The East Carolinian, January 13, 1994






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FBI probes Kerrigan case
Allegations in the battery case of
figure skater Nancy Kerrigan are
underway. Officials suspect a
connection to competitor Tonya
Harding. Story page 11.
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Cinematic Perfection
Think no really good movies
come to Greenville? Well for
'Remains of the Day' and
'Schindler's List' you're right.
They're in Raleigh. Reviews
on page 8.
Today
oramMiM
Tom orro w
The East Carolinian
Vol. 69 No. 2
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, January 13,1994
14 Pages
Library
While parkins will continue to diminish, research options will multiply
By Jason Williams
Photo by Cadrtc Van Buren
Soon the monstrous renovations preying on our parking lots will attack staff spaces. Perhaps the hidden
agenda is to increase campus fitness, for everyone will be in top shape after 15-minute treks from their cars.
Assistant News Editor
Members of the graduat-
ing class of 1994 will not get to
use the new, expanded Joyner
Library during their college ca-
reers. Students graduating in
1995 or 1996 will have to work
around construction and rubble
while the new portion of the
library is being built. By 1997,
students may begin to see the
fruits of the recent bond refer-
endum that allotted $29.5 mil-
lion for the renovation of Joyner.
1998 graduates will be the first
class that won't be ashamed of
their library.
Joyner Library Director
Dr. Kenneth Marks estimates
the time for the construction of
the new wing of the library and
the complete renovation of the
existing space to be 43 months.
"Approximately in early to
mid-April construction will be-
gin Marks said. "The way in
which the project is projected,
there will be three distinct
phases. The first phase will be
the construction of the new
space which will be on the back
or south side of this building.
That construction is supposed
to take about 19 months.
"The second phase, which
will last probably 10 or 11
months, will be the renovation
of the East Wing and the cre-
ation of the pedestrian corridor
that will run from the columns
he said. "The last phase will
take six to eight months
Following each phase,
there will be a three month
"move-in" period during which
some library facilities will be-
gin to transfer existing services
to newly-completed portions of
the building.
Because of the amount of
construction and renovation
that is to take piace, and the fact
that the construction and reno-
vation can not take place simul-
Week-long plans
for M.L. King, Jr.
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Monday, Jan. 17 is a holi-
day. There are no classes, and
many businesses will close in ob-
servance of this holiday. How-
ever, instead of celebrating a
break from school, why not cel-
ebrate it for what it is: a celebra-
tion of the life of Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. and the role he
played in advocating human
rights and world peace.
Many events are scheduled
on ECU's campus to honor King
and the ideals he promoted.
"The events are open to the
public said Dr. Brian Haynes of
Minority Affairs. "We encour-
age students to come out and
learn more about Dr. King
The celebration begins on
Monday evening, Jan. 17, at 7:00,
with a candlelight march from
Christenbury Gymnasium to
Mendenhall Student Center.
Upon arrival at
Mendenhall, Dorothy Cotton,
director of Student Activities at
Cornell Universitywill give the
Martin Luther King, Jr. address.
Cotton was director of education
for the Southern Christian Lead-
ership Conference from 1960 to
1972. She worked with King on
his executive staff and was the
only female member.
ECU's Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity is co-sponsoring both the
march and Cotton's address. Ev-
eryone is encouraged and wel-
come to attend both events,
Haynes said.
Other events are planned
for the week. A "Wish Board for
World Peace" will be at different
locations on Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday from 10:00a.m.
to 2:00 p.m. on each day. Stu-
dents are invited to use the board
to make their wishes for world
See MLK page 4
Anyone got an extra $14
million? ECU could use it
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
ECU has a good reason to
celebrate the beginning of 1994.
As o( Dec. 31, ECU's Shared Vi-
sions campaign has obtained $36
million in private funds, and
hopes to reach a goal of $50 mil-
lion by next December � one
year ahead of schedule.
This fund-raiser is the larg-
est ever for ECU, involving 700
volunteers ind several faculty
members.
"What this project is seek-
ing is to allow the University to
do many things tat we would
otherwise not be able to do de-
pending on state dollars and stu-
dent tuition said ECU Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin. "This is
going to be the frosting on the
cake
Many donations to date
have been in excess of $1 mil-
lion. One anonymous family
donated over $4 million to ECU's
School of Medicine. The Walter
Williams family of Greenville
donated $1.4 million to the Ath-
letic Department, the largest ever
for ECU athletics.
Massive regional cam-
paigns, which reach across the
state and into Virginia, will be
launched between February and
April, focusing primarily on
alumni and previous donors.
Why do these people give
so generously?
"Because they believe in
what ECU is trying to achieve
Eakin said. "Many of them have
a had a long and very heart-felt
relationship with ECU. They be-
lieve it provides an opportunity
not only for the students of EC U,
but also as an important part of
our state's heritage
See MONEY page 4
Music students travel to Miss.
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
For many ECU students,
Christmas was a chance to relax
and ignore academic responsi-
bilities. Music students Roger
Dale McVey and Kenneth Meyer,
however, had other plans. They
spent their holiday practicing six
to seven hours per day for re-
gional competitions coming up
during January.
McVey, a senior, is a pianist
and Meyer, a graduate student,
studies guitar. Both won first
place in the Music Teachers As-
sociation auditions in Winston-
Salem during the fall. This suc-
cess sends them to Hattiesburg,
Mississippi, Jan. 21-24, where
they will play in the MTA divi-
sional auditions.
Both students will perform
a solo Concerto, which lasts about
20 minutes, and another 30-
minute solo for the competition.
If McVey andor Meyer win the
Mississippi competition, they
will compete in the national au-
ditions in Washington, D.C in
late March. Winners of the na-
tional competition receive con-
cert appointments to perform in
front of audiences rather than
judges.
McVey says that he is not
really nervous about the compe-
tition, but he recognizes the im-
portance of being able to com-
pete in such an event. He is study-
ing at ECU on the Henry Wooten
scholarship, which is funded by
the Wooten family. It is one of
the biggest scholarships for mu-
sic students. McVey will gradu-
ate in May, 1994, and plans to go
on to graduate school for more
experience.
"I like playing solo more
than anything McVey said. "1
hope to go into concert perfor-
See MUSIC page 4
Opening
soon!
ECU students
and faculty will
soon find some
consolation in
the fact that the
new Todd
Dining Hall will
adequately fuel
those lengthy
hikes to those
far-off parking
spaces.
Photo by
Cedrlc Van Buren
taneously because the library
must remain open, makes this
a longer-range project than
usual, Marks said.
During the first phase,
library operations should not
be affected by the construc-
tion. "We have collections and
study space, and staff and fac-
ulty offices in the space along
the back wall, so there will be
some adjustment. We will try
to keep changes to a mini-
mum he said.
During the second
phase, Marks hopes to begin
moving many services into
the new part of the building.
"Our goal is to move people
only once during this process
and give people as much fore-
warning as possible
When completed, the
additions to joyner will effec-
tively double the size of the
library. "The new space will
See LIBRARY page 4
"Student of the Month" recognized nationally
RHA student works for better residence halls resionally and nation-wide
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
James "Jamie" Moretz, an
ECU junior education major, re-
ceived the "Student of the
Month" award for June 1993
from the National Association
of College and University Resi-
dence Halls.
Linda Sessoms, Residence
Halls Association (RHA) advi-
sor, said that Moretz has taken
the lead in many RHA events.
He has acted as treasurer for
RHA at ECU and has been very
active in the regional division of
RHA on behalf of ECU. When
ECU hosted the RHA state con-
ference, Moretz was instrumen-
tal in helping out with the event.
"During June he was the
only active RHA member on
campus Sessoms said. "And
he basically kept RHA running
during that month while others
were gone during the first ses-
sion of summer school
He said that it was pretty
exciting because he was chosen
out of 10 people in the United
States, Canada, and Australia.
He also said that receiving such
an award can help further his
career goals for working in resi-
dent life.
Not only does Moretz work
with RHA, but he is currently
working in the Resident Depart-
ment of Education. He also
serves as the Associate Director
for the North Carolina Associa-
tion for Resident Halls and as
Assistant to the Associate Direc-
tor for the South Atlantic Affili-
ate for Colleges and University
Resident Halls.
Moretz has the opportunity
to work in the regional organi-
zation next year.
"I haven't decided what
I'm going to do yet Moretz said.
See AWARD page 3
It's all in
your head
or is it?
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
You feel sick, so
you visit a physician,
right? But what if your
problems stem from psy-
chological stressors? Or
what if you visit a psy-
chiatrist, but you need
to see a physician? Will
your doctor be able to
recognize such a condi-
tion, or will you go with-
out proper treatment?
The Association of
Medicine and Psychia-
try, a group of physicians
who have interests in
both medical and psychi-
atric patients, recently
elected ECU's Dr. James
G. Peden as its president.
"One of the prob-
lems with specialization
is that you tend to not
recognize things that
aren't in your area of ex-
pertise said Peden, a
psychiatrist and associ-
ate professor of internal
medicine.
"There are lots of
studies which indicate
that psychiatrists fre-
quently overlook medi-
cal problems in their pa-
tients. It also goes in the
other direction � as
many as 50 percent of
patients who show up in
a doctor's office have
problems that aren't
clearly related to bodily
problems � they may
have symptoms arising
from depression, anxiety
or even substance abuse.
These often go under-
diagnosed and under-
treated Peden said.
The Association of
Medicine and Psychia-
try, an international or-
ganization, is based in
Kansas and has around
200 members.
See PROF page 3





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2 The East Carolinian
January 13. 1994
11313
December 2
12:45 a.m.
An unknown person threw a can of tuna
through a window at 183 Aycock Residence Hall.
December 3
An unknown person scraped a parking sticker
off a vehicle parked in the freshman lot on Third and
Reade Streets.
An unknown person walked on a student's car
denting the rear bumper and the top of the car, and
causing $200 damage to the vehicle. The car was
parked in the freshman lot on Third and Reade.
December 9
Recreation Services reported the theft of a f risbee
golf goal valued at $450. The goal was described as
a pole with plastic chains around it.
December 10
9:15 a.m.
A female reported receiving harassing phone
calls from a male in Jones Hall. The male asked to
speak with the victim and said "You know who this
is
January 2
5:15 a.m.
A non-student was caught with a weapon at
the gazebo near the Biology building. The weapons
were two nine inch butterfly knives.
January 7
8:13 p.m.
An unknown person stole a blue nylon wallet
from the basketball courts at Belk Dorm. The wallet
and its contents were valued at $15.
Compiled by Jason Williams. Taken from ECU police
reports.
Bobbitfs preferences questioned
MANASSAb, Va. (AP) �
John Bobbitt liked rough sex and
slapped his wife around in front
of others, witnesses said at
Lorena Bobbitt's trial on charges
of cutting off her husband's pe-
nis with a kitchen knife.
"He said he liked to make
girls squirm and yell, make them
bleedJonathan Whitaker testi-
fied. Another witness, Jonathan
Kaupua, said Bobbitt once told
him he liked women to "scream
and squirm away. That turned
him on
Both acquaintances of
Bobbitt testified Tuesday, along
with two others who said they
saw Bobbitt hit his wife, as the
defense tried to show that Mrs.
Bobbitt was subjected to years of
sexual abuse and other battering
that caused an "irresistible im-
pulse" to maim her husband on
June 23.
Mrs. Bobbitt, 24. is charged
with malicious wounding. If con-
victed, the Ecuadoran-born
manicurist could get up to 20
years in prison and be deported.
Bobbitt, 26, was acquitted
last year of charges he sexually
assaulted her just before she cut
off his penis.
Terri McComber, who once
worked with Mrs. Bobbitt at a
manicure salon, took the stand
to describe a soured weekend
outing to a Maryland beach in
1989, shortly after the couple
were married. She said Bobbitt
dragged his wife from the board-
walk at Ocean City, accusing her
of inviting whistles from pass-
ing men.
"He came up, grabbed her
bv the hair. He said the weekend
was over. 'We're going home.
That's it McComber said. In
the car. Bobbitt shoved and
slapped his wile, the witness
said.
Another witness, Amalia
Hoyt, said Bobbitt roughed up
his wife in public. Bobbitt gave
his wife a present of bikini un-
derwear at a Christmas Eve party
in 1989, then berated her when
she balked at showing the gift to
a group of men, Hoyt said.
"He grabbed her by the arm
and he pushed her against the
wall Hoyt said. "Heasked her,
'What's wrong with you? Why
can't you show it?
Bobbitt retook the stand to
deny that he ever abused his wife,
saying she often scratched,
kicked and hit him.
"1 never hit my wife. I just
pushed her, restrained her and
held her down to keep her from
hitting me the former Marine
said. "She's only like 90 pounds,
and I'm 185
THE STUDENT UNION MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE
INVITES YOU TO PARTICIPATE IN
THEIR ANNUAL.
CANDLELIGHT MARCH
on
January 17,1994
at 7:00 pm
(:

"j1
The march will begin at Christenbury Memorial Gym
and and at Mendenhall Student Center.
Call 757-4715 for further information.
Rush hour
proves fatal
for woman
PHILADELPHIA
(AP) � A morning rush-
hour argument on one of
Philadelphia's busiest
highways ended when a
driver in a business suit
shot and killed a passen-
ger in another car.
Eileen McGuigan, 36,
was shot in the head Tues-
day as she rode to her job
as a cashier.
Her fiance, John F.
O'Kane Jr was driving
down the Schuykill Ex-
pressway when a car cut
him off. At a bottleneck,
the cars stopped beside
each other and "wordsand
gestures were exchanged
Sgt. Thomas Burke said.
The driver in a suit
opened fire from an exit
ramp and drove off, disap-
pearing in the city.
"I gave him the fin-
ger for cutting me off and
he shot her in the head
O'Kane said. "She had no
idea what hit her
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January 13, 1994
The East Carolinian 3
AWARD
"I want to improve the resident
halls on campus as well as re-
gionally and nationally
Working in the regional or-
ganization would give him the
chance to do just that.
"I sincerely hope Jamie will
continue in a leadership role at
East Carolina Sessoms said.
"But I know the regional organi-
zation would also greatly benefit
from his contributions
Moretz received the
President's Choice Award from
ECU this past year, as well a
several regional awards.
Continued from page 1
RHA plays an important
role on college campuses. It is the
liaison between residents, school
administration and the commu-
nity. The organization plans ser-
vices for all residential students.
Some of the services include re-
frigeratormicrowave rentals,
carpet sales and student loans.
In addition to services, RHA
sponsors various programs on
campus like "S.E.X. Week RHA
week, the upcoming Jell-O wres-
tling, and the Hall Olympics.
RHA encourages leadership de-
velopment within the residence
halls.
MONEY
Continued from page 1
PROF
"Every gift is important
Charles Phlegar, campaign di-
rector, points out. "A lot of the
gifts we are working on now
range between $25,000 and
$100,000
The proposed spending
budget will allocate funds to stu-
dent development, faculty en-
richment, program enhancement
and campus development.
Student development will
receive $10 million. This sum in-
cludes $4.5 million for merit-
based scholarships, $3 million for
graduate fellowships, $1 million
Continued from page 1
for NCAA scholarships, $1 mil-
lion for athletic personal devel-
opment and $500,000 for minor-
ity leadership awards.
Acampaignbrochurecom-
piled by Shared Visions boasts
that faculty is ECU's greatest
source of contributions � $6 mil-
lion will be used for faculty en-
richment.
Professorships and distin-
guished professorships will be
financed by $3.5 million, $1.5
million will go toward research
initiatives and teaching enhance-
ments and $1 million will be
granted tor endowed lecture-
ships.
Program enhancement will
be given $8.5 million to divide
between the v isual and perform-
ing arts, library collections will
receive $1.5 million. Initiatives
to improve public schools will
receive $1.5 million, program-
specific gifts for schools and de-
partments will total over $3 mil-
lion and the International Stud-
ies program will receive
$300,000.
Campus development will
receive the largest amount � $18
million � and $9 million will
be used to expand Ficklen Sta-
dium and renovate Minges
Coliseum. Almost $2 million
will be spent on the addition
to Joyner Library, and $3 mil-
lion for the Leo W. Jenkins
Cancer Center.
ECU's Diabetes Center
and Center for Alcohol and
Drug Abuse will each receive
$2 million. Campus beautifi-
cation will receive $200,000.
The largest private fund-
raiser in previous years totaled
$2 million in 1988.
In fulfilling his duties as
president, Peden expects to
speak for conferences and com-
mittees throughout the year, as
well as write a column for the
organization's newsletter.
Peden plans to actively
lobby the Association of Medi-
cine and Psychiatry in order to
obtain proper coverage under
the new national health care
plan.
"This is a dynamic and in-
triguing field that shows prom-
ise of improving the lives and
health of many people Peden
said.
Here at ECU, Peden is a
primary care psychiatrist, an as-
sociate professor of internal
medicine, a member of the ad-
missions committee and super-
visor for medical students ful-
filling their residencies.
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 19944995 Term
Any full-time student with
a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available at the Student Union Office
Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline To Apply: January 19, 1994
DAY STUDENTS
DO YOU WANT TO MAKE
A DIFFERENCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative on the ECU
Media Board. (A student living off campus
and not a member of a fraternity or sorority.)
Help set policies for operation of WZMB,
The Rebel, The East Carolinian,
Expressions & The Photo Lab.
Apply in The Media Board Office, 757-6009
2nd Floor Student Publications Building
Macintosh Quadra� 660av823O, with internal
AppleCD " 300i CD-ROM drive, Apple AudioVision � 14'
Display, Apple Extended Keyboard II and mouse.
Ont)'$3,037. Or about $47.00 a month
with the new Apple Computer loan.
flie
Computer
Loan
Macintosh LC 4J5 4:80, Apple Color Plus 14' Display.
Apple Keyboard II and mouse. Only $1,280. Or, about
$20001 a month with the new Apple Computer Loan.
Mx
Introducing Tin
Introducing The Great Apple Campus
Deal. Right now, buy any select Macintosh'
or PowerBook computer, and you'll also
get seven useful software programs. It's all
included in one low price. (The software
alone has a combined SRP of $596.) And,
the new Apple Computer Loan offers low
monthly payments that make the deal
even better. Apply by January 28,1994. and
your first payment is deferred for 90 days.
All you have to do is qualify. So, what
are you waiting for? An Apple" computer.
It does more. It costs less. It's that simple.
Apple PouerBook 145B 4180. Only $1,262 Or about
$19.00 a month uitb the new Apple Computer Loan
All easy application process. Mid you ctld'qualify for
loir monthly payments on a Macintosh or PouerBook.
It does more. It costs less. It's that simple.
Visit your Apple Campus Reseller for more information.
Student Stores
Wright Building � 757-6731
Hours: M-Th 8-8, Fri 8-5, Sat 11-5
ban jnounu and monthtv payment
wuertst raw





4 The East Carolinian
January 13, 1994
Yeltsin promises reform while support wavers
MOSCOW (AP) � A leading
pro-reform group threatened today
to withdraw itssupportfrom Presi-
dent Boris Yeltsin if reformers lose
out in a planned Cabinet reshuf-
fling.
Yeltsin supportersare already
outnumbered in Russia's new par-
liament bv Communists, ultrana-
tionalists and other anti-reform
forces. A splintering among reform-
ists, which thethreatby Democratic
Russia could portend, likely would
further weaken their position.
Parliament opened its first
session Tuesday but has so far been
mostly concerned with selecting its
leadership and other housekeeping
matters.
On Monday, Yeltsin ordered
Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin tocutthenumber of
deputy prime ministers from nine
to four and to name candidates for
those positions within a week.
Yeltsin has promised that Econom-
ics Minister Yegor Gaidar, the ar-
chitect of Russia's free-market re-
MUSIC
forms, will remain in the Cabinet
and that the reforms will continue.
But reformers and Western econo-
mists weary reformers will lose in-
fluence. "Seriousdangers are loom-
ing over the reforms said a warn-
ing issued today by the Democratic
Russia movement.
Democratic Russia, which
claims tens of thousands of sup-
porters across the country, Ls one of
several groups that last year formed
Russia's Choice, the leading pro-
reform bloc in parliament.
Continued from page 1
mance.
"McVey isa very gifted pia-
nist and musician said Dr. Henry
Doskey, McVey's professor. "It is
a great honor to reach the
regionals. We're proud of him
While McVey appears calm
about the Mississippi competition,
Meyer savs that he is very ner-
vous about competing.
"I'm happy to get into the
finals Mever said. "The guys
I'm going against are really good
players
Meyer will finish his gradu-
ate degTee in the Spring of 1995.
He plans to continue his educa-
tion to get his doctorate in classi-
cal guitar. He wants to teach and
MLK
perform during his musical ca-
reer. ECU students can see Meyer
play a guitar concerto with the
school orchestra later in the spring.
Elliot Frank, Meyer's pro-
fessor, said that the Mississippi
competition is a great opportu-
nity for students because per-
formers will be heard by people
who would otherwise never hear
them. Even if they do not win
the competition, many people
will recognize the competitors'
talent. Frank said that Meyer
has been a genuine pleasure to
teach.
"Meyer is one of the most
talented people I have taught in
a long time Frank said.
Continued from page 1
Other students who com-
peted in the state MTA auditions
include clarinetists Laura Avery
and Angela Harris, who were
named alternate winner and hon-
orable mention winner respec-
tively, in the NC MTA collegiate
woodwinds category. Three pri-
vate students of ECU's Suzuki
strings program director Joanne
Bath also placed as alternate or
honorable mention winners.
LIBRARY
Continued from page 1
add about 160,000 square feet to
the existing space Marks said.
"We will end up with a library
that is approximately 300,000
square feet in size
The new librarv will be able
to house more books and stu-
dents as well. There wil i bo space
for 1.5 million volumes, up from
the current capacity of 970,000.
There will also be seating for
2.000 students up from 1,100.
"Perhaps the most critical
thing for students is right now
we don't have anv group studv
rooms at all Marks said. "The
completed facility will have 36
to 38 group studv rooms with a
seating capacity of four to eight
students
With new construction tak-
ing place, the West end of campus
will lose additional parking places.
"The new building will take much
of the parking direct! v behind the
library Marks said. "The con-
struction lot, the part that will be
fenced, will start on the far end of
peace.
Tuesday's board will be at
the Wright Place, Wednesday's
board will be located at the De-
partment of Athletics and
Thursday's board will be in the
3rody Building.
On Thursday evening, at
7:00, the week's events will con-
clude with a public presentation
and panel discussion on "The
Civil Rights Movement and Its
Portrayal in the Media Barry
Saunders, a columnist with the
Netvs and Observer, will be fea-
tured at the discussion.
In addition to next week's
events, ECU has invited its stu-
dents to submit essays and art on
the Martin Luther King, Jr. birth-
day theme of "A Commitment to
Human Rights and World Peace
Entries should be submitted by
Monday, Feb. 28,1994 at 5:00 p.m.
in Mendenhall, room 244. Win-
ners will be announced on April
4, the anniversary of King's death.
Each category will receive $100
for first place and $50 for second
place.
Central Book &
News
Girls of Greenville
Calendar
p L U including tax
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
SPRING
TryGumby's J drJVlrNVx
Buffalo Wings & I
peeved SPECIALS!
Pick-Up In Only 10Min.
And you thought you had
already seen the ball drop.
Roundball excitement abounds in January.
Don't drop the ball and miss intramural
basketball registration.
Spring Basketball Invitational Tournament
to be held January 19. 20.22. & 23
Poole play and tournament action
S15.00 fee per team
Registration begins January 10 - January 19
Register in 204 Christenbury Gym from 9:00am � 5:00pm
Don't miss these basketball deadlines:
5-on-5 registration & Preview Tournament lottery
January 18 at 5;00pm in Bio 103
Basketball Shooting Triathlon registration: February 8 at 8:30pm in CG Gym
Slam Dunk registration: February 16 at 5:00pm in Bio 103
Call Recreational Services at 757-6387 for more details.
21-GUM-B
321-4862
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
Located next to Blockbustervldeo
HOURS
MON-THURS:
11:OOAM-1:30 AM
FRI-SAT:
11:00 AM-2:30 AM
SUN:
11:00 AM-1 :OOAM
Gumb Jones
X-LARGE
2ltem Pizza
ONLY
$539
gjji
Gumby Destroyer
2 LARGE
11tem Pizzas
ONLY
$9.99
GARRY OUT
SPECIAL
Large 1 tern Pizza
ONLY
$439
Gumby Solo
Medium 11tem Pizza
and 1 Soda
ONLY
$529
Gumby Feast
2 Smaa 2 tern Pizzas
and 2 Sodas
ONLY
$737
Massive Gumby
Giant 20 inch
1 temRzza
ONLY
$10.15
the library, taking in the staff lot,
and will end up where the house
is on Ninth Street
Parking that will be lost in-
cludes approximately half of the
PERSONAL CHECKS
Above Prices DO NOT Include Tax. Oiler Ma) Expire
Without Notice. $5.00 Minimum Order For Deliven.
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
spaces behind the library, all of
the staff lot behind the library and
the d irt lot that borders the woods
Marks said the fence should go up
in April.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Couaseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
ew JLJie
P eMowslhip
Come join us every Thursday night at
7:00 in the General Classroom Bldg.
Room 1018.
Everyone is welcome for fun fellowship
and Bible study!
For more information contact
Eddie Hilliard at 830-6814
you Are Invited
to aft of our spring activities1.
Among the things that are happening this semester:
f
State Methodist'Presbyterian Student Conference
CJan.28-30 @ Qreensboro)
Study Trip to IsraelSpring "Breaks
Wor Trip to Mexico in May
'Jugular 'Wednesday Meetings
5:00 TM. 'Dinner
5:45 TM. 'Program
'Worship
Interesting Speakers
fun and games
Jorum 'Discussions
Living Quarters available for Summer & "Jail'94
We are located at 501 'E. fifth Street, directly accross from
the Art'Budding
!cv. Dan
'Earnhardt
M 'csku foundation
75S-2030
!ev. 'Mary graham
Trcsbytcrian
Ca mp us jdin ister
752-7240
CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR HENDRIX THEATRE WINNERS,
TO MELISSA R. CONLEY-SPENCER FOR WINNING A HICKORY
HAMS GIFT BASKET AND TO BOUKEO HOMSOMBATH FOR
WINNING A100.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE TO
ECU STUDENT STORES.
THERE WILL BE FOUR MORE GIVE AWAYS THIS SEMESTER,
INCLUDING TICKETS TO ROBERT FULGHUM AND A SPECIAL
HOT AIR BALOON RIDE FOR TWO (VALUE:225.00)
REMEMBER THAT THE 35,000TH PERSON THROUGH THE
DOORS OF HENDRIX WINS350.00. AT PRESENT,
THE ATTENDANCE IS AT 12,573.
BE ON THE WATCHOUT FOR MORE BLOCKBUSTER HITS, SUCH AS,
"THREE MUSKATEERS "THE
FIRM AND "CARLITO'S WAY"
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU I
WHO? Vic Henley
WHERE? Monday January 24
MSC Room 244
WHEN? 7:37pm
Doors open at 7:30pm.
Free 7 student or faculty ID.
Free refreshments.
Vic Henley - Comedian





The East Carolinian
January 13, 1994
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
w
100 recycled paper
Maureen Rich, News Editor
Jason Williams, Asst. News Editor
Stephanie Ttlllo, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Phebe Toler, Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt AyCOCk, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-1353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Preservation of Auschwitz debated I
There is actually an international de-
bate under way about how Poland preserves
the decaying remains of the Nazi death camp
at Auschwitz for future memory.
A debate. Does this strike anyone as
odd? What is being discussed is whether or
not Auschwitz � the concrete and brick
building, the history that emanates from it,
the pain and the memories deserve to exist
as a reminder of days gone
by. In other words � is it
appropriate for Auschwitz to
exist?
Those in favor of pre-
serving the ruins argue that
this is one of the best ways
for the Nazi atrocities to be
remembered. They concur
that it can also serve as a
teaching tool for future gen-
erations to learn from.
Approximately 1.6 mil-
lion people, most of them
Jews, were killed at
Auschwitz during World
War II. As it stands now,
Auschwitz has one small
sign indicating that the ashes
of about 100,000 people lie
in the small pond near the
death camp. The grounds are barren, save
for periodic slabs of concrete and brick where
once stood gas chambers and crematories.
Now the deterioration of the Birkenau
section of the camp is beginning to force
decisions by the Polish government on
whether it should be restored, somewhat
restored or be allowed to fade into history.
Taking different positions in the debate over
Auschwitz are historians, conservation ex-
perts, Jewish representatives and Poles lay-
ing plans for its future.
The debate has been driven by renewed
interest in the Holocaust in the past few
years, prompted in part by the aging of the
generation of survivors and by a changed
attitude of many younger Jews who want to
remember rather than forget.
What we have with those in opposition
to the preservation is a sort of state of de-
nial. They believe that if they
ignore the act long enough
that it will go away as if it
never existed.
What they are denying is
the unsettling feeling a visit
to one of the many concentra-
tion camps can evoke. For
many, it is the most eloquent
testimony to what occurred.
It seems almost as if time stops
� reverses even � and what
one is met with is a great inner
sadness for those tortured and
killed, along with a contempt
towards those involved with
the brutal acts. It is one of the
greatest spiritual experiences
and one of the hardest to en-
dure � not a memory, but an
experience that is as powerful
as a memory.
Too often have people ignored history
and committed the same unspeakable acts
without regard to the lessons that are star-
ing us right in the face. Case in point:
Bosnia's ethnic cleansing. History repeats
itself, indeed! But only because of human
stupidity and stubbornness in realizing
truth.
Auschwitz exists not only in its mean-
ing but also in its physical site.
By Brian Hall
O'Neil's pure intent increased power of state
Listening to the radio on
my way back to Greenville last
Thursday, I heard the report that
the country had lost two promi-
nent citizens. While I disagree
more often than not not with
President Clinton's policies, I was
saddened by the
news of the �
death of his
mother, Virginia
Kelly. There is
no good time for
such a tragedy,
but for Mr.
Clinton this
blow, coming so
soon after his
recent troubles ��Mm
and immedi-
ately before his trip abroad, must
be particularly difficult to bear.
At the same timecamenews
of the passing of former Speaker
of the House, Tip O'Neil. After
summarizing Mr. O'Neil's life in
the depressingly brief manner of
newsmen (as if one's life can ad-
equately be summed up in a one-
minute spot), the reporter closed
his report by stating that Mr.
O'Neil would be remembered as
a champion of the working man.
This statement caused me to think
for the rest of my trip.
No one would dispute that
O'Neil was a paragon of modern
liberalism. He was a firm be-
liever in the ability and necessity
of using the power of the govern-
ment to help the lower classes. I
do not question the intentions of
liberals who try to help the
beatendown. What bothers me is
our rights are not
granted to us by the
state, but are
something we are
endowed with at birth
by our Creator
the unquestioned assumption that
one's pure motives will automati-
cally bring about good results. As
the saying goes, the road to hell is
paved with good intentions.
The liberal social program of
the past 60 years, which have
been en-
� acted with
the inten-
tion of mak-
ing life more
fair, have
done noth-
ing so much
as greatly
enhance the
power of the
federal gov-
ernment.
Nowhere in the Constitution can
one find any authority for such
actions. The closest (and only de-
fense that I have ever heard put
forth) is the so called "elastic
clause As many of you no doubt
remember from your high school
history7 classes, this is the clause
which you were told allowed Con-
gress to make whatever laws were
"necessary and proper I was
always told that it was this ability
to stretch which allowed the Con-
stitution to be a "living document
Stop me when you have heard this
before.
What is always left out of
such discussions is the words im-
mediately after "necessary and
proper which are "for carrying
into Execution the foregoing Pow-
ers" which are carefully enumer-
ated and limited. What we have
forgotten is that the purpose of the
Constitution is not to grant us
certain rights. As the Declaration
of Independence states, our rights
are not granted to us by the state,
but are something we are en-
dowed with at birth by our Cre-
ator (or Nature, if you prefer).
What the Constitution does
is limit the power of the govern-
ment so that it cannot take away
those rights. The limited power
of the state is our only protection.
It is interesting to read the Feder-
alist, in which Hamilton, Madi-
son and Jay try to convince the
people of New York that the Con-
stitution does not give too much
power to the federal government.
This effort was necessary because
many, like Jefferson and Henry,
thought that a government as
strong as the one in the Constitu-
tion would deprive its citizens of
their rights.
Once we permit the state to
seize more power by interpreting
the Constitution in any manner it
wishes, it is only a matter of time
before this same government,
which we have strengthened in
hopes that it will accomplish good,
falls into the hands of those who
will use that same power to seize
our rights.
Before we crown anyone as
a champion of the oppressed and
downtrodden, let's examine what
his real deeds were. If the most
enduring legacy of Mr. O'Neil is
that during his many years of
public service he helped
strengthen the power of the state,
despite any short term gain, we
are all worse off in the long run
By Laura Wright
Ponderable parking solution: raize traffic office
Let me tell you a story about
a woman.
I don't remember her name,
so for this article, I'll call her Ber-
tha. Bertha lived in a college town
where she placed wheel locks on
cars that were parked illegally in
apartment parking spaces. For
those of you who aren't familiar
with wheel locks, they are devices
that are placed upon the front tires
of cars. The car is rendered immo-
bile and in order to drive again,
the owner of the car must pay a fee
(in this case, to Bertha) in order to
have the lock removed.
Various apartment com-
plexes hired Bertha to disable the
vehicles of wayward college stu-
dents who didn' t live in the apart-
ments but parked their cars in the
lots and walked to class. Bertha, in
a very nondiscriminatory way,
even wheel locked the unfortu-
nate visitors of various apartment
dwellers.
Now, while Bertha was do-
ing a service to the university (en-
couraging students to purchase
parking stickers) and the rental
property owners, the college stu-
dents whose cars were wheel
locked were pissed.
I suppose that it's one thing
to get towed and quite another to
have a lock placed upon your front
tire�and begging mercy from the
merciless Bertha was futile.
Anyway, after a period of a
couple years, most of the college
student community was aware of
Bertha's job and this woman was
given the endearing nickname
"The Wheel Lock Hog So much
animosity accumulated towards
Bertha that she had to deal with
verbal abuse at every turn A group
of students made t-shirts that said
"kill the Wheel Lock Hog" and
Bertha even received death threats.
A bit extreme, you say? Yep,
but it is true. Eventually, Bertha
had to leave town. I don't know
what she's doing now but I would
imagine that she stays as far away
from parking lots as possible. The
moral to this story is clear: Don't
mess with a college student body
when it comes to parking because
parking may be one of the few
things that college students take
seriously.
I stand firmly behind my
decision not to buy a parking
sticker. I came back from break to
discover that a very large section
of one of the parking lots h ad been
very neatly fenced in. Some day a
rec center will stand there. Since it
appears that this rec center thing
is inevitable, wouldn't it make
more sense to start work on it in
the summer when all of those
people who bought $70 parking
stickers are elsewhere? To rectify
the present situation, we could
build a parking lot where the traf-
fic office now stands.
And while I'm one subject, I
appealed a ticket that I got way
back in September. I waited all
semester to find out whether or
not I won my case but I never
heard anything. When I regis-
tered for classes for this semes-
ter, there were no outstanding
fees to be paid so I assumed that
my appeal had been successful.
On Dec. 10 or so, I got a letter tha t
told me that I owed $35 for the
ticket that I got in September.
They didn't even wish me a Merry
Christmas. I think that efficiency
is a virtue, how about you guys?
But even better than this
post-semester ticket were the ar-
ticles that were sent from the li-
brary to my house on January 5.
I ordered some research material
through inter-library loan (be-
cause our library didn't have
what I needed) near the end of
last semester. I needed this stuff
for a paper that I was writing that
was due on Dec. 7. Only a month
late, that's not so bad.
I can't really complain too
much about the library though,
since it is about to get a much
needed overhaul. Unfortunately,
I won't be around to experience
it. But for those of you who are
still here when all of this work
has been completed and the next
project is underway (maybe a pet-
ting zoo), study hard, recreate
hard and get a bike�it won't
require a parking space and I
doubt that there will be many
spaces around. Bike parking
stickers may be the wave of the
future.
Welcome back.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
In regards to the editorial of November 30,
"Clinton's first year proves productive the quan-
tity was there but what about quality?
It should surprise no one that a President
working with a House and Senate of the same
party could pass an abundance of feel good legis-
lation.
Case and point, "the motor voter bill I
didn't know that registering was so strenuous.
Granted, a number of people might be confused
on where the library is but I would think that it
couldn't hurt anyone to visit it. By the way, since
registering to vote is so perplexing, I can only
imagine what kind of mental anguish voting will
cause.
That brings us to economics. Mr. Clinton
wants to tax cigarettes to help stop people from
smoking but also wants to use the revenue to fund
his new health care plan. How can an expensive
social program be fully funded with revenue
derived from tax that is supposed to stop an
activity?
Which brings me to his "deficit-reduction
package Didn't a President get fired for raising
taxes and implementing his $500 billion pack-
age? How can the President be expected to be
taken seriously on cutting the budget when he
lobbied on shooting down the PennyKasich bill
that would cut the budget by $100 billion.
Then there is the Brady bill. Something tells
me that a person that is going to use a gun in an
illegal manner probably won't be hesitant to buy
the gun in an illegal manner. How about a wait-
ing period for parolees?
Eric R. Sandberg
Junior
Clinical Laboratory Science
Stuff you should know
�Something to consider when exiting Joyner Library � You know the security system that protects
the library from students and patrons walking away with a book that hasn't been checked out? To avoid
getting overly technical, each book checked into Joyner is equipped with a magnetic strip that triggers an
alarm in the apparatus located near the exit door. To avoid setting this alarm off, at check-out time, the
library de-magnifies each book. Apparently, in the event that a patron absent-mindedly leaves the building
without checking a book out, the alarm will sound and the red-faced individual reverses hisher position
to await the scorn of a library attendant.
"Sounds fair you say. Well, is it also fair for Joyner Library to require these "offenders" to relinquish
information (name, ID number, possibly an address) that is kept on file with a written explanation from the
"offender" as to why they tried to leave illegally? This info is kept on file for a month and then sent to Steve
Nelson, the assistant dean of students. If an incident occurs twice, that person will be subject to
disciplinary legal action. This policy was enacted by the employees of the circulation desk�not by ECU,
or the state even, but by a handful of people who work at Joyner.
Sounds like a system that doesn't accomplish much of anything in terms of nabbing the people who
really try to steal books. The true criminals are entirely more resourceful than the Uibrary gives them credit
for. They certainly would not be stupid enough to waltz out the door with a hot book. Twice.
So who else sees The List and how long does a name stay on it? This system is twin to the age-old
elementary school method called a Permanent Record and just as ineffectual.
Take heed, folks





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Page 6
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'The East Carolinian
Classifieds
�iiniir ,mmmmmmmmmMmMmmmmwmmmmmm&mmmmmmmm0mMmmmmmmmB
January 13, 1994
For Rent
SUBLEASE: One bedroom
apartment near Pitt Commu-
nity College. Call 355-8737
APT. FOR SUBLEASE, 1 bed-
room, unfurnished, $265 mo
deposit neg 830-9547
2 ROOMMATES (male or fe-
male) wanted immediately to
share 4 bdrm apt. 2 12 baths
$156rent l4bills. Convenient
Location. 752-6835
ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom2 bath apart-
ment 1 block from campus.
Rent $225-237, Deposit $225,1
2 utilities. Prefer non-smoker.
Callleave message 830-9595.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed for apt. 12 block from
campus, 3 blocks from down-
town, 2 blocks from supermar-
ket, rent includes phone, utili-
ties, cable. Call 757-1947
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED
3 bedroom townhouse, 2 B's.
Located 5 mins from campus.
Furnished completely, except
for your bedroom. Only $250
perrmonth, water, sewer and
cable. Please call 321-2379 and
leave message.
THflEE FEMALE ROOM-
MATES needed to take over
lease. 2 bedrooms 112 bath.
Close to campus, $128.75 a
month plus 14 utilities. Call
Brookie or Lorie 758-6692.
ROOMMATE WANTED to
share a house close to campus.
Rent $250.00 and deposit. 1 3
of utilities. Call Scott 758-9604
ROOMMATE NEEDED: for 2
bdrm townhouse apartment.
Rent is $170.00 per month and
For Rent
12 utilities. Includes on-site
laundry, pool, and ECU tran-
sit. Callleave message. Stacy
Peterson 321-1532
MATURE CLEAN, male room-
mate needed to share a house
in a quite neighborhood. 13
utilities and $200 a month. Call
355-8783 or 321-2830 ask for
Kevin.
NEED FEMALE ROOM-
MATE immediately Prefer
non-smoking, serious student.
Walking distance to campus,
private room, private bath.
Pay 12 rent, 12 utilities.
Pleasecall757-1738or 758-5862.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
needed immediately to share 4
br townhouse in Tar River.
$162.50 14 utilities. Non-
smoker. 758-4332
H Help Wanted
CRUISE JOBS
Students Needed!
Earn up to J2,000mo. working for
Cruise Ships or Land-Tour companies.
World Travel. Summer and Full-Time
employment available. No experience
necessary. For more information call:
(206) 634-0468 ext. C5362
FREE TRIPS & CASH �
Call us and find out how hun-
dreds of students are already
earning free trips and lots of
cash with America's 1 Spring
Break company! ChooseCancun,
Bahamas, Jamaica, Panama,
Daytona or Padre! Call now!
TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 328-SAVE or
(617)424-8222.
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing
brochures! Sparefull time. Set
own hours! Rush Stamped en-
velope: Publishers (GI) 1821
K Help Wanted
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham
NC 27705
HELP WANTED Ladies earn
$500 a week full-time part-
time daily payout. Playmates
Adult Entertainment Snow Hill,
NC. Call for interview 747-7686
COUNSELORS to lead thera-
peutic groups for youths with
emotional behavioral problems
in outdoor and indoor settings.
Live in. BABS degree in Psy-
chology, Social Work or a re-
lated field required. Apply to
Three Springs of North Caro-
lina. ECUPOboxl320Pittsboro,
NC 27312
SOCCER REFEREES USSF cer-
tification clinic to be held in
Greenville Jan. 21-23. Earn extra
$ and get plenty of exercise. Call
752-7514 for details
TWO PHYSICIANS seekingre-
sponsible student(s) to care for
child in our home full or part
time. Possibility of shared shifts.
References required. 321-1410
HOUSECLEANING for faculty
family- walking distance- 5 hrs
wk- very flexible, $5hr. Call
only between 5-6pm. ph 752-
0306
For Sale
SPRINGBREAKSALE1994!We
have the hottest destinations! Ja-
maica,Cancun, Bahamas, Florida.
Allattheguaranteed lowestprices
with the ultimate party package.
Organize small group and Travel
free! Call Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710
SPRING BREAK Bahamasparty
cruise! 6 days $279! Trip includes
For Sale
Tired of trying to
stretch your dollar?
We pay cash on the spot fon
�USED BRAND NAME
MEN'S CLOTHING
�STEREO & VIDEO
�EQUIPMENT
�MICROWAVES
�TELEVISIONS
�FURNITURE
If you are selling you must be 18 with a
picture 1D.(NCDL, ECU)
s
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
752-3866
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
MON-FRI10-12 & �li;
Sat 10am-l pm
Cruise room, 12 meals 6 free
parties! Hurry! This will sell out!
1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Cancun Ja-
maica! Fly out of Raleigh and
spend 8 days on the Beach! We
have the best trips prices! In-
cludes air hotel parties from
$429! 1-800-678-6386
SPRING BREAK! Panama City!
8 days oceanview room with
kitchen $1 Walk to best bars!
Includes free discount card- save
$50 on cover charges! 1-800-678-
FLORIDA'S new Spring Break
hotspots! Cocoa BeachKey West!
More upscale than Panama City
Daytona! Great beaches
nightlife! 8 days in 27 acre Cocoa
For Sale
Beachfront resort159! Key West
$249! 1-800-678-6386
8-BIT NINTENDO with 33
games, includes 11 sports, Tetris,
Chess; two controls and zapper,
hint book and codes. $300OBO.
931-8024, leave message
SPRING BREAK 1994!
Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica,South
Padre, Florida at 110 Guaran-
teed Lowest Prices from 1 spring
break company! Call John 752-
2992.
SNOW SKIS K2 5500 size 203
and Rossignol 75v bom pair in
greatcondition,excellentpricecall
John 752-2992
E Services Offered
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
NORTH PADREMUSTANG ISLAND
r �L0R�I�D'll
DAYTONA BEACH
PANAMA CITY BEACH
ORLANDOWALT DISNEY WORLD
C�0�L�0�II�A�D�0
STEAMBOAT
VAIUBEAVER CREEK
BRECKENRIDGEKEYSTONE
H.E-V-A.D.A
LAS VEGAS
S-O-U-T-K C-A-R O-L-I-M-A
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE NOW
CALL TOLL FREE FOR FULL
DETAILS AND COLOR BROCHURE!
1'800'SUNCHASE
HEYMRDJ! Please play my
favoritesong! It'stimetoplanfor
spring socials and Mobile Music
Plxxductionsisgearinguptomeet
its popular demand with 2 com-
plete systems and light shows.
E Services Offered
Widest variety of music, best
DJs, most popular service with
ECU greeks. Call Lee at 758-
4644 for bookings.
WML
Personals
WRITERMUSICIAN
and poetic soul seeks like
minded lady for friend-
ship and fun. Send pho-
tos and correspondence
to: Kane, po box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835
ANNA Thanks for mak-
ing me so happy these
past few months, I love
you! John
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Heather B.Carroll! Alright
miss social butterfly,
you're the "Big 2-0 We
all hope you do great this
semester and have fun to
boot! Love always, Kelli
the gang.
FOUND 1-10-94: a scien-
tific calculatoi between
Joyner Library and Stu-
dent Health Center. Call
321-6505
aS Greek
PI LAMBDA PHI is looking
for a few good men who are
interested in joiningcampuses
youngest but fastest growing
fraternities call 830-51 for
details.
ALPHA PHI EXEC: Can't
wait for our trip to the moun-
tains! We have lots of plan-
ning to do this weekend!
ALPHA PHI would like to
welcome everyone back!
Good luck this semester.
Announcements
OPPORTUNITIES
are available to students
who are interested in be-
coming Personal care at-
tendants to students in
wheelchairs, readers and
tutors. Past experience is
desired but not required.
If interested, contact ei-
ther of the following: Of-
fice of Coordinator 103
Greene Hall Telephone:
(919)757-6110, Officefor
disability support ser-
vices Brewster A-l 16 or
A-114 Telephone:
(919)757-6799
ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH & SAFETY
2 work study positions
available in Recycling.
8am-5pmMonFri. If in-
terested, please call 757-
6096. Leave message-
name, phone number and
time to be reached.
MEDICINE STUDENT
NATIONAL MEDICAL
ASSOCIATION
on Jan. 22, 1994 will
present the Ninth Annual
Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Senior recognition
banquet at the Ramada
Inn in Greenville. The
event will begin at 6:30.
Dr. Brenda Armstrong,
one of four pediatric car-
diologists in the country
will be the keynote
speaker. Tickets are
$20.00 and include a din-
ner, gospel and jazz en-
tertainment. Proceeds
will benefit the Eastern
NC Maternity Home and
the SNMA adopt a family.
For more information con-
tact: Annette Wagner at
752-2416.
LITERACY
VOLUNTEERS OF
AMERICA-PITT
COUNTY
will hold a 16-hour work-
shop beginning Thur. Jan.
13th with an orientation
from 7 to 8pm. Classes
will be held on Thur. and
Mon. evenings from 7 to
9:30pm beginning Jan.
20th. One in every four
adults in Pitt County is
functionally illiterate.
Volunteer tutors are
greatly needed to combat
this disability. Please
help. Call 752-0439 for
details.
LDSSA
will be sponsoring 2 reli-
gion classes spring semes-
ter. The 1st class will be
Wed. 12:00nto l:30pmai
MSC Room 242. The
other class will be at
6:30pm -8:00pm at the
IDS Church in Lyndale.
The course of study will
betheDC. The LDS so-
rority will also be meet-
ing following the Thurs.
evening institute class.
Everyone is invited to at-
tend. For more informa-
tion call Lew Williams
(collect) 919-523-1755.
INVESTMENTS CLUB
will hold its first meeting
of the year on Thur. Jan.
13. It will take place in
GCB 3007 at 5:00. All
majors are welcome.
Come learn about invest-
ing
CAREER SERVICES
WORKSHOPS
to following workshops
sponsored by Career Ser-
vices are open to any in-
terested students: Re-
sume writing: Tue. Jan.
18 Mendenhall 14
4:00pm. Interview Skills:
Wed. Jan. 19 Mendenhall
14 5:00pm. Prospective
May and Summer 1994
graduates who have not
done so can still register
with Career Services at
the next Orientation
meeting which will be
held on Thur. Jan. 20 at
3:00pm in MSC 221.
GREENVILLE, AREA
Bisexual, Lesbian and Gay
community group spon-
sors discussions and ac-
tivities, meetings are
closed. For information,
758-8619
ECLUAfOMEN'S
Ultimate Frisbee team.
Anyone interested in
playing Ultimate Frisbee,
please call Michelle,
Leslie or Holly at 752-
2520. No experience is
necessary. Come feel the
Ultimate experience.
STUDENT EXCHANGE
England, Netherlands,
California, Colorado,
these are a few places
some of your peers will
be going this semester
because they came by
the office in the fall! It is
time to consider a stu-
dent exchange or study
abroad experience for
fall semester! IF you are
interested in study sites
which are available,
please contact Stephanie
Evancho, International
Programs, 757-6769 for
details on how you can
pay ECU tuition and study
at another location! Do it
today!
ATTENTION
COMMUNICATION
STUDENTS!
EC3 will be holding then-
first 1994 meeting on
Wed. Jan. 19th at Chico's
restaurant. Majors and
minors welcome. For fur-
ther information call Laura
at 830-0551.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
show off your racquet-
ball skills when Recre-
ational Services hosts a
Racquetball singles tour-
nament. Come to the reg-
istration meeting on Jan.
25 at 5:30pm in BIO. 103.
for more information call
Recreational Services at
757-6387 or stop by 203
Christenbury Gym.
RECREATLONAL
SERVICES
come play water polo
with Recreational Ser-
vices! There will be a
registration meeting on
Jan. 25 at 5pm in
BIO 103. For more in-
formation call Recre-
ational Services at 757-
6387 or stop by 203
Christenbury Gym.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
you don't have to wait
until March to find bas-
ketball madness at ECU!
There will be a basket-
ball preview, basketball
invitational, and bas-
ketball registration
meeting on Jan. 18 at
5pm in BIO. 103. for
more information call
Recreational Services at
757-6387 or come by
203 Christenbury Gym.
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-
paid
Announcements
Any orsanization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetothe limited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may
be cancelled before 10 a.m. the
day prior to publication
however, no refunds will be
given
For more
information
call 757-6366.





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The East Carolinian
Page 8
Lifestyle
January 13, 1994
Hendrix holds Scottish theme dinner
Come and visit Scotland for dinner and a movie at
Hendrix for an evening.
Photo Courtesy of the British Tourist Authority
The Edinburg Festival is an example of what can be seen on Thursday.
Two screenings wilt be held at 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. with dinner.
Richard Attenborough
reminisces long career
By Bridset Hemenway
Staff Writer
Have you wondered about the
life of the Scottish? A land where
bagpipes, highland games and high-
land flings continue to fascinate the
world peeping in. Scotland is a land
where explorers battle the raging
North Sea to tap the crude petro-
leum locked in beneath it. A place
where fisherman roam the most
famous lochs catching the fish that
feed the world. A place everyone
should visit.
On Thursday, Jan. 13th
,Hendrix Theatre will present to you
the opportunity to travel to Scot-
land and the Scottish Isles through
the TravelAdventure film Theme
Dinners. After enjoying a filmabout
the exciting land of Scotland visi-
tors will feast on an authentic Scot-
tish dinner. There will be matinee
and an evening showing for this
film and dinner will be served at
6:15 p.m. for the convenience of
viewers.
This exciting experience is
brought to ECU by Joe and Mary
Liz Adair. Joe and Mary Liz have
lived, worked and traveled in over
60 nations and have produced
travel-destination films on four con-
tinents. With the help of Joe Adair's
work in International Studies and
his experience in the American
Peace Corps and Mary Liz's sociol-
ogy, philosophy and music back-
ground, the two create an adven-
ture for those who are unable to
travel to exotic lands. Their films
have won several awards includ-
ing the Kentucky Thoroughbred
Award, which is the highest public
relations honor within their home
state of Kentucky. Joe Adair is a
past-president of the International
Motion Picture and Lecturers Asso-
ciation. Together the Adairs recently
received the prestigious Speaker of
the Year Award.
Also during the tour viewers
will visit Edinburg and her royal
mile , greet Glasgow , Aberdeen
and Perth. They will experience the
excitement of teeing off along the
hallowed fairways of Turnberry,
Gleneagles and St. Andrews in this
historic home of golf and unravel
the intrigues surrounding Mary
Queen of Scots while roaming in
the palaces. If they wish viewers
cansampledelicaciessuchas,baked
fish with dill cream sauce, roast
pork with apples and red cabbage,
baked butternut squash and almond
cakes. The English language with a
Gaelic lilt will catch everyone's at-
tention as they travel aboard The
Royal Scotsman-the worlds most
luxurious and romantic train. Itwill
be a night to remember as you expe-
rience. Scotland and the Scottish
Isles.
Tickets to the screening of the
film will be $4 and$12.50 for dinner
seats. The film will be shown at 4:00
& 8:00 p.m. and is sponsored by the
Department of University Unions
at ECU.
Film and dinner tickets are on
sale now and can be purchased at
the ECU central ticket office in
Mendenhall student center. Tickets
canbecharged to major credit cards
by mail or phone at 757-4788. If that
is long distance, call 1-800-ECU-
ARTS.
LOS ANGELES (AP) � He
had a long career as one of
England's best actors. He has
earned knighthood from the
Queen and Academy Awards for
directing and producing Gandhi.
For all this, Richard
Attenborough may be most re-
membered as the build er of Ju ras-
sic Park.
This bothers Sir Richard not a
whit. After 50 years at his trade,
he knows the value of starring in
what is likely to be the most suc-
cessful movie of all time.
"Probably in that one movie,
more people have seen what I've
done than in all the other films
put together he mused duringa
visit here for the opening of his
latest film as a director,
Shadowlands. He added with a
chuckle: "I've done one or two
things that were better than that.
Not much, though
Attenborough almost didn't
play the pivotal role of John
Hammond, the tycoon who rep-
licates dinosaurs for an island at-
traction. Steven Spielberg previ-
ously had asked him to appear in
two of his films, but
Attenborough was unable to do
so. He succumbed to Spielberg's
pleading � and immediately re-
gretted it.
"I hadn't acted in 14 years
he said. "It's much easier to be a
director than an actor. If vou're
an actor, you've got to get it right.
Who's to say whether you got it
right as a director? I thought to
myself, all those lines to remem-
ber
Always the perfectionist, he
remarked that he wished he could
do some of his scenes over again.
But he had high praise for
Spielberg.
"He's marvelous, brilliant. I
don't understand, and there's no
use denying it, a certain jealousy
as far as he's concerned, or a cer-
tain lack of warmth toward him
in certain areas of Los Angeles.
For he's a genius
Richard -Samuel
Attenborough was born 70 years
ago in Cambridge, where his fa-
ther was a college president. He
won a scholarship to the Royal
Academy of Dramatic Art and
soon was appearing in West End
plays. An agent took him to Noel
Coward, who was seeking fresh
faces for his film tribute to the
navy, In Which We Seri'e.
His budding film career was
interrupted by the air force, and
Attenborough ended up photo-
graphing bombing missions over
Germany.
After the war,
Attenborough's acting career
flourished, both in British films
(Brighton Rock, Dunkirk) and
See RICHARD page 10
Alternate Roots hits Durham
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Activists, community orga-
nizers and artists are joining to-
gether in Durham on Jan. 26-30
for a Community Arts Revival.
The event will analyze ways in
which artists and communities
can act as partners for social
progress.
The Arts Revival is presented
by Alternate Roots (Regional Or-
ganization of Theaters South) as
parts of its CommunityArtists
Partnership project. The event is
open to the public and will in-
clude performances, celebrations,
workshops, forums, case studies
and small group discussions.
Kathie de Nobriga, the
ROOTS Executive Director said,
"We called it a revival because
we believe artists are again tak-
ing an active part in the develop-
ment of the communities where
BH
they live and work. We feel it is
time to bring together those who
are immersed in this work, to
share our knowledge, examine
key issues, sing, eat and make art
together
The festivities will be held at
the Durham
Arts Council,
Omni Hotel,
Hayti Heritage
Center,
Durham Convention Center, The
Palace International and other lo-
cations near downtown Durham.
Notable performers from all
over the Southeast such as story-
tellers, John Spelman and Cynthia
Watt; poet Alice Lovelace; and
singer, Elise Witt, will be featured.
Renowned artists and cul-
tural activists including E'Vonne
Coleman of the Durham Arts
Council, Bill Cleveland of the
Center for the study of Arts and
Community, and Matt
Scharzman of the Arts and Social
Change program at the New Col-
lege of California will lead the
discussions.
This CommunityArtists
Project is made possible through
the support of The Nathan
Cummings
Founda-
tions, The
National
Endow-
ment for the Arts Presenting and
Commission Program, The North
Carolina Arts Council, The Mary
Duke Dibble Foundation, The
Lila-Walace Reader's Digest Fund
and The Durham Arts Council.
Registration for the event is
possible until Jan. 17, but limited
space is available. Registration
fees are: $85 for artists, $100 for
the general public, $125 for rep-
resentatives of an Institution or
University and $35 for local rep-
resentatives.
Geronimo documents American Indians
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The sad plight of the Native
American has become a popular
theme for American cinema. Be-
ginning with Dances With Wolves
and then continuing in films like
Thunderheart and The Last of the
Mohicans, the American Indian has
firmly entered the collective na-
tional psyche.
A film like Michael Apted's
Thunderheart was memorable be-
cause it depicted not only the mis-
treatment of American Indians 150
years ago but the abuses inflicted
on them today as they struggle to
survive in ramshackle trailers on
dilapidated reservations.
The newest installment in the
cinematic treatment of the Native
American, Geronimo: An American
Lege takes place over a hun-
dred years ago.
As told through the lens of
Walter Hill, the film historically
creates the atmosphere present
during a time when the West was
being settled, and the Native
Americans were being shuttled
onto reservations against their
wills.
The U.S. Army was assigned
the task of herding the American
Indians onto the reservations like
so much cattle. The officers merci-
See GERONIMO page 9
CD Reviews CD Reviews
mi
Definite Purchase
)�
Worth A Try
j
Take Your Chances
s
No Alternative
IH
So alternative rcxk has been
batted around a lot lately in the
media, to both the music's better-
ment and its detriment. Sure, it's
great thataltemarive now ;ets some
attention and that some talented
people make the money they 'de-
serve to be making. Butwhen record
companies sink their fangs into any-
thing, they tend to warp it in their
own image. And it's only a matter
of time before they screw up alter-
native�has anyone really looked
closely at Stone Temple Pilots?
Could they be the Monkees of
grunge? It's like a virus.
Fortunately, the disease can
be felt only occasionally on No Al-
ternative, a compilation of alterna-
tive music released late last year as
an AIDS benefit. The producers
make the point that the term alter-
native is meaningless; any label that
canbeused to cover both Smashing
Pumpkins and the Beastie Boys (to
use two examples from the album)
has been stretched too tight. It's a
good point. Bu 11 think the real ques-
tion is, with Nirvana (the current
altemati ve frontmen) riding the top
of the charts, what is this music
supposed to be alternative to?
At any rate, No Alternative is
a nice package overall. Most of the
groups assembled here have im-
pressive credentials, so who cares
about labels? Real treats include
Soundgarden toning down their act
on "Show Me the Breeders (hear-
ing Kim Deal is always nice) on
"Iris altemativeelder, Bob Mould,
with "Can't Fight It and Matthew
Sweet doing another strange trib-
ute to Japanese animation, in
"Superdeformed
The coolest track on the al-
bum, however, is Pavement's "Un-
seen Power of the Picket Fence
which looks back to "the ancient
time, when there was no fifty states
in a tribute to REM. In meandering
garage-band fashion, Pavement
pretends to make a legend of Stipe
and the boys while reallv just hav-
ing a lot of silly fun. Expect lamen-
tations on the rampant stupidity of
our generation if many Baby
Boomers figureoutthehowling his-
torical inaccuracy in this song's fi-
nal verse. What fun!
No Alternative also has a few
problems, however, like Soul
Asylum's cover of "Sexual Heal-
ing These guys were once one of
the best rock bands on Earth, but
this track makes me seriously won-
der if they'vefinallysoldoutlmean,
if you're going to do a Marvin Gaye
song, you could at least do a good
one. I sincerely hope tiiis track is
meant as a joke, because, if not, it's
truly pathetic.
While "Sexual Healing" is
the only glaring flaw in the album,
several tracks are just plain boring.
Sarah McLachlan's "Hold On for
See ALTERNATIVE page 10
Green Apple
Quick Step
Wonderful Virus
m
"Rapid flow of suburbiaIroni-
callyifsyouMotherly anti-confusion,
genocideTeach me Indian, How to
listenBuild a bridge over my sky
Two films
close to
perfect
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Two films opening in the
rest of the country but have
not yet made it to Greenville
are 77k Remains of the Day and
Schindler's List. Both films
achieve cinematic perfection.
Remains of the Day stars
Anthony Hopkins as Mr.
Stevens, a prim and profes-
sional English butler work-
ing for Lord Darlington in
the time just before World
War II. Emma Thompson
plays Miss Kenton, a house-
keeper who works for the
Darlington house. The affec-
tion between Mr. Stevens and
Miss Kenton is only gradu-
ally revealed and even then
not fully.
The Remains of the Day is
based on the 1989 novel of
the same name by Kazuo
Ishiguro. The novel was
adapted for the screen by
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala and
she once again, as happened
last year for her adapta tion of
Howard's End, should receive
an Oscar nomination.
Jhabvala worked again
with producer Ismail Mer-
chant and director James
Ivory. Ivory has never been
awarded an Oscar, and prob-
ably will not receive one this
year, he certainly deserves
one. He has now directed two
of the most magnificent films
of the'90s�Howard's Endand
The Remains of the Day.
Though Ivory has now firmly
established himself as a di-
rector of impeccable artistic
taste. He has moved beyond
the limited realm of art house
films and is now becoming a
recognizable name in the
world of cinema.
The most remarkable
compliment thatcanbe given
to The Remains of the Day is
trtatitsurpassesHoawvf sErui
in quality. 77k Remains of the
Day pulsates with passions
that remain caged inside the
souls of these English charac-
ters. The film's finale is emo-
tionally devastating, and the
images in that final reel will
not soon leave the viewer.
Schindler's List, if pos-
sible, is even more powerful
than 77k Remains of the Day.
Oskar Schindler (magnifi-
cently brought to life by Liam
Neeson) was a German en-
trepreneur whose sympa-
thies swung toward the Jew-
ish community as World War
See FILMS page 10
mr
Don't Buy
Sounds a little confusing you
say? Well, squeeze these lyrics be-
tween some excellent cords and
rhythm and you have Green Apple
Quick Step. Taken from the song
"Rapid" theselyricscould represent
the unique and progressive sound
of a new band taking the alternative
scene by storm.
The band first hit the scene in
1989 as Inspector Luv and die Ride
Me Babies. However, when their
following began to spread further
than their home town of Tacoma,
Wash. ,menameGreenAppleOuick
Step took form.
During their stint as Inspector
Luv the group played parties, ga-
rages and street comers throughout
Tacoma. It was late 1991 when the
group released a 4-song indepen-
dentEPcallednofKTWorW.Shortly
See GREEN APPLE page 10





January 13, 1994
The East Carolinian 9
Bach festival begins this weekend
"Bach: Before and Beyond
a series of free concerts sched-
uled at East Carolina University
this month, will brighten this
wintry season for Eastern North
Carolina music devotees.
The series is billed as a "basi-
cally Baroque festival celebrat-
ing solo and chamber music bv
its sponsor, the ECU School of
Music, with faculty and guest
artist performers.
Opening the series on Fri-
day, Jan. 14 is "Rigaudon to Raga-
Harpsichord Music from Four
Centuries a performance by
harpsichordist Elaine Funaro of
Chapel Hill. Ms. Funaro will
present keyboard music of vari-
ous types and periods, including
GERONIMO
works by early composers Henry
Purcell, William Byrd and Jean-
Phillipe Rameau and contempo-
rary pieces by Bela Bartok, Penka
Kouneva, Dan Locklari, Tom
Robin Harris and Peter
Klausmeyer.
Featured in thisand other con-
certs in the festival will be the
handcrafted replica of a mid- 18th
century French harpsichord that
was donated to the School of Mu-
sic last spring by Conrad Sharpe
of Greenville.
The second festival concert,
set for Thursday, Jan. 20, is "J.S.
Bach: The Splendor of the Ba-
roque with Cornell University
ha rpsichordist William Cowdery,
and several ECU faculty singers
and strings and woodwinds instru-
mentalists. One selection will show-
case the talents of Greenville surgeon
and music aficionado Ira M. Hardy III
"in an operation of the vocal sort
The festival concludes Monday,
Jan. 24, with "Trumpet Tunes and
Ayres a program of 17th century and
early 19thcentury English and Italian
music for trumpet and harpsicJiord
presented by faculty trumpeter Tho-
masHuenerandharpsichordistJanette
Fishell. Assisting will be two faculty
colleagues�tenor Perry Smith and
George Broussard, performing on the
sackbut (a medieval trombone).
Each concert will begin at 8 p.m.
in the Hetcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
Continued from page 8
lessly carried out their orders
and forced these people onto
small tracts of land with poor
soil.
A story of such mistreatment
deserves more empathy than
Geronimo gives it. Instead of
plumbing the emotional depths
and the motivations of some of
the participants of the
"Geronimo Campaign the film
opts to relate its tale in quasi-
documentary style.
The emotional impact be-
comes muted in the hands of
Hill. Instead of trying to under-
stand the driving forces behind
the savagery exhibited bv both
the Apaches and the army, Hill
matter-of-factly relates the
events as told by a young officer
on the campaign to capture
Geronimo.
The actors try their best and
all give credible performances.
Jason Patric has the lead as Lieu-
tenant Charles B. Gatewood, an
idealistic young officer who senses
the futility of the Apache resis-
tance and tries to communicate to
them that they should accept their
fate and move quietly onto the
reservations. He urges the Apache
to acquiesce to the government
demands not out of loyalty to his
country but out of compassion for
the Apache.
Wes Studi ably fills the role
of Geronimo. He makes
Geronimo almost supernaturally
powerful yet he allows his frail-
ties to show through.
One scene that rises above
the rest of the film involves the
two leads. As Lieut. Gatewood
confronts Geronimo for the last
time, Geronimo tells him: "I am
Geronimo, an Apache warrior.
Who are you?"
"Just a man replies
Gatewood, "like yourself
Had the rest of the film con-
centrated on these two "men" the
film may have developed into a
powerful film. Unfortunately,
Geronimo introduces a bevy of
other characters who dilute the
emotions of the two leads.
The other cast members try to
bring spark to poorly written roles.
Robert Duvall plays a hired hunter
of Apache and Gene Hackman
portrays an army general who is
sympathetic to the Apache cause.
Both men try valiantly but they
cannot fully develop their charac-
ters in the short screen time they
are given.
Geronimo never bristles with
the necessary intensity to really
propel it. Walter Hill has man-
aged to take a compelling story
and drain it of its emotional im-
pact. He succeeds in telling an in-
teresting story but a tale this excit-
ing should not be so dull on film.
On a scale of one to 10,
Geronimo rates a seven.
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10 The East Carolinian
January 13, 1994
RICHARD
Continued from page 8
� American (The Great Escape, The
Sand Pebbles). By the mid-1960s,
the acting life had paled.
"1 was blessed or cursed or
whatever with this ridiculous
sort of cherubic face he said. "I
played the quivering psychopa th
on the lower decks of Her
Majesty's navy or something
similar. 1 was type-cast, and I got
fed up with it. I thought when
this disappears, I'd have noth-
ing to survive on. So I went into
production
Attenborough began pro-
FILMS
ducing films with Bryan Forbes
and turned to directing with Oh!
What a Lovely War. His 20-year
effort to make a film biography of
Gandhi paid of f in 1982 with eight
Academy Awards, including best
picture and director. He has also
directed A Bridge Too Far, Young
Winston, Cry Freedom and Chaplin,
which failed at the box office.
The director has bounced
back with Shadoiulands, a singular
love story based on a real-life
English writer-teacher and the
American divorcee he married.
Continued from page 8
II progressed. He was able to
single-handedly save more than
1,000 Jews from the gas chambers
at Auschwitz.
As directed by Steven
Spielberg, Schindler's List paints
one of the most vivid portraits of
the Holocaust yet. In stunning
black and white, Spielberg con-
veys the atrocities of the Holo-
caust with an artistic sense that
forces a reevaluation of his entire
career. With this film, Spielberg
has proven that he has matured.
Schindler's List defies superla-
tives. It is simply the most accom-
plished picture of the year and
possibly of the decade. The com-
pliments lauded it thus far still do
not do the film justice. Schindler's
List is not just a film�it is an expe-
rience.
When the next installment on the
history of cinema isvmtta,Schindtcr's
List will play a prominent role. It is,
quite simply, that good.
Both films can be seen in Raleigh.
And if ever films were worth a road
trip, The Remains of the Day and
Schindler's List are. Better yet, take a
Saturday and see both, but leavesome
room in between the two in order to
absorb the emotional impact. Perhaps
the films will soon come to Green ville.
Schindler's List is being advertised as a
comingattractionatalcxaltheater,but
there is no guarantee the Holocaust
images will ever flicker inside a theater
in this town. We can only hope that
bothfilms will open here.If they do,see
them immediately, because a perfect
film is hard to find.
On a scale of one to 10, both films
rate a ten.
GREEN APPLE
Continued from page 8
after the release of their EP, the group
relocated toSeattle. After trying toavoid
the music explosion going on there,
they hit the road on a West Coast van
tour during the Summer of '91. They
still felt they liadn't quite developed
the sound they were after.
Ty Will Man, lead vocalist of Cain
AppleQuickStep,saidaboutthistime
period, "We wereout in left field, hang-
ingbackuntilwegotthesoundthatwe
were after
Thechange they were waiting for
occurred after they lost their original
bassist. When the band recruited Mari
Anne Braeden to fill the missing bass
slot, it added a whole new dimension
to the sound through the use of Mari
Anne's back-up vocals.
Finally, in the fall of '92, after a
performance at a tiny Seattle bar, they
were approached by Medicin label's
president, Kevin Patrick, who had
worked with such acts as P.M. Dawn
and PJ Harvey. This of course lead to a
contract and a debut album which
embodies Green Apple Quick Step's
awesome energy, provocative song
writing and an abundance of authen-
tic attitude.
Wonderful Virus, the title of their
debut album, states how their music
affectsitslisteners�easy tocatch, hard
to get nd of. The 10-track CD offers a
variety of sounds and rhythms. One
particular style could not appropri-
ately represent Green Apple Quick
Step's Sound each sting is different.
Guitarists, Steve Ross and Dan
Kempthorne, and bassist, Mari Anne
Braeden,combineacousticchordswith
"grunge" drums using several differ-
ent rhythmical techniques for a sound
that belongs to Green Apple Quick
alone.
The one section that Ls most ap-
pealing to this critic was the combina-
tion of Ty Willman on lead vocals and
Mari Anne Braeden on back up vocals.
The two voices produce a sound that
accent the musical background, mak-
ing i t stand on t from any other a 1 terna-
tive band around.
Green Apple Quick Step's Wom-
derful Virus is one CD worth the cost of
CDprices,and afteronelLsten,you too
will want to make a quick step toward
becoming a Green Apple Quick Step
to Bridget
Hemenway
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ALTERNATIVE
Continued from page 8
instance, kind of stops things dead
right in the center of the album.
UncleTupelo's "Effigy" is alsoworth
missing, as Ls the Verlaines' "Heavy
33 It's not that these tracks are bad
jctly; they're simply mediocre,
something to fill up space between
trackone(MatthewSweet)and track
nineteen (Nirvana).
The spirit of the 70s also
haunts No Alternative, and the less
said about that the better. While I
can handle the retro fad as a clever
and somewhat nasty joke, the fact
that people take it seriously scares
the hell out of me. Personally, I think
the whole thing was masterminded
by the Boomers to warp us in their
image. Lots of Boomer record execs
out there, you know
The producers claim that No
Alternative is the voice of our gen-
eration, but I can't quite accept that.
Now don't get me wrong. There's a
lot of good music here, and I recom-
mend buying it whole-heartedly.
Get the cassette, though, if you can;
it's cheaper, and there's a Sonic
Youth track that can only be found
there. And while I'd let Pavement
step up to the podium for me any
day of the week, 1 want nothing to
do with "Sexual Healing no mat-
ter who plays it.
� Mark
Brett
lifestyle stuff writers-let's have fun
New Year's
I will
exercise at
least once
this year.
Balance out your lifestyle with fitness
programs from Recreational Services
Fitness Class Registration Information
Registration Dates
January 18 - 25
March 1-15
Cost per Session
SlO.OOStudents
$20.00FacultyStaffSpouse
Session Dates
January 24 - March 3
March 14 - April 22
Cost ptr Prop-in Class
$5.00 for 5 classesStudents
$10.00FacultyStaffSpouse
Choose from Aerobics, STEP, Low Impact, Hi-Lo, Funk, Funk Step,
Sport Moves, Outdoor Athlete, Aquarobics, Hi-Lo STEP, Power STEP,
Jump Start, and Toning. Pick up a class schedule with times, days,
location and instructor information in 204 Christenbury (Jym and
register from 9:00am-5:00pm.
Start the year off with a FREE Fitness Fizzical
FREE to all ECU students. The Fitness Fizzicals Program assesses body
composition, cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance,
flexibility, and blood pressure. Results help in formulating a personalized
plan for improving and maintaining optimal fitness with testing conducted by
the Human Performance Lab (M-T-Th-F 1 -5pm). Appointments and wellness
information may be obtained during hours of operation Monday Thursday
from 3:OOpm-5:30pm in I07A CO. Cost for faculty and staff is $15.
Pick up your RSVP (Recreational Services vitality
Program) package in 204 Christenbury Gym when
you come by to register.
()r call 7r7-(387 for more details.
Presents
THURSDAY
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Begin at 9:30pm-11:30pm
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Begin at 8:00pm-11:30pm
arty to your favorite Classic Rock,
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UNTIL 11.30pm





The East Carolinian
January 13, 1994
What's On Tap?
Friday, Jan. 14
W. Basketball, home
vs. George Mason,7 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 15
M. Basketball, away
at Old Dominion, Norfolk, VA
noon(HTS)
M. & W. Swimming
at Duke University, Durham, NC
1 p.m.
M. Indoor Track
at Florida Invit Gainesville, FL
Sunday, Jan.16
W. Basketball
vs. American University at 3 p.m.
W. Indoor Track
at Joe Hilton Invit UNC, Chape
Hill, N.C.
Monday, Jan. 17
M. Basketball
vs. Fairfield at 7 p.m.
The 411
Monday, Jan. 10
M. Basketball, home
beat George Mason, 86-72
,Vft'�'s CAA Uuchrs
STANDINGS
Team Conference GB
ECU 2-0 1.000 �
Overall
UNCW 2-0
JMU
UR
W&M
ODU
GMU
AU
1-0
0-0
0-0
0-1
0-2
0-2
1.000
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
0.5
1
1
1.5
2
2
9-1
8-4
7-4
4-7
1-8
7-5
5-8
2-10
.750
.667
.636
.364
.111
.583
.385
.167
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Kent Culuko, JMU 20.0
Odell Hodge. ODU 19.1
Donald Ross, GMU 18.5
TimFudd, AU 17.8
Kurt Small, W&M 17.1
Rebounding Avg
Sherif El-Sanadily, UNCW 8.8
David Cully, W&M 8.7
Khyl Horton, GMU 8.6
Mike Hodges, UR 7.9
Odell Hodge, ODU 7.8
Assist Avg
Troy Manns, GMU 7.6
Kevin Larkin, ODU 5.0
Drew Phillips, UNCW 4.7
Kevin Swann. ODU 4.4
Curtis McCants, GMU 3.8
Field Goal
Clayton Ritter, JMU .642
Odell Hodge, ODU .527
Kass Weaver.UR .523
Anton Gill, ECU .500
Carl Parker, W&M .493
Free Throw
Kent Culuko, JMU .915
Kevin Swann, ODU .881
Darren McLinton, JMU .833
Matt Verkey, W&M .806
Kurt Small, W&M .794
3-pt Field Goal
Kent Culuko, JMU.535
Sean Duff, W&M.469
Darren McLinton, JMU.467
Lester Lyons, ECU.438
Dennis Leonard, JMU.433
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
East Carolina8.6
Old Dominion7.4
James Madison4.7
UNC Wilmington2.4
Richmond-1.2
George Mason-4.0
William & Mary-8.1
American-11.4
Rebounding Margin
UNC Wilmington6.4
East Carolina3.5
Richmond3.1
George Mason2.8
Old Dominion1.3
James Madison-2.8
American-3.3
William & Mary-5.8
Field Goal
James Madison48.6
UNC Wilmington45.7
East Carolina44.4
Richmond43.8
Old Dominion43.8
George Mason42.4
William & Mary41.7
American39.2
Def. Field Goal
East Carolina 41.9
UNC Wilmington 42.9
Old Dominion 44.6
James Madison 45.0
George Mason 45.4
Richmond 45.8
William & Mary 46.6
American 49.9
Compiled by Brad Oldham
Sports
Page 11
Charlesworth makes early impact
File Photo
Dannielle Charlesworth
Cowboys' Smith
corrals NFL MVP
(AP) � Emmitt Smith keeps
conquering new frontiers.
"History, again said Smith,
who did something that Roger
Staubach, Tony Dorsett and Bob
Lilly never accomplished with the
Dallas Cowboys.
He became the first player in
franchise history to win the NFL's
MVP award.
Smith, passed over by 16 other
teams in the 1990 NFL dra ft, called
winning The Associated Press
award "sweet, about as sweet as
it gets
"There are so many great
players who have played for the
Cowboys, and there are so many
great players who are in the league
this year Smith said. "That's
why this award is so special
Staubach won the NFC MVP
award, but never earned it for the
entire league.
"It's all a little overwhelm-
ing said Smith, who recently
won his third consecutive NFL
rushing title although he missed
the first two games of the season.
"I guess God had a plan when he
had Emmitt Smith in mind. I'm
glad to be a part of that plan.
"Look at the things that have
happened to me. I just won a third
rushing title after spotting the field
two games, and I've got a chance
for another Super Bowl ring
Smith said it still burned him
that no team would take a chance
on him but the Cowboys.
"I thought Tampa Bay might
want me Smith said. "I was just
an hour away there in Pensacola.
I had a lot of second thoughts
about coming out as a junior on
that draft day. I kept slipping and
slipping. Then Dallas traded draft
picks so it could move up to get
me
In his young career, Smith is
rapidly running out of goals to
shoot at. But he still has a few.
"I've got some things to keep
me going he said. "I want to
take a good shot at Walter
Pay ton's rushing record, and that
will take awhile. I also wouldn't
mind being in the Professional
Football Hall of Fame some day
Earl Campbell, Jim Brown
and Steve van Buren are the only
other players to win three con-
secutive NFL rushing titles �
Brown actually leading the league
for five straight years, 1957
through 1961. All three arc en-
shrined at Canton, Ohio.
"Emmitt earned it, that's for
sure Dallas quarterback Troy
Aikman said of Smith's winning
the award.
"Emmitt played hurt and he
played great agreed Cowboys
offensive lineman Erik Williams.
"It's a tremendous accomplish-
ment for someone who missed
the first two games of the season.
He had a great regular season
Smith, selected Monday as
MVP in voting by 81 national me-
dia members, narrowly beat last
year's winner, Steve Young of the
San Francisco 49ers. Smith re-
ceived 26 votes, while Young, the
league's top passer, had 21.
"It's a great honor because it
means you've done what you're
supposed to do and done it as
well as anyone said Smith, who
ran for 1,486 yards this season,
with nine touchdowns, and
caught 57 passes, with one TD.
Track sprints into winter season
(SID)�The EastCarolina men's
andwomen'strackteamopenedtheir
indoor season Saturday at the Father
Diamond Invitational meet hosted
by George Mason University.
While the field was dominated
by participants from track clubs and
larger university programs, promis-
ing performances were turned in by
several Pirate runners.
Freshman standout Brian
Johnson placed sixth in the400 meter
dash with a time of 50.49. He was
followed by the contribution of his
teammate, Danny Allette, who fin-
ished ninth.
Lewis Harris also competed for
the Pirates, finishing 14th in the 200
meter dash and Chris McKinney
turned out a fifth-place finish in the
Richmond transfer helps set
off loss of Gaynor O'Donnell
By Dave Pond
Staff Writer
For Danielle Charlesworth,
playing her second year of college
hoops took a year longer than she
had anticipated. Under NCAA
regulations, Charlesworth sat out
last season but still has three years
of eligibilty left for Rosie
Thompson's Lady Pirates.
After playing her freshman
season for the Richmond Spiders,
Charlesworth has come a little
closer to home to play roundball
for the Lady Pirates. She plans to
wreck havoc on Buc oppponents
for a long, long time, and has al-
ready begun to leave her mark.
"Danielle is one of the most
dedicated athletes that I have ever
worked with said women's head
coach Rosie Thompson. "She's an
excellent ball handler, and she is
great at putting pressure on the ball
defensively
Charlesworth grew up in a very
athletic environment. "I've always
been involved in sports, whether it
was basketball, soccer or tennis
she said. Her older sister was a
member of an N.C. State's national
championship cheerleading squad
while she was in college.
Charlesworth went to Rich-
mond out of Millbrook High in
Raleigh, N.C, lettering four times
in basketball as well as in soccer.
During her senior season,
Charlesworth was named captain
of both the basketball and soccer
team. After her senior year, in which
she captained both squads,
Charlesworth was named an All-
State hoopster and an All-Ameri-
can soccer player
"I wanted to go to college to
possibly play both soccer and bas-
ketball, and in fact, I was recruited
higher as a soccer player than I was
for basketball she said. "I went to
Richmond to play basketball be-
cause I thought it would be a good
opportunity to step in and play
quickly
For the 1991-1992 Spiders,
Charlesworth played in all 29
games, earning a spot on the Colo-
nial Athletic Assosciation All-
Rookie team. She is a exceptional
three-point shooter, nailing 47.4
percent of attempts her freshman
year.
However, Charlesworth was
not happy in Richmond.
'Theentirecoachingstaffthat
recruited me went to another
school after I signed, and I just
didn't like it as much
Chrlesworth said, "It was too
small of a school for me. Also,
ECU was a lot closer to home
she said.
"We recruited Danielle out
of Millbrook and would have
loved to have had her play for us
then, but we had no scholarship
to offer her Thompson said,
"With her transferring with three
years left, it seems like it worked
out good for everyone involved
This year, Charlesworth is a
key player in the success of the
Lady Pirates.
Thompson went on to stress
how much Charlesworth loves
the game. "Last year when she
couldn't play in games and was,
See CHARLESWORTH page 14
FBI probes Kerrigan attack
(AP) � Allegations that the
husband of figure skater Tonya
Harding and her bodyguard ar-
ranged last week's attack on rival
skater Nancy Kerrigan are being
investigated by the FBI, accord-
ing to a published report.
The Oregonian reported in a
copyright story that Handing's
husband, Jeff Gillooly, acknowl-
edged he was one of the two men
being investigated, but told the
newspaper he was not involved.
"I wouldn't do that Gillooly
said. "I have more faith in my
wife than to bump off her compe-
tition
There was no indication that
Harding had any involvement in
theattackor knew anything about
it, the newspaper said.
In an interview Tuesday with
KOIN-TV in Portland, Harding
denied any link to the attack, say-
ing she felt cheated of the chance to
compete with Kerrigan.
"I really wanted to skate against
her she said.
Handing's bodyguard, Shawn
Eric Eckardt, who also is being in-
vestigated, called the allegations
"absurd
"I would never get involved in
anything like that Eckardt told
TheOregonian. "Thatwouldbejeop-
ardizing my future, my career. I
mean, that's not something I could
do or allow
The newspaper, in the front
page story, said that Eugene C.
Saunders, a 24-year-old Portland
minister, told investigators that he
had listened to a tape record-
ing of Gillooly and Eckardtplot-
ting to injure Kerrigan with a
third man, described as a "hit
man" from Arizona.
There is no phone listing
for a Eugene C Saunders in the
Portland area. Efforts to find
him early today were unsuc-
cessful.
A woman who answered
the phone at the Portland office
of the FBI referred all calls to its
Oregon spokesman, Bart Gori,
who was unavailable for com-
ment.
Earlier, however, Gori told
The Oregonian that "the events
surrounding that attack possi-
See SKATING page 14
3
Scholarship cuts outrage
NCAA minority coaches
(AP) � Boil down the rheto-
ric from the camps warring over
the NCAA's decision not to re-
store a single basketball scholar-
ship at each school and what it
comes down to is a debate about
opportunity. Plain and simple.
And raw.
Paying positions in college
sports are scarce right now. It
seems hard to believe that in these
days of $1 billion TV payouts (over
four years) for the basketball tour-
nament and offers of $50 million
or more per year for a college
football playoff.
But something has to give, if
the outgoing chairman of the
NCAA Presidents Commission
can be believed. According to Gre-
gory O'Brien, who is also chancel-
lor of the University of New Or-
leans and an adequate mathema-
tician, 70 percent of Division I
schools, including many of the
big-time programs, are already
operating at a deficit.
Two years ago, the NCAA
voted to cut the number of bas-
ketball scholarships at each school
from 15 to 13. Black coaches voiced
objections at the time that the cuts,
in conjunction with tougher aca-
demic standards, would mean less
opportunities forblack kids. They
were no doubt right.
And with even tougher stan-
dards set to go into effect next
year, those same coaches let it be
known as the NCAA convention
See NCAA page 14
triple jump at 49-01.0 feet
SeniorCharlesMilesplaced 10th
in a competitive 55-meter dash with
a 6.51 finish.
The women turned in some fine
performances with only one day of
practice since the Christmas break.
Lady Pirate indoor records werebro-
ken in thelongjump, the3000meters
and 500 meters.
In the long jump, Amanda
Johnson leaped 17-feet, 7-inches to
set the new record, Dava Rhodes ran
the3000metersin 10:29.79 and Alexis
Jacks turned in a time of 1:2120 in the
500 meters.
"Thiswaseverybody'sfirstmeet
of the year, so they ran it more of an
individual meet Head Coach
Charles Justice said. "As a team,
File Photo
The East Carolina men's and women's track teams competed recently in
the Father Diamond Invitational. Three school records were topped.
we're further ahead than we were
last year at this point
The Lady Pirates return to ac-
tion Sunday, Jan. 16atthe Joe Hilton
Invitational in Chapel Hill, N.C. on
the campus of North Carolina.
The men will be in Gainesville,
Horida on Jan. 21 to compete in the
Horida Invitational meet.
J
Holtz pushes
for college
playoff system
(AP) � A college football
playoff is inevitable, said Notre
Dame coach Lou Holtz, whose
team finished No. 2 in the polls
this year.
"We'll see a two- or four-
team playoff in my coaching life-
time, and I don't plan on coach-
ing much longer he said. "I
think it definitely will happen in
the next two years
Holtz spoke Tuesday at the
Greensboro Area Chamber of
Commerce's annual meeting.
Notre Dame defeated
Florida State 31-24 in the next-
to-last regular-season game, and
both emerged with bowl victo-
ries. Florida State finished 12-1
Notre Dame 11-1.
Florida State finished No. 1
in the polls.
' College football is the only
sport in America in which a
champion isn't determined on
the field Holtz said. "A play-
off after the bowl games would
produce tremendous revenue
that could be used to fund mi-
nority scholarships and gender
equity throughout college ath-
letics.
"The college presidents'
main concern about a playoff is
that it would take players away
from classes. But a four-team
playoff would only take two
weeks, and most schools don't
even hold classes for at least a
week after New Year's Day"
If a selection process for a
playoff is required, Holtz said it
should be handled by an impar-
tial committee like the NCAA
See HOLTZ page 13





�����gffininnr ii
iWHHHHHMmaHIIHfrk.
�mm - . . am h
-a� tMii�Miwi i �.�� � i' 1.1 ii i � wt M �
12
77i? �as Carolinian
January 13, 1994
Money persuades players
(AP) � Money wasn't an issue
for Tyrone Wheatley. It was for
David Palmer.
Wheatley, one of the best run-
ning backs in Michigan history an-
nounced Monday that he will pass
up a chance for millions in the NFL
to return for his senior season in
Ann Arbor.
"A lot of people talk about
money said Wheatley, who needs
1,359 yards to become the Wolver-
ines' career rushing leader. "But the
money's going to be there for me
next year. I want to stay here, try to
win the Heisman Trophy I want
to go out a winner
Michigan coach Gary Moeller
was delighted with Wheatley's de-
cision.
"We always expect the unex-
pected from him, and this is one of
those cases he said. "It's good for
a lot of reasons, and it's not just the
touchdowns. He's a good person to
have around
Palmer, an all-purpose star who
finished third in the 1993 Heisman
balloting, said throughout the sea-
son that he planned to return for his
senior year at Alabama. But he
changed his mind and decided to
enter the NFL draft, in part because
he has two young children to sup-
port.
"I've tried to look at all sides,
but the bottom line is I have to fulfill
the needs of me and my family
said Palmer, a record-setting re-
ceiver who also contributed to the
Crimson Tide as a quarterback, run-
ning back and kick returner.
Birmingham attorney Rodger
Smitherman, who will probably
represent Palmer in contract nego-
tiations, said family obligations
were a major factor in the player's
decision to rum pro.
"These were very serious con-
siderations he had Smitherman
said.
Other underclassmen also an-
nounced their decisions Monday,
the deadline for declaring eligibil-
ity for the NFL draft.
Running backs James Bostic of
Auburn and Calvin Jones of Ne-
braska are going pro, while Ohio
State receiver Joey Galloway is stay-
ing in school.
"I don't put muchemphasison
material things�I wasn'tbrought
up that way said Galloway, who
tied an Ohio State record with 11
touchdown catches in 1993 'Money
is important, but it doesn't drive my
life
Bostic, who led the Southeast-
em Conference in rushing, said he
had nothing more to accomplish at
Auburn, which went 11-0 this sea-
son.
Rice hauls in passes and awards
(AP) � What began as a frus-
trating season for Jem' Rice ended
up as one of his best.
The San Francisco 49ers wide
receiver had just three touchdown
receptions in the first sue games, but
recovered to lead the league in
touchdowns (16) and receiving
yardage (1,503).
Early next season, Rice should
pass Jim Brown's NFL career mark
of 126 touchdowns. Rice, already
the all-time touchdown reception
leader with 118, has 124 career TDs,
including six rushing.
Recognizing his durability as
the game's premier receiver and his
integral role in the 49ers' league-
leading offense, a national panel of
media members Wednesday se-
lected Rice as The Associated Press
1993 Offensive Player of the Year.
' 'This feels really good because
it's been awhile since I've received
an award like this said Rice, who
also won the award in 1987, when
he caught 22 touchdown passes in
just 12 games. "You've got to have
guys around you to complement
you, but you also have to have an
inner drive in yourself to get the job
done
Rice's closest competition in
voting by 81 panel members was
49ersquarterbackSteve Young, who
won the award in 1992. Rice had 28
votes to 21 for Young, the league's
leading passer for a third straight
season.
Young and Rice kept working
on their timing and the payoff came
when thev and the team went on a
six-game tear, winning all of them.
Rice had 10 touchdown catches in
that span, including four in a 45-21
victory at Tampa Bay on Nov. 14.
"I think we're making big
progress Rice said. "We're going
to get better down the road. We're
talking about different situations,
on the field and off the field. When
you communicate like that, you
have the feeling you're on the same
wavelength
Attention all sportswtiters!
There will be a prospective writers meeting Friday at
4:30p.m. at the Student Pubs, building.
r
It's TOURNAMENT TIME
at Mendenhall Student Center!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
CHESS
SPADES
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent ECU at regional
competitions to be held at East Tennesee State University in Johnson City the weekend of
February 25-27, 1994. All expenses will be paid by the Department of University Unions.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out.
All-Campus Men's and Women's Billiards (Pool) Tournament
Tuesday, January 18
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Men's and Women's Table Tennis Tournament
Wednesday, January 19
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
All-Campus Co-Rec Bowling Tournament
Thursday, January 20
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Bowling Center
All-Campus Chess Tournament
Tuesday, January 25
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
All-Campus Spades Tournament
Wednesday, January 26
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center, Rooms 8 C-D-E
V
There is $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk and in the Billiards and Bowling Centers located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center. Call the Student Activities Office. 757-4766, for more information.
Harris Teeter
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Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food btamps
PW &.





January 13. 1994
The East Carolinian
13
Track athletes awarded
(AP) � Track stars Michael
Johnson and Gail Devers were
named sportsman and sports-
woman of 1993 by the U.S. Olym-
pic Committee on Tuesday.
Johnson was unbeaten in 400-
meter races last year, winning gold
medals at the World Track and
Field Championships in the 400
(43.65 seconds, the third-fastest
ever)and 1,600-meter relay (a42.94
anchor leg in a 2:54.29 clocking).
The 26-year-old Rockwall,
Texas, runner was world cham-
pion at 200 meters in 1991. He con-
centrates on the 400 now and has
won 23 races in a row at that dis-
tance.
Devers, also 26, from Palmdale,
Calif, won the 100 meters and 100-
meter hurdles at the world cham-
pionships, the first athlete to win
both at an Olympics or world cham-
pionship meet since Fanny
Blankers-Koen of the Netherlands
at the 1948 Games in London.
The 1992 Olympic gold med-
alist in the 100 also anchored the
United States to a silver medal in
the women's 400-meter relay at the
world championships.
Johnson received 478 points
from a national panel of sports-
writers and broadcasters, USOC
officials and fellow athletes, beat-
ing wrestler Bruce Baumgartner
by 68 points. Baumgartner gained
more first-place votes, 19-15.
Devers edged gymnast Shan-
non Miller 538-526, getting one
more first-place vote, 23-22.
Both Devers and Johnson were
first-time winners of the award,
which started in 1974. It was the
first time track athletes had swept
the honors since 1985, when triple-
jumper Willie Banks and distance
runner Man' Decker Slanev won.
Woodson picks off AP award
(AC) � Rod Woodson always
lias wanted to play on both ikies oi
the ball Now that he has been se-
lected The Associated Press 1993
Defensive Player of the Year, maybe
he'll let that dream die.
Woodson, the star oornerbackol
the Pittsburgh Steelers, was a run-
away winner in balloting by 81 na-
tional media members, receiving 35
votes. Abig-plavspecialistWcxxlson
had eight inteceptions this season,
returning one for a touchdown. He
also is a fine punt returner.
Mostimportantlv.heis the leader
of the aggressive Steelers' defensive
unit, even if he does it without shout-
ingormakinginspirational speeches.
"I'mnotcomfortabledoingtliat.
I'm not a rah-rah guy, unless you get
me mad on the football field
Woodson said.
When he was a star at Purdue,
Wixxlson played receiver and defen-
siveback. 1 fehasmadeitnosecretthat
hew (mid like a chance tocatch or carry
the ball with the Steelers, tu.
But Woodson hasn't mentioned
anything along those lines recently,
ivali.inghowimportantfhecomeiUKk
position is.
"I think nowadays teams recog-
nize that if you have Jerry Rices and
Michael In ins and AndreRisonsand
Andre Reeds running around on of-
fense, you need guxl DBs to cover
them he said. "In retrospect, you get
an athlete, you sav put him at running
back or receiver, but now they're say-
ing, 'Let's put him at defensive back 1
think that s giving respect; we need
tl �ese players back here.
"I think most of the good athletes
in the league now are! )Bs. I'm trying to
being unbiased, but that's the way I
think it is
Woodson's seventh season was
his most impressive, ami he was the
leading vote-getter on defense for the
AP All-Pro team, his third year on that
select group.
Reggie White of Green Bay fin-
ished second with 12 votes. The defen-
siveend,whowasthepriecatchoftlie
first true free-agent market in NFL his-
ton won the award in 1987.
Deion Sanders needed only 11
games to impress nine voters; he spent
the first month of the season playing
baseball with the Braves.
Warm Up with a1
Delicious
Hot Drink!
Panthers grab Bills' Polian
(AP) � The Carolina Panthers
will add great depth to their stiH-
forming brain trust by signing the
man credited with converting the
Buffalo Bills from losers to contend-
ers, a football insider says.
Bill Polian, a two-time NFL ex-
ecutive of the year, was to be named
general manager of the NFL expan-
sion team at an afternoon news con-
ference today.
Owner Jerry Richardson also
was to announce the elevation of
current general manager Mike
McCormack to the newly created
HOLTZ
position of team president.
"I hope you people realize how
lucky you are said Denver Broncos
director of football operations and
player personnel Bob Ferguson, who
assisted Polian in Buffalo and was a
scout for McCormack with the Se-
attle Seahawks.
"WhatCharlottenow has in Bill
and Mike are two great minds in the
football business leading their foot-
ball team. Looking around the
league,Ican'trhinkofanythingstron-
See PANTHERS page 14
Continued from page 11
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"I'm convinced that sports-
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serving manner said the Notre
Dame coach. "Leave us out of it for
a minute. North Carolina lost to
Alabama 24-10 in the Gator Bowl
and dropped from No. 11 to No. 21
in the coaches' poll. That was un-
called for. Do you suppose maybe
some coaches were anxious to stem
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14 The East Carolinian
January 13, 1994
PANTHERS
Continued from page 13
ger. That is a great mix. The more
experience you have, the faster the
winningcancomehetold77u'Cwr-
lotte Observer.
Polian, 51, will step down as the
NFL's vice president of football de-
velopment to take the Charlotte job.
Polian hasbeena widely-sought
commodity since his controversial
firing by Bills owner Ralph Wilson
following last season's 52-17 Super
Bowl loss to the Dallas Cowboys,
Buffalo's third consecutive Super
Bowl defeat.
Polian joined the Bills in 1984 as
pro personnel director and was pro-
moted to general manager prior to
the 1986 season, following consecu-
tive 2-14 records. He built the Bills
into a Super Bowl team by 1990 after
a series of clever signings, draft
choices and trades.
He is one of only three men �
along with general managers Bobby
Beathard of San Diego and George
Young of the New York Giants �
who have been named league ex-
ecutive of the year more than once.
The Observer quoted NFL
sources as saying Polian's hiring in
the role of general manager is unre-
lated to McCormack's quadruple
bypass heart surgery last weekend.
Sources said the club initially
offered Polian the position of player
personnel director, with the under-
standing that he would become gen-
eral manager upon McCormack's
SKATING
bly involved a federal violation. 1
don't want to go beyond that
The newspaper said Saunders
turned to Portland private investi-
gator Gary Crowe for advice after
hearing the tape. Crowe knew both
Saunders and the man who had
clayed the tape for him, but The
Oregonian said his motive for re-
vealing it was unclear.
Saunders retained a lawyer and
went to the authorities Monday af-
ternoon, Vie Oregonian said, add-
ing that after questioning him, the
FBI talked to Crowe on Tuesday.
Crowe said that an unidenti-
fied Portland man with connections
to Harding had approached the man
known to Saunders and asked him
to arrange an "accident that would
knock Kerrigan out of the figure-
skating competition.
Kerrigan, the 1992 Olympic
expected retirement in three to five
years.
But with other NFL teams, in-
cluding the Philadelphia Eagles,
apparently willing to offer Polian a
general manager's position, sources
said the Panthers upgraded their
offer with the same title.
Polian was Buffalo's general
manager and vice president of ad-
ministration.
Polian apparently also dis-
cussed job opportunities with the
Los Angeles Rams, New Orleans
Saints and thejacksonvillejaguars,
the NFL's other expansion team.
McCormack, 63, is recovering
well and he was expected to be
released from the hospital by Fri-
day, according to a nurse at Presby-
terian Hospital who asked not to be
named. She said his recovery is ex-
pected to take four to six weeks, The
Gaston Gazette reported today.The
Panthersconsider itessential to have
scouts in place for next month's
NFL Combine Camp in Indianapo-
lis, which will bring together the
top 300 college prospects for testing
. and evaluation, The Gazette re-
ported.
Carolina won't draft until 1995,
but many of the players in this crop
could be available in the supple-
mental draft and through free
agency.
The Pantliers will begin play in
September, 1995.
Continued from page 11
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: What bowl did the ECU
football team win in 1964 ,
and 1965?
�jaioq snxr) vpuotf
di$ sv umouy oiou 'pioq dutwSuvi dii :y
ALFREDO'S, he
NCAA
Continued from page 11
bronze medalist, was a favorite to
defend her national title at the U.S.
FigureSkatingChampionshipsand
Olympic team trials last week in
Detroit.
Kerrigan was struck on the leg
after a practice session Thursday,
suffering severe bruises that forced
her to withdraw from the competi-
tion.
Harding, the 1991 national
champion who was fourth in the
1992 Olympics, went on to skate
two clean programs and easily won
the national title.
Immediately after Harding was
awarded her medal, the Interna-
tional Committee of the U.S. Figure
Skating Association appointed
Kerrigan to the Olympic team,
bumping national runner-up
Michelle Kwan to the alternate's
spot.
got underway this week in San
Antonio that if the proposal to
restore the 14th scholarship failed,
they would do more than simply
talk.
So now we apparently are go-
ing to have a boycott of some kind
or other beginning as early as Sat-
urday, the birthday of slain civil-
rights leader Martin Luther King
Jr. For all its symbolic value, the
coaches leading the boycott would
rather the rest of us focus specifi-
cally on what the defeated pro-
posal meant: One more scholar-
ship at each Division I school trans-
lates into 300-plus more opportu-
nities, most of which would be
snapped up by black kids in the
inner cities.
A long time ago, college schol-
arships were supposed to be the
means to a better life. Though ev-
erything else about the games has
changed, and the term student-
athlete has become an oxymoron,
some things have not changed.
"We have lost sight of the role
of athletics Georgetown coach
CHARLESWORTH
John Thompson told Newsday in
an interview. "This is a means of
survival for some kids
The NCAA vote, by a 191-119
margin, was not without symbolic
value of its own. When the presi-
dents commission took control of
the organization a few years ago,
its stated goal was to reign in col-
lege athletic departments with
their runaway budgets and re-
peated abuses.
Still, if we're going to priori-
tize � as CEOs like to say � it
only seems fair to start with those
who otherwise have the least op-
portunity. And besides, there's
always the chance that a handful
of the kids who go on to become
pros will take the lessons they
learned on campus about oppor-
tunity to heart.
After leaving before his se-
nior year and signing a multimil-
lion-dollar deal with the NBA's
Dallas Mavericks, Jamal
Mashbi i turned around and en-
dowed the University of Kentucky
with a $300,000 scholarship.
Continued
from
Page 11
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in essence, a practice player, you
could look at Danielle and nine out
of 10 times she would have a bas-
ketball in her hand, trying to im-
prove her game and get ready for
this season
When asked to give a view on
her own strengths and weaknesses,
Charlesworth stated, "My quick-
ness and ball-handling skills offset
my height disadvantage, since I'm
only 5-foot-3
Thompson agreed, noting that
"Danielle's only weakness is her
height, and that will only factor into
the game when she is matched up
against a much taller point guard
In the classroom, Charlesworth
is a junior majoring in education,
and minoring in mathematics. She
is also considering a double major
in these areas.
At her present pace, Danielle
Charlesworth will be a well-known
name in Greenville for years to
come.
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 13, 1994
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 13, 1994
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.982
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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