The East Carolinian, November 16, 1993






Sports
Pirates stroke to top of CAA
The ECU swim team finished
first in the CAA tri-team meet
this past Saturday, knocking
off Georgia Southern and
Old Dominion. Story page 8.
Lifestyle
Welcome to Dumpsville
If your mate is ready to
have you out of their life,
how would you prefer to
get the baa news?
Students respond in
Health column on page 6
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 67
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, November 16,1993
10 Pages
Fraternity questions Public Safety response
� .oK��iwr.iiiHcTrcTPfPiih- als who are visiting that, and
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Afightatan Alpha Thi Alpha
party on Saturday, Nov. 6 led to
severalarrestsandquestionsabout
how Public Safety polices campus
parties.
Early Sunday morning, Nov.
7, a dance in Mendenhall Student
Center hosted by the Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity was brought to a
halt when a fight broke out. A shot
was fired and campus police ar-
rested five non-studentson charges
of disorderly conduct.
The fight began inside
Mendenhall, broke up momentarily
and resumed outside in the park-
ing lot. The two Public Safety offic-
ers serving as security for the party
called for back-up and by the time
they arrived on the scene, someone
fired a shot and the fight ended.
"The subjects were ordered
to the ground,a weapon wasfound
by an officer up underneath the
reartireoftheautomobile'Crime
Prevention Officer Keith Knox.
"Also, a holster that fit that par-
ticular weapon was found inside
the front seat of that car
Public Safety arrested
Maurice Lamont Daniels, 17,
Antwon Lamont Anderson, 16,
Lynn Leeshen Moore, 20, Damon
Tyrell Moore, 19, and Lorenzo
Devon Howard, 18. All five were
placed under $200 secured bond
atthe Pitt County Jail. None of the
individuals are ECU students.
"Wedidn'tmakeanyarrests
of the students who were there
Knox said. "We don't really know
who all was involved in the fights.
Those were the individuals who
were fighting when the shot was
fired
Cedric Van Buren, an ECU
student who attended the party,
complained that Public Safety
failed to control the fight before it
moved outside.
"Our fraternity brothers
broke up the fight and escorted
the people outside Van Buren
said. "The Public Safety officers
should have made sure they va-
cated the premises.
"The whole incident could
have been nipped in the bud if
Public Safety had done their jobs.
We're paying them $100 a night to
come in and talk with their friends.
They don't do anything Van
Buren said.
Knox said the Public Safety
officers performed their jobs cor-
rectly. "My understanding is that
the fight had broken up prior to
the actual officers getting involved
in it. Theofficers thatwere present
had called for additional officers.
As they were arriving, they had
dispersed, and then the fight broke
back out again. And it all hap-
pened within a matter of seconds
or minutes
Knox said PublicSafety has a
policy of escorting people out to
their cars to insure that they leave
campus. "Idon'tknowatthatpoint
whether we had determined that
these individuals were involved
before the fight broke out again.
Some of the officers ran outside to
identify the suspects and that's
when they heard the shots fired
Van Buren and Demetrius
Carter, presidentof ABLE said their
fraternity has had problems with
Public Safety before. "I've been at
partieswherel would gogetPub
lie Safety because I saw some mari-
juana or drugs, and they don't
move Van Buren said. "They've
sprayed mace at two more of our
parties earlier this year
"We've sat down with the
new director, Teresa Crocker, to
resolve the guest policy Carter
said. "We've revised it to include
the way Public Safety handles
themselves and what our respon-
sibilities are
Knox said that Public Safety
has had problems at Alpha Phi
Alpha parties before. "We've had
several occasions where there have
been fights that end up in the park-
ing lots or the area outside the
public building.
"One of the histories of those
dances is that there have been oc-
casions where we have individu-
als who are visiting that, and we
have actually picked up weap-
ons off individuals he said.
Knox said that he could
not respond to the mace inci-
dents. "I wasn't there, so I don't
knowwhatoccurredatthatpar-
ticular incident Both he and
ECU Chief Ronnie Avery said
that they were not aware of any
of the pepper spray incidents
and that no one had filed a com-
plaint regarding them.
Public Safety provides two
officers for security at campus
parties held at Mendenhall. "We
provide one officer, who is on
duty, in addition to a student
patrol officer who takes care of
the field part of it Knox said.
"There is a policy set in place
through residence life that we
follow their guidelines
SGA rejects proposed bill
anycre?
Three ECU
students enjoy
the fine food,
elegant
atmosphere and
extraordinary
service at one of
the many five-
star eating
establishments
on campus.
Photo by Leslie Petty
Get out the checkbooks again
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Tuition bills for spring se-
mester will go out soon and many
people will be in for a surprise. In
addition to the usual tuition and
fees, students will be charged an
additional $9 for the fee increase
for the current semester.
Rather than send out new
Mils at the beginning of this semes-
ter, university cashier Michael
Balko, Jr. said his office elected to
include the fee increase in the next
bill. He said it would not have
been cost-efficient to mail out
18,000newbills. The bills for spring
semester will go out the week of
Nov. 22.
"Tuition is set by the legisla-
ture, while fees are set by the Board
of Governors Balko said.
"The Board of Governors
cannot make a decision on fees
until they find out what the legis-
lature is going to do. In this case,
the Boa rd of Governors made their
decision shortly after the bills for
the fall went out
The cashier's office hasbeen
collecting the fee over the course of
the semester. "We try to remind
peop le when they come in for other
business, that they owe the fee
Balko said. "We've already col-
lected a good portion of it
Students do not have to pay
the $9 now, however. Balko said
students can wait until they re-
ceive a bill without penalty. Those
who grad uate in December will be
billed separately.
Those who have not paid the
fee need not worry about being
unable to register for classes. Stu-
dents will not be tagged for having
unpaid fees and they will be al-
lowed to register as usual.
"This is different from hav-
ing unpaid bills for dorm damage,
the library, parking you will be
tagged for these and you will not
beable to register for classes Balko
said.
The $9 increase in student
fees applies only to full-time stu-
dents and includes an $8 increase
in health services fees and a $1
increase in other university fees.
Pa rt-time students will be billed $2
for the fee increase.
The Cashier's Office has
opted not to rebill students in a
similar situation before. "We once
underbilled by $0.50 for the fall
semester Balko said.
"It would have cost too much
to send out new bills to 18,000
students to get $0.50 in return, so
we waited until the next semester
and billed them then
Balko said the fee increase
wa s announced in The Da ily Reflec-
tor and The News & Observer, but
not in The East Carolinian.
"We haven'thad any contact
with the campus paper he said.
"We elected to get people as they
came in and rebill the others on the
next bill
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
Graduate Class President
Mike Hadley introduced a bill at
last night's Student Government
Association meeting that may have
reduced problems in future SGA
elections.
The bill called for a more thor-
ough elections report to be pre-
sented to the legislature, a review
board to review the actions of the
legislature and a review board to
examine the election itself, in order
to initiate any changes that would
be helpful for future elections.
The bill wasdefeated in a vote
of 18 to 16. It was the consensus of
the legislature, the executive coun-
cil,andadvisorsRudolphAlexander
and Dean of Students Ronald
Speier, that a revision of the rules is
necessary before any future elec-
tions take place.
The current election rules call
for a review of the elections chair
after each election and before an-
other election takes place. No such
review has occurred for the election
this fall, but mis was justified by
Secretary Kristie Hoffstedder who
said that the Elections Chair, Justin
Conrad, has resigned his position.
The current rules also call for
the Elections Chair to submit a re-
port to the SGA President, Speaker,
Secretary and Legislature within one
weekof theelection.This semester's
report was filed last week. Elections
were held on Sept. 29.
Conrad's explanation for this
is that the current rules make no
provisionforwhen the report should
be turned in, if there are problems
during the election.
The current rules also require
that the report include the number
ofvotescastintheelection,thenum-
ber of votes cast at each polling
place and any information and rec-
ommendation the Elections Com-
mittee would like to give the SGA.
This semester's report in
eluded the total number of votes
and thenumber of votes castateach
polling place, but mentioned none
of the problems in the election. The
report included the required infor-
mation, but was not helpful to the
legislative body.
HacHesbili required that the
report include the winner of each
race, the candidates who were dis-
qualified from the election, the ac-
tionsoftheElections Review Board,
should there be any and recom-
mendations for subsequent elec-
tions.
SGA advisor Dean Speier
and Rudolph Alexander, recom-
mended that similar changes be
made in response to the past elec-
tion They felt that their role as
advisors was to let the rules of the
body govern the process, but they
are recommending changes for
future elections.
SGA Speaker, Brynn Tho-
mas, announced his plan to form a
committee to revise the rules, after
the presentation of Hadley's bill
and before the vote on it. He de-
scribed the issue as being "at the
top of the executive agenda
Thomas stated that his com-
mittee members will be appointed
before Christmas, and the commit-
tee will consider all of the rules. He
stated "all rules are subject to
change
The decisions of this com-
mittee are to be announced to the
legislature and voted onbefore the
Spring elections. A new elections
chair will be appointed by the Ex-
ecutive Council and voted on by
the legislature before the spring
elections.
New Student Union director wants creativity
By Jennifer Jenkins
Public Safety's new director responds to students
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
Teresa Crocker became the
newdirector of ECU's Department
of Public Safety on Nov 1,1993.
Crocker came tr �CU from
North Carolina Statt University
(NCSU), where she served as assis-
tant director of Public Safety from
1991 to 1993.
She succeeds campus police
Chief Ron Avery, who acted as in-
terim director, after James Depuy
resigned last winter after the wire-
tapping controversy.
Crocker described herself as
"responsible for all law enforce-
ment on campus She is ?!so the
director of 37 sworn officers over
500 acres.
Crocker already has her foot
in the door with an agenda for the
new future, based on her percep-
tions of the campus and what ECU
students need.
"We need to do some things
with our manpower, particularly
in the areas of bicycle larceny and
breaking and entering crimes in
satellite parking lots she said.
Th number of bicycle larce-
niesat NCStatehasdecreased over
the past few years, due in part to
rules requiring bikes to be regis-
tered with the university, and the
education of students on how to
properly secure iheir bikes.
Crocker suggested these pro-
cedures will protect bikeson ECU's
campus.
In reference to the recent at-
tacks on students, Crocker says the
Public Safety Department has
"done a very good job of informing
students of serious crimes. Our job
is to continue to educate new and
returning students about well-lit
areas, escort services and the Pira te
Ride program
"Currentlystudentsare fairly
well-informed about how to pro-
tect themselves Crocker said.
"But each student must take re-
sponsibility for their own safety.
See CROCKER page 3
Staff Writer
The new director of student
activities, Stephen James Gray, is
expanding the boundaries of stu-
dent activities on campus. Gray,
exclaims that, "he is challenging
the students to be more creative
with the events that happen on
campus
Before Gray was named the
director of student activities for
ECU, he was the coordinator for
the University of Iowa's Office of
Campus Programs and Activities
for six years. Therefore, he has the
experience it takes to make stu-
dents activities more of a success.
Improvements ha ve already
started to show through with
Gray's support. The Pennies for
Hendrix has set a goal of 35,000
pennies to be given away in late
April. This prize will be given to
one of the patrons of Hendrix The-
ater. Also, the Student Union is
randomly giving away door prizes
at different movies. For example,
they are giving away $100 for
spring semester books and tickets
to a madrigal.
In the future, Gray hopes to
improve Barefoot on the Mall. He
has hopes in making it more of a
program than a one-day festival.
Gray would like to tie in education
and heal thseminarsthroughoutthe
Stephen Cray,
the new director
of Student
Activities, is
trying to develop
different events
for students.
Perhaps he has a
reform idea for
the registration
process
week to go along with the spring
theme of the previous festivals.
In September of 1994, Gray
hashelped schedulea campus lead-
ership program. Thisprogramwill
provide training for student lead-
ers on ECU's campus. Some of the
groups included will be LEAD,
RHA, Student Union, SGA,
Photo by
Cedric Van Buren
Panhellenic Council and other
groups.
Gray is trying to help stu-
dentsdo something differentand
less conforming that will educate
the population of ECU. "Every
activity will have something new
to add to the curriculum Gray
said.





tun
November 16 1993
Puerto Rico's voters speak out
Pregnancy, poverty go hand in hand
Statistics on adolescent sexuality, pregnancy and childbirth
show that a pregnancy can be a crisis in a young woman's life, but
the reason has more to do with poverty than age, say researchers
who have conducted an extensive study into the problem in the
United Statesand the United Kingdom. The study also reveals that
despite an American stereotypedepictinga poor minority woman
as the typical mother, 68 percent of all adolescent births in the U.S.
are white teens, and over half the births are to unmarried mothers.
The study resu Ited in several astonishing figures. An estimated 45
percent of all U.S. female teenagers have premarital sex, and most
are not consistent contraceptive users. As a result, an estimated 40
percent of females become pregnant at lea st once before age 20, and
about four-fifths of these pregnancies are unintended.
Study: Smokers have other bad habits
Well, smokers, there's more bad news for you from research-
ersat Florida State University and San Diego University. While you
may be getting more spaces on campus to smoke, you may not have
the energy to get there. Chances are you drink too much alcohol
and caffeine, don't exercise enough and eat all the wrong kinds of
foods. "It appears that bad habits cluster said Doris Abood, a
Florida State associate professor of health education. The research
found that never-smokers consumed less than fivealcoholicdrinks
a week, while heavy smokers had more than 10 beverages in a
week. Smokers also skipped meals more often than non-smokers,
and when they did eat, leaned toward salty, high-fator fried foods.
Heavy smokersalso said they drink nearly fivecupsofcoffeedaily.
Pepperdine students help California fire victims
Students at Pepperdine University helped victims of the fires
that swept through Southern California in late October and early
November and destroyed hundreds of homes throughout the area.
Although several hundred outlyingacresat Pepperdine, located in
Malibu, were burned, students at the university organized a disas-
ter response team to help those whose homes were destroyed in the
fire. The response teams worked as a liaison between the victims
and social service agencies to find assistance for the fire victims.
Classes at the university were canceled for two days because of the
hazardous conditions and road blocks. Although classes resumed
on Nov. 3, the effects of the smoke were still evident on campus.
"This place smells like a barbecue said university spokesperson
Jeff Bliss.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
(AP)SANJUAN, Puerto Rico
�Flag-waving Puerto Ricans voted
against pursuing statehood, choos-
ing instead to remain a U.S. com-
monwealth in the first ballot on the
island's status in more than a quar-
ter-century.
Sunday's vote turned back the
strongest movement this century
forfull union with Washington Gov.
Pedro Rossello, who spearheaded
the campaign for Puerto Rico to
become America's 51st state, con-
ceding defeat but urging support-
ers to continue the fight.
Commonwealth supporters
danced in the streets and said they
would press for a redefinition of the
island's ties with the United States.
Although the margin of vic-
tory for commonwealth status was
less than three percentage points,
"This was a clear repudiation of
statehood said Miguel Hernandez
Agosto, a senator who leads the
pro-commonwealth Popular
Democratic Party.
Commonwealth received
823,258, or 48.4 percent of the vote;
statehood 785,859, or 46.2 percent;
independence 75,253, or 4.4 percent.
Turnoutwas higher than pre-
dicted, with 73.6 percent of Puerto
Rico's 2.3 million registered voters
casting ballots. It was the first vote
on the island's status in 26 years.
Commonwealth celebrants
jammed traffic, honked horns,
waved PuertoRican flagsand tooted
trumpets.
Ethnic pride and economic
concerns were among the main is-
sues in the non-binding referend urn.
Commonwealth supporters con-
tended the island's culture and
Spanish langua ge migh t be lost and
noted that becoming a state would
mean Puerto Ricans would have to
pay federal taxes.
The island also would no
longer have been able to offer the
tax break that attracts industry and
has helped gi ve i t one of the highest
standards in the Caribbean and
Latin America, though still well
below thatof the poorest U.S. states.
Statehood supporters said it
would bring billions of additional
dollars in federal aid and played to
Puerto Ricans' fears by saying thei r
U.S. citizenship might be lost if they
stayed a commonwealth.
Political status has been hotly
debated here almost since the mo-
ment U.S. troops captured the Car-
ibbean island from Spain in 1898.
Puerto Rico became a com-
monwealth with some autonomy
in 1952, two years after Puerto Rican
nationalists tried to assassinate
President Harry Truman.
As a commonwealth, Puerto
Ricoelectsa non-voting representa-
tive to Congress and ha s no vote for
president. Statehood would have
allowed it to elect at least six con-
gress representatives,aswellastwo
senators.
SUBSTflTMIf
Every Tuesday is
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7p.m. till Close
99C SUBS
Your Choice
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Bologna & Cheese
Ham, Salami & Cheese
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$1.99 includes ta.x
ALFREDO'S
We deliver to Dorms
& Apartments
752-0022
ECU'S Favorite Pizza Place
Large Pizza with Topping
golden
corral
STEAKS, BUFFET & BAKERY
504 SW Greenville Blvd � Greenville, NC 27834
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GOLDEN CHOICE BUFFET
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r with choke of Mushroom
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avy or Grilled �.�
$3.89
Please present coupon when
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Offer good at participating Golden
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Not valid in combination with anv
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rgolden
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valid in combination with any
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STUDENT UNION: WE'RE MORE THAN BAREF00t MENfeHT MADNESS
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757-6004
) OUT THIS WEEKS
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU 1
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"ECU STUDENT UNION IS QUALITY
-TERESA GOINS.
Watch for musicians
performing every other
week 11:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m. in Jones and
Mendenhall cafeterias.
movies start it 8:00 p.m. and are free with
valid ECU I.D. for faculty, stiff, and students
"Like Water for Chocolate"
Wednesday, November 17th, and Sunday, November 21st
"Hard Target" with Van Damme
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, November 18-20.
"Celebrate the Season with Cocoa and Carols" by the Special Events Committee.
Free, at Mendenhall art gallery, November 30th, 4-5 pm
BILL DERMODY
ART EXHIBITION
NOVEMBER 14 - 24
MENDENHALL UPPER ART GALLERY
RECEPTION: NOVEMBER 17,7:00 P.M
BROUGHT TO YOU BY S.U. VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE
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"Be the first on your block to party"
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1109 Charies Blvd.
758-4251
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT
7 DAYS A WEEK





JPJ.ll i M�
1��� i ,
November 16, 1993
Satellite classes to broaden ECU reach
The East Carolinian 3
a Dawson
Staff Writer
A$12milliondollarprojectat
ECU has been given early appn n a I
under the Technology Reinvest-
ment Project (TRP). The p roject vv i I
build on a program that has been
devised between ECU and Black
and Decker(U5.), Inc. Jtwill use the
Black and Eecker interactive televi-
sion network and plant sites as
"learning laboratories" for gradu-
ate students from Black and Decker
and military bases close to theBlack
and Decker plants, in lieu of tradi-
tional classrooms.
"This program is unique in
it's delivery of an entire program
through the use of technological
advances said Dr. Elmer Poe, a
professor and chairof the industrial
technology program.
Outofthe2,850proposalsthat
were submitted to the project, 41
were given early approval. Only
two were from universities, and
ECU was the only one in North
Carolina. Submissions were taken
. Cont'd
CROCKER
P9-1
"Obviously our departmen t
can't be everywhere. This behav-
ior will go a long way in prevent-
ing crimes from occurring
Crocker is pleased with the
new bicycle patrol unit since offic-
ers on bicycles are better able to
hear thingsand communicate with
student.
Crocker also stated that Pub-
lic Safety intends to maintain a 24-
hour patrol within the next few
months.
"This is one of the best pro-
grams you can have on a college
campus Crocker said.
ECU is particularly well-
suited for the bicycle patrol and the
climate is particularly conducive
to the program.
Crocker joined theNCSU De-
partment of Public Safety in 1981.
In 1989 she becamechief investiga-
tor and in 1991 she was appointed
assistant director over a staff of 42
officers, 30 reserve officers and 40
student employees.
from more than 12,000 companies,
universities, federal research labs
and state and local governments
from 50 States, including the Dis-
trict of Columbia.
The program is designed
around the idea of a satellite course
linked between ECU'S School of
Technology and Black and Decker's
plant located in Tarboro, N.C. The
company director of the program,
Gary Lanier, is the senior program
engineer, and is the Director of Tech-
nical Training at Black and Decker,
Inc.
The program will target cities
suchasFayertevilleand Easton,Md.
and hopefully in two to three years,
will spread tosuchcitiesasTowson,
Md Hampstead, Md and
Asheboro, N.C. The program will
award, to those who successfully
complete the program, a master of
science in Industrial Technology
with a concentration in manufac-
turing from ECU.
The program will serve 60
Black and Decker associates and 60
military and defense personnel from
places like Pope Air Force Base and
Fort Bragg. It will betaughtthrough
live video and mail video, enabling
14 graduate professors to teach the
courses from ECU through satellite
linkage with the Black and Decker
factories involved and to send pa-
perwork and exams through E mail
convergence and Internet access.
The program, written by Dr.
Barry DuVall, a professor and the
coordinator of partnerships, will
enable ECU to bring other partner-
ships into existence. Examples of
companies who have developed
industrial partnerships with ECU
are Glaxo, Burroughs Wellcome
and many other North Carolina
manufacturing firms.
Federal grants in the sum of
$472 millionare marked for projects
that link America's defense and
commercial sectors.
As quoted by President
Clinton, this program "will help
ensure that we have the best de-
fense in the world, while creating
new job opportunities for Ameri-
can workers.
TBULUET
. i Aduit
Entertainment
f Center
"Greenville's ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
We now Offer
Limousine
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TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11 pm-1am
CASH PRIZE F . 4
�Contestants need to call b register in advance. Must arrive by 800. LsCtH'CCtlC-
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
Silver Bullet Bartender
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
1
McDorld�
I
I
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Avo.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
ValidJ4.C.JJ). Required
ISBll'i
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-eJlHIHl
MAKE
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We Buy More Used Books Than
Anyone In Town. Period
5765. Cotonche Street, 758-2616
Opm 9:006:0) Monday-Friday 10:00-5:00 Satuniay
Youte supposed
to get a lot out of college,
but this is ridiculous.
I � U� ET� IEYLJJ.J
Macintosh LC475 4180, Apple Color Plus
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Only $1,280.00
Macintosh Quadra 610 8160, Apple Color Plus
14" Display, Apple Keyboard II and mouse.
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Introducing the Great Apple Campus Deal. Now, when you buy any
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'
���� ��"�.�?





�- . I ��
The East Carolinian
Page 4
Opinion
November 16, 1993
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, Gerund Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing F.dnor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
Karen Hava-ll. News h.lui
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Oison. Asst Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia V'ongue. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
AifA
100 recycled paper
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Semng the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Student fees get that much bigger
How many of you discovered that you
were tagged this week when registering for
classes? Exactly how annoyed were you as you
were sent off to take care of the fine? And how
many muffled, nasty comments sprung from
your mouth during the whole ordeal? Quite a
few, we're willingly to bet.
To "be tagged" is obviously a term that
before the Industrial Revolution, or more spe-
cifically, the computer age, was never uttered.
Who needed it? It reeks of impersonal connota-
tions. It's so nasty, its right up there with using
a social security number for identification pur-
poses. And grumbling under one's breath seems
an ever-increasing phenomenon on and around
campus. Hey, it is registration time, folks.
But on a whole different level of nastiness,
ECU decided to include a fee increase on tuition
bills without notification, one semester ex post
facto (that's "after the fact to all non-Latin
speaking individuals). During the week of Nov.
22, tuition bills for spring semester will be sent
out.
Contained within the bills will be a sweet
little surprise � namely, a student fee increase
� initiated primarily for the purpose of health
services fees. An $8 increase goes to health ser-
vices and $1 goes toward "other" � that vague
catagory, otherwise known as miscellaneous.
This comes in the wake of the implementa-
tion of a medication fee for over-the-counter
drugs. A fee increase that provides us all with
the glorious ability to waltz into Student Health,
hand over a buck and exclaim, "Give me some
ramamine Wow � life as an ECU student
really is keen
If you are indeed a full-time student, on
your bill will be not only the spring semester
increase of $9, but a retro-billing of $9 for the
current fall semester. Nice work, everyone. Well,
that is if the Cashier's Office hasn't already
collected the fee from you during an undoubt-
edly joyful trip to see them. They just wanted to be
helpful. The sad thing is they probably consid-
ered it a huge favor to all of us.
So instead of sending out new bills at the
beginning of the fall semester, the Cashier's
Office decided to include the fees together on the
spring bill, since it wasn't cost-efficient to mail
out 18,000 new bills. Well, maybe it isn't cost
efficient to pay $18 extra � did anyone ever
consider that?
And the clincher, ladies and gentlemen, is
that December graduates will be billed sepa-
rately "Happy graduation, everyone and thank
you for shopping ECU Nothing like a nice $9
slap in the face and "thank you for playing
(Their giving just never ends)
So just in time for the holidays is a warm
little present from your friends at the Cashier's
Office. Be sure to thank them two-fold for this
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
It's just too bad we can't pay them with
pennies
By Alex Ferguson
Dorm curfews keep hormones in check
Sex.
What a word. Just the
spelling alone is a formidable
punch in the gut. First there's
the "s and that's a powerful
beginning because there are 60
gazillion words that start with
"s The "e well, it's pretty
tame. It's only a vowel, and its
main job is to carry the word
along to the next letter. And
that would be, yow, the "x
Untamed, raw power in that
letter there,
and beer, plush carpet and ra-
dial tires (wha?). It's blatantly
draped itself over TV and the
silver screen. What once was
considered taboo, immoral or
just plain private, is now being
flaunted and paraded about like
it's the hottest thing since
Howard Stern's new book.
And now, my little college
students, as if you didn't deal
with it enough, it's entwined it-
self into the newest uproar over
curfew in one
men and women stra-
tegically thrustingtheir
various body parts at
you in an attempt to
convey a oneness with
sex and beer, plush
carpet and radial tires.
folks. Sepa-
rate,
they're
Alphabits;
together,
they're an
unstop-
pable force.
By placing
them at the
front of this HBBaHMi
article, I've probably doubled
my readership (lessee, two
doubled, that would befour!).
Whoever formulated that con-
coction of letters to sum up the
thoughts and actions we've
come to know as sex really
knew hisher linguistics.
Turn your head, left or
right, and you are going to find
some hint of sex. (Pause whilst
everyone quickly, desperately,
scans their immediate vicinity).
Of course, there's the obvious
evidence. People. Can't have
people without it. But that's
procreation, a fact of life, and
therefore, not a valid argument.
We're not talking about the
continuation of the human race.
We're talking sex.
You'll see it in magazines
at convenience stores under
opaque plastic wrap, so no one
gets a freebie. It's on countless
advertisement displays; men
and women strategically
thrusting (Cool, huh-huh, he
said "thrust) their various
body parts at you in an attempt
to convey a oneness with sex
of our neigh-
boring college
dormitories.
The
University of
North Carolina
in Chapel Hill
has been under
heavy pressure
as of late con-
mmmm cerning the col-
lege dorms and their policy that
all non-residents in the build-
ings must leave at a set time in
the evening.
I'm sure you understand
the premise, ECU follows a simi-
lar guideline. Now, UNC stu-
dents are protesting the time
limitation and pushing for a 24-
hour curfew-free dorm life. If
such a revision was allowed,
guests, including those of the
opposite sex (oooooo!) would
have unlimited access to what
would essentially become on-
campus apartments.
Naturally, parents and sev-
eral schoolgovernment offi-
cials are aghast at such a sug-
gestion, citing unprohibited sex
and otner riotous, immoral ac-
tivities that, by removing the
curfew, the UNC would appar-
ently allow or uphold.
The students' argument is
that unlimited guest entry is the
only adult thing to do, and ev-
eryone should be ashamed of
themselves to think that sex is
the only drive behind the cur-
few ban. It would also allow stu-
dents to meet for chatting,
studying, watching movies and,
here's my favorite, card play-
ing.
Yeah, right. And, of course,
the the oldest trick in the book
for these seemingly oppressed
victims in this dictatorial envi-
ronment is the cry of violation
of the First Amendment.
As in many cases, I think
the parents may be relying on
the college to be a surrogate par-
ent here, teaching the students
right and wrong and keeping
their noses clean. But that's not
the function of a university. If
parents are hoping curfews in
the dorms are going to be the
key factor in stomping out pre-
marital sex, I have some news
for them. Like in Jurassic Park,
nature finds a way. And believe
me, your kids are going to find a
way, with or without that cur-
few.
Nevertheless, I'm siding
with the parents on this one. I
know colleges nationwide have
adopted this dorm freedom, in-
cluding many state and private
schools in North Carolina. But,
allowing 24-hour curfew-free
dorms to exist is like allowing
kindergartners free access to
Willy Wonka's chocolate fac-
tory.
I certainly don't see huge
protests or massive student
whinings over school libraries
or any of the other school build-
ings that close down for the
night. The dormitories are
school property, and if curfews
are a factor in their operation, so
be it. A limitation such as this
does no harm, and may even
prevent unwanted surprises(I'll
let your imaginations do the rest
on that one).
If the residents can't con-
trol their hormones enough
through the duration of their
stay, then either move out, go to
a friend's house or re-think your
hormones.
NOW TO TEST THE ECU
"SWINDLE LA&'S"LATEST
INVENTION-Tirt� MACHINE
�o THAT W� CAN KEP
CHEATING nEuj f��5 At8"A
.STUDENTS 0JEj(L Mb WGtj
fa a o
A
A
�4
rt
rCEMflE "13
By John Adams
Unsuspecting students hassled by loans
This weekend I received three
letters. One was my bank statement.
The other two were concerning my
student loans.
The first letter concerning my
student loans claimed that I had to
begin paying for the interest on one
of them. The other letter was from a
loan collecting agency and claimed
that I was late on one of my loan
payments. 1 suppose any day now
some guy named Rocko will show
up at my door and threaten to break
my legs if I do not pay up.
My first reaction to these let-
ters waspanic. Ihavealwaysguarded
my credit very carefully. My second
was anger. I checked my loan docu-
ments and found that I had (as I
suspected) been granted deferment
of the interest on the first loan, and
deferment until graduation on the
second loan.
ThisisnotthefirsttimeCHhas
done me wrong, and for some rea-
son I do not think it will be the last.
Unfortunately for me, it is too late to
turn back the clock on my student
loan shenanigans. For you, though,
who are just now starring down that
misguided path, I have developed a
10-point plan for dealing with the
entire student loan process.
1. Be aware that you are deal-
ing with a bureaucracy. By defini-
tion, a bureaucracy is any labyrin-
thine organization which seeks to
obtain your total acquiescence
through inertia, stupidity, confusion
or all of the above. A bureaucracy
wants you to quit because it makes
their job a lot easier. Never quit,
though, becausegoingthrough them
is the only way to get your loan.
2 Alwaysbe polite with whom
you are dealing. Try to give people
the benefit of thedoubtatfixst. If they
start to irritate you, however, get
their name and then lay into them.
This may not actually help you get
your loan any faster, but screaming
tends to relieve stress.
3.Neverwaitin line. Your time
is too important to spend two hours
waitinginlineforonequesrion. Walk
up to the front of the line and say you
have a 2:00 appointment with your
loan officer. When the secretary can
not find your appointment listed,
create a scene. They will squeeze you
in just to get you to shut up.
4. Always lie to your loan
officer. Well, not so much lie as just
nod your head and say "yes" a lot.
Act interested in what he is telling
you, but do not forget your primary
goal is to obtain large sums of money
at low interest rates. Do not think of
it as lying. You are just being agree-
able.
5. Always geta co-signer. Bor-
rowing money is a big deal, so you
want as little accountability as you
can muster. A half-witted uncle
usually makes a good co-signer,
especially if your parents are not
dumb enough to get suckered.
6. Always borrow more than
you need per semester. School is
very stressful and there is nothing
like a spring break trip to the Baha-
mas or a new stereo to make you
feel better.
7. Borrow asmuchasyoucan
while you are in school. In our
society, you are nobody unless you
are in debt! Never forget this.
8. Never give CFI your
present address. These people are
relentless. This is the best way I
know to slow them down.
9. Defer! Defer! Defer!
10. Default Onesimple word,
my friends. Why do you think you
pay that $50 insurance fee on every
loan? Your credit may be bad for a
few years, but you will recover.
I hope my 10-point plan will
be useful to those of you who are
just now contemplating student
loans as a means of financing your
education. Thatfirstloanis the hard-
est step to take, but believe me,
once you take it, you are off and
running.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
This letter is in response to the Nov. 9th article
"Leaders respond to campus concerns Ron Avery,
Chief of PublicSafetywasquoted as saying thatstudents
engaging in suspicious activity, "especially if you are a
youngblack male willbe asked to produce a student ID
card. I spoke to Chief Avery about his comment and he
explained that he was misquoted and his comments
were taken out of context
Even if that was the case, the quote still raises an
issuethathasbeenplaguingthe African American males
on this campus, that being differential treatment. The
relationship between Public Safety officers and African
American males on this campus is almost nonexistent.
Many students complain of harassment, being in the
form of excessive stopping, and in some instances, the
excessive use of force.
The question that I raise is: What is Public Safety
doing to try and remedy these problems? Are there any
cultural diversity classes being given to the officers? Is
theof fice actively recruiting African American officers,
and,forthatmatter,otherminorities,includingwomen?
But most importantly, are the officers trained in rela-
tionship skills, showing respect, treating students as
equals? I've always been told, in order to get respect,
you must first give some respect.
So I challenge you, Teresa Crocker, the new
Director of Public Safety, to consider these questions
and hopefully come to an answer. If these problems
continue to go unattended, matters will continue to
worsen, and I am sure that you and I both do not want
to see that happen.
Demetrius Carter
Junior
Biology
President of A.B.L.E.
(Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality)
To the Editor:
First of all, I would like to congratulate the entire
police force of Public Safety for apprehending the four
individuals in connection with the first three armed
robberies that occurred on this campus. They showed a
tenacity to protect the students that definitely went
above and beyond the call of duty. Long hours and late
nights were not uncommon in their desire to bring the
justice and peace that everyone clamored for.
To those out there who claimed that the police
were not doing their jobs to the best of their ability, 1 call
them to look at how the individuals were caught. Were
they caught attacking another person on campus? No.
Were they caught committing another crime? No. They
were caught by good, old-fashioned police work�the
hunting down and catching of criminals. This is proactive
law enforcement at its best � stopping the problem
before it happens again
Another topic that I feel the need to speak on is the
multitude of myths and misconceptions about ECU
Public Safety. These are not rent-a-cops nor are they
security officers. Every person you see in a white uni-
form on campus is a sworn police officer of the state of
North Carolina. Individuals in blue or gray uniforms
are either reserves or guards, respectively. Together,
these individuals work towards the same goal: to serve
and protect the ECU campus.
I think the only way that students can get a real
ideaofhowtheECUpoliceworksistoworkrightalong
with them. To paraphrase an old native American
saying, "don't judge a man until you walk a mile in his
moccasins Having worked with them for the past
semester, even my own preconceptions have been
changed. These are people doing their job. Doing it the
best way they know how. They're not here for your
convenience. They're here for your protection. Want a
safer campus? Get involved. Realize that these officers
out there risk their lives daily, just as any other police
officer does. Support then in their lawful actions and
maybe a positive result will come about.
Joseph Horst
Senior
Criminal Justice
JUtJli�lMTJ.





The East Carolinian
Page 4
Opinion
November 16, 1993
I he Last Carolinian
I indsav Kcrnande
Gregorj Dickens, '�
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
Karen Hasseli,
Maureen Rich, Aral Veins Editor
Julie Totten, l.ut style Editor
Laura Wright, Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asa. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Vongue. Copy Editor
Phebe Toler. Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
A 9a
100 recycled paper
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt AyCOCk, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Assl. Lavoul Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editonal Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Student fees get that much bigger
How many of you discovered that you
were tagged this week when registering for
classes? Exactly how annoyed were you as you
were sent off to take care of the fine? And how
many muffled, nasty comments sprung from
your mouth during the whole ordeal? Quite a
few, we're willingly to bet.
To "be tagged" is obviously a term that
before the Industrial Revolution, or more spe-
cifically, the computer age, was never uttered.
Who needed it? It reeks of impersonal connota-
tions. It's so nasty, its right up there with using
a social security number for identification pur-
poses. And grumbling under one's breath seems
an ever-increasing phenomenon on and around
campus. Hey, it is registration time, folks.
But on a whole different level of nastiness,
ECU decided to include a fee increase on tuition
bills without notification, one semester ex post
facto (that's "after the fact to all non-Latin
speaking individuals). During the week of Nov.
22, tuition bills for spring semester will be sent
out.
Contained within the bills will be a sweet
little surprise � namely, a student fee increase
� initiated primarily for the purpose of health
services fees. An $8 increase goes to health ser-
vices and $1 goes toward "other" � that vague
catagory, otherwise known as miscellaneous.
This comes in the wake of the implementa-
tion of a medication fee for over-the-counter
drugs. A fee increase that provides us all with
the glorious ability to waltz into Student Health,
hand over a buck and exclaim, "Give me some
Dramamine Wow � life as an ECU student
really is keen
If you are indeed a full-time student, on
your bill will be not only the spring semester
increase of $9, but a retro-billing of $9 for the
current fall semester. Nice work, everyone. Well,
that is if the Cashier's Office hasn't already
collected the fee from you during an undoubt-
edly joyful trip to see them. They just wanted to be
helpful. The sad thing is they probably consid-
ered it a huge favor to all of us.
So instead of sending cut new bills at the
beginning of the fall semester, the Cashier's
Office decided to include the fees together on the
spring bill, since it wasn't cost-efficient to mail
out 18,000 new bills. Well, maybe it isn't cost
efficient to pay $18 extra � did anyone ever
consider that?
And the clincher, ladies and gentlemen, is
that December graduates will be billed sepa-
rately "Happy graduation, everyone and thank
you for shppping ECU Nothing like a nice $9
slap in the face and "thank you for playing
(Their giving just never ends)
So just in time for the holidays is a warm
little present from your friends at the Cashier's
Office. Be sure to thank them two-fold for this
once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
It's just too bad we can't pay them with
pennies
By Alex Ferguson
Dorm curfews keep hormones in check
Sex.
What a word. Just the
spelling alone is a formidable
punch in the gut. First there's
the "s and that's a powerful
beginning because there are 60
gazillion words that start with
"s The "e well, it's pretty
tame. It's only a vowel, and its
main job is to carry the word
along to the next letter. And
that would be, yow, the "x
Untamed, raw power in that
letter there,
and beer, plush carpet and ra-
dial tires (wha?). It's blatantly
draped itself over TV and the
silver screen. What once was
considered taboo, immoral or
just plain private, is now being
flaunted and paraded about like
it's the hottest thing since
Howard Stern's new book.
And now, my little college
students, as if you didn't deal
with it enough, it's entwined it-
self into the newest uproar over
curfew in one
men and women stra-
tegically thrustingtheir
various body parts at
you in an attempt to
convey a oneness with
sex and beer, plush
carpet and radial tires.
folks. Sepa-
rate,
they're
Alphabits;
together,
they ie an
unstop-
pable force.
By placing
them at the
front of this ���������iMi
article, I've probably doubled
my readership (lessee, two
doubled, that would befour!).
Whoever formulated that con-
coction of letters to sum up the
thoughts and actions we've
come to know as sex really
knew hisher linguistics.
Turn your head, left or
right, and you are going to find
some hint of sex. (Pause whilst
everyone quickly, desperately,
scans their immediate vicinity).
Of course, there's the obvious
evidence. People. Can't have
people without it. But that's
procreation, a fact of life, and
therefore, not a valid argument.
We're not talking about the
continuation of the human race.
We're talking sex.
You'll see it in magazines
at convenience stores under
opaque plastic wrap, so no one
gets a freebie. It's on countless
advertisement displays; men
and women strategically
thrusting (Cool, huh-huh, he
said "thrust) their various
body parts at you in an attempt
to convey a oneness with sex
of our neigh-
boring college
dormitories.
The
University of
North Carolina
in Chapel Hill
has been under
heavy pressure
as of late con-
��� cerning the col-
lege dorms and their policy that
all non-residents in the build-
ings must leave at a set time in
the evening.
I'm sure you understand
the premise, ECU follows a simi-
lar guideline. Now, UNC stu-
dents are protesting th time
limitation and pushing for a 24-
hour curfew-free dorm life. If
such a revision was allowed,
guests, including those of the
opposite sex (oooooo!) would
have unlimited access to what
would essentially become on-
campus apartments.
Naturally, parents and sev-
eral schoolgovernment offi-
cials are aghast at such a sug-
gestion, citing unprohibited sex
and other riotous, immoral ac-
tivities that, by removing the
curfew, the UNC would appar-
ently allow or uphold.
The students' argument is
that unlimited guest entry is the
only adult thing to do, and ev-
eryone should be ashamed of
themselves to think that sex is
the only drive behind the cur-
few ban. It would also allow stu-
dents to meet for chatting,
studying, watching movies and,
here's my favorite, card play-
ing.
Yeah, right. And, of course,
the the oldest trick in the book
for these seemingly oppressed
victims in this dictatorial envi-
ronment is the cry of violation
of the First Amendment.
As in many cases, I think
the parents may be relying on
the college to be a surrogate par-
ent here, teaching the students
right and wrong and keeping
their noses clean. But that's not
the function of a university. If
parents are hoping curfews in
the dorms are going to be the
key factor in stomping out pre-
marital sex, I have some news
for them. Like in Jurassic Park,
nature finds a way. And believe
me, your kids are going to find a
way, with or without that cur-
few.
Nevertheless, I'm siding
with the parents on this one. I
know colleges nationwide have
adopted this dorm freedom, in-
cluding many state and private
schools in North Carolina. But,
allowing 24-hour curfew-free
dorms to exist is like allowing
kindergartners free access to
Willy Wonka's chocolate fac-
tory.
I certainly don't see huge
protests or massive student
whinings over school libraries
or any of the other school build-
ings that close down for the
night. The dormitories are
school property, and if curfews
are a factor in their operation, so
be it. A limitation such as this
does no harm, and may even
prevent unwanted surprises(I'll
let your imaginations do the rest
on that one).
If the residents can't con-
trol their hormones enough
through the duration of their
stay, then either move out, go to
a friend's house or re-think your
hormones.
NOW TO TEST THE ECU
U5WNPL5 M6'5V LATEST
INVENTION- TIME MACHINE
So THAT WE CAN �e�P
cdEATiNG vb) fees t�lri
to Q o
A
A
yi
vt
tceMflE "13
By John Adams
Unsuspecting students hassled by loans
This weekend I received three
letters. One was my bank statement.
The other two were concerning my
student loans.
The first letter concerning my
student loans claimed that I had to
begin paying for the interest on one
of them. The other letter was from a
loan collecting agency and claimed
that I was late on one of my loan
payments. I suppose any day now
some guy named Rocko will show
up at my door and threaten to break
my legs if I do not pay up.
. My first reaction to these let-
terswaspanic. Ihavealways guarded
my credit very carefully. My second
was anger. I checked my loan docu-
ments and found mat I had (as I
suspected) been granted deferment
of the interest on the first loan, and
deferment until graduation on the
second loan.
ThisisnotthefirsttimeCHhas
done me wrong, and for some rea-
son I do not think it will be the last.
Unfortunately for me, it is too late to
rum back the clock on my student
loan shenanigans. For you, though,
who are just now starting down that
misguided path, I have developed a
10-point plan for dealing with the
entire student loan process.
1. Be aware that you are deal-
ing with a bureaucracy. By defini-
tion, a bureaucracy is any labyrin-
thine organization which seeks to
obtain your total acquiescence
through inertia, stupidity, confusion
or all of the above. A bureaucracy
wants you to quit because it makes
their job a lot easier. Never quit,
though, becausegoingthrough them
is the only way to get your loan.
2 Alwaysbe polite withwhom
you are dealing. Try to give people
the benefit of thedoubtatfirst. If they
start to irritate you, however, get
their name and then lay into them.
This may not actually help you get
your loan any faster, but screaming
tends to relieve stress.
3. Neverwaitin line. Your time
is too important to spend two hours
waitinginlineforonequestion. Walk
up to the front of the line and say you
have a 2:00 appointment with your
loan officer. When the secretary can
not find your appointment listed,
createascene. They will squeezeyou
in just to get you to shut up.
4. Always lie to your loan
officer. Well, not so much lie as just
nod your head and say "yes" a lot.
Act interested in what he is telling
you, but do not forget your primary
goal is to obtain largesumsof money
at low interest rates. Do not think of
it as lying. You are just being agree-
able.
5. Alwaysgetaco-signer. Bor-
rowing money is a big deal, so you
want as little accountability as you
can muster. A half-witted unde
usually makes a good co-signer,
especially if your parents are not
dumb enough to get suckered.
6. Always borrow moe than
you need per semester. School is
very stressful and there is nothing
like a spring break trip to the Baha-
mas or a new stereo to make you
feel better.
7. Borrow asmuchasyoucan
while you are in school. In our
society, youarenobodyunlessyou
are in debt! Never forget this.
8. Never give CFI your
present address. These people are
relentless. This is the best way I
know to slow them down.
9. Defer! Defer! Defer!
10. Default Onesimpleword,
my friends. Why do you think you
pay that $50 insurance fee on every
loan? Your credit may be bad for a
few years, but you will recover.
I hope my 10-point plan will
be useful to those of you who are
just now contemplating student
loans as a means of financing your
education. Thatfirstloan is thehard-
est step to take, but believe me,
once you take it, you are off and
running.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor
This letter is in response to the Nov. 9th article
"Leaders respond to campus concerns Ron Avery,
Chief of PublicSafetywasquoted as saying thatstudents
engaging in suspicious activity, "especially if you are a
youngblackmale willbe asked toproduceastudentID
card. I spoke to Chief Avery about his comment and he
explained that he was misquoted and his comments
were taken out of context
Even if that was the case, the quote still raises an
issuethathasbeenplaguingthe African American males
on this campus, that being differential treatment. The
relationship between Public Safety officers and African
American males on this campus is almost nonexistent.
Many students complain of harassment, being in the
form of excessive stopping and in some instances, the
excessive use of force.
The question that I raise is: What is Public Safety
doing to try and remedy these problems? Are there any
cultural diversity classes being given to the officers? Is
meofficeactivelyrecruiting African Arnericanofficers,
and,forthatmatter,otherrruiiorities,indudingwomen?
But most importantly, are the officers trained in rela-
tionship skills, showing respect, treating students as
equals? I've always been told, in order to get respect,
you must first give some respect.
So I challenge you, Teresa Crocker, the new
Director of Public Safety, to consider these questions
and hopefully come to an answer. If these problems
continue to go unattended, matters will continue to
worsen, and I am sure that you and I both do not want
to see that happen.
Demetrius Carter
Junior
Biology
President of A.B.L.E.
(Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality)
To the Editor
First of all, I would like to congratulate the entire
police force of Public Safety for apprehending the four
individuals in connection with the first three armed
robberies that occurred on this campus. They showed a
tenacity to protect the students that definitely went
above and beyond the call of duty. Long hours and late
nights were not uncommon in their desire to bring the
justice and peace that everyone clamored for.
To those out there who claimed that the police
were not doing their jobs to the best of their ability, I call
them to look at how the individuals were caught. Were
they caught attacking another person on campus? No.
Were they caught committing another crime? No. They
were caught by good, old-fashioned police work � the
huntingdownand catching of criminals. This is proactive
law enforcement at its best � stopping the problem
before it happens again.
Another topic that I feel the need to speak on is the
multitude of myths and misconceptions about ECU
Public Safety. These are not rent-a-cops nor are they
security officers. Every person you see in a white uni-
form on campus is a sworn police officer of the state of
North Carolina. Individuals in blue or gray uniforms
are either reserves or guards, respectively. Together,
these individuals work towards the same goal: to serve
and protect the ECU campus.
I think the only way that students can get a real
ideaofhowtheECUpoliceworksistoworkrightalong
with them. To paraphrase an old native American
saying, "don't judge a man until you walk a mile in his
moccasins Having worked with them for the past
semester, even my own preconceptions have been
changed. These are people doing their job. Doingitthe
best way they know how. They're not here for your
convenience. They're here for your protection. Want a
safer campus? Get involved. Realize that these officers
out there risk their lives daily, just as any other police
officer does. Support them in their lawful actions and
maybe a positive result will come about.
Joseph Horst
Senior
Criminal Justice
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nvnaanmaaBMsaMBN






16, 1993
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
For Rent
For Rent
Ringgold Towers
UretcflSUBdnn
it New Capet fnswy natei. ttiter Sewer
ktcUetU Safari tint
$240month
CONTACT MR JBNI6AN AT :3193 323-0415
SUBLEASE from Jan. toJuly.3BR,21
2 bath townhouse. 1 12 blocks from
campus, $600 month. Call 758-0721.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
second semester (Dec. 14) Brand new 2
bedroom apartment within walking
distance to campus. Rent $197.50 1
2 utilities. Call 752-9854.
ROOMMATE NEEDED-Dec. 93' 2
bedroom, 2 bath ccndo at Willoughby
Park. Female, grad student or serious
undergraduate. S265 month plus 12
utilities. 756-5268
NOVEMBER RENT FREE: share 14
expenses, cable free, water free, sewer
free. $166.25 per month. Pick up lease
until May with deposit required. No
deposit utility account. Contact Sun-
shine Parker at Rainbow Reality 758-
5393 or call 919-663-3)91 after 3.00pm.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEDfor
spring semester to share a bedroom in
a brand new duplex. Onlv blocks from
campus. SI75 month plus 1 3 utili-
ties. Mostly furnished. Call Kelly 758-
1753
2 BEDROOM I 1 2 bath townhouse
torrent. Includes washer dryer, water
and cable. Recently carpeted and
painted. Great condition. Close to
campus. Call Marc 757-1885
LOOK! Campusarea! 4bedroom,21
2 bath townhouse $625, with basement,
pets ok! Homelocators 752-1375; fee.
Dorm blues! 1 bedroom with all utili-
ties paid! $285 walk to class!
Homelocators 752-1375; fee. Students
wanted! 2 bedroom duplex $300 or 3
bedroom $480. Pets ok! Homelocators
752-1375; fee. Hundreds of confirmed
vacancies! Call us and tell us your
needs. Call 752-1375 Homelocators
today for your selection.
ROOMMATE WANTED Library st.
12 block from campus. Great house-
washer, dryer, central heat and air. $210
per month- needed ASAP. Call 752-
4039 ask for Rick or Heath.
1 BEDROOM unfurnished apt. Ready
Dec. 1st. Nice location, 2 miles from
campus. $265 month$265 deposit.
355-5116
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for
spring semester. $170andl2utiliries.
Call 757-3177
SHARE 3 Bedroom house and 1 3 utili-
ties Male or female, call 752-3080
NEED IMMEDIATELY roommate to
share 2bdr� 2 bth apt. at Arlington
Square. Prefer non-smoking studious
minded individual. $218month rent
12 utilities security deposit. 355-
2884 lv. message.
FORSUB-LEASE:onebedroomapart-
ment, fully furnished at Ringgold Tow-
ers. Located on first floor. Located
lose to campus. Parking and security
guard on premises. $395 per month
includes watersewer. Available in
Dec. Call 757-2510 and leave message.
RESPONSIBLE NON-SMOKER FE-
MALE needed to share 3br. duplex 3
blks. from campus starring in Dec. or
Jan. Rent is $135 per month 13
utilities. Call 758-7879 for more info.
Please leave a message.
E" Help Wanted
FREE TRIPS & CASH Call us
and find out how hundreds of students
are already earning free trips and lots
of cash with America'sl Spring Break
company! Choose Cancun, Bahamas,
Jamaica, Panama, Daytona or Padre!
Call now! TAKE A BREAK STUDENT
TRAVEL (800) 328-SAVE or (617)424-
8222.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $90 to
$125 phr. escorting in the Greenville
area. You must be 18 yrs. old, have own
phone and transportation. Escorts and
exotic dancers needed. For more infor-
mation call Diamond Escorts at 758-
08.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Fam ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to M id-
west Mailers PO Box 395, Olathe, K)
66051. Immediate Response.
AA CRUISE & TRAVEL JOBS: Earn
12900 mo Travel the World Free!
(Caribbean, Europe, Hawaii, Asia!)
Cruise Lines now hiring for busy holi-
day.Springand Summer seasons. Guar-
anteed employment! Call (919)929-4398
ext. 11.
THE PLAYGROUND OF
GOLDSBORO is looking for enthusi-
astic entertainers. Excellent hours, easy
$$ and carpools available. Ask for Erin
at 355-4792 or (919) 734-3777.
BREAKERS! BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE! Panama City from $99, Ja-
maica Cancun from $439, Padre $239,
Daytona $79. Sell trips, earn cash, party
free. Call EST 1-800-234-7007.
GREEKS AND CLUBS: Raise up to
$1,000 in JUST ONE WEEK! for your
fraternity,sorority and club. Plus$l,000
for yourself. And a FREE T-shirt just for
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
PIRATE PAINTB ALL is expanding to
new market areas in eastern N.C We
need super-energetic people for our
Marketing Team. This is a great oppor-
tunity for anyone in the School of Busi-
ness or Leisure Systems Studies to sink
your teeth into a growing company.
Your salary will be based on a direct
profit-sharing basis. If you know any-
thing about Guerrilla Marketing or if
you are smart and super-energetic, call
752-8380.
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK.
Make up to$2,000- $4,000 Mo teach-
ing basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan, and S. Korea.
Many employers provide room and
board a, d other benefits. No teaching
background or Asian languages re-
quired. For more information call:(206)
3 Help Wanted
632-1146. ext. J5362.
"?PARTY IN THE SUN"� Spring
Break, Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas, S.
Padre, Florida including the Ultimate
Party Package! Organize small group
and travel free! lowest prices guaran-
teed! Call Sun Splash Tours Today 1-
800-426-7710.
AA CRUISE & TRAVEL JOBS. Earn
$2500 Mo. Travel the world free!
(Caribbean, Europe, Hawaii, Asia!)
Cruise lines now hiring for busy holi-
day, spring and summer seasons. List-
ing service Call (919) 929-4398 ext. 11.
BEACH Spring Break Promoter. Small
or larger groups. Yours FREE, dis-
counted or CASH. Call CMI1-800-423-
5264.
LADIES NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:
earn $500 to $800 a week full time, part
time anytime. Pay out daily. Playmates
Adult Relaxation. Hw. 58 & 13 Snow
hill. Call 747-7686.
BEAUTIFUL, CONFIDENT LINGE-
RIE MODELS for Lori's Intimate Af-
fair Fashion show. Nov. 18. 756-6846
(Lori's) Call for interview. No prior
modeling experience necessary.
EARN UP TO559.89 PER WEEK
assembling our products at home!
Amazing 24 hour recorded message
reveals details! Call today! 1-919-243-
1835 Leave your telephone number.
FACULTY MEMBER NEEDS respon-
sible babysitter for an 8-year old Mon-
days and Thursdays 2:50 until 5:15,
some days this semester-regularly
spring semester. 756-9394 after 5:30.
STOCKSALESPERSON: Part-time
Heavy lifting requered. Apply at the
Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington Vil-
lage.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON- to keep two
children at home from 2:30-6:00pm.
Transportation is required. Pay nego-
tiable. References required. Call after
6:00pm. 758-4770
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY! Indi-
viduals and student organizations
wanted to promote the hottest spring
break destinations, call the nation's
header. Inter-campus programs 1-800-
327-6013
BLVD. BAGEL help wanted part time
and weekend. Must be hard working
and able to work with others-good per-
sonality. No phone calls 327 Arlington
Blvd. '
STUDENTS: Looking for part-time
work with flexible hours? ECU is look-
ing for a few good pirates to contact
alumni for the annual fund program.
$5.00 per hour. Contact the telefund
office at 7574215
For Sale
SPRING BREAK � Plan early, save
$50 and get best rooms! Prices increase
1215! Bahamas Cruise6days includes
12 meals, $279! Panama City room w
kitchen, $119! Cancun from Raleigh,
$399; Jamaica from Raleigh, $429; Key
For Sale
West,$249,DavtonaRoomwkitchen,
$149! 1-800-678-6386.
MEMBERSHIP to Club For Women
Only. Low monthly payments! Call
Angie 931-9768.
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
CRUISE $279! 6 Days! Includes 12
meals and all taxes! This is a HUGE
party! Greal Beaches and Night life!
Hurry Prices Increase 1210!
l-800678-6386.
EARLY AMERICAN bedroom suite.
Includes fullqueen headboard, night
stand, 5 drawer chest, no mattress, like
new. $250.00 321-1708
ANTIQUEOak topdraftingtable6'x4'
$200.00. Antiquesaxaphone-silveralto
$200.00. Ladder rack, fits ford flOO
short bed $100.00. Call 758-3172 leave
message
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS:sports supple-
ments at major discount prices:
cybergenics, hot stuff, gainers fuel 2500,
heavyweight 900, vanadyl sulfate, tri-
chromelene, amino acids and much
more! Call Charles today at 931-9097
for more info.
FORSALE:Queensizewaterbed. Like
new with padded rails and double
pedested, mirror and bookshelf. Ask-
ing $300, price neg. Call 752-4901
leave message
THANKSGIVING AIRLINE
TICKET. Round trip from Greenville,
NC to Pittsburgh, PA. Leaving 1123
returning 1128. Hope to recoup cost
of ticket, $230, but will negotiate. 746-
2663
WATER BED Queen size,
semiwa veless, black leather headboard.
Call at 758-3322 between 6p7p. M-F
1982 VW SCIROCCO 5-speed, AC,
Am Fm cassette, very well maintained
red, reliable car must sell! $1800 or
best. 756-2949 leave message
MOPED, Tomos, like new, only 500
miles, up to 30 mph and 100 mpg,
excellent condition, $425.00 call 756-
9133
CANNONDALE Delta V. (front sus-
pension) frame and fork. Brushed alu-
minum finish; with stem, headset and
seatpost, $600. Most driverrain and
ID Services Offered
Services Offered! BI1 Greek
Urflwt Ubrwy of Irfamtton in U
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Order Catalog Today with Visa MCot COO
HUt 800-351 0222
Or. rush $2 00 to RmmtcIi latorrrutwn
M3?? Idaho Ave .T206-A Los Angeles. CA 90025
LI VE PSYCHIC READERGet answers
to your questions ROMANCE,
MONEY, HEALTH. 1-900-990-9721
EXT. 182. $2.98min 18 24hrs.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: we are service
orienteddedicated to ensure you and
your friends a heart-pounding, adrena-
line rushing good time. Come join us at
pirate paintball for a 312 hour session
you'll never forget. Sneak through the
cool, clean, crisp forest air as you make
your way to your opponents flag sta-
tion. As you near their outer defenses,
shots are fired at you. As you stand to
return fire, your adventure begins. Will
you survive to capture the flag and win
the game? Will you be the last one left
to defend the "Alamo"? Will you and
the rest of your special forces team be
able to take out the "predator" before it
takes you out. Come and see how
much fun you can have in a 3 1II hour
session. We are open Monday thru
Friday for groups of 8 or more, and
Saturdays for individuals or groups
from 1-40. Call 752-8380 for info and
reservations We breed excitement!
HEY MR. DJ! Please play my favorite
song! Mobile Music Productions plays
only what you want to hear when you
want to hear it. Widest variety of mu-
sic, years of experience, best DJs, most
popular service with ECU greeks. Will
travel. Call Lee at 758-4644 for book-
ings.
BE Greek
ALPHA PHI OMEGA-BAP Lil bro
from 313 Greene you're the best little
brother. Hopel'vedoneequallyaswell.
Heres hoping you have all the cookies
youandsnowbearcaneat. Kepsmilin
Me
FRIDAY is drawing near Zetas. Has
everyone found that absolute stranger?
Hope everyone is looking forward to
Friday night. It's going to be a strange
one!
TO THE PI PLEDGES of Zeta Tau
Alpha,youguysarealmostthere. Keep
up the good work. Zlam the sisters.
THE SISTERS OF ZETA TAU AL-
PFT want to thank Rob Wheeler and
Eric Roth for their great coaching in
intramurals. You guys are true hon-
orary Zetas. Thank you!
CONGRATULATIONS to all the
new members of Alpha Omega Pi:
Angel Byrd, Kristin Ingling, Monica
Kindley, Amy Mohr, Roxanne
O'Ferrell, Kate Sharp and Debbie
Smith!
THANKS JIM-you'll always be our
greek god. Love Alpha Omega Pi
IT WAS DOWN TO THE ELBO one
Sun. night for a party that seemed just
so right. Itstartedoutslow but quickly
picked up as those Lambda Chi Al-
phas started tipping the cup. the
music was going and everything was
great as people got their half cards
and found their mate. Shagging music
started and partners were found.
Couples from everywhere were dance
floor bound. After a few hours Wil-
lowStreetwascallingournames. We
had to find somewhere to continue
the night's games. We "played with
a half a deck" and had lots of fun, a
terrific time was had by everyone.
Thanks new sisters and Lambda Chi
Alpha Love, Alpha Omega Pi
PI LAMBD APHI- "Putting Around"
with you guys was a blast as usual!
Can't wait to party with you guys
again! Love the sisters and pledges of
Pi Delta.
THETA CHI-Thurs. night was great!
The apple pie was especially tasty!
Hopetogettogetheragainsoon! Love
the sisters and pledges of Pi Delta.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI- Thanks for
Thurs. night! It was great seeing you
guys again! Love the sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta.
NEW SISTERS OF ALPHA PHI:
Thank you for our house gift and our
bears. We love them. You all are the
best! Love, your sisters.
Potential
Six-Figure Income
OLDE Discount is looking for energetic people
to start a career in the brokerage business.
Requirements include:
College Degree
General Market Knowledge, and
Excellent Communication Skills
OLDE offers:
6 to 12 Month Extensive Training Program
Competitive Salary and Commission Structure
Relocation Possibilities
Call Peter Floyd for more information:
1 800 937-0606
jrfOLDE
America's Full Service Discount Broker"
Member NYSE & SIPC
Announcements
STUDENT SURVEY
During the week of Nov.
29-Dec 3, a survey of stu-
dent opinion of instruction
will be conducted at ECU.
Questionnaires will be dis-
tributed in classes with en-
rollments greater than
five. All students will have
the opportunity to express
opinions on the teaching
effectiveness of their in-
structors. The survey will
be conducted during class
time and will take approxi-
mately 15 minutes to com-
plete. Student participation
is voluntary and no identi-
ties are requested. Instruc-
tors have been requested
to leave the classroom
while the questionnaires
are being completed. Re-
sults of the survey will be
distributed to instructors
after final grades have
been posted. The teaching
effectiveness question-
naire was created by the
Faculty Senate Committee
for Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning
and Institutional Research.
The results of this survey
are used by instructors for
improving their teaching
skills and in course devel-
opment, and by adminis-
trators in decisions of ten-
ure, promotion and merit.
EN.IOY SINGING?
University chorale, Muse
1635 12:00 M,W,F school of
music, No audition re-
quired.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Bingo! Come join some
bingo fun when the Natu-
ral life program at recre-
ational services hosts a
holiday bingo night on
thurs. Nov. 18th at 8 pm in
Christenbury Gymnasium.
So, come enjoy the fun, see
how your luck holds up and
don't forget to BYOC (Bring
your own can). Bring a
can of food for the needy
and you are eligible to play
holiday bingo for fantastic
prizes! For more info, call
the Natural life hotline at
931-R&R4U(7748) or recre-
ational services at 757-
6387.
AMERICAN
MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
The last meeting of the se-
mester will be held on Wed
Nov. 17th at 4:00pm in
GO 031. Please bring do-
nations (canned or dry
goods and or clothing) to
help needy families dur-
ing the holidays. Refresh-
ments will be served.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next Gamma Beta Phi
meeting will be held on
Nov. 16th at 5:00pm in room
244 Mendenhall. Donuts
will be given out after this
meeting. Hope to see you
there! For more info, con-
tact Allison at 931-8285.
UNIVERSITY FOLK AND
COUNTRY DANCE CLUB
Square and country dance,
Tues Nov. 16th, 7-9pm, at
the Ladonia Wright Build-
ing (behind student
health). Live music by old-
time band! Everyone in-
vited! Come alone or bring
a friend. Also election of
officers.
ECHO
East Carolina Honors Orga-
nization will be holding a
mandatory meeting on
Wed. Nov. 17th at Fleming
Hall's basement. This will
be the last meeting this se-
mester, and refreshments
will be served-so please at-
tend. Our large but simple
fund-raiser will be dis-
cussed. This will determine
the size of the ECHO schol-
arships to be given this
spring. If you cannot at-
tend, please contact Alisa
(931-7885).
PRE-PHYSICAL
THERAPY CLUB
To all members of the pre-
p.t. club. The Nov. meeting
will be held at "Pizza Inn"
Nov. 18 at 5:30. This is our
exam study breakThanks-
giving party. Bring a little
cash and plan to feed up on
buffet pizza and have a good
time. If you plan to come or
if you need a ride, please
call Dawn (757-0573) any-
time between now and
2:00pm on Thurs.
PHYSICAL THERAPY
CLUB MASSAGE
CLINIC
Tues. 1116 and Wed. 11
17. Allied health build-
ing, PT clinic, 6-9pm. $2
per 10 minutes, 30 min-
utes maximum. For re-
duced tickets, contact a PT
student. Support our
canned food drive by
bringing a can with you!
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 p.m. for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10a.m. thedaypriorto
publication; however, no refunds will
be given
For more
information call
757-6366.
�yjprw'tfT.lwMarw�w"pw





�nwwiiiag �, M
77ig Eos Carolinian
Page 6
Lifestyle
November 16, 1993
i
Fly" and "Mudpie" take hysteria to WZMB
Many students are finding themselves smiling before 10 a.m.
Photo courtesy of "Fly" and "Mudpie"
If you haven't heard the WZMB radio show by "Fly" and "Mudpie tune into 91.3 on Monday and Friday
morn.ngs from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00a.m. It's sure to give you more than a few morning laughs.
Phoenix dies of
drug overdose
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
If you've been listening to
WZMB on Monday and Friday
mornings lately, then you've prob-
ably heard the hysterical "Fly and
Mudpie Show
The show began in early Octo-
berwhentwoafternoonDJswanted
tohostthesamemomingslotforits
absent DJ. Their answer to the prob-
lem was simply to do it together.
They called themselves "Fly" and
"Mudpie" and the show became a
big hit.
I dropped by the station on
Friday morning to hang out with
these guys while they did their
show,andIstillhavestomach pains
form laughing so hard.
The show usually begins at 6
a.m. with a recap of the funnier
things that have happened since
the last time they were on the air.
By the time the show ends at 10
a.m they have made fun of every-
thing from Bamey to Rusty the
rent-a-cop.
AccordingtoMudpie,theirgoal
is "to give WZMB a show with fa-
miliar music to wake up to and to
putalittle tickle in people's bellies
The music they play is on the
lighter side, and a lot of it is by call-
in request. They also give away
prizes every couple of hours.
Aside from the music and the
jokes, these guys also have a few
philosophies. They think Bamey is
a bad influence on kids and that it's
only a matter of time before "he
goes insane, becomes an alcoholic
and hits someone
Regular guests on the show are
characters named Average White
Girl�their promotions manager;
Leroy Pile�a salesman; Puberty
Boy and Psycho News Man
Both DJs are seniors graduat-
ing in May and, like most, have no
idea what they're going to do next.
Fly is originally from Chicago and
has been working at the station for
a year and a half. I asked him why
he was doing radio, and he said, "a
little voice spoke to me and said
thatitwantedanoutreachonmom-
ing radio�it had to be me
Mudpie is from Charlotte, and he
has a friend that goes by Moonpie;
he thought "it would be cool to
change it
In the short time that they ha ve
been on the air as a duo, Fly and
Mudpiehavealreadybeennamed
DJs of the month by the executive
staff. I asked them who their hero
was, and in unison, withouthesita-
tion, they said Howard Stern.
I had a blast with these guys.
They have a moral dilemma,
though, that even I couldn't an-
swer. Maybe you can: Why in the
hell did Julia Roberts marry Lyle
Lovett? If you think you know, Fly
and Mudpie would love to hear
from you.
'My Life emotional masterpiece
LOS ANGELES (AP) � The
image of River Phoenix as a quiet,
clean-cut Hollywood actor shat-
tered with autopsy results that re-
vealed he died from a potent mix of
cocaine and heroinToxicological
tests conducted onPhoenix showed
extremely high levels of the drugs,
thecoroner'sspokesman,ScottCar-
rier, said Friday. Phoenix, 23, died
outside a Sunset Boulevard night-
club on Oct. 31.
The tests also found marijuana,
the prescription sedative Valium
and an over-the-counter cold medi-
cation, Carrier said.
Though the tests said morphine
was found in Phoenix's blood, Car-
rierexplained thatheroinshowsup
as morphine as it is metabolized by
the body.
Comedian John Belushi died
11 years ago from the same lethal
mix. Unlike Belushi, who died in
1982, Phoenix did not inject heroin
and cocaine.
"There were no needle marks
Carrier said. "How it was intro-
duced into his body is unknown at
this time
The coroner's office ruled the
death accidental.
The Sheriff's Department said
Friday it had closed its investiga-
tion into Phoenix's death outside
the Viper Room, a trendy West
Hollywood music club co-owned
by actor Johnny Depp.
Viper Room patrons said the
actor had been weaving and acting
strangely before he went into con-
vulsions at the club and was led
outside, where he collapsed.
Phoenix achieved stardom in
films, such as Stand By Me, Running
On Empty, for which he received an
Oscar nomination, and My Own
Private Idatio.
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Sometimes a film that uses
obvious manipulation to achieve
its ends can rise above those con-
trivances to deeply affect an audi-
ence. Sometimes a motion picture,
while not approaching art, can
make a difference in one's life.
My Life, a new film, written
and directed by Bruce Joel Rubin
(the writer and director of Ghost),
demonstrates how an overtly ma-
nipulative film can still produce
intense, emotional effects on its
audience if all the film elements are
properly combined.
The film opens in 1963 in De-
troit, Mich where a young boy
wishes upon a star for a circus in his
backyard. The next day, after he
tells all his friends about the circus,
he discovers that the circus did not
find his backyard.
Thirty years later, the boy who
wished for a circus talks to a video
camera to explain to his unborn
son that he is dying of cancer.
My Life stars Michael Keaton as
Bob Jones, formerly Bob Ivanovich.
Bob changes his name when he
moves to L.A. to try to forget his
family.
Bob talks to the camera, but his
words, though stating the doctor's
prognosis, belie his true condition.
Bob exhibits the symptoms of the
first stage of dying�denial.
Throughout most of the first part of
My Life, Bob stays mired in this first
stage.
Bob works as a public relations
professional and, judging from his
material possessions, does very well
at his job. Bob's life has become
superficial, though, and he treats
his wife and family the way he
would a client. By being reticent,
Bob hurts his wife, Gail (Nicole
Kidman), because he rarely gets in-
volved in her life.
Gail asks Bob to come with her
to the second ultrasound of their
unborn child. As with most of his
life, Bob has other commitments
that preclude his presence. When
cancer strikes in the prime of his life,
Bob reacts the way he would to any
situation: He stubbornly denies he
is sick because he has no time to be
sick.
Bob refuses to tell his family or
anyone he knows. Judging from the
company Bob receives when he
becomes home bound�no one vis-
its�Bob possesses a bevy of ac-
quaintances but few, if any, friends.
When looked at in summary,
My Life seems paper thin, and the
plot unfolds in the first 15 minutes:
A man, who has not learned to love
deeply and who prizes materialism
above all else, needs to re-examine
his life and change himself before
he dies.
This summary does not do the
film justice, though. Two elements
combine to make My Life succeed:
Rubin's ability to infuse his heart
into his film and Keaton's perfor-
mance.
Rubin brought the same emo-
tional intensity to Ghost that he
brings to My Life. Though both
films last too long, itis their lengths
convince the viewer that Rubin
desperately wants to make a state-
ment.
Bob Jones is given such
warmth by Michael Keaton that
he deserves to be nominated for
anOscar. Tim Burtonhired Keaton
toplay Batman becauseofhiseyes,
and Keaton's eyes work well in
My Life. On the oustside, Keaton
seems humorously nonchalant,
but behind those eyes lies a world
of pain.
Keaton anchors the film and
outshines Kidman who has a
thankless role. Gail simply re-
sponds to her husband and,
though caring and wonderful,
lacks the character development
that Bob goes through.
As Bob progresses through
the stages of dying, he teaches the
viewer about living. In a society
like ours, where death gets dis-
SeeUFEpage7
CD Reviews
J Don't buy
Meet the real Tom Quick
JJ Take Your Chances
J�
Worth a Try XW Definite Purchase
Sugarsmack
Top Leader
Hope Nicholls was once the
singer for Fetchin' Bones, one of
the few southern alternative
bands of the eighties that didn't
bow down and worship at the
feet of REM. Fetchin' Bones is
gone now, but Hope plays on
with her new outfit, Sugar smack,
and their first album is Top Leader.
The new band is reminiscent
of the old, with the hard and soft
melodies clashing just as ener-
getically as ever. But Hope's stint
with industrial super group
Pigface has left its mark on Sugar-
smack; Top Leader boasts two full-
fledged industrial tracks. Of the
two, "Blast with rapid-fire
mixes and cuts from one sound
to another, is a better listen than
the repetitive "Freak The in-
dustrial sound worms its way
into the openings of several other
songs as well.
One of these songs, "Bring
on the UFOs is a hopeless little
ditty about how we've made such
amess of the world that wemight
as well just chuck the whole thing
and wait for the space aliens to
come and take us away. This
one's a snarler, with Hope grind-
ing through the chorus in her
typical growly fashion. A nice,
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Greenville has recently inher-
ited a well-traveled musiciannamed
Tom Quick who moved to Green-
ville eight months ago. Quick was
the lead singer for the McCoys after
Rick Derringer left the band. The
McCoys created such hits as "Hang
on Sloppy" and "Fever
Quick also toured with Chuck
Berry for a short stint as his drum-
mer, but surprisingly, this isn't a
situation Quick wishes to relive. "I.
was really surprised Quick said.
"He wasn't really anything like I
expected. He was real loud and
obnoxious. He left me and the en-
tire band stranded inCincinnatiand
refused to pay us. It wasn't a situa-
tion I want to go through again. But
at least I can say I played with one of
the greats
Quick spoke of how he'd seen
music change through the years.
"Things have changed so much.
Back when I first started playing,
there were more songwriters. Now
it seems like there is just specialized
musicians. Also, today, the record-
ing procedures are so much more
ad vanced. People are able to be slip-
pery about things. They can en-
hance one word or one note to an
extent that it doesn't even resemble
a person's natural performance. We
all know what happened to Milli
Vanilli
However, he pointed out many
current musicians that he likes, "I
like bands like Bad Company and
Van Halen, I like the kind of youth-
ful energy and enthusiasm that
bands like Van Halenbring to the
stage. I still feel that I havea lot of
youth in me. Right now I'm
35years old and I feel very com-
fortable walking around campus
hanging around the students. I
feel like I belong there Quick
said.
Quick's most recent record-
ing is titled Tightrope, wnich he
plans to release in conjunction
with his upcoming tour. He said,
"Most of my songs are justcheesy
love songs, or they deal with the
concept of hope. There is so many
things in our society thatcan get
you down today. It's almost like
we're in a depression. Through-
out the years, my life has gone
through many ups and downs.
SeeQUICKpage T
Sugarsmack
angry counterpart to Porno for
Pyros' goofy "Pets
Another angry track, though
much less explosive, is "Swindle
This song has a contemptuous
tone, woven through a blues rap
melody, and concerns itself with
a ruined Earth made by U.S. cor-
porate con games. With its sub-
dued anger and quiet guitar ar-
rangements, "Swindle" sets an
eerie mood.
A certain dystopian air blows
through Top Leader; this is not
exactly happy music. In fact, I
don't think there's a single up-
beat track on the album. Whether
it's the murmuring static of
"Seven Seas" or the screaming
paranoia of "Pissed Off" (a real
barn-burner; I'll bet it brings
down the house in a live perfor-
mance), Sugarsmack paints a
dreary picture. Not the kind of
stuff I'd recommend for the clini-
cally depressed.
For the well-balanced among
us, however, I support it whole-
heartedly. This is good rock-and-
roll, people! It's unpretentious but
willing to take chances. It follows
no real rules but its own, and
that's what this rock thing is sup-
posed to be about. So give Top
Leader a try. You'll never be so
happy to be depressed again.
� Mark
Brett
Today: Breaking Up
Answered by
Jennifer Phillips, Student Health Service
Question:
What is the best way to in-
form someone that you wish to
discontinue a relationship?
Answer.
Communication thatis direct,
yet compassionate is the key. In-
terestingly, when college students
are asked how they would like to
be treated when a partner ends a
relationship, responses often in-
clude:
"tell me right away"
"be honest"
"let me be the first to know"
When students are asked how
they actually ended their last rela-
tionship, acting honestly and di-
rectly, as previously proposed
wasn't done. Listed below are
common examples of mistakes.
"I have his best friend tell
him
"I wrote a letter
"I just stopped calling
"I purposely made
them jealous so they �
would break up with
me �
Suggestions:
1. The best way to
end a relationship is in L
a fair and courteous
manner.
2. When you feel a relation-
ship is over, deal with it immedi
ately.
3. Say what is on your mind.
4. Don't make promises that
you can't keep, such as "trying
to work it out
5. Once a relationship ends
it is important to put space be-
tween you and your ex-
partner. Bothparties
need adjustment
time.
6. Get on with
q your life; don't
become the care-
taker of yeur ex-
partner if yon broke
it off. In some relation-
ship; a new friendship
can develop, however ths is not
always possible.





November 16, 1993
Continued from page 6
LIFE
s loveforper-
ikes me
ment that
m perfor-
. iH'tlu r l m
n front oi UM) people
i pie, I love seeing enthusi-
ism from tiieaudienee. That's what
makes me happy
Continued from page 6
cussed i hispers, if at all, a
film liki can actually
many people by bringing them face
to face with their own mortality .My
Life, because of its structure, pn �ves
to he a lesson tor the living.
The ending of My life avoids the
teary funeral scene. Die nic�t emo-
tionallygTippingseeneoecursnearthe
end when a hospital bed is moved into
the Jones' house, because the cancer
has metastasized to Bob's brain. As
Gail sits on the bed with sunlight
streaming o er her, she weeps bi rte 11 v
for the imminent loss of her husband
and the deterioration he will undergo
before dying.
Rubin uses the flashes of lights
which he exhibited inCtos to convey
pain, happiness and eventually death.
The final imageof Bob, reading Green
Eggs and Ham" to his son via video
camera,avoidsanobvioustear-w ring-
ing ending by giving the viewer a
much more subtle view of death. The
videoimagecrfBobwiUprobablystay
with the audience tor a long time, as
it subtly conveys the intense loss that
death brings to a family.
As a w rk of art, My Lff partially
succeeds. The story needs to be built
up and to rely on a more sturdv
coastruction. By making Bob ex-
tremely wealthy, the director obvi-
ated the need for financial discus-
sions.
Asa profound life lesson, MyZ.jt
admirably succeeds. In a cinematic
time when action heroes dominate
the screen and death only occurs vio-
lently, a film which challenges view-
ers to realistically watch a man live
and die should be commended and
seen
On a scale of one to 10, My Life
rates a seven
CONGRATULATIONS
GRADS
There is still time to choose from our complete
selection of Custom Announcements, Name Cards,
Memory Books, Party Supplies and gifts.
Fine Papers � Gifts � Fragrances
110 East 5th Street - Downtown Greenville
758-1151
Did you know?
The East Carolinian 7
More than 50 tons of meteor-
oids enter the Farth's atmosphere'
every day but most of them burn
up before they reach the ground.
The space shuttle travels 3d
times taster than most passenger
jets.
In the language of the aborigi-
nal people of Australia, "koala
means "the animal that does not
drink for the furry marsupials get
the moisture they need from their
diet of eucalyptus leaves.
Despite governmental efforts
to curb population growth, India is
growing by 16 million peoplea year
and will reach a billion bv the vear
2000.
The repertoireof beluga whales
includes chirps, croaks, burps,
grunts, squeaks, moos, mews,
screams and yaps.
Budweiser
At the end of a summer in
polar latitudes.a humpback whale
may have accumulated as much as
half a ton of troublesome barnacles.
Tlu-highest pricee erpaid for
�i pocket watch was $2.7 million in
1989 for the sale of a I 'a tek Philippe
Calibre '89 pocket watch, wi tin 1,729
individual parts.
Suriname, acquired by the
Netherlands from Great Britain in
1667 in exchange for New
Amsterdam (New York) was for-
merly called either Netherlands
Guiana or Dutch Guiana.
The platypus is found only in
Australia. It has a duck's bill,
webbed feet and a beaver's tail. It
lays eggs like a turtle� yet has ha ir
like a bear and nurtures its young
on mother's milk.
Basketball fans! Your ship is coming in Thursday.
The Navigator debuts Nov. 18th fTTIw East Carolinian.
And support your CAA Champion Pirates as they play
against Court Authority in Minges at 7:00 that niszht.
Central Book &
ill
James ChtvelT
was $250 now $14.00
Ii-eChHstmas Special
Limited Time Only
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
"Quick Cash "
BOSCH
Jeffreys Beer & Wine will buy back
EMPTY A-B KEGS
Please return them to:
Jeffreys Beer & Wine, N. Greene St.
Greenville, NC, 758-1515.
Closed from 12-lpm
ONE OF :he anheusep busch companies
4
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752-7303 i 209 E. 5th St.
yV(ireenvilIe, C
ATTIC $" w
AIJE JEFF BRAIMNON Doors 9Pm
ZMlE JEFFBA�ETT Comedy 10pm ROUND 2
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CONleciY Thanks For Voting Us
' JONE The "Best Place To Hear bve Muse"
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even mesnesdm GREENVILLETIMES READERS' POLL
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as specfically noted in this ad. If we do run out of an advertised caI MnwnUN' NOVEMBER 14 THROUGH
item, we will offer you your choice of a comparable item whe avail- .NOVEMBER 20, 1993 IN GREENVILLE. WE
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Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per Hem purchased
Bring out the
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Until 6:00 pm
we will reopen frkJav. Nov 26th
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Maxwell -
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Master-
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Master Blend tM
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34.5-OZ. CAN
IN I Mt DELI PASTRY SHOPPE"
SHadn $999
Pumpkin Pie
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125 SIZE FLORIDA TANGEL0S OR
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The East Carolinian
What's On Tap-
Thursday, Nov. 18
M. Basketball, home
Court Authority, exhibition 7
p.m.
The 411
Saturday, Nov. 13
Football, away
lost to Kentucky, 6-3.
M. & W. Swimming, home
beat Old Dominion and
Georgia Southern.
W. Soccer, away
beat Appalachian, 3-0
beat UNC-C 1-0
lost to TennChan. 3-2.
College Football
No. 1 Notre Dame beat No. 2
Florida St 31-24.
Sunday, Nov. 14
W. Soccer, away
lost to TennKnoxville, 2-0.
AP Football Top 25
I.Notre Dame (62)
2. Florida St.
3. Nebraska
4. Miami
5. Ohio St.
6. Auburn
7. Tennessee
8. Florida
9. West Virginia
10. Texas A&M
11. Alabama
12. Wisconsin
13. North Carolina
14. Penn St.
15. Oklahoma
16. Washington
17. UCLA
18. Colorado
19. Arizona
20. Kansas St.
21. Indiana
22. Southern Cal
23. Virginia
24. Clemson
25. Virginia Tech
Sports
November 16, 1993
UK kicks game-winning field goal
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
If there is one good thing
head coach Steve Logan can say
about this year's season � it is
almost over.
The Pirates fell 6-3 against
the Kentucky Wildcats on Sat-
urday in a heartbreaking loss
at Commonwealth Stadium in
Lexington, Ky in front of the
stadium's smallest crowd ever.
With just 29 seconds left in
the game, Nicky Nickels kicked
the 29 yard field goal to give
the Wildcats the win.
The kick was set up by a
Junior Smith fumble on the Pi-
rates' last possession the fourth
quarter.
The Pirates have now lost
their fourth game in a row (2-8)
in a season that has been
plagued by injuries and bad
breaks. For the third straight
week, ECU was forced to play
on a rain-soaked field.
"I told my kids to be ready
to play in bad weather Logan
said.
"The conditions were bad,
and the field was soaked se-
nior right guard Ken Crawford
said. "But it has been like that
for the last two weeks, so we
were used to it. We wanted to
go in and run the ball because
we knew it would be tough to
pass
Another spectacular per-
formance was displayed by
Smith and the ECU offensive
line. Smith, coming into the
game off a record-breaking 282
yard rushing game against
Tulsa, added another 169 yards
on 34 carries to his career rush-
ing yardage at ECU. Smith
needs just two more yards to
surpass Carlester Crumpler
Srs 1972 single season rush-
ing record of 1,309 yards.
"We know that Smith is a
good runner, and we feel proud
to block for him. We don't al-
ways get the praise, but having
a 1,000-yard rusher behind us
the last two seasons makes us
feel good Crawford said.
Smith wasted no time get-
ting the job done against the
Wildcats. On the first play of
the game, he bounced off of
one Kentucky defender and
took off down the field for a 63-
yard gain.
"On that first run, I wanted
to make a big play for the of-
fense to start things off" Smith
said. "I broke a tackle and I
was off to the races
The Pirates were unable to
score inside the red-zone on
their next three plays, and were
forced to settle for a 21-yard
field goal by kicker Chad
Holcomb.
The Kentucky offense suf-
fered a serious loss when start-
ing quarterback Pookie Jones
left the game because of an
ankle injury after being sacked
by ECU defensive end Willie
Brookins.
Jones was replaced by sec-
ond-string QB Antonio
Phtfo by Miry North D�vl�
Junior Smith rushed for 169 yards on Kentucky's muddy field, putting himself just two yards behind
Carlester Crumpler Srs single season rushing mark of 1,309, set in 1972.
O'Ferral. The Pirates defense
gave O'Ferral problems all af-
ternoon. Freshman strong
safety Daren Hart led the way
for the ECU secondary, with 16
total tackles, 15 of those being
solo.
"This is by far our best de-
fensive effort of the season
Hart said. "This is the type of
team effort we are trying to es-
tablish here. We've been strug-
gling in the secondary all sea-
son, trying to prevent the big
offensive plays. I think we ac-
complished that this week
An interception by senior
cornerback Travis Render be-
fore the half ended secured
ECU'S 3-0 lead going into the
locker room. Junior Smith had
already racked up 104 yards on
16 carries.
UK coach Bill Curry and
the Kentucky fans were quickly
learning about the talents of
Smith and the ECU line.
Despite prior third quarter
struggles this season, ECU
held their own in the third
against UK. A fabulous div-
ing interception by cornerback
Emmanuel McDaniel set the
tone for the ECU secondary
starting the second half.
The Pirates started their
first drive of the third quarter
from their own 27 yard line.
The Pirates drove down to the
UK two yard line, where once
See KENTUCKY page 10
ND ticket prices
blow the roof off
Robinson ending career off the bench
SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) �
They were already telling tall tales
about Florida State-Notre Dame,
four days before the game was
played.
Thesubjectofthechattenticket
prices. More specifically, prices for
tickets bought second-hand.
Good seats for Saturday's
game between the No. 1 and No. 2
teams in the country had been go-
ing for $1,000 or more several
weeks before the game. The price
droppedabittheweekof the game,
but people still were clamoring to
buy and sell seats, ticket agents
said.
A South Bend man who iden-
tified himself only as Mike, said a
woman wanted to charge him
$10,000 for a pair of tickets. Mike
passed and was holding out in
hope of paying about $200 apiece.
"I've heard all the stories
said South Bend ticket agent Andy
Kostielney. "Some guy said he sold
two tickets for $22,000,butlhaven't
seen it
Kostielney's most expensive
seats, twoon the 30-yard line, went
for $750 apiece.
Most tickets to 59,075-seat
Notre Dame Stadium have a face
value of $27.
Scott Goldberg, owner of All
Season Tickets in Los Angeles, said
histopsellingpricewas$850apiece
for four seatsnear the 25-yard line.
But Goldberg said he has heard of
tickets goingfor as much as$l,100.
The Florida State-Notre Dame
game has drawn more attention
from ticket agents than other big
games primarily because it is be-
ing played at Notre Dame,
Goldberg said.
The stadium is small com-
pared to other schools, and the
aura is immense, he said.
Saturday's game will be only the
third time that the nation's top two
teams have played at 64-year-old
Notre Dame Stadium since The
Associated Press poll began in
1936.
No. 2 Notre Dame lost to
Purdue in 1968, and No. 1 Notre
DamebeatlowaPre-Hightin 1943.
After naming their price and
getting it for weeks, ticket agents
have seen a marked reversal in
inquiries.
People looking to sell far out-
numbered those interested in buy-
ing, and supply has surpassed de-
mand.
South Bend distributor John
E. Green sold three end zone seats
for $600 each, but he was asking
only about $300 apiece Monday.
By Dave Pond
Senior Staff Writer
The time has finally come for
Pirate fifth-year senior linebacker
Reggie Robinson. After walking
on duringhis freshman season of
1989, Robinson has received his
chance to start for the Pirates,
and he has made the most of it in
1993.
Robinson was born on Feb. 4,
1971, in Greensboro, N.C to
Grant and Thelma Robinson. He
grew up in Greensboro and even-
tually earned two letters in foot-
ball and one in each tennis and
baseball atGrimsley High School.
As a senior in 1988, Robinson
was named his football team's
defensive captain and was given
the postseason honors of All-
Conference and All-County for
gathering 189 tackles during the
season.
"I could have gone to smaller
schools on a scholarship, but I
didn't feel that's where I should
be he said. "ECU always plays
such a different type of schedule
than other schools do, and 1
wanted to help build a defensive
tradition in Greenville
Redshirted for the 1989 sea-
son, Robinson started practicing
as a linebacker, learning the ins
and outs of the Pirate program.
He continued his training at in-
side linebacker during the 1990
and 1991 campaigns, and was re-
warded with reserve play in 10
games in 1992, in which he col-
Buc swimmers win tri-team
Reggie
Robinson
lected three unassisted tackles
and earned first his Pirate letter.
Before this 1993 season,
Robinson was given his first
scholarship, and is playing with
all the flair and excitement that
he had shown potential for in
seasons past.
"He's a real team player
said Pirate Assistant Coach Bob
Babich. "For four years Reggie
gave us all he had and got virtu-
ally no reward, and this season
it's all finally working out for
him
Through the ECU-Kentucky
game, Robinson had collected 78
tackles and snatched two inter-
ceptions. He had a career-high 17
tackles and a sack against Vir-
ginia Tech and also had 16 tack-
les against South Carolina.
"Reggie's a real smart
p1 ayer said Coach Babich. "On
every snap he always gives the
team 100 percent
In the classroom, Robinson
is now taking his final 'hours,
and will graduate in December
with a degree in Political Sci-
ence. He will be entering gradu-
ate or law school in the spring.
"I want to be an accom-
plished lawyer Robinson said.
"Probably in some type of liti-
gation
When he is not hitting run-
ning backs or law books,
Robinson said that he enjoys
playing the piano and collect-
ing coins and stamps. "With
football and upcoming gradua-
tion, I don't have time to do a
whole lot he said.
Looking back at this rather
forgettable Pirate season,
Robinson said that team mo-
rale is still high and that the
Pirates still have a job to do
upset Cincinnati to end the sea-
son on a high.
"Theefforthas stayed there
all season Robinson said. "We
are more united as a team now
then we have ever been
Both Robinson and Coach
Babich are pleased with how he
has come along in his career at
ECU.
"The whole staff and team
are happy that everything has
worked out well for Reggie
Babich said.
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The Pirate swim teamshad their
first home meet of the season at
MingesAquaticCenteron Saturday.
ThePiratesgotthewininthetri-team
meet, beating out Georgia Southern
and CAA rival Old Dominion. Four
varsity records were broken for the
team.
"We swam extremely well
coach Rick Kobe said. "We domi-
nated both teams
For the men, it was senior Brian
Soltz leading the way, with wins in
the 100-yard free (4838) and the 50-
yard free with a time of 21.92 sec-
onds. Fellow senior Carlos Ochoa
swam strong as well, with a win in
the 200-yard free (14734) and the
200-yard fly(20057).Sophomoredis-
tance swimmer Jason "Fezz" Fan-
dominated the 500 and 1,000
freestyles, with times of 45139 and
10235. Chris Bembenek won the
200 backstroke in 156.16, and set a
record in the 100 back with a time of
52:62. Sophomore David Benson got
the win in the 200IM with a time of
15850. The 400medleyrelayteamof
Bembenek, Benson, Lance Tate and
John Donovan won with a time of
333.42.
SophomoreJackieSchmiederled
the way for the women with wins in
the 1000 distance free, and 200 IM.
Freshmen Lesley Hawley broke
records in both the 100 back, with a
time of 6054, and in the 200 back
(2:08.61). Melissa Phillips won the
200 fly (2:1058). Sophomore Beth
Humphrey placed first in the 200 free
with a winning time of 156.72.
Soltz repeated his victories in the
50 and 100 frees against ODU.
See SWIM page 10
Holtz polishes dome, too
(AP) �Even people who be-
lieve LouHoltz tarnished theGolden
Dome will now have to concede that
he polished it some, too. The ques-
tion it begs is whether it's possible
any longer, even at Notre Dame, to
doone without first doing theother.
You don't ha ve to like Holtz, or
buy into his shriek: Woe is always
him. The constant poor-mouthing
is tired, the occasional bullying is
jarring and the cloak of piety comes
out from the closet sooften it's start-
ing to look tattered. There are more
things to dislike about Holtz�be-
fore ever opening "Under the Tar-
nished Dome" � and more than a
few people do.
But they have to respect his
abilities to coach. And to motivate.
And to win. Whatever his other
sins, Holtz understands the Notre
Dame mystique, whatever else it
means, means winning football
games.
"We can't do nothing about
mystique coach Bobby Bowden
said after his No. 1-ranked Honda
State team became its latest victim.
"I can see what tradition means
to them he added. "Their kids
played like they were possessed
That was true of Irish teams
since the beginning of the century,
and never was it more true than on
Saturday. In Knute Rockne's day,
Irish teams were made up of Irish, a
tough enough bunch to begin with.
They were often underdogs, often
played on the road, often with some-
thing to prove and more often than
not, they overachieved.
Because of an ideal that began
men and traces i nearly unbroken
lineof success, muchhas changed.
Holtz now has thebest of the Irish,
as well as Poles, Germans, Italians
and African-Americans. Alhough
Holtz would have everyone be-
lieve otherwise, Notre Dame is
rarelythe underdog. Yethisteams,
keeping faith, overachieve in the
biggest games, too.
After Saturday's victory,
Holtz didn't say whether waking
up the echoes was in his game
plan. But some of his innovations
echc�dRockne.NotreDame'sfirst
touchdown came on a reverse by
Adrian Jarrell, a part-time tanker
and full-rime punter, makirgonly
the third rushing attempt of his
four-year career. Two other rush-
ing touchdowns came from Jeff
See HOLTZ page 10
-
"WP1





November 16, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
KENTUCKY
Continued from page 8
m the
en-yara in
Again, the Firate defense
stood up and made the big play.
After a 49-yard run by UK
fullback Damon Hood, Brookins
recovered a Hood fumble on
first and goal from the ECU
four-yard line on the very next
play.
A failed drive was ended by
an 18-yard shank by ECU punter
Bill Wilson, which gave the
Wildcats the ball on the ECU
40-yard line. The Wildcats drove
to the 11-yard line to end the
third quarter.
It was only the second time
this season the Pirates have held
an opponent scoreless in the
third quarter.
Unfortunately, the Pirates
lead did not last much longer. A
24-yard field goal by UK kicker,
Nickels tied the game, 3-3 with
13 minutes left.
After a failed drive by ECU,
Wilson booted a 35-yard punt
to the UK 27. ECU senior line-
backer Reggie Robinson
stepped up big for the Pirate
defense on the very next play.
A pass was deflected off of
a UK receiver near the ground
and out of nowhere, Robinson
hustled to the ground and
caught the ball just in time to
get the interception.
This gave ECU great field
position inside UK territory. On
fourth down from the Kentucky
29-yard line, Logan reached into
his bag of tricks and pulled out
a fake field goal play that was
used last year against Virginia
Tech.
The ball was snapped to
holder Michael Jacobs, who
overthrew an open Jerris
McPhail for an incomplete pass.
The Kentucky offense took
over on downs and drove the
ECU five-yard line. The Wild-
cats had a chance to take the
lead, but a 22-yard field goal
attempt by Nickels was no good,
giving the ball back to the Pi-
rates with a 1:45 left in the game.
Then this set up the posses-
sion the Pirates would like to
forget. The only flaw Smith had
all game was when he fumbled
the ball away on third and seven
on ECU's 27-yard line. This set
the game winner for Kentucky.
The loss was obviously very
frustrating for the Pirates' play-
ers and coaches, but no blame
can be pinned on Smith.
"On that last run, i was try-
ing to fight for those extra
yards Smith said.
"I apologize to all my team-
mates for letting them down.
It's usually bad to look ahead to
the future, but for this game I
think you almost have to. I can
learn a lot from this game as far
as helping me in my growth as
a player
"This game is very impor-
tant to us as a team Logan
said. "I told my team in the
lockeroom after the game that
this contest can either
strengthen us or fracture us
I K. Nickels, 24-yard
3, UK 3
Ik: Nick) Nickels, 29-yard
field goal, 0:28. UK 6, ECU 3
m Stat
UK ECU
First Downs 19 13
Rushing 15 8
Passing 3 2
Penalty 1 3
Rush Att. 55 45
Gained 287 209
Lost 5 19
Net 282 190
Pass Att. 16 16
Comp. 6 6
Net 34 36
INTs 3 1
Tot plays 71 61
avgplay 4.4 3.7
Fmb-lost 1-1 3-1
Pen-yards 4-45 5-40
INTs-yards 1-0 3-13
Punt-yards 2-14 0-0
KO-yards 2-28 2-13
Time of Possesion33:24 26:36
3rd down 7-16 1-12
Sacks-yds 0-0 1-3
Kickoff: 1:01 p.m ended at 3:25
p.m.
Temperature: 57 degrees
Weather: Thunderstorm in
progress, 100 percent humidity,
100 percent chance of rain.
East Carolina Playhouse
ZZZZZZZZZZIZ presents ZZZZZZZZ
Athol Fugard's
Award Winning Play
THE ROAD TO
MECCk
NOVEMBER 18. 19. 20. 22 and 23.
8:00 p.m.
NOVEMBER 21, 1993
2:00 p.m.
1993
McGinnis Theatre
(corner of Fifth & Eastern)
CALL
757-6829
ECU Students: $4.50
General Public: $7.50
Snowshoe
Ski Tri
6 Spaces left for
4 nights
lodging slopeside
in Stemwinder
luxury condo, 4 days
skiing. Must commit
before Fri, Nov 19th.
December 17-21, 1993
Price: $240.00
Call Harold Wise
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
Come out and support Pirate Basketball
this Thursday at 7pm at Minges.
For this season's Imeup.check out
the Navigator in this Thursday's paper
NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
"BARS THAT WON'T GET YOU IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW"
Students receive tree beverages w ID
758-2712
Sunday-Thursday
11:00-9:30
Friday-Saturday
11:30-10:00
isfll
3T7TI
rv
Delicious
Chopped Sirloin
with mushroom gravy or peppers & onions
includes choice of potato and hot Texas toast
FREE SUNDAE BAR
�EAT IN ONLY"
FRKi: POTATO BAR
Limit 4 persons per coupon. Must
present coupon when ordering.
Coupon expires November 30, 1993.
Not valid with any other discounts or
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Good at Greenville locations only.
xii;
m
2903 E. 10th St.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
ECU
UK
0
0
0
0
0
6
Final
3
6
First Quarter
ECU: Chad Holcomb, 21-yard
field goal, 12:26. ECU 3, UK 0
Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
� A certificate program open to qualified women who have a
baccalaureate degree
� Approved by the American Bar Association
� Intensive full-time summer schedule May-August. Part-time
evening schedules beginning August or January
� Placement service for graduates is without fee to employer or
graduate
Applications deadline for the 1994 Summer Program: February 1, 1994. For
details, contact: Legal Assistants Program, Continuing Education, Meredith
College, 3800 Hillsborough St Raleigh, NC 27607-5298, (919) 829-8353.
MEREDITH
COLLEGE ��
Meredith College admits women students withitut regard tit race, creed, national
or ethnic origin, age or handicap.
r DOWNTOWN. CREENUILLE M
WEDNESDAYS
IN THE ARMY,
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND:
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who just wants a job can
find one But if you're a nurs-
ing student who wants to be in
command of your own career, consider
the Army Nurse Corps You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given your own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with your level of experience. As
an Army officer, you'll command the
respect you deserve. And with the added
benefits only the Army can offer-a $5000
signing bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacation�you'll be well in com-
mand of your life Call 1-800-USA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BEAU YOU CAN BE.
NOCOUER
$150 Highballs
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THURS0rVS
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$ 150 Highballs
DANCE





November 16, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
ENTUCKY
Continued from page 8
n the
n-yard li
Again, the Pirate defense
stood up and made the big play.
After a 49-yard run by UK
fullback. Damon Hood, Brookins
recovered a Hood fumble on
first and goal from the ECU
four-yard line on the very next
play.
A failed drive was ended by
an 18-yard shank by ECU punter
Bill Wilson, which gave the
Wildcats the ball on the ECU
40-yard line. The Wildcats drove
to the 11-yard line to end the
third quarter.
It was only the second time
this season the Pirates have held
an opponent scoreless in the
third quarter.
Unfortunately, the Pirates
lead did not last much longer. A
24-yard field goal by UK kicker,
Nickels tied the game, 3-3 with
13 minutes left.
After a failed drive by ECU,
Wilson booted a 35-yard punt
to the UK 27. ECU senior line-
backer Reggie Robinson
stepped up big for the Pirate
defense on the very next play.
A pass was deflected off of
a UK receiver near the ground
and out of nowhere, Robinson
hustled to the ground and
caught the ball just in time to
get the interception.
This gave ECU great field
position inside UK territory. On
fourth down from the Kentucky
29-yard line, Logan reached into
his bag of tricks and pulled out
a fake field goal play that was
used last year against Virginia
Tech.
The ball was snapped to
holder Michael Jacobs, who
overthrew an open Jerris
McPhail for an incomplete pass.
The Kentucky offense took
over on downs and drove the
ECU five-yard line. The Wild-
cats had a chance to take the
lead, but a 22-yard field goal
attemptbyNickelswasnogood,
giving the ball back to the Pi-
rates with a 1 :45 left in the game.
Then this set up the posses-
sion the Pirates would like to
forget. The only flaw Smith had
all game was when he fumbled
the ball away on third and seven
on ECU's 27-yard line. This set
the game winner for Kentucky.
The loss was obviously very
frustrating for the Pirates' play-
ers and coaches, but no blame
can be pinned on Smith.
"On that last run, I was try-
ing to fight for those extra
yards Smith said.
"I apologize to all my team-
mates for letting them down.
It's usually bad to look ahead to
the future, but for this game I
think you almost have to. I can
learn a lot from this game as far
as helping me in my growth as
a player
"This game is very impor-
tant to us as a team Logan
said. "I told my team in the
lockeroom after the game that
this contest can either
strengthen us or fracture us
kj Nicki
IK: Nicky Nick
field goal, 0:2c
ream Stats
UK ECU
First Downs 14 13
Rushing 15 8
Passing 3 2
Tenalty 1 3
Rush Att. 55 45
Gained 287 209
Lost 5 19
Net 282 190
Pass Att. 16 16
Comp. 6 6
Net 34 36
INTs 3 1
Tot plays 71 61
avgplay 4.4 3.7
Fmb-lost 1-1 3-1
Pen-yards 4-45 5-40
INTs-yards 1-0 3-13
Punt-yards 2-14 0-0
KO-yards 2-28 2-13
Time of Possesion33:24 26:36
3rd down 7-16 1-12
Sacks-yds 0-0 1-3
Kickoff: 1:01 p.m ended at 3:25
p.m.
Temperature: 57 degrees
Weather: Thunderstorm in
progress, 100 percent humidity,
100 percent chance of rain.
Snowshoe
Ski Tri
6 Spaces left for
4 nights
lodging slopeside
in Stemwinder
luxury condo, 4 days
skiing. Must commit
before Fri, Nov 19th.
December 17-21, 1993
Price: $240.00
Call Harold Wise
(830-5160)
ECU
UK
0
0
0
0
0
6
Final
3
6
East Carolina Playhouse
ZZZZZZIZZZZ presents ZIZZZZZZ!
Athol Fugard's
Award Winning Play
THE ROAD TO
MECCk
NOVEMBER 18. 19. 20, 22 ant 23. 1993
8:00 p.m.
NOVEMBER 21. 1993
2:00 p.m.
McGinnis Theatre
(comer of Fifth & Eastern)
CALL
757-6829
ECU Students: $4.50
General Public: $7.50
Come out and support Pirate Basketball
this Thursday at 7pm at Minges
For u iis season's lineup.check out
the Navigator in this Thursday's paper
NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
"BARS THAT WON'T GET YOU IN TROUBLE WITH THE LAW"
Students receive free beverages w ID
758-2712
Sunday-Thursday
11:00-9:30
Friday-Saturday
11:3010:00
rv
Delicious
Chopped Sirloin
with mushroom gravy or peppers & onions
includes choice of potato and hot Texas toast.
FREE SUNDAE BAR
�EAT IN ONLY�
FREE POTATO BAR
Limit 4 persons per coupon. Must
present coupon when ordering.
Coupon expires November 30, 1993.
Not valid with any other discounts or
specials.
Good at Greenville locations only.
ft
SU&
Tf
Z903 E. 10th St.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
First Quarter
ECU: Chad Holcomb, 21-yard
field goal, 12:26. ECU 3, UK 0
Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
� A certificate program open to qualified women who have a
baccalaureate degree
� Approved by the American Bar Association
� Intensive full-time summer schedule May-August. Part-time
evening schedules beginning August or January
� Placement service for graduates is without fee to employer or
graduate
Applicauons deadline for the 1994 Summer Program: February 1, 1994. For
details, contact: Legal Assistants Program. Continuing Education, Meredith
College, 3800 Hillsborough St Raleigh, NC 27607-5298. (919) 829-8353.
MEREDITH
COLLEGE
Meredith College admits women students without regard to race, creed, national
or ethnic origin, age or handicap.
r DOWNTOWN. CREENUILLE J
A
IN THE ARMY
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND.
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who just wants a job can
find one But if you're a nurs
ing student who wants to be in
command of your own career, consider
the Army Nurse Corps You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given your own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with your level of experience. As
an Army officer, you'll command the
respect you deserve. And with the added
benefits only the Army can offer�a $5000
signing bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacation�you'll be well in com-
mand of your life Call 1-800-USA ARMY
WEDNESDrVSl
NOC0UER
$ 1.50 Highballs
$1.00 Shots,
THURSLWST
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
LADIES FREE UNTIL 12:00.
$1.00 Drafts
$ 150 Highballs
DANCE
.
DANCE





November 16.1993
ree letters of intent
wig tht-1 ip 150 high school se-
�s in the nation by several re-
ng magazines.
Riles comes to EC L from West-
em Nebraska College in Scotisbluff,
vs here he is entering his sec-
ond sea x in.
from Ol V on Rile)
8forward from New Ellenton,S.C,
and Bernard Cooper. ;i 6-10 center
from W indsor, .C have signed to
pbybasketbaUatECU for the 1994-
95 season.
"These three student-athletes
will fill the needs of our squad for
the upcoming seasons said Firate
coach Eddie Payne. "The area for
concern this season is our inside
game, and I feel Von and Bernard
give usa lot more physical play and
bulk that we'll need in the middle.
Next season, we'll be losing Lester
Lyons and we'll need a player with
his athletic ability in our lineup.
Othello is a great defender and is
quick to the ball. All three of these
student-athletes give up the poten-
tial to move forward with this pro-
gram
Meadows, who will be a senior
at Creighton Prep, has been ranked
SWIM
( ooper originally signed with
East Carolina out of Bertie High
School, but attended Spartanburg
(S.C.) Methodist College, where he
is entering his second season.
Payne still has one scholarship
to give for the 1994-95 season. Ad-
ditional information on the 1993
early signees is listed below:
EastCarolina University Men's
Basketball 1993 Early Signees:
Othello Meadows, 6-3, 175,
Guard, Omaha, Neb. (Creighton
Prep)
Von Riley, 6-8, 240, Forward,
New Ellenton, S.C. (Western Ne-
braska CollegeSilver Bluff HS)
Bernard Cooper, 6-10,220, Cen-
ter, Windsor, N.C. (Spartanburg
MethodistCollegeBertieSeniorHS)
He originally signed with
East Carolina out of Bertie High
School.
Continued from page 8
HOLTZ
Continued from page 8
Burris, who spends the rest of the
game playing safety. Kevin
Pendergast, who added a 47-yard
fieldgoal�thelongestofhiscareer
�and four extra points wasa soccer
player un til Holtz yanked himoutof
practice one day a few seasons back.
But only last week, shortly be-
foredeclaringPendergasthiskicker
forever, Holtzauditoned thecurrent
soccer team to see if anyone kicked
off deeper. He does things like that
all the time. At any time.
Because the motivational ploys
atNotre Damechange to fit the tim-
bre of the times, it'sno wonder Holtz
is having a hard time keeping up
with the names that fill the Irish
record books. Speeches as good as
the "Gipper" are hard to come by,
and changing jerseys from blue to
green doesn't impress kids like it
used to. And asGerry Faust, Holtz's
predecessor in South Bend learned,
even a saint isn't safe with a 500
record.
Holtz coaxes kids from every-
where to a small town with bad
weatherin the middleof Indiana the
same way his predecessors did. He
promises them that at some junctu re
every season, they will play in the
biggest game of their lives. Then he
promises a bigger game next week-
end.
It doesn' t work every weekend.
Some say Holtz promises his kids
more, and considerably less-noble,
inducements. And that he rums a
blind eye to how some linemen got
so big so fast, and a bad attitude
toward playerswhodon'tcomeback
from injuries fast enough. But after
last weekend's display of coaching
�throwing untested players into
the fire at the biggest moments,
cajoling some and kicking others
�ifsclearhekeepsenoughhappy
to field a team worthy of history's
burden.
In this day and age, the won-
der may not be that the dome re-
flects some of the things that are
about college football. But that it
reflects so much of the good.
2905 E 5th St
Greenville, NC 27858
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Bembenek, Ochoa and Benson also
scored repeat wins in their events.
The team of Jon Languell, McGee
Moody, Bembenek and Jay Noles
wcri tre400 freestyle. Schmieder and
Humphrey led the way again for the
women. Hilary Stokes won the
freestyle withatimeof2559.Hawley
and Phillips again claimed first place
in their events.SeniorJacquelineSilber
won in the 500 free, and the medley
relayteamofHawley,Stokes,Phillips
and Humphrey won with a time of
4:03.43.
In diving, freshmen Beth Hanna
and Billy Galleher won their events
with 438 points and 481 points, re-
spectively.
TheBucs will return toMingeson
Saturday,for another tri-meetagainst
Davidson College and William and
Mary. The meet beginsat2 p.m.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 16, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 16, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.976
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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