The East Carolinian, November 18, 1993







to
ol Awareness
rt out the
What place
'�ee Chapter
tore from 10
Lifestyle
Check out Gray Gallery
The Gray Gallery will
be hosting an exhibition
called "In Celebration
of Craft: A North
Carolina Heritage" from
Nov. 18 to Dec. 23.
Story page 7.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 68
Circulation 12,000
Youths caught
damaging cars
By Maureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
Thanks to a concerned citi-
zen of Greenville, ECU police
arrested four individuals Tues-
day night responsible for ap-
proximately $30,000 worth of
vehicle damage, police said yes-
terday.
The arrests took place
within a matter of minutes, after
police responded to a call placed
at 9:23 p.m Officers recovered
an aluminum baseball bat and a
claw hammer which ti.e four
males, one 16-year-old and three
15-year-olds, used to repeatedly
strike 17 vehicles parked in the
lots at Fourth and Reade Streets.
Two harmed vehicles were
parked along Fourth Street near
the intersection of Reade Street.
Vehicle damage included bro-
ken windows, headlights and
body damage.
"It was just senseless said
ECU Lt. Keith Knox. "All they
said was they did it 'for the fun
of it
In recent months ECU po-
licearrested four individuals for
similar offenses. Twoof the indi-
viduals were ECU students,
Knox said. Two were arrested
for breaking into vehicles, and
two were apprehended after
vandalizing vehicles.
Although the individuals
responsible for Tuesday night's
destruction are juveniles, the 16-
year-old will be prosecuted as
an adult, Knox said. Police will
present the facts of the crime to
a j uvenile court counselor, who
will determine the 15-year-olds'
punishments.
Police plan to seek juve-
nile petitions against the three
15-year-olds. "We expect to
seek some type of restitution for
the victims Knox said. "Insur-
ance will cover the damage, but
it can't replace the victims' time
and loss. Individuals should be
held accountable for Lheir ac-
tions
"We'd like to thank the
individual whocalled us Knox
said. "Anyone who sees any
kind of similar actions � pick
up that phone. You never know
what that person is up to
Greenville Police were no-
tified and are conducting an in-
vestigation into the incident, as
two of the damaged vehicles
were parked off-campus.
Gobble,
Gobble,
Gulp!
Look out Moms,
we are coming
home! Anxious
students
everywhere are
dreaming of that
holiday of
holidays,
THANKSGIVING.
God, how we
need a good
meal after
writing all these
papers.
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
Greenville focuses
on homeless
By Richard Holt
Staff Writer
The Pitt County
Commissioner's office has
passed a resolution designating
Nov. 21, 1993, as the First An-
nual Pitt County Homeless Day.
Locally, this affects the Green-
ville Community Shelter, a
United Way Agency homeless
shelter for men, w( men and
children.
The executive director of
the facility, Rommi Drozdov, is
an ECU graduate student pur-
suing a M. A. in Public Adminis-
tration. The creation of the Pitt
County Homeless Day has been
a long-awaited event. "The sig-
nificance of this day is to ac-
knowledge the shelter's volun-
teers and to enable people to
recognize the homeless prob-
lem says Drozdov.
The homeless problem in
Greenville is more serious than
what people may immediately
realize. "There were 950
unduplicated homeless resi-
dents between October '92 and
October '93 says Drozdov.
The new designated Home-
less Day is also designed to draw
attention to providers of the shel-
ter. "Many area churches pro-
vide a great deal of food and
volunteers to serve it. In addi-
tion, Chico's has provided soup
for 60 people for the past five
years says Drozdov.
To commemorate the First
Annual Homeless Day, the
Greenville Shelter, is conduct-
See HOMELESS page 3
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, November 18,1993
16 Pages
JFK conspiracies abound after 30 yrs
EDITOR'S NOTE � Ameri-
cans in growing numbers reject the
conclusion that Lee Haroey Oswald,
acting alone, fired the shots that killed
President John F. Kennedy and
wounded former Texas Goik John
Connolly. After three decades and
countless books and TV specials, the
conspiraa issue threatens to over-
shadow both the Kennedy legend and
legacy.
ByMIKECOCHRAN
Associated Press Writer
DALLAS (AP)�In death as
in life, John Connally could not
escape theechoesofgunfire30years
ago in Dealey Plaza.
As the former Texas gover-
nor lay in state in Austin this sum-
mer, researchers were demanding
bullet fragments from his body.
They insisted tests would prove
President John F. Kennedy's slay-
ing was the result of a conspiracy.
"It's an appalling attempt to
capitalize on Governor Connally's
death to gain publicity for worn-
out theories said Julian Read, a
Connally confidant.
The attempt failed. The frag-
ments from the horror of Novem-
ber 1963 were buried with
Connally. But the theories were
not.
Indeed, they have never been
more pronounced than today, as a
generation of Americans born af-
ter the assassination reaches adult-
hood.
It is almost as if the tra uma of
Kennedy's death and the memory
of his Camelot cannot compete with
the clamor about conspiracy.
The question these three de-
cades later, it seems, is not "Who
was JFK?"
It is "Who killed JFK?"
Photo by Gregory Dickens
Kennedy was supposedly shot from the sixth floor window of the book depository (left) in Dallas, Texas.
His car was located at about the same area as the car in this photo taken 30 years later.
The sky was overcast that
Friday morning, but the autumn
sun melted away the chill and the
cloud cover as Air Force One made
the short hop from Fort Worth to
Dallas Love Field.
It was Nov. 22,1963.
At the urging of local politi-
cians, Kennedy ordered the reflec-
tive glass shield atop the presiden-
tial limousine removed.
"We can't have you hiding
from the people one official com-
plained.
And, after all, politics had
brought the president to Texas, a
pivotal and worrisome state in his
1964 re-election plans.
Huge, enthusiastic crowds
greeted the motorcade. Kennedy,
his wife Jackie at his side, smiled
and waved from the back seat. Up
front, John and Nellie Connally
beamed at the Texas welcome.
Just before 12:30 p.m the
motorcade slipped out of the glass
and steel canyons of downtown
and zigzagged toward Elm Street
and adrab,seven-storybrickbuild-
ing.
Moments before the limou-
sine reached the Texas School Book
Depository, Mrs. Connally turned
to Kennedy. And in one of the iro-
nies of history, she said, "No one
can say Dallas doesn't love and
respect you, Mr. President
"You sure can't he replied.
The first shot sounded like a
firecracker. The second and third
shots were unmistakably gunfire.
In 1964, the Warren Commis-
sion concluded that three shots were
fired on the motorcade, all from the
depository building's sixth floor
and all by Lee Harvey Oswald.
Soon,however, thefirstwave
of conspiracy buffs were arguing
over how many shots were fired,
from where and by whom. The
grassy knoll next to the book ware-
house would become, as one writer
called it, "an elevation on the
American landscape as prominent
as Mount Rushmore
Significantly, no one re-
ported seeing a second gunman
that day, and virtually everyone
reported hearing no more than
three shots.
Even so, the Warren Report
came under attack almost imme-
diately, and a zealous district at-
torney in New Orleans launched
an investigation that eventually
resulted in the only criminal trial
connected to the bloodshed in Dal-
las.
Jim Garrison prosecuted
businessman Clay Shaw on con-
spiracy charges in a trial that in-
cluded 34 days of testimony and
less than an hour of jury delibera-
tions. After the acquittal, Garrison
arrested Shaw for perjury, but the
courts dismissed the case, brand-
ing it outrageous and inexcusable
persecution.
Thirty years later, surveys
show thatmore than eightoutof 10
Americans do not accept the basic
conclusion that Oswald, a life-
time misfit, was the lone assas-
sin.
Yet, as so many reject the
commission's finding, the
Kennedy family itself accepts it.
The slain president's
brother, Sen. Edward Kennedy,
has refused to debate conspiracy
theorists or comment on their con-
tentions, but he complained re-
cently when informed a new book
would contain autopsy photo-
graphs and enhanced pictures of
the shooting from the Zapruder
film.
"This is the ultimate and
most heartbreaking exploitation
of President Kennedy he said,
"and it deeply saddens me
At the heart of most con-
spiracy arguments is whether the
samebullet�the so-called Magic
Bullet � could have passed
through Kennedy's upper back
and caused the wounds suffered
by Connally.
The two were struck almost
at the same instant. If the same
bullet could not have wounded
both men, there had to have been
a second bullet�and therefore a
See JFK page4
Health museum teaches kids
ECU students and staff volunteer time
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
ECU students and staff members
have been volunteering their time at the
Adventures in Health Children's Museum.
The museum was developed in 1987
to teach children and adults about some of
the health problems of today, and to pro-
mote healthy life-styles.
Karen Vail-Smith, one of the
founders, says that through the program
"our students get experience teaching
public school children and we get the op-
portunity to involve medical people with
education people to better instruct the
children
The exhibits focus on substance
abuse, fitness, stress and relaxation, nutri-
tion, dental health, bicycle safety and self-
esteem.
The museum also houses a resource
library for parents.
The exhibits are meant to teach by
giving visitors hands-on experience. Stu-
dents may place organs into a human
model, test their strength and cardiovas-
cular fitness or study the human body
through models and computers.
The student volunteers give tours,
teach classes, answer questions and repair
exhibits. "Many of the volunteers started
working at the museum to fulfill require-
ments for health classes and stayed on to
continue volunteering said Executive Di-
rector Sandra Stroehmann.
"These volunteers are so inspira-
tional Stroehmann said. "They are spend-
ing hours out here and they are our man-
power. We cannot afford to operate with-
out them
The museum is funded by state grants,
private and corporate donations and spe-
cial events. There is no admission charge at
the museum, but schools do pay for some
private workshops.
Adventures in Health is inside the
Science and Nature Center at River Park
North.
The complex also includes a collec-
tion of shells from around the world, live
frogs, lizards and snakes, as well as several
touch and learn displays.
Local elementary schools visit in the
mornings, and the museum is ope; to the
public Tuesday through Sunday 1 p.m. to 5
p.m. Interested volunteers may contact Di-
rector Sandra Stroehmann.
M

ECU fraternity
rocks away
By Brian Olson
Staff Writer
If you have driven down Fifth Street
the last couple of days, you might have
noticed some guys rocking away in rock-
ing chairs.
fhe Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity held
a 24-hour rock-a-thon from noon Tuesday
until noon Wednesday. Two brothers main-
tained a steady pace in rocking chairs on
the front porch for the time period. Mem-
bers of the fraternity traded places on and
off during the course of the long event.
"We worked really hard, and I am
proud of everybody who participated in
the event president Rick Erazo said.
This was the first rock-a-thon held by
the fraternity and because of its success it
may be done again in the future. Donations
were collected from individuals and busi-
nesses throughout Greenville. It was a suc-
cess, and �he fraternity raised a few hun-
dred dollars to benefit the Dream Factory
Foundation.
"We (Sigma Phi Epsilon) realize our
potential for helping the community phi-
See SIG EP page3





'titan
November 18. 1993
ound Other
College students gain credit access
students acrt.
ie nation are armed with credit
as Although the temptation to spend may lead to financial
disaster tor some students, a majority of students control the urge
to just charge it, officials say. A survey of college students' spend-
ing habits revealed that about 90 percent of the students polled
said it was important for them to have a credit card history in their
own name, said Stuart Himmelfarb of Roper College Track in New
York. "That means recognizing the importance of not messing it
up he said. According to Roper's survey of 4,000 full-time
students on 100 college campuses, students are not going on
massive shopping spree The survey also said that 56 percent of
undergraduate students have a credit card.
Rocky is getting a makeover
For years he has been the butt of numerous condom and sex
toy jokes on campus. He's been hazed by visiting fans. He's been
beaten by other Mid-American Conference mascots. Now, Uni-
versity of Toledo officials want him to change. In fact, they don't
"want him to be "him" anymore. The UT Athletic Logo Committee
Is in the process of redesigning UT's mascot, Rocky the Rock et, and
it wants the help of the student body. The committee provided the
following requirements of the new mascot: The mascot must be
gender-free, with no distinguishable male or female features; it
must have a friendly or smiling appearance; it must include a
design that can be made into a costume of great ease and mobility
for the wearer; and it must represent all cultures and ethnic groups
equally.
College freshmen work soup kitchens
Every freshman entering Stonehill College this year is re-
quired to donate a day of their time to St. Paul's Soup Kitchen, the
.ftabitat for Humanity, a homeless shelter or the Old Colony
Hospice. "I don't know of any other college that does anything like
-this with its entire incoming freshman class said the Rev. Dan
fesing, the founder of the "Into the Streets" program. The two-
-year-old program is a mandatory part of freshman orientation,
twhich is scheduled for two days. School officials say they created
the program to familiarize students with the community of North
lEaston and to make them aware of the social problems that exist
in the world outside of college. "It's proving to be a very positive
experience for everyone involved Issing said.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Geography fraternity welcomes new members
By Angie De Rosia
Staff Writer
Tuesday night, as part of this
year's National Geography Week,
ECU professor Dr. John Phillips
presented "I Spoke To The River
a lecture on fluvial geography and
the "New Dialogue with Nature
Tiiis is the first year the geog-
raphy department celebrated Ge-
ography Week as a singular de-
partment. New members to the Ge-
ography Fraternity, Gamma Theta
Epsilon, were inducted before the
presentation.
Vice-President of Gamma
Theta Epsilon Jamie Gosweiler and
Secretary Tracy Roberts presented
the ind uctees with their certificates.
New members inducted were: Ri-
chard Beachley, Teresa Boyd,
Marco Cedillo, Marvin Estes, Jane
Mculu, Mary Beth Morde, Rodney
Reeves, Susan Sayetta and Phillip
Scearce.
Each year, an expert in the
focus for the year is brought in to
give a lecture. This year's topic was
water, and the geography depart-
ment was fortunate to have their
expert, Dr. Phillips, on the staff.
Dr. Phillips received his
master's in geography at ECU and
then went on to Rutgers to work
toward his Ph.D. He is currently
the executive director of the
Pamlico Tar River Foundation.
He gave a slide presentation
that included research he did while
studying wetlandsinArizona. "We
learn about our world while speak-
ing to it Phillips said.
Phillips said the topic of wa-
ter should be of great importance
to everyone since a majority of this
earth is covered by water. "How
can we understand this earth we
live on without understanding riv-
ers?" Phillips said.
Prisoner decides to escape again
LEXINGTON, N.C. (AP) �
A prisoner in the Davidson Countv
jail who said he was not interested
in running anymore after he es-
caped and was caught in Montana
must have changed his mind.
Taking advantage of a short
diversion, Michael Sonner pushed
out a first-floor air conditioner,
wiggled outside, climbed a razor-
wire fence and escaped from the
jail Tuesday morning.
Two months ago, Sonner fled
a work detail while serving a 10-
year sentence at the Davidson Cor-
rectional Center for breaking and
entering. That escape lasted five
days. He was captured at a Grey-
hound bus station in Montana.
After his capture, Sonner
was charged with kidnapping,
armed robbery, rape, breaking and
entering and vehicle theft. Police
said Sonner broke into at least two
houses, stole vehicles and sexu-
ally assaulted a Virginia woman
while out.
The 25-year-old Virginia
native'slatestescapecameatabout
2:30 a.m. Tuesday after guards
emptied his cell to search for an
illegal radio, Davidson County
Sheriff's Major Billy Ray Nail told
the News & Record of Greensboro.
None of the guards saw the
escape until they were lending in-
mates back into the cell and no-
ticed the hole in the hallway.
Sonner had been at the Pied-
mont Correctional Center in
Salisbury. He came to Lexington
Monday morning for a court ap-
pearance this week in connection
with his September escape.
Photo by Leslie Petty
The geography department finally gets to celebrate National Geography
Week. The party started with this "Name the 50 States" contest.
Current and potential news writers MUST
attend the meeting at 5:30 p.m. today.
Alcohol affects almost every aspect of a person's life, especially
as college students. By presenting all the facts concerning alcohol
� bothgood and bad�we at The East Carolinian strive to present
the students at ECU with the education necessary to make an adult
choice.
By treating this issue in the way we have, The East Carolinian
recognizes that the students at East Carolina are adults and
should be treated as such. By not advocating a certain choice but
rather the freedom to make a choice, we hope that the students
would act responsibly when they reach that point in their lives.
With all the facts before them, the students will hopefully
reexamine their thoughts and attitudes about alcohol. If the
students are content with their situation, fine. If they feel the need
for a change, even better. The East Carolinian's main purpose is to
have all who read the campaign ask themselves one simple ques-
tion.
What place does alcohol have in my life?
F
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I 1. What is your gender?
a. Female
, b. Male
� 2. What is your classification in
� school?
I
I
I
a. Freshman
b. Sophomore
c. Junior
d. Senior
e. Graduate
a. 0 days
b. 1 to 2 days
c. 3 to 5 days
d. 6 to 10 days
e. More than 10 days
� 3. Which statement describes your
I situation?
I a. lam not a member of a
Greek organization.
b. I am a sorority member.
c. I am a fraternity
I member.
14. During the past 30 days,on how
many days did you have at least
� one drink of alcohol?
I
I
I
� 5. During the past 30 days, on how
� many days did you have 5 or more
I drinks of alcohol in a row within a
couple of hours?
i a. 0 days
i b. 1 to 2 days
Ic. 3 to 5 days
d. t to 10 days
' e. More than 10 days
6. Which statement best describes
your perception of alcohol
� consumption on the ECU campus
J before you came to campus?
' a. The amount of alcohol
consumed on the ECU campus is
not different from other campuses.
b. Alcohol consumption
I
c. Alcohol consumption on
the ECU campus is less than
� consumption on other campuses.
on the ECU campus is greater than
consumption on other campuses.
d. I do riot remember.
e. I have no opinion.
7. Which statement best describes
your perception of alcohol
consumption on the ECU campusnfrer
you came to campus?
a. The amount of alcohol
consumed on the ECU campus is not
different from other campuses.
b. Alcohol consumption on
the ECU campus is greater than
consumption on other campuses.
c. Alcohol consumption on
the ECU campus is less than
consumption on other campuses.
d. I do not remember.
e. Ihave no opinion.
8. Which statement best describes
your consumption of alcohol since
coming to ECU?
a. The amount I drink has
not changed.
b. I drink less alcohol.
c. i drink more alcohol.
d. I don't drink alcohol.
9. Which statemem best describes
you?
a. I read The East Carolinian
2 times a week.
b. i read The East Carolinian
1 time a week.
c. I do not read The East
Carolinian.
10. Each week for 12 weeks, 12
characters told a story about alcohol.
How manyof these "advertisements"
did you read in The East Carolinian?
a. I did not read the
advertising campaign.
b. I read less than 6 of the
advertisements.
c. I read more than 6 of the
advertisements.
d.I read all 12
advertisements.
11. Do you feel that the method used
in "The Case of the Ten Beers" was
effective in its intended message and
its intended audience?
a. Yes
b. No
Tfattsezmes!
i
i
i
Clip out this survey and turn it in for a free drink of Pepsi or O'Douls
in front of the Student Stores between 10 and 2 today. Free T-shirts
will also be given out randomly.
�"�� � -� � � wmmmtm �� � � m mttmrnmrnmrntmiaj
EAST $L It
CAROLINIAN VfW j I
Chapter 12
What the hell am 1 gonna do?
As I lean back in this recliner,
staring at the pockmarked ceiling
in my dingy office, I ask myself
that question over and over. I'd
gone searching for the truth be-
hind my old friend Al and I'd sure
gotten it. The problem was, do I
want Al to have a place in my life
now that I know what I know?
Sometimes I wish I'd never taken
this case.
Looking out my grimy sec-
ond-story window, the wind was
a-whistling and the dogs were a-
howling. Another one of
Beersborough's infamous down-
pours was in the making. Some-
how it didn't mean the same.
Something had changed and I still
wasn't quite sure what it was.
I turned back to my desk and
looked at the map the trucker had
left. I still didn't understand what
had happened with him, but this
map seemed to be my best bet to
make any sense out of this whole
mess 1 was in. Studying the route
he had taken, I realized that his
trip was real close to mine. Maybe
too close.
What did I really know about
Al, anyway? Had going back to
the Brewery really done any good?
Was I any closer to finding Al than
when I started? Not since my days
back on the force had there been
so many questions running
through my mind like a freight
train heading into the night, spear-
ing the darkness with its lone
headlamp.
I leaned back in my chair,
causing the chair to creak a warn-
ing once again, and thought about
what I had found out. There was a
lot more to Al than what I had
thought. And some of it wasn't
very good.
He's old, for one. Older than
he looks. The guy's been around
even longer than Beerstein, which
is saying a lot.
He gets around, too. Every-
one seemed to know him, or at
least have heard of him. Even col-
lege students knew him better than
I thought I did. Makes you won-
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
sorroivsfor a while.
Mick Hammered had sivorn never to set foot
in the Brewery again. Setting out to find his old
friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermented world of the Brewery.
Every Thursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a diameter who will expose Alma ivhole new light. When it's finally
over and done with, Mick�and the reader�will be faced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
&.
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
Joel Keggsy, The Beersborough Gazette
CAROLINIAN
der, Mick, are you as good as you
think you are?
1 thought about all of the
people Al had affected so strongly.
Coorstis, who w swell on his way
to drinking himself into an early
grave. The Director, who never
met Al but had to deal with his
effects whether he liked it or not.
Perhaps the big0est character that
stood out in my mind was the kid.
Johnny "Red" Cohol.
Think about it. A kid who
finds out his father is a major
mover-and-shaker in the Brew-
ery. Not the best place in the
world, by any means, and cer-
tainly not a place where you'd
want to grow up. Did the kid have
a choice? No. Fate threw him into
Al's hands and then into mine.
Sometimes I really wish he had
never stepped through my door.
I stare out my window again,
watching the rain stream down
like a cool drink down a parched
throat. Could I tell the kid any-
thing useful when he came in? I
don't know.
That's what really got me. I
hated leaving a case half-finished,
even though I knew I'd tracked
down every single lead I could. I
hadn't found Al and that fact sat
inside me as well as a three-day
old sandwich would. Not very
well, if you know what I mean.
I tilted back my chair and
pushed my fedora over my eyes. I
could hear the creaks and groans
of the building as it shifted in the
high wind. It reminded me too
much of my own age so I tried to
focus on something else. But mv
thoughts kept coming back to Al.
Do I really know Al Cohol?
Before this case, I would have
laughed at that question as I was
pushing the guy who asked it out
the door. But now, I'm not too
sure. See, there's one question that
keeps coming back to me, over
and over like a record whose
needle hit a scratch in it. Maybe
you can help me with it. I'll try
anything right about now.
What place does Al Cohol
have in my life?
BITS
204 E. 5TH ST.
752-6953





November 18, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
nity helps keep Greenville warm
e'ps out needy
inter Wrap-Up"
of the
li
' he 1 3 need) fami-
'IV l lie
Salvation Army and
ouncil on Aging chose the
ramilit - v, ho would receive this
n ice.
"Water heating is the sec-
ond largest energy user in the
home said Robbie Tugwell,
GUC's Energy Services Man-
ager, whose staff provided train-
ing and materials for the project.
HOMELESS
oi inter V.
.
ppri iximateh - h - 25 .� �
itility bills
GUC s nergy Services
start met with fraternity mem-
bers on rhursday, Nov. LOfora
hands on training session. GUC
also provided the insulated wa-
ter heater blankets and other
ry materials.
ommunity service is an
important part of our frater-
nity said Matt Austin, Pi
Kappa Alpha's Community Ser-
vice Chairman.
"Winter Wrap-Up was a
good way for us to help fami-
lies, and it also gave us a chance
to work with other organiza-
tions like GL'C, which is some-
thing we'd like to do more of in
the future
How many ECU
students does it
lake to install a
heater blanket?
Apparently,
three. These
P I K A s
volunteered their
time to help
families in
Greenville gear
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Continued from page 1
ing an open house on Sunday
Nov. 21. "The open house will
run from two until four o'clock
in the afternoon. Greenville's
Mayor, County Commissioner
and City Council will be in at-
tendance Drozdov said.
The problem of
homelessness is one which has
gained a good deal oi national
media attention during the past
several years. Similarly,
Greenville's attention will be riv-
eted to this event. "Greenville's
telev ision stations will cover the
event Drozdov said. "This will
help to expose the shelter to the
public
One of the most important
things that people can contribute
towards aiding this problem is to
volunteer or donate supplies. "We
are constantly in need of help
says Drozdov. This needed help
is in the form of volunteers and
donations.
Volunteers can work at the
shelter in capacities related tospe-
SIGEP
rial projects, shelter maintenance
and tood service. Constantly
needed supplies include: toilet-
ries, dish and laundry detergent,
linens and towels, disposable pa-
per dinnerware, office supplies,
coffee, sugar and stamps.
Persons interested in vol-
unteering at the shelter should
contact Rommi Drozdov at 752-
8766. Donations can be made bv
stopping by the shelter located at
207 Manhattan Ave between
Myrtle and Chestnut Streets in
Greenville.
Continued from page 1
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1 111Jl J�I I"111 I
November 18, 1993
Continued from page 1
� i ssh denounced
ispiracy burs, Posner's Case
d mainstream ac-
Posner explains how medical
expertise combined with comput-
erized re-enactments, special en-
hancements of the Zapruder film
.ind new bullet-impact tests prove
the single-bullet theory. Accord-
ingly, Oswald's first shot missed,
he second hit both Kennedy and
Connally and the third indisput-
"ably was the fatal Kennedy head
shot.
"This case has indeed been
closed by Mr. Posner's work said
esidential biographer Stephen
Ambrose, a onetime single-bullet
skeptic. "His chapter on the single
t bullet is a tour de force, absolutely
'r brilliant, absolutely convincing
�I - But so many, still, refuse to
believe. Partly, it's because
Kennedy's death was such a con-
suming event; partly, it's because in
subsequent years � during Viet-
nam, throughout the Watergate
scandal, at so many other junctures
'�'�"� the government lied.
� ; � Under pressure from re-
searchers, journalists and Congress,
the federal government released
'some 900,000 Kennedy-related
documents in August, the largest
single disclosure ever. National ar-
ssembled the "Kennedy
fromsuchsourcesasthe
: te louse Select Committee
ssassinations and the Warren
Commission. In addition, the City
i .t Dallas opened its long-secret hies
on the assassination at the behest of
j city councilman.
In both cases, the stacks of
material contained intriguing gems
of trivia, but no bombshells.
But it's not just in the airless
warren of government files that the
fascination with the events of Nov.
22,1963, continues.
The 1990 feature film JFK,
which ingrained the Zapruder im-
ages on a new generation, had a
cinematic subplot for everyone �
and was nominated for a Best Pic-
ture Academy Award.
As expected, a new flurry of
books and television specials ap-
peared for this year's 30th anniver-
sary. Among the offerings were the
NBC movie Fatal Deception, Marina
Oswald's story, and a PBS "Front-
line" project devoted to her hus-
band.
A favorite tour stop in Dallas
now is The Sixth Floor, a museum
located, appropriately, in the Texas
School Book Expository.
The Dallas County Historical
Foundation overrode the city's col-
lective sense of shame and opened
the exhibit in 1989.
It was an instant hit, and al-
ready has attracted more than 1.5
million visitors � many drawn to
the eerie sniper's nest in the sixth
floor's southeast corner.
And the JFK Assassination
Information Center remains open
in Dallas as a commercial, con-
spiracy-flavored repository of in-
formation and services.
Two years ago, the center co-
sponsored anassassinationsympo-
sium. With evangelistic fervor,
speakers and panelists swapped
conspiracy theories and cursed the
government, the media and the
Warren Commission.
It was such fun that it has
become an annual affair.
Himdredsofconspiracybuffs
and JFK researchers areback in town
this week for the third such meet-
ing, sharing their "individual pieces
of the puzzle
Privately distressed over the
invasive proliferation of theories
and disturbed by profiteering, mem-
bers of the Kennedy family have
remained largely away from the
conspiracy spotlight.
Instead, they focus on the slain
president's confidence, optimism
and inspiration, his contributions
to the space program, the Peace
Corps and civil rights, his courage
during the Cuban missile crisis.
President Clinton, flanked by
Kennedy kin, spoke of the slain
president in such words while help-
ing dedicate the remodeled JFK Li-
brary last month in Boston.
"The 21st century can be our
century if we approach it with the
vigor, the determination, the wis-
dom and the sheer confidence and
joyoflifethatJohnKennedybrought
to America in 1960 Clinton said.
The library contains a new
section on the assassina tion, but the
museum clearly is aimed at memo-
rializing Kennedy's life and not the
tragic way he died.
"Of all he did, my brother
would take the highest pride in the
legions of young Americans he in-
spired and whose lives he touched
and changed Edward Kennedy
said through an aide.
More than anything else, the
senator said, President Kennedy
gave the nation a revival of spirit:
"He brought us a belief that
we were equal to any challenge,
that the greatest challenge of all was
to be faithful to our best ideals �
and with courage he led us in a time
where one false step could have
doomed the world itself
Recalling the president's in-
augural phrase about the torch be-
ing passed, his brother said, "The
truth was, he relit the torch for a
whole new generation and more
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iT" -Tmtf Ti i
The East Carolinian
s
t, 1993
What's On Tap:
Thursday, Nov. 18
M. Basketball, home
Saturday, Nov. 20
Football, away
at Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio,
1 p.m.
Volleyball, away
at CAA Tournament,
Williamsburg, Va through
Sunday, TBA
M. & W. Swimming, home
DavidsonWilliam & Marv, 2
p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 21
M. & W. Swimming, home
College of Charleston, 2 p.m.
Monday, Nov. 22
W. Basketball, home
Moscow Dynamo Club (Exh.), 4
p.m.
TJw411
Saturday, Nov. 13
Women's soccer, away
won two of three games at
Appalachain State tourney
Please . . . No Wagering
Robert Todd, 51 points
TEC Sports Editor
ECU 1, 3-2
"I picked the upset last week
and they almost came through
(I've been trying to gain some
ground on Chris Justice in the
standings)
Brian Olson, 56 points
TEC Assistant. Sports Editor
Cin. 10,24-14
"Junior Smith has another
great game, but alone can not
carry the Pirate offense. This team
shows good things to come for
next season
Kevin Hall, 50 points
WZMB Sports Director
Not available for comment
Brian Bailey, 38 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
Not available for comment
Chris Justice, 62 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
Cin 11,24-13
"The future looks bright. It
could look a lot brighter with an
ECU upset
Brad Zaruba, 38 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
Cin. 18,28-10
"Pirates looking ahead to-
wards next season
Demetrius Carter, 25 points
ABLE President
Notavailableforcomment
Maureen Rich, suest picker
Assistant New Editoi
ECU3,20-17
"Pete Rose may bet on the
Bearcats, but I'm betting on the
Pirates
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
Compiled by B. Olson
Sports
Hoops start tonight
File Photo
ECU will tip off the basketball season tonight in Minges against the
Court Authority in an exhibition game.
(SID) � Head coach Eddie
Payne's ECU basketball squad will
take to the court for the first time on
Thursday when the Pirates host
Court Authorityat7p.m. in Minges.
The Pirates began practice on
Oct. 30 and have worked out six
days a week in preparation for the
1993-94 season.
"We are still putting things into
our schemes Payne said. "This
game will give us a chance to do a
lot of experimentation. We'll have
to use every chance we get to see
our kids in competition before we
open the season. This will be a very
important outing for us
The Pirates will also host the
Moscow Dynamo Sport Club in an
exhibition game at Minges Coli-
seum on Nov. 23 at 7 p.m.
ECU returns seven lettermen
from last year's squad, including
preseason Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation Player of the Year Lester
Lyons.
The Bucs,reigningCAA cham-
pions, open the season at UNC-
Charlotte on Nov. 29. The Pirates
do not play in Minges Coliseum
until Dec. 6 against Campbell.
Students may pick up tickets
for a specific game one working
day prior to that scheduled game at
the ECU Athletic Ticket Office in
Minges Coliseum. The ticket office
is open from 8 a.m5 p.m.
Each student has the opportu-
nity to obtain one free ticket with a
See B-BALL page 15
Carson entering 27th year
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
ECU track head coach Bill
Carson, entering his 27th year of
coaching at ECU, is a perfect ex-
ample of what consistent and
dedicated leadership can do for
an athletic program.
Since arriving at ECU in 1967,
he has taken the Pirate track pro-
gram from ground level to one
capable of producing Olympic
competitors.
Carson, a 57-year-old
Steubenville, Ohio native gradu-
ated from West Virginia Univer-
sity in 1960, competing as a senior
co-captain on the track team. The
top sprinter in the VVVU program
for three years, Carson returned
to his alma mater in 1963 as an
assistant coach. A subsequent
move to coaching the team at
Furman and achieving a masters
degree from the University of
Florida prepared Carson to take
his current job as head coach of
Parham signs
letter of intent
(SID) � Tony Parham, a 6-1
guard from Archbishop Carroll
High School in Washington, DC,
has signed a national letter-of-intent
to play men's basketball at ECU,
school officials announced Wednes-
day.
Last season, Parham averaged
nine points and four assists per game
for coach Carroll Holmes' squad.
Against Good Counsel High School
of Wheaton, Md Parham scored a
season-best 23 points.
'Tony is a very skilled ball han-
dler and shooter, who I think will
improve by leaps and bounds as he
maturesphysically said Piratecoach
Eddie Payne. "He is an outstanding
young man and will provide excel-
lent depth in the backcourt for us
Archbishop Carroll finished 27-
7 last season and won the Washing-
ton Metro Athletic Conference title.
The squad lost to Dunbar in the city
championship game by two points.
Parham is an honor roll student
at ArchbishopCarroll and a member
of the school's yearbook and news-
paper staff. -
Parham gives the Pirates four
prospective student-athletes in thus
fall's signing period. Earlier, East
Carolina inked Bernard Cooper, a 6-
10 center from Windsor, N.C, Von
Riley, a 6-8 forward from New
Ellenton, S.C and 6-3 guard Othello
Meadows from Omaha, Neb.
the Pirates.
A mere glance at Carson's of-
fice proves how successful his ten-
ure at ECU has been. It serves
almost as a shrine to the tremen-
dous success Ca rson has enjoyed.
TrophiesadornCarson'sdeskand
bookcase, and Ail-American
awards and conference champi-
onships cover the walls. However,
there a re more awardsthatdonot
receive "top billing" in Carson's
office. Forexample, Carson's 1988
NCAA Div. 1 Coach of the Year
award for District 3, or the fact
that Carson served as president
of the IC4As in 1991, or the coach's
tremendous commitment to na-
tional track and field athletics.
Currently, Carson is working with
other college coaches on an in-
structional video to help new
high-school track coaches prepare
for their profession. One of
Carson's main goals is to keep
promising athletes in track and
field for the long term.
"The best thing about coach-
ing is dealing with these young
men Carson said. "We'd like to
see a lot of them stay in the sport
After serving for so many
years, one would wonder if adapt-
ing to changing times would be
difficult for Carson, but the vet-
eran coach said he doesn't find
that a problem.
"The athletes of the nineties
are really no different Carson
said. "There are different things
you have to face, but really things
aren't any different
Carson said that East Caro-
lina had changed quite a bit in the
26 years he had been there and
while he understands how the uni-
versity has grown, he sometimes
misses the intimacy of days past.
"It used to be where every-
one was on a first-name basis,
now sometimes it's a little diffi-
cult Carson said. "But I think
everyone in the athletic depart-
ment is great, I think form top to
bottom we have as good an ath-
letic staff as you can get
Women's soccer club
finishes season
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The ECU women's soccer team
took a trip to Boone this past week-
end to compete in the SWSA
Women's Soccer Tournament at
Appalachian State University. This
was the second straight year that
ECU was invited to compete, and
they made an excellent snowing.
On Sa turday, each team played
the other three teams in their divi-
sion. In ECU's first game, they took
on the host team and won, 3-0.
Midway through the first half,
Pirate halfback Jennie Haines took
a pass from N landy Gaster in front
ofthenetandputitinforal-OIead.
At the 21-minute mark in the 25-
minute long half, Gaster was fouled
in the penalty area and the Pirates
were awarded a penalty kick.
Rebecca Williams took the kick and
placed the shot just inside the right
post to give the Pirates a 2-0 lead at
the half.
In the second half, ECU domi-
nated play and, 11 minutes into the
second half, scored once again. The
Pirates had a free kick from 25 yards
out, and Jennie Haines touched the
ball to Junior forward Amy War-
ren, who drove the shot past a div-
ing goalie to make the score 3-0.
In the second game on Satur-
day, ECU took on UNC-Charlotte
and won, 1-0. This game was de-
fined by extremely physical play
on both sides of the ball. Just 6
minutes into the match, Mandv
Gaster dribbled through the UNC-
CH defense and lofted a shot over
the keeper for the victory and a
guaranteed spot in the semi-finals
on Sunday.
In the third and final match on
Sa turday, ECU took on the Univer-
sity of Tennessee-Chattanooga, los-
ing 3-2. Last year UT-C eliminated
the Pirates from the tournament by
keeping ECU out of the semi-finals.
This year, UT-C had to beat
EastCarolina to make it to the semi's
themselves. Without a doubt, this
was the most competitive game of
the day. Chattanooga scored the
first goal, 12 minutes into the first
half, but Heather Seanor scored off
of an assist by Gaster to tie the game
at one just 10 minutes later.
In the second half, UT-C took a
2-1 lead as darkness began to fall.
Kellie Troy put the rebound in and
Amy Warren shotnine minutes into
the half to knot the game in a 2-2 tie.
Five minutes later, a UT-C forward
broke free and put the Pirates in a 3-
2 hole. By now, the players were
barely able to see, hindering the
See SOCCER page 15
Page 13
Football season
ending in Ohio
ByBrian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
This Saturday will be the
lasthurrah, thank goodness. The
sooner the final seconds tick off
the clock the better. The Pirates
can close the books on this frus-
trating season and prepare for
the bright future.
ThePirates(2-8)willbeplay-
ing their last game against the
improved Cincinnati Bearcats.
Normally, at this time of year, at
Cincinnati, the campus is put-
ting football in the past and gear-
ing up for basketball, which by
the way, is just around the cor-
ner. Cincinnati is mostly known
for their success in basketball,
but this year, for a change, it is
the football team making all the
headlines.
The Pirates have never lost
to the Bearcats in a seven-game
series, but this year could be the
breakthrough. The Cats are 4-0
at home this season.
"They're a real surprise team
thathas an outside shotata bowl
game Logan said. "Cincinnati
is playing good, error-free foot-
ball right now
Cincinnati (7-3) has already
clinched at least a tie for Inde-
pendent Football Alliance. ECU
is also part of the alliance and the
other teams are Tulsa, Southern
Miss and Memphis State.
This game will pit two great
runningbacksagainsteach other
�Cincinnati's David Small and
ECU's Junior Smith.
Small gained 203 yards last
week against Houston and col-
lected four touchdowns. He has
run for over 100 yards in four
straight games and has 14 total
TDs on the season. Last season
he ran for 104 yards on 26 carries
last year against the Pirates in
Ficklen Stadium. This year he
will be running into the heart of
the improved ECU defense.
Smith will reach an ECU
milestone this Saturday. He
needs just four yards to break
the all-time ECU single-season
rushing record. He has 1,306
yards on the season and is look-
ing to break the record held by
Carlester Crumpler, Sr. Smith
has been one of the few high-
lights during this tarnished sea-
son.
A main element to the
Bearcats' success this season is
turnovers. The Cats are fifth in
fewest in the category with just
11.
Cincinnati also has put to-
gether a good defense. The team
ranks 16th in total defensive
yardsallowedpercontest(300).
Nose guard Bob Duckens an-
chors the defensive line with 48
tackles. Butkus Award candi-
date Nate Dingle has 63 tackles
and the Buc offense must be
aware of him at all times. The
secondary is led by standout
Jocely Borgella and is tied for
the school's career ESTTs. The
Buc offense has struggled with
the pass all season and will con-
centrate on handing the ball to
Smith.
The Bearcats offense has
put up big numbers on the
scoreboard thisseason. They are
averaging 33 points in games
they won. Quarterback Lance
Harp orchestrates the offense.
He is 126 of 268 for 1,441 yards
and eight touchdowns. His fa-
vorite hook-up will be wideout
AlbertSweet. He has 27 catches
for 451 yards. The strength his
the running game led by Small.
Last week, the Bucs held a
powerful runninggameof Ken-
tucky in check. The Pirates did
end up losing 6-3 in the mud at
Lexington, though.
The Buc defense has kept
the future bright and has kept
ECU in almost all games this
year.
Since this will be the last
game, it will be time to say good-
bye to some seniors: Carlester
Crumpler, Jeff Cooke, Bernard
Carter, Greg Floyd, Morris
Letcher, Reggie Robinson,
Derek Taylor and Ronnie Will-
iams.
Cincinnati
Linebacker
Nate Dingle
is a Butkus
Award
candidate.
He and the
Bearcats
have high
hopes for a
post-season
bowl.
Photo courtesy
of UC SID
By Kerry Nestor
Staff Writer
On Saturday, Nov. 20, East
Carolina's cross country teams
and the women's track and field
team will be hosting the second
annual Pirate Chase 5K Road
Races and Walk.
It is an all day event and will
begin at the Pirate Club building
next to Ficklen Stadium at 11
a.m. The schedule of events will
be as follows: at 11 a.m men's
five-kilometer road race. At 11:30
a.m women's five-kilometer
road race. At 12:15 p.m awards
presentation and at 12:30 p.m.
post-race party and commence-
ment of the ECU vs. Cincinnati
football game hosted by Jeff
Charles and Carlester Crumpler
on the Pirate Sports Network.
The road race is being put on
by ECU head women's track
and field and assistant cross
country coach Charles "Choo"
Justice. He has organized nu-
merous races through the years
that hc�ve benefited local chari-
ties.
The Pirate Chase is de-
signed to help promote running
and fitness in the Greenville and
ECU Campus community. Pro-
ceeds from the event are put
into the programs to be used
for scholarships, equipment
and other special projects con-
cerning the ECU cross country
and track and field teams.
Members of the teams work
the race as volunteers. It is also
an opportunity for the commu-
nity to get to know members of
See RACE page 15
Pirate Chase starts Saturday





November 18, 1993
ct III
fr
ished 47th out of 298 runners
ith a time of 18:41. Following
were Catherine Norstrand who
was 57th with a tune ot 20:26.
Finishing off for the Pirates was
Cindy Szymanski, who came in
250th turning in a time of 21:03.
Assistant head coach Charles
Justice was happy with the per-
formances. "Tara, Dava and
Cathrine all turned in times near
their personal bests which is good
because the course was clogged
with so many people running
justice said.
For the men, there were 276
runners who run the 10,000 meter
race. Mikejolley finished 231 with
runners
8th out of 40
� l. Mark Mathis fin-
in a time of
- was 241st
men, the top three
tverall in the race were:
Individuals
k) Weils, Alabama, 16:53
Nicole Stevenson, Wake For-
est, 17:05
Knsten Hall, N.C. State, 17:08
Team
.C. State 90 pts.
Alabama 117 pts.
Clemson 151 pts
For the men, the top three fin-
ishers were:
Team
Wake Forest 69 pts.
Florida 136 pts.
Tennessee 144 pts.
Saturday's meet concludes the
men's and women's cross country
teams seasons.
PCC plays ball
(Press Release) � It.mav he"
November, but sports fans at Pitt
Community College in Greenville
will be talking about baseball.
PCC administration an-
nounced the beginning of the
college's baseball program at a re-
ception last night in the Vernon
White Buildingstudent lounge. The
baseba 11 program will begin its first
season of play during the Fall of
1994.
According to PCC President
Charles E. Russell, the college will
participate in the National Junior
College Athletic Association
(NJCAA) Division I. Pitt will play
colleges such as Mount Olive Col-
lege, Louisburg College, and com-
munity colleges. Dr. Russell will
express thanks to local fans who
have developed a plan to begin the
baseball program and to raise funds
forabaseballstadium. He will name
Darrell Hignite as Chair of the PCC
Athletic Boosters Club.
PCC Athletic Director Charles
Cobum will announce that Monte
Little will serve as Interim Coach
for the baseball program.
College coaches, professional
scouts, PCC athletic fans and local
community leaders will be present
to kickoff the PCC Baseball Program.
Panthers announce late move
GBA MEETING
Graduate
Business
Association
Election of Officers '93-94
Last meeting of
calendar year '92-93
5:15PM -6:15PM
Tues, Nov. 30, 1993
GC 1023
Karate club kicks butt
(K) � The sport of Karate has
been growing among ECU's club
sports for severaJ years and this
5�a r has gotten off toa greatstartas
the Goju-Shorin Martial Arts Club
pifoved its capabilities in a martial
arts tournament tha t was sponsored
by Champion Karate Center and
held in Wilmington, N.C, last Sat-
urday.
: Lee Baird, Kim Bresnen and
.Mike Pridgen were among the first-
place recipients for their outstand-
ing performance in the division of
Kara, with Kris Hoffler coming in
third. Bresnen also excelled in the
division of Sparring to bring home
another first place trophv.
In addition, Elizabeth Nelson
and Cliris Richards were awarded
second place trophies for their per-
formance in Kata as well. Other
Sparring winners included Hoffler
(second place), Heidi Rhoden (third
place), Chris Richards (third place)
and Chris Newton (fourth place). In
ad di tion to Hoffler's other successes
for the day, he also carried home a
third place award for his perfor-
mance in the weapons division of
the competition.
If you are interested in joining
the club or for additional informa-
tion, call Recreational Services at
757-6387 or come by 204
Christenbury Gvmnasium.
CHARLOTTE (AP) � The
NFLstadium fortheCarolina Pan-
thers will be owned by a private
trust rather than team owner Jerry
Richardson as a result of a late-
stage maneuver to clinch
Charlotte's hopes of landing an
expansion team.
The change was made shortly
before NFL owners voted unani-
mously on Oct. 26 to award Char-
lotte the league's 29th team, said
Mark Richardson, who managed
the NFL drive. It won't affect fans,
he said.
Butitapparentlyaffected NFL
owners, many of whom had lin-
gering concerns about the debt
Richardson and his business part-
ners would incur in attempting to
pay $140 million for the expan-
sion team and build a $160 million
stadium at the same time.
The solution, developing in
consultation with attorneys and
financial advisers, was to place
ownership of the Carolinas Sta-
dium Corp. in the hands of a pri-
vate trust. Carolinas Stadium
Corp. is the company Richardson
and his partners formed to own
and operate the stadium.
The trust, created for this pur-
pose, will own all stadium stock
and receive a portion of i ts annual
profit, to be donated to charity.
While Richardson Sports
won't own the stadium, it would
have an operating agreement to
manage it.
"The only thing that has
changed is another entity will own
the bricks and the mortar of the
stadium, but we will still have
control, and we will still make the
operating decisions Mark
Richardson said.
To NFL owners, the critical
effect of the ownership change was
that it reduces the amount of debt
Richardson and his partners in-
curred, plus shields them from
the financial risk of owning a sta-
dium.
Graduation Announcements
Each Announcement is:
� Emblazoned with Gold School Seal
� Comes with free matching envelopes
� Printed in 7-10 DAYS
Personalized with
YOUR NAME and DEGREE
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what you think. BRING YOUR
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November 23rd!
Duncan Hines
Yellow Cake Mix
790
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Ice Cream
Sandwiches
Hungry Jack Marcus James
(Australian Wine
Assorted Variety
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Potatoes
990 $1.49
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Dairies
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990
Quart
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NOW ACCEPTED AT BELL'S FORK
& 10TH ST. LOCATIONS
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758-2501
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Budweiser
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Bud Dry
PRICES GOOD
NOVEMBER 17 THRU NOVFMRFR 21
suitcase
ILU-Mli






November 18, 1993
SOCCER
eivetne
lals and
No
beat ECl
In the first half, 1 ennesseepres-
sured e ery pass that ECU made,
taking .shot after shot at the 'irate
net, without scoring. Then, just two
minutes before the half, a Tennes-
see corner kick was headed into the
corner of the net and ECU trailed 1-
0.
For the first 10 minutes of the
second half, the Pirate offense was
on a roll as they strung together a
number of passes that penetrated
the Volunteer defense.
A Jennie Haines shot that was
headed for the goal was saved by a
sprawling Tennessee goalkeeper.
Despite some good chances, ECU
just could not seem to get the ball in
the back of the net.
Continued from page 13
W ith a minute left in the match,
rates were pushing forward
to tie the game, a Tennessee
forward struck a shot from 25 vards
out that went into the upper right
comer of the ECU goal and sealed
the game.
Following the loss, ECU coach
Chip Hudson said, "I am really
proud of the effort tha t our team put
in all weekend long. We lost today to
a team that played just a little bit
better and got a few more breaks
than we did.
"Everyone involved with this
tournament has said that we had the
most improved team this year, and I
agree with them
ECU fullback Missy Cone was
voted to the All-Tournament Team
for her outstanding play.
ECU's last game of the vear,
against Duke, has been forfeited. The
Pirates final record for the season
was 6-4-1.
Early in theSpringsemester, the
Women's Soccer Club will begin
playing its indoor season.
The East Carolinian 15
RACE
Continued from page 13
the athletic teams here at
ECU.
The ECU Student Stores is
sponsoring special divisions and
awards for ECU Students, Fac-
ultyStaff and Alumni.
Awards will be given in these
three divisions for the top male
and female finishers.
ECU participants are also eli-
gible for open and age group
awards.
To preregister come by 204
Christenbury Gym or at ECU
Track and Field Office.
The entry fee is S5 for ECU
students with a valid ID and $6
the day of the race. Other par-
ticipants may preregister for $12
and $13 the day of the race.
And be sure to stick around
after the race for the post-race
party.
Food and drinks will be pro-
vided by local sponsors.
Runners are encouraged to
stay and listen to the ECU vs.
Cincinnati football game broad-
cast.
Pregame broadcast begins
at noon and the game begins 1 run through the entire football
Pm- game.
Race results will be an- For information on the event
nounced during the broadcast by just contact coach Choo Justice at
the Voice of the Pirates, Jeff the track and field office at 757-
Charles. The post-race party will 4611.
B-BALL
Continued from page 13
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: When was the last time the ECU football team
did not win more than two games in a season?
(S-Z) smwS an fsnt uom sonq di 'gggi uj :y
valid ECU ID card. A limited num-
ber of student guest tickets are avail-
able at half-price on the designa ted
student pick-up day. Students are
limited to one discounted price stu-
dent guest ticket with their ID. All
additional tickets are full-price,
which is $7 for a single game ticket.
On the designated student pick-
up day, students can also present
one additional valid ECU student
ID.
On game day, ECU students
can present their valid ECU student
ID only to obtain a ticket on an
availability basis. All tickets not
picked up on the designated stu-
dent pick-up day will go on sale on
game day to the general public for
$7.
Student ticket holders must
present their valid ECU student ID
with their student tickets at the gates.
Student ticket holders without
proper student ID will not be ad-
mitted into Minges Coliseum.
There is no group seating for
ECU basketball. Individuals want-
ing to sit together are encouraged to
arrive to the coliseum early. All stu-
dent seating is general admission
by sections in the upper and lower
levels. Gates open 90 minutes prior
to tip-off.
Winner of three National CNBAM Awards
Winner of the Most Outstanding Medium
East Carolina University
CAROLINIAN
$ UNEMPLOYED? h
NEED MONEY? 4
ALFREDO'S
We deliver to Dorms
& Apartments
752-0022
ECU'S Favorite Pizza Place
COLLEGE NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY
99c slices
ECU NATURAL LIFE PROGRAMS PRESENTS.
TONIGHT
8:oopm in Christenbury Gym
mam: a
til lip
Pitchers: $1.50
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LIFESTYLE EDITOR
NEWS EDITOR
Must be responsible for generating
story ideas and assigning news stories
SYSTEMS MANAGER
Ensure that computer hardware and
software are working correctly,
troubleshooting and maintaining systems.
All Applicants must have a 2.0 G.P.A.
Apply at
The East Carolinian,
2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building
757-6366
PRE-
THANKSGIVING
SALE
PRICE SALE
Buy one
get one 1 2 price!
Offer good on any
item of clothing.
(2nd item must be of
equal value or less)
SAVE 20
ON GIFT ITEMS
Choose from a large
selection of
� license plates
� key chains
� bumper stickers
�Pee-Dee dolls
� stuffed animals
and lots more!
does not include textbooks or computers
COMPUTER
CLEARANCE
Come by the Student Stores
and check out our
Clearance sale on Demo
and discontinued
computers and software!

all offers good through 112493
Student Stores
ECU Student Stores: More than just books-
your dollars support student scholars
One Stop Shopping at the Heart of Campus





GOLDEN
DELIGHT
SWEET
POTATOES
ALLS1Z 'GRADE "A" SELF BASTiN
BUTTERBALL
TURKEY
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TURKEY
GREEN
BEANS
.LB
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FlRADr'cCrciPCDV 0 FLORIDA NAVAL & 189
LARGE CELERY ea stalk9t ORANGES �& I
PERDUE FRESH HEN OR
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TURKEY
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HT FRENCH OR FLAKY
BROWN &
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HERB OR CQRNBREAD
PEPPRIDGi FARM
STUFFING
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.89
2
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SPIRAL HALF OR WHOLE
SLICED HAM
99 STEWING SIZE
OYSTERS
�-SELECTED VARIETIES
99 DEL MONTE
VEGETABLES
.so:
2
3ro SELECTED VARIETIES
79 NABISCOSNACK
vt
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BETTY CRQCKEk
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PRESIDENTS CHOICE
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IN THE DELI-BAKERY
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99
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DINNER INCLUDES
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�2 LBS CORNBREAD DRESSING
�2 LBS GILBETGRAYY
�1?OZ CRANBERRY RELISH
SERVES 8-10
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Harris feeder





Inside
Schedules
:
-V
�son
� UN:
drin iit Mason
iinrit.iii
NC State
� i American
� illi.un & Mar
leorge Mason
I Niminion
� William & Man
f.i!i.i - Madison
� Old Dorr
� Rj hmond
� Richn
I V ilmington
� i James Madison
ication Carolinian. Thursday, NouiiIh.t 18. 1993
Your guide to help map the eourse of the 19( men's and women's basketball season
Man h INC�-Wilmington � �� iniiniaiiKiit � �







Pace I
November 18. 1993
NAVIGATOR '9394
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
Location: Washington, D.C.
Enrollment: 11,500
Nickname: Eagles
Colors: Red, White, & Blue
Court: Bender Arena (5,000)
Coach: Chris Knoche
Record at AU: 3j49, 4th yr
Career Record 37-49 4th yr
LettermeftReturnirii(Losl. 82
Probable Starting Lineup
G:DarryH&SfcWifi1t
6-0.170 $0 7.5pp$ 3 3 apg
G: DuanlSilham 34
6-4, 190, So. 4.0 ppg. 15 apg
F: Christian Ast 25
6-8, 210, Jr, Transfer from Duke
F: Tim Fudd 23
6-7. 210, Jr. 9.9 ppg. 6.5 rpg
C: Marko Krivokapic 45
6-8, 205, Jr. 5.1 ppg. 1.7 rpg
GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY
Location: Fairfax, Va.
Enrollment: 20.308
Nickname: Patriots
Colors: Green & Gold
Court: Patriot Center (10,000)
Coach: Paul Westhead
Record at GMU: first year
Career Record: 247-153,14th yr
LetterajenReturningLost: 83
Probatf! .parting Lineup
G: DcJlcFi jsi4f 11S,
6-1. 185, Jr, 9'PQ, 33,3pta
G: Troy Manns 3 SSKSM"
6-1,175, So, 11.3 ppg, 4.5 apg
F: Khyl Horton 4
6-6, 200, So. 8.5 ppg, 4.5 rpg
F: Mark McGlone 35
6-7. 210, Jr, 9.7 ppg, 6.0 rpg
F: Camerron Taylor 44
6-6, 205, So, 56 fga
JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY
Location: Harrisonburg. Va.
Enrollment: 11,250
Nickname: Dukes
Colors: Purple & Gold
Court JMU Convocation Center (7,612)
Coach: Lefty Driesell
Record at jMte97-55, 5th yr
CA A Conference Preview
Career RecC
31rstyr
Lettermen PrSffpngt 68
Probable StlrlihgLi.neuifev
G: KentCulukb3-
6-4, feOTJr, .& ppg39fb 3pta
G: Denflis Leonard 31
5-41,160. Jr JUCO Transfer
F: Clayton Ritter 52
6-7, 215, Sr, 64 fga
F: Ameka Wilson 44
6-8. 225, Jr, JUCO Transfer
C: Kareem Robinson 4
6-8. 250. So. 54 fga
UNC-WILMINGTON
Location: Wilmington. N.C.
Enrollment: 8.000
Nickname: Seahawks
Colors: Green. Gold & Navy Blue
Court: Trask Coliseum (6.100)
Coach: Kevin Eastman
Record at UNC$L43, 4th yr
Career nwjWWRWp, 7th yr
Lettermen ReTte�OSt 83
Probable Starting Lmf up:
G: Ganon Baker �24
6-2. i SCJj Jr, OwjUesne Transfer
G: Drew rlttfpW
5-10,175, Sr, 41 3pta, 3.3 apg
F: John Spann 4
6-6, 225, Jr
F: Shenf El-Sanadily 33
6-8, 235, Jr, 6.1 rpg, 1.8 blkspg
C: Darren Moore 52
6-9. 245, So, 61 fga 6.1 rpg
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion has moved from 22nd to 13th
in the nation's power rankings as a
conference.
Over the By ROBERT
last several TODD
years, the tal- r-D1TOR
ent-levelofthe
CAA's players has risen. The aver-
age heights and weights of the
plavers has risen, too.
Lefty Driesell, who coached
Maryland until the death of Len
Bias, and the addition of George
Mason University's Paul Westhead
will help bring legitimacy to a
youthful core of talent CAA
coaches.
Driesell has taken his James
Madison Dukes to a first-place, or
share of first place, finish four years
in a row.
However, JMU lost an All-
CAA backcourt, 61 percent of their
points, 67 percent of their rebounds,
68 percent of their assists and 59
percent of their minutes played.
The addition of JUCO standout
Dennis Leonard will help ease the
losses in the backcourt, but not
enough to claim first place from a
powerful Old Dominion team.
The Monarchs head coach,
Oliver Purnell, lost Mario Mullen,
one of the better players in the con-
ference, until at least December.
Mullen hurt his back in a car acci-
dent in the preseason.
ODU's front line, even with-
out Mullen, is the best in the con-
ference and should cause problems
for ECU. Center Odell Hodge is
the CAA's leading returner in field
goal percentage, rebounds and
blocked shots.
However, their backcourt and
perimeter shooting are not spec-
tacular. Forward Petey Sessoms is
the only serious three-point threat
for the Monarchs.
Last season ODU led the con-
ference in scoring with 84 points
per game. That should be good for
second place this year, after
Westhead installs his fast-break of-
fense at GMU.
The Patriot record for points
in a game is 126. That should fall in
the first game of the year.
Westhead's Loyola Marymount
teams averaged in the neighbor-
hood of 120 points per game, an
NCAA record 181 points in a single
game and an NCAA tournament
record with a 149-115 victory over
Michigan in 1990.
Freshman guard Curtis
McCants averaged 32 points, nine
rebounds, eight assists and five
steals per game as a senior. His
abilities should be accentuated in
Westhead's high-tempo game. His
career highs are 51 points, 14 re-
bounds and 19 assists and was
named last year's Gatorade High
School Player of the Year in Rhode
Island. He may take over the start-
ing role from Donald Ross before
the season begins.
Photo courtesy of SID
Kareem Richardson played well enough to earn All-CAA
Rookie Team honors last year.
The Seahawks of UNC-
Wilmington have gone from 11-7,
coach Kevin Eastman's first sea-
son, to 17-11 last year. The birds
lost three starters, but Virginia
transfer Corey Stewart and
Duquesne transfer Canon Baker
should help fill the void. Sopho-
more center Derren Moore, 6-foot-
4, 245 pounds, will only be chal-
lenged in the middle by ODU's
Hodge as the conference's best cen-
ter. Guard Drew Phillips' shoot �
40 percent from behind the arc �
should keep things open for Moore
and forward Sherif El-Sanadily,
who is one of the better shot blockers
in the conference.
The University of Richmond
has gained national prominence as
a team to avoid in the NCAA tour-
nament. There most recent upset
was in 1991 when they became the
first 15th seed to defeat a second
seed, as the dropped the Syracuse
Orangemen, 73-69. Then-coach
Dick Tarrent, has retired and
former UR player Bill Dooley has
taken the helm.
The Spider backcourt is formi-
dable. Both Eugene Burroughs and
Gerald Jarmon shot better than 41
percent from the three-point line.
OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY
Location: Norfolk, Va.
Enrollment: 16,729
Nickname: Monarchs
Colors: Slate Blue & Silver
Court Norfolk Scope (10,253)
Coach: Oliver Purnell
Record at ORIJi:3, 3rd yr
5th yr
.OSL11-2
iup:
The front is a little thin, but trans-
fer Derrick Wall, 6-foot-7, 212
pounds, might assume a starting
role. Wall played at Northern
Durham high school and attended
the Naval Academy, earning All-
Patriot League Rookie Team hon-
ors. Last season, he played at
Chowan and was named the team 's
defensive plaver of the year.
American University will join
William & Mary in the cellar. AU
lost 1992-3 CAA Player of the Year
Brian Gilgeous and second team
All-CAA forward Craig Sedmak.
Christian Ast, who transferred
from Duke, has not played signifi-
cant time in two years and the rest
of the team does not offer much of
a threat to the rest of the league.
Forward Tim Fudd will play a
prominent role for the Eagles He is
the third leading rebounder return-
ing to the CAA.
Guard Michael Blackmon can
shoot the trey, but the Eagles will
fall from the sky this season.
The Tribe return guard Kurt
Small, the second leading return-
ing scorer in the CAA. After Small
the rest of the team has seen little
action. William & Mary should be
planning for next year.
Career Record ,
Lettermen
Probable Stafi'ric
G: Kevin Larterj 12
6-4,182, ppta, 2.1 apg
G: Kevin Swdfl
6-2, 165, �fM fta, 3 apg
F: Mario Mullen 24
6-6, 220, So, 10.8 ppg, 7.3 rpg
F: Petey Sessoms 4
6-7,190, Jr, 16.9 ppg, 43 3pta
C: Odell Hodge 33
6-9, 250, So, 56 fga, 9.1 rpg
UNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND
Location: Richmond, Va.
Enrollment: 2.800
Nickname: Spiders
Colors: Blue & Red
Court: Robins Center (9,171)
Coach: Bill Dooley
Recore?atyft9-Qvt�ytJ
Career Record:CMi1r$tyr
Lettermen ReturningLost: 75
Probable slSg:tne.u.0:
G: Eugene burroughs 42
6-2, 173, Sr, 44 3pta, 3 9 apg
G: Gerald Jarmon 12
6-1,161, Sr, 413pta, 3.6 apg
F: Derrick Wall 32
Transfer from Chowan
F: Mike Hodges 45
6-6, 202, Sr, 60 fga, 9.8 ppg
C: Jeremy Metzger 52
6-8, 205, Jr, 38 fga
WILLIAM & MARY
Location: Williamsburg, Va
Enrollment: 5,300
Nickname: Tribe
Colors: Green, Gold & Silver
Court: William &Mary Hall (10.000)
Coach.Chuck Swenson
Recrat:v1: IP 11 "W yr
Career Bessm 58-111, 6th y; ,
Letterrrtef, Rs&rmagLQS 5 -J
Probab&eS&rftngL'neup: �
G: David Cox �10 ;
6-0.J65. 3r34tga. 2.1 apg
ll34�lga.
G: Kurf Slfiairf11'
6-3,185, Jr, 15.7 ppg. 39 3pta
G: Matt Verkey 5
6-3,185. So, 10.3 ppg, 41 3pta
F: Carl Parker 40
6-6, 210, So, 13.5 minpg. 3.6 rpg
F: Sean Duff 24
6-6. 210. Sr. 91 fta
NAVIGATOR STAFF
Volume I, Issue 1
Circulation: 16,000
General Manager
Lindsay ffernandez
Advirtisirlg Director
W MatiHege
Managing Editor
Gregory Dickens
LayoutMjinaaer-
Burt Afcocjgf
Edifor & iesianer
Robert Todd
Assistant Editor
Brian Olson





NAVIGATOR '93
Growing up in
the 'House of Payne'
Old Dominion University is on
the top of nearly everybody's bal-
lot to win the C A A championships.
Oliver
Purnell, the I By ROBERT
Monarch's I TODD
head coach, I Editor
seems to be the I
only one who disagrees.
"If I had to pick any team to-
day, I'd pick Eddie he said,
referring to ECU head coach Eddie
Payne. "Like Payne said, their
kids have learned how to win
Purnell may have just been try-
ing to rid himself of the weighty
expectations placed on him.
"I kinda felt like Oliver was
sayin' 'Anybody but me You
know, he's like, 'Now I got this
monkey off my back You know,
it's flattering. I might have to ask
him if he really meant it
Oliver?
"I meant it when I said I would
put Eddie's team down as number
one. I think they are very talented,
along with James Madison and
UNC-W. I'm writing ECU down
as number one
After last season's number
seven-seeded Pirate team shocked
number two-seeded ODU, 73-67,
in the first round of CAA tourna-
ment, ECU went on to claim the
championship and an automatic
bid to the NCAA tournament �
ECU'S first since 1972.
"The reality was that we were
a championship team last year
Payne said. "But the reality also
was that we didn't have a winning
record. Our players have no rea-
son to be cocky
Lester Lyon's, the preseason
favorite to win CAA Player of the
Year, stepped into a leadership
role. Before the season, he called a
team meeting on his own accord.
Should a few more players elevate
their games as Lyons seems to have,
the Bucs should fare well.
Anton Gill, at 6 feet 8-inches,
averages a three-point attempt per
game and will move from the for-
ward position to the vacant center
See PREVIEW page 18
November 18, 1993
Page 2
courtesy SID
Lester Lyons led the Pirates to their first NCAA
appearance since 1972.
Westhead running the show at GMU
The Wright brothers and their
flying machine were often laughed
at. And some people never thought
the automobile would replace the
horse. But
By Robert
Todd
Editor
these innova-
tions changed
the world's
way of getting
from one place to another.
Paul Westhead, the new head
coach at George Mason University,
has been the innovator of a method
to get from one basket to another
faster than anybody.
He has had much success: A
world championship as head coach
of the 1980 Los Angeles Lakers and a
61.8 percent winning percentage at
the collegiate level with only three
losing seasons � two at LaSalle in
Philadelphia and one at Loyala
Marymount.
When he took over at Loyola
Marymount, like GMU, they were in
last place. He immediately turned
the national spotlight on his team
and their style of play.
Then he recruited Philly
products Hank Gathers
and Bo Kimble and, at the
end of his third year,
Westhead's team had a 28-
4 record and went the first
of three-straight NCAA
postseason appearances.
But, for some reason,
he still hears chuckles and
must deals with skeptics
of his system.
"One of the goals in
sport � football, baseball, basketball
� you're in the contest to have the
Paul Westhead
Westhead said. "Fast, slow, what-
ever you decide your pace is. So, if
you know you can control pace, you
have an advantage.
"That doesn't mean you win, but
you're sure playing the
game the way your play-
ers are accustomed to do-
ing in practice. So, I have
kinda of found a scheme
where the pace is always
mine
Ah, the pace.
Westhead likes for his
team to average 100 shots
per game. Last season the
Patriots averaged 59.
He said his goal is
simple: "Score 100 points
in every game and hope that the op-
position doesn't score more than a
game being played at your pace hundred in some of the games.
"This is not a 'win-loss' goal sea-
son. This is an 'establish a style of
play' and establish excitement for
the game and get your players happy
to go on the road and look at the
opposition and say 'hey, you'reprob-
ably about 25 points better than us,
but I tell ya, at the end of the game
you're going to be tired So, if we can
get that going we'll be in good shape
and win a few games along the way
Westhead's system employs
numbered fast-breaks. Each player is
assigned a position on the floor and
after a change of possession, every
player is supposed to run to his of-
fense spot as fast as he can, regard-
less of where he is at the exchange of
the ball. Obviously, this requires his
See WESTHEAD page 18
1993 PIRATE ROSTER
1992 PER GAME STATISTICS
So.SamePosClass
33Kevin ArmstrongFSr
5Tim BashamFFr
14JerodCobeaGFr
4Don DouglasCFr-RS
32Anton GillFC Jr
22Viben HunterFSr
24Chuck JonesF GFr
15Lester LyonsSr
3Louis MooreFFr
21Kareem RichardsonGSo
25Chuckk RobinsonFJr-T
13Skipp SchaefbauerGFr
23Qirtey YoungGSr
Averages
2.3 vrs
Ht Wt Hometown, HSJUCO
6-6 213 Gastonia, N.C Hunter Huss
6-6 215 Roanoke, Va St. Johns Prospect Hall
6-2 170 Coral Springs, Ra Douglas
6-11 232 Falls Church, Va Bishop O'Connell
6-8 207 Rakigh,N.C,MiHbrook
6-5 200 Raleigh. N.C Chowan JC
6-5 205 Kinston, N.C Fork Union
6-4 160 Lewiston, N.C Bertie Senior
6-6 205 Rock fBIl.S.C, Rock Hin
5-11 170 Rantoul. III Rantoul
6-8 225 Charleston, S,C, Howard Co. College
6-4 200 Elk River, Minn Elk River
6-5 200 atesarjeake.VaDeep Creek
6-5 205
Min
6.7
26.6
19.3

29.6

24.6

FC7c
38.9
58.0
49.3
37.3
43.6
52.0
32.8
63.0
47.0
27.0
26.5
35.7
24.1
FTPTS 18.2 10.2 103REB 0.8ASTTOBLK 0.2STL
0.70.20.1 0.2
80.09.42.32.2 1.60.2 0.2 0.6
70.012J 15.0 5.410.0 0.50.8
52.46.0 15.43.0 10.00.8 5.01.30.4
80.42.72.62.82.3
20.88J3.0
70.27.12.02.52.40.11.0
17.09.0
23.55.08.0
18.9 43.3 15.8 53.4 6.1 3.4 0.9 1.5 0.2 0.6
All available HS or JUCO slats are given
THE NA VIGA TOR'S CAA
PRESEASON RANKINGS
1. Old Dominion
2. James Madison
3. UNC-Wilmington
4. East Carolina
5. George Mason
(tie) Richmond
7. American
8. William & Mary
THE NAVIGATOR'S
PRESEASON ALL-CAA
G Lester Lyons ECU
G Troy Manns GMU
F Petey Sessoms ODU
F Clayton Ritter JMU
C Odell Hodge ODU
1992-3 IN REVIEW
STANDINGS
Team Conference
Overall
JMU 11-3.78621-9.700
ODU 11-3.79621-8.724
UR 10-4.71415-12.556
AU 6-8 .42911-17.393
WM 6-8 .42914-13.519
UNCW 6-8 .42917-11.607
ECU 4-10.28613-17.433
GMU 2-12.1437-21.250
All-Colonial First Tearr1
CIs Pos
William Davis, JMUSrGF
BrvQn Edwards, JMLJ SrG
Brian Gilgeous, AUSrGF
Petey Sessoms, ODU SoF
Kenny Wood, URSrF
All-Colonial Rookie Team
CIs Pos
Odell Hodge, ODUFrC
Troy Manns, GMUFrG
Darren Moore, UNCW FrC
Mario Mullen, ODUFrF
K. Richardson, ECU1 FrG
All-Colonial Defensive Team
CIs Pos
Donald Anderson, ODU SrG
Eugene Burroughs, UR JrG
Jeff Chambers, JMUSrC
Brian Gilgeous, AUSrGF
Lester Lyons, ECUJrG
Returning Statistical Leaders
Scoring Avg
Petey Sessoms, ODU 16.9
Kurt Small, W&M 15.7
Lester Lyons, ECU 15.4
Rebounds Avg
Odell Hodge, ODU 9.1
Mario Mullen, ODU 7.3
Tim Fudd, AU 6.5
Assists Avg
Troy Manns, GMU 4.5
Eugene Burroughs, UR 3.9
Gerald Jarmon, UR 3.6





Page 3
November 18. 1993
NAVIGATOR '93- '94
NCAA Rule Changes
35-second shot clock i 5-second rule deleted
College basketball will add a
new twist to the game this coming
season. Some novel rule changes
will be in ef-
By Brian
Olson
Assistant Editor
feet for '93-
94. These
rules will
make the
game quicker and more explo-
sive.
The first rule that will be
switched concerns the shot clock.
Instead of having 45 seconds to
shoot the ball, a team will only be
allowed 35.
Ten seconds may not seem to
make a difference, but it will af-
fect the tempo more than fans
think.
Some coaches were not
pleased with the manner in which
the rule change was made.
"My fear is that it is going to
be an uglier game than it has been
in the past ECU head coach Eddie
Payne said. "There is not going to
be the flow to it that there used to
be, but really nobody knows be-
cause the rules committee didn't
seem fit to experiment with the
rule, they just put it in so it is kind
of like a conjecture
It will force the offense to
move more quickly up the floor
and get in an offensive set.
Teams will have to be more
aware of the shot clock and this
See CLOCK page 17
The coaches in the CAA can't
seem to agree on the consequences
of not having the five seconds rule.
The rule stated �
that a player, I By ROBERT
dribbling or I ToDD
not, must ei- I editor
ther pass the I
ball or break an imaginary six-foot
plane between he and the defender
within five seconds. At different
times during the annual CAA me-
dia day, coaches had a chance to
express their opinions.
"The five second deletion, I
think, is a terrific idea GMU coach
Paul Westhead said. "Anything that
can take the decision factor away
from the official and put it back in
the hands of the player, 1 think, is
always a plus
"I don't like it ECU coach Eddie
Payne said. "As a result of the dele-
tion you'll see a lot more ugly shots.
I don't like taking that flow out of the
game. You'll see a lot more isolating
and one-on-one stuff
"Maw, how many times did we
get that call � how many times did
anybody get that JMU coach Left
Driesell said. "And usually, if you
did, it was a bad call anyway
"How hard is it to count five
seconds Payne said. "It forces a
team to move without the ball. It
forces guys to make plays. A lot of
times there's a turnover made be-
cause the player is worried about
the call that creates action to me
Decide for vourself.
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Schaefbauer brings size, shooting range and maturity to Pirates
Photo courtesy of SID
Skipp Schaefbauer, a native of Elk River, Minn will play a
prominent role in the Bucs backcourt as a freshman.
ECU'S Skipp Schaefbauer is a
throwback to another era � a time
when athletes were role models.
Schaefbauer
(pronounced By ROBERT
Sha yf-bower) is TOD D
engaged to his EdTQR
high school
sweetheart, Nina Kopetka, earned a
3.85 GPA at Elk River High School
(graduating 15th in a class over 400),
doesn't get drunk and is church-go-
ing.
He is reversing the gambling-
alcoholic-drug-abusing-athlete trend
set in motion during the mid80s.
Even the seemingly-invincible
Michael Jordan was singed by ru-
mors of gambling and criminal in-
volvement.
Ushering in the post-Jordan-
Larry Bird-Magic Johnson era are
media icons like Shaquille O'Neal,
Larry Johnson and Chris Webber. But
rarely do these nouveau-disgust-
ingly-rich entertainers desire the sta-
tus of "role-model
Like Charles Barkley empha-
sized in a Nike spot, "Parents should
be role models
And he is right. But, the athlete-
as-role model persona that has tragi-
cally withered away is experiencing
a refreshing renaissance on the cam-
pus of ECU.
"Being an only child, I remem-
ber looking up to other athletes in
high school Schaefbauer said. "I
think athletes can be good role mod-
els
Schaefbauer said he would defi-
nitely like the responsibility of being
a role model.
"I would hate for him to get la-
beled head coach Eddie Payne said.
"He is a very directed, motivated
athlete and student, too. He really
wants to excel and works toward
that end and very meticulously so.
He'sa focused driven type a guy. But
at the same time, he's free and he's
fun to be around
Schaefbauer said basketball,
family and religion are his priorities,
although not in that order.
"God is a very large part of my
life I'd never want to rank my
priorities he said.
Oh, and Schaefbauer can play
basketball, too.
This 18-year-old, 6-foot-4, fresh-
man guard could compare notes with
Shaq on breaking basketball goals.
Schaefbauer's dunk was not
glass-shattering a la the rapping, Fu-
Schnickens fan or Darryl Dawkins
(a.k.a. Chocolate Thunder), but it
broke a goal just the same.
Schaefbauer credits the destruc-
tion to a faulty basket in Minges, but
this wasn't the first time he brought
destruction down on an iron rim. He
broke his first goal in the ninth grade
in Elk River.
Schaefbauer, Mr. Basketball in
Minnesota last year, has had to set
the record straight about his home
town.
"When you say Elk River to
people down here, they think, like,
we canoed to school Schaefbauer
said. "Its only abouta half-hour north
of Minneapolis so its really a subur-
ban area of Minneapolis
He chose ECU over Washington
State, Wyomingand William & Mary.
He also chose playing hoops for the
Pirates over plaving wide receiver
for Colorado, Wisconsin or Minne-
sota and he admits that playing both
sports for the Pirates has crossed his
mind.
His 40-yard-dash time of 4.6 sec-
onds places him five one-hundreths
See SCHAEFBAUER page 17





NAVIGATOR '9394
November 18. 1993
Page 4
Lyons taking his share of accolades
1 ester Lyons' boyish -mile
might be a little deceh ing.
He might appear to be inno-
cent and quiet.
By Brian
Olson
�Vm-tt Editor
but he is just
the oppo-ite.
He is full of
energy and es-
pecially lets it
all hangout on the basketball court.
You can find always find
1 ester keeping things loose around
the gvm. During the Lady Pirate
team photos. Lester jumped up be-
hind the camera and pretended to
throw a basketball at them. All the
plavers laughed and jumped back
just before their picture was taken.
Lvons is entering his final sea-
son of ECL' basketball and it could
be his best vet. He was named pre-
season MVP bv the press on Media
Dav in Richmond Lvons has the
ability to jump start this ECU team
in a hurrv, and he has the abilitv to
take a game over bv himself. He
will be the go-to man this year and
the team just might live or die bv
his performances.
Lvons is not new to eastern
North Carolina. He is from
Lewiston, N.C and went to Bertie
High School. Lvons started roam-
ing around that Bertie gvm when
he was about five years old. His
mother was a coach at the school.
and he would always be around a
basketball. The game sort of grew
on him. He gives a lot of credit for
his success to his mom and he savs
she was a big influence on him.
Lyon's mother also coached bas-
ketball at N.C. A&T.
If you have been to some ECU
basketball games over the vears,
you might think of Lester Lvons as
a real outgoing guv because he is
so good. Off the court, Lyons goes
through a change.
"I'm just one of those real quiet
off-the-scene guvs. Out here on
the court I'm wild and live, but
once I get off the basketball court,
it's a whole different Lester Lyons
Lester said smiling. "I keep to mv-
self a lot when I'm not with the
guys
Lvons is a hard, dedicated
worker and he has proven that re-
cently. He himself called a team
meeting to discuss the plans and
future for this coming season. Head
Coach Eddie Pavne learned of this
and .was very impressed. He said
that this was the first time that he
had heard of a plaver doing this
Photo courtesy of SID
Lyons upgraded his defense last year to complement his offense.
He has been chosen as the preseason CAA Player of the Year.
"Lester works reallv hard
Pavne said, "He's a good worker.
From the feedback I've gotten he
was one of the hardest workers we
had in the preseason
When Lester is not swapping
basketballs through nets, he likes
to sit back and enjov some good
old music. Hecalls himself a music
man. He enjovs all tvpes, but he
has his favorites. He enjovs slow
jams with Silk and listens to rap-
pers MC Lvte and Queen Latifah.
He will also get comfortable to the
tunes of "The Great" Bob Marlev.
"I grew up as an onlv child,
and 1 plaved and did everything
bv myself Lvons said. "I used to
use the radio as a toy and it reallv
got me into music
Back on the court, Lvons has
put up some outstanding statis-
tics. He owns the record for career
three-point goals made, career and
single season steal records. He is
second in career assists, third in
career blocked shots and free throw
percentage. Lvons enjovs hitting
the outside jumper and is fourth in
career three-point field goal per-
centage.
Lvons is also a hit with his
schoolwork. He took advanced
courses all through his time at
Bertie and graduated in the top !5
percent of his class He is now
majoring in construction manage-
ment and hopes to graduate 'his
summer. If there is no more bas-
ketball after college, he would like
to manage or supervise a construc-
tion company.
"It 1 do the things I am sup-
posed to do this year, and have a
good strong vear, and we do some-
thing team-wise, 1 think I'll have
a chance to do something in bas-
ketball
The road to becoming a senior
is a long maturing process. The
transition can be very difficult. You
are on your own for the first time
in life and you have to take on
responsibility.
"It was real difficult for
me Lvons said. "I had a lot
of adjusting to do. It was a
lifetime experience. I had
thoughts about going home
ater mv freshman year
People do not just ma-
ture off the court, but on the
court as well. Over the last
two seasons Lyons has aver-
aged 15.5 points per game and
2.7 assists. Learning to play
tougher levels of the game is
a challenge.
"Personally I think I've
matured and plaved more under
control, learning the system and
knowing what it takes to go out
and win a ball game Lvons said,
"Early in mv career, I played out of
control a lot and didn't know what
was going on out there, and now I
just calmed down a lot more. The
coach asked me to do a lot more
things for the team and I under-
File Photo
Rising to the occasion has never been a problem for Lyons. He
scored 27 against UNC.
stand my role
A team will also look to lead-
ers, especiallv the seniors. Some
greats have led bv example, like
baseball great Pete Rose, and some
lead vocally, like NBA star Charles
Barklev.
"A team is going to
always need a leader. I
think I'll do a lot more
leading actively than
vocally
� Lester Lyons
"A team is going to always
need a leader Lester added. "I
think I'll do a lot more leading
activelv than vocally"
Last vear, the ECU team made
it to the NCAA Tournament led by
Lyons.
In the first-round loss to even-
tually champions UNC, Lyons net-
ted 27 points and grabbed four re-
bounds. No other player would go
on to score more points against
the Tar Heels in the tournament.
"That was a great experience
for me and the team Lyons said,
"That is what you play for in your
four vears. You want to be in the
NCAA Tournament playing
�� teams like North Carolina
and Duke. It was good ex-
perience for me and it was
the greatest experience for
mesince I've plaved basket-
ball
Lester Lyons is a class
act at East Carolina and will
go down in history as being
one the best in school his-
tory.
This season could be his
finest vet and make sure you
look for his new number 15,
instead of number 5.
Lester likes to switch his num-
ber everv season because he says it is
just something to do. He wore num-
ber 11 during his sophomore season.
The number 21 will be worn by
theotherguard, Kareem Richardson.
These two together will be one of the
best back court duos in the CAA.
Whatever jersey Lyons wears
vou can be sure he will light up





Page 5
November 18. 1993
NAVIGATOR '9394
Gill prepared to show the conference his talent
By Brad
Oldham
Stvff Writer
Photo courtesy of SID
Gill will have to rebound well
for the Bucs to win.
For East Carolina center Anton
Gill, the rime has come to show the
CAA conference just what he's made
of After a
hyper- ex-
tended elbow
injurv last vear
slightly dimin-
ished his fabulous All-CAA Freshman
season, the 6-foot-S Raleigh native is
returning as one of four starters geared
up to defend the CAA title.
While attending Millbrook High
School,Gill was plaving without much
of a supporting cast. This leadership
role gave Gill the freedom to test his
game, which included the opportu-
nity to shoot from the outside and run
the show at point guard. He averaged
26.5 points his senior season, and was
named Cap Five4-A Plaverof the Year.
When he was ready to pick a col-
lege, Gill liked what he saw here at
ECU under then head coach Mike
Steele. He chose East Carolina because
he felt that the program was one he
could fit into. After redshirting his first
year to bulk up a bit, Gill had estab-
lished himself as a starter by the next
season.
"It felt good to be named on the
CAA All-Freshmen team because 1 got
a chance to go from being redshirted
one season to being recognized the
next Gill said. He started in 2b games
for ECU and averaged 11.4 points and
7.1 rebounds a game in the 91-42 sea-
son.
Last season was one of changes
for Gill. Coach Payne and the Pirates
looked to him as a solid scorer, and it
showed in their record. ECU was 7-1
when he hit 60 percent of his field
goals. His points and rebound aver-
ages dropped slightly, which de-
pended some on his elbow injury suf-
fered against Old Dominion. umber
32 made up for it in the CAA tourna-
ment, though, helping ECU clinch the
title by contributing 14 points against
Old Dominion,and lOpointsandseven
rebounds in the championship game
against James Madison that sent the
Pirates to the NCAA tournament to
face the UNC Tarheels.
"Going to the tournament was big
for us said Gill. "It gave the school
more exposure and gave the basket-
ball program here a lot of attention. It
helped us get recognition that ECU is
more than just football People got a
chance to see us play, which will mean
more media coverage. For me person-
al it was like a dream. The Tarheels
were mv favorite team growing up. It
was kind of hard to believe
The situation for Gill and the Pi-
rates this year is one which has not
occurred in some time for ECU basket-
ball. Thev are now actually expected to
win games.
"Things have gotten better here
now because of the CAA Champion-
ship Gill said, "It seems like we are
getting more and more support each
year, and we're not going to have a
downfall. Last vear, we won the tour-
ney but did not have that good of a
season. It's good to win the tourna-
ment, but we're working harder than
in years past to put together a winning
season
It is true that people are going to
have high expectations for Gill and his
teammates. As with anv team, fans are
going toexpectbiggerand better things
even after the most monumental of
seasons. With the addition of solid re-
cruiting by coach Payne in the off-
season, the Pirates are in the drivers
seat to repeat as CAA champs.
"Everybody is going to have to
contribute to make it happen Gill
said, "We know we can win the big
games, we just need to keep working
With the tradition of schools in
the CAA such as lames Madison, Old
Dominion and UNC-Wilmington ha v-
ing basketball talent, the road to suc-
cess for the Pirates will not necessarilv
be void of challenges. Gill is readv to
start the season .with con ti nued weight
training that has alreadv added 35
pounds to his framesince first arriving
in Greenville. As for his three-point
shooting, an aspect of his game that
was a bit off last season, Gill regained
his confidence to shoot the three over
the summer.
In his free time, Gill likes to listen
tomusicand just hangout with friends.
A communications major, he hopes to
one day pursue a career in TV produc-
tion but is pretty much leaving his
options open for now.
"We need to get all the fan sup-
port wecanGillsaid, "Even if we lose
one, keep coming out to the games. It's
rare to see teams go undefeated
Gill gives props and a shout-out
to all of his teammates, because in a
season in which the first banner in
Minges will be hung, a new stage in
ECU basketball is beginning.
Young hoping to finish senior season on top of CAA
Coming out of high school. East
Carolina forward Curlev Young was
recruited by colleges all over the na-
tion. There was
no question he oY DRAD
was a hot com- OLDHAM
modify. Staff Writer
The6-foot-
4 1 2 oung helped lead Deep Creek
High School in Chesapeake Va. to
the regional tournament all four years
he was there. He was plaving in big-
time high school tournaments, and
was on his way to making a name for
himself in college basketball.
While playing in one of these
tournaments in College Park, Md,
Young got a chance to look at the
University of larvland as a possible
choice for schools.
He got an opportunity to meet
the plavers, the new coach Bob Wade
and to look around the campus.
Young liked what he saw. Most im-
portantly. Young liked the exposure
he knew he could get bv plaving for
a major ACC program like UM. With
high expectations, Young headed to
College Park to plav with the Terra-
pins.
You could sav that things did
not go quite as planned for Young at
Ma rvland. After starting the first few
games of the season, Young was
benched by Coach Wade. This did
not go over well at all for him.
"I jutdid not have the patience
to sit the bench Young said, "Af-
ter always playing in high school, I
wasn't used to it. I was frustrated
because I knew 1 was outplaving
the guys in practice that were start-
ing
Then there was the probation.
After an investigation into the school
by the NCAA, illegal rule violations
such as players being rewarded cars
and money, coaches giving players
illegal privileges and various other
infractions were found. The school
was penalized severely. No
postseason play for two years and no
televised games. After plaving just
one season with the Terrapins,
N oung. along with other members of
the UM team, decided to pack up and
move on.
After playing in the big-time
ACC conference. Young decided that
he wanted to transfer to a smaller
school where hecould get more plav-
ing time. He had a cousin, Andre
Fields, who played football here at
East Carolina Young liked the fact
that ECU was close to home and de-
cided to come here and plav for Coach
Payne and the Pirates. "It was totally
different here compared to Mary-
land Young said, "It was so much
smaller, which meant more personal
attention. At Maryland, it was easv
to just become another face in the
crowd. I knew that basketball reallv
was not that big here when I came,
but I figured that after ECU sent a
player to the NBA Blue Edwards),
times could change
According to Young, that time
has come. "It's totallv different here
now. East Carolina basketball is on
another level. There are a lot more
expectations put on us now. We need
to get a winning season, which hasn't
happened in about six years. We're
getting a lot more exposure, and more
TV time than ever before
The reason of course is obvious
The Pirates shocked evervone bv
upsetting James Madison University
to win theCAA Tournament last sea-
son. The win gave the Pirates a trip to
the NCAA Tournament, to face the
Tarheels of UNC. Going to the tour-
ney was meaningful for Young, but
he was used to it by then. After play-
ing the caliber of teams he saw in the
ACC, such as Duke, UNC and Geor-
gia Tech, Young was prepared to tace
the new challenges being thrown at
ECU basketball.
As for this season. Young hopes
the Pirates can win both the regular
season and postseason tournament
titles, which would automatically
send FCL back to the NCAA tourna-
ment. He definitely feels thev have
the team to do it. "We have seven
new players and fou r out of five start-
ers back Young said, "Our two prac-
tices a dav will help the voung guvs
get used to our offense. Thev are verv
athletic, which will help them get
used to our system faster Young is
certainly a player looked up to bv the
rookies.
"I think Curlev is going to have
a big impact this year Skipp
Schaefbauer said, "Evervone on the
team respects him. He's reallv sup-
portive and positive
As for after college, Young is
currently working as an intern to get
his degree in criminal justice. After
graduating in the spring, he will look
over his options.
The idea ot plaving overseas has
come to mind, but as of now just
getting the degree is most important.
Young's interests off the court in-
clude listening to music (at full blast),
just hanging out with friends and
having a good time.
With solid leadership such as
Young, Lester Lyons and Anton Gill
around, plus the addition of the 11th-
best recruiting class in the nation,
look for the Pirates to repeat the honor
of CAA champions.
Young will play swingman for
both the small forward and in
File Photo
the Pirates, spending time at
the backcourt.





WOMEN'S TAKE-OUT SECTION
NAVIGATOR '9394
November 18, 1993
Page 6
Lady Pirates boast youngest team
After making a run at the Colonial
Athletic Association title the past four
seasons, Rosie Thompson's Ladv Pi-
rates will begin
By Dave
Pond
Senior Writer
the 1993-1994
with a whole
new outlook.
The entire
starting lineup from last season's 16-12
Lady Pirates is gone due to gradua-
tion. It included Gavnor O'Donnell,
last year's national assists leader; Toina
Coley, who was second in the country
in steals; and All-CAA center Rhonda
Smith.
Last year's starters accounted for
almost 80 percent of Ladv Pirate scor-
ing, and those points will be sorely
missed this year.
The roster, withonlveleven mem-
bers, includes nine sophomores and
freshmen, and Coach Thompson will
have tobuild her team around her only
erienced player, sophomore for-
.rd Tomekia Blackmon, who missed
a last three season games with an
CL injury to her left knee, the second
ee injury of her basketball career.
1 is expected to be at 100 percent bv
season opener at Campbell,
lhere are five guards battling for
ng time for the Lady Pirates, all
to offset the rather significant
f O'Donnell and Coley.
inielle Charlesworth, a transfer
CAA-rival University of Rich-
, looks to be the replacement for
nell.Shewasnamedtothel991-
.AA All-Rookie squad, playing
28 games as a reserve for the
:rs.
Three returning guards are in the
it for playing time as well. Senior
jhonda Baker averaged 11.6 min-
tes and 2.1 points per game, starting
n three. She should receive more play-
ing time as her experience level in-
creases.
Sophomores Angela James and
BelindaCaglesaw limited play as fresh-
man. James played in 13 games, aver-
aging 1.4 ppg and 6.2 mpg. Cagle
played in 25 of the Lady Pirates' 28
games, averaging 1 point and 5.8 min-
utes per game.
True freshman Justine Allpress
has followed fellow English guard
Gaynor O'Donnell to East Carolina.
She will be competing for the shooting
niard spot. Last year, Allpress aver-
aged 25 ppg, and was named the 1992-
1993 Lichfield and District "Young
Sports Personality of the Year
At the forward positions,
Blackmon and LaTesha Sutton have
returned with intentions of starting.
They will be pushed hard by freshmen
Shay Hayes and Tracy Kelley.
Tomekia "Fruky" Blackmon is
ECU's top returning scorer, and has
the most experience of all returners.
She was named to theCAA All-Rookie
Team after averaging9.6 ppg and lead-
ing the league in field goal percentage
(60.6). Although expected to be fully
recovered, her recurring knee prob-
lems could hinder her performance, as
well as the team's.
LaTesha Sutton will be asked to
step forward this season after plaving
in a reserve role last year. She had
ECU's second highest season free
throw percentage last year (7.65), aver-
aging 7.1 minutes per game. The expe-
rience that she earned plaving in the
CAA tournament will be helpful in her
continued development as a player.
Freshman Shay Hayes came to
ECU from Waldorf, Md where she
was the conference scoring leader, av-
eraging 19.0 ppg her junior year for
McDonough High School, leading her
conference. She also grabbed 11.4 re-
bounds per game, good for the confer-
ence lead as well. A four-sport athlete,
Hayes was named All-Conference in
the high jump and the triple jump,
skills that should come in very handy
for this short Lady Pirate squad.
Tracey Kelley also came from
Maryland, where she was a two-time
All-State player, leading the
Middletown Knights to the Maryland
State title last year. Kelley was
Middletown's all-time leading scorer
and rebounder, with over 1300 points
and 900 rebounds during her high
school career. She also received the
Maryland Scholar Athlete award in
each of her high school years.
The center position is the biggest
question mark for the Lady Pirates.
Senior Janet Rodgerson, one of the tall-
est Piratesat 6 feet 2 inches,hasearned
three letters at ECU, but has averaged
only 1.2 points and 1.8 rebounds per
game during her career. Last season,
Rodgerson averaged 2.4 ppg and just
1.3 rpg.
She will be strongly challenged
for the starting job by Swedish fresh-
man Michaela Wallerstrom
WaDerstrom, also 6 feet 2 inches, led
the Vasalundskolan Vikings to the fi-
nals of the Swedish Championship in
1991 and the semis in 1992, and played
File Photo
Fruky Blackmon (No. 42) led the CAA in field goal percentage
as a freshman. She will lead a team featuring just two seniors.
as a reserve for the Sweden National
team that participated in the World
University Games.
With such a young and inexperi-
enced program, the Lady Pirates have
been picked to finish seventh, in front
of only UNC-Wilmington. Defending
CAA champion Old Dominion, led by
two-time CAA Player of the Year
Celeste Hill, should again take it home
in 1993-1994.
"We are real young said Coach
Thompson. "Wehavetocometogether
as a unit and try to improve every
day
Along with the tough CAA sched-
ule, playing a strong non-conference
schedule will not help to increase
Thompson's '9394 winning percent-
age. Teams such as Alabama, Ken-
tucky and North Carolina are licking
their chops waiting for the Dec. 29-31
UCF Holiday Classic, in which the Lady
Pirates have entered. The Lady Pirates
open their home season Jan. 5 with
Duke, and also host perennial powers
UNC-Charlotte and N .C State later in
the season.
This season should be looked at
by the fans as a season of rebuilding.
Any team losing one starter, such as
the Chicago Bulls' loss of Michael Jor-
dan, has to adjust and rebuild. The
Lady Pirates lost all five starters, so
Coach Thompson will be forced to com-
pletely rebuild the Lady Pirates and
look toward next season for conten-
tion. They could surprise a few teams,
but it looks like a long season for the
ladies of the hardwood.
1993 IADY PIRATE ROSTER1992 PER GAM I:STATISTICS
No.NamePo. GClass FrHIHometown, HSMin FG 3FGFT PTSREBAST TO BLK STL
35Justine Allpress5-7Staffordshire, England, John Taylor25 58.8 2.0 54.4 9.6 76.9 1.0 70.4 1.9 19.01.7 .5 1.1 .03 .35 4.4 .57 1.8 .10 .57 .4 .32 .6 .07 .14 (Stats from University of Richmond)
21 42LaShonda BakerGSr5-8Myrtle Beach. S.C Myrtle Beach11.1 28.1 -213 60.6 -6.0 22.6 20.0 10.7 28.0 47.4
Tomekia BlackmonFSo5-fiSnow HilL N.C Greene Central
14 5Belinda CagleGSo5-10Trenton, G.A Northwest
DanielieChateswonh GSo-T5-3Raleigh, N.C Miilbrook
32Shay HayesFFr5-11Waldorf. M.D McDonough11.4
23Angela JamesGSo5-7FayetteviBe, N.C Fayetteville62 46.7 -50.0 1.45.10 .6 - .17
44Tracey KelleyFFr6-0Jefferson, M.D Middleton
22Janet RodgersonCSr6-2Bear Grass, N.C Bear Grass6.0 53.5 -70.6 2.41.3 1.2.07 .4 .14 .07
30Latesha SuttonGSo5-9Walstonburg, N.C Greene Central7.1 40.9 -76.5 2.1.03 .1 - .03
33MkteelaWalierstrom FFr6-2Soina, Sweeden, Vasalunos16.58.2MMFMPPffPI'
Averages2.0 yrs5-912MM available HS stats are giveri
THE NAVIGATOR'S CAA
PRESEASON RANKINGS
1. Old Dominion
2. James Madison
3. George Mason
4. Richmond
5. William & Mary
6. American
7. East Carolina
8. UNC-Wilmington
THE NAVIGATOR'S
PRESEASON ALL-CAA
Ashleigh Aken W&M
Marcell Harrison GMU
Fruky Blackmon ECU
Gail Wilkins AU
Celeste Hill ODU
1992-3 IN REVIEW
STANDINGS
Team Conference Overall
ODU 14-0 1.000 22-8 .733
JMU 9-5 .643
UR 8-6 .571
GMU 8-6 .571
ECU 7-7 .500
AU 7-7 .500
W&M 3-11 .273
UNCW0-14 .000
16-11 .593
12-15.444
17-10.630
16-12.571
15-13.536
11-17.393
4-23 .148
All-Colonial First Team
CIs Pos
Ashleigh Akens, W&M Jr F
Marcell Harrison, GMU Jr G
Celeste Hill, ODU Jr F
Nickie Hilton, GMU Jr F
Pam Huntley, ODU Sr C
Rhonda Smith, ECU Sr C
All-Colonial Rookie Team
CIs Pos
Fruky Blackmon. ECU Fr F
Amber Blank, UNCW Fr G
Keri Chaconas, GMU Fr G
Heather Hopkins, JMU Fr F
Yolanda Settles, W&M Fr G
Gail Wilkens, AU Fr G
All-Colonial Defensive Team
CIs Pos
Rebecca Dayvault, W&M Sr
Karen Jenkins, AU Sr
Christina Lee, JMU So
Laura Teter, GMU Sr
Toina Coley, ECU Sr
C
F
G
F
G
Returning Statistical Leaders
Scoring Avg
Celeste Hill, ODU 17.0
Gail Wilkins, AU 14.9
Marcell Harrison, GMU 14.6
Rebounds Avg
Nickie Hilton, GMU 10.3
Ashleigh Akens, W&M 9.9
Celeste Hill, ODU 9.3
Assists Avg
Marcell Harrison, GMU 3.7
Gail Shelly, JMU 3.6
Christina Lee, GMU 3.4





Page 7
November 18, 1993
NAVIGATOR '9394
Feeling 'the wrath of Fruky'
When Tomekia Blackmon was
growing up, she paid her dues, like
so many other basketball players,
on the court in
her back yard. I By ROBERT
One-on- I TODD
one games I Editor
were almost an I
everyday occurrence at the
Blackmon house. So was talkin'
junk.
"You can't play, Fruky she
was taunted. "Get that stuff outta
here she heard when her mother
blocked her shot. Yes, her mother.
Blackmon's mom, Wataonar
Blackmon, is still a tough competi-
tor and her fire to win rubbed off
on Tomekia, who is better known
as Fruky (a nickname her
"grandaddy" gave to her as a
child).
Competition against men (and
a determined mother) has made
Fruky a physical player who wel-
comes contact in the post.
"When 1 set a pick, 1 want my
opponents to feel the wrath of
Fruky she said. "I like the way it
feels to knock somebody down.
When somebody comes down low,
I swing sooo hard, and even if I
miss, they know I'm after them. I
want to intimidate them, so the next
time they're thinking about me
Fruky's mom is also a dedi-
cated fan. Between reprimanding
referees, Miss Blackmon finds en-
couraging words for Fruky.
"Even if I didn't know she
came to the game and I could
her somebody talking, I'd be like,
'there's my momma Fruky said.
This season should bring
Fruky's mom a lot to cheer about.
While she stands two inches
under six feet, she is a force in the
post. Last season, as a freshman,
she led the CAA in field goal per-
centage with 60.6 percent shoot-
ing. Fruky also brought down 5.5
rebounds per game in her role off
the bench against CAA opponents.
CAA seems unkind to
young Lady Pirates
The Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion looks to be as competitive as
ever. Almost all teams are contend-
ers for the CAA
By Dave
Pond
Senior Writer
File Photo
Tomekia "Fruky" Blackmon will be the leader of a young
Lady Pirate squad. She is coming off her second ACL tear.
Head coach Rosie Thompson
has praised Fruky for her physical
play and says her quick-
ness has, surprisingly,
improved trerru ndously
from last year.
Fruky's speed was a
concern during the pre-
season. In last year's fi-
nal regular season game,
she tore her anterior cru-
ciate ligament for the sec-
ond time.
Her recovery has
given the Lady Pirates a
chance to compete
through a tough non-con-
ference and CAA schedule.
Without Frukv, an already
Fruky
Blackmon
small and youthful group of play-
ers would be lacking a force on
defense. With the loss
of 6-foot-2 center
Rhonda Smith, the team
will also rely on Fruky
for points in the paint.
Staying healthy is a
must for Fruky, a nurs-
ing major.
Her presence is a ne-
cessity for any hope of a
successful season.
And the support-
ing presence of
Wataonar Blackmon
will likely light the fire
that will drive Fruky to excel this
season.
title, taken by
Old Dominion
University last
season with a
14-0 conference record.
American University returns
three starters from last year's 15-13
squad, including CAA Rookie of the
Year, Gail Wilkins. Wilkins averaged
14.9 ppg as well as leading the league
in three-point accuracy.
Senior Kirsten Keller joins her,
hoping to improve on her
11.5 ppg and 1.9 blocks per
game ratio. The Eagles also
led the league in field goal
defense for the second year
in a row.
George Mason Uni-
versity brings back a
strong nucleus, including
All-CAA selections Nickie
Hilton and Marcell
Harrison. The duo com-
bined for 28.7 points And
13.9 rebounds per game,
leading the Patriots toa 17-10 record.
The Patriots led the CAA in rebound
margin for the sixth straight season,
but will be hurt by the loss of CAA
All-Defensive Team member Laura
Teter
James Madison returns four
starters from last year's squad, in-
cluding Kara Ratliff, a Second Team
All-CAA selection, who averaged
14.1 ppg, good for the Dukes' team
lead.
She will be joined on the front
line by the 1992 CAA Rookie of the
Year Krissy Heinbaugh and 1993 All-
Rookie Team member Heather
Hopkins. In the backcourt, Christina
Lee and Gail Shelly hope to continue
their success.
Susan Yow inherits the coaching
Rosie
Thompson
job of the 4-23 UNC-Wilmington
Seahawks. A very young squad, they
are led by sophomore Amber Blank,
a 1993 CAA All-Rookie Team mem-
ber, who averaged 9.1 ppg during
her freshman season.
UNCW needs to improve de-
fensively after finishing 1993 last in
scoring and field goal percentage
defense.
Old Dominion returns nine
letterwomen, led by two-time All-
CAA Player of the Year Celeste Hill,
who averaged a league high 16.1 ppg
for the Lady Monarchs last season.
She is joined by senior guard Deanna
Vander Plas, who had 71
assists and 52 steals in
1993.
However, they are the
only two starters from last
year's championship
squad, and how quick'
the reserves step up w
greatly affect a 1994 char
pionship return.
Richmond retur
four starters from a r
diocre 11-15 squad.
Spiders' success will
on three seniors, center Heidi P
guard Debbie Barnes, and fo.
Ellen Bartuska. They must imp
on the boards after ranking last
conference in rebound mart
1993. How well they reboum
determine if the Spiders will b
cessful in the CAA.
William & Mary has a sol u
of nine letterwomen returning
last season's 11-17 squad, who
vanced to the finals of the CAA to
ney in postseason play.
The Tribe is led by senior fo
ward Ashleigh Akens, an All-CA,
selection, who averaged 14.1
points per game. W&M needs to
improve shooting in all aspects of
their game for the '94 season to be
a success.
Baker moving into starting role
Myrtle Beach, S.C. can contain a lifestyle
that is too fast for certain people. Fortu-
nately for ECU, LaShonda Baker is one of
those persons.
LaShonda Rochell By BRIAN
Baker, a senior guard CUNNINGHAM
on the ECU women's Staff Writer
basketball team was
born and raised in Myrtle Beach her entire
life. It was in her juvenile days where she
often found herself just hanging out at the
basketball courts. Baker was influenced
early on by her aunt and some friends to
play basketball.
"A lot of people would always com-
ment about how good my ball-handling
skills and quickness were Baker said. "But
my jumpshot drew the most raves from
people
At Myrtle Beach High School, Baker
was a three-time All-State performer for
the Seahawks and averaged 19 points a
game while also helping her team win the
regional championships in back-to-back
years, 1989 and 1990. Baker is alsoonly the
third player in Myrtle Beach High School
history to score over 1,000 points. She also
received the Connie Kingsbury Award dur-
ing her senior year. This is an award given
to the player who is most dedicated to the
game. From 1990-92, Baker attended
Anderson Junior College in Myrtle Beach.
She averaged 11 points a game before trans-
ferring to ECU last year.
"I really didn't know much about ECU
except for their football team at the time. I
did want to get away from home, how-
ever, and after a few of my friends told me
about ECU, I looked into it and decided to
come here said Baker, who plans to ma-
jor in social work.
In her debut year with the Pirates,
Baker averaged 12 minutes a game and
managed to score a season-high 10 points
See BAKER page 12
Photo courtesy SID
Baker said she feels women's basketball has much to offer even though they do
not dunk. She will be exciting the crowd in Minges from the guard spot.





NAVIGATOR '9394
November 18, 1993
Page 8
Rodgerson filling big shoes
Most people look up to Janet Rodgerson. At 6 feet 2 inches and wearing
a size 12 shoe, Rodgerson is aBy Ashley
center forNeal
ECU'SStaff Writer
women's bas-
ketball team. Rodgerson begins her
fourth season with the Lady Pi-
rates with onlv one regret about
her collegiate career.
"I should have come in with
more confidence and been more
aggressive Rodgerson said.
In addition to her mental game,
Rodgerson says working harder
in the weight room would have
made her game stronger and pre-
vented her from settling for sec-
ond string. Not one to dwell on
past actions, Rodgerson is making
the most of her final season and
putting forth her strongest effort
ever, mentally and physically.
Although the official season
lias not begun, Rodgerson and the
10 other team members have al-
ready begun a regimen that re-
quires them to run five days and
lift weight three days. This pre-
season conditioning is without
coach supervision and relies com-
pletely on player dedication.
Graduating next fall with a de-
gree in elementary education will
enable Rodgerson to pursue the
only career she has ever consid-
ered, that of a second grade school
teacher. Unlike teaching, however,
basketball was not always a con-
sideration.
"It basketball chose me, 1
didn't choose it Rodgerson said.
"Bear Grass is a real small town -
everyone knew me
Because she was 5-foot-ll in
the eight grade, Rodgerson says
people often assumed she would
play basketball. It was her junior
high coach who motivated her to
participate in the sport and try out
for the team .
Aspects that were not key ele-
ments of her game in high school
have turned into essentials as a
collegiate player. Because of her
size and the conference she played
in high school, Rodgerson says she
never acknowledged the impor-
tance of physical strength or ag-
gressiveness.
The turning point of
Rodgerson's Pirate career came last
year during a holiday tournament
against UNC-G. She went into the
game after the starting center got
into foul trouble. Despite a lack of
experience, Rodgerson scored into
the double digits and helped ECU
clinch a victory.
Rodgerson attributes that
game as being her most important
because it was instrumental in
building her confidence. As for
physical ability, Rodgerson savs
practicing with Tomekia "Fruky"
Blackmon has helped her on-court
performance.
"We plav hard and work each
other forward Blackmon said.
"She Rodgerson helps my game
because she's a big girl
While Rodgerson's 6-foot-2-
inch frame challenges a 5-foot-ll-
inch Blackmon, it is Fruky's dedi-
cation that Janet admires.
Rodgerson says that although
Blackmon was absent from the
game due to knee surgery, she has
worked hard and almost regained
her full potential in a short time.
At the conclusion of last sea-
son, ECU's women's basketball
team lost five starters, including
their center. According to head
coach Rosie Thompson, the team's
starting line up will vary from
game to game, based on each
player's performance during prac-
tice. Thompson says that Janet's
hard work during preseason train-
ing should pay off and Rodgerson
should emerge as a team leader.
"I'm expecting big things from
Janet Thompson said. "It's her
last year and she wants to make a
contribution
Photo courtesy of SID
Rodgerson will be holding down the vacant post position
created by the loss of All-CAA center Rhonda Smith.
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Page 9
November IS. 1993
NAVIGATOR '9394
Charlesworth shows dedication at 5'3"
For Danielle Charlesworth,
playing her second year of college
hoops took a year longer than she
had antici-
By Dave
Pond
Senior Writer
pated. Under
NCAA regula-
t i o n s ,
Charlesworth
sat out last season but stil! has three
vears of eligibility left for Rosie
Thompson's Ladv Pirates.
After playing her freshman sea-
son for the Richmond Spiders,
Charlesworth ha come a little closer
to home to plav roundball for the
I ady Pi-
rates. She
plans to step
in and wreak
havoc on the
Bucs' oppo-
nents for a
long, long
time.
"Danielle
is one of the
most dedi-
cated ath-
letes that I
have ever
worked
with said women's head coach
Rosie Thompson. "She's an excel-
lent ball handler, and she is great at
putting pressure on the ball defen-
sively
Charlesworth grew up in a very
athletic environment. "I've always
been involved in sports, whether it
was basketball, soccer or tennis
she said. Her older sister was a mem-
ber of an N.C. State's national cham-
pionship cheerleading squad while
she was in college.
Charlesworth went to Rich-
mond out of Millbrook High in Ra-
leigh, N.C, lettering four times in
basketball as well as in soccer. Dur-
ing her senior season, Charlesworth
was named captain of both the bas-
ketball and soccer team. After her
senior
vear, in
which she
captained
both
squads,
Charles-
worth was
named an
All-State
hoopster
and an
A 1 1 -
American
soccer
player.
"I wanted to go to college
to possibly play both
soccer and basketball,
and in fact, I was
recruited higher ?s a
soccer player
� Danielle Charlesworth
" wanted to go to college to
possibly play both soccer and bas-
ketballand in fact, I was recruited
higher as a soccer plaver than I was
for basketball she said. "I went to
Richmond to play basketball because
1 thought it would be a good oppor-
tunity to step in and play quicklv
For the 1991-1992 Spiders,
Charlesworth played in all 24 games,
earning a spot on the Colonial Ath-
letic Association All-
Rookie team.
She is a exceptional
three-point shooter, nail-
ing 47.4 percent of at-
tempts her freshman year
However, Charles-
worth was not happy in
Richmond.
"The entire coaching
staff that recruited me
went to another school af-
ter 1 signed, and I just
didn't like it a?, much
Chrlesworth said. It was too small
of a school for me. Also, ECU was a
lot closer to home she said.
"We recruited Danielle out of
Millbrook and would have loved to
have had her play for us then, but
we had no scholarship to offer her
Thompson said, "With her transfer-
ring with three vears left, it seems
like it worked out good for everyone
involved
This year, Charlesworth is be-
ing looked upon as a key plaver in
the success of the Ladv Pirates.
"If the season started today, she
Danielle
Giarksivorth
cause we were left due to gradua-
tion without a point guard after last
season said Thompson.
Thompson went on to stress how
much Charlesworth loves the game.
"Last year when she couldn't
plav in games and was,
in essence, a practice
plaver, you could look at
Danielle and nine out of
10 times she would have
a basketball in her hand,
trying to improve her
game and get ready for
this season
When asked to give
a view on her own
strengths and weak-
nesses, Charlesworth
stated, "My quickness
and ball-handling skills offset my
height disadvantage, since 1 am onl v
5-foot-3
Thompson agreed, noting that
"Danielle's only weakness is her
height, and that will only factor into
the game when she is matched up
against a much taller point guard
In the classroom, Charlesworth
is a junior majoring in education,
and minoring in mathematics. She is
also considering a double major in
these areas. If her potential can be
realized, DanielieCharlesworth will
be a well-known name in Greenville
i-ould step right in at the point, be- for years to come.
If you didn't
advertise in
The
Navigator,
don't miss
your next
opportunity.
For details,
call The East
Carolinian at
757-6366.
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NAVIGATOR '9394
November 18. 1993
Page 10
Thompson enters second season
(CAA SID) � Rosie Thomp-
son, a name synonymous with
Pirate Basketball, begins her sec-
ond year as head coach of the
Lady Pirates. Thompson took
over the ECU program in 1992
after serving as an assistant coach
under Pat Pierson for five vears.
As promised by Thompson,
IL was competitive and posted
its 20th winning season in 24 vears
with a 16-12 record. The Pirates
were 8-8 against CAA foes.
Thompson began her asso-
ciation with ECU in 1975, and as
they say, the ret is historv. ECU s
all-time leading scorer (2,352
points) and rebounder (1,183 re-
bounds), Thompson still holds
Pirate records for points and re-
bounds in a single season.
During her career, Thomp-
son was the most accurate free
throw shooter in school history
hitting 74 percent from the line.
She also led ECU in scoring, re-
bounding and minutes plaved her
final three seasons.
Thompson's accomplish-
ments were recognized statew ide
earning NCAIAVV Plaver of the
Year honors along with numer-
ous other awards. She is the onlv
Lady Pirate to have her jersev
retired. In 1990, East Carolina in-
ducted her into the school's Ath-
letics Hall of Fame.
A 1979 ECU graduate, Th-
ompson received her masters de-
gree in 1985. After playing one
year of professional basketball
with the St. Louis Streaks, she
served as Assistant Director of
Admissions from 1984 until join-
ing the Lady Pirate staff as a full-
time assistant in 1987.
Words from the coach:
Evaluate the CAA race.
The toughest yet! ODU will be
the team to beat with Celeste Hill
returning and a strong recruiting
class.
Right behind theMonarchs could
be Ml, JMU or GMU. The Eagles
and the Dukes had great recruiting
years and return a lot. If JMU can
have a great near last season with less
than 10 healthy players, imaginewhat
Sheila can do tliis year.
GM U retu ms Nickie Hilton and
Marcell Harrison, one of the tough-
est duos in the league.
W&M continues to get stronger
and is no longer the cellar dweller of
the league. I can't really say about
Richmond. They were inconsistent
at times last season but I think Tammy
will always have her team ready to
play.
ECU is unpredictable. We lost
five seniors, all starters, and don't
have any experience to replace them.
We're happy with our recruiting
class, however, with all freshmen, no
one brings in the experience we need.
Sophomore Fruky Blackmon is the
only returning player with any real
playing time.
UNCW has a good coach in Sil-
van Yew. but it is hard to turn a
program around in a near.
What is the most interesting
thing about your Program?
Probably the fact that we are
deep in the middle of rural eastern
North Carolina, and on our roster ice
have five players who come from
within a two-hour radius and then
we have two international players
from Sweden and England.
How will this year's team
differ from the 1993 squad?
Experience! Last year we started
five seniors. This year our roster in-
cludes two seniors, no juniors, five
sophomores and five freshman.
1992-3 TeamSuperlatives
Most Points:Most FT Attempted:
92 vs. UNC-Ashville35 vs. UNC-W
Fewest Points:Most FT Made:
39 vs. ODU26 vs. Virginia Tech
Fewest Points Allowed:Fewest FT Attempted:
56: vs. NC A&T4 vs. UNC-CH
Most Points Allowed:Fewest FT Made:
94 vs. N.C. State1 vs. UNC-CH
Field Goals Made:Most Rebounds:
38 vs. UNC-Ashville60 vs UNC-A
Fewest FG Attempted:Fewest Rebounds:
42 vs. JMU (2)26 vs. UNC-CH. ODU
Highest FG:Most Assists:
61.9 vs. JMU (2)26 vs. UNC-A
Lowest FG:Fewest Assist:
27.4 vs. ODU8 vs. Va. Tech
Lowest FG Allowed:Most Steals:
27.6 vs. UNC-A22 vs. Winthrop
Highest FG Allowed:Fewest Steals:
59.6 vs. UNC-3 vs. Va. Tech
CharlotteMost Blocks:
Most 3-pt FG Made:7 vs. Campbell
4 vs. Northeastern.Fewest Blocks:
ASU0 vs. Northeastern
Most 3-pt FG Attempted:Most Turnovers Caused:
11 vs. UNC-W33 vs. Winthrop
Highest FT:Most TO Made:
78.6 vs. ASU33 vs. ODU
Lowest FT :Fewest TO Made:
25 vs. UNC-CH15 vs. William & Mary
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Page 11
November 18. 1993
NAVIGATOR '9394
Allpress latest English import
This year's women's basketball
team, predicted to finish seventh in
theC A A conference this vear, is faced
with the pros-
pect of making By WARREN
up for lost ex- SlJMNER
perience, par- gTAFF witer
ticuiarlv at
their shooting guard position.
With the departure or their En-
glish assist leader GaynorO'Donnell.
head coach Rosie Thompson was
forced to scout for a plaver to firm up
her backcourt And where on earth
could thev find such a plaver1
Why, Jolly Old England, of
course.
Freshman point guard Justine
Allpress is the Lady Pirates' latest
English import. This native of
Staffordshire could prove to be a vi-
able challenger for shooting guard.
Allpress led her team at John
Taylor High School to four English
National Championships in four dif-
ferent age groups. She played on an
international team based out of
Xorthhampton that won tourna-
ments in Scotland and Wales.
Allpress averaged 25 points a game
last season and knows that she could
be called at any time to contribute to
the Pirate unit.
One would think that such pres-
sure would lead to a classic case of
freshman nerves, but that's not the
case for Allpress. She said her inter-
national experience would serve her
well in college.
"I learned a lot of things plaving
in England Allpress said. "I've
had experience in handling pressure
situations and know I can plav well
at those rimes
Allpress said that the speed-
based Pirate team is very attractive
to her and will fit nicely with her
style of play.
"My greatest asset is mv speed
she said. "In high school we were
very much the same, with a lot of fast
breaks and such. The game is verv
much the same over there
Allpress said she is prepared to
face the taller teams in the CAA, and
was prepared well by playing against
talleropponents in England. Accord-
ing to Allpress, her three-point profi-
ciency is another strength in her
game.
"I can hit the threes, that's no
problem she said. "The three point
line here is probably a foot inside of
what it was over there. I think that's
going to be an advantage
Allpress said that she was a little
taken back at the boldness of Ameri-
can society and the warmth of North
Carolina humidity when she first ar-
rived in Greenville, but she is begin-
ning to make an adjustment to life in
the U.S.
"I nearly died when I first got
here, it took a little while to get used
to swearing as soon as you walk out
the door, it's a lot warmer. I couldn't
believe when I got here that I'd be
walking around at the end of Octo-
ber dressed in a pair of shorts. But
now I guess I'm used to it. It's differ-
ent but I like it. I'm quite happy to be
warm, thank vou
"The student body as a whole is
very different here, back in my coun-
try things are much more reserved,
and, at first, I wasn't quite used to it.
But on the whole, the people here are
so friendly. My roommate, who's
from Sweden, and I went out to a
store and when we walked to the
door, the assistant said 'Hi' and asked
us how we were doing. We were like
'What, is she talking to us?"Oh we're
fine, thank you. We really didn't ex-
pect that
Allpress said she was also sur-
prised at the attention Americans pav
to athletics.
"We had heard about the NBA
in England, but there's a lot more
hype here than in England. I mean, in
my high school everyone knew I was
an athlete but it wasn't as big as it is
here. Here, if you're a basketball
player, or an athlete, you're supposed
to be somebody special. There's a lot
more emphasis put on those things
here. I'm used to playing on the na-
tional level and there being, for the
women, maybe 200 people. There is
definitely a lot more hvpe here
File Photo
Gaynor O'Donnell led the nation in assists last season.
Like Allpress, O'Donnell is from England.
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NAVIGATOR '93- '94
November
Page 14
"Ice" chillin' at the point
Kareem Richardson's plans for
the upcoming season re -imple.
They are the same .1- those of every
other member
ot the ecu I By Dave
men- basket- I Pond
ball team, con-
tinue to im-
prove on team and individual plav
and get back to the NCAAs
Richardon said that ht -
a s looking to improve on every-
thing that he does, and if he can
keep up his ongoing pace. �
the Pirates to victory in 14 should
be a lot easier than in past Pirate
seasons.
Richardson came to East Caro-
lina from Rantoul Township High
School in Rantoul, 111. Forthe Eagles,
"Ice" Kareem earned four letters in
basketball, averaging 24.5 points,
6.7 rebounds, 6.3 assists and 2.9
steals per game his senior vear.
During his high school career,
Richardson was named an honor-
able mention All-American, se-
lected twice as the Champaign-
Urbana News Gazette Player of the
Year, and became the school career
scoring leader with 1,820 points.
Richardson was a star in the
classroom as well, earning honor
roll status in each of his four years
of high school.
During recruiting, East Carolina
head coach Eddie Pavne was im-
pressed with what he saw in
Richardson, both on the court and off.
"He was a true point guard,
and had always plaved the point,
which was important to us Payne
J He had an excellent under-
4 the came at that early
tea ' he was as
. i in thedassm � as he was on
A highly decorated recruit,
Richardson said hechose Ea Caro-
lina over Indiana Wisconsin and
EvansviHesimplybecause. I knew
1 could step in right awav and help
to build a quality program at ECU
Coach Payne said that he saw
in Richardson, a player with
big-time quickness that could score.
Also. Richardson thinks along the
same lines as I do, which helps dur-
ing game situations
"I feel that I can also bring a lot
to the game because I am able to
penetrate and break down de-
fenses Richardson said. "I can also
shut down the opposing point
guard, taking away a major part of
their game
Richardson and Payne both
agree that his consistency needs to
improve to keep up with the rest of
his game.
"If Kareem could nail a 17-foot
jumper consistently, that would
make him a very difficult plaver for
the opposing point guard to con-
tain Payne said.
A? a freshman, Richardson
stepped up and took hold of the
starting point guard position, aver-
aging 7.1 points, 2.0 rebounds and
2.? assists in 30 games last season.
The Pirates played 500 ball with
Richardson in the starting lineup
last vear. gome 7-7
Overall, the Pirate record was
14-16, including the march to the
NCAA,
Last season. n chardson's play
helped him ear position on the
I992-93CAA iokie Team.
"Last sea� e started off
quickly, winning our Christmas
tournament and starting 4-1, but
then we hit a seven-game slide
Richardson said. "Even though we
were losing, we knew that we were
getting better all along. We kept
our confidence up and went into
Richmond for theCAA tourney feel-
ing like we could win it all. We
stopped making the late-game little
mistakes that plagued us all season
and reeled off three straight victo-
ries to take it
Then came the University of
North Carolina Tarheels in the first
round of the NCAAs.
"There is simply no other at-
mosphere like the NCAAs
Richardson said. "I mean, two or
three thousand people showed up
just to watch us practice. We came
in with a good attitude, but Caro-
lina just wore us down with their
size and substitutions
Off the court, Richardson has
See RICHARDSON page 17
Hunter puts last year in the past
Transferring from college to col-
lege can be a difficult thing to do, espe-
cially if yourplayingbasketball. ECU's
Wilbert Hunter
By Brian
Olson
Assistant Editor
has gone
through this,
worked out the
kinks and is
now ready to make a big impact on an
improving basketball team.
Wilbert played his first season at
ECU last year after transferring from
Chowan College and had a seesaw
season. He started the first 13 games
for the Pirates last season and then
ended up seeing playing time from the
bench.
"That has to junior college plav-
ers. They have adjustment periods just
like freshman players do head coach
Eddie Payne said. "We made a conser-
vative effort to stick with him during
those times when he wasn t pla ving as
well as we thought he could and as he
thought he could
Hunter averaged six points a game
last year and collected three rebounds
per game. Hunter broke loose against
Tennessee Tech last season and col-
lected a personal career high 22 points.
This athletic six-foot-five-inch guard
should really be a big contribution
junder the basket because of the loss of
center Ike Copeland. The rebounding
jobs will have to more
distributed to more
players.
"Iwanttoexceed
my expectations from
last year Hunter
said, "My transition
was a little harder
than I thought it was
going to be. I finallv
started coming
around and getting
used to the system
here
There will be
some shifting among
the starters this veur
and Hunter will prob-
ably be shifted in and
out of the lineup. It
looks like he will be
splitting time at for-
ward with Chuckie
Robinson and Curlev
Young.
"I think if I keep working hard, 1
can get back to that starting spot.
Curlev is a good player so it is going to
be a toss-up between me and Curlev.
Hopefully, I'll start again
Playing the University of North
Carolina lastseason in the NCAA tour-
nament was really a taste of reality for
himself. He grew up in Raleigh, N.C
Photo courtesy SID
Hunter played against teammate Anton
Gill in high school.
as a Tar Heti fan and found himself on
the court last season plaving against
his favorite team.
Before he even came to ECU, he
already had some plaving experience
with his teammates. He plaved against
Anton Gill in high school and hooked
See HUNTER page 16
Photo courtesy SID
"Ice" Kareem Richardson could become a force in the Colonial
Athletic Association with his improved jumpshot.
Jones comes home to
play college basketball
Chuck Jones comes to East Caro-
lina this season with hopes of help-
ing the team continue its recent suc-
cess. Jones, a t-
By Brad
Oldham
Staff Writer
foot-6 forward
from Kinston,
N.C, is one of
manv new
faces this vear
for head coach Eddie Pavne.
Chuck comes from a very suc-
cessful Kinston High School program.
Coached by veteran coach Paul Jones,
and playing with the likes of Jerrv
Stackhouse, Jones has had his fair
share of previous accomplishments
before entering college. He was voted
as a Big East4A conference first team
member at Kinston, and helped lead
his team to the state championship
game his senior year. He attended
Fork Union Prep school for one vear
after high school to help polish his
academic and basketball skills.
High school coach Paul Jones
has optimistic views on Chuck's new
home here at ECU.
"One of the main reasons we
made it to the state finals was be-
cause of Chuck Jones said, "He's a
great kid, and he's got great athletic
ability. He has verv good ball-han-
dling ability for a forward. 1 think he
can contribute earlv at ECU. He cer-
tainly has the skill to make an im-
pact
Chuck Jones was recruited bv a
number of schools coming out of high
school. Programs such as UNC-Char-
Iotte, Georgia Southern, Virginia
Commonwealth and UNC-Greens-
boroal! showed interest in recruiting
Jones. He decided on East Carolina
because it was close to home. His
mind was already made up to come
here even before the Pirates had their
postseason success.
The goal for Jones in his first
season here is simple. "I want to help
take ECU back to the NCAA tourna-
ment, but this time for more than one
game Jones said.
In his free time off the court,
Chuckenjoys playing Nintendo with
his teammates and watching movies.
His major is still undecided.
With Coach Payne and his Pi-
ra tes bringing in the 11 th-best Spring
recruiting class in the nation, Chuck
Jones will surely play a role in the
Pirates winning their second straight
CAA title.





Page 15
November 18. 1993
NAVIGATOR 'Q1.q4
D.0"flasreadyt0 rebound from redshirt season
"The Big Man on Campus" is a
title that even- athlete wants to hold
To garner the attention of the 17,000-
plus students
By Warren
Sumner
Staff Writer
on campus, and
the hordes of
sports fans in
the region, is a
justified dream
foreveryparricipantincollegesports.
It brings accolades and notoriety and
tame.
Butwhatifyoucouldn'tgetaway
from it1 What if, as nice as you may
act, and as easygoing as you mav be,
vou were always faced with being
that B.M.O.C, regardless of how vou
perform athletically?
Welcome to constant staring.
Welcome to a world where anonym-
ity is impossible and expectations of
you constantly soar; where you can't
walk down the street without hearing
the hushed whispers of awestruck
onlookers and the thuds of nudging
elbows.
Welcome to the life of Don Dou-
glas.
Standing nearly seven feet tall,
the Pirate basketball team's redshirt
freshman center has grown accus-
tomed to such attention. It simply
comes with the territory. Being able to
hide m a crowd at that height is a
difficulty, being able to hide rom them
is an impossibility.
"Living life at 6-foot-10 is diffi-
cult because people look at you differ-
ently because no matter where vou go
or wha tever you are doing, people are
going, 'God, look how tall that guy is'
or it's always a constant question of.
Oh, do you play basketballHow tall
are you? Douglas said It'sa part of
my everyday life. 1 don't mind be-
cause I understand it's just their curi-
osity, but my friends, who are with
me when people ask me that, are like
'How can you put up with that?"
Douglas said that walking
around campus can sometimes be a
problem, because some of the
university's doorways are molded at
a 6-foot-8 height, and there is always
a constant battle to try to find shoes
and clothes. (Douglas' foot is a size
16). Perhaps most distressing to Dou-
glas is the way he is perceived by girls.
"1 think that girls in general are
really intimidated by my size Dou-
glas said. "Because my physical stat-
ure is so tall, they think I'm going to be
bully-ish
Just talking to Douglas for a few
minutesdiscountsany contention that
he is a bully. He is soft-spoken and
congenial and seems to allow no form
of intimidation to come into his con-
versation. Douglas seems to be a regu-
lar gny, albeit a 6-foot-10 regular guy.
"I'm a very easy going person
Douglas said I love talking to people,
Don Douglas
sometimes its difficult for me to start
a conversation with people because
I'm afraid how they will take it. Some-
times, when I do initiate conversa-
tion, people don't know what to say
because they feel intimidated or what-
ever. I feel more comfortable when
people initiate conversation with me.
Then I won't feel awkward talking to
them
I lowever there was one particu-
lar occasion last March where Dou-
glas did initiate a conversation, an
extremely rareconversation where he
couldspeakeye-to-eyewith UNC cen-
ter Eric Montross.
"Itwas good to finally meet him
he said. "Several people on campus
said something to the effect that i
resemble h im. One of my friends even
gave me the nickname of 'Dontross
When I talked to him on TV, a lot of
people saw me point to me and then
to him and a lot of people thought I
was talking trash to him, but I was
telling him that before the game, we
were signing a lot of autographs and
a lot of kids were coming up to me
wearing North Carolina gear think-
ing that 1 was him
Douglas said that watching
Montross play had a motivational ef-
fect on him.
"It really made me want to play
he said. "More so that game because
we made the tournament, but it was
really hard to practiceall last vearand
know I couldn't play. But sitting there
in Winston-Salem and watching him
go up and down the court made me
want to play all that much more
Now that Douglas' redshirt sea-
son is over, he will have an opportu-
nity to quench that desire. He said he
understands that his height will cre-
ate expectations in the mindsof Pirate
fans, but is realistic about his goals for
this season.
"I want to make as much contri-
bution to the team as possible, but I'm
not expecting to come in and average
20 points a game or anything like that.
My part on this team is probably going
to pretty reserved because we're so
deep. Ialsohavealot to learn aboutthe
game beca use I have only been playing
sincemyeighthgradeyear.Ihad never
picked up a basketball before then
Douglas said he is prepared to
face the fans' expectationsof his height
and ability, no matter how demanding
those expectations may be.
"A lot is going to be expected of
me just because I'm 6-foot-10or 6-foot-
11. I'm just going to try to keep away
from everyone else saying 'why didn 't
he do this' or 'why didn't he dunk it
there I'm sure there is going to be a lot
of heat, but I just want everyone to
know I ha ven't been playing thisgame
for that long and my best years are still
to come
3:00PM
4:00PM
5:00PM
6:00PM
7:00PM
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10:00PM
First Impressions
Listen Up
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Listen to Play-By-Play on
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NAVIGATOR '9394
November 18. 1993
Page 16
JheCAA
HomeTeam Sports
File Photo
ECU will be on Home Team Sports on Jan. 15, 26 and
29. The last two dates will be televised from Minges.
NovemberTime
27 Troy St. atGMU10 p.m.
29 G.Wash.atAU9 p.m.
December
2 ODUatUCSB(ESPN)Mtirirt
11 Virginia at ODU7:30 p.m.
22 VCUatGMU7:30 p.m.
31 JMU at Minnesota8 p.m.
January
8 ODU at JMU7 p.m.
,0 AUatUNCW7:30 p.m.
15 ECU at ODUNoon
17 W&MatUR7 p.m.
19 URatGMU7 p.m.
22 UNCWatJMU2 p.m.
ODU atGMU4 p.m.
26 JMU at ECU7p.m.
29 UNCWatECU4 p.m.
31 VCU at ODU7:30 p.m.
February
5 JMU at ODU7:30 p.m.
9 URatODU7 p.m.
14 ODUatUNCW7:30 p.m.
19 GMUatODU7:30 p.m.
26 URatJMU4 p.m.
March
5 Quarterfinals 12,2,7,9 p.m.
6 Semifinals3,5 p.m.
NBA Draft
Picks
from the CAA
1992
Matt Fish, UNCW
(R2, Warriors)
Curtis Blair, UR
(R2, Rockets)
1991
Chris Gatling, ODU
(R1, Pacers)
1989
Blue Edwards, ECU
(R1, Jazz)
1987
David Robinson, Navy
(R1, Spurs)
Brian Rowsom, UNCW
(R2, Pacers)
Frank Ross, AU
(R5, Sixers)
1986
John Newman, UR
(R2, Cavs)
Ricky Wilson, GMU
(R3, Bulls)
Kenny Gattison, ODU
(R3, Suns)
1985
Mark Davis, ODU
(R4, Cavs)
1983
Mark West, ODU
(R2, Mavericks)
7 CAA Championship 8 p.m.
HUNTER �TZ
up with Lester Lyons on the same AU-
Star team.
One of his biggest thrills was not
just plaving with his new teammates,
but against now-pro Bobby Hurley
when he attended a five star summer
basketball camp. Hunter was only a
sophomore in high school then and
reallv had no idea who Hurley was.
When things are not always going
so well for Hunter, he can look to his
family for support.
"What was real special about last
season was, you know how bad 1
struggled, they were still there sup-
porting me.
"Thatshowed me how much they
reallv cared about what 1 was doing
My familv made me feel real good
about everything
When this season is over, it will
come time for Hunter to decide on his
future.
He is majoring in communications
and hopes to find a career in it after
basketball.
Hunter would like to go into pro-
duction. He is possibly thinking of
heading into commercials.
"Can't tell what's going to hap-
pen after school. I'll have to sit down at
the end of the season and think about
that Hunter said.
For this season, Hunter has to put
forth his best to be a quality asset to this
heavily talented Pirate team.
This is his last season and there is
no turning back.
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Page 17
November 18. 1993
NAVIGATOR
'0-?.
'94
SCHAEFBAUER
Continued from page 3
of a second out of the top-10 times on
the Pirate football squad, just behind
running back Junior Smith.
But, Schaefbauer said he chose
ECU because of the people, not the
football.
"The facilities probably weren't
as good as Washington State he said.
"Once vou get a distance that's too far
todrive, its basicallvall the same. And
North Carolina is a big basketball area,
and that's kinda another reason why
1 chose to come here
Tobacco Road certainly has
plentv of opportunity for a plaver
with Schaefbauer's ability.
Last season at Elk River High
School, Schaefbauer played the point
and had the opportunity to distrib-
ute theball. He averaged 23.5 points,
five rebounds and eight assists per
game. This year, he will see time
backing up both shooting guard
Lester Lyons and point guard
Kareem Richardson and may play
some small forward.
"1 think Skipp's going to play a
lot Pavne said. "You know, he's a
very strong, physically mature fresh-
man. More so than the average
(freshman). Also he plavs a ma-
ture, smart game. He can shoot the
RICHARDSON
basketball and he's got the respect
of our players. I expect him to be a
very solid contributor of a lot of
minutes
While not as quick as some other
guards he has faced, his size and
shooting ability combine to balance
things out at either position.
With this being Lyons' last sea-
son, the duo of Schaefbauer and
Richardson mav soon become the
best back court in the CAA. And �
just maybe � fans in Minges will
see Richardson lob the pass that
Schaefbauer uses to rip down an-
other rim.
Continued from page 14
continued his success in the class-
room, where he has already made
the Dean's List, earning over a 3.0
grade point average. He plans on
majoring in communications, aspir-
ing to either coach college basket-
ball or go into sports broadcasting
after school.
"Like every college athlete, I
also want to go pro after I graduate,
as well he said.
Richardson is a big Lakers fan
and his favorite player is former
L.A. point guard Magic Johnson.
"The way that Magic saw the
court and knew what to do with the
ball was unbelievable he said. "I
also admire him because of his cour-
age
This season, Richardson and
the rest of the Pirate hoopsters are
getting ready for what looks to be
another entry into the N'CAAs. The
slogan for the Pirates is, "The Pur-
suit Begins. Workin' for More in
'94 However, the team, accord-
ing to Richardson, is very different
than that of the CAA champs of
last year.
"This year we have more shoot-
ers, better group rebounding, and a
lot more overall talent Richardson
said. "It's a lot more relaxing when
you have more than one go-to guy

and you can go in with the ball
instead of kicking it outevery time
Individually, Richardson
knows that he also has to get better.
"It's a new year he said. "Per-
sonally, I want to raise all of my
stats at least 10 percent and in-
crease mv assist to turnover ratio
to 3-1
What is in store for the Pirate
fans in 1994?
"A whole new ball game
Richardson said. "Overall, we're a
more talented bunch of guys this
season. It's going to be a whole dif-
ferent atmosphere, very enthusias-
tic and exciting to watch
CLOCK
Continued from page 2
change will probably generate
more shots and passes. It might
benefit teams that like to run the
fastbreak.
"There is a difference between
taking a shot at 32 with 13 seconds
on the clock and taking a shot at 32
with three seconds on the clock
Pavne said. "I think that's where
you'll see the difference with the
type of shot selection
The team charted some shot
selection in practice and most were
taken in the twenties just about ev-
ery possession. Payne says that they
might have to get it down a little to
be on the safe side.
Defenses will also have to make
their own changes.
"Changes with in a possession:
soft press, three quarter court press
and drop it back into a zone Payne
said. "You inbound a ball, you ne-
gotiate the soft press and get it
across half-court maybe kick it
down to the base line and it comes
back out and then they get into a
zone. So now, all of a sudden, you're
looking at you used maybe 12, 13,
14 seconds. "
College basketball is trying to
see if this will make the game a little
more exciting, like the NBA.
The professionals use a 24-sec-
ond shot clock and that is why pro
scores are so much higher than in
college.
You could probably say that
this rule was pressed by television
networks because they want to see
a more action packed game.
"Maybe we'll see some more
one-on-one play said ODU head
coach Oliver Purnell, "I'm not sure
if that is necessarily good for the
game, but when you get down to
eightsecondsleftonthatshotclock,
you might want to get the ball into
your best scorer's hands arid try
and let him go one-on-one.
"Defensively, you might see
some more trapping and some more
zone to try and force a low percent-
age shot. It will be a very interest-
ing thing to watch
This rule is not written in stone
forever, thankfully. If it does not
work out, it can be switched back at
the end of the season.
This rule will not affect every
team however Under new head
coach Paul Westhead, George Ma-
son will be shooting the ball about
every six to eight seconds.
He wants to shoot the ball at
least 100 times a game (the normal
is about 60). ECU fans will be in for
quite a show when the Patriots visit
Minges.
The bottom line: This new shol
clock rule should really not affect
the style of ECU basketball, but no
one knows for certain until it is
tested.
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NAVIGATOR '9394
November 18. 1993
Page 18
WESTHEAD
Continued from page 2
players to be in top physical condi- we played well after five seconds
Sharpe makes our all-
Westhead quipped.
- he ran so fast he liter-
and was airborne for
it the fast pace and high
"To say we play no defense
Is incorrect in five seconds
we hit you good
� Paul Westhead
Hon. That is why he has his players
run wind sprints with parachutes
Ittached to their backs.
"Micha
para'
In the sprin
ally took of
bout tour
Because
scores
teams often
;ain repu-
tations for
not playing
d e f e n s e
His system,
though,
will not
work with-
out it. Westhead initiates a man-to-
man full-court press with traps. The
goal of his defense is to force a turn-
over or a quick shot.
"We put a high priority on our
defense he said. "Now, how it is
and how it would be evaluated by
the viewer might be different, but 1
know it generates the speed that 1
want we get up and attack you so
were not going to have to plav de-
fense tor 35seconds�we're going to
play defense for five seconds. But,
what I would dispute with people
is that the five seconds we play is
very, very hard. Too sav we play no
defense is grossly incorrect. To say
mat may be more accurate. But in
five seconds, we hit you good
Some of the doubts about his
svstem stem from his lack oi success
with the Denver Nuggets. In his two
seasons with the team, the Nuggets
won just over a fourth ot their games.
"At Denver when 1 arrived, it
wasa depleted team Westhead said.
' Alex En-
glish and
Fat 1 ever
had gone
away be-
fore I ar-
rived so
you're
running
in to a
team that had to let all their good
players go because they weren't win-
ning enough, and they had to start
over. To do that you've got to have
about a five, six vear blueprint. Un-
fortunately, when vou're the next
coach coming in after a couple of
stars leave, vou're starting from
scratch Your svstem can take you
so far. I was a fast-break coach in
1980 when we won a world's cham-
pionship and was a fast-break coach
in 1992 when we came in last in Den-
ver
Other detractors of his system
argue that it works on a collegiate
level because of the time span be-
tween games but would wear out an
NBA team because of the longer
games and more grueling schedules.
"I would still dispute that � the
easy answer is 'they pla s2 games
and 4S minutes It' too long and the
plavers can't keep the pace
Westhead said. And, to this day,
I'm certain that's exactly why it
should work. Because the problem of
pace isn't with your team, the prob-
lem ot the pace is with the opposi-
tion. As much as it could work in
college, it could work in the NBA.
But will it? Can you get guvs to do
that is another issue
Unfortunately, Westhead does
not know what to expect from his
current team at CMC or the confer-
ence.
Well, va talk about going in
blind. It's the classic case of it he
said. "1 have none of that advantage
of being familiar with the players.
So as we start practice, I'll have to
learn who the players are as they go
through the first week, 10 days.
"A friend of mind called me up
and said, 'did you see that Street &
Smith picked you eight?' and I said,
'well, that's not so bad I didn't real-
ize that there was only eight teams in
the league. 1 thought it was a 10-team
league we only have the opportu-
nity of moving up
And at a very quick pace, if
Westhead has his way.
PREVIEW
Continued from page 2
STUDENT UNION - WE'RE MORE THAN BAREFOOT
LOOK FOR
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STARTING 2ND WEEK
OF NOVEMBER.
MUSICIANS WILL BE
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EVERY OTHER WEEK.
FIND OUT THIS WEEKS EVENTS !
THE
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757-6004.
DON T MISS
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(GREAT STUFF)
MENDENHALL ART GALLERY,
NOVEMBER 14-24,
RECEPTION: NOVEMBER 17,7:00 P.M.
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
ECU STUDENT UNION
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE.
spot. Cill is a career-36.1 percent
shooter from behind the arc and
replaces IkeCopeland, who led the
l AA in rebounding last vear.
"Anton (ill is capable of, and
needs to, step his game up a level
Pavne said "He had some verv.
very good -ames last vear and
other games where he disappeared
� well we can t have that. He's a
real big key tor us
Junior college transfer Chuckie
Robinson has been the biggest bully
in the paint during the preseason.
He has been ferocious under the
glass and draws a lot of fouls on
offense.
Robinson could start at power
forward and Curlev Youngatsmall
forward with freshman Don Dou-
glas backing up Gill at center.
Forward Wilbert Hunter
started 13 of the first 14 games last
vear, but the transition from
Chowan College was difficult and
he plaved a reserve role the re-
mainder of the season.
Kevin Armstrong may see
more plaving time this year at for-
ward. An All-CAA Rookie Team
member in 1990-91, Armstrong was
lost to a blown knee midway
through the next season.
After recovering and playing
IS games last vear, Payne said he
expects Armstrong to surprise
people this season.
With Lvons in the backcourt
will be CAA All-Rookie Team
member "Ice" Kareem
Richardson. An improved jump
shot mav take the lightning-quick
Richardson into the elite class of
the CAA. With freshman Skipp
Schaefbauer, the Pirates have per-
haps the best backcourt trio in
the conference.
Schaefbauer, h-foot-4 and 200
pounds, can hit from well behind
the three point line, dish the ball
off and plav in the paint.
ECU has been picked to finish
as high as third in the CAA, but
Tavne said he thinks forth or fifth
is a little more realistic. Even if the
Pirates finish seventh again, it
doesn't reallv matter:
"We're not interested in just
winning games, we want to win
championships Payne said.
Every Tuesday is College Night 7pm till close
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All films start at 8:00 and are FREE with
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"HARD TARGET" R
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SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21st
(watch for our free door prizes and selected rrtowesj
Monday Small Ham & Cheese,
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215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
316 SW Greenville Blvd
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. (919)756-7171





1993-94
ECU Men's Basketball
Home Games
NOV18 COURT AUTHORITY
SOY 23 MOSCOW DYNAMO SPORTS CLUB
DEC 6 CAMPBELL
DEC 16 FIRM AN
DEC 22 APPALACHIAN STATE
FAN 3 WESTERN CAROLINA
JAN 8 AMERICAN
JAN 10 GEORGE MASON
JAN 17 FAIREIELD
JAN 26 JAMES MADISON
JAN 29 INC-WILMINGTON
FEB 12 WILLIAM & MARY
FEB 16 OLD DOMINION
FEB 23 RICHMOND
ALL HOME GAMES START AT 7:00PM
PROUD TO BE
YOUR BUD!





Title
The East Carolinian, November 18, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 18, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.977
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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