The East Carolinian, December 2, 1993






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on page 2.
Lifestyle
Get into the spirit!
I f you 're gonna be in the
NC mountains over
break, stop through
Chimney Rock and see
Santa and his helpers.
Story on page 9.
Today
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Tomorrow
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The East Carolinian
VoL 68 No. 70
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
AIDS victim dreams for future
By Shannon Cooper
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Nan Hawkins, one of the two people to receive the Volunteer AIDS
award, poses with a poster version of the AIDS Awareness Day stamp.
Staff Writer
The AIDS virus has infected
10 to 12 million people world-
wide. Closer to home in NC, 15,000
to 20,000 are infected with the HIV
virus. Pitt County took part in a
worldwide AIDS Day celebration
on Dec. 1 in recognition of the
millions of people infected with
the AIDS virus. The first "AIDS
Awareness" postage stamp was
unveiled as part of the AIDS Day
celebration. Present at the unveil-
ing was Nan Hawkins, one of the
two people awarded the Volun-
teer AIDS award. AIDS Day ac-
tivities were sponsored by the Pitt
County AIDS Service Organiza-
tion. PIC ASO ia a volunteer asso-
ciation that has played a large role
in making Pi tt County more aware
of the AIDS pandemic.
The celebration ended with
a candlelight vigil and march from
Jarvis Methodist Church to the
Town Commons. Ron Kimble,
Greenville City Manager, Dr. Tho-
mas L. Walker and Dr. Tim Mon-
roe, President elect of PICASOand
Director of the Pitt County Health
Center were some of the speakers
present for the AIDS vigil. Volun-
teering and partnership against the
spread of AIDS along with pre-
vention and education were the
main focuses of the vigil.
"We want to realize that as
individuals, what a difference we
can make in the hopes of working
with HTV and helping to educate
others Susan Kellerman, PIC ASO
Chairperson of the Education Sub-
committee, said.
One in every 250 people in
the U.S. are infected with AIDS
virus. AIDS is the third leading
cause of death in adults from 25 to
44 years of age.
"To lead this crusade we
must be concerned with this be-
cause it is an economic issue, social
issue and one that we all must be
concerned with Kimble said.
The theme of this year's AIDS
Day is "A Time to Act "The theme
this year is a challenge, the chal-
lenge goes out to governments,
communities and individuals. The
challenge is for us to set aside old
habits of complacency, denial and
discrimination Tim Monroe, Di-
rector of the Pitt County Health
Center and President elect of
PICASO,said.
Rick O'Neil, a volunteer with
the PICASO agency, discovered
that he had AIDS in 1991. O'Neil
gives a messageof hope and wants
to spread that hope to other vic-
tims of the AIDS virus.
"When I close my eyes for
the last time, I want to know that
people like you will continue to
fight. I dream of a world with no
AIDS and no cancer; a world of
love and peace. If we can't come to
that in my lifetime I hope we can
do it yours O'Neil said.
Art School
re-accredited
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
The ECU School of Art has
been approved for accreditation by
the Na tional Associa tion of Schools
of Art and Design.
This recognition gives ECU
the distinction of 30 straight years of
accreditation. "Thirty straight years
of accreditation is a singular honor
said Michael A. Dorsey, dean of the
School of Art. "ECUistheonlyschool
in North Carolina to have this dis-
tinction
ECU competed with 79
schools also looking for accredita-
tion this fall, and was selected along
with 26 other schools for this recog-
nition. The accreditation process re-
quires an extensive self-study re-
port and an on-site evaluation.
"When the committee
votesthey will grant commenda-
tion in areas of excellence said
Dorsey.
ECU was recognized in the
areasof faculty dedicationand train-
ing, quality of sendee, diversity of
programs, internships, student work
in metal design, wood design, draw-
ing, painting, ceramics, sculpture,
fibers and communication arts, in-
stitutional funding for facility im-
provement, new equipment and
support for graduate students.
ECUalso impressed theevalu-
ationteam withitsprompt response
to problem areas. As a result of the
evaluation the school will make
some changes in curriculum and
safety, and upgrade the facilities.
The first project is a ventila-
tion refurbishment inside the build-
ing. Theassodationalsoconsidered
the entire university when it evalu-
ated the general education require-
ments of the art majors curriculum.
"The recognition offers pres-
tige and honor to ECU students
Dorsey said. "When an evaluator
from the outside grants a recogni-
tion that covers all areas from fac-
ulty to facilities students can feel
some security about the program
DA issues report on spray death
CONCORD, N.C (AP) �
Concord police officers used no
excessive force during the arrest
of a man who died after being
sprayed with pepper gas, the dis-
trict attorney said today.
In a 13-page report, District
Attorney Bill Kenerly said Angelo
Robinson, whose arrest and death
on July 11 triggered rioting in Con-
cord, did not die because of crimi-
nal negligence.
Robinson died while in po-
lice custody after officers used
pepper spray to subdue the 308-
pound former Concord High
School and college football player.
He was taken into custody
to be charged with disorderly con-
d uct and assault on a government
official at the Waffle House on
U.S. 29, Kenerly said. Robinson
died after being taken by police to
the county jail entrance and then
to Concord police headquarters.
It was reported that officers
tried to resuscitate Robinson.
Eleven minutes transpired be-
tween Robinson's arrival at po-
lice headquarters and when an
ambulance was called, according
to police radio transcripts.
The 24-year-old's death
touched off a riot in the predomi-
nantly black Logan Community,
during which more than $130,000
in property damage was caused,
a convenience store was burned
and several officers and
firefighters were injured by bricks
and debris thrown at them.
A week-long state-of-emer-
gency throughout Concord fol-
lowed.
Mary Blakeney, chairman of
the human relations committee of
the Concord-Cabarrus County
Chamber of Commerce, called for
a calm resolution, but also criti-
cized the findings.
"I think it (the report) is an
outrageous miscarriage of justice,
See PEPPER page 5
Threat of Brady prompts widespread gun sales
CONCORD,N.H. (AP)�For
Alan H. Marcotte, there are only 90
shopping days left until Brady.
As President Clinton signed
into law the Brady bill, with its
restrictions on weapons purchases,
Marcotte, his son, and gun enthusi-
asts nationwide went shopping
Tuesday.
Effective Feb. 28, the new law
will require a five-day waiting pe-
riod and background check for gun
purchasers.
"I wouldn't be here today if
the bill had not passed the 60-
year-old Marcotte, who has owned
guns since he was 12, said as he and
his son checked the goods at Riley's
Sport Shop.
"It's the principle of the
thing Marcotte said, as he picked
out a handgun. "We want to enjoy
the freedom and right before the
government takes them a way from
us
The Brady bill and the crime
bill moving through Congress have
convinced weapons enthusiasts
that they had better get their guns
while they can.
"There's some panic buying
See GUNS page 5
It's a
Griswald
Christmas
just in case any
of you haven't
gotten into the
Christmas spirit
yet (yea, we
know,it's hard
with exams and
all), you can go
by this house on
Porter Town Rd.
outside of
Greenville and
catch a little.
Ho! Ho! Ho!
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
Thursday, December 2,1993
16 Pages
World marks
AIDS Day
(AP) Australians dimmed
lights on landmark buildings
today, Princess Diana had a
ticket to an AIDS fund-raising
rock concert in London and in
Bangkok nurses sold yellow
roses.
Even in China, where the
usual attitude is to ignore AIDS
as a foreign problem, the health
ministry called a meeting of
medical specialists to mark
World AIDS Day.
Governments called for
better education and preven-
tion, and individuals mourned
loved ones lost to AIDS.
The World Health Orga-
nization estimates that 13 mil-
lion people worldwide are in-
fected with the human immu-
nodeficiency virus, or HIV,
which causes AIDS. It says that
figure may triple within seven
years.
Diana's support for AIDS
causes underlined the high pro-
file that AIDS has long had in
Western countries.
In much of Asia, where
many experts fear the epidemic
could reach explosive propor-
tions, cultural taboos have ham-
pered open discussion. But that
is beginning to change.
Nurses sold roses in the
Thailand capital, where a flour-
ishing sex trade has helped
spread the virus, to publicize
the risks.
China's vice minister of
health Yin Dakui was quoted
by the official Xinhua News
Agency as telling the medical
meeting, "It is very important
for Chinese to raise their aware-
ness of AIDS
It was more than a plati-
tude. According to a survey in
Yunnan province, one-third of
government workers, doctors
and police did not know
whether the AIDS virus could
be transmitted by shaking
hands or having a meal with an
HIV-positive person.
In the Philippines, where
the government has clashed
with the Roman Catholic hier-
archy over AIDS prevention
and family planning, thou-
sands of people flocked to
Manila's financial district for
a parade and rally.
Health secretary Juan
Flavier appeared wearing a
red T-shirt emblazoned with
"Red Alert, Stop Aids
Characters costumed as
a condom and a skeleton
capered in the crowd, while
air force helicopters dropped
red confetti.
In Japan, which has also
tended to label AIDS a for-
eign problem, celebrities in-
cluding a popular woman
professional wrestler handed
out information to commut-
ers in train stations.
Hong Kong, a British
colony, began offering HIV
tests in 1985.
Even so, prevention ef-
forts have been frustrated by
a reluctance, especially
among older people, to dis-
cuss sex. Traditional taboos
also apply; homosexuality
was only recently decrimi-
nalized.
As elsewhere,
underreporting of AIDS cases
is common in many parts of
Asia.
In conservative, over-
whelmingly-Muslim Indone-
sia, the health minister says
there are fewer than 200 HIV
carriers � but other officials
say the number may be 100
times that.
In India, the rapid
spread of AIDS has slowly
overcome a traditional reluc-
tance to talk openly about sex.
Today, a major Indian news-
paper for the first time printed
a graphic sketch illustrating
condom use.
The WHO and local so-
cial groups have fanned out
in the seedy slums of Bombay
and Calcutta, where prosti-
tutes and drug addicts are
most at risk.
Health experts warn
that AIDS could be an eco-
nomic catastrophe for India,
a nation of 880 million people
with a per capita income of
only $360.
Examination Schedule
Time Class Regularly Meets Time and Day of Examination
8:00 MWF11:00-1:00, Tuesday, December 14
8:00 TTH8:00 -10:00, Monday, December 13
9:00 MWF2:00 - 4:00, Wednesday, December 8
9:00 TTH2:00 - 4:00, Thursday, December 9
10:00 MWF 2:00 - 4:00, Friday, December 10
10:00 TTH2:00 - 4:00, Tuesdav, December 14
11:00 MWF2:00 - 4:00, Monday, December 13
11:00 TTH2:00 - 4:00, Wednesday, December 15
12:00 MWF8:00 -10:00, Wednesday, December 8
12:00 TTH8:00 -10:00, Thursday, December 9
1:00 MWF8:00 -10:00, Friday, December 10
1:00 TTH11:00 -1:00, Wednesday, December 15
2:00 MWF8:00 -10:00, Tuesday, December 14
2:00 TTH8:00 - 10:00, Wednesday, December 15
3:00 MWF11:00 -1:00, Wednesday, December 8
3:00 TTH11:00 -1:00, Thursday December 9
4:00 MWF11:00- 1:00, Friday, December 10
4:00TTH 11:00-1:01). Mnnrlav Dprpmhpr 13


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olinian
December 2, 1993
vrouncf Othei
Deaf man committed for 68 yrs.
State dawdling to remove him from isolation
Insensitive perhaps, but T-shirts are free speech
A fraternity has won a battle against University of Califor-
nia-Riverside administrators who ordered the Phi Kappa Sigma
chapter disbanded for three years after members sported T-shirts
that demeaned Mexicans. On the advice of university attorneys,
UC-Riverside officials decided to settle a lawsuit filed by the
fraternity before the case went to court, said Jack Chappell,
director of universitv relations. As part of that settlement, two
administrators who ordered the discipline against the fraternity
- will be briefed by attorneys about recent rulings in the area of free
speech. "People need to realize that the campus is a marketplace
of free ideas, and that includes the rotten fruit as well as the good
and nourishing food Chappell said. "Even repulsive expression
is protected
Groups serve older students' needs
Returning to college can be a frightening experience for an
adult, but there are organizations on campuses across the country
designed to help these non-traditional students make the neces-
sary adjustments to college life. According to the Department of
Education statistics for the fall 1991 semester, 4.1 million of all
undergraduate college students are above the age of 25. Carla
Warner, director of the Center for Adult Programs and Services at
Eastern Tennessee University, defined adult students as anyone
23 years or older, but said there are a lot of exceptions. Some of the
non-traditional students are younger than 23 and have families.
"It's more about what their responsibilities are, not their chrono-
logical age she said.
Alcohol not limited at DU
Resident students at Duquesne University are not limited to
:72 cans of beer per week as reported in the school's newspaper,
: The Duquesne Duke. In fact, resident students 21 years old and
� older have unrestricted alcohol privileges, campus officials said,
I refuting a story about a new alcohol policy restricting the amount
" of alcohol allowed in the residence hall that was printed on the
front page of the paper's Sept. 30 issue. A statement made by the
resident director saving he would question students who check in
more than three cases of alcohol per week, or three bottles of
liquor per week, was taken out of context, campus officials said.
The statement was not meant to limit students, said the Rev. Sean
Hogan, executive vice president of student affairs.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP)
� Despite the state's promise
more than a year ago to make
amends, a deaf man remains
where he has been for 68 years
� isolated in a state psychiatric
hospital � even though he is
not mentally ill.
State officials have been
slow to move 97-year-old unius
Wilson to a cottage on the
grounds of Cherry Hospital, a
sprawling psychiatric complex
in Goldsboro that once was an
insane asylum for black people.
Wilson's guardian, John
Wasson, and his lawyer, Paul
Pooley, say state officials are
dragging their feet on a year-
old legal agreement. A state of-
ficial says removing lead paint
from the cottage and finding
money for the $62,000 renova-
tion slowed the project.
Regardless of the cause,
time is running short for the man
who has lived in a silent world
at Cherry since Nov. 21, 1925.
"Anyone who's 97 years
old, I think you measure their
life in minutes � not in days
said Wasson, assistant director
for social work with the New
Hanover County Department of
Social Services. "I'm very dis-
turbed by this whole thing
Wilson was 29 when he
was sent to the hospital. He had
been found incompetent to
stand trial on an attempted rape
charge. Two years later, he was
castrated. Eventually, the charge
was dropped, but Wilson re-
mained locked in the insane asy-
I The Case or the Ten Beers
i TheEastCarolinian conducted a survey designed to study perceptions
ofalcohol on the ECU campus. During the period that surveys were given
� out, The East Carolinian received a total of 133 surveys, from which we
I j � -y-I- ���i,�,�i;(wi� thatikipTPncttcompleted fullv.
I
used 126 as our sample, throwing out seven thatwere not completed fully.
The below percentages in no way represent a true sample of heECU
lpopulation.Inthespiritofunbiasedreporting,TheEastCarolinianleaves
any conclusions up to the individual reader. We only hope to promote a
I greaterawareness of the impact alcohol has on theECb campus.
I 1. What is your gender?
; a. Female
� b. Male
� 2. What is your classification in
J school?
i a. Freshman
j b. Sophomore
t c. Junior
j d. Senior
, e. Graduate
I 3. Which statement describes your
situation?
i a. I am not a member of a
j Greek organization.
I b. I am a sorority
i member.
J c. I am a fraternity
member.
� 4. Dui Ing the past 30 days, on how
J many days did you have at least one
� drink of alcohol?
a. 0 days
b. 1 to 2 days
I c. 3 to 5 days
d. 6 to 10 days
I e. More than 10 days
I 5. During the past 30 days, on how
I many days did you have 5 or more
� drinks of alcohol in a row within a
couple of hours?
a. 0 days
b. 1 to 2 days
c. 3 to 5 days
d. 6 to 10 days
e. More than 10 days
Which statement best describes
I your perception of alcohol
consumption on the ECU campus
� before you came to campus?
a. The amount of alcohol
I
I
I
I
I
I
consumed on the ECU campus is
I not different from other campuses
j b. Alcohol consumption on
� the ECU campus is greater than
I
consumption on other campuses. 11
d. 1 do not remember
e. I have no opinion
c. Alcohol consumption on
I the ECU campus is less than
consumption on other campuses
I
I
I
I1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
7. Which statement best describes
your perception of alcohol
consumption on the ECU campus
after you came to campus?
a. The amount of alcohol
consumed on the ECU campus is
not different from other campuses.
b. Alcohol consumption
on the ECU campus is greater than
consumption on other campuses.
c. Alcohol consumption on
the ECU campus is less than
consumption on other campuses.
d. I do not remember.
e. I have no opinion.
8. Which statement best describes
your consumption of alcohol since
coming to ECU?
a. The amount I drink has
not changed.
b. I drink less alcohol.
c. I drink more alcohol.
d. I don't drink alcohol.
9. Which statement best describes
you?
a. I read The East Carolinian
2 times a week.
b.Iread The East Carolinian
1 time a week.
c. I do not read The East
Carolinian.
10. Each week for 12 weeks, 12
characters told a story about alcohol.
How many of these
"advertisements" did you read in
The East Carolinian?
a. 1 did not read the
advertising campaign.
b. I read less than 6 of the
advertisements.
c. I read more than 6 of the
advertisements.
d.I read all 12
advertisements.
Do you feel that the method
used in "The Case of the Ten Beers"
was effective in its intended
message and its intended audience?
a. Yes
b. No
a.
3.
a. 48
b. 52
a. 7
b. 18
c. 33
d. 39
e. 2
a. 75
b. 10
c. 15
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
17
21
32
�4
17
49
19
16
10
17
6. a. 48 8
7.
48
42
2
1
7
58
32
2
2
6
9.
a.
b.
c.
d.
a.
b.
c.
10. a.
b.
c
28
23
41
8
80
18
2
25
48
17
11
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CW��
A
SMinMrod liy:
Campos
challenge
lum, unable to hear or speak.
In 1990, a Cherry Hospital
social worker learned his his-
tory and decided to try to help
the strong, stocky man, who
looks much younger than he is.
Since he has regained some
ability to communicate, Wilson
has grown increasingly frus-
trated with the state's inaction,
Wasson said.
"He has said through sign-
ing that he wants to be off a
locked psychiatric geriatric
ward. That is what he wants
Wasson told the New Hanover
County Social Services Board on
Tuesday. My biggest fear is that
he has a stroke or dies before he
gets over there
With the threat of a law-
suit hanging over them, state
officials agreed in October 1992
to ensure Wilson's remaining
days would be unlike the past
68 years. Hospital officials have
trained the people who work
with Wilson to communicate
with him.
But the settlement also
called on state officials to move
him to an wrtroent. Off �
agreed in August that the hos-
pital would renovate a cottage
on the grounds for him to move
into by early October. That date
was changed to early December
because lead paint, which is
toxic, was found in the two-bed-
room cottage.
"It seems a little bit absurd
to worry about his lifelong ex-
posure to lead paint at this point
in his career Pooley said.
The project also was held
up by state officials' search for
$62,000 for the renovations, said
Steve Johnson, assistant chief for
mental health services.
Johnson says bids on the
renovation have been received
and construction should begin
soon.
Seagroves
trial ready to
begin
d. 10
. a. 63 -
b. 23
NA 14
n ATTIC
h 752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St
yVGreenville, NC
The
CoMedY
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear Live Music . �
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DURHAM (AP) � A 12-
member jury is in place and ready
to hear opening statements today
in the trial of a break-in victim
charged with killing one teen and
wounding another by shooting
them in the back as they fled his
home.
The case, which has racial
overtones because the defendant,
Michael Seagroves, 37, is white
and his victimsblack, willbeheard
by nine whites, two blacks and
one Asian. The jury was seated on
Tuesday.
Seagroves, who claims self-
defense, is charged with volun-
tary manslaughter in the death of
15-year-old JamalEvans Elliott on
March 18. The shooting occurred
after Seagroves encountered
Elliott and threeotherteensbreak-
ing into his home.
He is also charged with as-
sault with a deadly weapon and
inflicting serious injury, for
wounding Clifton Hester Taft
during the same incident.
Seagroves' defense is ex-
teen-age victims wereshotatclose
range as they attacked the resi-
dent, and that neither boy was
shot squarely in the back.
The surviving youths have
said they were running away from
Seagroves when he fired at them
with a .22-caliber rifle, reportedly
striking Elliott four times and Taft
twice.
Prospective jurors were in-
formed Tuesday that Seagroves
has no legal burden to prove that
he acted in self-defense. The bur-
den, rather, is on the state to prove
that he did not.
17 men settle
for $13 rrullion
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
(AP) � Seventeen men who ac-
cused a former Roman Catholic
priest of sexually abusing them as
children have agreed on a $13
millionsettlementattomeyssaid.
More than30plaintiffshave
sued the Archdiocese of Santa Fe,
claiming they were sexually
abused by priests as children.
Aboutl2priestshavebeennamed.
The settlement involves Ja-
son Sigler, who left the priesthood
in 1982 after being charged with
airninal sexual penetration of a
minor. Sigler pleaded guilty in
1983 in exchange for a deferred
sentence.
According totheagreement,
Sigler will make a videotaped
statement within five days, testi-
fying about how much the arch-
diocese and the Servants of the
Paraclete treatment center in
Jemez Springs knew about his
sexual problems and when they
knew it.
Bruce Pasternack, an Albu-
querque attorney representing the
accusers, said the damages will be
collected from eight insurance
companies.
Pasternack said Sigler has
filed claims against eight insur-
ance companies representing
priests who worked for the arch-
diocese and agreed to assign his
rights to those claims to the plain-
tiffs.
He said the insurance com-
paniesbreached their duty to pro-
vide Sigler with a defense against
lawsuits alleging sexual abuse.
The archdiocese sued sev-
eral insurance companies in Au-
gust, contending they wrongly
refused to pay claims stemming
from allegations of sexual mis-
conduct by priests.
Albuquerque attorney Ron
Koch, who represents Sigler, pre-
dicted the settlement would "fa-
cilitate a resolution of all the other
cases
The 17 plaintiffs will con-
tinue their six civil lawsuits in
state court against the Archdio-
cese of Santa Fe and the Servants
of the Paraclete.
Sigler, 55, met with 16 of his
accusers in Pasternack's office
Monday to apologize for his ac-
tions.
After the private meeting,
the 16 men held a news confer-
ence.
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December 2, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
Students chosen for program
: Women in Science Scholars prosram
about :
(nit1!1
gram. Two students, Rae i i
and Amy Norris wen
represent fast Carolina .it .i cer-
emony held at Glaxo in Raleigh
on Nov. 15.
The students were able to
observe current female scientists
and will both receive $1,000
scholarships. Glaxo has de-
signed the program to encour-
age present majors to continue
their education in the science
field.
Glaxo is utilizing a unique
method of involving females in
science by pairing each partici-
pant to a mentor female scientist
who will be available to give ad-
vice and encourage undergradu-
ate females in obtaining a degree
in science. Amv and Rae were
on w ith
axo, louring
hands on
in a ariety of jobs
ra Williams, Ph. Device
nt and chief information
i ilaxo Inc feels that,
of fields the
nts will encounter, a new
understanding ol science's role
in society may develop a variety
ol Styles in research of the fu-
ture.
Amy orris, a biology ma-
jor, was given the honor after
careful review. She is planning
to attend graduate school for
ecology. Because of her winning
this vear, Amv and Rae will be
given preference in renewing
their scholarships next year.
"Most departments began
by looking at top females said
Charles Bland, chair of the ECU
biologv department. "We are very
competitive in biology. We have
a number of good students
Rae Troiano is a geology and
German major. She feels that her
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mentor helped encourage her to
keep her options open and not
develop a negative attitude to-
wards the svstem.
"What was interesting was
that my mentor was from Scot-
land said Troiano. "There is
also an international aspect in-
volved
Grades were not the only
criteria for acceptance into the
program. Rae and Amy are both
involved in extracurricular ac-
tivities and have grade point av-
erages higher than 3.0.
Glaxo requires that each
candidate submit a letter stating
future plans and career goals. A
letter of recommendation was
also required.
ECU will receive an addi-
tional $25,000 which will be used
for future participants.
13-year-old honored for heroic effort
WILMINGTON (AP)�Thir-
teen-year-old Gabe Atkinson said
he is no hero.
But he was honored Monday
with a plaque from the New
Hanover County Sheriff's Depart-
ment for his heroic efforts this sum-
mer when he steered a car to the
side of the road a fter the driver had
a seizure.
"We like to recognize a good
deed like this New Hanover
County Sheriff Joseph McQueen
Jr. said.
Gabe, a friend and his friend's
mother were driving on a New
Jersey highway during a vacation
in July when the boy's mother had
a seizure and lost consciousness.
His friend grabbed the wheel
on one side and Gabe, who was in
the back seat, grabbed the other
side. The car had accelerated and
because the boys could not reach
the brake, thev steered the car to
the median.
By then, Gabe's mother, who
wasdriving another car just ahead,
noticed the car behind her swerv-
ing-
Susan Atkinson said, "I
looked back and saw an arm dan-
gling out the window and I turned
around
The boys managed to shift
the car into neutral while on the
median, but the car was still mov-
ing about 35 mph. Susan Atkinson
said she shouted for the boys to
switch off the ignition and Gabe
did.
"Some adults would have
panicked Sheriff Joseph
McQueen said. "Whathedidwas
good. He was thinking
If you thought you would skip the news
writer's meeting today. Captain Jean-
Luc Picard orders that you "reconsider
your decision (5:30 p.m.)
Great Selection � Great Prices
geodes
jewelry
rock samples
HOLIDAY
ROCK SALE
mineral crystals
polished stones
and much more!
in the central lobby of ECU's
Graham building
(between Whichard and Gen. Classroom)
Thursday December 2 from 8am to 5pm
Friday December 3 from 8am to 3pm
wwwwwyvwai
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RING IN THE
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:
2
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Combo
Includes small fry
and a regular drink
$1.99 i $3.49
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Checkers
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SEE IF
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THE
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AT YOU
MIDAS
TOUCH
BUYBACK BONUS PRIZES ARE AT YOUR FINGERTIP
Turn a simple game card into instant treasure.
Sell your books for cash and receive a free game
card with each transaction. Then apply your
goiden touch by simply scratching off the prize
area to see if you have the MIDAS TOUCH.
IT'S A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY!
We buy all books with current market value
PLAY THE MIDAS TOUCH STARTING DEC.8
30NVENIENT LOCATIONS
Wright Place Soda Shop
Dec.8-9&13-14 8:30am-7:00pm
Dec.10 8:30am-5:00pm
Dec. 11 11:00am-4:00pm
Dec. 15 8:30am-5:00pm
More than just books �I Your dollars support student scholars!
Wrisht Building � 757-6731
- ��� � ��. �





December 2, 1993
t bally attack at speech
recognizing World AIDS Day
do
Center, Clinton was interru
by a young man who accused
him of failing to live up to his
promises on AI LJ)S 'Slk k Willie
the man shouted. " The Republi-
cans were right. It's time to put
up or shut up, Bill "
The president stood motion-
less and listened. The outburst
lasted about a minute before the
man was ushered out by security
guards.
Clinton said he was not
bothered by the incident, which
occurred after the president had
visited with AIDS patients. He
said he would rather have the
man "screaming at me than have
given up
"Part of my job is to be a
lightning rod the president said.
"Part of my job is to lift the
hopes and aspirations of the
American people, knowing that
as long as you try to lift hopes and
lift aspirations, you can never
fully close the gap between what
you're reaching for and what
you're actually doing and know-
ing for sure that there's no way I
can now keep everybody alive
who already has AIDS
Health Secretary Donna
Shalala and Surgeon General
Joycelyn Elders donned aprons
and dished out scrambled eggs
and sausages to homeless men
fighting both poverty and the
deadly infection.
At Georgetown Medical
Center, Clinton visited with sev-
eral AIDS victims, including
� and hoping
priate lots of
be done
1 ater, in his speech, Clinton
said the nation must fight every
day against AID "The purpose
oi this day is to remind us that
our attitudes, behavior and pas-
sion should be revved up the
president said.
At that point, the unidenti-
fied AIDS activist ran down the
aisle toward the president, stop-
ping about 50 feet from him.
"One year, lots of talk, no
action the protestor shouted.
Clinton did not appear
ruffled by the outburst. "It's
alright. It's alright he assured
the crowd, some of whom reacted
angrily toward the demonstra-
tor.
The administration says that
in less than a year it has boosted
AIDS research by 21 percent and
sharply increased support for pro-
grams like the Health Care for the
Homeless project that Shalala and
Elders visited.
On Tuesday, Shalala an-
nounced the formation of a task
force of government, industry,
academia and activist groups to
speed the search for new drugs to
fight the disease that has already
killed 204,000 Americans.
Shalala sat down to break-
fast beside Maxwell Wedge, 32,
who told her that life on thestreets
with the HIV infection is "very
stressful. It's very depressing
"It's like an everyday war.
You get depressed and angry.
Some days I'm angry with the
whole world he said.
Marvin Faulker, 29, com-
plained of long waits togethous-
ing. "We don't have a long time
he said.
Gary Myers, 43, com-
plained that because he quali-
fied for regular Social Security
disability and gets more than
S500 a month, he is ineligible for
Medicaid and has no health in-
surance.
Elders told the homeless
men, Til always be out there as
your surgeon general fighting for
you
At a Justice Department cer-
emony, Attorney General Janet
Reno said the Justice Department
is enforcing the Americans with
Disabilities Act to combat dis-
crimination against AIDS vic-
tims, saying: "The days of fear
and prejudice are ending
Phi Sigma Pi honor fraternity bikes
for bucks for Heart Association
By Jennifer Jenkins
Staff Writer
Phi Sigma Pi is now biking
tor bucks. Recently, 40 brothers
in the fraternity rode 385 miles
on stationary bikes. The Bike
for Bucks-a-thon was held at
Cycle Center on Arlington Bou-
levard, and raised over SI,500.
Kelly Kellis, Phi Sigma Pi's
ways and means chairperson,
telt that "the event was very suc-
cessful and we hope that the
fraternity will continue this ac-
tivity in the future The money
the fraternity earned will go to
the American Heart Association
and Phi Sigma Pi. The frater-
nity will use the money for gen-
eral purposes and needs of the
organization.
The bike-a-thon, co-spon-
sored by Cycle Center, lasted
from 4 a.m. until 9 p.m. Brothers
of the fraternity rode on two
stationary bicycles that Cycle
Center provided for them.
Ashlev Neal believes "everyone
in the fraternity had a great time
and everything was for a good
cause
25 Off
ANY GIFT ITEM
AT REGULAR PRICE
Picture Frames, Glassware,
Appliances, Jewelry, Candles, Wood
Crafts, Stuffed Toys, Timex Watches
'Fragrances Excluded
Guoy � Competitive Pnces � Service
I One coupon per customer. This sale excludes any sale
(merchandise, cigarettes, Pepsi and Coke products,
prescriptions, fountain merchandise or any OTC
I products. Coupon expires December 24, 1993.
911 Dickinson Ave. �I
752-7105
1700 W. 6th Street 2
758-4104
2301 Stantonsburg Rd. �3
757-1076
1631 S.E. Greenville Blvd. 4
752-0030
Each brother got dona-
tions and sponsors from the
community of Greenville and
the local businesses. Local
businesses also donated vari-
ous items to the fraternity to
help them through their 12
hour day.
"The Bike for Bucks was
truly successful and we would
definitely like to try it again in
the future said Howard
Tucker, the owner of Cycle
Center.
e&ec
SKI TRIP
FEBRUARY 5 & 6
$120 FOR STUDENTS
$130 FOR FACULTY.
STAFF. & GUESTS
Register by:
Friday, January 21
In room 117 Christenbury Gym
ECU provides: transportation, odqnq in Waynesboro.
VA. and lift tickets for day & night skiing.
YOU provide: skis (rent in Greenville or
Wintergreen). ski clothes, and rrieal money.
Call ECU Recreational Services at 757-6387 for more details.
Sneak Preview
Student Union Films Committee
presents a sneak preview
screening of a new major motion
picture from Columbia Films
Geronimo
An American Legend
Monday, December 6
at
8:00pm, Hendrix Theater
Starring: Jason Patric, Robert Duvall,
Gene Hackman, and Wes Studi
as Geronimo
Pick up FREE tickets at the Discovery
Booth at Mendenhall or the Student
Store on Friday, Dec. 3
and Monday, Dec. 6
mAowa oct to w - iq
Sponsored by S.U. Films Committee
MSSHMSISl
CLASSICS NIGHT
with the best in classic Rock &C Dance Music
& (X DRAFT EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT!
THURSDAY
FLASH BACK
$1.00 Domestics, $1.00 House HiBalls & $2.75 Pitchers
with the Best in Rock, Dance & Disco from the 70s to the
Current Hits.1.00 Members $3.00 Guests.
FRIDAY
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for Members & Greek ID's.
Reduced guest Admission 7-9. $50 Prize to the Fraternity &
Sorority with the Best Attendance Before 9.
Bar Specials All Nite Every Friday.
SATURDAY
Kick off football season with Coors Light!
$1.50 Zimas, $1.5016oz Coors Lights, & $3.00 Noxzima
Every Saturday!
Come Early
E
Monday Night
"Reading Day �vc"
Come en out one! gel the some specials os Saturday Night
i





December 2, 1993
The East Carolinian 5
Planned Giving gets new prez

-

the meetings.
"1 feel quite honored that my
peers across the state respect mv
ability enough to elect me a presi-
dent Ball said. "The past presi-
dents have been from University of
NorthCarolina atChapel Hill, N:orth
Carolina State University and Wake
Forest. Membership recognizes that
my program at ECU is heading to
the same league
Planned Giving is a gift to a
charitable institution where there is
GUNS
planning involved. Profes-
ttorneys accountants,
� tc I work with clients and
advise them in making decisions
that best tit their interests. Large
arships, fellowships or aca-
demic enrichment funds going to
departments for research are ex-
amples of Planned Giving's contri-
butions.
The North Carolina Planned
Giving Council has two main pur-
poses. The primary purpose is for
these professionals to educate cli-
ents on estate and financial tech-
niques to maximize 'heir clients'
gifts.
In turn, their clients could re-
ceive an income or their gift could
be tax deductible. The other pur-
pose is to promote philanthropy in
North Carolina using Planned Giv-
Continued from page 1
ing techniques.
Ball joined ECU's staff in 1986,
already being a native of Green-
ville. Ball also serves as the legal
counsel to The ECU Foundation,
Inc. Ball directs the planned giving
efforts of ECU through the Division
of Institutional Advancement.
Ball is also a member of the
National Association of College and
University Attorneys, theN. C. State
Bar, the N.C. Bar Association and
thePittCounty Bar Association. Ball
is also associated with the Green-
ville law firm of Colombo, Kitchin
and Johnson.
"Bali is a representative to all
of our alumni. ECU is very fortu-
nate to have his expertise here
said Charlie Flayer, associate vice-
chancellor for institutional advance-
ment. "To have someone as a part
of the counsel and a part of ECU
speaks highly of the university
PEPPER
Continued from page 1
going on Riley's salesman Ron
Hakim said. "There's no doubt
about it
Bill Perkins, manager of Da vis
Center Shooting Sports in Louis-
ville, Ky said the bill has been great
for business.
"Peopleareafraid.Thevdon't
want their name on papers that go
to the government he said. "Big
Brother already knows too much.
They don't want these guns traced
to them because they're afraid the
government will eventually use this
to take the guns away
The Brady bill's effect on gun
buyers is not as great in states that
already have waiting periods, such
as California, New York and New
Jersey.
"State laws here make the
Brady bill look like nothing said
Frank Caso, owner of Caso's Gun-
A-Rama Inc. in Jersey City, N.J. "It
won't mean anything here
The pending crime bill is in-
creasing gun sales even in states
with waiting periods.
Don Davis, owner of several
Indiana gun stores, said there has
not been much increase in handgun
sales because of the state's seven-
day waiting period. But gun dis-
tributors have gone on a buying
spree for AK-47s and other assault
weapons because they expect Con-
gress to ban the weapons next year,
he said.
"Those guns, the ammunition
that feeds those guns, have all been
swallowed up because of the Brady
bill Davis said. "People are gam-
bling that the crowd in Congress
are sic going to come to their senses
and ban them
John Marker, owner of the
Black Hills Trading Post in Rapid
City, S.D said he has sold about 35
assault weapons a week since the
Senate voted to ban them as part of
the crime bill.That'sabouta tenfold
increase in sales horn a year ago, he
said.
"They're buying them while
they can Marker said. "It's an in-
vestor item. They're better thahCDs
(bank certificates of deposit)
He sold one for $2,500 and
several for $1,500. Most sales are in
the $700 range.
and of course I was not surprised
at the outcome of the report
Blakeney said. "All along, since it
has taken such a long time, I felt
this would be the end result
But Blakeney added thatcivil
disobedience will not help the situ-
ation.
Police Chief Bob Cansler
called in the SBI to investigate and
put three officers on desk duties
until the investigation was com-
pleted. The SBI's findings in a
1,250-page report went directly to
Kenerly to determine if there were
grounds to file criminal charges
against the three officers.
Cansler also discontinued
use of pepper spray in his depart-
ment following the Aug. 30 re-
lease of the state Medical
Examiner's report on Robinson,
which stated that pepper spray
brought about bronchial spasms
that led to Robinson's death by
asphyxia.
That report was the first in
the nation that medically linked
pepper spray as a leading factor
contributing to death. Medical re-
sults showed Robinson also had a
.14 blood alcohol equivalent on
the breathalyzer scale, a trace of
caffeine in his system, food and
vomit were found in his lungs,
and the walls of his lungs to have
been chronically inflamed. No
other natural disease was found,
Kenerly said.
Kenerly said Robinson re-
fused to be arrested by officer
Jimmy Maner. Maner and Officer
Brandon Eggleston tried to lake
physical control to handcuff
Robinson, who then pulled
away from the officers.
The two officers sprayed
Robinson with the pepperspray
several times Kenerly said
Robinson had difficulty seeing,
"walked away from the officers
while shielding his face and us-
ing his shirt to wipe the spray
from his face
Robinson threw a punch
at Maner after the officer at-
tempted to use his baton to sub-
due Robinson, the report states.
With a large crowd gath-
ering, Robinson jerked away
from Eggleston and said, If
you mace me again, I'm gonna
kick your ass Kenerly said.
yS-l
Ed
iiiiiiiiiiii
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting applications for
SYSTEMS MANAGER
The candidate's responsibilities and
qualifications would include:
A 'Ensuring that computer hardware
I
and software are working correctly,
being responsible for troubleshooting minor software
problems, or resolve problems by calling the appropriate
service personnel
�Managing The East Carolinian's network server
�Developing training and orientation sessions about
computer software for new staff members
�Be enrolled as a student at East Carolina University
�Have and maintain a minimum of a 2.0 grade point average
while employed at The East Carolinian
�Be able to determine the newspaper's production needs and
keep an up-to-date inventory of
equipment, parts, and supplies
�Have extensive knowledge of
Apple Macintosh hardware (CPUs,
LaserWriters, modems, scanners,
monitors, wiring, etc.) and software (networking, desktop
publishing & word processing applications, graphic &
telecommunications software)
� Applications are available at The East Carolinian office
located on the second floor of the Students Pubs building
$3.95
LUNCH SPECIALS
MONDAY
Chicken Fajita Salad or Tortillas de Toro
- TUESDAY
Chicken philly mex or beef caldo
WEDNESDAY
ENCHILADA SUISA OR PHILLY MEX SANDWICH
THURSDAY
STEAK PICADO OR ENSALADA DE PAPAS WITH SOUP
FRIDAY
BEEF BURRnO OR CHICKEN PICADO
Mwctoan Restaurant
521 COTANCHE ST. DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 7571666
ALL ABC PERMITS OPEN DAILY FOR LUNCH
WE'RE
BROW
Try Captain D's Broiled Dinners
Chicken Cnoose from broiled
t chicken, fish or shrimp.
FlSn A" dinners include rice,
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KIDS EAT FREE
ON THURSDAY!
Age 10 years and younger.
Limit 2 with each adult dinner nt
reg. price. Dining room only.
SUPER SENIOR
WEDNESDAY
ANY DINNER fc9 9Q
Plus FREE Drink O
(Excludes Platters and Packs) (Age 60 and Over)

SEAFOOD
626 South Memorial Drive Greenville
nniHMnnai





The East Carolinian
Page 6
Opinion
December 2, 1993
The East Carolinian
Lindsa Fernandez Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege Advertising Director
Karen Hassell, .v. � i Editor
Maureen Rich, ts� � Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson, Asst. Sport Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham. Account Executive
Kelly kellis Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Printed on
100 recycled paper
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Nations reflect on World AIDS Day
Once � not very long ago � even
those of us in Generation X lived our lives
without a disease called Aquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome. Now this disease
(more readily identifiable as AIDS) is the
number one killer of American men aged
25 to 44 and the eighth biggest killer over-
all.
The figures are bleak: AIDS has
claimed more than 200,000 American lives;
HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) has in-
fected an estimated 13 million people
worldwide (The World Health Organi
zation assesses that this figure will
triple within seven years); it is es-
timated that 92 Americans die by
the hands of AIDS every day. And
there doesn't seem to be a cure in
sight. This deadly disease that fails
to discriminate is parent to interna-
tional recognition on Dec. 1, aptly
named World AIDS Day. This year
marks the fifth annual World AIDS
Day.
It is unfortunate that AIDS
has grown into such a decisive
factor in human lives that time
must be set aside for reflection
on the thousands of lives it has
stolen, that we as human beings
must hold international meetings on strat-
egy towards its demise, and that some
people still can't get it through their heads
that AIDS is not a gay disease.
Lights were dimmed around the globe
Wednesday as a symbol of grief and hope.
More than 5,000 groups participated in
blackouts, including 15-minute darkenings
of skylines in New York, Seattle and San
Francisco. Local events included a candle-
light march and vigil sponsored by Pitt
County AIDS Service Organization and
ECU Peer Health Educators.
There is even a 29-cent stamp featur-
ing the well-recognized red ribbon � the
symbol of AIDS awareness and compas-
sion � that went on sale Wednesday in
conjunction with World AIDS Day events.
After the slack attention of the Reagan
and Bush administrations, the Clinton ad-
ministration, while still being heavily criti-
cized, has done more for the epidemic in
terms of increased spending on re-
search and development.
The administration Tuesday
announced a plan to marshal
forces in an effort to speed up
the AIDS fight. A 15-member
task force taken from govern-
ment, the pharmaceutical indus-
try, medicine and AIDS sufferers
is intended to accelerate discovery
of drugs to combat AIDS and cut
the red tape for approval.
Perhaps the two most im-
portant things to remember
in light of the worldwide re-
flection, is to, first of all, act
responsibly in terms of your
lifestyle choices. Don't engage
i n any sexual activity without the use
of a condom with Nonoxinal-9 and never
share hypodermic needles. Secondly, show
compassion for those who are HIV posi-
tive or have AIDS. AIDS doesn't only effect
them, it can effect you andor a loved one.
You are not immune.
Look inside yourself and find some
humaneness � after all, we are in this to-
gether.
By Laura Wright
Holidays harbor heaps of half-baked hoopla
Since the end of the semes-
ter is just around the corner, let
me take this opportunity to wish
everyone the best of luck on ex-
ants. I am beginning to feel that
enfl-of-the-semester panic. You
know the kind that I mean? The
kind where you are so stressed
out and have so much to do that
you can't really do anything ex-
cept think about how much you
have to do and how stressed out
you are?
Holidays require that we
observe and respect
certain traditions and
those traditions, I
believe, are the reasons
why so many people
commit suicide over the
holidays.
I was
going to take
this, oppor-
tunity to re-
flect upon
the past sev-
eral months,
butmymind
is too occu-
pied to re-
in e m b e r
what's hap-
pened. I vaguely recall getting a
parking ticket
One event that is still very
clear in my memory is Thanks-
giving. On the ride home, as usual,
the traffic was from Hell and at
home, the food was same stuff-
ing, different year. My soul for
some variety!
Basically, I dread Thanks-
giving. I don't know when I
stopped watching those redun-
dant parades, realized that cran-
berry sauce is slimy and gave up
on the "day after" mall scene, but
somewhere along the way, my
holiday perception changed.
Now, I'm not knocking ev-
erything about Thanksgiving; I
think that it's still a time to be
with friends and family, a time to
III IIIM MLMMII 11 �j,y.WIMBlaiIIPMI,BIJLiMigJWPJWS
be close to those who love you, and
a time to share a traditional turkey
dinner. I think that's great.
Unless you happen to be a
turkey. Or�as is true with me�
you are a vegetarian in a house
where no one understands or re-
spects that decision.
A friend suggested that I
mold a turkey out of tofu. This
wasn't a bad idea because it's pos-
sible to make that stuff taste like
just about any-
thing if you
know how. Un-
fortunately, I
don't and, any-
way, such an at-
tempt to break
with tradition
would have
been met with
disdain. As
usual, I put a
meager helping of turkey on my
plate but I didn't eat it.
Since I always sit at the
"children's table" (the children's
table is reserved for my 26-year-
old cousin, Kevin, my 18-year-old
sister, Lee Ann and 23-year-old me),
it was easy to fake eating meat.
After the meal, I snuck into the
kitchen and put my turkey in the
fridge with the rest of the leftovers.
All of this for the preservation of
appearances and the maintenance
of tradition.
Holidays require that we ob-
serve and respect certain traditions
and those traditions, I believe, are
the reasons why so many people
commit suicide over the holidays.
People associate a lot of complex
emotions with the memories that
are evoked during familiar holi-
day happenings.
I did notice that new holiday
traditions are taking place while
others are disappearing. For in-
stance, have you heard Adam
Sandler's turkey song? Every time
I turned on the radio last weekend,
I heard "Turkey for me, turkey for
you. Let's eat turkey in my big
brown shoe Maybe I missed it,
but I don't think that the Peanuts'
Thanksgiving special was on this
year. I hope that Adda:ns Family
Values will become a tradition; this
movie provided some of the best
Thanksgiving commentary that
I've heard in a while.
Since I remained silent and
endured the Thanksgiving thing, I
think that in order to maintain my
sanity, I will boycott all of those
Christmas traditions that cause me
so much anguish. Here are some
suggestions if you would like to do
the same.
Decorate something other
than a tree this year. How about
something that didn't have to die
first, like your refrigerator? My
exercise bike is already sporting a
string of lights. Buy ycur friends
things that they need, like grocer-
ies or text books for next semester.
Make tapes of your favorite songs
for your parents. Ask them to do
the same for you. You may gain a
greater appreciation for one an-
other. Don't buy anyone perfume,
tree ornaments, neckties or fruit-
cakes and, most importantly, don't
go to the mall.
Happy holidays and death to
those tacky little wreaths on sta-
tion wagon grills. McDonald's
makes a mean egg nog milk shake.
Ho, ho, ho.
By Brian Hall
Kevorkian aids in devaluation of human life
Something that really bothers
me is when people invent new
"rights My favorite example of
this happened earlier this year when
Illinois senator Carol Mosley Braun
came up with a "right not to be
offended Somehow this right man-
aged to elude all the great scholars of
freedom such as Locke and Mill. If
such a right really existed, most of
Senator Braun's colleagues would
be out of work, just from the times
that they haveoffended me.
Seriously though, the worst
case of this at present is a mysterious
(and ominous sounding) "right to
die" espoused by some, most no-
table Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the Michi-
gan suicide doctor. Dr. Kevorkian is
actively advocating and performing
doctor-assisted suicides, violating
Mchigan law in the process. It is his
contention that such laws are uncon-
stitutional, apparently uc'ng the
same legal reasoning which the Su-
preme Court used to find a right to
abortion in the case of Roe vs. Wade.
The invention of new rights is
the hot thing to right now, especially
because it is much easier to merely
assert that one has a right than to
honestly and intellectually argue for
your position. Trying to persuade
people intelligently involves think-
ing�not the most popular Ameri-
canpastime presently. Appealing to
theemotionsby defining anew right
ismuch easier. Itimmediatelylabels
opponents of your policy as uncar-
ing facists who would restrict per-
sonal liberty. Americans are rightly
jealous of defending civil liberties
and sympathetic to those whose
rights are trampled on.
Which, in the present case,
would be no one. No reasonable
person will deny that an individual
is best able to decide for himself
what to do with his life. If, in in-
stances of chronic pain, terminal ill-
ness or severe depression, that indi-
vidual decides to end his temporal
existence, then I know of no one who
would advocate stopping them.
However, because we tolerate a cer-
tain behavior does not mean that we
should encourage it with official sanc-
� tion by allowing others, especially
health careprofessionals, to actively
help in such suicides.
The main argument for doc-
tor-assisted suicide, namely that a
person who wishes to kill himself
should be able to so so with as little
pain and as much assurance of suc-
cess as possible, is so easy to refute
that it is not surprising that its advo-
cates hidebehind a phony right. Any
onewhodesiresinformationonpain-
less deaths can obtain it from many
sourcessuchas the Hemlock Society
orthebookFzMflExzr. These sources
provide all the relevant information
foranyonedeterminedtodohimself
in. If this information requires some
effort to find, all the better. Do we
really want to live in a society where
it is nearly effortless to kill oneself?
BeforewetakeDr. Kevorkian's
prescription to "use the dying pro-
cess" to better society, we should
consider recent reports which show
that he has had an unpleasant ob-
session with death for more than40
years. He has, in the past, stated
that convicted criminals, especially
thosewhoarieondeathrow,should
instead be used for fatal medical
experiments, which he claims
would be more useful than animal
testing (and would also probably
make the members of PETA a lot
happier). He has also said that the
medical experiments the Nazisper-
f ormed on the Jews in World War II
were not "completely negative"
and that "Jews were gassed. Arme-
nians were killed in every conceiv-
able way. They've Jews had a lot
of publicity, but they didn't suffer
as much
While Dr. Kevorkian has ev-
ery right to hold whatever contro-
versial and abhorrent ideas he
wishes, it is time for the American
media to stop giving him a forum
to push his views. Hopefully, the
tide has begun to turn against his
campaign to use the medical com-
munity to take lives instead of sav-
ingthem, thereby viola ting theoath
to "first do no harm His cam-
paign is merely the next step our
society is taking in devaluing hu-
man life. With abortion legal, we
have stated that the lives of the
unborn are not worth as much as
the rest of us.
Now Dr. Kevorkian and his
ilktellusrhatthelivesoftheoldand
ill are not of the same value. If his
view wins out, what group will be
the next to be devalued?
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
What is going on with ECU football? Was this
another rebuilding year or was this a look at the new
Logan era? What happened to the Scud Missile attack?
Did the opposition get a hold of some Patriots or what?
I can't help but wonder where the Pirate football pro-
gram has gone. Will Steve Logan be able to find it?
I can't figure out how a team that was full of
promise and talent can go 2-9, and no one even mentions
changes in the team leadership�rmtalkingBIGchanges.
Is Steve Logan's job that secure?
Disappointing is hardly the word to describe this
season. ECU should know better that it all boils down
to money. Big time coaches recruit big time players. Big
time players and coaches play big time schedules, win
bigtime games and getmtobigtimecoriferenceswithbig
time followings. All of these in turn create big time
revenue in merchandising and at the gates.
Carlester Crumpler had an All-American perfor-
mance. JuniorSmithbrokeseveralECUrushingrecords
to make a name for himself for his upcoming senior
season. The defensive unit improved in leaps and
bounds under first year defensive coordinator Larry
Coyer. And the promising, albeit still unproven, start of
Marcus Crandell against Syracuse and Central Horida.
Steve Logan says blame youth and injuries� for a 2-9
season? Where does the coach fit in among offensive
inefficiencies (he was a dam good offensive coordinator
in 1991), turnovers and a plethora of penalties? What
happens next year if Marcus Crandell stumbles and
doesn'tperform up to rhephenomenal expectations that
have been placed on him for next season?
Two years ago, ECU was 11 -1. No one forgot that.
Since then, new coach Steve Logan has produced back to
back losing seasons (5-6 and 2-9) and declining national
respect for a once bright football future. Many ques-
tions have gone unanswered.
There are several big names out there on the
market that would be great for�EGADS� rebuilding
the pirate program. Ken Hatfield, Skip Holtz, Dick
Sheridan, David Archer and a few others are just
waiting to be snatched up by a program looking to
move up to another level. These coaches could help a
strugglingprogram to regain national recognition, top-
notch recruits, a conference affiliation, increased fan
support and maybe even winning seasons and more
bowl bids. How are we going to fill a 50,000 seat
stadium with 2-9 football teams? Attendance has
steadily declined over the past two years. Interestinthe
program has also dwindled. This program will not be
able to survive financially as an independent among
the super conferences and bowl coalitions in the de-
cades to come. We have to start taking steps now to
insure the stability and success of a football program
that promotes school spirit and pride.
I'm tired of the negative feeling I get every time I
watch the Steve Logan show and the post game inter-
views. Ifnothingelse,Iwouldliketoseeamore positive
attitude from our coach. Players like Crumpler, Smith
and Bernard Carter alwayscameacross witha positive
attitude as role models, so why can't Logan? Isn't he in
a position of power that would warrant such an atti-
tude? Iwouldliketoseethisprogramthriveonsuccess,
both athletically and academically. If Steve Logan can
reach that goal, then he should be commended. If not,
ECU must try to find out who can.
Mike Ashley
Senior
Communications
letters to the editor must be signed and accompanied with a
working phone number, class rank and major, address all letters
to : the east Carolinian, attn opinion editor, student pubs, build-
ing, second floor, ecu, greenville, nc 27858.





The East Carolinian
993
For Rent
Ringgoid Towers
Unit 601,2 Mm
Nr Capet, frnwy foCW .Vatcr & Sewer
inched. 2 SHtatUwt
S24Qmonth
CWWCTIIttJBNMMTB18)3Z3-IH15
FOR RENT NOW! 2 bdrm2 bath
apartmentconvenientlylocated 1 block
from campus. Very modern with all
new appliances. Basic cable, water,
sewer and washerdryer included.
Only one previous tenant. Call 757-
3428 if interested.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
sublease 3 br1 bath house, 1 blkfrom
campus. $233month. Call 752-3472
SUB-LEASE: Starting Dec. 11. One
bedroom apartment in Ringgold Tow-
ers. For 1 or 2 people. Fully furnished,
convenient parking, security guard,
close to campus. S395 per month. Dec.
rent free. Includes water and sewer.
Call 830-9211
2BEDROOMSTOSUBLET-in4 bed-
room house 12 block from campus.
Washer dryer, dishwasher, AC,
cable, 5135enmonth. Male or female.
Call 830-1591 Paul or Clark
FEMALEROOMMATE NEEDED for
spring semester, to share a bedroom in
anewduplexon Wyndham circle. Onlv
blocks from campus Mostly furnished,
a must see! 5175 a month plus 13
utilities. Call 758-1753
WILDWOOD VILLAS- 2 bedroom, 1
12 bath townhouse with unfinished
basement, available Jan. 1. 5525 per
month, call Chip Little 756-1234
KINGSTON PLACE- 2 bedroom, 2
bath furnished townhouseavailablefor
spring semester. Short term leasea vail-
able. 5600 per month. Call Chip Little
756-1234
WILDWOOD VILLAS-2 bedroom, 2
1 2 bath townhouse with finished base-
ment available, Jan. 1. $600 per month,
call Chip Little 756-1234
HOUSE FOR RENT, 4th st. 3 bed-
room2 bath, sunroom, central air
heat, enclosed backyard, all yard ma int.
included. Available end Dec.Jan. 1
758-6130
SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom, 1 1 2 bath, 1
12 blocks from campus, $450. 752-
1835
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
apt. 12 block from campus, 3 blocks
from downtown, 2 blocks from super-
market. Rent includes phone, utilities,
cable. Call 757-1947
FEMALE ROOMMATE N EEDED for
nice 2 bedroom apartment. Neat, non-
smoker preferred. Call 752-4869.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share-i bedroom apartment in Tar River
for Spring Semester. RentS162.501
4 utilities. Available after 1220. Call
758-4332.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share2 bed
2bathcondo. Pool, tennis ct fireplace,
dishwasher. Rent 5265 cable, wash
dryer included. I am a 22 year old
female Literature major, smoker. 321-
1170
NONSMOKING graduatemature
For Rent
intedtosharethreebedroom
louse, furnished with stor-
i en minutes from ECU. 5237
month 12 utilities. 830-9118
SPACIOUS 2 bedroom apt. 2 blocks
from campus. Water, sewer, heat, air,
and basic cable included. Available for
Dec. Call 752-8900
E3 Help Wanted
FREE TRIPS & CASH � Call us
and find out how hundreds of students
are already earning free trips and lots of
cash with America's 1 Spring Break
company! Choose Cancun, Bahamas,
Jamaica,Panama,DaytonaorPadre!Call
now! TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 328-SAVE or (617)424-
8222.
ATTENTION LADIES: EamS90toS125
phr. escorting in the Greenville area.
You must be 18 yrs. old, have own phone
and transportation. Escorts and exotic
dancers needed. For more information
call Diamond Escorts at 758-0896.
THE PLAYGROUND OF
GOLDSBORO is looking for enthusias-
tic entertainers. Excellent hours, easy 5$
and carpools available. Ask for Erin at
355-4792 or (919) 734-3777.
BREAKERS! BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE! Pan. na City from 599,Jamaica
Cancun from 5439, Padre 5239, Daytona
579. Sell trips, earn cash, partv free. Call
EST 1-800-234-7007.
PARTY IN THE SUN" Spring
Break, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, S.
Padre, Florida including the Ultimate
Party Package! Organize small group
and travel free! lowest prices guaran-
teed! Call Sun Splash Tours Today 1-800-
426-7710.
LADIES NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:
earn 5500 to 5800 a week full timepart
time anytime. Pay out daily. Playmates
Adult Relaxation. Hwy. 58 & 13 Snow
hill. Call 747-7686.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING- Earn
up to 52000month working on cruise
ships or land-tour companies. World
Travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
etc.) Summer and full-time employment
available. No experience necessary. For
more info, call 1-206-634-0468 ext c5362
$10-$400UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
Rush Stamped envelope: Publishers (GI)
1821 HillandaleRd. 1 B-295 Durham NC
27705
YARD WORK- transplanting azaleas,
preparing flowerbeds, weeding out ivy,
plantingpansies,etc. You need to have a
littleknowledgeofgardening. Youmust
have a car, work your own hours, pay is
S5 per hour Call 736-2496
PART-TLME SECRETARY NEEDED.
Approximately 10-15 hrsweek. Great
for college students with flexible sched-
ules. Starting pay at S6hour. Good
mathematical skillstyping a plus. Call
752-1204 on Friday Dec. 3rd between
9am-lpm. Ask for Tina. EOE.
BEACH Spring break promoter. Small
orlargegroups. FreetripsandCash. Call
CMI1-800-423-5264
Classifieds
E3 Help Wanted
For Sale
STUDENT to work in local law office
approximately 20 hours a week doing
clerical and general secretarial work
Familiarity with computers and word
perfect required. An interest in going to
law school beneficial. Send resume to
Post Office Drawer 5026, Greenville, NC
or call 355-0300
PART-TIMECOURIERtowork9amto
lpm, daily. Must have own transporta-
tion and good driving record. Duties
include: running errands, sorting mail,
and filing. Starting hourly wage of 54.50.
If interested, send resume or complete
applicationat:PittSurgical,P.A.905Johns
Hopkins Drive, Greenville.
message
FOR SALE: GE washing machine. Full
size. Good condition. 5100.00 neg. Call
Julie at 758-4332. Leave message.
YARD SALE 403 Biltmore st. Sat. 9-12.
Everything must go. Cheap, Cheap,
Cheap. The Zoo.
MEMBERSHIP FOR SALE: The club
for women only- take over payments,
no enrollment fee- 16 months left on
contract. Call Ann 8-5 at 752-5101 after
6pm and weekends 747-5088
29 GALLON SALT WATER fish tank,
hood, filter, and stand, etc. 5125 752-
6833
For Sale l$$NEED CASH$$
TUDENT
WAP
SPRING BREAK � Plan early, save
550 and get best rooms! Prices increase
1215! BahamasCruise6 days includes
12 meals, 5279! Panama City room w
kitchen, SI 19! Cancun from Raleigh,
5399; Jamaica from Raleigh, 5429; Key
West, S249; Davtona Room wkitchen,
5149! 1-800-678-6386.
MEMBERSHIP to Club For Women
Only. Low monthlv pavments! Call
Angie 931-9768.
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
CRUISE 5279! 6 Days! Includesl2 meals
and all taxes! This is a HUGE party!
Great Beaches and Night life! Hurry
Prices Increase 1210!
1-800-678-6386.
MOPED, Tomos, like new, only 500
miles, up to 30 mph and 100 mpg, excel-
lent condition, 5425.00 call 756-9133
CANNONDALE Delta V. (front sus-
pension) frame and fork. Brushed alu-
minum finish; with stem, headset and
seatpost, 5600. Most drivetrain and
accessory parts available. Call Larry at
752-2248.
ALASKASUMMER EMPLOYMENT-
fisheries. Many earn $2000mo. in
canneriesor53000-S6000mo.on fish-
ing vessels. Many employers provide
room, board and transportation. Over
8000 openings. No experience neces-
sary! Maleor Female. Get the necessary
head start on next summer. For more
info, call: 1-206-545-4155 ext. A5362
FOR SALE: 12 string Oscar Schmidt
acoustic guitar. 5225 neg. Mint cond.
Call Bruce at 758-4579
EXCELLENTCONDITION: Reclining
couch chair set. OriginallyS900. Must
sell. Will take 5275. Call 758-2403
TANDY 1000 SX includes software,
monochrome screen, and desk. S500or
best offer. Call 758-9206
IGUANA: male, 1ft. long from head to
baseoftail. Of breeding age. Heatrocks,
vitamins leash included. A berterdeal
than in stores. Call Doug at 758-3931
msg.
1986 VW QUANTUM, auto, cruise,
power windows, air conditioning, all
options, new sterio cass. Maintenance
records. 84,000 miles 51800. Neg Call
752-5811
FOR SALE: queen size waterbea, sofa
bed, dresser, old Tv. Graduating must
sell. Price neg! Call 830-1683 leave
We pay cash on the spot fort
USED MEN'S CLOTHINQ
fc
V
� Tommy Hilfiger
� Polo
� Nautica
� J Crew
STEREO & VIDEO
EQUIPMENT
t� MICROWAVES
TELEVISIONS
If you arc selling you must be 18 with a
picture ID.iNCDL, ECU)
752-3866
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
MON-FRI 10am-5 pm,
Sat 10am-2'pm
ID Services Offered
Lvpst Library of Irrtorn abon in U S r
19.27$ TOIKS- ALL SUBJECTS l
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC oi COO
EH 800 351-0222
Or rush $2 00 to Research Information
Yi? Idaho Ave �?o6-A tos Anyetes. CA goo?1)
NEED WORD PROCESSTYPING?
Lowestoncampus. Ind.proofreading,
spelling, gram, corrections. Over 15
yrs. exp. call Cindy 355-3611 anytime.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: We are service
oriented dedicated to ensure you and
your friendsa heart-pounding, adrena-
linerushinggoodtime. Comejoinusat
PiratePaintballfora 312 hour session
you'll never forget. Sneak through the
cool, clean, crisp forest air as you make
your way to your opponents flag sta-
tion. As you near their outer defenses,
shots are fired at you. As you stand to
return fire,youradventurebegins. Will
you surviveto capture the flagand win
the game? Will you be the last one left
to defend the "Alamo"? Will you and
the rest of your special forces team be
able to take out the "Predator" before it
tikes you out. Come and see how
much fun you can have in a 31 2 hour
session. We are open Monday thru
Friday for groups of 8 or more, and
Saturdays for individuals or groups
from 1-40. Call 752-8380 for info, and
reservations. We breed excitement
Announcements
Page 7
,�
Personals
IQ
Greek
PRINCE CHARMING- Happy Anni-
versary baby cowboy princecharming
Sir Lancelot cinnamon raisin honey
bunny big pumpkin cute butt
sweatheart. Love Always, Princess
Cinderella
SQ
Greek
CONGRATULATIONS new brothers
of Phi Sigma Pi: Greg Parks, David
Hillman, Sun C. Song, Sean Moser,
Britt Strickland, Cherie Scroggs, April
Hooand, Clover Webb, Amy
Zmistowski, Sarah Reynaud, Audra
Latham,SusanBullard,JenniferHobbs,
Andrea Winslow, Jennifer Poppe
Krystyn Hartley, Theresa Dudash,
Laura Hines, Rickie Lee, Heather
Phillips, Christi Mingis, Tracy Little,
Janine Jason, Leslie Boyles,and Heather
Wavco.
GOOD LUCK to Lisa Berting and Jill
Hammond and congratulations! thanx
forallyourworkanddedicarion. We'll
miss you! Alpha love, your sisters of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONStoallthenew
officers of AOPI: President-Beth
McGhee, VP-Amy Johnson, Member
EducJillWoolard,CR-AmandaSmith,
House Manager-Meredith Stevens,
Chapter Treas-Tami Johnson, Asst-
Monica Arnold, House Treas-Jenny
Vest, Asst-Jenny Gorka, Kof R-Kerri
Sechman, Rush-Trista Maarsh,
Corrresponding Secretary-Anne
Rossiter, Recording SecMichelle
Benedetti, PR-Tara Franklin, Social-
Melody Grover, Asst-Ashley
McAlexander, New Member Educ-
Holly Fleming, Scholarship-Jenny
Lucas, Alumni Relations-Karla Thomp-
son, In tram urals-Nan Woods, R3-Lorie
Pettis, Panhellenic Exec-Maureen
McKenna, Panhellenic Del- Caren
Cantrell, Historian-Stephanie Minkove,
song leader-Paige Chitty! Cet ready
for next semester.
SISTERS OF AOPI: Here's to a suc-
cessful founder's day Everyone get
psyched to grab yourself a date!
THANKS to everyone who helped to '
make Operation Santa Claus a great
success. All of the sisters of AOPI.
HAPPY HOLIDAYS to everyone!
Love, All of the sisters of AOPI.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new !
exec, of Alpha Phi: PresTamiHakobz,
Vice PresBetsy Smith, Treasure- I
Heather Joyce, House Manager- !
Monica Sweet, Rush Director-JuJie
Breazeale, Fraternity ed-Kristen Lott,
Chapter Promotions-Stacey Klatsky,
Scholarship-Melissa ChesnuL j
Panhellenic-Robin White, Recording
SecJ.P. Worley, Administrative Ass
Nan Patterson, Social Chair-Shelley
Daubenspeck, Philanthropy-Kim
Laughery, Activities-Lynne Smith,
Corr. Secretary-Amanda Baer,
Gamma-Kristen Schiayone
Intramurals-Katy McNiff, Love, your
Sisters.
GOOD LUCK to everyone on your 2
exams. Love, Alpha Phi w
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA-Thank you;
for an incred ible year. It was an hon'of;
being your president! I love and Will'
miss you all. Always Kimberly
SIGMA FORMAL was a blast. We
foundoutalotaboutsomepeople. We
did not know thatClairol was Brandy
and Jenna's best friend! On to Sat.
night, hope no one saw the pit stop, k
should be easy to grow back the grgss.
wekilled! Itwas fun for everyone, the
American Legion will never forget us
CONGRATULATIONS to the new'
officersof Sigma Sigma Sigma, Pres.Jeri I
MacNamara, Vice Pres Lori'Marco,
Treasurer, Georgia Lloyd, Sec Molly
Carter, Rush Chairman, Jen Grubbs,
Sorority Educ, Caroline Brayboy.
CONGRATULATIONS to Laura
McCabe-Best Pledge, Christy Rogers
Most spirited, Jenna Sellars and Liz,
Hollimanfbr-bestBiglilsis! Lovettie
sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma.
Potential
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THE AMERICAN RFD
CROSS
needs your support at the
upcoming bloodmobile at
Mendenhall student center
on Tuesday, Dec. 7,1993 from
10:00am to 4:00pm. Blood
given by Red cross donors is
used to assist chemotherapy
patients, people undergoing
surgery, hemophiliacs and
accident victims in the Mid-
Atlantic Region, and to assist
other Red Cross regions in
times of need. Blood dona-
tions are desperately needed,
especially O positive and O
negative. To be eligible, a
person should be in good
health, 17 years of age or
older, and weigh at least 110
pounds. We would like to
solicit the support of the
community, faculty and stu-
dents in reaching our goal
of 200 units. This bloodmo-
bile is sponsored by the Pre-
professional Health Alli-
ance, the Student National
Medical Association, and Al-
lied Blacks for Leadership
and Equality(ABLE).
ECU SCHOOL OF ART
is having their annual
Christmas sale on Thurs. Dec.
2, Fri. Dec. 3, from 8 am until
5pm and Sat Dec. 4, from
10am until 2pm. The sale
will take place on the ECU
campus at the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center on 5th st. across
from the Chancellor's house.
Items available will be hand
crafted jewelry, textiles,
scarves, woods, prints, ce-
ramics and Christmas cards.
Come out and purchase that
someone special a unique,
handcrafted Christmas gift.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB
will hold its last meeting for
this semester on Thurs Dec.
2nd at 5:00 in GCB 3007. All
those who are interested in
joining for next semester are
encouraged to attend.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
ALLIANCE
will be having a get together
at the Java shop (1011-D
South Charles Blvd) on
Thurs. Dec. 2nd at 4pm. All
are invited. This will be a
great opportunity to have
your ideas and opinions
heard.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Events: Tues. Nov. 30-Lisa C.
McDonald, voice, Senior
recital(AJ Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7pm free). Wed. Dec. 1-
Jonathan Smart, guitar, Se-
nior recital (AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 7pm free). Thurs.
Dec. 2-5 ECU Madrigal din-
ners: for ticket info, call
757-4788 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS(Mendenhall Student
Center). Thur Dec. 2-ECU
Jazz 'Bones, George
Broussard, Director (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8pm
free). Fri Dec. 3-ECU String
Orchestra, Fritz Gearhari,
Conductor(AJ Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 8pm free). Sat
Dec. 4-Tracey Nicole Age,
clarinet, Senior Recital(AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7pm
free). Sun Dec. 5-Wind En-
semble Holiday Concert:
Sponsored for the commu-
nity by the friends of the
School of Music (Wright Au-
ditorium, 3pm free). Also on
Dec. 5- Cheryl Bowen, clari-
net, Senior Recital (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7pm
free). Mon Dec-Guest Re-
cital: RyoNoda, composer and
saxophonist from Japan (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 8pm
free).
CONTESTANTS
are now being accepted for
the Miss Pitt County Pageant,
an official Miss America Pre-
liminary, scheduled to be
held Jan. 22, 1994 in Green-
ville. Women must be be-
tween the ages of 18-24 and
will be judged in Interview,
Talent, Evening wear, and
Swimsuit competitions. For
more info, please call con-
testant coordinator Kim Dale
at 746-3171
EAST CAROLINA NATIVE
AMERICAN
ORGANIZATION
next meeting will be held on
Mon. Dec. 6 at 7pm. The meet-
ing will take place at the
home of April and Thomas
Maynor. If you need direc-
tions, call April Maynor at
756-7602 or Kim Sampson at
752-5924. All members are
urged to attend.
FIESTA DE NAVIDAD!
Spanish club Christmas
party. Fri. Dec. 3; 7-12pm.
Place: Social room at St.
Peter's Catholic Church; 2700
E 4th st. S3 cover charge.
Enjoy Latin American food,
music, dancing, a pinata and
participate in gift
e.change(bring a unisex,
wrapped gift, S5 value). For
info, call Karina Collentine,
Adv. 757-6232 or Ramon
Serrano, Pres. 931-8542. i
CAREER SERVICES "
WORKSHOPS
the following workshops
will be the last ones offered
this semester: Thurs. Dec. 2,
3pm; Interview
skills(Bloxton), Tues. Dec.7,
4pm; Orientation to career
services(Bloxton), Mon. Dec.
13, 3pm Orientation to C.S
Prospective Dec. graduated
can still register with Ca-
reer Services at the orienta-
tion meetings. Services, in-
cluding the monthly news-
letter, will be available to
you through Aug 1994.
AMERICAN RED CROSS
will be holding a Bloodmo-
bile on Fri. Dec. 3 at the Bap-
tist Student Center (located
on 10th street, beside
Wendy's), the goal will be 50
pints of blood. For more info,
call 752-4646.
i.
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W��l
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 9
17th annual madrigal dinner welcomes season
Staff Reports
Photo Courtesy of ECU Performing Arts Series
Join the Court Dancers as they entertain you during the ECU Madrigal Dinner Series, Dec. 2-5. Start the
Christmas season off with wonderful food and festive entertainment. For tickets call 757-4788.
The East Carolinian
The Christmas season festivi-
ties of England during its Golden
Age (circa 1600) will be recreated
at ECU Dec. 2-5 when ticket-hold-
ing "guests" gather in the Great
Room of Mendenhall Student
Center for the annual Madrigal
Dinners.
The Elizabethan-style feasts
offer the same kind of music and
merriment which might have
been enjoyed in a manor house of
the English Renaissance. Seating
begins for the Thursday-Satur-
day dinners at 6:45 p.m the Sun-
day dinner begins at 4:45 p.m.
- Singers, musicians and danc-
ers,along withjugglers, tumblers,
poets, minstrels, a jester, a wiz-
ard or a mime�all in Elizabethan
costume�provide the entertain-
ment. Again this year, a popular
feature is a repeat presentation of
Shakespeare's "comedic trag-
edy Pyranms and Thisbe, per-
formed by the Student Life Play-
ers and directed ty Robert Caprio
of the ECU Department of Com-
munication.
Costumed serving knaves
and wenches will provide the
guests with a choice of prime rib
or roast chicken, both traditional
English dinner. Each evening's
feast is highlighted by a salute to
the Boar's Head, wassail toasts
and a flaming dessert. Patrons of
age may bring their own unforti-
fied spirits which will be served
by wine stewards provided by
the caterer.
Presiding over the festivities
are James and Franceine Rees as
Lord and Lady of the Manor, who
are assisted by a Lord High Cham-
berlain. Each course is heralded
by a fanfare presented by a trio of
trumpeters.
Concluding each evening's
festivities is a Christmas carol
sing-along.
Dr. Brett Watson of the ECU
School of Music will direct this
year's dinner and entertainment.
Dances will be choreo-
graphed by Patricia Pertalion of
the ECU Department of Theatre
Arts. This year is the 17th season
that these perennially sold-out
dinners have been offered at
ECU.
The ECU Madrigal Dinner
Series is sponsored by the ECU
Department of University
Unions, the School of Music and
the Department of Dining Ser-
vices.
Places in the premium seat-
ing area are $25 each, other
seats are $20 each and seats for
ECU students and youth are $15
each. Tickets may be chargedio
major credit cards.
Tickets are available from
the ECU Central Ticket" Office
in Mendenhall Student Center,
phone 757-4788 or toll-free 1-
800-ECU-ARTS.
Ticket Office staff maintain
a seating chart as places are re-
served. Patrons who purchase
their tickets in person may se-
lect their choice of seats at one
of the banquet tables.
The Great Room, located
on the second floor, east wingof
Mendenhall Student Center, is
served by an elevator and is fully
accessible to patrons in wheel-
chairs.
'Me and Kev'
makes ya wonder
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Have you ever started read-
ing a book, put it down after a few
chapters and sat there thinking,
"Huh??" Has a book ever made
you feel like you're sitting on the
edge of a cliff, looking down at a
clouds ���MBMHHI
sea
and thinking of
what might lie
down there
waiting for
you? Simon
Black's Me and
Kei'isjust such
a book.
Black
paints a picture
ofStevenJones,
a boy who re-
treats into a pri- fimmmmm
vate fantasy world after being se-
verely beaten by his father. Steven
creates Kev, an imaginary little
boy similar to Steven, to offset the
psychological damage that he has
felt. Through the story, the reader
is hard-pressed to be certain of
whether or not Kev is real or just a
figment of Steven's imagination.
Black approaches such touchy
subjects as sodomy, alcoholism
and insanity with a sleight of hand
that would have made Houdini
���M envious.
Just when
the reader
thinks ev-
erything is
going along
smoothly
with no
hitches,
Black
throws a
wrench into
the reader's
����������b mind, caus-
ing it to freeze and start all over
again.
SeeBOOKpagre12
Peel away the outer
layer and you will
discover another
layer, and another,
and another like
an onion that will
make you cry.
'A Christmas Carol' visits ECU
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
A musical stage version of
the Charles Dickens classic tale,
A Christmas Carol, will be per-
formed by a touring company at
ECU on Wednesday, Dec. 8.
The performance is sched-
uled for 8 p.m. in Wright Audito-
rium and is a return engagement
of a warmly-received 1991 per-
formance on campus. This event
is presented as an "added attrac-
tion" to the 1993-94 University
Unions Artists Series.
This production of A Christ-
mas Carol, staged by Bill Fegan
Attractions, features the familiar
cast of characters together with
an ensemble of singers and danc-
ers�all in Victorian English cos-
tume�as well as period sets and
special effects.
Among the well-known fig-
ures in the story are the miserly
See CAROL page 11
Z1 A T? Th 1h 1? Come up and see us some-
Oll Visit Career Services
Resource Room
N
R
Are you clueless about a possible career for yourself? Or do
you have some ideas, but a lot of questions about your options?
If you are trying to choose a major, the Counseling Center
offers careerexploration andassessment inventories, along with
a special program on choosing a major. In addition, Career
Services offers many helpful resources, such as information
about employers and specific kinds of jobs. You may visit both
to find the kind of help that you need.
�Career Decisions Room- this is where you will find publica-
tions like the Occupational Outlook Handbook, and computerized
assessment tools like SIGI Plus, which help you assess your skills
and research possible occupations that match your talent s and
preferences.
Career Planning Room- where you will find graduate school
bulletins and manuals that can help you select graduate study
programs, or tips on resume and letter-writing, dressing for
interviews, and obtaining work experience while in school.
�Employer Information Room- where you will find employer
information files, and schedules for on-compus interviews and
applications for teaching in and out of NC.
And, of course, we offer much, much more. Why not visit
Career Services today to see how we can help you?
Santa swings through Chimney Rock
By Jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
With all the stuff that jolly ol'
Saint Nick has to take care of this
holiday season, it's a wonder that
he'llhavetimetovisitawestemNorth
Carolina mountainside this weekend.
But come this Saturday and Sunda v,
Santa will be practicing his chimney-
climbing at one of the state's popular
points of interest.
On both days tl us weekend, Dec.
4 and 5, you can go see Santa at
CjiimneyRockPark,whereMr.Claus
and his team of helpers will be on
hand to welcome the Christmas sea-
son, North Carolina-style.
This weekend marks the park's
holiday kickoff celebration. Santa
will polish up on his annual climbing
feats both days from noon until 1
p.mbutmanyotherevents will high-
light this weekend in the mountains.
Artists will display their works
in the park beginning at 10 a.m. both
mornings, while N.C. musician John
Mason will play Christmas tunes on
his hammered dulcimer. Santa 'selves
will be around to serve hot cider and
hot chocolate throughout the week-
end.
B
H�
CD Reviews
Don't buy
AfcJ Worth a Try AW
Ar Take Your Chances
Definite Purchase
Red Red Groovy
25
Hi
m m m
The trio Red Red Groovy was
formed three years ago in Minne-
apolis by Bret Edgar. Edgar was a
former DJ at Prince's Glam Slam
nightclub and worked in a studio
mixing tracks for local hip-hop and
house acts. He was greatly influ-
enced by the dance club and rave
scene.
His plan was to fuse a little
guitar, retro-60s ideas and pop sen-
sibilities to make the dance genre a
little more "user friendly
Edgar soon met Mike Hill, a
rave pop scene enthusiast who also
played guitar.
"I was working on the first song
for the album and I knew Mike and
I had some similar tastes in music.
So I asked him if he'd like to lay
down a guitar lick. He did. It
clicked says Edgar.
Now the foundation was made,
but there was a piece missing. A
mutual friend suggested vocalist
Lori Larson whose voice gave their
sound the pop sensibility they were
looking for.
Red Red Groovy released their
first single Another Kind of Find"
back in September.
It became an international
dance club hitwitha techno-groove
that is not so harshly taxing. They
soon followed up with a 17 track
album entitled 25.
25 melds alternative guitar,
dreamy vocals, spoken word sound
bites, acid-influenced sound bites
and some toned-down techno to
create a somewhat new sound for
the dance oriented listener.
The band is similar to many
other groups of the genre because
of their psychedelic nature, but at
the same time, the 60s textural key-
boards and guitar can be heard,
separating it from the restSixties
hippies and the 90s ravers havesome
things in common like the peace-
love idealism and a fondness for
little tabs of paper.
The band's mixture of these two
semi-compatibleerasmaybeagood
and marketable idea. So rave on.
� Kris
Hoffler
Art Sale
The ECU School of Art is having its annual Christmas sale
on Thursday, Dec. 2 and Friday, Dec. 3 from 8 a.m. until 5
p.m. and on Saturday, Dec.
2 p.m. The sale will take
campus at the Jenkins
Fifth Street across from
house. Items available
elry, textiles, scarves,
ramies and Christmas cards.
4, from 10 a.m. until
rS pace on the ECU
Fine Arts Center on
the Chancellor's
will be hand crafted jew-
wood items, prints, ce-
Come out and purchase that
certain someone special a unique, han crafted Christmas gift.
If you want to learn more about
natureinourstate,join Chimney Rock
Park's botanist Elisabeth Feil on
guided nature walks at 2 p.m. each
day. She'll be there to help inidentify-
ing native trees and other plant life.
Dasher, Dancer, Prancer and the
rest of the gang won't make this trip,
butthe "Magik Trek" llama team will
be in the park to add to the holiday
atmosphere.
"Because llamas are from the
South American Andes Mountains,
whereit'scoldmostof the time said
Magik Trek's owner George
Appenzeller'wheneverthe tempera-
tures drop below 30 degrees, the
llamas start prancing around and
acting like little kids
The llamas will sport holiday
outfits thatincludered bow tiesand
colorfulear tassels. They'llbeon the
Chimney Park Meadows from 11
a.m. to4p.m.onSaturday and from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.
Also on the Meadows, you can
walk through and help decorate a
display of Christmas trees. Make
omamentsatthepark'sNatureCeri-
ter from noon until 3 p.m. bom
SeeX-MASpag�12
t'
Has TV violence hit
major fork in road?
EDITOR'S NOTE � The latest
Anti-TV violence crusade could sweep
in newlaws. Thepublic'sgrowingfearqf
crime and increased belief that violence
seen on TV incites more people to do
violent crimes makes it likely tlmtsomeof
live measures before Congress may be-
come law. Nine measures liave been
introduced, designed to regidate vio-
lence on television.
LOS ANGELES (AP)�Televi-
sion, so fond of reruns, appears to be
the reluctant star of a deja vu drama:
the 1990s version of the on-again,
off-again outcry against TV violence.
But industry executives, public
interest groups and experts say the
swelling protest is not merely a re-
peat of the past. This time, some
hope and some fear, it will end with
new laws restricting TV program-
ming.
Political realities, the public's
growing fear of crime, a changing
television industry and sawier ac-
tivists make likely the passage of at
least some of the bills before Con-
gress.
"The issue is not going to just
fade away said William Abbott,
president of the Foundation to Im-
prove Television. "The solution this
time has to be long-term and set in
place
Thenetworksarelobbyinghard
against restrictive measures pushed
by groups such as Abbott's and by a
growing number of lawmakers. But
they concede a gloomy outlook.
"If people continue to ignore
the traditions of the First Amend-
ment, then I think it's very likely
we'll have legislation said Martin
Franks, vice president of CBS in
Washington
"Sofar,wearenotmeetingwith
rip-roaring success" in getting Con-
gress to listen to network arguments,
Franks said.
Nine measures have been intro-
duced to regulate violence on televi-
sion, including a bill to limit the
hours when violent programming
can be shown and one to make man-
datory the now-voluntary labeling
of violence.
The pressure is primarily on
thetraditionalbroadcastnetworks,
which use regulated public air-
waves for distribution of their pro-
gramming and are still the most-
watched.
Cable channels, which reach
60 percent of U.S. households, are
seen as less likely candidates for
new restrictions on violence be-
cause they are not delivered over
public airwaves and are requested
by subscribers.
The nine anti-violencebillscap
a crescendo of complaints about
TV's role in what many see as an
increasingly vulnerable America,
where even two buffoonish MTV
cartoon figures named Beavis and
Butt-head are deemed a peril to
public safety.
It is not a novel attack; from its
earliest days, critics have ques-
tioned television's influence on
society.
"Historically, every new me-
dium is treated with suspicion by
people accustomed to theoid'said
George Gerbner of the University
of Pennsylvania's Annenberg
School for Communication.
"Pulp literature, it was
thought, made workers lazy, indo-
lentand violent, "Gerbner says. "It
created a great cultural debate.
Then came comic strips, then came
motion pictures, then came radio
The potential effect on chil-
dren is always the most troubling.
In the 1950s, psychiatrist Frederic
Wertheim caused a sensation with
his argument, detailed in Seducttpn
of the Innocent, that comic books
corrupted youngsters.
The first TV networkprograrh-
ming went on the air in 1946; six
years later, in 1952, Congress held
its first hearings into the impact of
TV and radio violence on chil-
dren�prompted by concern over
increasing j avenile crime.
In the late 1960s, social and
political upheaval and a soaring
crimeratepromptedrenewed scru-
tiny of television The Boston-based
See TV page 10
BHMHIimMMI






December 2, 1993
aJ
� in the mid-190s when
the i onbt ersy reached a high point
and the networks deckled to have
what was calkd the 'family hour "
said c Jerbner, a longtime researcher
into IV loience.
But the crafting oi an early
owning rime bk vkdevoted to family
programs was short-lived; the courts
ruled it represented network collu-
sion in violation of antitrust laws.
Soon after, cable's expansion of
the TV uni verse diminished scrutiny
of CBS, ABC and NBC; broadcasting
wasn't the only game and the re-
source of the public airwaves ap-
peared notquitesoprecious,Gerbner
said.
The networks gradually seemed
to cede the most graphic violence to
cablechannels.
Betsy Frank, senior vice presi-
dent Of Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising
in New York, calls the current fall
primerime schedule one of the most
advertiser-friendly in memory.
"In all honesty, the (broadcast)
networks probably have very little
violence on them says Edward
Donnerstein, a University of Califor-
nia professor who was co-author of a
1992-report on TV violence for the
American Psychological Association.
'Roseanne "Home Improve-
ment" and other comedies have dis-
placed action shows such as "The A-
Team" and "TJ. Hooker" that once
lured viewers.
There are about 40 sitcoms this
season and some 20 dramas�few of
those action-oriented.
(However, Gerbner contends
that broadcasting remains fairly con-
sistent in the amount of violence, with
mor$ than 50 percent of characters in
prirrjetirne TV involved in serious or
comic violence each week. Others
notekhat older network fare contin-
ues to air widely in syndication).
Although many agree the level
ofviolenceonbroadcastnetwork tele-
vision! has decreased in recent years,
pubDc concern over the issue has
grown.
A Times Mirror poll conducted
earlier this year found Americans are
increasingly disturbed by violence
on TV entertainment shows.
Fifty-nine percentsaid they were
"personally bothered" by such vio-
lence�compared to 44 percent in a
1983, poll. Eighty percent said enter-
tainment violence is "harmful" to
society, compared to 64 percent a
decaideago.
Love Mother Earth
Recycle with cure!
Rush continues to make legendary tunes
� 1 I PHIA(AP)�The
Rush's latest album,
-ho things that
� alone such as a nut and
rhe( D itself showcases three
other things that haven't existed
apart for the past 20 years: drum-
mer-lvricist Neal Peart, guitarist
Alex Lifeson and bassist-singer
Geddy Lee.
Peart attributes the Canadian
band's longevity to a combina-
tion of Lifeson's spontanaeity,
Lee's "melodic instinct" and "me-
ticulous passion" and his own
"obsessive drive
"We root each other and we
uproot each other said Peart,
who has written a biography of
the trio.
Rush has been pushing the
envelope of progressive rock
since its first self-titled album in
1974, combining sonic power and
intricacy with lyrical integrity and
intelligence. Lee's bass playing
hrs influenced countless musi-
cians to take the instrument out
of its strictly rhythmic role and
into a melodic one.
They've done everything
from concept albums (2112) to
live albums (All the World's a Stage,
Exit Stage Left, A Show of
Hands"). Their classic, "Tom
Sawyer from 1981 's Mewing Pic-
tures, is still one of the most re-
quested songs on rock radio. Rush
has done 18 records, including a
double disc anthology in 1990,
Chronicles.
The band s 19th effort is pared
down, less dependent on technol-
ogy and more reliant on the natu-
ral sound of guitar, bass and per-
cussion. The band brought back
Peter Collins, who had done their
more heavily produced records,
Power Windows (1985) and Hold
Your Fin 1987), but this time, they
wanted simplicity.
The formula seems to have
worked � Counterparts debuted
at No. 2 on Billboard's album
charts, the band's highest debut-
ing album ever.
Peart is Rush's wordsmith,
and he is fascinated with the con-
cept of yin (the passive and nega-
tive female force) and yang (the
active and positive male force).
He can use a nature metaphor one
minute, a technical one the next.
He's also a disciplined writer
who favors restraint as opposed
to what he calls "unabashed emo-
tionalism
"Here's a lovely example:
people always think, 'oh, it must
be so healthy psychologically to
be a drummer because you can
just smash things all the time
Peart said. "Well, you can't. You
have to control yourself. You have
to smash them at the right time
with the right intensity and a sense
of flow. I never feel released
when I'm playing drums � I just
feel tremendously disciplined
"Counterparts" deals with
personal issues: the nature of love
("The Speed of Love "Cold
Fire"); ambition ("Cut to the
I
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Bring in a friend (if ou have more than one friend, bring them in to)
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HERE A YEAR FROM NOW
CHRISTMAS PARTY WITH SAVOY TRUFFLE (THURSDAY).
Chase"); and Carl Jung's con-
cept of the masculine animus and
the feminineanima ("Animate").
But Peart says it's not con-
ventionally introspective, but
more a combination of personal
experience and imagined situa-
tions.
"That's really a style of lyri-
cism that I congenially dislike
he said with a laugh. "I'm not
really fond of self-revelation in
lyrics because I think it's a bit
indulgent
Peart's mind works as deftly
as his drum patterns. He speaks
of Jung, T.S. Eliot, politics, his-
tory, his fascination with Chi-
nese and African culture and his
love of cycling in rapid succes-
sion.
"These songs grow out of
reading and conversations and
thinking and driving and col-
lecting phrases he said.
LAST ASSIGNMENT, STUDENTS,
SHOP AT WILD BIRD WORLD!
Christmas List
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M-F10-6 Sat 10-5 Sun 1-5
ECU PIRATE RIDE & ESCORT SERVICE
The ECU Transit Pirate Ride will now operate an
additional two and a half hours on Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday. Previously the Pirate Ride
stopped at 12:00am, but now it will run until
2:30am with an added stop on 5th street. We
encourage students to take advantage of this
service as a safe means of transportation on our
campus.
The Student Government Association is also
sponsoring the "Student Safety- Pirate Watch"
escort service. If a student needs an escort they
should call Public Safety at 757-6787.
�$ Christmas Computer Sale ff
Get a Great rioliday Deal on an IBM, Dell, Packard �
Bell, or Apple Macintosh Computer
HOLIDAY SPECIALS on DeO computer systems
Come by the Student Stores for more details.
MACINTOSH DEMOS
AND CLOSE-OUTS
Come by the Student Stores
for more information
while supplies last.
INCREDIBLE DEALS
on Apple Newtons
Communication System $699
-or-
10 discount on Newton
Purchase
SPECIAL!
MACINTOSH LCIII system:
25Mhz 68030 Processor-Apple Color Plus Display
Apple Keyboard II'Great Campus Software Set
4MB RAM 80MB HD $995
4MB RAM 160MB HD $1100
Students Stores
East Carolina University
757-6731
Sale cxlciul
i





December 2, 1993
The East Carolinian 11
CAROL
women
Continued from page 9
e dress
d be found in�cotton,
e in India�and purchased
iottle ol Perrier she would
use for washing down the pills.
l husband was watching
eballdownstairsshesaid. "I
shouted to him, because at the
last minute I had changed my
mind. But he couldn't hear be-
cause his favorite team must have
been winning, all the noise. I went
downstairs, holding these things,
and shouted, 'Clark! Clark And
he took me to someone who could
help me
It was the mid-1980s, and
Mukherjee wondered if she'd ever
write again. Her books weren't
selling; neither she nor her hus-
band could find a job. For a while
it seemed this descendant of an
upper-caste Indian family would
spend her last days in a rented
home in Iowa.
But anyone who has read her
Knows Mukherjee is on far more
intimate terms with survival than
she is with giving in. The weeks
following her near-suicide re-
sulted in her acclaimed collection,
The Middleman and Other Stories.
In 1989, she published a novel,
jasmine, in which the title charac-
ter endures poverty, rape, the
murder of a husband, and she
boasts at the end that she will
"reposition the stars
The author has written two
works of nonfiction and six of
fiction, the latest being the novel
Tlie Holder of the World. Mirroring
her own life, her stories tell of
immigrants in the United States
and Canada and the inevitable
cultural conflicts. They also are
classic American stories�full of
motion, escape, improvisation.
' "What's comforting about the
U.S. is how our mythology sup-
ports identity being reformulated
constantly Mukherjee said dur-
ing a recent interview.
"In India, Britain, if you're
not Anglo or not belonging to the
right race or religion, you could
have been there for 3(10 years, but
you will always be treated,
overtlv, as a guest
In' The Holder of the World,
Mukherjee offers a twist on her
earlier books; she writes of an
American woman and what hap-
pens to her once she travels to
India. The heroine, Hannah
Easton, transforms from an or-
phan raised in a Puritan house-
hold to a rebel�"neither wife nor
queen"�striding into the
enemy's war camp.
Easton was born in 1670, in
the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
Her father was killed by a bee and
her mother ran off with a Nipmuc
Indian. Hannah is left on the door-
step of a traditional New England
family and handed down wisdom
on how to be an "agreeable bride
and efficient helpmeet
At age 21, her life abruptly
changes when a dashing, one-
eyed seafarer arrives from Lon-
don, asks permission to court her
and proposes marriage. They
move to India, and she becomes
known as the "Salem Bibi"�mis-
tress to a Rajah, hostage of an
Emperor.
The Holder of the World is
Mukherjee's attempt to change
how Americans think about his-
tory. India is revealed as a coun-
try of profound influence on early
settlers. Hannah lives as danger-
ously � and as bravely�as the
more famous male characters of
classic American fiction.
The Holder of the World is pub-
lished by Alfred A. Knopf and
has a suggested retail price of $22.
"Everything in
excess! To enjoy
the flavor of life,
take big bites.
Moderation is
for monks'
-RA. Heinlein
enezer
1 md ov er-
� i ratchit;
mdicapped child,
; Si r lOge's nephew
who urges his ill-natured
to be merry at Christmas.
to the storv are the
Ghosts ot Christmases Past,
Present and et to Come and the
figure oi Scrooge himself before
the drive tor gain altered his per-
sonality and tate and caused him
to greet Christmas with a spite-
till, "Bah' Humbug
typical ot much ot Dickens'
writing, A Christmas Carol was
based on the prolific novelist's
idealistic beliefs in the unity of
humanity, the necessity of good
w ill and generosity in human con-
duct and kindness to children and
to the poor.
This year marks the 105th an-
niversary of the first publication
of the book, which is considered
Dickens' best known and most
beloved storv. Despite the fact that
A Christmas Carol was written to
help relieve enormous financial
pressure on its author and that he
spent an inordinate amount of
time and trouble perfecting it,
Dickens insisted that the book be
nicelv packaged by its publisher
and sold for only five shillings
per copv.
The Bill Fegan troupe has pre-
sented its Christmas Carol produc-
tions many times during the past
16 years. "We salute the success
of the storv and hope it continues
to touch people's lives and give
them an enjoyable break from the
normal hustle and bustle of the
holiday season commented a
company official.
Advance tickets for A Christ-
mas Carol are SI 5 each for the gen-
eral public, $12 for ECU faculty
and staff and $8 for ECU students
and youth. All tickets sold at the
door will be $15. Tickets are now
on sale at the ECU Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall Student
Center. Orders may be charged to
major credit cards by mail or by
phone (757-4788 or long distance,
1-800-ECU-ARTS).
Wright Auditorium is fully
wheelchair-accessible and is
equipped with assistive listen-
ing devices for those with hear-
ing impairments. Other special
services (large-print or Braille-
printed programs, sign language
interpretation, etc.) can be ar-
ranged for patrons with physi-
cal disabilities if prior notice is
given to Ticket Office personnel.
MAKE
TOR
BOOKS
feBuyMoieUsed BcdssThan
Anyone Mown. Period
c
9&
516 S. Cotanche Street, 758-2616
Opentil 8 PM Dec. 8,9,13 & 14 Open til 6 PM Dec. II





X-MAS
Continued from page 9
December 2, 1993
Kxi for
one year aftei the purchase date and
are available at $16 tor adults and $8
for those aged .six to 15. here is no
admission for children under six
With the annual pass, you also
getdisoounls in the park 'sSkv Lounge
gift shop and snack bar. and you'll
receive Chimney Rock's seasonal
newsletter.
�sions i osl SL' tor
for si through 15-
ids under six get in free.
- is located on I lighway
miles southeast of
- ilk It is open daily except
Christmasani: New Year's Days, for
more information, write to Chimney
Rock Park, P.O. Box 39, Chimney
Rock, NIC, 28720, or call roll-free at 1-
800-277-9611.
So, if you've had your fill of
crowded malls and other holiday
mayhem, head west this weekend to
see Santa in a more natural�and re-
laxing�setting.
Who's There?
Attic
Thurs. EgyptBlackeyed Peas
Fri. Everything
Sat. Dillon Fence
O'Rocks
Sat.
Kill KidsJennyanykind
Peasants Cafe
Thurs. Leftovers Fri. Rare Daze
Sat. Flying Mice
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
CKLCSS
Central
News
15 off Everything
except Newspapers and Magazines
with this ad and ECU ID
Expires 12-31 -93
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
&tea& 6efaie exzm4
Friday, December 3
Christenbury Gymnasium
8:00pm - Midnight
� FREE Fitness Classes
� Basketball at 8:00pm
� Volleyball at 10:00pm
� Weight Room &
Swimming Pool open
Call ECU Recreational Services at 757-6387 for more details.
300K
Continued
from page 9
Black talks about a state of
mind that is half-lie and half-truth,
comparing it to the red and black
ribbon of an old typewriter. One
can never go entirely into the red
or the black, because doing so
leaves behind too many unan-
swered questions. Through this
analogy, Black captures perfectly
the indecisiveness of the human
race, focusing on the mystery of
the human mind and its complexi-
ties.
Through Steven, Black ques-
tions reality as mankind com-
monly accepts it. What is real and
what is not? What is normal and
what is abnormal? All of us have
heard voices inside our head. Is
Steven's Kev any different? Black
never answers these questions for
the reader, wisely knowing that
one answer may not satisfy all.
Again, the world is a mix, neither
all red nor all black.
Me and Kev will, if nothing
else, cause readers to stop and
think for a minute. This book
should be read three or four times
so that the reader can grasp its
many hidden levels of meaning.
On the surface, Me and Kev
emerges as a disturbing book. Peel
away the outer layer, however,
and you will discover another
layer, and another, and another
like an onion that will make you
cry.
fSfc -ft- 10-3
Sniper SioRe wep ,& Thurs $20 Deposrr
$3 0 off 18K DRawiNij for FRee RiNw
OPEN ,
yjgtsoccERs:
Greenville Square (K-Mart) Shopping Center
Greenville, IMC 27858 919-756-7475 ;
Shoes (indoor, outdoor), shirts, uniforms, balls,
goals, videos and all your soccer needs.
teafcg2teSki&ek
ECU PIRATE RIDE & ESCORT SERVICE
The ECU Transit Pirate Ride will now operate an
additional two and a half hours on Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday. Previously the Pirate Ride
stopped at 12:00am, but now it will run until
2:30am with an added stop on 5th street. We
encourage students to take advantage of this
service as a safe means of transportation on our
campus.
The Student Government Association is also
sponsoring the 'Student Safety- Pirate Watch"
escort service. If a student needs an escort they
should call Public Safety at 757-6787.
SPEND YOUR WINTER BREAK
AT SNOWSHOE.
FUN&PART1ES
PLUS
FANTASTIC SKIING!
JANUARY2thru4orJANUARY6thm8
4th night option available, Jan. 5
Lodging
nights
Where else can you have as much fun on a macaroni
and cheese budget than during Snowshoe's InterCollegiate Ski
Week This special package gives students 33 savings on 3 or
4 daynight packages. Plus! A 'Welcome Aboard Party . NAS-
AK clinic and race tickets, 50 savings on group ski lessons,
discounted rates on ski rentals and outrageous live entertain-
ment throughout the week.
Be certain to hang out 'til Saturday for the 'Winter
Break Fest sponsored by Budweiser & Dannon yogurtfun
races, a huge party, games and prizes for all.
So, plan now to BREAK for Snowshoe, and experience
some of the best tun and skiing in the East!
Cnowshoc
�SMLVER CREEK
For Reservations Call 304-572-5252





The East Carolinian
What's On Tap:
Friday, Dec. 3
M. Basketball, away
at Mount 3 Tip-Oft
Tournament, Emmitsburg, Md.
vs. Columbia at 6 p.m.
Central Connecticut State vs.
Mount St. Mary's at 8 p.m.
Recreational Services
Reckless & Wildr registration in
BIO 103 at 8 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 4
M. Basketball, away
at Mount St. Mary's Tip-Off
Tournament, Emmitsburg, Md.
Consolation Game at 6 p.m.
Championship Game at 8 p.m.
M. & W. Swimming
vs. American University at 1 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 6
M. Basketball
vs. Campbell University at 7 p.m.
W. Basketball, away
at N.C. A&T, Greensboro, N.C.
at 7 p.m.
The 411
Monday, Nov. 29
M. Basketball, away
lost to UNC-Charlotte, 62-85
Tuesday, Nov. 30
W. Basketball, away
lost to Campbell, 62-81
Men's CAA Leaders
STANDINGS
Team Conference GBOverall
ODU 0-0 .000 �2-0 1.00
GMU 0-0 .000 �1-0 1.00
UR 0-0 .000 �1-0 1.00
JMU 0-0 .000 �1-1 .500
AU 0-0 .000 �0-1 .000
ECU 0-0 .000 �0-1 .000
W&M 0-0 .000 �0-1 .000
UNCVV 0-0 .000 �0-2 .000
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS
Scoring Avg
Mike Hodges, UR300
Renwan Alford, GMU29.0
Donald Ross, GMU23.0
Petey Sessoms. ODU21.0
Kurt Small, W&M21.0
Rebounding Avg
Khyl Horlon, GMU18.0
Andrew Fingall, GMU16.0
Mike Hodges, UR14.0
Renwan Alford, GMU12.0
David Cully, W&M11.0
Assist Avg
Troy Manns, GMU9.0
Curtis McCants, GMU6.0
Kevin Swann, ODU5.5
Kevin Larkin, ODU5.0
Dennis Leonard, JMU45
Field Goal
Jeremy Metzger, UR1.00
David Cully, W&M857
Darren Moore, UNCW.800
Mike Hodges, UR.769
Kenwan Alford, GMU.750
Free Throw
Kevin Swann, ODU1.00
Eugene Burroughs, UR 1.00
Kass Weaver, UR1.00
Louis Moore, ECU1.00
Christopher Jensen, W&M 1.00
3-pt Field Goal
Curtis McCants, GMU1.00
Donald Ross, GMU.636
Kevin Larkin, ODU.500
Lester Lyons, ECU.500
Eugene Burroughs500
TEAM LEADERS
Scoring Margin
Old Dominion21.0
Richmond140
George Mason10.0
James Madison4.0
William & Mary-13.0
UNC Wilmington-13.0
East Carolina�23.0
American-35.0
Rebounding Margin
George Mason25.0
Richmond4.0
James Madison0.5
UNC Wilmington0.0
Old Dominion-0.5
William & Mary-5.0
American-5.0
East Carolina-16.0
Field Goal
Richmond54.5
Old Dominion45.8
James Madison44.9
George Mason44.9
UNC Wilmington42.1
William & Mary39.4
East Carolina30.5
American27.3
Del. Field Goal
George Mason38.3
Old Dominion405
East Carolina42.6
American463
Richmond463
William & Mary492
James Madison52.6
UNC Wilmington57.0
Compiled by Brad Oldham
Sports
December 2, 1993
Camels down Lady Pirates
Stockwell scores 27
File Photo
Fruky Blackmon scored 14 points and grabbed 7 rebounds in ECU'S
loss to Campbell Tuesday night.
Laimbeer ready to pack
his bags and move on
RICHFIELD, Ohio (AP) �
Bill Laimbeer, whose flying el-
bows helped give the Detroi t Pis-
tons their "bad boy" image in the
late 1980s, may be through with
basketball.
"I won't deny it. How about
that?" Laimbeer said Tuesday
night when asked about reports
that he planned to retire yester-
day. "That's basically all I'm go-
ing to say right now
Laimbeer has been troubled
by an aching back, which kept
him out of Tuesday night's gn me
against the Cleveland Cavaliers.
Radio station WJR in Detroit
reported that three sources said
Laimbeer would announce his
retirement today. The radio sta-
tion didn't name the sources.
Coach Don Chaney said to-
day that team officials had tried
unsuccessfully in recent weeks
to talk Laimbeer out of his plans
to retire.
"We tried to team up on him
and we all took shots at him to try
to talk him out of it Chaney
told WWJ-radio in Detroit this
morning. But, he said Laimbeer
resolved that, "with all things
considered, it was best that he
step down
The Pistons scheduled a news
conference for 2:30 p.m. Spokes-
man Matt Dobek refused to con-
firm or deny that Laimbeer would
announce his retirement or that
he would even attend.
Laimbeer, 36, suited up for
the Pistons' game against the
Cavaliers, but did not play.
In the fourth quarter of the
Pistons' 92-74 loss, theCleveland
crowd chanted, "We want Bill
"I heard them Laimbeer
said. "We were talkingabouthow
I should stand up and fake going
to the scorer's table
The 6-foot-ll Laimbeer had
started the previous five games
and averaged 12.7 points per
game in his last six. He is averag-
ing 9.8 points this season.
"It's a complete surprise. I
had no idea said Boston's Rob-
ert Parish, who was suspended
several years ago for punching
Laimbeer during a playoff game.
"He'd had some good games. I
think he had a 25-pointer last
week
Laimbeeraveraged indouble
figures for nine consecutive sea-
sons from 1982-83 through 1990-
91, and last season he became the
19th player in NBA history to
reach 10,000 points and 10,000
rebounds.
"Before thegame, he just said
he wanted to do other things in
life teammate Terry Mills said.
"Hesaid hecouldn'tstillgiveup
his body and do things the way
he likes to do them. He's going
out the right way
Laimbeer is the Pistons' ca-
reer leader in rebounds and
games played, and he led the
NBA in rebounding in 1985-86,
averaging 13.1 per game.
"He played a long time Do-
minique Wilkins of the Atlanta
Hawks said. "He won't be
missed, that's for sure. I had
plenty of run-ins with him
Laimbeer reportedly had
considered quitting after he and
teammate Isiah Thomas got in a
fight at practice Nov. 16. Thomas
broke his right hand when he
punched Laimbeerln the back of
the head.
"We love each other. That's
the bottom line, and that won't
ever change Laimbeer said the
day after the fight.
A product of Notre Dame,
Laimbeer was chosen by Cleve-
land in the third round of the
1979 draft, then spent the 1979-
80 season playing in Italy before
joining the Cavaliers for most of
two seasons.
Cleveland traded him to De-
troit in February 1982 as part of a
deal involving four players and
two draft choices.
He was selected to the All-
Star team four times and helped
Detroit win NBAchampionships
in 1989 and'90.
"He's one of those guys ev-
ery fan outside of Detroit hates
Jeff Hornacek of the Philadelphia
76ers said. "But if you're from
Detroi t, you have to love the guy.
Being a shooter, I'd love to play
with a guy like that. I have no
idea why he'd call it quits at this
point in the season. I guess he
didn't see the Pistons going to
the playoffs
Chaney would not con-
firm Laimbeer's retirement
plans.
"There's been rumors of him
retiring all year, and he's still
here Chaney said. "That's
something I can't do anything
about, anyway. Even in training
camp, there was speculation, but
you have to go on
Buies Creek (SID) � Beth
Stockwell matched her career
high with 27 points and added 10
rebounds to lead Campbell Uni-
versity to an 81-62 women's bas-
ketball win over East Carolina
Tuesday night at Carter Gymna-
sium in the season opener for
both teams.
Susan Bess-Gilkerson added
12 points and a career-high 10
rebounds for the Lady Camels,
while a senior guard Amy Nigro
canned 18 points, 11 in the sec-
ond period.
Stockwell, a sophomore from
Douglas, Ga made 10-of-22 field
goals and hit 7-of-9 free throws
for the Lady Camels.
Despite taking the floor with
only eight available players due
to injuries, Campbell defeated
ECU for only the third time in 22
meetings in the series. The 19-
point victory was a 1st) the largest
for Campbell over a Lady Pirate
squad.
Stockwell scored 17 points in
the opening period as CU took a
43-25 halftime advantage. ECU,
however, opened the second half
with a 12-3 run to trim the mar-
gin to 46-37.
Tracy Kelley's short jumper,
Danielle Charlesworth's layup
and two free throws by Keliey
brought ECU within 55-51 with
11:30 remaining, but the Lady
Pirates could draw any closer.
After Justine Allpress's layup
cut theCampbell margin to59-53
with 10 minutes to play,
Ca m pbel 1 went on a 22-4 run over
the next 8:57 to seal the victory.
Nigro scored six points in the
flurry while Debbie Knight
added five to give Campbell an
81-57 margin.
Sophomore Chrystal Smith
handed out a career-high 13 as-
sists for Campbell, which plays
again next Tuesday (November
7) at home against Barton Col-
lege in a 7 p.m. tipoff.
Charlesworth led East Caro-
lina with 15 points on 6-of-12
shooting. Temekia Blackmon
contributed 14 points and seven
rebounds before foulingout with
1:04 to play. Keliey added 10
points and seven boards for the
Lady Pirates, who play at North
Carolina A&T on Monday.
"I was really proud of the
way our team came out so
strong Head coach Wanda
Watkins said. "It was nice to see
our players complement each
other. I was really pleased with
the poise that Beth Stockwell
played with tonight. It was good
to see her come out in the begin-
ningofhersophomoreyear play-
ing in such a dominant fashion
Jags win
NFL's
30th slot
ROSEMONT, 111. (AP) �The
NFL owners had a surprise up.
their sleeve.
Jacksonville, the longshot, be-
comes the NFL's 30th franchise,
joining the Carolina Panthers 5
when the league expands for the
1995 season.
"It's football country Jerry
Jones, owner of the Dallas Cow-
boys, said after the 26-2 vote that
made theJacksonvillejaguarsand
their green, orange and black .
spotted uniforms a reality. "We, ;
get a lot of our talent out of there. �
and they're the only game ifl
town
Jacksonville beatouttwooUl!
NFL cities, St. Louis and Balrt
more,aswellasMemphis,onecJ" �
the favorites when the league be
gan lookingatexpansion six years
ago.
It was done largely on the
recommendation of Tagliabue,
who said he decided on Monday.
that Jacksonville was his choice -
"As the process evolved, it,
became clearer and clearer that
the Southeast was a terrific areaA
for football, for sports and for the
NFL J,
The Southeast was also the -
See JACKSONVILLE page 16
2001: a Wake Forest odyssey
(SID) �East Carolina Univer-
sity and Wake Forest University
havecontractuaily agreed toa two-
game football series, ECU Direc-
tor of Athletics Dave Hart, Jr an-
nounced Wednesday.
The Pirates will open the sea-
son in 2001 in Winston-Salem,
N.Cagainst the Demon Deacons.
Wake Forest will return the visit to
Ficklen Stadium on Sept. 7,2002.
Wake Forest is the second At-
lantic Coast Conference school to
appearon the EastCarolina sched-
ule during the next 10 years.
The Pirates will play at Duke
on Sept. 10,1994and host the Blue
Devils on Sept. 11,1999 in Ficklen
Stadium.
The games against Duke and
Wake Forest mark the first con-
tacts with ACC schools to play in
Greenville in over 25 years.
Wake Forest visited Ficklen
Stadium on Sept. 21,1963, which
was the dedication game of
Ficklen Stadium. The Pirates also
visited Winston-Salem on Sept.
22,1979.
Florida State visited Green-
ville during the 1987 season, but
was not a member of the ACC at

��mmnmmm
ECU'S football
team has added
the Deamon
Deacons totheir
future schedule.
The will play a
home-and-
home series
beginning in
2001.
the time.
"We are very pleased to an-
nouncea home-and-home con tract
with Wake Forest Hart said. "It
took several months for both par-
File Photo
ties to identify dates which would
enable us to begin what we hope
could develop into a long, pro
ductive series for both institu-
tions
West Virginia hoping to play in Sugar Bowl
CHARLESTON, W.Va.(AP)�
High-ranking West Virginia offi-
cials appear to be leaning toward
playing in the Sugar Bowl, while
the Cotton Bowl is said to be heavily
pursuing the Mountaineers.
But Mountaineer players, with-
out whom West Virginia (11-0)
wou'dn't be undefeated, ranked
third in the country and poised to
accept a major bowl bid, have their
own ideas.
"Ideally, weshould play Notre
Dame in the Sugar Bowl said West
Virginia senior linebacker Wes
Richardson.
But that's not an option, since
the Sou theastern Conference cham-
pion, either No. 9 Florida (9-2) or
No. 16 Alabama (8-2-1), is ensured
one spot in the Sugar.
"Since the bowl coalition
doesn1allow(aWVU-NotreDame
match-up), obviously the whole
system is screwed upRichardson
said. "With all the controversy, it
could be cleared up with us playing
Notre Dame
Richardson was referring to the
dispute over national champion-
ship possibilities. If the Mountain-
eers win, they believe they should
be considered for No. 1 because
they haven't lost.
The Mountaineers believe
they could stake an undisputed
claim to the title by beating the.
Irish and having No. 1 Florida
State beat No. 2 Nebraska (11-0)
in the Orange Bowl, since No. 5
Notre Dame (10-1) beat the Semi-
noles (11-1) during the regular
season.
A WVU-Notre Dame match-
up, however, isn't an option in
any bowl at the moment Instead,
See BOWLS page 16
Referees and linesmen end NHL strike
MONTREAL(AP)�Thestrike
isoverand National Hockey League
referees and linesmen could be back
on the ice by tonight.
After the two sides met for nine
hours, commissioner Gary Bettman
and Don Meehan, chief negotiator
for the officials, Tuesday night an-
nounced a tentative agreement in
principal had been reached.
"Both sides need to go through
the ratification processa weary and
irritated Bettman said. "I need the
board of governors' approval and
Don Meehan needs the approval of
his members.
"We'll try to accomplish that
within the next 24 hours. If all goes
well, the officials will be back on the
ice by Thursday
the league and the NHL Offi-
cials Association agreed not to re-
lease details of the agreement until
they have consulted their members.
Referee Terrv Gregson, the
association's president, said results
of the vote, to be taken by telephone,
should be in by this afternoon.
"I'm pleased said Gregson,
who promised to reach all of the
58 officials.
The referees and linesmen,
whose coi iective barga i ning agree-
ment expired Aug. 31, went on
strike Nov. 15.
Since then, games have been
played using replacement referees
and linesmen drawn from junior,
university and minor professional
ranks. Their officiating has been
criticized by some players, includ-
ing Brett Hull of the St. Louis Blues
and Theoren Heury of the Calgary
See NHL page 15

-





'�� iWnt
December 1, 1993
imed player of the year
The East Carolinian 14
n nj h nors by being ch( tsen
� thf year and offensive
r of the fcir by The Associ-
ated Press on I uesday.
"We pretty much had the
offense. A lot of guys who
played defense were here thisyear,
too he slid. "It was a challenge
for the team to go out and prove
itself.
"We went out and did what
we needed to do
The voters in the Atlantic
Coast Sports Writers Association
rewarded Ward for making his
point to the league this year and
winning Florida State's second
tiiJain as many years in the ACC.
Ward gt)t 84 of the85 votes for
offensive player of the year. The
other vote went to Maryland quar-
terback Scott Milanovich. In the
. ward
ent to
who
pty-1 landed le
playerthe
player of the
received 63 votes.
mmatel errick Alexander got
iU, North Carolina defensive
back Bracey Walker was next with
seven, Seminole defensive back
Corey Sawyer received two and
fourother players split the remain-
ing four votes.
Ward either owns or shares
17 school offensive records. They
include season and career marks
for total offense, the single game,
season and career records for
passescompleted, and most touch-
down passes in a season.
Also the point guard for
Florida State's basketball team,
Ward is the ACC's top-rated
passer and is rated fourth in the
country. He produced 3,371 yards
of offense thisyear, second in the
ACC to Milanovich and seventh
in the latest NCAA statistics.
While they are numbers to be
proud of, Wan) is far from gloat-
ing.
"I still have room for improve-
ment he says. "People look at
you mm. say you're the best, but I
still have room for improvement.
I'm not perfect yet. I haven't
thrown my perfect game
Brooks had outscored the op-
position at one point this season,
but nagging injuries kept him off
the field late in the year. He did
score three touchdowns in the first
four games while opponents had
managed two touchdowns.
The Seminoles were also the
best defensive team in the league
by more than 40 yards a game.
Brooks finished the regular sea-
son with a flexible cast on his arm
as Florida State knocked off
Florida to keep alive its chances
for the national championship.
"HecamebackagainstFlorida
on Saturday and played. I'll be
honest with you, he probably
wasn't over 80 percent of his natu-
ral self Florida Statecoach Bobby
Bowden said. "Still, I thought he
made his point in that ball game.
He was obvious several times
1996 Shrine Bowl set for Carolinas
CHARLOTTE (AD - The
19 Shrine Bowl will be played
in the Carolinas NFL Stadium,
the Carolina Panthers said Tues-
day.
The 72,300-sea t Carolinas Sta-
dium is under construction and
scheduled for completion for the
1996 season.
"Moving into Carolinas Sta-
dium is a major development in
the history of the Shrine Bowl
and a challenge to make thegame
itself worthy of such a spectacu-
lar venue and the finest football
stadium in thecountry'saidCD.
McClure, chairman of the Shrine
Bowl of the Carolinas Inc.
The Shrine Bowl pits the best
high school football players from
North Carolina against those
from South Carolina. This year's
Shrine Bowl will be played Dec.
18and will no longer conflict with
the North Carolina High School
Athletic Association state play-
offs.
Holiday cheer from the East Carolinian:
Have a happy and safe New Year. Don't take any wooden nickles
Mmm, egg nog! "Hey, Frank! Now's your chance � Bill is standing
under the mistletoe Live long and prosper. Use the force.
A OUSTMAS GfT
IBOM tQ) SUM
SIGHS H) YOU
SAVE 20
on regular wearing apparrel.
one item per coupon.
Student Stores
ECU Student Stores: More than just books�
your dollars support student scholars
One Stop Shopping at the Heart of Campus
Located in Wright Building � 757-6731 � Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
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�w�T.�waW inwin�m







� in- iililiWi
December 2, 1993
l
iated Press Top 25
3. Kansas (13)
4. Noith Carolina
5. Michigan (3)
6. Duke (1)
7. Temple (1)
8. Oklahoma St.
9. Massachusetts
10. UCLA (1)
11. Louisville
12. Virginia
13. California
14. Purdue
15. Minnesota
16. Illinois
17. Georgia Tech
18. Syracuse
19. Arizona
20. Vanderbilt
(2)
4-0
3-1
1-0
1-0
0-0
2-0
4-1
1-0
0-1
0-0
1-1
3-0
2-2
0-0
0-1
1-0
0-0
1-0
liana 0-1
Washington 0-0
23. Cincinnati 1-1
24. Wisconsin 1-0
23. Georgetown 1-1
Others receiving votes:
Marquette 103, Connecticut 99,
Florida State 90, Ohio State 82,
Xavier, Ohio 81, Boston Col-
lege 79, Maryland 54, Western
Kentucky 47, LSU 44, Mem-
phis State 43, Missouri 31, Penn
26, Tulane 26, Virginia Com-
monwealth 22, Nebraska 21,
Seton Hall 21, Alabama 18, New
Mexico State 18, Pepperdine 14,
New Orleans 12, Washington
State 11, Texas 10, Butler 6,
Georgia 6, West Virginia 5, Ten-
nessee St. 4, Arizona State 3,
Oklahoma 3, Brigham Young
2, Coppin State 1, Idaho 1, Old
Dominion 1, UNLV1.
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: What current ECU basketball player won
Mr. Basketball honors as a high school player
in Minnesota?
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Have an opinion on
the Heisman?
The Top 25?
Who do you think is
the best player in the
NBA? Let the sports
staff of
Tlie East Carolinian
know by submitting a
letter and we may let
the whole campus
know how you feel.
Drop by our office
and give our
wonderful secretary,
Deborah Daniels
your submission. We
are located in Student
Pubs across from
Joyner Library.
Natural
Budweiser
NHL
Continued from
page 15
Flames.
Under the old agreement, first-
year referees earned $50,000 a year
while rookie linesmen earned $33,000.
The league offered referees a 29
percent salary increase and l inesmen
a 26 percent hike. The officials origi-
nally asked for a 60 percent pay raise
but have reportedly agreed to accept
the league's offer in exchange for
improved pensions, severance pay
and other benefits.
Montreal referee Dave Jackson
saidTuesdayheislookingforwardto
returning to work.
"I'm glad to supposedly be go-
ing back said Jackson, in his first
year as an NHL referee. "I have no
idea whatwe settled for.Itwasstress-
ful. It always is
Tuesday's negotiations, which
were the first face-to-face meeting of
the twosidessinceNov.22 in Buffalo,
began at a hotel in suburban Dorval
at 11 ajn. There wasplenty of move-
ment in and out of the room through
the afternoon and evening before the
two sides emerged at 8 p.m. to an-
nounce the agreement.
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Introducing the new Apple Computer Loan. Right now, with this spe- January 28,1994, your first payment is deferred for 90 days. It's an
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December 2, 1993
The East Carolinian 16

ONVILLE
First, the expansion an-
nitteesvoti irjackson-
ville. ITie other two votes were for
Baltimore �� from Robert Tisch of
BOWLS
It! II KJ . uTITIdn
phia.
Then acksonville won on the
,vith only Braman and
� iweinofNewEngland,a
r partner in one of the St Lovds
2againstthecity.The
Giants, with co-owner Wellington
Mara casting the vote, switched to
Jacksonville.
By going to Jacksonville, the
Continued from page 13
!FL is going to a ci ty wi th no other
professional franchises. But it'salso
invading a hot college football area
� Florida and Florida State are
within two hours, meaning an NFL
expansion franchise will be com-
peting for fans with two national
championship contenders.
All that made the selection an
upset.
"I'm not surprised about any-
thing said Ralph Wilson, owner
of the Buffalo Bills. "You never go
into any meeting with a predeter-
mined view
The vote may lead to more flux.
The Los Angeles Ra ms, Cincin-
nati Bengals and New England Pa-
triots all have indicated they might
move. Baltimore is interested in the
Rams and St. Louis in the Patriots,
largely because of Orthwein, who
took over New England as a favor
to the league.
Tagliabue downplayed that.
"We will follow our normal
process for moving teams he said,
citing rules which require owners
to show that they can do better in a
new territory than their own. He
declined tocommentwhen asked if
any current teams met those crite-
ria,butsaidhe'scommitted to keep-
Continued from page 13
ingthePatriotsin New England.
The Jacksonville group is
headed by J. Wayne Weaver, a
Connecticut shoe manufacturer,
and includes Jeb Bush, son of
former President George Bush.
It will play in the Gator Bowl,
renovated for $121 million and
cut back from 82,000 to 73,000
seats with 10,000 club seats and
68 luxury boxes.
the only place West Virginia and
Notre Dame are squaring off is be-
hind the scenes in bowl negotia-
tions, where both universities ap-
pear to be fighting for a spot in the
lucrative Sugar Bowl.
"Everybody wants Notre
Dame a source close to the bowl
negotiations said Tuesday. "Their
TV ratings are light years ahead of
everyone in college football
Everybody might want Notre
Dame, but the Sugar Bowl still will
need some help from pollsters to
get the Irish.
The way the bowl coalition's
poll currently shakes out, the Cot-
ton Bowl gets first choice and will
likely extend the bid to the Moun-
taineers, who just as likely will
refuse.
Cotton Bowl executive direc-
tor Rick Baker said those two
moves will be all that's needed to
seal the Sugar and Cotton pair-
ings.
"The Big East champion and
ACC champion and Notre Dame
must play in the Orange, Suga r or
Cotton unless it's 1 vs.2 Baker
said. "So obviously if West Vir-
ginia passes (over the Cotton) to
the Sugar Bowl, again there is no
other option
Under tha t scenario, West Vir-
ginia Would play Saturday's Ala-
bama-Florida winner and earn
$4.15 million from theSugar. Notre
Dame would play No. 7 Texas
A&M (10-1) in the Cotton, which
pays out S3 million per team.
But there's a different possi-
bility that could reverse thedesti-
nationsofWest Virginia and Notre
Dame.
Under it, Florida would blud-
geon Alabama and climb higher
in tne coalition rankings than
Texas A&M, thereby winning first
choice for the Sugar. In that case,
the Sugar might choose West Vir-
ginia when the pairings are offi-
cially ex tended Sunday, or it might
op. f'or NotreDameand the Irish's
powerful TV following.
Sugar executive director Troy
Mathieu declined to say who his
bowl favors.
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 2, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 02, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.979
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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