The East Carolinian, November 11, 1993






-�
.ness
i Rod Slurring
1 to hear Tales
' Vill W
stories help him find Al? i, ij
�HHH �
apter 11 on page 2.
Lifestyle
Get your tickets now!
The New Vic Theatre group
of London will be performing
Chaucer's 'Canterbury Tales'
in Hendrix theatre Saturday,
November 13. Story page 6.
The East Carolinimt
Vol. 68 No. 66
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, November 11,1993
12 Pages
Be
Careful
Students hurrying to and
from class. Cars, trucks,
vans, motorcycles, bikes
racing to wherever. The
combination proved
hazardous last Friday
afternoon at the Tenth
Street and College Hill
intersection. Julie Samples,
an ECU student, was
running across Tenth Street
between stopped traffic
when she ran into the side
of a vehicle, police said in a
press release. She sustained
injuries after being knocked
to the ground. Police said
as of Nov. 5, no charges
had been filed.
Smokers get a space
ByJason Williams
Staff Writer
Got a light? That phrase
may be heard more frequently
around campus as officials will
soon relax the prohibition on
smoking in campus buildings to
comply with a new state law.
G. S. 143-598, passed this
summer by the General Assem-
bly, requires that at least 20 per-
cent of space be set aside for
smokers in most state-owned
buildings. Currently ECU has a
clean-air policy which prohibits
smoking in all campus buildings
Certain buildings such as
libraries, museums and health
care facilities will be exempt
from the regulations. Buildings
in which indoor air quality is
suspect, most notably the Gen-
eral Classroom Building with its
case of "bad air may also be
exempt.
The university has created
a task force to implement the
legislation, which was supposed
to take effect on Oct. 1. Director
of Environmental Health and
chair of the task force Herbert
Oxendine said new campus
regulations should be in place
for the beginning of the year.
The task force will conduct
a survey of faculty and staff who
occupy certain buildings to help
them decide how to allocate
space for smokers. "We want a
building's occupants to tell us
where they would want the
smoking areas, in a break room,
in a lobby, or in some other
Photo by
Leslie Petty
Perot and Gore come
aimed with charts
RHA members attend regjonals
ECU organization brings in the honors
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
ECU's Residence Hall Asso-
ciation (RHA) recently received six
awards at the regional conference
for Residence Hall Associations.
The conference, held at the
University of Alabama in
Tuscaloosa, drew over 1000 RHA
members from 62 schools who are
members of the South Atlantic
Affiliateof College and University
Residence Halls. ECU sent 32 resi-
dence hall students to the three-
day conference which occurred be-
tween Oct. 22 and Oct. 24.
Topics such as personal lead-
ership development, fundraising
and community servia, creative
thinking, rape awareness and
AIDS were just some of the topics
discussed at the leadership ses-
sions.
"All of the students came
back very motivated and ready to
present p rograms on our own ca m-
pus said Linda Sessoms, advisor
to the RHA.
ECU's RHA received second
place in the "Most Spirited
School Spirit leaders were Su-
san Bartlet, Ben Smith and James
Moretz.
Janna McDonald, ECU
RHA president and current state
RHA president, was awarded the
distinguished Eagle Award for her
outstanding service to the regional
board.
"She Jannaj is well re-
spected in our region as a knowl-
edgeable leader Sessoms said.
In addition, McDonald was
awarded a service certificate for
her roll as Regional Communica-
tions Coordinator for NorthCaro-
lina and was honored as "Execu-
tive Board Member of the Month"
for her service and dedication to
ECU.
Moretz was awarded "Stu-
dent of the Month" for his service
to ECU and he also received the
distinguished Silver Pin for his
service to the Director of the Re-
gional Board.
Several ECU RHA members
presented programs to conference
attendees. Tina Richardson and
Moretz presented a program deal-
ing with the loss of a long-term
relationship, "It Ain't Over 'till
It's Overand Baby It's Over
McDonald and Michelle Reece,
presented "We're Gonna Make
Your Brown Eyes Blue" dealing
with stereotypes and diversity is-
sues. Reece also served as the con-
ference delegation coordinator
and represented ECU at the re-
gional business meetings.
"Our RHA has really grown
over the past three years
Sessoms said. "I hope other
schools will continue to look at
ECU as a benchmark in student
leadership
Army
WASHINGTON (AP) � Al
Gore and Ross Perot both com-
plained that the other stretched
the truth. At least on that one point,
both were right.
The vice-president and the
Texas billionaire came to their na-
tionally televised debate armed
with graphs, photos and a multi-
tude of statistics to bolster their
positions on the North American
Free Trade Agreement.
However the information
blizzard was presented in such a
disjointed way that viewers who
did not begin the evening as trade
experts may well have come away
feeling more confused than en-
lightened.
In the 90-minute CNN pro-
gram, both men tried to use statis-
tics on trade flows, wages in the
two countries and productivity to
prove their case that NAFTA, by
removing trade barriers, would
either result in more jobs or fewer
jobs in the United States.
Gore proclaimed that the
Mexican trade liberalization that
has already occurred and the fur-
ther removal of trade barriers pro-
posed by NAFTA would acceler-
ate a favorable trend that has seen
America's trade balance go from a
deficit of $5.7 billion in 1987 to a
surplus of $5.4 billion last year.
"If that trend continued for
another two years�and NAFTA
will, by removing those barriers,
greatly accelerate it�we will have
a larger trade surplus with Mexico
than with any country in the
world Gore said.
The trouble is that the trend
has been moving in the opposite
direction this year. Mexican im-
ports to the United States have
been rising much more rapidly
than U.S. exports to Mexico, trim-
ming the surplus to an annual rate
so far of just $2.78 billion, half of
last year's total.
It is this narrowing of
America's trade surplus with
Mexico that has caused critics to
question the administration's con-
tention that passage of NAFTA
will create 200,000 new jobs over
the next two years from increased
U.S. exports to Mexico, a claim
thatGore repeated Tuesday night.
Opponents say that even if
U.S. exports do rise enough to sup-
port that many new jobs, the ad-
ministration fails to account for
the jobs tha t will be lost from higher
Mexican sales in this country as
U.S. trade barriers are lowered.
Gore claimed that 22 of 23
economic studies support the
administration's view thatNAFTA
will result in more American jobs.
However, the congressional Joint
EcQjnomic Committee has accused
See NAFTA page 3
Army Chief of Staff presents each member
with a bronze coin
By Todd Griffin
Special Staff Writer
On Oct. 17, Cadet Todd Grif-
fin and Instructors MSG Charles
Thomas and SSG Ronald Carter
of ECU Army ROTC invaded
Washington D.C. to participate
in the Army's 10-mile run.
Run the River Bridges,
sponsored by the Association of
the United States Army (AUSA),
is an annual run which begins at
the Pentagon and crosses the
Potomac to wind through his-
toric D.C.
As the largest 10-miler held
in the U.S it attracts military
leaders and personnel from posts
all over the world. Among the
more than 7,000 runners, were
FORSCOM commander Gen.
Dennis Reimer and the Sergeant
Major of the Army, SGM Richa rd
A. Kidd from ECU.
While in D.C, the team from
ECU was housed by Company E,
3rd Infantry Regiment�"The
Old Guard" at Fort Meyer, Va.
Staying with soldiers of Com-
pany E offered a behind-the-
scenes view into the unit respon-
sible for providing the Presiden-
tial Honor Guard, the U.S. Army
Drill Team, the Presidential Cas-
ket Team and the Firing Party.
During their stay, the team
received a guided tour of the
Quarters of the Tomb Sentinels,
located at the Tomb of the Un-
known Soldiers, in Arlington
National Cemetery.
In addition to participating
in the 10-miler and activities with
the Old Guard, the team attended
portions of the AUSA conven-
tion. While at the convention,
they toured exhibits by the De-
Photos by Griffin
Cadet Todd Griffin (right) and Instructors MSG Charles Thomas and SSG Ronald Carter of ECU ROTC ran
in the Army's ran in the Army's 10-mile run on Oct. 17.
fense Industry that showcased
future military equipment. They
also participated in a forum
headed by Gen. Maxwell
Thurmon (Ret.), a graduate of
N.C. State.
The ECU team had the op-
portunity to meet the Army Chief
of Staff, Gen. Gordon R. Sullivan,
who presented each with a com-
memorative bronze coin embla-
zoned with the Army insignia.
On Monday, the team attended a
luncheon at which the U.S Army
Chorale performed and the Su-
preme Allied Commander Eu-
rope, Gen. George Joulwan,
spoke.
Before returning to ECU,
the team met with the Director of
the Army Congressional Liaison
Office and received a special tour
of the Capitol Building.
Members of the team said
they arrived back physically ex-
hausted, but euphoric after a chal-
lenging visit. The team is already
making plans for a return visit in
1994 led by MSG Thomas and
SSG Carter. Cadet Griffin is
scheduled for commissioning to
Second Lieutenant upon gradua-
tion this December.
place Oxendine said.
"We are going to inter-
view smokers and nonsmok-
ers and we want everyone to
have an opportunity to com-
ment. The survey will help us
identify the most appropriate
places and allow people to
comment on things the task
force may have missed
The survey will be sent
out by Dec. 1 and the task force
should make their decision by
the beginning of Spring semes-
ter.
Members of the task force
include faculty, staff, admin-
istration officials and repre-
sentatives from SGA.
Oxendine said there is anequal
number of smokers and non-
smokers on the task force.
Travel
abroad for
work
By Jennifer Jenkins
Staff Writer
Students interested in
summer internships and jobs
should plan early. There are
many different countries that
will interest anyone's curiosi-
ties. Students can travel to Ire-
land, Costa Rica, New Zealand
and many other countries.
"Few students get to ex-
perience working internation-
ally said Jon Heise, director of
International Programs. "lithe
student does not like it, he or
she has not lost anything, and
they have experienced a great
opportunity that most students
do not
Many foreign countries
offer jobs to younger students
who have not decided on a ca-
reer. The job would be the same
typeofsummerjobfoundinthe. -
United States, such as waiting
tables, working in hotels, cin-
emas or clothing stores; or yard
work.
International Employ-
ment Centers provide appli-
cants with all the information
they need for minimal fees.
They provide a Visa, a tempo-
rary place to live, and knowl-
edge that they have on finding? -
jobs. It is possible for interns to
find a job in approxima tely two
weeks, if he or she sets realistic
goals.
Students should not ex-
pect to work in another country
and become a millionaire. By
the time bills are paid, and
money is spent on traveling or
shopping, there will not be
much extra cash. Interns will
gain the great experience of see-
ing new places, meeting new
people and living a whole dif-
ferent culture.
For students who have
already chosen a career direc-
tion, an internship is still a good
idea. An internship can provide
greatexperience and something
to add to the resume students
try so diligently to build before
going into the real world.
On the other hand, there
may not be any salary for in-
terns and they may not provide
room and board. Heise said,
"the internships are a living ex-
perience that help you decide
on a career
Interns can be found
See TRAVEL page 3
la lumnm
��T�T�-�ai �j






November 11, 1993
Nobel Laureate to speak at ECU
imo
housands of college
getting that job they
n apartment, many find
members of Generation
- weak job market and
are among the causes forcing graduates to
iti - and goals ,md perhaps come to a conclusion
time to pack up and move back with mom and dad. It is
mated that a substantial portion�some estimates range up
to 40 percent � of the lc million adults between the ages of 18
and H li e it home with one or both of their parents.
Dog shot at bar recovering
Andrew Brown can't believe anyone would shoot his best
friend. Square, his 5-year-old halt-Labrador, half-chow dog,
was shot once. The bullet entered through his back, a quarter-
inch from his spine, and exited through his skin. Square sur-
vived, and his assailant is behind bars. Brown, a University of
rgia graduate student from Charleston, S.C was in the
Georgia Bar at the time of the incident, which occurred in
October. He said Square was tied to a parking meter outside
when he was shot. Square's injuries did not require surgery, or
even stitches, but he is on antibiotics. "It could have been a lot
worse Brownsaid. Robert Lee Cox, 34, of Athens, wasarrested
by police and charged with aggravated assault, discharging a
firearm in the city limits, reckless conduct and cruelty to ani-
mals, police said. Cox said the dog began barking and came
toward him as he walked by. "It was just total confusion when
it happened Brownsaid. "My first instinct was violence. After
all, he shot a dog on a leash, but everybody stayed cool until the
police came Square is now resting at home while his wound
heals. "He never even whimpered Brown said.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
On o. 12, the ECl C hem-
istry Department will have Dr.
1 lerbert L. Brown, the 1979 Nobel
I aureateandaprofessoratPurdue
L niversity in Indiana, speak at the
department's "Student Meeting in
Miniature I his meeting, which
coincides with National Chemis-
try Week, will be at 8p.m. and will
be open not only tor the chemistry
students, teachers, and professional
chemists, but for the public as well.
" riu'Student Meeting in Min-
iature" is a day-long presentation
that occurs every two years and "is
designed to provide undergradu-
ate and grad ua te students from all
fields of chemistry and chemical
engineering with an opportunity
to present their research projects to
colleagues in a professional atmo-
sphere said Dr. Art Rodriguez,
the program chairperson for this
year's meeting.
Co-sponsored by the Eastern
North Carolina Section of the
American Chemical Society (ACS),
the East Carolina ACS Student Af-
filiate, and the ECU Chemistrv
Alumni Professional Society, the
day-long Friday program of the
Student Meeting in Miniature"
will includepresentauonsonchem-
istry research by two undergradu-
ate students and six graduate stu-
dents.
Presentations will be pre-
sented in the Flanagan Building, in
rooms 201 and 207.
The program will begin at 8
a.m and will conclude with a ban-
quet and the presentations of re-
search awards Fridav evening.
Brown is best known for his
research on the role of boron in
organic chemistry. In addition to
the Nobel Prize, he has received
various honors, such as the 1981
Priestley Medal, the 1982 Perkin
Medal and the 1985 A.I.C. Gold
Medal. Brown has also been
awarded the National Academy of
Sciences Award in Chemical Sci-
ences for 1987.
Brown holds the title of
Wetherill Research Professor
Emeritus at Purdue University.
Cost forattending the techni-
cal sessions is $5. High school stu-
dents and teachers are invited to
attend free of charge.
THE ECL HONORS PROGRAM
OFFERINGS FOR SPRING SEMESTER 1994 INCLUDE
"fiacMBtfering Folk Arts and Artists" "ManaStrial Accounting"
Horn,r Literature" "Electronic Information Processing"
C S.U�is Research Process in Biology"
Chemistry and the Environment Human Genetics"
' Rocks. landscapes, and National Parks" ' Statistics for Business"
History and Philosophy of Technology" Spanish American Literature (in trans.)
a- well us ANTH 1000: ASKS 2001; EDUC 3200: ENGL 1200,1250.2000 Wtr
FORL 2221: INTl. KXH): HLTH 1000.4501: HIST 1551.1553; MATH 2172- PHIL
1110.1696: I'SYC Kiwi: SOCI 2! 10: SPAN 1004; SPED 2000; WOST 2000 & 2400.
ALL ECU STUDENTS WITH .u GPA OR BETTER QUALIFY TO TAKE
HONORS COURSES. REGISTER FOR THEM IN REGULAR REGISTRA
TION. THEN, BRING YOUR COMPLETED REGISTRATION FORMS TO
THE HONORS OFFICE CALL DR.DAVID SANDERS (757-6373) IN GCB
2026 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Plan ahead! The news staff writer's meeting
next Thursday (1118) will he absolutely
mandatory. Even if you normally skip, 1
expect you to be there. This is not a joke.
Correction
Tuesday's news article "Campus leaders respond to stu-
dents" incorrectly quoted Dean Speieras saying the money for
the Recreation Center will come from an increase of $75-$100
per semester for the next 30 years. This fact should be attrib-
uted to Nance Mize, director of Recreation Services.
Ssshf
It's A Well-Kept Secret .
We can't say what garment labels have been
cut . come by and you'll recognize them.
You'll love our prices!
Division of U.B.E.
210 E. 5th St.
OUTLET M-S 10-6
:arolinian C
Chapter 11
When my stomach had stopped
its churning merry-go-round ride, I
had a chance to look at my sur-
roundings. The street outside of
Burt's had been replaced with some-
thing that looked like somebody's
cotton-candy machine had slipped
a gear. Cloudsof fog pooled around
my feet, going out in every direction
as far as my eyes could see.
As I turned around in a circle,
trying to find some landmark, that
voice that had pulled me awav from
Burt's sounded again. I whirled
around to find this guy standing
with his handsbehind hisback, talk-
ing to some invisible group that
seemed perched over my shoulder
likea vulture eyeinghisnextdinner.
"Mister Hammered is about to
hear something about his friend, Al
Cohol He's on a journey that is al-
most finished, a journey that may-
lead him to a place he mav not like
The guy paused like he yvas waiting
fora standing ovation. "Where could
this place be, you may ask? Follow
me, Rod Slurring, and find out
I felt the ground spin under me
like someone spun a roulette wheel
one spin too fast. When the ball fi-
nally stopped � in the 00 slot, it
seemed like � the guy was gone.
Just like the trucker. I was beginning
to get a little angry You wouldn't
like me when I'm angry.
"Nearly died when I threw up
in my sleep This voice flew out of
nowhere and went there as fast as it
came. I had no idea who had said it,
since I was still as alone as a wino
passed out in the gutter of life, head-
ing toward that deep, dark, dank
sewer of death.
"I was shaking, alone and al-
ways drunk in Los Angeles. Now,
thanks to AA, I'm one of your pro-
fessors This voice came over mv
left shoulder, shooting out into the
air'ikea fastball. Asl turned around
to catch a glimpse of the owner,
another sounded behind me.
" V! v father is a drunk. I drink. I
like to drink. I will continue to
drink The voice paused long
enough for me to get a bearing on it.
The problem was � it was coming
from empty space. "I pray I will
never have children

The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
sorrows for a while.
Mick Hammered had sworn never to set foot
in the Brewery again. Setting out to find his old
S friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy ami fermented world of the Brewery.
EvenThursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole new light. When it's finally
over and done with, Mick�and the reader�will be faced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
r,
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane s Hammer and Hammett v Spade
Joel Keggsy, The Beerslmrouh Gazette
CAROLINIAN
I pulled out Betsy, trying to train
her on somebody but not having
much luck. "Who the hops are you?
What do you want?" I yelled, trying
to keep my voicesteady. I didn't like
this. Not one bit. Another voice an-
swered me.
"I lost one of my best friends
becausesomeonedidn'tcareenough
to say I'm too damn drunk to drive
The bitterness in the tone gave me a
clue. Maybe this guy, whoever he
was, was trying to help me find Al.
Where was he, though?
"My best friend died Another
short one, almost too soft to catch.
But I was getting the hang of it. You
had to stand in one place, with vour
head cocked like a dog who hears
something humanscan't.Comeon, I
thought, don't stop now.
Thevoicesdidn'tdisappointme.
"My father is an alcoholic. His mother
is an alcoholic. I drink and like to
Don't stop now, buddy, tell me what
I need. "Guess what that means
The voices were coming faster
and faster. I could hardly make out
some. "One of my friends died of
alcohol poisoning " was run over
like a Mac truck by "On New Year's
Eve, my sober friend was knocked
90 feet by a drunk driver. All he
could do was blink and hear. Seven
days later he died
"Makes me angry at the world "
shouted at me right in front of mv
face. I almost fell, but was pushed
back by the loud "Two years ago,
one of my best friends was killed
becauseofdrinkingand driving. His
car flipped over into a creek and he
drowned. His BAG was .3"
The voices kept hitting me until
I dropped to my knees, yelling the
word "Stop Unbelievably, they
did. Then that guy's voice came back.
As he spoke, I felt that same whirl-
pool in my stomach. "Mister Ham-
mered has one more stop to make
before he's done. The problem is
I strained to catch the last part, but
failed as darkness swept over me
like a thundercloud.
I was back in front of Burt's.
Like I never left. As I looked at the
trucker's map clenched in mv fist, I
decided. I'd had enough. I'm going
back to the office.
BITS
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reminiscent of the Idizabethan Period.
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November 11, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
e begins Friday:
donate before the holidays
TRAVEL
Continued
from
pagel
irtmentoi :
m? Irv donating.
Citv employees are sponsor-
ing the fourth annual "Caring Is
Sharing" food dm e, beginning Fri-
day, Nov. 12, and ending Nov. 19.
The drive is tor canned goods which
directly benefit residents of Green-
ville.
" Last year's success was q uite
a thrill said Janie Teele, from the
Citv Manager's Office.
The Pitt Countv Council On
Aging (one of the five groups ben-
efiting from the drive) received six
boxesof foodlastyear� enough to
feed 20 families for two months.
Food can be dropped off in
all or at Public
adquarters,
a East Mall.
immunity groups, busi-
hes and civic organi-
also supporting the
donations received are
equally divided among the Green-
ville Community Shelter, New Di-
rections (a family violence center),
Pitt Countv Council On Aging, the
Salvation Armv and SaintGabriel's
Catholic Church. These organiza-
tions work year-round to provide
help for the less fortunate people in
the Greenville area.
This will be the second year
Carolina East N Iall has participated
in the event. A giant food basket
will be located in the center of the
mall. This is the largest collection
area yet, Teele said, andthe drive is
increasingly expanding and may
gradually catch on nation-wide.
abroad for practically any major
The Middle East News Agency in
Egvpt is looking for journalism
majors. The World Bank is look-
ing for finance, economics, ac-
counting and statistics majors to
fullfill positions for the summer.
The American Bar Association
wants students interested in law
to learn legal procedures. There
are also many openings for sci-
ence majors.
Along with specific majors,
there are other jobs to interest stu-
dents. Students can work with
Amnesty International or home-
less children. Work in religious
settings teaching and helping
people in the church is also avail-
able.
Any of these opportunities
are a great way to learn about
another culture and the culture of
an ancestor's country. Most com-
panies are becoming international
or have international relations.
NAFTA
Continued
from
pagel
the administration of double-
counting some studies to come up
with that figure and ignoring oth-
ers that predict job losses.
From its own review of
NAFTA studies, the JEC said the
effect of NAFTA would probablv
range from a net gain of 200,000
jobs over five years to a net loss of
thatmanyjobs. Either development
would be relatively minor in an
economy that is expected to gener-
ate 4.9 million net new jobs over
the next five years.
Both Gore and Perot
wrangled over the makeup of the
trade flows between the two coun-
tries. Perot contended that half of
American export sales were really
semi-finished goods being shipped
to Mexico for assembly and reship-
ment to the United States.
Gore said 80 percent to 90
percent of American exports stay
in Mexico and private studies say
that figure is closer to reality.
MBERSHDP
with this coupon & student ID.
Texas u
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Page
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
November 11, 1993
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez
Gregor) Dickens
Matthew A. Hege, ig Director
Printed on
Karen Hassell
Maureen Rich
Julie Totten . hdnor
Laura W right
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asa. Sporn Editor
Amy E. Wirtz. Opinion P
Amelia Vongue. Copy Edm
Jessica Stanley Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, iti i nmirFirrlrrr
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
100� recycled paper
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Sen. in ihe ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion ot the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call 919) 757-6366.
Smoking policy lights up debate j
Smoker's rights � isn't that an oxymoron?
In theory, policies are implemented for good
reason. Usually this holds out until, suddenly, one
ortwodisgruntledpeopleobject causing the polity
to mysteriously go up in smoke. (Sorry, bad pun,
but in this editorial, it was inevitable).
To say that people who smoke deserve the
right to do what they do in front of and around
non-smokers is ludicrous. To inflict harmful car-
cinogens on those that either don't smoke or can't
smoke because of various medical conditions is
simply unfair. And to vote into law a policy that
allows this in a closed area shows little insight on
the lawmakers part.
This comes in lieu of a state law passed by the
General Assembly this summer called G.S. 143-
598 (sounds kind of foreboding, huh?). It requires
that at least 20 percent of space be set aside for
smokers in most state-owned buildings. This is 20
percent of precious classroom or office space
wherein nicotine-addicted individuals can dirty-
up the air simply because they don't have enough
willpower or sense to quit.
Sounds too harsh for you? The Surgeon
General has stated countless times that cigarette
smoking can cause anynumberoffatalillnesses�
just take your pick: lung cancer, emphysema, low
birthweight in unborn children and other numer-
ous respiratory diseases. With that in mind, how
can a group of individuals legitimize this law?
For one, North Carolina isa tobacco-produc-
ing state (duh). It is home to two of the biggies in
the tobacco industry: R. J. Reynolds and Phillip
Morris. Obviously, it is within the best interest of
the state to allow for open policies concerning
smoking rights. God (and the Marlboro Man)
forbid if there was a decrease in smokers � a
phenomenon that would, in turn, cause a decrease
in overall sales of those nasty little cancer sticks. The
whole state would have to do something drastic,
like focus their agricultural attention on things like
cotton and grain (Naw, never mind, the textile
industry couldn't use a boost or anything).
Another point to be considered is that the
General Assembly saw far enough into this policy
to decide that there are buildings that should be
exempt from the new smoking policy. In other
words, there are buildings deemed immune to the
so-called smokers' rights: libraries, museums and
health care facilities, in addition to those buildings
without good air quality.
So, let's get this straight�it's okay for smok-
ers to inflict second-hand, headache-causing, con-
tact-irritating, cough-inducing smoke in certain
buildings tint's perfectly safe), but it's not okay to
do so in a health care facility. Uh, no. Sorry, doesn't
float. Maybe that's the reason that ECU currently
has a clean-air policy which prohibits smoking in all
campus buildings.
The university has created a task force to
conduct a survey in order to decide how to allocate
space for smokers. Students, of course have no say
in the survey that will enact the new legislation by
the beginning of Spring semester. But get mad
anyway! Say something about how you feel or be
subjected to smoky hallways and bathrooms and a
lingering odor in the carpets.
Smokers can attempt to run and hide or stand
up and fight this issue out, but there is no validity to
this new policy. Smoking is unhealthy. And aside
from being unhealthy, it is just plain rude to inflict
another person to your nasty addiction. If you're
that hooked and believe yourself to be that cool, go
outside and fill your lungs with some nice carbon
monoxide.
Just leave non-smokers out of it.
By Laura Wright
PC movement: another form of tokenism?
Have you ever woken up
in the middle of the night with
someone's hand on your face?
You recoil in horror and try in
vaintojumpoutofbedbutsome-
thing makes your escape impos-
sible. Suddenly you realize that
the hand on your face is your
own and that your entire arm is
asleep. This happened to me last
night. I was on my stomach and
my arm was mHBBIHH
say anything without offending
someone. I think it's about time
that we started being more aware
of what we say and how our com-
ments are perceived by others. I
don't think that people have be-
come any more sensitive; it has
always hurt to hear negative
rhetoric about chest size, skin
color or intelligence level. It's just
that the people who have always
MMia been insulted
it's about time that
we started being
more aware of what
we say and how our
comments are per-
ceived by others.
underneath
my head so
when I
woke up,
my hand
was right
beside my
eyes. I
freaked out
and asked
myself, "If I �mmmm
turn my head, will I be able to
see the body at the end of this
arm?" I convinced myself that
the arm was, in fact, attached to
me, but adrenaline was going
and I was wide awake. My arm,
however, was comatose.
So what's the point here?
Actually, my arm has nothing to
do with my opinions about any-
thing, but it did wake me up,
and once I was awake, I couldn't
go back to sleep. I started think-
ing about the rest of my life and
I started to panic.
I narrowed my focus to
thoughts about the rest of my
career as a graduate student at
ECU. An English graduate at
ECU. A multicultural literature
English graduate student at
ECU. Sheesh. I became frus-
trated.
I keep hearing from friends
and colleagues that this "politi-
cal correctness" thing has gone
too far, that it is impossible to
have finally
said "enough
But, un-
fortunately, in
spite of all the
hype, rhetoric is
the basis of
P C n e s s .
Granted, it's
hard to change
� your vocabu-
lary to accommodate a less criti-
cal set of terms, and members of
ethnic and gender groups that
have very few negative terms as-
sociated with them have to be
more careful than members of op-
pressed and stereotyped groups.
For example, traditionally
there have been very few�if
any�negative terms associated
with white men while there have
been many associated with mem-
bers of other ethnic groups and
with women. Naturally, then,
white men tend to be the ones
that get frustrated with and criti-
cal of PC.
Rush Limbaugh comes to
mind. Talk about frustrated. But
Rush needn't worry, at least not
vet.
I fear that the PC movement
is just another form of tokenism.
All of the language that is spoken
in the PC world makes it appear
that things are more equal in the
real world. 1 hings may be chang-
ing for the better, but we still
have a long way to go. All the
cautious language doesn't mean
anything without the backup of a
real commitment to change
things.
To use an old cliched ex-
pression, actions speak louder
than words.
If you are afraid that women
and minorities are "taking over
do a quick head count of the fac-
ulty at ECU and determine the
ratio of white men to all other
groups. Chances are you'll find
out that your fears are unfounded.
But to bring all of this back
to my worries about my future, I
would like to offer an example of
the inactive rhetoric of political
correctness. I am a multicultural
literature student primarily be-
cause I believe that there is litera-
ture by women and by men out-
side of the white male traditional
literary canon.
ECU offers this course of
study to its graduate students
(how politically correct of it) but
there isn't a single multicultural
literature course offered to gradu-
ate students for the spring of 1994
and there was one offered this
semester. Meanwhile, I sense hos-
tility towards the threat of
multiculturalism.
I hope that things do change,
that people put actions behind all
of those politically correct words.
I hope that someday the English
graduate department at ECU will
have concentrations in
multicultural literature, women's
literature, black literature, Chi-
nese-American literature, etc. but
until any real tolerant changes
take place, complaints about the
extremes of PC are unfounded.
I'll try sleeping on my back
tonight.
By Brian Hall
Clinton's foreign policy disfunctional
Surely, you would think that
President Clinton would have had
enough of foreign policy disasters
after his first 10 months in office.
You would think that he would be
ready to concentrate on his ambi-
tious domestic agenda, "like a la-
ser as he himself pu t it in last year's
election campaign. But no, this past
weekend he continued his focus on
foreign affairs, stating that a com-
plete blockade of Haiti might be
needed to restore Jean-Bertrand
Aristide to office as president.
The Haiti affair illustrates just
how incompetent our president and
his advisers are in foreign affairs.
First, just what do we hope to accom-
plish by blocka ding a country which
can soil import whatever it needs
overland from the Etominican Re-
public? The factions opposed to the
return of Mr. Aristide, from all ac-
counts that I have seen, are the
wealthy of the country, many of
whom will only benefit from the
inflationsuretoresultfromthisblock-
ade. How this blockade will bring
about the return of Mr. Aristide has
never been explained.
More importantly, what pos-
sible interest does the United States
have as to who runs Haiti? Espe-
cially when the choice seems to be
between the military, runby corrupt
thugs, and Mr. Aristide, widely be-
lieved to be mentally unstable and
reportedlyjust as guilty of atrocities.
Other than our natural desire to see
the will of the people of Haiti, as
expressed in free elections,honored,
we have no interest there, and cer-
tainly no vital interest.
The truth is that the only rea-
son that Bill Clinton is concerned
about the situation in Haiti is that he
needs the support of the Congres-
sional Black Caucus to pass his (and
Hillary's) health care plan and
NAFTA
When PresidentClinton came
to office, he had no previous experi-
ence in foreign affairs, nor any ap-
parent interest in them. Much of his
present difficulties can be traced to
the advisors which he has chosen for
himself, namely Secretary of State
Warren Christopher, Secretary of
Def ense Les Aspin, and worst of all,
UN Secretary BoutrcsBoutros-Ghali.
Christopher,astatedepartment offi-
cial in the Carter Administration
(surely not America's era of greatest
success on the foreign affairs front),
hasbeenweakandindecisive. Aspin
is largelyresrxmsible for me firelight
in Somalia which resulted in the
deaths of 18 servicemen. Boutros-
Ghali, perhaps taking advantage of
our inexperienced president, has
convinced Clinton that the United
States should become even more
deeply involved in peace keeping
duties,insuchplaces as Macedonia
and Rwanda.
It was Boutros-Ghali who
convinced the president to use
American troops in Somalia, not to
ensure the distribution of food as
originally intended by President
Bush, but to arrest General Aidid
and help "nationbuild President
Clinton has now said that he real-
izes his error, and he has promised
that our troops will be out of Soma-
lia by March 31. Hopefully he will
keepthispromise longer than some
of the others which he has made
(i.e. the middle class tax cut). The
point is that there is no purpose for
our troops to be there any longer.
They have accomplished their origi-
nalmission,and shouldberemoved
immediately. The only reason that
Icanseeforthewaitissothatitdoes
not look like Aidid ran us off.
Whichis the under current of
both of these affairs. President
Clinton is willing to risk American
lives, something which he was not
will to do himself, for symbolic
reasons. Those who have willing
offered to serve, who have willing
offered to give their lives, to defend
their country deserve better than
die so that Bill Clinton does not
appear weak, or to get a piece of
legislation passed.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
In your Nov. 4th issue, I was astonished that the
article, "War on drugs threatens personal freedom by
Brian Hall, supported the decriminalization of drugs.
I've found myself entertaining the thought of decrimi-
nalizing marijuana but never could I conceive decrimi-
nalizing such harsh drugs as cocaine or heroin.
Mr. Hall tries to justify this decriminalization by
offering tax money and also.by saying that the "war on
drugs" is a complete failure. It would seem to me that if
our "war on drugs" has kept one child, one teenager or
even one adult off of drugs then its been somewhat of a
success.
And I'd ha ve to say that some success is better than
no attempt. Mr. Hall also says that decriminalizing
drugs would deprive organized crime out of about $50
billion a year. Well when prohibition ended organized
crime found other means of makii .g money (dealing in
drugs). Do you not think that if they were to lose $50
billion a year they wouldn't find another way to make
thatmoney? mearuclethengoessofarastosaythatour
current prohibition is hypocritical. Hypocritical be-
cause the legalized drugs, tobacco and alcohol, kill
more than one hundred times as many people a year
than illicit drugs. My point exactly. If prohibition on
alcohol wereineffectdon'tyou think this figure would
be greatly reduced? I'm simply trying to say that the
decriminalization of drugs would greatly increase the
users of drugs. And if I've learned anything from all of
the wasted money on "war on drugs" it's that drugs
can do nothing more than cause a lot of pain for a little
pleasure. And to me, it's just not worth it!
S. Joseph Crumpler
Freshman
Business
To the Editor:
In his recent letter ot the editor, Phil McGuinn
expressed frustration over what appeared to him to be
the University abrogating "its responsibility to pro-
vide a safe learning environment for its students His
frustration over not knowing what actions Campus
Police and the Administration are taking to address
the recent armed robberies is understandable.
Our emphasis in the media has been to make
students aware of the incidents, encourage them to
take specific precautions to enhance their own safety
and protection and heighten their diligence in report-
ing suspicious behavior. These are just practical,
common sense personal safety measures that we all
need to be reminded of periodically. It was not
intended to indicate that the Campus Police are not
aggressively dealing with the situation at the same
time.
While I will not go into details, I want to assure
the campus community that our Campus Police offic-
ers have taken this matter very personally. A number
of exceptional steps have been taken to protect our
pop ulation from these felons and to hopefully iden-
tify and apprehend the individuals responsible for
these crimes. The dilemma we face is that, should
we publicize the actions being taken, we would in so
doing limit the effectiveness of those actions. While
I am sure some of Mr. McGuinn's comments were
offered to dramatize his concerns, the campus com-
munity should have some degree of confidence that
the University is acting responsibly and has taken
definitive steps to address this particular series of
incidents. We just cannot jeopardize the benefit of
those actions by publicizing them.
Everyone needs to understand, however, that
there are no guarantees of safety; not on our campus,
not in our communi ties, and not even in our homes.
Unfortunately, violent crime is a fact of life in our
society today. We each must act prudently, avoid
putting ourselves unnecessarily in unsafe situations
and look out for the safety of others.
Richard Brown
Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs
mmmjri'
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��WfcVj
��.�ii� ��n
�The East Carolinian
November 1 1, 1993
For Rent
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Mtm) .2 Bdrm
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IncMed. 2 Student U�.
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I CflWTAn MR JfflWBAW AT 9191323-0415
Classifieds
Page 5
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3-bed-
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737-3191.
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
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1.
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campus, $600month. Call 758-0721.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for
second semester (Dec. 14) Brand new 2
bedroom apartment within walking
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2 utilities. Call 752-9854.
ROOMMATE NEEDED FOR
SPRING SEMESTER to share 2 bed-
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APARTMENT FOR RENT: 2 Bed, 1
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ROOMMATE NEEDED-Dec. 93' 2
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Tickets 756-6846.
LIVE PSYCHIC READER Get
answers to vour questions ROMANCE,
MONEY, HEALTH. 1-900-990-9721
EXT. 182. $2.98min 18 24hrs.
OVER $2,000 IN CASH AND PRIZES!
LORI'SATTIC lingerie contest
every Wednesday after Comedy
Zone. Register 756-6846.
ELEGANT, REFINED MODELING.
PIRATE PAINTBALL : we are
service orienteddedicated to ensure
you and your friends a heart-pound-
ing, adrenaline rushing good time.
Come join us at pirate paintball for a
312 hour session you'll never forget.
Sneak through the cool, clean, crisp
forest air as you make your way to your
opponents flag station. As you near
their outer defenses, shots are fired at
you. As you stand to return fire, your
adventure begins. Will you survive to
capture the flag and win the game?
Will you be the last one left to defend
the "Alamo"? Will you and the rest of
your special forces team be able to take
out the "predator" before it takes you
out. Come and see how much fun you
can have in a 3 12 hour session. We
are open Monday thru Friday for
groups of 8 or more, and Saturdays for
individuals or groups from 1-40. Call
752-8380 for info and reservations We
breed excitement!
Laptf library 4 h-wmrton m U.S.
is,m TOMS - ALL'SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COO
8003510222
Or rushS2 OOto. RMtwchlatormrtw
11322 Idaho Ave �06-A. Los Angeles. CA 90025
Personals
APPLE-I hope the friendship we've de-
veloped will continue to flourish. Sorry
about the load of bricks Sunday; Call me
DC
�"PARTY IN THE SUN"� Spring ANTlQUEOak topdraftingtable6'x4' WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks like minded lady for friendship
and fun. Send photos and correspon-
dence to: Kane, PO Box 8663, Greenville,
NC 27835
WANT TO GET MORE PRACTICE in
public speaking? Free those butterflies,
and improve your communication and
leadership skills at the same time with
the GreenwilleToastmasters. Join us at
our next meeting, Tues. Nov. 23 at 5:30 in
the Sheppard Memorial Library second
floor conference room. Or call 746-3805
for more information. For professionals
aand students who want to become bet-
ter public speakers, communicators and
leaders.
gg Greek
PHI SIGMA PI Brothers-have fun at
national convention and don't forget
the deadline for Tau Tales is Nov. 15.
Thanks.
DELTA CHI would like to congratu-
late its newly elected officers: Jim
Downey as "A Mike Amazon as"B
Brian Powers as "C David Gorlesky as
"D John Varr.er as E Frank Rygiel
as � and Sean Stowers as the new
rush chairman. The Brothers and Am's
of Delta Chi.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA We had a
great time last Wed. night even for the
brief time we got together. Hopefully
next time we can pull an all nighter!
Hope to see ya soon! The brothers and
Am's of Delta Chi.
CHI OMEGA We're looking forward
to Sat. night. Hope you guys are ready
for our bus "trip" around Greenville!
The brothers and Am's of Delta Chi!
ALPHA PHI OMEGA�BAP. You
guysdidahellofa jobSun. Keep up the
great work you will be rewarded soon.
In leadership, friendship and service.
The Brother
DELTA SIGMA-Thanks fora great time
at the pre downtown! Love Alpha xi
Delta
ALPHAXI DELTA-Thedrinksdid flow
and we all watched the show that came
from our brother Kevin. You looked so
fine as we danced and dined and we
thought we were in heaven. But you
had to go, we all know that you all left
with grins. Because it would be sad
with the fun we had for you not to come
back again! Love Delta Sigma Phi.
DELTA CHI: Everyone can't wait for
Sat. night for the "around the world
social Love Chi Omega
THANKS DUSTIN for the great for-
mal t-shirts. Love Chi Omega
BRAD GRIFFIN: Congratulations on
2nd place in Greek God. Love, Chi
Omega
MARY BETH AND SHELLEY:Thanks
for a great job with formal. It was the
best! Love Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS to Chi
Omega's new exec President-Jennifer
Greek
McCain, Vice President-Beau
Beauchemin, Treasurer-Amy Sadler,
Secretary-JulieThompson,Personnel-
Tricia Crotts, Rush chairman-Beth
Powell, Panhellenic-Michele Baritell,
and Pledge trainer-KathySare. Good
Luck! Love Chi Omega
WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK the
following local businesses for their
donations to the Pick-A-Pirate spon-
sored by Gamma Sigma Sigma: ECU
Bowl, Villa Roma, Darryl's, Riverside
Steak Bar, Pizza Inn, Szechuan Gar-
den, Mazatlan, Pizza Hut, Carmike
Cinema, DixieQueen, Ragazzi's, Pro-
fessor O'Cools, Filibuster's,
Applebee's, Hilton Inn, Ramada Res-
taurant, Fosdick's, Clyde Richard's,
Tom's, Golden Dragon, Peking Pa
ace, Final Score, Bar-B-Que Barn,
Shabops, Golden Corral, Hickory
Hams, Big Splash Golf Center, Big
Dai's Sports Grill
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA Get
psyched for Sat. night! Cocktail is
just around the corner. See ya There!
CONGRATULATIONS Alpha Sig-
mas on your initiation into Alpha
Delta Pi! Love, your sisters!
LOOK! Up in the sky- it's a bird ! It's
a plane! It's Brandon Hoffman!
Thanks so much for representing us
in Greek God. Congratulations on
your win. You were great. Superman
was such a hit! Thanks again! Love,
the sisters of Alpha Delta Pi!
CONGRATS to the Sigma volleyball
team! 4-0 way to go! Good luck in
playoffs! Love your Sigma Sisters
DELTA CHI Thanks for the pre-
downtown we had a blast! Let's get
together soon! Love the Sigmas
JULIE SAMPLES Hope you feel
better soon! Love the Sigmas!
ANNA HARRINGTON Congratula-
tions on your engagement! Love your
sisters
RETOGRIFFINThankyouforrepresent-
ing us in Greek God. You will always be
ourgreekgod! LovetheSigmas
JASON KEMPTON-Sohowlongdoes
ittakeyou? 23minutes? Congratsonbest
eyes and thanks for representing us in
greek god! You can be our greek god
anytime! We love you! Love, the sisters
and pledges of Delta Zeta
DELTA ZETAS Get ready for formal
thisweekend! It is sure to be a blast!
ZETA TAU ALPHA Everything was
great Sat at the game. Every onehada
real good time. The rain kind of put a
"damper" on things,but thatdidn'tseem
to bother anyone too much. Hopetoget
togetherwithyousoon! Thebrothersand
Am's of Delta Chi
CAMILLE PATTERSON: Miracles do
come true. In came Joey with enough
roses for two, a surprise for you and only
I knew, three special letters and a man
who is very true Congratulations on
your Pika lavalier. I am very happy for
you. Alpha Phi tove and mine. Elizabeth
Announcements
STUDENT SURVEY
During the week of Nov. 29-Dec
3, a survey of student opinion of
instruction will be conducted at
ECU. Questionnaires will be dis-
tributed in classes with enroll-
ments greater than five. All stu-
dents will have the opportunity
to express opinions on the teach-
ing effectiveness of their in-
structors. The survey will be
conducted during class time and
will take approximately 15 min-
utes to complete. Student par-
ticipation is voluntary and no
identities are requested. In-
structors have been requested to
leave the classroom while the
questionnaires are being com-
pleted. Results of the survey
will be distributed to instruc-
tors after final grades have been
posted. The teaching effective-
ness questionnaire was created
by the Faculty Senate Committee
for Teaching Effectiveness and
the Office of Planning and Insti-
tutional Research. The results of
this survey are used by instruc-
tors for improving their teach-
ing skills and in course develop-
ment, and by administrators in
decisions of tenure, promotion
and merit.
ECU INVESTMENTS CLUB
The ECU investments club will
be holding a meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 11 th at 5:00 pm in GCB
3007. All majors are encouraged
to attend. Come join us, you may
learn something
AMERICAN RED CROSS &
NATIONAL MARROW
An estimated sixteen thousand
American children and adults
are stricken each year with leu-
kemia or one of thirty other
fatal blood diseases. For many,
the only hope for survival is a
marrow transplant. Because a
donor and patient must march
very closely, the chances that a
patient in need will find a
matching donor can be as high
as one in a million. Volunteers
are desperately needed. To find
out if you could be a patient's
one in a million chance, get
tested at ECU on Nov. 16th, Be-
tween 11:00 am and 4:30 pm.
NATIONAL STUDENT
EXCHANGE
Having trouble getting classes?
If you can't fine it at ECU, try
going on exchange to one of over
110 universities in the U.S. and
take your classes in a different
environment. Pay ECU tuition
and study in another part of the
country. There is time to apply
for next fall and spring semes-
ters. Contact Stephanie Evancho
in International Programs or call
757-6769 for further informa-
tion.
COMMUNICATING TO
ASSERT YOURSELF
The Counseling Center is offer-
ing a two-session workshop for
students designed to identify
effective communication tech-
niques for achieving
assertiveness in your life. Em-
phasis will be placed on the
relationship between self-es-
teem and assertiveness behav-
ior. Members are expected to
attend both meetings. The meet-
ings will be Monday, Nov. 15
and Wednesday Nov. 17 from 1 -
2 pm. Call 757-6661 to sign up.
THE FOUNDATION FOR
THE FUTURE
The Foundation for the Future
is in need of student volunteers
to assist elementaryhigh
school graders with homework
on weekdays. Please contact
Sandra Jones, Director at 830-
1221.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College Students should
contact their advisers the week
of Nov. 8-12 to make arrange-
ments for academic advising for
Spring Semester 1994. Early
registration will begin Nov. 15
and end Nov. 19.
THEORY COLLOqUIUM
LECTURE SERIES
Son Bialostiesky (Penn State Uni-
versity) "Bakhtinian Speech
Genres in Life and Literature:
On Poems as Greeting, Warnings,
Complaints, Excuses, Toasts,
Boasts, and Burial Instructions"
Friday, 12 Nov. 2:00pm. GCB
2018.
PEACEKEEPING A
DANGEROUS GAME
The League of Women Voters of
Pitt County presents: Peacekeep-
ing- A Dangerous Game, The
United Nations In a Changing
World. Speaker is Dr. Nancy
Spalding, Assistant Professor of
Political Science, ECU. Tuesday,
Nov. 16, ECU. Greenville Recre-
ation and Parks Bldg Cedar Ln
Greenville. For more informa-
tion call 756-5352.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Table tennis anyone? Come join
the fun when recreational ser-
vices hosts a table tennis tour-
nament on Thurs. Nov. 11. Reg-
ister from 5:30-6:00 pm at Grand
Slam USA (100 E. 14th St.). For
more information call recre-
ational services at 757-6387.
ENJOY SINGING?
University chorale, Muse 1635
12:00 M,W,F school of music, No
audition required
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
Wed. Nov. 10- Jorge Benitez,
trombone, Senior recital (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 9:00 pm,
Free). Thurs Nqv. 11- Sym-
phonic Wind Ensemble and the
Concert Band, Scott Carter and
Chris Knighten, conductors
(Wright Auditorium, 8:00pm,
Free). Fri Nov. 12-Michelle
Roelofs, flute, senior recital (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00pm,
Free). AlsoonNov. 12-JayCable,
trumpet and Katrina Dingle, tuba
in senior recital (AJ Fletcher
Hall, 9:00pm, Free). Sat Nov.
13- Guitar ENSEMBLE, Elliot
Frank, Director (AJ Fletccher
Recital Hall, 7:00pm Free). Nov.
14- The NC Guitar Quartet, (AJ
Fletcher Recital Hall, 3:00pm
Free). For more information call
757-6851 or the 24 hour hotline
at 757-4370.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Bingo! Come join some bingo fun
when the Natural life program at
recreational services hosts a
holiday bingo night on thurs.
Nov. 18th at 8 pm in Christenbury
Gymnasium. So, come enjoy the
fun, see how your luck holds up
and don't forget to BYOC (Bring
your own can). Bring a can of
food for the needy and you are
eligible to play holiday bingo
for fantastic prizes! For more
Need Money?
We pay cash
on the spot!
aim.
� Video Equipment
� Television
� Stereos
(portable Sihome)
� Microwaves
� Also buying used
NAME BRAND
men's clothing!
If you are selling you must be 18 with
a picture ID (NCDL. ECU)
TTI
TUDENT
WAP
OP
We're SELLING Too!
752-3866
MON-FRI 10-12, 1-3
Sat 10-1
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
info, call the Natural life hotline
at 931-R&R41K7748) or recre-
ational services at 757-6387.
mmmmmmmam





The East Carolinian
Page 6
Lifestyle
November 11, 1993
Travel series takes you away
Photo courtesy of
ECU Performing Arts Series
King Ludwig of Bavaria, his country and his castles are featured in the
Travel-Adventure Film The Magnificent World of Mountain King.
By Jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
For the second time in less than
a month, ECU's Department of Uni-
versity Unions will give you the
opportunity to visit a far-off place
and learn its history via another
installment in the 1993-94 Travel-
Adventure Film Series.
With the late-Oct. presentation
or "A New England Sample you
were able to check out an Ameri-
can source of history and culture.
Coming up on Monday, Nov. 15,
you can venture to The Magnificent
World of the Mountain King; that is,
to the southern German kingdom
of Bavaria.
Documentary film makers
Lucia Perrigo and Howdee Meyers
will be on hand to narrate the film,
which focuses primarily on King
Ludwig U.The film's producers are
well-known in documentary movie
circles for their frequent use of
mood photography and music to
enhance their "travel theatre"
showings.
Perrigo and Meyers' film de-
picts Ludwig (who ruled Bavaria
from 1864 to 1886) in a storybook
fashion. The king, as the movie
explains, led a life of luxury. He
lived in flamboyant palaces, took
up an intense interest in music and
art and financially assisted the ca-
reer of composer Richard Wagner.
The film adds a touch of in-
trigue with its handling of the du-
bious end of Ludwig's political life,
when in 1886 he was declared to be
insane and was deposed.
In addition to the Ludwig
story, Vie Mountain King, takes you
to the world-renowned Passion
Play, which takes place once every
decade at Oberammergau, to the
Bayreuth Music Festival and to the
hamlet of Gerweis, where the
Dachshund population outnum-
bers that of the people living there.
The film will have two screen-
ings next Mondav. The matinee
will be shown at 4 p.m while an
evening screening will be at 8:00.
Both showings will take place in
Hendrix Theater at Mendenhall
Student Center.
Another aspect of the Adven-
ture-Travel Series is the theme din-
ner that complements each of the
films. Next week's fare will in-
clude beef barley soup, beef Stro-
ganoff with egg noodles,
knockwurst withsauerkruaut and
other German dishes.
The dinner will take place in
Mendenhall's Great Room at 6:15
p.m.
See FILM page 7
ECNAO seeks
to educate all
16 states
work on
smoking ban
NEW YORK (AP) � Smokers
won't be able to light up after down-
ing theirburgersandfriesatfast-food
restaurants if a teamofstateattomeys
general has it their way.
Officials from 16 states want the
restaurants to ban smoking in their
establishments, saying it's harmful
for young people to breathe.
"Every day millions of children
and teen-agers in this country spend
time eating, playing and working in
fast food restaurants said Robert
Abrams, attorney general for New
York.
Because smoking is permitted in
almost all of these restaurants, young
customers and workers are exposed
to passive smoke, a carcinogen for
whichnosafelevelsof exposure have
been established he said Monday.
The group prepared a report on
"Fast Food, Growing Children and
PassiveSmoke:ADangerousMenu
See SMOKE page 7
Help decide outcome of famous
poem' The Canterbury Tales'
A visiting theatre group will bring Chaucer's stories to life
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
Imagine Chaucer's Tales with
a twist of vaudevillian charm. Its
wicked sense of fun and a taste of
bar-room brawl create the praised
performance of "The Canterbury
Tales" by the New Vic Theatre of
London. While the tales are told,
audience participation adds to the
creative mobility brought about
by this credible troupe.
The force behind the New Vic
shows is a comic named Micky
O'Donoughue who is one of the
company's founders. He is omni-
present through out the tales by
acting in the performance, run-
ning through the audience and
telling jokes. "The tales are very
bawdy and so are we said
O'Donoughue, laughingly.
The stories have been rewrit-
ten in Modern English so to ap-
peal to and be understood by the
modern audience. "They'll under-
stand every word instantly said
O'Donoughue. "Once every year,
we pick a classic and make it as
loony as possible. I created the
concept, then worked with
Michael Bogdanov, the director,
on how we were going to carry it
out. Then I brought in Robin Davis
to work on the verse. This kind of
play has to be in verse
It is a friendly show, where
you're not only invited to interact
with the set and performers, but
where you can determine the out-
come.
It is set in modern times, with
period costume, on the vicarage
lawn. It's the finals of the 600th
anniversary of the Canterbury
Tales. Performers have gathered
to tell their tales and the audience
witnesses the contests. The audi-
ence then votes on the perfor-
mance they favor the most, the
winner will receive the Geoffrey
Chaucer Cup for the best teller of
their tale.
The miller is played by
O'Donoughue who will stoop to
anything to get attention. "I play
the Miller he continues. "I was
knocked out in round one because
my tale was so filthy, so I help the
others tell their tales
He seems to parallel the dry
humor of Benny Hill, using that
comedian's same comic style
which is in British music hall.
The troupe will be perform-
ing The Canterbury Tales at Wright
Auditorium for one night only. It
is part of the ECU Performing Arts
Series and will be here on Satur-
day, Nov. 13.
Tickets are now available at
the Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center. Have
a great night out and come see this
vivacious performance full of
imaginatively hilarious situations
led by British humor.
By Laura Wright
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Did you know that North
Carolina has the largest Native
American population east of the
Mississippi River and the seventh
largest Native American popula-
tion in the country? There are over
80,000 Native Americans living in
North Carolina and according to
the 1990 census, they make up
1.2percent of the state's popula-
tion. The East Carolina Native
American Organization, or
ECNAO, is a special support
group at ECU that provides fel-
lowship for Native American stu-
dents and other students inter-
ested in Native American culture.
According to Kimberly
Sampson, president of ECNAO,
there are 80 Native Americans on
the campus of ECU and currently
30 are actively involved in the
organization.
Sampson says that on ECU's
campus, there are members of the
Lumbee, Haliwa-Saponi, Chero-
kee, Coharie, Waccamaw-Siouan,
Algonquin and Aromusteet tribes.
In North Carolina, the Lumbee
tribe, with around 35,000 mem-
bers, is the largest and the
Meherrin, with fewer than 500
members, is the smallest.
Native American students
first attended ECU in 1971 and
there have been several attempts
to form an organization that meets
the needs of these students. Be-
cause the number of Native
American students has been rela-
tively small, it has been difficult
tomaintain an organization. Be-
fore Sampson revived ECNAO
in the Spring of 1992, the group
had been inactive for several
vears.
Sampson feels that with the
continued support of students,
faculty and administration, the
new organization will continue
to thrive. She hopes to reach out
to Native Americans at PittCom-
munity College as well.
The group meets on Mon-
days night from 7:00 until 9:00
and meetmglocations vary from
week to week. Old and newbusi-
ness is covered during the first
half of the meeting and the sec-
ond half is reserved for Native
American cultural activities like
bead work, dance classes and
regalia workshops.
Regalia is the traditional Na-
tive American dress that will be
worn by members during
ECNAO'sSpringpow wow. The
pow wow is scheduled for April
23, 1994. "Hopefully said
Sampson, "everyone willbeable
to participate
Other club expectations in-
clude the formation of a Native
American dance team at ECU,
participation in community ser-
vice activities, tutorials among
members, orientation for high
school students and campus
drives to promote awareness of
Native American students at
ECU.
See ECNAO page 7
Latino Fiesta set for Saturday
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
Latin America comes to ECU
for an evening at the "Latino Fiesta
a Hispanic cultural celebration, with
food, performances, musicand danc-
ing.
Latin American music will be
played by D Pablo Morales from El
Salvador. Some of his music will
include Salsa and Meringue. There
will alsobe Mexican dance featuring
Sandra Arroya, and you can dance
the night away with this inspiring
music. Dinner willbe available with
foods form various Latin American
countries.
The last Latino Fiesta two years
ago was a great success. Not only
was there a large assortment of
foods, but also the entertainment
was super; dancers in brilliant cos-
tumes skillfully performed dances
fromdifferentcountries.Thenight
wasculturally "eye opening and
the music was the best of its kind.
This event is sponsored by the
International Student Association
and the main purpose is to pro-
mote the awareness of the His-
panic culture. The Latino Fiesta
willbeSaturday,Nov. 13from6:30
p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Tickets are now
on sale at the Central Ticket Office
located in Mendenhall Student
Center. Tickets will also be avail-
able at the door and cost $4.00 for
students and $5.00 for the general
public.
m
i
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
slig
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
nn
JDon't buy
jJ Take Your Chances jjj Worth a Try AfcW Definite Purchase
Radio Head
Pablo Honey
Hi
0 m m
My 10-year-old nrighbor,TJ,told
me he liked Radiohead. Then he
started singing "Creep Thenhedid
a Michael Jackson impression. What
akid. ButlWashesingingthe "Creep"
that is the second song on the album,
with its dirty-wordy, or was he sing-
ing the mystery 13th track: "Creep"
without the dirty-wordy?
Radiohead's Pablo Honey isbeau-
tiful. I'm sure you've heard "Creep
a grinding little number, mellow yet
pensive, that'slikejumpingoff a pier
into water that's only two feet deep;
sort of poignant, yet scaryatthe same
time.
Radiohead is u band that incor-
porates three guitars, a nice move
that hasn't been done successfully
since Thin Lizzy's Viunder and Light-
ning. Of course, the guitars are differ-
ent than Thin Lizzy's, but they work.
They work because they are �in
Radiohead'sown words�Inaudible
Guitar, Abusive Guitar and Polite
Guitar. That's like scotch, grenadine
andbitters:Separately,theylackpres-
ence, but combine them and you get
more fun than a hayride on Hallow-
een.
Thorn Yorke's vocals are su-
perbly matched to the music, like a
fine beaujolais to filet mignon. The
only drawback to Pablo Honey is that
sometimes it seems like we get a bit of
that .38 Special Syndrome: beautiful
things done with seven chords. But
it's not enough to discourage this
guy-
A song other than "Creep" that
delivers a slick, gentle pounding is
"You the first cut on the album. It's
a swell intro to what follows. "How
Do You?" is a fast jam that races up
the spinal column like an electric spi-
der. And for the feedback fan; there's
"Stop Whispering I almost think
we could have used some old-fash-
ioned jamorama here, but the feed-
back carries a certain dignity.
"Anyone Can Play Guitar" is an
honest grinder that sets out to prove
its title and then relents, settling on a
turbulent groove with a thoughtful
beat. But, with the exception of
"Thinking About You which is a
song that can really be felt � I mean
you can FEEL this thing � the re-
mainder of the songs fall in to a groove
that dominate the album. It's not an
unpleasant groove; it'sjust a lot of the
samethang.
Pablo Honey is fine and dandy;
Radiohead smokes like burning
leaves.
You'll love'em. I guarantee, if
you compare Pablo Honey to your
oven, you'll find thatRadioheadcooks
a little faster.
� Andy
Sugg
Love Jones
Here's to the Losers
0 0 0
Just when you may have given
up hope of ever hearing anything
truly origjnal,alongcomesLoveJones.
First, we have an amalgam of doo
wop pop, bossa nova and real
rhythm- and-blues. Add to that a
littlesamba,someurbanejazzstylings,
funk,boogie, excellent harmoniesand
a whole lot of subtle weirdness.
Ben Daughtrey (singer percus-
sionist) and Barry Thomas (bass)
formed Love Jones in the Spring of
1990. They were both recovering
"punk rockers" who wanted tomake
some real songs and "a tone for their
sins as rock 'n' rollers These two
found three other dudes of similar
inclinations: singer and guitaristChris
Hawpe (former "hardcore" guy),
singer Jonathan Palmer (still suffer-
ing from "heavy metal" flashbacks)
and drummer Stuart Johnson (re-
formed cover band front man). They
all had their fill of stupid haircuts,
attitude, flannel, doc martins, nose
rings and vomit.
For a year they played at every
type of club in Louisville, even to the
noisy, punk crowds that they had
fled.
Then they headed to Holly-
wood. Zoo Entertainmentgavethem
a deal, and they cut their first record,
Here's to the Losers. The album was
completed injury and Augustof 1993.
They used the famous "C" room of
Studio56, which had been usedby he
likes of Nat Cole, Billie Holliday and
that Elvis guy. All the basic tracks are
live tapes and most of the vocals were
performed with all three singers us-
ing the same micropone, an old fash-
ioned method indeed.
The result is some really smooth
stuff, a lounge lizard's dream come
true. Explored so little, this type of
music needed someone to bring it
into the light. This album may be the
manifesto for a new musical move-
ment that is truly "alternative
It is really hard to give a decent
description of the sound. But this can
be said: If you have an adventurous
bone in your body, this is something
sodifferentthatitmayjusttickleyour
fancy. Love Jones' Here's to tlie Losers
seems to be one of only a few alterna-
tives left in a world where corporate
clones rule and "alternative" is now
mainstream.
Rage against the mainstream;
let's samba everyone.
� Kris
Hoffler
Shrunken Head
Offering
Hi
Out of Atlanta, Georgia come
the Shrunken Heads, a new band
on the new alternative to alterna-
tive scene. These guys sound re-
markably like Husker Du, espe-
cially the lead singer, who could
give Bob Mould a run for his
money. Their sound is a heavy
grunge, but they are quite me-
lodic at the same time.
It is easy to see that their
influences come from past and
present. The band claims that gi-
ants of the alternative scene,
Swervedriver, Sonic Youth and
Buffalo Tom are their main
sources of influence.
Shrunken Head has been
around the Atlanta area for about
two years. They were about to
break up when, to their surprise,
they got a four-record deal with
November Records, a label only
a few months old. They were also
one of only three bands to play
the '92 Lollapalooza Plaza sec-
ond stage and were showcased at
the New South Music Seminar.
The band has changed mem-
bers numerous times. Julian
Phillips (lead vocals and guitar)
is the band's only original mem-
ber. He wrote or co-wrote all of
the album's songs except
"Whither? Hither
Phillips, a 26-year-old with a
See HEAD page 7
� ii wuMimmmv
�� �'�'






November 11, 1993
The East Carolinian 7
SHRUNK
page o
ECNAO
Continued from page 6
H,
'
d
rid
"We all started off listening to
REM tapes and learned our guitar
licks that way saj s Phillips. "We
started increasingly turning up the
distortion and the current in the
amps. We used the same basic
chord progressions and the same
song writing structures�just free-
domof form. As far as songs go, we
all have an affinity for melodic
lines And they do have an excel-
lent three-part harmony.
Some of the more outstanding
tracks are "Razor Star "Broken
Brain" and "Carmel They are cer-
tainly refreshing to hear in an era
of much emulation, and the qual-
ity of the lyrics is an added plus as
well.
This is one for the collection, so
try a little Head.
� Kris
Hoffler
is a member of the
,i Native American
I ducation. This
tudentassociationisamade
. group of college students
that d iscuss the needs and concerns
olNatie Xnurkansoncollegecam-
pu. es. The council consists of North
CaiolinaStateUniversity.EastCaro-
lina University, Mr. Olive, the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Wilmington, Campbell, Catawba,
Meredith, Elizabeth City State, the
SMOKE
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and Pembroke State.
November is Native American
Heritage Month and ECNAO will
have a display window set up in
Mendenhall in order to help pro-
mote awareness on campus. For
more information about the East
Carolina Native American Organi-
zation, contact either ECNAO presi-
dent, Kimberly Sampson at 752-5294,
or vice president, Tina Lynch at 758-
1711.
Continued from page 6
Garv Gerdemann, a spokesman
for Kentucky Fried Chicken, said the
state officials were misguided.
"If the will of the people and the
politicianselectedby them decide it's
not right for society to smoke in res-
taurants, they need to pass laws that
we can follow, rather than pressuring
us to conduct public policy experi-
ments he said.
Of KFC's 5,000 U.S. restaurants,
3,000arefranchisedandsmokingpoli-
ciesare up to the franchiseowners.Of
the 2,000 corporate-owned restau-
rants, Gerdemann said, where size
permits there are always nonsmok-
ing sections.
Burger King's spokesman
Michael Evans declined to comment
on the report, but said about 10 per-
cent of its 5,200 franchised restaurants
ban smoking. All of the 800 company-
owned restaurants offer segregated
non-smoking areas.
McDonald'sdidnot immediately
return a call for comment.
FILM
Cont'd
from
page 6
The Department of Univer-
sity Unions advises that you get
your tickets to the film in advance
to insure that you'll get guaran-
teed seating.
Single rickets for the film are
$4 while season tickets can be
purchased for $21 for the general
public.
For ECU faculty and staff and
for groups of 15 or more, the indi-
vidual season ticket price is
$17.50. You can attend the dinner
only by season ticket, available
for $70 per person.
In addition to the Bavarian
film and dinner, future events
include viewings of Australia,
Scotland, Tahiti, Ireland and the
Netherlands.Tickets for the '93-
94 Adventure-Travel Series are
on sale at the ECU Central Ticket
Office. Stop by Mendenhall, or
place your orders by phone by
calling 757-4788 or 1-800-ECU-
Arts.
Who's There?
ATTIC
Thursday Johnny Quest
Friday Chamelion
Saturday Mother Nature
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Friday
Saturday
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Friday
Saturday
Jason
Leftovers
All Natural Band
HARD TIMES
Dance Lessons
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MM1' I II





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IF VW KWt GOT IT,
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MEMBER
NETWORK �1993 (AllmJOO TMT ((WAVY, MlM?U Rl(





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The East Carolinian
Sports
November 11, 1993
What's On Tap;
Saturday, Nov. 13
Football, away
atKenl exington, Ky. 1
Cross-Country, away
at NCAA District III Champi-
onships, Greenville, S.C. TBA
M. & W. Swimming, home
Old DominionGeorgia
Southern 2 p.m.
W. Soccer, away
Club Tournament TBA
CFA Football
No. 1 Florida St. vs. No. 2 Notre
Dame, at South Bend, Ind 1:30
p.m.
The 411
Wednesday, Nov. 10
Volleyball, away
LATE
Please No Wagering
Robert Todd, 48 points
TEC Sports Editor
ECU 1,21-20
"ECU can't go through the
year without an upset and
Kentucky's kicker is 0-6 from 30
yards and deeper � he'll miss
the game winner
Brian Olson, 51 points
TEC Asst. Sports Editor
Kentucky 21,38-17
"The Kentucky running
game is too versatile and the
Wildcats get this needed win to
head to a bowl game
Kevin Hall, 45 points
WZMB Sports Director
Kentucky 28,35-7
"A bad season will not get
any better against a tough SEC
team
Chris Justice, 57 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
Kentucky 24,34-10
"Kentucky has too much to
play for to overlook East Caro-
lina
Brian Bailey, 38 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
not available for comment
BradZaruba, 38 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
not available for comment
DemetriusCarter,25 points
ABLE President
not available for comment
Maureen Rich, guest picker
Assistant New Editor
UK14,42-28
"It'll be a tough test but a
good learning experience. We'll
gain confidence through the
loss
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
Compiled by B. Olson
Wildcats hoping to scratch Pirates
By Roberts. Todd
Photo courtesy ot UK SID
Kentucky linebacker Marty Moore has recorded 101 tackles and three interceptions this season. If he
leads the SEC in tackles this year, it will mark his third in a row.
Sports Editor
I wrote in the pre-season that
Kentucky was a bad team, and 1
added that if ECU wins only one
game all season, this should be the
one. Whoops � my mistake.
UK is 5-4 and beat South Caro-
lina, Ole Miss, LSU and Mississippi
St and nearly won against Florida
andGeorgia.Sowhydid they lose to
Vanderbilt, a team that was 2-4-1?
Fluke. Could ECU, at 2-9, pull an-
other upset? Maybe.
On paper, the Wildcats'offense
gains only 30 yards more than the
Bucs, but they score al most five more
points per game. On defense, the
Bucs allow only 20 more yards but
give up twice as may points.
Why? Turnovers. ECU's turn-
over margin for the season is minus
14 while UK's is plus nine. And just
like the path not taken, it has made
all the difference.
The Wildcats returned only one
starter to the offensive line. How-
ever, their youth has opened holes
for runningback Maurice Williams,
helping him average 84.6 yards per
game and 6.3 per carry.
Quarterback Pookiejones i s not
much of a depth-threat pocket
passer (5 INTs, 8 TDs), but his
mobility may give the bucks
trouble.
Jones set a school record with
l,729yardsintotaloffensein 1992,
and is breaking more each game
this year.
Kentucky'sdefense switched
to a 4-3 from the multiple front
they used in 1992. New defensive
coordinator Mike Archer put his
hopes on inside linebacker Marty
Moore and has not been disap-
pointed.
Moor: ha S led the SEC in tack-
les the last two seasons and broke
the century mark in tacklesagainst
Vandy. He racked up 148 tackles
in 1992, in part because no other
Wildcatcould gethishandson the
person with the ball.
This season has been a differ-
ent story. UK's defensive line has
tackled opponents for losses, bat-
ted down passesand given Mixire
more than adequate help.
The secondary hasalsobeena
big su rprise for Kentucky this sea-
son.Defensive back Ma rcusjenkis
averages nearly a pick a game.
If Junior Smith canavoid fum-
bling the ball against UK's stickv-
finger defense, he should have an-
other spectacular game. For ECU
to win, though, Perez Ma ttison will
have to avoid the interception.
Finland sends gift
to tennis team
By Ashley Neal
Staff Writer
In January of 1991, Markku
Savusalo left Ylivieska, Finland to
participate in an exchange program
that would enable him to play colle-
giate tennis.
Savusalo, before beginning his
ECU career (he is
pursuing a degree
in marketing), was
required by law to
complete an 11-
month military ser-
vice to his country.
A special program
gave Savusalo the
flexibility to con-
tinue playing ten-
nis competitively
during his "tough
service
"My sister was
an exchange stu-
dent in Australia
Savusalo said. "I
always had a
dream to go to the
United States and
play tennis
In Finland, unlike the United
States,high schoolsdonot compete
againstoneanotherinathletics. Ath-
letes join clubs that sponsor com-
petitive sporting events with other
clubs in the city or surrounding ar-
eas.
Savusalo, an avid ice hockey
player, will return to Finland after
graduation and seek a career in
sports marketing. If the job market
does not hold a promising future,
Savusalo says he will return to the
United States and continue hisedu-
cation.
Describing the men's team as
international, competitive and fun,
Savusalo said ECU has been the
positive experience he hoped for
when pureuingacademicsand ath-
letics abroad. Other countries in ad-
dition to Finland, represented by
the men's team include: England,
Sweden and the Netherlands.
"It just happened that we got
a lot of interest from kids outside the
countrv Coach Bill Moore said.
As a young boy in Finland,
Savusalo's father introduced him to
tennis. The elder Savusalo played
an active role in his son's success by
coaching Markku as he prepared
for tourna-
m e n t s .
Savusalo ac-
knowledges
agility and vol-
leys as strong
aspects of his
game, while
ground strokes
andhisbaseline
game are char-
acterized as
weak.
"Usually,
thereareexcep-
tions. I play bet-
ter when under
pressure
Savusalo said.
"It's pressure
a motivating
factor
Savusalo and junior Jaime Holt
are often paired together as doubles
partners. Because they have played
together before this season, there is
a degree of chemistry that proves
invaluable during competition.
"We support each other on the
court Holt said. "I think we are
better this year
Balancing academics and ath-
letics on a year round basis often
means sacrificing social events.
However, Savusalo optimistically
explains thatalthough the schedule
can be hectic at times, he finds time
during the weekends to attend
school functions,catcha movie with
friends, and relax.
"Tennis has given me a lot of
things Savusalo said. "It's good
for my self-confidence. You get bet-
ter and the commi tment makes you
feel good
Markku Savusalo
Cowboys ink Kosar to contract
IRVING, Texas (AP)�Bemie
Kosar, released unexpectedly this
week by the Cleveland Browns,
signed a one-year contract with
the defending Super Bowl cham-
pion DallasCowboys, The Associ-
ated Press has learned.
Kosar, who played for Dallas
coach Jimmy Johnson at the Uni-
versity of Miami in 1984, was tak-
ing a morning flight to Dallas on
owner Jerry Jones' private jet.
Johnson, who said Tuesday
that Kosar still is a "tremendous
talent planned to announce
whether Jason Garrett or Kosar
will start Sunday's game against
Phoenix if Troy Aikman is notable
to overcome his pulled left ham-
string.
Aikman pulled the hamstring
Sunday in the third quarter of Da I-
las'31-9 victory over theNew York
GiantsthatpropelledtheCowboys
into sole possession of first place
in the NFC East.
Released unexpectedly by the
Brovvnson Monday, Kosarcleared
See KOSAR page 12
Bourque belts 12 year s'experience
By Ashley Neal
Staff Writer
The purple Pirate jacket
Drew Bourque wears symbolizes
seven years of fun and contribu-
tion. An "M" stitched in gold
thread on his left sleeve and a "4"
on the right represent his num-
ber and position as a mid fielder
for ECU's lacrosse club.
"Besides being one of our
most talented players,heisalsoa
great teacher toour younger play-
ers teammate Jeff Gauland said.
"He shows patience with help-
ing them improve their skills,
thus improving the entire team
Bourque's interest in lacrosse
peaked 12 years ago while he
watcheda friend's game. Already
an experienced hockey player,
Bourque began playing lacrosse
because it too was a fast paced
sport.
When Bourque first came
to ECU, he changed his major a
couple of times before deciding
on psychology. Bourque at-
tributes his decision to experi-
ences his father, a businessman,
has encountered during his ca-
reer.
"I don't have that 'go for the
throat' attitude Bourque said.
"I'd rather help people
Since graduating with a de-
gree in psychology, Bourque
has continued hiseducationby
working on his Masters Degree
inChild Developmentand Fam-
ily Relations. Bourque says his
emphasis in marriage and fam-
ily will better prepare him for a
career in residential therapy.
"You can't really help the
individual unless you help the
family Bourque said.
Although Bourque served
terms as vice president and gen-
eral officer during his under
graduate days, he says the de-
See DREW page 11
HOOPS!
ECU'S CAA
championship
basketball team
scrimmaged after
Saturday's
football game.
This year's team
has been picked as
high as third and
as low as fifth in
the conference.
Photo by
Harold Win
Home wins wrestling tourny
(RS) �"Thisyear's tournament
was the most competitive it has ever
been since wrestling initially started
one year ago said Ryan Home.
Home, a seven year wrestler, cap-
tured his third championship title at
this year's ECU wrestling tourna-
ment held on Nov. 7 at the
ChristenburyGymnasium.
The tournament wasdivided up
into four sections (Class I through
Class IV) in which the wrestlers were
matched up tocompeteaccording to
their weight. The event was coordi-
nated by MarcGainey and wasspon-
sored by the Department of Recre-
ational Services.
" fhe competition on each level
was great. No one class outweighed
the other said Gainey.
The winners from each class
received a trophy for first place and a
medal for second place. "I love the
sport, but it only makes me wonder
why it is not a part of ECU's dub
sports said Richard Ray.
Ray, the Class I champion from
Creedmoor, N.C celebrated with
the other class champions David
Ward (Class II) and Mike Williams
(ClassIV)followingtheSunday night
event.
Even though the sport is not an
active part o( ECU club sports, it has
still gained enough publicity to at-
tract over 60 spectators who showed
much satisfaction as the wrestlers
went at it on the mats. "I'd really like
for the sport to expand and become
an active club sport so that we
wouldn'tonlybelimited to ECU, but
cancompeteon a broader level said
Gainey.
If there are any interests in de-
veloping wrestling as a club sport,
call PatCoxat757-6387orstopby204
Christenbury Gymnasium.
Register now for this year's tur-
key trot competition. This competi-
tion, co-sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Recreational Services and
ARA, will be held on Wednesday,
Nov. 17at4p.m. and will consist of a
two-mile ru n that will start and finish
at the Bunting Track area. A combi-
nation of turkeys, pumpkins, and
intramural t-shirts will be awarded
to the winners. You must be present
to win.
Interested participants are re-
quired to meet on Tuesday, Nov. 16
at 5 p.m. in the Biology Building
room KB for registration and a more
detailed breakdown on the formatof
the event.
For more informa tion, ca II sport
managers, Melissa Toretch or Emily
Gwtz at 757-6387.
Bonds wins
third MVP
in four years
SAN FRANCISCO
(AP) � He has three Na-
tional League MVP awards
and the richest contract in
baseball history.
Now Barry Bonds
wants something that
money and awards can't
buy.
The San Francisco Gi-
ants slugger, who received
his third MVP award in four
years on Tuesday, said his
career won't be complete
wi thou t a World Series ring.
"You never getinto that
elite class until you win
Bonds said. "You hear
about Ernie Banks, but the
Cubs never won. You hear
more about Reggie Jackson
and his home runs in the
World Series.
"I think that's some-
thing that's got to happen
for me to get into that elite
See BONDS page 12
�MMMMRH
�� ����-���. v -
m





November 11, 1993
The East Carolinian 11
ds UNLV after six-year investigation
l!
that dates back
lesday with an
agreement that limits some televi-
sion appearances and scheduling
and costs the scl .ool two basketball
scholarships.
"We're )ust delighted it's over
and thatwe'restill in the postseason
playoffs UNLV president Robert
Maxson said. "VVe think we were
treated fairly. It'sa wonderful sense
, �� 12i unspeci-
e agreement,
N AA said revolved
around inducements and benefits
to recruits and current UNLV ath-
ietes. Neither side released specific
violations because of an ongoing
court dispute involving the state's
due process law.
NCAA officials said they were
happy to settle the 6-year-old case,
which was its longest pending in-
fractions case.
VVe don't ever like to see an
institution go through an infrac-
tions process that lasts more than
si x years'said David Swank, head
oi the NCAA infractions commit-
tee.
Swank credited the university's
eagerness to investigate the allega-
tions and its decision to setup more
compliance efforts on campus. That
reduced what would have been a
mandatory minimum sanction of
twoyears probation and a one-year
to til ban on postseason play and
television appearances.
Tarkanian urged the univer-
sity toopposethecharges,claiming
they were minor and not justified.
Tarkanian wasnotavailable for
comment Tuesday, but his replace-
DREW
ment, Rollie Massimino, said he
could live with the sanctions.
"Obviously, no one likes to be
punished Massimino said "But
under the circumstances they were
fair and reasonable
Under the terms oi the settle-
ment, UNLV will be able to play
only Big West Conference games at
home in the 1994- SK5 season and will
be prohibited from televising non-
conference regular season road
games for the next two seasons.
In addition, the school will be
barred from using any exceptions
to NCAA limits on the number of
basketball games for preseason
tournamentsand foreign toursand
will have to reduce pa id recruit vis-
its to the campus.
Continued from page 10
GET APPLICATIONS
NOW
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE NOW. NEW COST EFFICIENT AND
CLOSE TO CAMPUS! FREE WATERSEWER,
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CALL 752-8320 FROM 9:00AM TO 5:00PM
mands of graduate school have
prohibited him from seeking
other club offices. This semester
Bourque, a Charlotte native, is
doing an internship with PORT
(Providing Opportunities for Re-
covering Teens). This program
gives support to adolescents re-
covering from substance abuse
and reunites them with their
families.
Bourque describes a career
Maritime Studies Association Presents
USCG Captain's License Prep Course
OEPAflTtllNT Or TRANSPORTATION
This course will prepare you to take the USCG Captain's
Test - Learn the Coast Guard way of thinking
Nov. 13 and 14, 1993 8am to 4:30pm
Maritime History Bldg. Corner of 9th and Cotanche St.
Cost: $200, $50 deposit (tax deductible)
Limited space - 1 st come, 1 st served basis
Reply to MSA co ECU Maritime History Dept.
The course is taught by Capt. Rick Jones - USCG Licensed
to 1600 tons, 20 years experience
For Information, call 757-0630 (evenings)
J
as a residential therapist as being
similar to his internship with
PORT. In addition to lacrosse
and his internship, Bourque par-
ticipates in a volunteer program.
Bourque began training at the
Real Crisis Center last year and
continues to donate his time
whenever possible. The center
acts as a hotline for callers who
need to speak with someone
about personal or domestic prob-
lems they may be experiencing.
From working at PORT and the
crisis center, Bourque realizes
the value of his supportive par-
ents.
"(Drew's) one of the most tal-
ented guys on the team and we
really can count on him Bart
Revels, a club member, said.
"(He's) unselfish when scoring
goals - he knows when he can't
score and looks for the next guy
who can) make the goal
ECU's lacrosse clubcompetes
against other colleges and uni-
versities with active lacrosse
clubs, playing approximately 16-
17 games.
These include regular games,
play-offs and a tournament.
Bourque says he enjoys playing
against N.C. State because he
"hates" them and Old Dominion
Ifs Back!
The Seafood
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Includes 1 fish filet, 3 shrimp,
2 seafood crab cakes, fries,
cole slaw and hushpuppies.
SEAFOOD
626 South
Memorial Drive
Greenville
for their size and competitive-
ness.
"Drew can't make it to prac-
tice much with his schedule, but
when he's there his presence is
known the club's president
Dave LeSage said. "He leads in
assists. He's a team player
'wm
101 lVcharles Blvd.
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Fri Nov 12
CHAMEIR
Show Doors, Stones, Hendrix, Zeppelin, Van Halen and more
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
The New
Classic
Rock
Sat Nov 13
ECU's 1
Rock & Roll
Band
Mother Nature
ECU's 1
Rock & Roll
Band
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
Every Wednesday Night-
ATTIC s iUifu
CoMedY Ufu C
Doors 9pm
Comedy 10pm
Contest 11:30pm
THUR NOV 18
FRI NOV 19
SAT NOV 20
Hootie & The Blowfish
Rolley Grey & Sunfire
Mike Edwards and the
Banned (Adm. $2 wecu ID)
1 WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE CONCERT 15 � ��
MIKE MESMER'EYES'
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Tickets on Sale Monday





.
rsovember 11. 1993
BONDS
Continued from page 10
� hehil ;ue
with 46 home runs and 1
� helped carry San Francisco to
the verge of the playoffs. Bonds
believes the team will go farther
if the Giants retain free agents
Robby Thompson and Will Clark.
After becoming the first
player ever to win three MVP
awards in four years, Bonds al-
most immediately began prepar-
ing himself for a run at becoming
the first player ever to win the
NfVP four times.
"I feel I have a lot more to
accomplish. I just want to enjoy
this one and prepare myself for
next season. It (a fourth MVP
award) is something I want.
That's why I started training Nov.
1. I'm going to be ready he said.
Bonds also came close to win-
ning the MVP in 1991 when he
had 25 homers and 116 RBls for
the Pirates.
Given a $43.75 million con-
tract by the Giants last Decem-
ber, Bonds earned h money. He
led the NL in slugging percent-
age and on-base percentage and
scored 129 runs while leading the
Giants to a franchise-record 103
wins.
Bonds also had another
strong season in left field, good
enough to probably win him an-
other Gold Glove.
"Iwasn'tconcerned about the
talk on the contract Bonds said.
"I knew what I was capable of
doing on the field. I just let mybat
do the talking
Bonds, 29, joined seven oth-
ers as a three-time MVP. He re-
ceived 24 of 28 first-place votes in
balloting by the Baseball Writers
Association of America. Bonds
also received four second-place
votes for 372 points, far ahead of
Philadelphia center field Len
Dvkstra.
Dykstra got the other four
first-place ballots, along with 20
second-place votes, three for third
and one for fourth.
"In a way you have control of
this and in another way you
don't Dykstra said. "There were
a lot of guys to look at this season.
Look what Fred McGriff did
The next three finishers were
Atlanta Braves: David Justice,
McGriff and Ron Gant.
Bondswon the award in 1990
and again last year with the Pitts-
burgh Pirates, becoming the pre-
mier player in last year's free-
agent market. The Giants, whose
new ownership group wasn't
even in place yet, stunned base-
ball by giving him a six-year deal
that made him the richest player
ever.
tf'Kf'li
(A TRADITION SINCE LATE SEPTEMBER)
752-5855 110 E. 4th St Downtown
Thursday
F F T O V F R S M'not wtial mm m 0 our ,lltctien)
The All Natural Band
OTHER PEOPLE
(An Ecclectic Groove Ensemble)
(An Electric Groove Ensemble)
If it's Sunday, it's 85C Molsen Night.
I 85C Molsen Night ij
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(Thai's where the cafe part ot the Peasant's Cale kicks in)
NEXT THURSDAY THE 18TH (GAIL WARNING)
NOT JUST YOUR AVERAGE BAGPIPE, JAZZ, ABORIGINAL, FUSION BAND !
ONLY $3.00 CAUSE WE LIKE YOU ! ,
ONCE AGAIN "GREAT DRINK SPECIALS EVERY DAY"
We open at 4:30 EVERY TUES FRI
P.S: IS DAVE WEIMER ALIVE? HAS ANYONE SEEN HIM? WE'RE WORRIED!
Register to win � FREE $200 SHOE WARDROBE � at each location
Cont'd
KOSAR pg�i"
waivers Tuesday at 3 p.m. Early in
the day it appeared that the Miami
Dolphins had him locked up, but
the Cowboys joined the fray in the
afternoon indbeatoutMiami,Kan-
sas City and Philadelphia for his
services.
A one-year deal for Kosar
would allow him to become a free
agent after this season.
Kosar, 29, was released by the
Browns one day after he started for
them in a 29-14 loss to the Denver
Broncos. Todd Philcox is now
Cleveland's starter.
Kosar played for Johnson at
the University of Miami in 1984.
He led the Hurricanes to a national
title in 1983, one year before
Johnson became coach.
Olson's
Trivial Quiz
Q: The ECU
football team will
travel to
Kentucky this
Saturday to face
another South
Eastern
Conference team.
Name the only
SEC team the
Pirates have ever
beaten.
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while you wait
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Services & Counseling
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Greenville NC
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Reduced guest Admission 7-9. $50 Prize to the Fraternity &
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 11, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 11, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.975
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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