
participating nations.
Illustrated in action scenes
are: Tomas Brolin of Sweden,
Maxime Bossis and Michael
Platini of France, Jan Karas of
Poland and Antonio Luis Costa
of Brazil, Harold Schumacher of
Germany, Andoni Zubizarreta of
Spain, Lothar Matthaeus of Ger-
many, Diego Maradona of Ar-
gentina, Bryan Robson of England
and Carlos Santos of Portugal.
The Nicaragua stamps are
available from ihc Shield Stamp
CoBox2977,Grs ICentralSta-
tion, New York City, N.Y. 10163.
In answer to many requests
from readers concerning the is-
suance of new U.S. stamps, the
Postal Service affirms that "new
items will not honor cities, towns,
municipalities, counties, primary
schools, hospitals, libraries or
similar institutions due to the vast
number of such requests, because
it would be difficult to single out
any one for commemoration
While many other countries
issue semi-postals (added values)
for worthy causes, again the
Postal Service says "due to the
vast number of worthy fund-rais-
ing organizations in existence, it
would be difficult to single out
specific ones to receive such rev-
See STAMPS page 10
NEW YORK (AP) � If the new
world of 500 channels is as grand as
they sav, one of those channels will
certainlv be The Fontana Channel. All
Fontana. All the time.
But for now, we'll satisfy our-
selves with the season's two remain-
ing episodesof "Homicide: Lifeonthe
Street the superb crime drama for
which Tom Fontana, one of TV's most
gifted off-camera performers, serves
asanexecutiveproducerand a princi-
pal writer.
Airing this Thursday and next at
10p.m. EST on NBC, and starring Ned
Beatty, Richard Belzer and a squad of
other fine actors, "Homicide" is fight-
ing for its life in the ratings. But itcould
still punch its way into next season's
schedule.
Fontana, 42, was the guy who
stewarded this quirky and compel-
ling series through nine episodes last
year and the four that will make up its
sophomore miniseason.
� HispartnerisHoUywoodbigfoot
Barry Levinson,whocreatedtheshow.
"Who's Barry Levinson?" asked
Fontana a coupleofyearsago,livingin
Manhattan and a little out of touch
whenhewasinvitedtocomeaboard.
"What's Ram Man?" he asked
next.
But when told "Homicide"
would be a cop series without car
chases or gunplay, he said, "I'm in
Maybe you saw Fontana last
fall on the Emmy telecast when he
snagged a best-writing award.
He took that opportunity to
ehampionhourdramas,a form some
predict will fall prey to theonslaught
of cookie-cutter sitcoms and cheap
TV magazines.
"It's not the fault of the Ameri-
can public that the drama is in
trouble Fontana said. "It's us: the
writers, producers, the network ex-
ecutives, the studio money-
crunchers. We have to figure out a
way to reignite the imagination of
the American people
It was a revealing glimpse into
the Fontanan psyche. With no par-
ticular evidence tobolster his faith�
"I've never had a hit he concedes
� Fontana maintains a healthy re-
spect for TV viewers. TV may be
dumb, but viewers aren't.
But why trouble yourself, Tom?
Why?You could dash off a silly sitcom
that would make you a fortune or a
silly cops-and-robbers romp that
would run for years.
"lknow,lknowhesays,laugh-
ing and hanging his head.
So what's wrong with you? "I
don't know, I don't know he says,
laughing. "I don't know
Yes, he does. K � '
"There's a part of me that's so
bored with what I see on TV he.
says, not laughing now. "If I'm gb-
ingtodojust another show, itwould
be better for me to go off and open
mv bookstore in Maine. That's not
to attack other shows. But I think
there's a place in television for ev-
erything
Including' 'Homicide
RESIDENT ADVISORS
NEEDED
for Summer Ventures in Science
and
Mathematics Program;
June 15-July 16,1994.
Information meeting on February 1,
1994,
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 221, 3:15 PM.
Interviews week of February 7th.
Summer Ventures office 757-6036.
Eight two-hour sessions designed to prepare you
for the format and content of the
March 19,1994 GMA T Exam
GMAT
Review
Course
i
Courst SdieiluU
Tuesdayl-chruary S
ThursdayFebruary 1(1
Tuesdaylchru.iry IS
ThursdayFebruary 17
TuesdayFebruary 22
ThursdayFcbmary 24
TuesdayMarch 1
ThursdayMarch S
Course Time:
610p.m. -8V)p.m.
ONLY $150
for Early Registration
Itcfore January 2S
$170 lieginnivg January 2S
Verbal and Malh Topics lo Be Reviewed:
l Scnlcncc Ctnrcetiou
Heading Comprehension
? Critical Reasoning �
? Problem Solving (Arithmetic. Algebra. Geometry)
Data Sufficiency

Location:
General Classroom Building. Room 102fi
Instructors:
Dr. Patrick Bizzaro. Associate Professor. F.nglish
Dr. Mark A Coffin, Assistant Professor, Decision Sciences
Texts:
Tlie Princeton Revien: Cracking the System: Tlie GMAT
Die Official Guide for GMAT Review
iC'osl of texts incliKlctl in registration fee) h
Presented by
ECU School fRusiness ' Professional Programs
I2tm General Classroom fliiililmg
(91V) 757 (1.177
mid nwmwl �V Crffin
?
i
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Only $8 Adv Tix W SPGCial & DAG
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It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BOWLING CHESS SPADES
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opponunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at East Tennesee State University in Johnson City the weekend of
February 25-27 1994. All expenses will be paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST? �
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 20
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Tuesday, January 25
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Wednesday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the Menden-
hall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor of
Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office. 757-4766. for more information.





�ft) The East Carolinian
January 20, 1994
CONROY
Continued from page 8
to Weisfeld, who takes to tutoring
him and guiding him ever upward
in the pursuit of musical greatness.
; Music and movies become
Claude's escape.
! "The piano seemed to disap-
pear and somehow the lines them-
selves filled the boy's conscious-
ness, the architecture of the music
lucid in every small detail, the
whole statement sealed, floating,
and folding into itself, and into si-
lence. Claude ached at the beauty
of it
Eventually, young Rawlings
is taken under the wing of a suc-
cession of piano greats and
through powers of intense con-
centration mixes his musical
progress with fine schooling. The
boy' is soon playing among the
greats.
His personal life, however,
while not stunted, suffers from fits
and starts. He loves the unlovable
ROLLY GRAY
Catherine, who eventually escapes
her family by eloping with her
cousin.
The cousin's millions are no
salve, and the marriage founders
ashiscareerblossoms. ThatClaude
goes to London and meets anew
with Catherine brings the book
full circle.
Little seems left out in Body &
Soul. While calling it a 1990s epic
may be a bit of a stretch, the book
is hard to put down. It resonates
with true-life tales and morality
plays and enough writing verve
that one could easily see it becom-
ing fine fodder for a movie.
Perhaps the only sour note is
that Conroy occasionally tosses out
some obtuse word that clangs in
the copy � for example, "otiose"
on Page 428 mucks up the read.
No one wants to run to a dictio-
nary while reading a fine work of
fiction.
Continued from page 8
Most of the songs on mis al-
burn involve the subject of love or
just;feeling good. Some of the
reggae tunes carry strong political
messages like the track "Extinc-
tion' an indictment of the "pave
the planet" idea that runs Western
culture. No matter what message
is involved, all 10 tracks are worth
a listen.
MATTHAU
Roily Gray and Sunfire have
toured all over America, but they
call Chapel Hill home, which is
also the home of their label, Leap
Records. Sunfire has been around
for a whole, and with the growing
popul?rity of their kind of music,
their day in the sun may be soon.
� Kris
Hoffler
STAMPS
Continued from page 9
enues.
The Caribbean island nation
of Redonda hails Nobel Prize win-
ners with a set of eight stamps
and one souvenir sheet.
The honorees depicted on the
stamps are Dag Hammarskjold,
secretary general of the United
Nations in 1951; Guglielmo
Marconi of Italy for his work in
radio waves in 1909; Milton
Friedman of the United States for
economics in 1976; Albert
Schweitzr in 1952 for his medical
missionary work; German chem-
FISHY PANTS
ist Emil Fischer for chemistry in
1902; Alexander Solzhenitsyn for
literature in 1970; Ivan Palov for
medicine in 1904, and Winston
Churchill for literature in 1953.
The souvenir sheet is a trib-
ute to Albert Einstein, winner of
the physics award in 1921.
The Redonda stamps can be
obtained from the Shield Stamp
Co Box 2977, Grand Central Sta-
tion, New York City, N.Y. 10163.
Continued from page 8
Pants' cesspool of diseased flesh
imagery, however, is "Meaty
Greedy An attack on the corpo-
rate mind-set, this track is about
sleazy record executives sucking off
bands like friendly leeches that aban-
don their hosts when something else
comes along. Not a very flattering
way to talk about Muzza Chunka's
new friends at Arista Records, the
people who released Fishy Pants.
All of which may reveal why
the group is so concerned about hy-
pocrisy. Our heroes are dealing with
the very leeches they're singing about
This issue is addressed on "Dim Sum
Brunch the firsttrackonFsry Parts.
WhencorporaterockmeansNirvana,
what'sanidealisticyoungpunkband
to do? Apparently, Muzza Chunka
is tired of thinking about it. "I don't
know what it means shouts lead
Muzza mouth Paul Dybdahl. "1 don't
care what it means. Just let me quit
my fucked-up job and smoke green
pot with David Teague Say what
you will, at least they're honest.
Fishy Pants is not for every-
one. Muzza Chunka is loud and ob-
noxious. Their riffs have been heard
before. Sometimes the lyrics are
higher on shock value than anything
else. But there's an energy in this
angst-ridden, blown-speaker music
that I respond to. And they called the
album Fishy Pants for God's sake!
What more do you need?
� Mark
Brett
Continued from page 8
Phi Kappa Psi
January 25, 26 &27
8-1 lpm
508 W. 5th Street (ZTA house)
For More Information
Call Woody or Mike
at 830-9536
FOOD AND DRINK PROVIDED
says'Matrhau. "As a matter of fact,
the clearer you speak the less chance
you have of getting a job
Fie launches into an imitation
of a mumbling thespian, one that
sounds suspiciously like Marlon
Brando.
"It started with Brando con-
firms Morgan.
"No one trains for the stage
anymore Matthau says. "They
just train to know how to see an
agent
Both men started in theater.
Matthau has appeared in more than
20 plays on Broadway and won
two Tony Awards (for A Shot in the
Dark and The Odd Couple). His Os-
car came for The Fortune Cookie in
1966.
Morgan recalled living on
starvation theater wages until
marriage pushed him out to Hol-
lywood in search of better-pay-
ing movie roles. He eventually
turned to TV, starring in what
may be a record number of series,
including "Dragnet" and
"MASH" (for which he won an
Emmy in 1980).
When talk focuses on past
roles, Morgan offers that he has
played a judge at least once be-
fore, in the film Inherit the Wind
about the famed trial on teaching
evolution.
That triggers a bit of friendly
competition.
"I was a SupremeCourt judge
in First Monday in October says
Matthau, practicing one-
upmanship.
"I played (President) Truman
one time retorts Morgan.
"Igotyou beat says Matthau.
"I played an ADVISER to the presi-
dent. Fail Safe. Hank Fonda was
the president
Despite their long careers nei-
ther man seems seriously to con-
sider retirement. Matthau has re-
mained busy despite health prob-
lems, including a bout with double
pneumonia after filming Grumpy
in Minnesota.
"What else have we got to do?
We're very old people Matthau
says.
"I could (retire), but Walter
can't Morgan says.
"I have a big nut. My wife's a
depraved spender and I'm a de-
generate gambler says Matthau.
"Bad combination deadpans
Morgan.
ECO STUDENTS!
American Dental Plan
af North Carolina
Introduces
fln individual Dental Program!
WANTED
Self-Starter
High Energy Individual
Exceptional Leadership & Organizational Skills
Service Oriented
FOR
The Student Committee Chair Elect to work
with the 1994 Student Homecoming Committee
under the auspices of the ECU
Homecoming Steering Committee.
This position is highly visible and prestigious.
Application forms are available at the Information Desk , Mendenhall
Student Center. Please return the application and a letter detailing your
involvement in student organizations here at ECU by 5:00pm
Monday, January 31, 1994 to room 210, Mendenhall Student
Center. The top three candidates will be interviewed by the
Homecoming Steering Committee.
For further information, contact J. Marshall at 757-4711.
flDP BENEFITS INCLUDE:
ExaminationsNo Charge
X-RaysNo Charge
CleaningsNo Charge
Flouride TreatmentsNo Charge
Local AnesthesiaNo Charge
Braces25 Discount
"Bonus Benefits No Additional Cost!
� Vision Plan:I p To 50 Discount on Frames & Lenses
� Contact Lens Replacemenet: Up To 60 Discount
� Discount Prescription Drug Plan
These Benefits Automatically Included With DentaL.No Charge
CALL TODAY 355-1641
OFFERED BY
THE HUDSON GROUP
3219 LANDMARK ST. SU. 6B
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
mm
S&
1
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1994-1995 Terai
Any full-time student with
a minimum G.P. A. of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available at the Student Union Office
Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline To Apply: January 19,1994
su
PREVIEW
'94
Summer Student
Leadership Oppurtunity
Available
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Applications Available in
Room 203 Ervvin
Beginning January 24, 1994
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 18, 1994
At 4:00 PM

. .��, �� ��.�







�� - " � M.
ii.ifflgrr-�,�- �
The East Carolinian
Page 11
What's On Tap?
Thursday, Jan. 20
W. Basketball, away
at William & Mary,
Williamsburg.Va. at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan.21
W. Indoor Track, away
at Barnett Bank Invit Univ. of
Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
Saturday, Jan. 22
M. Basketball, away
at Richmond, Richmond, Va. at
7:30 p.m.
W. Basketball, home
vs. UNC Charlotte, 7 p.m.
M.&W. Swimming, away
at Richmond, Richmond, Va.
at 2 p.m.
The 411
Monday, Jan. 17
M. Basketball, home
beat Fairfield, 77-65
Wednesday, Jan.19
M. Basketball, away
late game vs. William & Mary
Sten's1.1 leakers
STANDINGS
Team Conference GBOverall
UNCW 4-0 .1.0010-4 .714
JMU 3-0 1.00 �9-4 .692
ECU 2-1 .667 1.510-4 .714
ODU 2-2 .500 2.59-6 .600
AU 1-2 .333 3.54-10 .286
UR 1-2 .333 3.55-9 .357
GMU 0-3 .000 4.55-9 .357
W&M 0-3 .000 4.51-11 .083
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Kent Culuko, JMU20.6
Odell Hodge, OOU19.5
Donald Ross, GMU18.7
Tim Fudd, AU18.2
Lester Lyons, ECU17.3
Rebounding Avg
David Cuily. W&M9.0
Khyl Horton, GMU8.6
Sherif El-Sanadily, UNCW 8.5
Odell Hodge, ODU8.1
Clayton Ritter, JMU8.1
Assist Avg
Troy Manns, GMU7.4
Kevin Larkin, ODU5.1
Kevin Swann, ODU4.6
Drew Phillips, UNCW4.3
Curtis McCants, GMU4.0
Field Goal
Clayton Ritter, JMU.619
Odell Hodge. ODU.532
Kass Weaver, UR.524
Anton Gill, ECU.521
Kent Culuko, JMU.486
Free Throw
Kent Culuko, JMU.932
Kevin Swann, ODU.875
Kurt Small, W&M.821
Corey Stewart, UNCW.818
Darren McLinton, JMU.816
3-pt Field Goal
Kent Culuko, JMU.538
Darren McLinton, JMU.459
Sean Duff, W&M444
Corey Stewart, UNCW.425
Lester Lyons, ECU.414
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
East Carolina8.6
Old Dominion7.0
James Madison5.5
UNC Wilmington2.4
Richmond-1.3
George Mason-4.0
William & Mary-8.7
American-9.3
Rebounding Margin
UNC Wilmington6.4
East Carolina3.5
George Mason2.8
Richmond2.1
Old Dominion1.9
James Madison-1.0
American-3.1
William & Mary-7.1
Field Goal
James Madison48.4
UNC Wilmington45.7
East Carolina44.4
Old Dominion44.2
Richmond43.5
George Mason424
William & Mary41.5
American40.2
Oef. Field Goal
East Carolina41.9
UNC Wilmington42.9
Old Dominion44.3
James Madison44.6
George Mason45.4
Richmond46.1
William & Mary46.5
American49.3
Compiled by Brad Oldham
Sports
January 20, 1994
ECU sends Stags back home
File Photo
Forward Wilbert Hunter, seen here last year, has worked his way into
this year's starting lineup and has been a physical force for the Pirates.
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The Pirates defeated the Stags
of Fairfield University at Minges
Coliseum on Monday night, 77-65.
In a non-conference game that was
played a bit below the level that
ECU has been showing, it was, nev-
ertheless, still a notch in the win
column for coach EddiePayne and
his team.
The Pirates are now 10-4, a turn-
around from last season, when ECU
didn't reach their 10th win until
February 24.
"We are pleased to get the win,
but not by the way we played to-
night'coachPaynesaid. "Weneed
to be playing better each
game,playing harder, playing
smarter, and just more consistently
each time out
ECU was once again led by
senior guard Lester Lyons, who
scored 17 points in his 100th game
here at ECU. Junior Anton Gill
added 13points,nineof whichcame
in the first half, along with six re-
bounds. Fairfield, which got 51 of
their 65 points from freshmen and
sophomores, were led by guards
Greg Francis, a freshman, and
sophomore reserve MeishayGattis.
The two players scored 15 points
a piece, and combined to hit seven
three-pointers in the game.
The Pirate offense looked in-
side to Gill early and often in the
first half. If Gill didn't hit the soft
jumper, he reversed the ball to the
perimeter for the three-point shot.
ECU had a total of seven three-
point field goals alone in the first
half, with two apiece from Lyons
and freshman Skipp Schaefbauer.
Senior forward Curley Young got
the 4,000-plus crowd behind ECU
at the end of the first half, scoring
five points on both a dunk and a
three-pointer.
Fairfield looked to their fresh-
man in the firsthalf for their scoring.
Francis and forward Shannon Bow-
man each had eight points in the
half. At half-time, it was ECU hold-
ing a 40-27 lead.
The second half started uglyfor
ECU. Fortunately, it started even
worse for the Stags, who failed to
capitalize on numerous Pirate turn-
overs to start off the half.
The Pirates tried to keep their
lead in double digits, but saw it start
to slip away. Senior guard Johnnie
Jones, who scored 12 points on the
night, cut the lead to nine with a
three-pointer at the three minute
mark. Like the true leader that he is,
Lyons took control of the game on
thenextplay, taking theballbaseline
for the bucket and the foul, pushing
the lead back up to 12.
Gattis hit a three with just over
two minutes left to bring the lead
back to nine, but after that Fairfield
was forced to foul, and the Pirates
went on to victory.
Earthquake rattles sports world
(AP) � The "Big A" sign in-
side the stadium is down. The
scoreboard and giant replay screen
are in ruins.
Anaheim Stadium sustained
about$3.4millionLidamages Mon-
day from the earthquake that
rocked Los Angeles.
The stadium, home of the Cali-
fornia Angels and Los Angeles
Rams, is farther from the quake's
epicenter than most of the Los An-
geles area's stadiums and arenas.
Yet, it was the only one to incur
significant damage.
Bret Colson, an Anaheim city
spokesman, said there will be a big
bill to foot because the insurance
deductible is $6.25 million, mean-
ing the damages will not be cov-
ered.
Anaheim is some 30 miles from
downtown Los Angeles and about
50 miles from where the quake was
centered in Northridge.
The new Anaheim Arena,
about a mile from Anaheim Sta-
dium and home of the NHL's
Mighty Ducks, had no apparent
damage.
"We were able to weather it
very well said John Nicoletti,
spokesman for the arena. "The
building isbuilt structuraliv sound.
Everything is fine
Nearer the epicenter of the
quake, which measured 6.6 on the
Richter scale, were Dodger Sta-
dium, the Los Angeles Coliseum
and Sports Arena, all near down-
town Los Angeles, the Rose Bowl
in Pasadena and the Forum in
Inglewood. All apparently had no
major damage.
The Sacramento Kings-Los
Angeles Lakers game Monday af-
ternoon was postponed because of
the mayhem.
"It's the scariest feeling I'veever
had Sacramento forward
Wayman Tisdale said.
'Two thoughtscame to mind
said Kings coach Garry St. Jean.
"One, is the building going to col-
lapse? Two, what about my fam-
ily?"
At Santa Anita, 20 miles from
Northridge, the special Martin
Luther King Jr. Day racing pro-
gram went on as scheduled and
drew a crowd of 19,001.
JaneGoldstein, director of com-
munications for Santa Anita, said
the track, with a rare Monday rac-
ing date because of the holiday,
sustained "only superficial, cos-
metic-type damage, a little plaster
down
The quake kept Roger Stein
home, but the horse he trains, 11-1
shot Southern Truce, still won the
$160,600 Santa Monica Handicap
by a half length over Arches of
Gold.
"A Grade I race and I'm not
even there Stein said when in-
formed by a Santa Anita employee
of Southern Truce's victory.
Asked if that was thebestnews
he'd heard all day, Stein replied,
"You're not kidding
Stein didn't go to the track be-
cause of damage at his home in
Woodland Hills, near the epicen-
ter.
One visiting team's players
See QUAKE page 14
U.S. Olympic Committee
feels Harding is worthy
(AP)�Bad taste maybe tough
on the rest of us, but the last time
someone thought to check, it still
was not a crime.
A case could be made to charge
Tonya Harding on the first count.
Take your pick of damning evi-
dence: loose lips, an unsavory ex-
husband, chintzy costumes, a lack
of grace, too much mascara. Yet,
the only thing that should matter
to those de-
ciding her
fate is
whether she
can be
charged with
the second.
So far,
that reason-
ing appears
to be hold-
ing. Harding
spent most of
Tuesday in mt
Portland re-
hashing the kneecapping of rival
Nancy Kerrigan wh the local dis-
trict attorney. Meanwhile, the
president of the U.S. Figure Skat-
ing Association was reminding
people Handing's place on the team
was by virtue of being national
champion and not subject to the
whims of a popularity poll.
"It's like taking a public vote
on whether you should hang some-
one for a murder Claire Ferguson
of the USFSA said. "Maybe it
would makeiteasieronthecourts,
but that's not the way we handle
justice in this country
It's like taking a
public vote on
whether you
hang someone
for murder.
Claire Ferguson,
USFSA
Though Ferguson would
never say so, her life would no
doubt go much smoother if
Harding simply surrendered her
spot. There is no doubt that if
Harding did so, life would be easier
for a lot of people.
For starters, there is the U.S.
Olympic Committee, in whose lap
the USFSA could dump this mat-
ter by taking no action against
Harding.
MKI Mil I tmtm Mil � Then there are
the U.S. Olym-
pians who
aren't figure
skatersbutfig-
ure to get lost
in the wake of
the TV cam-
eras trailing
Harding
across Nor-
way. And fi-
immwaBiw nally, there is
Kerrigan her-
self.
Imagine her surprise on open-
ing the door to her place in Nor-
way and finding Harding in the
bottom bunk, greeting her with a
throaty Yo, roomie Then imag-
ine Kerrigan frantically trying to
recall whether the movie Single
Wfrite Female began as threaten-
ingly.
In real life, however, Harding
hasn't been proved to be a danger
to anyone but herself. She got her-
self into this scrape; the odds re-
See HARDING page 14
Kerrigan will not be slowed
(AP)�Figure skater Nancy
Kerrigan has pronounced herself
determined to compete in the
Olympics after gliding through a
practice session, despite an in-
jury to one knee caused by an
assailant in Detroit.
Her coach predicted
Kerrigan would be performing
jumps and other complicated
moves as early as the end of this
week.
"My confidence wasn't
bruised. That was just my knee
Kerrigan said Monday after smil-
ing her way through a practice
session at a local ice arena. "I
think if the Olympics were to-
night, I'd be able to go out and do
my performance � although I
might have to sit down at the end
and say, 'Go get the stretcher
Evy Scotvold, Kerrigan's
coach, said he could see determi-
nation in the skater's eyes.
"As a coach, it's that game
face that is really great to see
Cotvold said.
The crime against her, he
said, "really has affected her in a
positive way. She has a great
mindset and amazing confidence
right now
Kerrigan was clubbed in the
right knee at the U.S. Figure Skat-
ing Championships on Jan. 6.
While skating Monday,
Kerrigan showed no visible ef-
fect of the attack. She fell once, a
mishap she later jokingly blamed
on rough ice.
"I was kind of stiff at first �
my knee, especially Kerrigan
said later at a news conference in
Pirates
looking at
CAA foes
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
While it might feel like
it is 50 degrees below out-
side, things are just start-
ing to heat up inside some
Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion gymnasiums.
The Pirates will com-
plete their two game road
trip on Saturday against
Richmond and will come
home to play two confer-
ence games at home next
week against fames Madi-
son on Wednesday and
UNC-Wilmington on Jan.
29.
On Wednesday, the
Bucs(2-1,10-4) were third
in the division trailing
UNC-W (4-0, 10-4) and
James Madison (3-0,9-4).
Wilimington so far seems
like to be the team to beat.
They have been on a roll
and knocked off pre-
season favorite Old
Dominium earlier this
week, while the Pirates
already lost their first
match-up with ODU.
When the Pirates
travel to Richmond, Sat-
urday, they will be facing
a team that has a deceiv-
ing record (1-2,5-9). Ear-
lier this year, the Spiders
lost a one point game to
Villanova and lost by only
six to ACC opponent
Wake Forest.Their confer-
ence win came against
William and Mary and
their losses came to ODU
and American.
The Spiders are being
led by senior forward
Michael Hodges. He is av-
eraging 13.6 points a game
along with 7.4 rebounds a
game. Guard Kass Weaver
will be matched up with
ECU guard Lester Lyons
and should be a good one
to watch. Weaver has the
best shooting percentage
on the team with .524 per-
cent.
If the division unfolds
as it is currently, next
week will be the most criti-
cal for the Pirates if they
expect to have a chance at
the CAA crown. The two
home games could set the
tone for the rest of the sea-
son for ECU. While ODU
is currently only fourth,
you can count on them
being around to battle for
the top spot.
Always keep in
mind that the regualr sea-
son does not always pro-
duce the CAA champ. All
eight teams make the fi-
nal tournament at the end
of the season and that win-
ner will advance on the
NCAA Tournament. Last
season the Pirates finished
seventh during the regu-
lar season and ended up
going on to win the CAA
Tournament in Rich-
mond, Va.
15

� ��
I'll �ii"Mi�i�ih� ifiiBwipiiiMn.nl���imiW�M





January 20, 1994
The East Carolinian 12
Owners;
(AP) � Baseball owners ap-
proved a long-sought revenue-
sharing plan but appeared un-
likely to select a commissioner
before concluding their three-day
meeting yesterday.
A joint session of the search
committee and executive council
adjourned at 2:30 a.m. EST Mon-
day without an announced rec-
ommendation for the
commissioner's job.
The owners planned to recon-
vene, but most thought a decision
today was unlikely. Even if the
seirch committee made a recom-
mendation, most clubs would
have just a few hours to consider
the candidate.
Finalists for the job, vacant
since Fay Vincent's forced depar-
Sullivan
makes switch
(AP)�Former Indianapolis 500
winner and Indy car PPGCupcham-
pion Danny Sullivan, the epitome of
suave sophistication, is apparently
about to become a Good 01' Boy.
Sullivan, who last week lost his
Indy car ride, said Tuesday he ex-
pects todrive five NASCAR Winston
Cup events in 1994, with the hope
that he will have a full-time stock car
ride the following seasoa
The 43-year-old Sullivan con-
firmed rumors of the move while
watching a General Motors test ses-
sion at Daytona International Speed-
way.
Sullivan, a former Formula One
driver who won 17 Indy car races
between 1982 and 1993, including
last year's Detroit Grand Prix, parted
company with Galles Racing last
week after primary sponsor Molson
pulled out.
But Sullivan, known for being
on the cutting edge of fashion and
whomadetheuptumedcollaratrade
mark, said that losing his Indy car
ridewasnotthecatalystforthemove.
"It was back in about October, I
started thinking about maybe we
ought to switch, try our hand at a
differenttvpeofracingseewhathap-
pens. But I don't know what the fu-
ture holds Sullivan said.
Felix Sabates and his Charlotte,
N.C-based Sabco Racing will pro-
videenginesandchassis,run the team
and provide sponsorship.
Sullivansaidhe tentatively plans
to run the early-season races at
�: Rockingham, N.C, and Richmond,
' Va as well as the inaugural Brick-
:� yard400atlndianapolisMotorSpeed-
way in August and the late-season
; races at Charlotte, N.C, and Atlanta.
Sullivan, whose experience in
stock cars is very limited, said he will
go through Buck Baker's driving
school at North Carolina Motor
Speedwaylaterthismonth and could
test a Winston Cup car at Daytona as
early as the first week of February,
. prior to the start of the NASCAR
5j season.
Sullivan left the door to Indy car
racing atleast slightly ajar for 1994, "if
a good ridebecomesavailable add-
ing, "You don't come into people's
backyardsandbeatthematrheirown
game real easily.
'The guysare tough. They know
thecircuit, know all thedrafting tricks.
They've been doing it for umpteen
years, got a lot of experience
itings
ture 16 months ago, are U.S. Olym-
pic Committee executive director
Harvey Schiller and Northwest-
ern University president Arnold
Weber.
Executive council chairman
Bud Selig gave no indication that
he thought a decision was near.
Selig hailed the revenue-shar-
ing agreement as historic and
unique. It passed on a 28-0 vote
but won't take effect unless the
players' union agrees to a salary
cap.
Details of the plan weren't dis-
closed. Teams in larger markets,
such as New York, are expected to
share some of their profits with
teams from smaller markets, such
as Pittsburgh.
"It's something that a year ago
I wouldn't have given you five
cents for Selig said. "I didn't
think it had a chance
"We're united � for a
change Cincinnati Reds owner
Marge Schott said.
Even owners from large mar-
kets expressed support for the
plan, designed to increase com-
petitive balance.
"I'm not looking glum, am
I?" New York Yankees owner
George Steinbrenner said.
The owners' efforts could be
in vain, however. The plan won't
take effect "until there's a salary
cap, which makes this kind of an
interesting exercise, doesn't it?"
Texas Rangers general partner
George W. Bush said.
The players union opposes a
salary cap. Disagreement over the
issue could lead to a player strike,
most likely late in the season.
'It's interesting the players
have to be an integral part of this,
but the players were excluded '
from the process" that led to ap-
proval of the revenue-sharing
plan, said Donald Fehr, executive
director of the Major League Base-
Iball Players Association.
I Fehr said the players would
accept a salary cap only if owners
can prove it's needed and agree to
share decision-making with the
union.
The players refused to con-
sider a salary cap in 1990 and
owners withdrew their proposal
during a 32-day spring training
lockout.
Capriati puts down racquet
Teen wants to finish school
(AP) � In the next few
months, teen-ager Jennifer
Capriati will be finishing high
school, nursing her elbow and
going to court to face a petty theft
charge.
But Capriati, the tennis star
who was thurst at an early age
into a bright, and often uncom-
fortable spotlight, has decided to
stay off the courts.
"I think she was forced to
take time off for an injury which
she had most of 1993' her New
York-based agent, Barbara Perry,
told The Associated Press on
Monday. "Having time off the
tour, she decided she wants to
concentrate on school until after
graduation, then come back
Capriati, 17, said she would
quit the pro tour until after gradu-
ation in June from Saddlebrook
High School at Saddlebrook Re-
sort in Wesley Chapel, just out-
side Tampa.
"This isn't a retirement
Perry added. "We don't know
the exact date she'll come back. It
depends on her work load
Since a first-round loss at the
U.S. Open last August, Capriati
has been out of action with bone
chips in her elbow. She has a ca-
reer match record of 149-45 and
earned $1.5 million in prize
money.
The past two years, however,
she has become increasingly more
uncomfortable with her celebrity
status and hinted as early as last
winter she might step away from
the game if the 1993 season mir-
rored the year she had in 1992.
"I need a break from it
Capriati told The New York Times
for a story in Monday's editions.
"It's unfortunate that I had an
injury, especially one that re-
quired such a long recuperation,
but I feel I've made the most of
my break from the tour. And I've
decided I want to concentrate on
finishing my senior year
Among the tournaments the
world's 12th-ranked player will
miss during her sabbatical are the
Australian Open, the Lipton Play-
ers Championships, and tour
stops at Delray Beach and Amelia
Island.
In December, Tampa police
cited her for allegedly shoplift-
ing a ring during a shopping trip
to a mall. Later this month she
will go through arbitration, a
court program for first-time ju-
venile offenders who have ad-
mitted guilt.
Capriati's mother said the
shoplifting allegation may have
been the final element in her deci-
sion to stop playing tennis.
"Before the ring incident, she
was seriously thinking of getting
back to her training and coming
back to play in the spring Denise
Capriati told the Times
Neither Capriati nor her par-
ents could be reached for com-
ment by the AP.
Capriati's father, Stefano,
who worked as his daughter's
manager and coach until last year,
said she is challenging her loved
ones to see how they react to her
if she doesn't play tennis.
"She's not rebelling. I would
not use that strong a word he
told the Times. "She's testing ev-
erybody � me, her mother, her
friends. And she's testing her-
self, too
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Everyone is welcome for fun fellowship
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For more information contact
l-cklie Milliard at 830-6814
PREVIEW '94
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity Available
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ORIENTATION STAFF
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE IN
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BEGINNING JANUARY 24, 1994
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AT 4:00 PM
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admission is FREE
coffee and dessert
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BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE S.U. POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE
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t T��,�,





13 The East Carolinian
January 20, 1994
CBS picks up 1998 winter Olympics
(AP) � CBS Sports is finally a
winner.
The network, which last month
lost its part of the NFL contract to
the Fox television network, has won
exclusive U.S. television rights to
the 1998 Winter Olympics in
Nagano, Japan.
Sources close to the negotia-
tions told The Associated Press
Tuesday that the winning bid was
about $375 million, a Winter Olym-
pics record.
The New York Times, in today's
editions, reported CBS as having
won the rights, quoting Richard
Pound of Canada, an International
Olympic Committee vice presi-
dent.
It was not known immediately
whether CBS actually outbid Fox
for the Winter Games or whether
the International Olympic Com-
mittee decided to accept a lower
bid from the more established U.S.
network.
A news conference is sched-
uled today in New York, but CBS
would not confirm it was to an-
nounce the bid.
This would be the third straight
Winter Olympics for CBS. The net-
w ork paid $300 million for the next
month's Games in Lillehammer,
Norway, and $243 million for the
1992 Games in Albertville, France.
The previous Winter Games
record was $309 million by ABC
for the 1988 Calgary Games.
In December, CBS lost the N FC
portion of the NFL contract for the
next four years to Fox, which bid
$1.58 billion, or about $100 million
per year more than CBS.
U.S. will bring high hopes to Lillehammer
Taylor does thinss different for hockey
(AP) � There is cautious opti-
mism for U.S. hockey.
Head coach Tim Taylor of Yale
did things differently this Olympic
preseason. Instead of using NHL,
college and European competitions
as auditions for a stream of players,
he kept essentially the same squad
together, earning strong showings
in exhibition games.
There will be no last-minute
raids of NHL players. Instead, he
will field a team strong on offense,
weaker on defense, with an average
age of 22.
The youth factor and the disap-
pointing decision of center Derek
Plante to stay with the Buffalo Sa-
bres does not daunt Taylor, who
ranks the U.S. team among the top
five competitors.
"We're young and we have to
survive on youthful enthusiasm
Taylor said. "We're going to have
refreshingly excited kids
Beyond figure skating and
hockey lie some potential surprises.
The U.S. luge team is the stron-
gest ever. Wendel Suckow's world
championship last season made him
the first U.S. slider to place in the
top three. Olympic veteran Duncan
Kennedy has medaled in every com-
petition this year. Credit has been
given to a new training facility at
Lake Placid, N.Y.
Cammy Myler, fifth place fin-
isher in the women's competition at
Albertville, will return. Despite
shoulder surgery, she took her third
straight U.S. title last year.
Hopes are even high for the
U.S. bobsled team, which has not
seen a medal in 30 years. Led by
Olympic veteran Brian Shimer, the
four-man team won last season's
World Cup overall four-man com-
petition and a bronze in last year s
world championships. Add to that
a made-in-America sled designed
by race car driver Geoff Bodine.
There is less optimism about
Alpine and Nordic events, given
the usually strong European teams,
particularly the Norwegians with
their home-field advantage.
But there are rays of hope.
Diann Roffe-Steinrotter,
women's giant slalom silver med-
alist in 1992, is returning following
a strong 1992 season and a more
mixed showing this year. Hilary
Lindh, silver medalist in the 1992
women's downhill, is also on the
team, returning after a knee injury
last year.
Look for good things from Julie
ParisienandPicaboStreet;eachwon
silver medals at last year's World
Championships, but have been
struggling this year.
Therearesimilar hopes for men
skiers AJ Kitt and Tommy Moe,
following their strong showings in
last year's World Cup competition.
Expectations are high for the
freestyle skiers. Donna Weinbrecht
is back to defend her 1992 gold
medal in the moguls following a
year of excruciating rehabilitation
from knee surgery. She has come
backstrongwithgoldmedalsather
first two World Cup events.
Teammate Kriste Porter, a
bronze medalist at last yea r's World
Freestyle Ski Championships, hopes
to become the first U.S. woman to
take home a medal in the new aeri-
als event.
The men's aerials team is par-
ticularly strong with World Cup
champion Trace Worthington and
fourth place finisher Kits Feddersen.
And if medals and glory aren't
enough incentive for the Ameri-
cans, how abou t cash? In past Olym -
pics, a good showing would earn a
U.S. athlete $2,500. This year gold
medalists get a $15,000 bonus; a
silver earns $10,000 and a bronze
$7,500. Fourth place garners $5,000.
Moran said any improvement
in the team's performance will have
little to do with cash lures.
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Hall adds new members
(AP) � Georgia athletic di-
rector Vince Dooley, who coached
the Bulldogs to a national title in
1980, was one of two former
coaches named to theCollege Foot-
ball Hall of Fame along with 12
players.
The other coach was the late
John Merritt of Jackson State and
Tennessee State.
Tony Dorsett, the Heisman
Trophy winner from Pittsburgh
whose 6,082 career rushing yards
is the most in NCAA Division I-A,
led the list of players named Mon-
day.
Induction is scheduled for Dec.
6.
Others players chosen by the
National Football Foundation were
Bob Babich of Miami of Ohio, Steve
Eisenhauer of Navy, Larry Elkins
of Baylor, Pete Elliott of Michigan,
Tucker Frederickson of Auburn,
Jerry Groom of Notre Dame, John
Had! of Kansas, Gif ford Nielsen of
Brigham Young, Ozzie
Newsome of Alabama, Marvin
Powell of Southern Cal and
Randy White of Maryland. .
Dooley coached Georgia
from 1964'to 1988, and at the
time of his retirement ranked
third nationally in victories. He
was 201-77-10, leading his team
to six Southeastern Conference
titles and 20 bowl appearanaces
in 25 seasons, including his last
nine.
In 1973, Dorsett became the
first freshman in 29 years to be
named to the All-America team.
He is the only major college run-
ner with three 1,500-yard sea-
sons.
Merritt was at Jackson State
from 1953tol962andTennessee
State for the next 21 seasons be-
fore his death in 1983. His record
was 232-65-11, and he was
named Black Football Coach of
the Year in 1962.
S1!
Take the Physical Challenge and
Get nasty at the 2nd annual
Pirate Double Dare
Thursday, January 27
in Christenbury Gym
Be ready to get nasty at 6:30pm

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Register vour 4 person team today in 204 Christenbunftym
First 16 teams to enter will be eligible.
Call ECU Recreational Services at 757-687 for more d

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January 20, 1994
The East Carolinian
Olympics in Norway will be unique
Lillehammer may cause headaches
The 1994 Winter Olympic at .i
glance:
WHAT: The 17th WinterOlym-
pic Games. Norwegians call them
"The Compact Games" because alJ
venues are located within 36 miles
of Lillehammer, the main host town
WHEN: 16 days, from Feb. 12-
27,1994.
WHERE: In Lillehammer, an
artist colony and tourist spot of
about 23,000 people, as well as
nearby towns on the shores of
Norway's largest lake, Mjosa, and
the south Norway valley of
Gudbrandsdalen. Lillehammer is
about 1 lOmiles north of the capital,
Oslo, and can be reached by road
and train. Norway, a country of 4.3
million people, claims to be the
cradle of modem skiing and is a
superpower of winter sports, espe-
cially skiing and speedskating.
HOWMANY: About2,000ath-
letes will compete for 115 gold med-
als. Eighty countries, the most ever,
have signed up; fewer will qualify-
by the Jan. 31 deadline. About7,500
news media personnel, 8,000 vol-
unteers, 2,200 police and 140,000
spectators will invade Lillehammer
WHY 1994: Lillehammer had
just two years, rather than the usual
four, after the last Winter Games in
1992 because the International
Olympic Committee decided to
stagger the Summer and Winter
Olympics. Until 1994, the Games
were held the same year, after each
four-vear Olympiad. Now, one or
the other will be held every other
year.
HOW MUCH: Norway,
mostly the national government,
has spent about SI billion on the
Games, not counting $533 million
for roads, utilities and related
projects.
TRAVEL: There is no airport
in Lillehammer. Most visitors will
arrive from Oslo by train or bus.
Roads will be closed to private cars
except late at night and in the early
hours of the morning.
DVANTAGES: Norway is a
winter sports haven.Charming
Norse and Viking theme. Norway
isa safe, clean and efficient country.
Lillehammer isa picture book town,
and the snow conditions have been
excellent after a series of warm and
dry winters
DISADVANTAGES:
Lillehammer is isolated and the trans-
port system will be straining to bnng
about 100,000 people a day into the
region. Norway Ls already very ex-
pensiveand residents fearprice-goug-
ing, endless foof lines, serious traffic
jams, and protests of Norway's com-
mercial whale hunts or its role in
brokeringapeacesettlementbetween
Israel and the Palestine Liberation or-
ganization.
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: What NCAA
record did the ECU
woman's basketball
team break against
American on Feb. 15,
1992?
�dui Jii iuojJ
3dMfgf puoxu v i f3i� :y
spectators will invade Lillehammer. dry winters. � � llMUMi iflfc
Butler upsets 'Bonecrusher' Smith QUARTERS
,Am . nv,�oh! hover fore an estimated 3,250 people WBA title unification bout with Ifi W�B� �
(AP) � Heavyweight boxer
Lionel Butler scored a third-round
technical knockout Tuesday night
- "against former World Boxing Asso-
ciation champion James
' 'Bonecjrjisher Smith.
Butler, ranked No. 4 by the
World Boxing Council, knocked
Smith down with a left hook to the
body in the scheduled 10-round
bout, part of a seven-fight card be-
HARDING
fore an estimated 3,250 people
"All I wanted to do was get in
there and keep taking it to him
said Butler (20-10-1).
Smith, of Lillington, N.C held
the WBA title in 1986 and last fought
in a heavyweight elimination tour-
nament in Mississippi in Decem-
ber, where he was defeated in the
semifinals bv Daniel Ducata.
Smith (39-13-1) lost a WBC-
WBA title unification bout with
Miice Tyson March 7,1987.
Wayne McCullough (11-0)
scored a seventh-round technical
knockout of Javier Medina (9-1-1)
to claim the vacant North Ameri-
can Boxing Federation bantam-
weight title, and former U.S. Olym-
pian Montell "Ice" Griffin (11-0)
earned an easy second-round
knockout of Steve Brewer.
Continued from pagel 1
TYSON FRESH FRYER-GRADE "A
main better' than even right now
.she will get herself out. And unless
or until someone proves that what
Harding knew and when she knew
it preceded news reports, she de-
serves the chance to do just that.
Just Tuesday night, during a
break in marathon talks with the
D.A Harding released a statement
saying she was cutting ties with ex-
husband Jeff Gillooly, a move that
puts additional space between her-
self and the cast of cartoon charac-
ters implicated in the Kerrigan plot.
If her increasing leverage makes
the USOC poobahs sweat, too bad.
These are the same people who did
nothing other than sweat when
diver Bruce Kimball competed in
the 1988 trials while charged with
drunk driving in a fatal accident. If
they're kicking themselves now for
not tightening up character require-
ments for Team USA, at least no one
can say they weren't warned.
SHOOTING
$2.00 Off
Lane Fee Tues-Thurs
$1.00 Off
Lane Fee Fri-Sun
One coupon per visit
Expires 12-31-94
�Basic Gun Safety Course
Phone 757-1040
LOW PRICES
JUICY
TANGERINES each
KIWI
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FRESH
RADISHES 6oi pkg
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Cont'd
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P9-11
Woburn. "After I kept going, it
loosened up more and more and
I felt better
Dr. Mahlon Bradley, an or-
thopedic specialist who has
worked with Kerrigan since she
was attacked, said there was no
swelling in her knee joint, al-
though the muscle that was dam-
aged still is swollen, and Kerrigan
has reported feeling tightness on
the outside of her kneecap.
THE NAVIGATOR
OFFICIAL PIRATE
BASEBALL TABLOID
1A94
DECORATED OR DESIGNER
SCOTTOWELS
Ad Deadline will be February 3rd.
QUAKE
Cont'd
from
P91
were more than happy to leave
Southern California on Monday af-
ter the quake.
The Vancouver Canucks were
staying at a hotel near downtown
Los Angeles after beating the
Mighty Ducks 4-3 Sunday night.
"I didn't know what it was at
first, but my roommate is Jimmy
Carson (former Los Angeles King)
and he said right away it was an
earthquake Canucks captain
Trevor Linden said after returning
to Vancouver. "The whole bed was
shaking and the noise was really
loud. It was a nice feeling getting on
that plane and coming home again
A college team that was out of
town during the quake � the Cal
State Northridge men's basketball
team � cut its road trip short. The
Matadors, who lost 100-85 at Colo-
rado on Monday night, decided to
return home and postpone
Wednesday's game against Air
Force at Colorado Springs.
"I don't think anybody wants
to be here right now, as beautiful as
Boulder is, as Colorado is coach
Pete Cassidy said. "There's a tre-
mendous concern on the part of all
of us � we want to go there and
help
DIET PEPSI OR
PEPSI
WEEKLY SPECIAL
WEEKLY SPECIAL
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Advertising Department
Office 919-757-6366
Fax 919-757-6558
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
invites applications for the
Summer Pre-Graduate Research Experience
10 Week Summer Research Project with
UNC-CH Faculty Mentor
Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences. Physical
Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, and Public Health
including Environmental Sciences and Engineering
Skill Enhancement Workshops Available
� Housing plus $1,000 Food Allowance and
$2,500Stipend
'Application Deadline is February 28, 1994
. Period of Program: May 24, 1994 to July 29, 1994
UNC-CH Contact is:
Associate Dean. Dr. Henry T. Frierson, Jr.
The Graduate School
200 Bynum Hall CB 4010
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Telephone: 919-966-2611
For Application Forms and Additional Information Contact:
Dr. Brian Haynes
204 Whichard Building � 757-6495
JIFFY CORN
MUFFIN MIX
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39
SELECTED VARIETIES wm ft
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CHICKEN NOODLE A A
CAMPBELL'S 2QQ
SOUP oz" i77
IN THE DELI-BAKERY
SUGAR
COOKIES
EA.
.10
Prices Effective Through January 25, 1994





Title
The East Carolinian, January 20, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 20, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.984
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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