The East Carolinian, November 9, 1993






��- M
Sports
s attack U.S. luge team
A hate group attacks
members of the U.S. luge
team in a bar in what once
was East Germany. See
story on page 8.
Li lestvie
EH
Slaves & Masters of Sleep
L. Ron Hubbard's new
book will delight SF
fans who await tales of
swords-and-sorcery.
See review on page 6.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 65
Circulation 12,000
Attackers captured
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, November 9,1993
10 Pases
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
ECU Public Safety and the
Ayden Police Department have ar-
rested four men for the recent rob-
beries on the ECU campus.
The men were caught after
Crime Stoppers identified the men
from a video taken by an automatic
teller machine during one of the
robberies.
All of those in custody are
black males from Ayden. Twenty-
three year old DemetricFenner and
James Howell have been charged
with three counts of robbery with a
firearm and have other charges
pending.
Curtis Jones, 17, has been
charged with one count of robbery
withafirearmandchargesarepend-
ingagainst24 year old Darrell Jones,
for alleged use of a credit card
Access
money for
college
By Laura Allard
stolen at the robbery in front of the
ATM machine.
The four men have confessed
to several crimes relating to the first
three campus robberies but no one
has been charged for the fourth,
which was the only attack on a
female victim.
ECU Public Safety officer, Lt.
Keith Knox feels that the fourth
incident is probably not related to
the first three. Therefore, "students
should still be careful on campus
and use the Pirate Ride, escort ser-
vices and theSGA Student Patrol
TheStudentGovernmenthas
been working on a Campus Safety
Act, intended to prevent such
crimes, since last summer.
Phase I of the plan was to
purchase two bikes for ECU Public
Safety to use in order to patrol the
campus and provide escorts.
Sgt. James Austin displayed
one of the bikes during last night's
SGA meeting and stated that dur-
ing the two days that the bikes have
been in use, he has provided sev-
eral escorts and chased down one
car with a citation.
He contends that the bikes
are a quiet, discrete way to catch
criminals in the act, and are easier
to maneuver through campus. The
bikes are also a less expensive mode
of transportation as they cost only
$1,200 for five years of use, as op-
posed to the patrol cars which cost
$3,000 annually, just to lease.
Phase II of the plan, which
includes placing 14 signs marking
stops for the Pirate Ride Shuttle,
continuing the Pirate Ride from 12
a.m. to 2:30 AM on Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday nights, and a
student patrol member to ride the
bus and check student ID cards will
cost the SGA $1401.
Staff Writer
Over $45 billion in scholar-
ship and financial aid money is
available for college students
through the Compu Access Net-
work.
Billions of dollars go un-
claimed every year because stu-
dents don't know how to access
the money.
Compu Access Network
matches students with specific
grades, career goals, religions and
ethnic backgrounds with schol-
arships, loans, grants, fellowships
and co-ops.
The $50 application fee con-
nects students to sources appro-
priate to their needs and abilities.
Within 72 hours of return-
ing the 26-question application,
students "receive a 30-page cus-
tomized report of sources, infor-
mation of their school's financial
aid program, and an array of dif-
ferentinformation" says treasurer
Deb McCrae.
"According to The National
Commission on Student Finan-
cial Assistance and the House
Sub-Committee on Post Second-
ary Education, $6.6 billion of fi-
nancial aid from the private sec-
tor went unclaimed in 1990" said
Claudia Woods, President of
Compus Access Network.
The Compu Access Net-
work has the largest computer
database of information in the U.S.
The company is connected to a
databank in Washington, D.C.
and is updated daily.
Campus leaders
respond to students
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
The recreation center is
more important to ECU than a
parking deck. The university is
waiting for an elderly woman to
die in order to buy her property.
Officers investigating a break-in
at a dorm room found a note that
said "Marsha and I are gone. If
you need to get in, the key is over
the door These are just a few of
the startling pieces of informa-
tion from Dean of Students
Ronald Speier and Police Chief
Ron A very in remarks they made
to the Council of Student Organi-
zation Leaders on Thursday.
In the wake of several armed
robberies on campus, Avery
spoke to the group first on the
topicof safety andsecurity. "The
robberies don't appear to be
planned; they are simply crimes
of opportunity. This means that if
you make yourself available, you
could make yourself a victim.
"Walk in groups of three or
more. Walk in lighted areas. I can't
think of any logical reason to be
out walking at 3 a.m. I mean, the
bars even close at two Avery
said.
Avery said if students have
to be out late they should use
Pirate Ride or call Public Safety
for an escort. "We're not a taxi
service, but we're there to escort
you for security purposes. We will
usually send one of our students
out to walk with you
Avery also encouraged stu-
dents to take steps to protect their
personal property. "The most sto-
len article on campus is a bicycle.
People treat their stereo like a prize
possession but treat their bike like
it's a toy.
"Lock your dorm rooms
when you leave. Don't think of
your dorm room as your home.
Lock up even if you're going to
the bathroom Avery said.
Don't do what Marsha and
her roommate did either. Avery
said that episode happened a few
years ago, and he still keeps in his
office a photograph of the note
stuck on the open dorm room
door.
Avery also warned about the
threat of robberies and attacks that
have been occurring on campus.
"If you are doing something
that makes you stand out, you
may be asked to produce an I.D
especially if you are a young black
male Avery said. He said that
nobody has complained about this
policy, however, and the student
body has been "very cooperative
and very understanding
Dean Speier addressed the
group next on critical issues fac-
ing ECU students. He planned to
speak on issues such as the uncer-
tain economy, substance abuse,
sexually transmitted diseases and
violence, but was quickly diverted
from these topics by questions
from the audience.
Speier responded to several
inquiries about parking by saying
he empathized with students, but
noted that it has always been a
problem. He said that the univer-
sity has created more than 300
new parking spaces to replace
those that will be lost when the
SeeCOSOL page 3
Photo by Harold Wtao
People United to Support the Handicapped helped to sponsor a wheelchair basketball game on
Sunday, Nov. 7. The event raised over $100 to support Disability Awareness Week.
PUSH sponsors b-ball
By Jennifer Jenkins
Staff Writer
The Rehab Rascals took on
the ECU Pirate and Lady Pirate
basketball teams in an exciting
game of wheelchair basketball
on Sunday evening in Minges.
Although ECU won, Susan
Pogemiller, PUSH coordinator,
believes "everyone had a great
time and it helped show that
people in wheelchairs can play
sports and do as they like
The game was supported
bv People United to Support
the Handicapped PUSH, Dis-
abled Awareness Network
DAWN, Eastern Carolina Spi-
nal Cord Injury Association, and
Recreational Therapy and Pitt
County Memorial Hospital. The
Lady Pirates played for the first
and third quarters, and the men
played the second and fourth
quarters.
During halftime, there
were door prizes awarded to in-
dividuals attending the game to
help support the Rehab Rascals.
University Book Exchange and
Student Store gave out
sweatshirts, and Darryl's and
Ragazzi's gave out certificates for
dinner for two at their res-
taurants. Quicksilver gave
out a gift certificate, and
George's Hair Designs gave
out a free haircut. Also, dur-
ing the halftime there was a
basketball freethrow contest.
There was over $100
dollars raised to help support
Disability Awareness Week in
April, and other future activi-
ties. There is another event to
be scheduled that is similar to
wheelchair basketball to con-
centrate on the abilities of the
handicapped instead of the
disabilities.
New director focuses on Shared Visions
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Robert S. Bragg, a profes-
sional fund-raiser, has joined
the ECU staff as director of the
Annual Fund.
Bragg, who came to ECU
from Florida State University,
will be directing ECU's
telemarketing and direct mail
fund-raising activities.
"I solicit the alumni as a
whole through the mail and
telemarketing Bragg said.
While at FSU, Bragg in-
creased telemarketing and di-
rect mail contributions by 53
percent, and he raised donor
participation by 45 percent.
Bragg's main emphasis at
ECU will be on the Shared Vi-
sions campaign, which began
last year and has a goal of $50
million by 1995.
"We are very much on
track with Shared Visions he
said.
Bragg is also excited about
the use of student solicitors for
the telemarketing campaign.
The actual calling will begin in
January and applications will
be available in December. Bragg
said he plans to contact The East
Carolinian about future adver-
tisements.
"This will provide em-
ployment for some ECU stu-
dents Bragg said. "I encour-
age any student to apply. These
are good flexible hours with
good pay
A new computer-assisted
telephone system, once in-
stalled, will allow solicitors to
Yellow ribbons mark POW
MIA awareness week
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Haveyouseentheyellowrib-
bons tied around campus? They
mark the beginning of POWMIA
awareness week.
"WhenVietnamoccurred,we
wereyoung and havenotbeen well
informed through the years. When
we put up the ribbons, people ask
us what it's about and, hopefully,
will want to get involved said
Johnnie Journigan, a project coor-
dinator.
As was done last year, a bam-
boo cage will be set up in front of
the Student Stores.
A cadet will be imprisoned
initfor 24 hours beginning at4 p.m.
Monday afternoon. He will be set
free in front of Minges Coliseum at
4p.m. on Tuesday. Air Force ROTC
willbeginaflagretreatceremonyat
4:15 p.m. Tuesday, to honor Prison-
ers Of War and those Missing In
Action.
A fly-by of four F-15 fighter
jets from Seymore Johnson Air Force
Base will introduce the evening's
See ROTC page 2
Ifs
paper
time
The rush is on to
get those papers
done. With
resources still
scarce at the
library, students
should start early.
(Yea, right. But, it's
a good idea.)
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
update alumni records and
provide information about
campus events and activities.
"We will be able to do a
much better job of communi-
cating with alumni he said.
"Using the computer system,
our phone solicitors will be
available to answer most
questions about ECU sports
events, alumni activities and
academic programs
The Annual Fund is an
effort to raise participation
among alumni and to attract
gifts to help with the opera-
tions of the university. Text-
books and computers are
bought with these funds.
In the past, student am-
bassadors worked as volun-
See BRAGG page 3
brates it's 20th anniversary
The Theta Alpha Chapter of Alpha Kappa Sorority, Inc.
was founded at ECU on Nov. 11,1973. (The sorority was founded
onjan. 15,1908atHoward University.) Tocelebrate this moment
of history, the Theta Alpha Chapter has planned the following
events:
Monday, Nov. 8 "Cupcake Sale" lla.mlp.m.
Location: Outside the ECU Student Stores
(Proceeds go to OPERATION SUNSHINE)
Tuesday, Nov. 9 "Penny Drive" 8a.m2p.m.
Location: Outside the ECU Student Stores
(Proceeds go to PICASO AIDS Foundation)
Wednesday, Nov. 10 "Forum: The Successful Black
Woman"
LocationTime: 7 p.m. in MSC room 221
Thursday, Nov. 11 "Anniversary Celebration"
Loration:TBA
(celebration begins at noon)






tlinian
November 9, 1993
Babies abandoned
Study finds thousands
Library sex offenses increase
And we though1 our library had problems. The University of
Arizona's mam library is experiencing human relations prob-
lems. In a recent two-week period, six sex offenses were reported
in the library, leaving police baffled, psychologists trying to
provide explanations and library officials saying they were un-
aware of the incidents. Nineteen sexual offenses were reported on
campus in 1992, including indecent exposure and voyeurism,
police said, while nine have been reported so far in 1993. A
humorous editorial in the Daily Wildcat suggested that the in-
crease of such acts was only a side issue. "The real question is,
what's so exciting about the library?" the editorial asked, going on
to suggest that the library could be divided into "Masturbation"
and "No Masturbation" sections.
Survey reveals athletes' bad habits
A survey on college athletes' drug use and understanding of
the AIDS virus has found that steroid use has decreased and that
half of the athletes were unclear about how AIDS is transmitted.
The number of steroid users in colleges has dropped to 2 percent,
the Michigan State University survey said. In 1985, when the
survey was first conducted, 4 percent of athletes said they had
used anabolic steroids. This number increased to 5 percent in 1989
and dropped to 2 percent this academic year. Athletes were also
surveyed on their opinions and knowledge of the AIDS virus.
Many athletes felt strongly about AIDS testing, but were confused
about how HIV is transmitted. More than half of the student
athletes felt that any athlete testing positive for the HIV should not
be allowed to compete in sports, and a majority said there should
be mandatory HIV testing before an athlete is allowed to compete.
Christian music controversy at NMU
Student funding will continue to back a Christian rock
program on North Michigan University's student station, WUPX-
FM in Marquette, Mich. The radio show, which is funded with
student activity money, was in conflict with a university policy
prohibiting student activity money from being used to fund
religious activities, detractors said. Station manager Kale Seagraves
defended the programming and said the show is not a religious
activity and does not promote a specific religion. Seagraves said
the show is aired on Sunday from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. because the disc
jockey was available during that time, and not for religious
reasons.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Four babies in the nursery at
Howard University Hospital
have never been outdoors, never
felt the sun on their silky skin.
They get their bottles, their baths
and their snuggles from strang-
ers.
They have spent their first
months of life in a room on the
hospital's pediatric ward, in le-
gal limbo while their mothers or
social workers struggle to find
them a home or a family.
According to a new report
obtained by The Associated
Press, they are among thousands
of newborn babies abandoned
by their parents or boarded in
hospitals because they have no-
where else to go.
Researchers counted
22,000 abandoned infants and
boarder babies in the nation's
hospitals in 1991, according to a
draft report from the Depart-
ment of Health and Human Ser-
vices.
It is the first national sur-
vey on boarder babies and the
researchers said their numbers
probably underestimate the
problem.
They are the tiniest victims
of crack-cocaine, poverty,
homelessness and AIDS, and
one of the reasons the number
of children in foster care is inch-
ing toward half a million.
Volunteers rock and feed
and bathe the babies; nurses
bring them clothes and toys. But
as long as the babies are in a
legal limbo, they can't leave the
hospital. They spend their first
months of life indoors.
"These are the everyday
things we take for granted, the
very simple things, that they've
never experienced said Joyce
Mason, a supervisory social
worker at Howard. "It has to
have some effect on these chil-
dren
BOWL
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BRAIN.
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Saturday, November 13
Sunday, November 14
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowl Information and
Registration Packet from the Information
Desk, Mendenhall Student Center.
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee
First plac learn members will receive $25.00 each and a College Bowl t-shlrt
Second place team members will receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For more Information, contact the Student Activities Office,
210 Mendenhall, 757-47664711.
Researchers found hospi-
talized babies who ranged from
basically healthy to medically
fragile: children with heart de-
fects and respiratory disorders,
hepatitis and congenital syphi-
lis, Down's syndrome, cleft pal-
ates and symptoms of drug
withdrawal. Some were prema-
ture, and many were born
weighing less than 5.5 pounds.
The study defines boarder
babies as infants, under the age
of 12 months, who remain in the
hospital beyond the time when
they are medically ready to be
discharged.
Abandoned infants are ba-
bies, also under the age of 12
months, who are unlikely to
leave the hospital in the cus-
tody of their biological parents
once discharged.
Sen. Christopher J. Dodd,
D-Conn and chairman of a Sen-
ate subcommittee on children
and families, said the report il-
lustrates the desperate need for
substance abuse treatment pro-
grams for pregnant women.
Dodd said it also suggests
that the child welfare system
isn't moving fast enough or ag-
gressively enough to find homes
for the boarder babies, espe-
cially the medically fragile.
Eventually, the report
found, 30 percent of the boarder
babies will go home with their
biological parents. The rest are
placed in alternative homes be-
cause their parents are either
unfit, unable or unwilling to take
their child.
But authorities sought al-
ternative homes for 59 percent
of the abandoned infants be-
cause child welfare agencies
didn't believe the baby would
be safe with its biological par-
ents.
Ann Rosewater, a deputy
assistant secretary at HHS, said
the number of abandoned and
boarder babies is a signal that
"we need to redouble our ef-
forts" to address the issues of
poverty, drug addiction and
troubled families.
ROTC
Continued from page 1
guest speaker, retired Col. Dennis
Biggs.
Veterans' groups from across
the area have all been invited to join
in the remembrance.
"Wedo thistoprovideaware-
ness. We want the public to know
that there are still people unac-
counted for, not only in Vietnam
but in Korea and other areas said
Kevin McLaughlin, project coordi-
nator.
Thursday evening, the Arnold
Air Society (sponsor of the aware-
ness week) will be conducting a
candlelight vigil beginning at 8:30
p.m in front of the Air Force
ROTC detachment (beside thestu-
dent stores).
Throughout the week, the
Arnold Air Society will be selling
POW MIA bracelets, t-shirts and
lithographs infrontof the Air Force
ROTCbuilding from 10am unul2
pm.
This is a non-profit venture
with all proceeds going to the Viet-
nam Vets of America in order to
refurbish the cage they have fre-
quently donated.
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November 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
tudy may offer to
diagnose Alzheimer's
im Sunday
sponsored by the federal National
Institute on Aging, a series of new
studies showed that one torm of a
gene called apolipoprotein-E, or
apoE, may protect some people
from developing Alzheimer's dis-
ease, while a flawed form of the
same gene substantially increases
the risk.
The research, originated by
a Duke University team led by Dr.
Allen Roses, showed that a rare
form of the gene, called apoE2,
appears to protect people from
deyeloping Alzheimer's disease,
but another form of the gene,
apoE4, results in a substantially
greater risk of developing the dis-
ease.
"This is a major discovery
that moves Alzheimer's research
to a new and higher level said
Stuart Roth of the Alzheimer's
Association. "It offers real hope
for the management of
Alzheimer's disease
"There is almost universal
agreement now about the impor-
tance of apoE in Alzheimer's said
Dr. Robert Katzman of the Uni-
versity of California, San Diego.
He said the discovery, for the first
time, offers the possibility of de-
veloping a drug that would copy
the natural protective action
against Alzheimer's that may be
provided by the apoE2 gene.
"Thiscould havea very, very
major impact said Katzman.
A statement from the Na-
tional Institute on Aging called
the apoE gene discovery "a break-
through in Alzheimer's research,
a disease that has baffled research-
ers for over 20 years
ATTENTION NEWS
WRITERS!
THE WEEKLY STAFF
WRITERS MEETING
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WEDNESDAY AND
NOT THURSDAY.
PLEASE COME IN
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innouncedearliei this
i and his group had
tatpi ople with the apoE4
tad an increased risk of de-
ling Alzheimer's.
In the body, each cell has
two copies of theapoE gene, which
is on chromosome 19. About 79
percent of the population has at
least one copy of an apoE variant
called E3. There are about 14 per-
cent with at least one copy of E4,
and only about 7 percent with cop-
ies of a third variant called E2.
The apoE research, which
was supported by other research-
ers reporting at Sunday's sympo-
sium, showed that people with
two copies of the E4 gene had 11 to
17 times greater risk of develop-
ing Alzheimer's. Even with only
one E4 gene, the risk was about
five times greater than among
people with no E4 genes.
Roses said 90 percent of
people with two E4 genes will have
Alzheimer's bv age 80. People with
that gene structure also are apt to
have the disease at a younger age.
Roses said apoE4 did not
cause Alzheimer's. Instead, he
theorized itis the absenceofapoE3
or apoE2 that makes it more likely
for the disease to develop and for
it to happen at an earlier age.
The researcher said both E3
and E2 have some protective ef-
fects, but this is particularly strong
for the rare people who have two
E2 gene variants.
Because of this new under-
standing, Roses and others said a
test for the apoE4 gene may help
in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's.
The disease now can only be defi-
nitely diagnosed at autopsy.
Additionally, because it is
now known tha t the E2 gene codes
for some protein that apparently
protects against Alzheimer's, it
becomes increasingly possible that
scientists can find some drug that
will prevent the disorder.
NC preacher nabbed in Bronx
NEW YORK (AT)�A North
Carolina minister who allegedly
tried to con police into thinking he
was a robbery victim was arrested
on drugchargesearly today in the
Bronx.
Michael Garrett, 43, of
Greenville, N.C told Officers
Arlene Rogers and Edwin Quino-
nes that he was robbed at 1:25 a.m.
today on Coster Street, said police
spokeswoman Sgt. Tina
Mohrmann.
Garrett said he was attacked
by two men, the tires on his 1990
Miata convertible were slashed
and his attackers were trying to
steal his car, Mohrmann said.
The robbers had disabled
Garrett's car to prevent him from
getting help, but "apparently they
forgot they slashed his tires" and
tried to take the car themselves,
Mohrmann said.
Rogers arrested David
Rodriguez, 25, and Felix Cordero,
COSOL
26, both of the Bronx, on robbery
and weapons charges, at Garrett's
car.
Meanwhile, the officers were
trying to get the tires repaired for
Garrett, who told the officers he is
a minister in Greenville.
' The cops were really trying
to be helpful, trying to get him
back on the road, trying not to
give him a bad impression of the
city Mohrmann said.
The officers opened the trunk
of Garrett's Miata in hopes of find-
ing a jack and spotted 1,000 packs
of heroin, according to the ser-
geant.
"What first appeared to be a
random robber' of the man, now
seems that the people who were
robbing him knew of his drug ac-
tivities
Mohrmann said Garrett al-
legedly bought the drugs for
$10,000, and was planning to re-
sell them in his hometown.
Continued from page 1
BRAGG
Continued from page 1
teers tocall alumni,but the mini-
mal number of students hin-
dered the number of alumni who
were called.
"By using paid students all
year around, we should be able
to talk'to all alumni Bragg said.
"This is a good way to build a
bridge to alumni
Prior to his work at FSU,
Bragg was the director of An-
nual Giving at the University of
Georgia in 1990 and the man-
ager of Annual Giving at Vir-
ginia Tech from 1988 to 1990.
Also, he managed political
campaigns for a Virginia con-
gressional cand idate and for a
delegate to the Virginia Gen-
eral Assembly.
Bragg, who graduated
from Virginia Tech in 1980,
holds graduate degrees in fi-
nance and in government from
the College of William and
Marv.
Debuting Nov. 18, 1993, is The East Carolinian
Navigator, your guide to ECU sports. This new
publication will cover the ECU Pirate Basketball
season and will preview the pre-season exhibition
games this month. The deadline for Advertising
space is Friday Nov. 12th at 4pm. For more infor-
mation, call The East Carolinian Advertising
department today at 757-6366 !
recreation center and library ad-
dition are built.
"We are moving toward a
non-vehicular, walking campus.
We will see more people park-
ing in the lots farther away and
using the shuttle services
Speier said.
Speier said the Parking
Committee will consider an in-
crease in the fee for parking stick-
ers for Fall 1994.
The Committee is debating
a tiered system in which stickers
for the Mendenhall and Library
lots would cost more than all
other stickers.
"We can't afford a parking
deck. The state doesn't fund
parking decks. We don't have
enough money for additional
parking spaces Speier said.
The university is waiting
to buy a piece of property just
off 10th Street to use for park-
ing. Currently an elderly woman
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
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STANTON SQUARE
On Stantonsburg Rd.
Mon-Fri 10am-8pm
Saturday 9am-6pm
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CHARLES BLVD
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Mon-Fri 9am-8pm
Sat 9am-6pm
830-5536
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville Blvd.
Mon-Sat9:30am-9pm
Sunday lpm-6pm
756-6200
!
I
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$2.00 OFF
All Services
expires Dec. 15. 1993
I
$5.00 OFF
i
i
Perms, Highlights, or Tanning Package
lives there and doesn't want to
sell.
Speier said rather than force
the woman out by claiming im-
minent domain, the university
will wait until she dies and bid
for the property then.
The money for the Recre-
ation Center, Speier said, will
come from an increase of $75-
$100 per semester for the next 30
years.
"I think a rec center is far
more important than a parking
deck Speier said.
He pointed out that stu-
dents had voiced their support
for the Recreation Center in two
campus-wide referendums and
through the SGA.
When asked if students
supported a rec center over a
parking deck, Speier said, "No-
body presented any other op-
tions. A parking deck was never
an option
Peking Palace
Restaurant
LUNCH SPECIALS $4.25!
FROM MENU
(INCLUDING ICED TEA)
Offer good until 111593
Greenvill
Square
Shopping
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In the
Kmart
Shopping
Center
I
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LUNCH
Mon-Fri 11:00am-2:30pm
DINNER
Mon-Fri 4:30pm-9:30pm
756-1169
Saturday 11 am-10:30pm � Sunday llam-9:30pm
Take out orders available!
(Including one egg roll and fried rice)
Bring this ad in for other specials
I
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LOOK FOR
"NOON DAY TOONS"
STARTING 2ND WEEK
OF NOVEMBER.
MUSICIANS WILL BE
PERFORMING IN
MENDENHALL CAFETERIA
AND JONES CAFETERIA
EVERY OTHER WEEK.
Special Notice:
Madrigal Tickets on
Sale NOW at
Central Ticket Office.
PONT MISS BILL DERMODY S
ART EXHIBIT & POSTERS (GREAT )
MENDENHALL ART GALLERY;
NOVEMBER 14 - 24,
RECEPTION: NOVEMBER 17, 7:00 P.M.
BROUGHT TO YOU BY ECU S.U.
VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE.
"S ATTENDANCE
AS OF
11793 8,878
COLLEGE BOWL
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13 &
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14.
BROUGHT TO YOU BY ECU S.U.
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
PICK UP INFO FROM MENDENHALL
INFORMATION DESK.
FOR MORE
INFORMATION,
CALL THE STUDENT
UNION HOTLINE AT
757-6004.
All films start at 8:00 and are FREE with
valid ECU I.D. for students, staff, and faculty
"SPLITTING HEIRSPG 13
WEDNESDAY, & SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 10 &14TH
"INDENCENT PROPOSALR
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, & SATURDAY,
NOVEMBER 11 -13TH
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU !
I
.L,
expires Dec. 15, 1993
I
J
ECU Student Union is "the funkyest,
coolest, groovest thing on this side
Of the eqUatOr - Melinda Small





� ��
�Mr-
The East Carolinian
Page 4
Opinion
November 9, 1993
The East Carolinian
l.indsa Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Assi. � i Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Assi. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Assi. Sports Editor .
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
A A
100 recycled paper
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Assi. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
It's sinking: NAFTA needs a raft-a I
The countdown begins. In eight days the
troubled NAFTA heads to the House to be
4 scrutinized, mollified and inspectified. It will
emerge, no doubt, like a meek kitten �
mewling and puking and stumbling towards
various committees just to begin the cycle
again.
Sad, ain't it?
Add to this special Washington-dance-
party-push, Ross Perot's paranoia towards
supposed death threats, and we have quite a
carnival. Perot has said that he is a target
because a "Mafialike" organized crime group
wants to be able to smuggle drugs into the
United States in shipments of Mexican pro-
duce. This man is truly dancing in his own
ballroom, folks. He's alone and doing the two-
step.
(Just a little side-note: In addition to this,
during the '92 presidential campaign, Perot
said that in 1970 his private security guards
foiled an attempt by the Vietnamese to assas-
sinate him. He also said the Black Panthers
?$nd Texas drug dealers had conspired to as-
sassinate him. Frankly, the man's a little daft.
Now, honestly, can that many people want
him dead? Or is this just his paranoia acting
up again?)
Perot has taken up an opposition to the
sinking NAFTA in a way only Perot can. The
American people love this man. The dedi-
cated believe everything that flows from his
mouth and follow him like dogs, mainly due
Jo his style of campaigning. By striking at not
only the heartstrings, but also the pursestrings,
of the common worker, he makes a pretty
good little argument for himself. Perot believes
that NAFTA would export thousands of U.S.
jobs to Mexico, and would condemn Mexicans
to lives of poverty.
This coming from a man that has billions.
Seems like he's really looking out for himself
and his stash before the future of American
workers. Please, Mr. Perot, we've heard this
ballyhoo before and only 19 percent of us be-
lieved you. Enough is enough.
Clinton replied to this onslaught by ap-
pearing on NBC's "Meet the Press" with a list of
complaints about all sides of the debate. In the
hour-long session, he denounced Perot's one-
liners and emotional retorts citing them as non-
factual accounts.
Clinton said the White House is not a full
30 votes short of the 218 votes needed for House
passage. He hopes to chip away at the deficit in
private meetings and the usual fancy-shmancy
dinners (also known as suck-up meals) in an
effort to pass this new baby in his presidental
career. Determined and fueled with the possi-
bility of enacting a continent-wide reform of
sorts, Clinton lashed out at unions and attrib-
uted much of his problems to labor opposition.
Unions are threatening remaining undecided
Democratic members of Congress or pleading
with them to vote against NAFTA. Everyone's
playing dirty now.
So now we have what looks to be quite an
interesting debate scheduled tonight at 9 p.m.
on "Larry King Live" on CNN�Perot and Vice
President Al Gore will face off in a verbal battle
over NAFTA.
Cover yourselves, this might get messy.
By Alex Ferguson
Paltry PC proves Pandora's box of peril
When reading the paper,
what's the first thing you turn
to? For some, nothing could be
finer than tackling the front
pkge and plowing through like
a newsprint junkie. For the
hard-core footbasketbase-
ball fan, it's the sports page,
while the accountants put their
money on the business section.
Then, there are people
like myself. No dabbling in the
stock section or pilfering
through
h e �����i
lifestyles
for me. No,
sir. I start
my day
right, with
a well- bal-
anced diet
of comics.
Always go
for the des-
sert first.
the sarcastic
pushing for politi-
cal correctness can
in some ways be a
very acceptable and
dandied-up version
of censorship.
say I read comics for research,
but that would only be a half-
truth. To be honest, I get a kick
out of them.
In fact, I can't imagine
someone who doesn't laugh at
the comics. Mind you, we're not
talking about the "steroid" typi-
cal tnuy macho! hero(ine) in the
shoot-em-up comics. I'm refer-
ring to the Charlie Brown-
Garfield genre. Whether it be
wit of Bloom
County and
Doonsbury or
the whimsical
humor of the
Far Side, every-
one has shared
a chuckle with
these classic
comics.
What
makes them so
endearing is
their ability to
Now, before you label me
as an ignorant savage, too in-
ept to comprehend the com-
plexities of the world, let me
say that I've made valiant ef-
forts to stay abreast with cur-
rent events. I'm certainly not
one of those nuts who tears
through the paper, frantic for
instant gratification via the
qomics page. Heavens, no.
ghat's why I always start off
ijv-ith the editorial cartoons.
We're talking high-grade co-
medic information here.
And if its a USA Today,
(they don't run comics, the
bums), I'll settle for their multi-
chromatic kaleidoscope more
commonly known as the
weather map.
I could say my reasoning
for reading the comics first
stem from my creative duty to
inspect the quality of today's
illustrative humor. Yes, I could
make us laugh at events that
otherwise might be sad, frus-
trating or downright impossible.
But who has the time to
read comics or laugh for that
matter, what with all the PC flak
flying around as America at-
tempts to keep from alienating
everybody. I understand it's im-
portance, but I find that push-
ing for political correctness can
in some ways be a very accept-
able and dandied-up version of
censorship.
I don't condemn censor-
ship in some instances; there are
things out there worthy of eradi-
cating. But now, the one area I
assumed was safe ground, com-
ics, has become the newest vic-
tim of a PC-punchy society.
Recently, there has been
some grumbling about the con-
tent of comic pages. It seems
that some characters display
properties some might find of-
fensive. There is talk of sexist
portrayal of female anatomy, il-
lustrative racial slurs and un-
fair representation of ethnic in-
dividuals. In fact, one can prob-
ably say that just about every
character could offend some-
body, somehow, someplace.
I'm sure there are a good
two to three hundred bald kids
and thousands of wishy-washy
losers out there mad as hell at
Charles Schultz and his little
Charlie Brown monster. Doesn't
it bother the secretaries that Ms.
Buxley from Beetle Bailey makes
them look like Grade A bimbo
material? After reading the strip
Blondie concerning Dagwood's
lackadaisical attitude towards
work, how can anyone look at a
businessman with a straight
face?
It must be sheer torture for
the pragmatics, reading about
cats and snakes talking and
prancing around like they were
human beings. We are talking
social-visualistic discrepancies
of biblical proportions here!
I'm not saying that this is a
Code Red emergency here, with
the very fabric of society on the
line. The world certainly doesn't
revolve around the funnies. But
the idea of placing disclaimers on
them (or taking other such mea-
sures), to placate all of those
people who may be angered by
the lack of Comical Correctness,
sounds like counting your chick-
ens before they've hatched.
Come on people, we may
just be starting to clutch at
straws here. Let's not pick on
the minuscule minutia. Taking
potshots at the cartoonists cer-
tainly won't help reign in
America's woes.
If there's a bone to pick,
make sure it's got some meat on
it.
THZte TH1$ C((LTD O N
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UK�XMS! THIS AH OuTdACg!
I causH planet ewHi steal
its womeatw�aj w� setz
,UO LAU6H fT
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By John Adams
Voluntary euthanasia misunderstood
"I stay away from death
By turning toward her face
wrote the great American poet
Theodore Roethke.
Possibly what Roethke
(who coincidently committed
suicide) meant by those lines is
that some people's very exist-
ence is so utterly torturous that
merely existing is a form of death
which can be escaped only by
embracing the latter.
Last week, Dr. Jack
Kevorkian was placed in jail for
breaking the new Michigan law
which prohibits physician-as-
sisted suicide. His bail was set
at a measly $20,000. Kevorkian,
however, refused to pay his bail
or to allow anyone else to pay it.
Instead, he choose to stay
in jail and begin a hunger strike
in order to promote awareness
of the hundreds of terminally ill
people who wish to end their
lives, but do not have the ability
to do so.
Physician-assisted suicide
is a fairly recent moral dilemma
which stems out of the incred-
ible advances in medicine over
the past 35 years. In Nobody's
Business, Alida Brill asks the
quintessential question, "Has
technologically advanced
medicineprimarily raised the
spectre of a feared dread exist-
ence sustained at half-life?" Un-
fortunately for many terminally
ill patients, the answer to Brill's
question is "yes
In 1976, the first right-to-
die case was heard. In this case,
(named the Quinlan case) the
judge ruled that voluntary eu-
thanasia may be administered
with the consent of the patient
or the family of the patient.
A 1990 Gallup poll shows
the 69 percent of Americans
agree with this ruling as long as
the patient is terminally ill and
has suffered a demonstrable loss
in quality of life. So, why is there
so much controversy over
physican-assisted suicide?
Along with Living Wills,
voluntary euthanasia has al-
lowed many to exercise their
right to die. In the process of
voluntary euthanasia, the doc-
tor "pulls the plug so to speak.
That is, the patient is taken off
any life-sustaining measures.
Hence, the patient is allowed to
die. It could take five minutes or
five days for the patient to die.
Physician-assisted suicide
is quick and painless. Can the
same be said for voluntary eu-
thanasia? Sometimes yes, some-
times no. How can voluntary
euthanasia thus be considered
morally acceptable, while phy-
sician-assisted suicide is against
the law in most states?
There are three stumbling
blocks for the legalization of
physician-assisted suicide. First,
most major religions strictly pro-
hibit suicide of any kind. If you
kill yourself, you will go to hell.
For many terminally ill paitents,
though, the suffering which they
are experiencing may lead them
to the conclusion that they are
already residing in hell.
Second, all doctors must
take the Hippocratic oath, which
most interpret to mean that they
must do everything within their
power to sustain life. Slowly,
however, many doctors are prac-
ticing medicine with the primary
intention of easing suffering and
maintaining quality of life. In
1986, the AMA approved vol-
untary euthanasia as a legiti-
mate medical procedure.
Finally, of course, there
is the overall stigma associated
with suicide in our society. The
basic line of reasoning is that
anyone who wants to kill him
or herself is obviously not in
complete control of hisher
mental facilities. The implica-
tion being that this individual
is not capable of making a life
or death decision.
I would argue, however,
that anyone who wishes to sus-
tain the life of someone who is
obviously suffering is not of
sound mind themselves.
When confronted with
death, all any of us want is a
quick and painless demise.
Why then do we not permit
those who are terminally ill
what we ourselves would de-
sire?
Terminal cases are not go-
ing to diminish. If anything,
there will probably be a dra-
matic increase with the on-
slaught of AIDS. If physician-
assisted suicide is not legalized,
the result will be much undue
suffering for many patients.
Many will possibly attempt to
take their own life with failed
results leading to more
unecessary suffering.
Derek Humpry, presi-
dent of the Hemlock Society,
believes that the only way to
be reasonably sure of a decent
death is to plan it. For those
who no longer have anything
to live for due to a substantial
loss in the quality of life, we
have a duty to provide them
with a dignified death.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Derek McCreight, do you even know what an
"ultra-feminist" is? Have you ever had a relationship
with a feminist or have you been to a feminist meet-
ing or function? Let me help you understand what
feminism is actually about since you seem to think
we're a bunch of "discredited white liberals
A feminist gets sick every time she reads in the
paper about a woman who has been raped and left to
die in her own bedroom. A feminist can't stand to see
her sisters scramble to figure out away to feed their
babies because of their low economic status. A femi-
nist notices on TV the latest molestation of a child. A
feminist hates to know the numbers of lives lost
fighting meaningless wars. Watching families hide
in the shadows while bullets rip past areas where
their children had once played. A feminist is very
aware of women in the past, hung as witches in the
name of religion because these women spoke their
minds and refused to lay low in society. A feminist
gets pretty tired of reading verbal attacks in the
campus newspaper directed at them, knowing that
if the faculty or the students attacked any other
minority group, the college administration in the
Spilman Bldg. wouldn't tolerate it. And, yes, Derek
a feminist has just about had it with women who
are trying to hold down jobs while their male
counterparts are trying to fondle them.
Derek, a feminist is for equality no matter
what gender, religion, race or physique. WE SEE
NO COLOR I strongly encourage you, Professor
Malmrose, and anyone else who "thinks" that they
understand feminism, to attend a Woman's Stud-
ies meeting. They're held every Thursday after-
noon at 4:00 in GCB 2014. Please, let us help you
with your ignorance of our meaning.
Dana Thielen
Sophomore
Merchandising
letters to the editor must be signed and accompanied with a
working phone number, class rank and major, address all letters
to: the east Carolinian, attn opinion editor, student pubs, build-
ina. second floor, ecu, areenville, nc 27858.
minjiiiniw�m
. � . � �����
��nHHHHHHHHI






�� . ��.
The East Carolinian
November 9, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
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Announcements
FREE PIZZA
All Student Pirate Club
Members and those stu-
dents interested in join-
ing ECU's fastest growing
organization are cordially
invited to attend a group
social at Boli's downtown
for FREE PIZZA, while it
lasts, on Wednesday, No-
vember 10th at 7:30 pm.
Afterwards, please join us
for Student Pirate Club
Night at the Attic Comedy
Zone. There will be a $2.00
admission charge with
your Student Pirate Club
Membership Card. For
more information, please
call the Pirate Club Office
at (919) 757-4540.
STUDENT SURVEY
During the week of No.
29-Dec 3, a survey of stu-
dent opinion of instruc-
tion will be conducted at
ECU. Questionnaires will
be distributed in classes
with enrollments greater
than five. All students will
have the opportunity to
express opinions on the
teaching effectiveness of
their instructors. The sur-
vey will be conducted dur-
ing class time and will take
approximately 15 minutes
to complete. Student par-
ticipation is voluntary and
no identities are re-
quested. Instructors have
been requested to leave
the classroom while the
questionnaires are being
completed. Results of the
survey will be distributed
to instructors after final
grades have been posted.
The teaching effective-
ness questionnaire was
created by the Faculty
Senate Committee for
Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning
and Institutional Re-
search. The results of this
survey are used by in-
structors for improving
their teaching skills and
in course development,
and by administrators in
decisions of tenure, pro-
motion and merit.
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
CITATION
Any student or faculty
member interested in
making a difference in
your community, helping
others, and making life-
long friends is invited to
attend our first meeting
on Wednesday, Nov. 10th
at 5:00 in the Fleming Hall
Basement. Bring a friend.
ECU INVESTMENT CLUB
The ECU investments club
will be holding a meeting
on Thursday, Nov. 11th at
5:00 pm in GCB 3007. All
majors are encouraged to
attend. Come join us, you
may learn something
AMERICAN RED CROSS
& NATIONAL MARROW
An estimated sixteen thou-
sand American children
and adults are stricken
each year with leukemia
or one of thirty other fa-
tal blood diseases. For
many, the only hope for
survival is a marrow
transplant. Because a do-
nor and patient must
match very closely, the
chances that a patient in
need will find a matching
donor can be as high as
one in a million. Volun-
teers are desperately
needed. To find out if you
could be a patient's one in
a million chance, get
tested at ECU on Nov. 16th,
Between 11:00 am and 4:30
pm.
NATIONAL STUDENT
EXCHANGE
Having trouble getting
classes? If you can't fine
it at ECU, try going on ex-
change to one of over 110
universities in the U.S.
and take your classes in a
different environment.
Pay ECU tuition and study
in another part of the
country. There is time to
apply for next fall and
spring semesters. Contact
Stephanie Evancho in In-
ternational Programs or
call 757-6769 for further
information.
COMMUNICATING TO
ASSERT YOURSELF"
The Counseling Center is
offering a two-session
workshop for students de-
signed to identify effec-
tive communication tech-
niques for achieving
assertiveness in your life.
Emphasis will be placed on
the relationship between
self-esteem and
assertiveness behavior.
Members are expected to
attend both meetings. The
meetings will be Monday,
Nov. 15 and Wednesday
Nov. 17 from 1-2 pm. Call
757-6661 to sign up.
THE FOUNDATION FOR
THE FUTURE
The Foundation for the Fu-
ture is in need of student
volunteers to assist el-
ementaryhigh school
graders with homework
on weekdays. Please con-
tact Sandra Jones, Direc-
tor at 830-1221.
INTERVIEW SKILLS
WORKSHOP
Seniors and Graduate stu-
dents completing their de-
gree in Dec. 1993 or May
Summer 1994 who have
not yet attended an inter-
view skills workshop are
invited to attend one on
Thur. Nov. 11. Sponsored
by Career Services, the
workshop will be held in
the Bloxton House at
4:00pm. It is also open to
students seeking intern-
ships and co-op experi-
ences.
RECYCLING
NATIONALISM IN
POST-COMMUNIST
ROMANIA
Professor Nicolae & Doina
Harsanyi, University of
Timisoara, Romania.
Wednesday, Nov. 10 3:30pm
GCB 1012. For additional
information contact Dr.
Cirkesena, 757-4284.
LATINO FIESTA
Latin American food, Live
DJ, and Dancing. Spon-
sored by the International
Student Association. Satur-
day, Nov. 13, 1993 6:30-
11:00pm. Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Multi-Purpose
Room. Admission: $4.00
Students, $5.00 General
Public. For further infor-
mation Contact: Patricia
Steffen: 931-9809 or Cen-
tral Ticket Office:757-4788
For Sale
from Raleigh, $429; Key West, $249;
Daytona Room wkitchen, $149! 1-
800-678-6386.
MEMBERSHIP to Club For
Women Only. Low monthly pay-
ments! Call Angie 931-9768.
ONE-WAY AIRLINETICKEXRa-
leighDetroitSan Francisco, $200.
Valid until Dec. 15. Call 830-9125.
SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS
CRUISE $279! 6 Days! Includes 12
meals and all taxes! This is a HUGE
party! Great Beaches and Night life!
Hurry Prices Increase 1210!
1-800-678-6386.
MOPED Tomos, 2 speed automatic
only 500 miles. No license or regis-
tration required. $475.00. Call 756-
9133.
ED Services Offered
E
i i:i
Personals
OVER Sljm IN CASH AND PRIZES!
LORI'SATTIC lingerie contest
every Wednesday after Comedy
Zone. Register 756-6846.
ELEGANT, REFINED MODELING.
LIVE PSYCHIC READER
Get answers to your ques-
tions ROMANCE, MONEY,
HEALTH. 1-900-990-9721 EXT.
182. $2.98min 18 24hrs.
FOR MEN ONLY:
LORI'S INTIMATE AFFAIR-
Annual Christmas Lingerie Fashion
Show! Ramada Inn Ballroom,
Thursday, Nov. 18. ALL LINGERIE!
Tickets 756-6846.
HEY BATTI or should I say Jes-
sica? Our Halloween Haunt wss
fun so how Tjout giving a "real"
girl a call.
THANKS toeveryone who sup-
ported Greek God! Love Alpha
Xi Delta.
ENJOY SINGING? UNIVER-
SITY CHORALE. MUSC 1635
12:00 MWF. School of Music. No
audition required.
DO YOUWANTTOGET PUB-
LISHED? If you write poetry,
prose, or have some interesting
doodles or drawings (including
cartoons), send them co Scratch
Yourself, 132 Longmeadow Rd
Greenville, NC, 27858.
BE Greek
TO SIGMA LAMBDA MEM-
BERS AND PLEDGESI want
to thank all of you who at-
tended my Halloween party. I
loved all the costumes! The cute
mouse, the cow with 4 utters-
or was that 5, Tom? The cat, the
gypsy, the belly dancer, Grim
Reaper and of course, our Pres.
with the "bad hair day and
all the rest of the outfits I loved!
One more weekend folks! Si-
lent Retreat! Can't wait! Your
one and only Member at
Large�Mo.
MATT HEDRICK Your class
showed through at GreekGod!
You did a super job. Thanks a
bunch. Love, Alpha Phi.
iJrgHt Ufannr rf MpPMiM in U.S.
ii.mnmcs-dtuuKTs '
Otdw Caaog Tatoy with Visa MC or COO
1N-351122?
Or, rush $2.00 to,
11322 kMwAvB J20S-A, Los AngsMs CA 90025
Lost & Found
LOST: Neutered male or-
ange tabby: answers to
EMO. Likes to ride. Call 752-
0226
ECU ECONOMICS
SOCIETY
Tuesday, Nov. 9th, the
Economics Society of ECU
will present Jim Wood from
IBM. This meeting is open
to all persons interested in
economics. Please bring
your related questions. A
business meeting will fol-
low.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College Students
should contact their advis-
ers the week of Nov. 8-12 to
make arrangements for
academic advising for
Spring Semester 1994.
Early registration will be-
gin Nov. 15 and end Nov.
19.
GRADUATE BUSINESS
ASSOCIATION
Meeting 5:15pm-6:15 pm;
Tues Nov 9; GC 1023 Dis-
tinguished Speaker: Joe
Gantz, President Empire
Brush Corporation; Ace
members are encouraged
to attend.
LSS MAJORSMINORS
T-Shirt contest prize is a
dinner for 2 at
Staccoto's. For more inf.
call Marcy at 752-9298
(Anyone can submit a
design!) LSS Society:
meets every Tuesday at:
Minges 142,4:30. Anyone'
interested is welcome
THEORY COLLOQUIUM
LECTURE SERIES ,
Son Bialostiesky (Penn.
State University)'
"Bakhtinian Speech'
Genres in Life and Lit
erature: On Poems as
Greeting, Warnings
Complaints, Excuses,
Toasts, Boasts, and Burial
Instructions" Friday, 12 ,
Nov. 2:00pm. GCB 2018. ,
PEACEKEEPING A
DANGEROUS GAME ;
The League of Women .
Voters of Pitt County,
presents: Peacekeep
ing- A Dangerous Game, -
The United Nations In a-
Changing World.
Speaker is Dr. Nancy,
Spalding, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Political Sci
ence, ECU. Tuesday, Nov.
16, ECU. Greenville Rec-
reation and Parks Bldg
Cedar Ln Greenville. For ,
more information call ?
756-5352.
i
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
timesfreeof charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 pm for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 pm for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10a.m. thedaypriorto
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
I�W�I
.
Ml MMI H.IE llll





��-� �� mr-
The East Carolinian
Page 6
Lifestyle
November 9. 1993
Primus rocks Raleigh's newest music hall
By Julie Totten
Burt Aycock
Photo courtesy of Interscope Records
Pictured above from left to right are: Tim Alexander, Les Claypool and Larry Lalonde of Primus. Thursday
night's show at the Ritz in Raleigh gave fans a heathly helping of funkadellic bluegrass house metal.
Christian group runs strong
By Sarah Wahlert
Lifestyle Editor
Last Thursday night at the Ritz,
Primus took control of the stage
and gave N.C. fans a show that
would keep bass lines in their heads
for days to come.
Unfortunatly, we missed the
opening act, The Melvins, but ru-
mor spread that they too had a
spendid performance. About 9:00
Primus opened their set with
"Damn Blue Collar Tweekers a
tune that echoes bassist Les
Claypool's background as a car-
penter in the San Francisco Bay
area. The audience immediately
warmed up to the band, as they
quickly fed into the second song,
"My Name is Mud All those who
were stationary during song num-
ber one broke loose into a world of
their own.
Primus left fans no time to
think about what they were hear-
ing or even time to lean over and
comment to a fellow " Primushead"
and smile. Each song in the first set
Staff Writer
fed into another, with no petty in-
termissions on the part of theband.
They were there to play. Period.
Even two separate technical
malfunctions that would have had
the average band taking a repair
break couldn't make this
funkadelic thrash trio put their in-
struments down. I'm sure Les, Ler
and Herb didn't mind breaking
into an instrumental jam session
while the equipment guy switched
a good microphone for a dead one.
The boys even had to change their
song list around so Les' stand-up
bass could be grounded properly.
(He got shocked the first time he
stepped up to it.)
All the electrical mayhem
brought back to mind his words at
the Raleigh Lolaplloza show when
his remote bass quit in the middle
of "My Name is Mud "Not only
does Primus suck but our equip-
ment sucks too
Bodies pogo-ed and sweatwas
Staff Writer
Editors note: The following is a
personal record of the writer's
attendance at an IVCF meeting.
Sshhh There's a rumor going
around that Christ is on this cam-
pit in the hearts, minds and souls
of any ECU students. I will prove
this rumor true by saying that I
have recently joined the growing
number of students touched by
Jesus. Don't get squeamish now;
please read on.
After many discussions about
God with this "bom again" guy, he
asked me to try going to a meeting
of the Intervarsity Christian Fellow-
ship. I admit I was nervous and
hesitant at first but I figured it
couldn't hurt me to go.
The meetings take place in the
General Classroom Building, room
1032, each Wednesday evening
from 7 p.m. to around 9 p.m. We
were slightly late, but before the
meeting starts, someoneoutside the
door makes name tags for every-
one.
Newcomers instantly feel wel-
come. I could hear clapping when I
entered the building, and this in-
timidated me at first. But entering
that lecture room was amazing. So
many students were singing and
praising God. I felt strangely com-
fortable despite my awe.
A typical meeting starts with a
few songs, some skits, more songs
and then a special addition called
"Word from the Herd This is when
someone from the group comes
forth and speaks about how the
Lord has affected his or her life. I
found it very touching. Then a
speaker talks about a specific prob-
lem that college students may face
and relates it to the Bible. Last
Wednesday's speaker talked about
self-image and related it to Moses.
The meeting finishes off with more
See CHRISTIAN page 7
flung about to the mid-set funk of
"Tommy the Cat the aquatic
psychedelia of "Diamondback
Sturgeon" and the nursery rhyme
indictment of consumerism in
"Pudding Time
The beer was flowing very
freely by this point and drunk,
dripping people continually
bumped and pushed their way to
various destination points. It was
quite unnerving to be in the cen-
ter of hundreds of intoxicated,
pushy fans that cared just as much
about maintaining a buzz than
they did about Primus. And not
to mention the fact that a security
guard snatched our freshly lit
cigarettes out of our hands and
smashed it under his black boot.
Another annoying "club policy"
was the fact that you had to finish
your can of beer (whatever was
left over after the bartender
poured it into a cup) before you
could step away from the bar.
Ever heard of draft beer, ritzy
See PRIMUS page 7
Novel explores two worlds
Carowinds searching for talent
By Tricia McCrory
Staff Writer
"What did you do last sum-
mer?" asksParamount'sCarowinds.
If you didn't spend last summer per-
formingforthousandsofpeopleand
having loads of fun, you missed out.
Luckily you have another chance.
Paramount's Carowinds, a di-
vision of Paramount Communica-
tions, Inc is offering an alternative
to the usual boring summer job. The
company's 1994 auditions are open
for singers, dancers, actors, instru-
mentalists and technicians. Thereare
even positions available for the
Hanna Barbera and Richard Scarry
costumed character program.
Auditions will beheld in Green-
ville onTuesday, Nov. 16 inHetcher
Music Building. They will be look-
ing for five to six singers and techni-
cians, six dancers and five to seven
actors or specialty acts.
Auditioners must be at least 16
years old and must appear in person
with a recent photo and current
resume. There is a two minute limit
onauditions whichareheld ona first
come, first serve basis.
Paramountadvisesparticipants
to be prepared for the audition. In-
strumentalists should bring two
pieces to perform: one in a jazz or
rock style, and another in a ballad
style. Musicians will also be asked to
sight-read.
Dancers will be taught a dance
combination and should wear ap-
propriateattireandshoes. They may
also be asked to sing.
Singers should bring a variety
of tunes, from upbeat to ballads.
They should also bring their sheet
music. Singers may be asked to learn
a dance combination.
So if you've got the moves, the
voice, or any talent at all, give it a
shot. There could be worse things
than parading around as Fred
Flintstone at Carowinds for a sum-
mer. For further information and
audition dates,contactParamount's
Carowinds Entertainment offices at
(704)-587-9020. Itmay beyour coolest
summer yet.
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Ever wanted to be in two
places at once? Ever felt like there
was another you lurking just un-
derneath the surface of your ev-
eryday self, someone who had
adventures unknown in your life-
time? L. Ron Hubbard's Slaves of
Sleep and The Masters of Sleep
draws the reader into two worlds
� one of everyday mundane life
here on Earth and one where hu-
mans are slaves in the Land of
Sleep.
Slaves of Sleep introduces the
main character � or characters,
as the case may be � of both
novels. Millionaire Jan Palmer is
a man who is content to let his life
be run by people who say they
have his best interests at heart.
When he is cursed with "Eternal
Wakefulness" by a vengeful Jinn,
he is transported into the body of
Tiger, a swashbuckler
extraordinaire whose life revolves
around the antithesis of Palmer's
� excitement and adventure.
As Palmer continues through
the story, the combination of his
personality and Tiger's develops
until the climax where both use
their special abilities � Palmer's
intellect and Tiger's brawn � to
save themselves in both worlds.
The Masters of Sleep follows in
the same vein as Slaves of Sleep.
Palmer has lost his sense of Tiger's
virility and is again faced with a
situation where both lives are in
L. Ron Hubbard's
novel, Slaves of
Sleep & The
Masters of Sleep,
is available in
bookstores now.
The hardcover is
priced at $19.95
and is sure to
delight fantasy
lovers.
jeopardy. As he struggles to real-
ize that part of him he has lost,
Palmer and Tiger are once again
immersed in a tale of swords and
sorcery.
Hubbard has once again
crafted two tales of fantasysci-
ence fiction guaranteed to delight
fans worldwide. With Slaves be-
ing first printed in 1939 and Mas-
ters in 1950, this hardcover pub-
lishes both stories for long hours
of action-packed excitement. Each
story in itself is worthy on its own
Cover photo
courtesy of
Bridge
Publications
merits; both together only add a
sense of continuity and purpose
that enhances the theme.
Hubbard weaves a tale that
the average reader can relate to,
combining fantasy and reality
with a touch that few have mas-
tered. Palmer is seen as an ordi-
nary person thrust into extraor-
dinary circumstances, striving
to succeed to the best of his abil-
ity. When the reader enters into
See HUBBARD page 7
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
B
i
Don't buy
JJTake Your Chances JJJ
Worth a Try AVO Definite Purchase
Lowen and Navarro
Broken Moon
0 0 0
Picture a flying hero who
lands upon a lame lion. The hero,
ever so valiant, pulls a thorn from
the lion's paw only to be eaten by
the lion. No, this isn't an excerpt
from one of Aesop's fables. These
are some of the lyrics from Lowen
and Navarro's, "Dreams I Left Be-
hind
Eric Lowen and Dan Navarro
have been writing songs for over
a decade. In 1990, their debut al-
bum, Walking On A Wire, received
great reviews, and they hope their
newest effort, Broken Moon, will
also.
"The first record's full of un-
abashed optimism, while this new
one has a lot of dark sides
Navarro said.
Although Lowen and
Navarro aren't household names
yet, they have written songs for
the Bangles, David Lee Roth, the
Temptations, Dave Edmunds and
the Four Tops. Their first success
as a songwriting team was the
song, "We Belong for Pat
Benetar.
Their poetic, heartfelt lyrics
are backed up by a folk-rock,
acoustic melody. Some of the
tracks on this CD include "All is
Quiet "Maybe Later" and the
title track, "Broken Moon
Susannah Hoffs of the Bangles is
featured on the tune "I'll Set You
Free
This CD's soothing, almost
melancholy quality captures true
to life experiences to which we all
can relate.
� Trish
McCrory
Swervedriver
Mezcal Head

With such influences as Sonic
Youth, Butthole Surfers and Dino-
saur Jr you'd think Swervedriver
would sound better than they do on
their new album, Mezcal Head.
Swervedriver was first signed
in 1990 by England's Creation
Records. The band consists of
founders Adam Franklin and Jimmy
Hartridge, as well as their new base
player Steven George and their new
drummer Jez. Swervedriver's first
album, Raise, was called, "a dizzying
debutofserrated guitars andmelodic
chaos" by Rolling Stone . The band
alsocreatjedrhehirs'SonofMustang
Ford" and "Rave Down So far, the
only song released from Mezcal Head
is "Duel
"Duel" sounds alright, but
"Blowin' Cool" and "A Change is
Gonna Come" stand out as better
songs�maybe even the only good
songs on the entire album.
A Change is Gonna Come' has
almost a seventies' kind of feel to it�
a bit of a swagger, you know Adam
Franklin says.
The opening song, "For Seeking
Heatmighthavesomesubstanceas �
well. Franklin refers to this opening
song as "a driving number indeed
Listening toMezcalHeadwas tor-
ture forme.Mostof the album sounds
very much the same. Because of the
waythesongsrunintoeachother,the
album seems to go on forever.
Unfortunately, the singer's voice
doesn't have much variation either.
The only parts of the album I really
liked were the song quotes in the CD
booklet.
If you already have
Swervedriver'sfirstalbum and enjoy
it, then maybe Mezcal Head is for you.
Thenagain,ifyoudon'thavethetime
to spare, or if you get bored easily,
don't even bother listening to one
song.
Byrheway,ifanyonewouldlike
this new album, I'm giving it away
for free. Sorry, Swervedriver, better
luck next time.
- Sarah
Wahlert
IPSJI
W 1 11
U afiSafelJlii8M.Jto L.� Mm �. � is m m jlB
Dahli Llama
Quarter 'Til Euphoria
)))
Dahli Llama has had success
since day one after getting their
band together back in March of
1991. They have only been to-
gether for two years and have
just put out a major CD called
Quarter 'til Euphoria. Dahli
Llama was voted best new band
in Charlotte for 1991 and was
also voted as having the sec-
ond-best locally released rock
CD in Charlotte next to
Firehouse.
Now they have a 12-song
CD that should bring the band
even more success for the fu-
ture. The band has a really
mixed sound of heavy metal
and psychedelic tunes on the
CD.
The vocalist Tara Busch
adds the psychedelic element
to the band with a strong soul-
ful melody in her voice. The
heavy grunge sound is made
by the guitarist Bill Kirch and it
is something the band can do
without. Some of the songs
display a little too much metal
sound which covers up the
good soul of the band.
The first track on the CD,
"How Do You Sleep was defi-
nitely the best because the band
See Dahli page 8
.





November 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 7
TIAN
Continued from page 6
yare.A
because
ill
- .in op-
HUBBARD
Continued from page 6
;aid Jeff
ainhour, presideni EVCF
executive council gaveme
some basic information on the
group. "Intervarsiry,OTW'for short,
Ls totally run by students. There are
Hvestudentson thee �,ecu the coun-
cil and small group leaders of Bible
studies in various locations on cam-
pus, including one off campus
group. Every once in a while, a
weekend activity will be scheduled.
Anyone is welcome anytime with
no need to register. Intervarsitv is
also nondenominational. Some-
times retreats are scheduled, and
most recently, some of the group
spent a weekend in Ocean Isle fur-
ther exploring their faith
Spainhour said.
The atmosphere also seems to
be an important part of IV.
Spainhour agreed by saying, "I feel
a warm atmosphere here. Every-
Cont'd
from
pg.6
rsit) provides
toleamabout
me instobe
inan th i lim. "his is a
; students to come and
their questions about spiri-
tual things, feel welcomed, accepted
and loved said Todd (ones, VCF
staff worker. "We want to help
people to see that being Christian
doesn t necessarily mean being re-
ligious, but having a relationship
with Christ. It can be tun, exciting
and invigorating
Junior transfer student Philip
Chase says, "IV is a great place to
come to learn more about our God
and to feel good about yourself
Personally, I am very glad I
found out about Intervarsitv Chris-
tian Fellowship. I encourage all stu-
dents�especially freshmen�to at
least come and observe. If anything,
it will help your life. I am already
making new friends and learning to
accept my imperfections. Please join
us Wednesday night. Even if you
come alone, I guarantee it will be
worth your time.
the Land ofSleep, he is transported final scenes are gtossi d o
into a realm where Earth's myths an attempt to finish the si
and supersti- � ,
� it
f ion
: a v e
DAHLI
Continued from page 6
v. ome ali e,
where magic
reigns and ge-
nies (or Jinn)
are masters of
their domain.
The only
drawback in
either novel is
the climax.
Hubbard spends a great deal of
time detailing the initial and
middle situations (which, in itself,
is not a bad thing), but then fails to
provide that same style to the end-
ing. Battles seem rushed, crucial
Earth's myths ami
superstition have come
alive, where magic
reigns andgenies (or
Jhm) are masters of
their domain.
u n d e t e r -
m i ii e d
minibei of
pages
If
reader is
looking for
an exciting
swords-
' sorcery
tale ot adventure, then Slaves oj
Sleep and The Masters of Sleep is
the book to buy. lut d n't ana
lyze the book too much because
continuity of plot essentials is
not stressed here.
O.K. folks, you better show up for
the weekly staff writers meeting
Wed. at 3:30. Dinner Thursday
night?
lets rara Busch's melodic voice
take over. Another attention
bei on the CD is a song called
! ittle Fish which had a little
bit of every sound.
In an interview in the Char-
lotte Observer, keyboardist Ann
ohnson said, "The band enjoys
playing in the dark, we'll burn
incense, turn on the strobes and
get psychedelic I could really
see them playing some of their
music in this unique fashion. The
last song, "Free is a slow tune
v hk h constantly reminds listen-
ers of Dahli Llama's blooming
talent.
The group is young and has
already had tremendous success,
but they have room for improve-
ment.
The songs previosuly men-
tioned on the new CD contain
some of the best local work I
have ever heard, but some of the
other songs a re so different from
I )ahli I lama's pychedelic image
because the heavy metal sound
takes over.
This band will work hard
to become one of the best alter-
native bands around because
of their love for music. The band
members say, "We are five mu-
sicians who love music and the
musicwecreate. Allwedoand
all we want to do is write, record
and perform our music
With this kind of determi-
nation, Dahli Llama is bound to
becoi.ie a huge success in the
music business.
The band's new CD, Quar-
ter 'til Euphoria, is an exciting
CD vvi th some great psychedelic
songs.
There may be a few songs
that you find yourself skipping
over because of the grunge
sound that is misplaced in Dahli
Llama's style.
- Steve
Griffin
PRIMUS
owners
Other than these two rules,
the club proved itself to be one of
the best sounding music halls in
our area. Since it was opening night,
the atmosphere was uptight and
that should loosen up with some
time.
Primus' two encore numbers
could not have been any more ap-
propriate. Les finger-plucked his
stand-up bass and Ler traded his
guitar for a banjo in the middle of
"The Air is Getting Slippery a
bouncy polka ditty with a refrain
of "It'sincrediblyhotinhere The
fellas came back out on stage a final
time to crank out "Jerry Was a
Racecar Driver the song that put
this brilliant oddball trio on the
college charts.
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- �
The East Carolinian
What's OiFTap?
Wednesday, Nov. 10
Volleyball, away
at Campbell, Buies Creek, N.C.
7 p.m.
The 411
Thursday, Nov. 4
M. Soccer, away
lost to James Madison, 3-0, at
CAA Tournament
Saturday, Nov. 5
Football, home
lost to Tulsa, 52-26
Volleyball, away
lost to Navy, 9-15,15-0,8-15,
15-12,9-15. beat LeHigh, 2-15,
15-7,15-9,15-7
Sunday, Nov. 7
Volleyball, awav
lost to Army, 10-15,15-12,10-
15,14-16
W. Soccer, home
tie, 2-2
i
Al Football Top 25
I.Florida St. (62)
2. Notre Dame
3. Miami
4. Nebraska
5. Ohio St.
6. Tennessee
7. Auburn
8. Florida
9. West Virginia
10. UCLA
11. Texas A&M
12. Alabama
13. Arizona
14. Wisconsin
15. North Carolina
16. Penn St
17. Oklahoma
18. Virginia
19. Indiana
20. Louisville
21. Colorado
22. Boston College
23. Wyoming
24. Kansas St.
25. Washington
Sports
November 9, 1993
Tulsa destroys Pirates in spite of rain
S Carolina offense has been ab-
PhotO by Harold Wise
Richard Petty was presented with an official ECU Pirate jersey at half time of Saturday's game. The day
was officially made Richard Petty Day in the city of Greenville by Mayor Nancy Jenkins.
Sledders beaten by racists
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
The cold, rainy, windy
weather was nothing compared
to the Golden Hurricane that the
helpless Pirates faced Saturday
afternoon. This was the last home
game of the season for ECU and
it was not the best of ways to go
outifyouwerea senior. The Tulsa
offense stormed in to Ficklen Sta-
dium and out with a 52-26 vic-
tory.
ECU, 2-7, has dropped three
in a row and the remaining two
games will be on the road at Ken-
tucky and Cincinnati.
"The nature of football coach-
ing is that you don't ever make
excuses Head Coach Steve
Logan said after the less to his
alma-mater. "I'm not making ex-
cuses; I'm sicker than anyone else
is about the turn of events but
when you get this deep into the
forest, it's incredibly hard to see
the trees
The traditionally potent East
Carolina offense has been ab-
sent this season because of ma-
jor injuries at quarterback. The
normally high powered pass-
ing attack has struggled this
year. The Bucs totaled 38 yards
through the air on Saturday.
"We have bottomed out as
far as our ability to throw and
catch the football Logan said.
"Our inability to catch the foot-
ball is just victimizing and rip-
plingall over the program right
now. It hurtsour special teams,
it hurts our defense. There were
14 points for the University of
Tulsa attributed, once again, to
our offense
The Pirates were making
everything click early on. On
ECU'S first possession, running
back Junior Smith scampered
50 yards on a fake reverse to
give the Pirates an early lead, 6-
0. The extra point failed on a
troubled hold by Michael
Jacobs.
See TULSA page 10
(AP)�The US. Olympic luge
team didn't travel a few thousand
miles to find a crusade. Even so, it
found them.
Last week, a half-dozen of the
sledders had gone to have a few
beersata bar in the town of Oberhof,
where they were training, in what
used to be East Germany. Before
the night was through, a gang of
neo-Nazi skinheads that eventu-
ally numbered 15 would intimi-
date team member Gordy Sheer,
who is Jewish, repeatedly insult
team member Robert Pipkins, who
is black, and punch and stomp
Duncan Kennedy, a two-time
Olympian who tried to distract
them long enough to let Pipkins get
out the door.
"Surprised?" Pipkins saiddur-
ing a telephone interview Tuesday
from the team's hotel in Austria.
"Totally.
"I've been coming here for four
years now, and Duncan has been
coming over since the early 1980s.
We never encountered anything
like this.
"Now I'm not naive said
Pipkins, the 1992 junior world
champion. "I know racism isa prob-
lem in the States, too. But person-
ally, the worst thing that ever hap-
pened to me at home was some-
body driving by in a car, rolling
down the window and yelling,
Trigger and then driving on.
'This he paused, "was worse.
Much, much worse
Police arrived an hour later,
arrested five of the skinheads, ai .d
told the Americans to lock them-
selves in their roomsand takedown
any signs identifying them as U.S.
lugers. Sheer stacked the furniture
inhisroomagainstthedoor.Pipkins
barely slept.
"We feel more secure now that
we're in Austria he said, "and
we're all a little more aware, that's
for sure. The more we talked about
it among ourselves, the more we
felt like it was important to make a
statement. We're public figures, in
a sense, and that gave us a unique
opportunity.
"Like everybody else, we'd
heard about the violence in Ger-
many, about things like this, and
never thougl it tha t anything needed
to be done. Sometimes Pipkins
said, "it takes something like this to
drive a point home
As events would have it, there
were any number of ways for the
lugers to accomplish that. The at-
tack on Kennedy made the front
pagesofmostGerman newspapers.
"A Shameful Act one daily la-
beled the attack.
Apologies from top German
sporting officials, politicians across
the region and the townspeople
poured into the US. lugeassociation,
and alongside them, promises of
tighter security.
The mayor of Oberhof, a townof
3,000 once used by the East German
Olympic team as a winter training
site, took the US. lugers to breakfast
on Saturday and pleaded with them
not to boycott the World Cup meet
scheduled therefor January .Though
US. luge officials were prepared to
do just that if the athletes had con-
cerns for their own safety, whatmayor
Hartmut Goebel could not have
known at the time was how eagerly
the Americans werealreadyplotting
their return to Oberhof. On Monday,
every one of the sledders went back
en the hill, including Kennedy, and
punched the time clock during their
runs within one one-hundredth of
each other.
Paraglider tries to
land in boxing ring
Newman charges 'attempted murder'
Volleyball team finishes 1-2 in tourney
Annapolis, MD (SID) �On
Saturday, the ECU volleyball team
started play in the Navy Forrestal
Classic, finishing the tournament
with a 1-2 record. Overall, the Pi-
rates stand at 11-22 and in the Co-
lonial Athletic Association the Pi-
rates finished the regular season
on Nov. 2 at 1-4. In the first match,
ECU met up with host team Navy
and lost in five, 9-15,15-0,8-15,15-
12,9-15.
"I thought we played well
enough to win. In game five we
stayed at status quo and Navy
punched it up a notch or two said
ECUhead coach Martha McCaskill.
Carrie Bme led the Pirate of-
fense with 17kills. Melanie Richards
had 15, and Staci Winters had 14.
Setter Sarah Laurent had 53 assists
for the match. Both Tara Venn and
Wintershelped thedefensiveeffort
with three solo blocks apiece.
In their second match of the
day ECU took on LeHigh and came
away with their first win of the
tournament in four games, 2-15,15-
7,15-9,15-7. "We started out abso-
lutely non-existentand got killed in
(AP)�Perhaps the only thing
more frightening than a paraglider
dropping unannounced into the
middleofSaturdaynighfstitlefight
would have been if the paraglider
turned out to be Don King.
We can � for a moment ai.y-
way � make light of what hap-
pened because no one was seri-
ously injured. This time.
Evander Hobfield, the former
andonce-againheavyweightcham-
pion, saw the invader before his
opponent did, little more than a
minute into the seventh round. And
even as Holyfield backed up, as-
tonished yet trying to avoid getting
hit by Riddick Bowe, visionsof what
happened toMonica Seles last April
popped into his head.
"I didn't know what was hap-
pening and I was trying to get
away he recalled. "I did mink
about that tennis lady being
stabbed, and I didn't know who
was he coming a fter, me or Bowe
No motive for the drop-in is
known yet, butit'snogood to laugh
and say it's just boxing or a harm-
less publicity stunt.
Three people were carried
away on stretchers from the park-
ing lot-tumed-fight arena in the
evening chill of the Vegas desert,
but all were out of the hospital by
early Sunday. It could have been
worse.
Two of mem � Bowe's preg-
nant wife Judith and his trainer, 82-
year-oklEddieFutch�fainted mo-
mentarily, overcome by the be-
wildering turn of events. The
third, paraglider James Miller,
suffered minor injuries after be-
ing dragged into the crowd and
catching several hard shots from
someone wieldingawalkie-talkie.
Miller was charged initially
with "dangerous flying a mis-
demeanor,and released after post-
ing $200 bail. There was specula-
tion felony charges of public en-
dangerment might follow, but a
police department spokesman
said Sunday any further charges
would haveto come from thedis-
trict attorney's office.
Naturally, Rock Newman,
Bowe's manager, favored some-
thingquicker�and stronger. Af-
ter wading into the crowdadmin-
istering frontier justice to Miller,
he had this advice for prosecu-
tors thinkhe should becharged
with attempted murder
If large chunks of this story
sound familiar, they should.
In the first inning of Game 6
of the 1986 World Series, soap
opera actor Michael Sergio para-
chuted onto the field between the
mound and first base atShea Sta-
dium carrying a banner that read
"Let'sGoMets'Though a few of
the ballplayers were amused, a
NewYorkdistrictattotneynamed
John Santucci was not.
Sergio was charged with
See FIGHT page 9
Women tie Raleigh dub
The Pirates' record moved to 11
the Navy Forrestal Classic. The
game one but men we came back
and played, probably three of the
best games we've played this year
said McCaskill.
Bme led the offense with 14
kills, Gwynn Baber had 12 of her
own and Richards had 10. On de-
fense, Winters had one solo block
and four block assists.
Fit Photo
-22 for the season after playing in
Bucs are 1-4 in the CAA.
On Sunday, the Pirates met up
with Army and lost in four games,
10-15,15-12,10-15,14-16.
ECU plays Campbell on Nov.
10inBuiesCreek,SC.TheCampbeU
match is the Pirates last regular
season match. The CAA tourna-
ment is scheduled forNov.20-21 in
WilliamsburgVa.
Kosar will sit for Philcox against Seattle
Belichick not bashing Bernie
(AP) � When Vinny
Testaverde separated a shoulder
last month, Bemie Kosar returned
to the starting lineup but Bill
Belichick still wasn't happy with
him, saying it was apparent that
Kosar's physical skills had di-
minished over the years.
"We've all seen him play
the coach said. "I'm not going to
bad-mouth and bash Bernie.
We'll sign another quarterback.
Todd (Philcox) will start against
Seattle. He's the quarterback
Kosar completed 79 of 138
passes for 807 yards with five
touchdowns and three intercep-
tions this year.
He started the Browns' first
five games, but was relieved by
Testaverde in the second half of
three of those. Testaverde then
became the starter for two games
before separating his shoulder
on Oct. 24 against Pittsburgh.
Kosar came back as the
Browns' starter Sunday in a 29-14
loss to Denver. He completed 16
of 30 passes including as pair of
touchdowns to Michael Jackson.
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
TheEastCarounawomen'ssoc-
cer club went to Raleigh this past
weekendtotakeontheRaleighdub
team. Raleigh has dominated the
Norm Carolina Women's Soccer
League foryearsand ECU was look-
ing to pull off a major upset and
nearly did, tying them 2-2.
Raleigh is comprised mostly
of former varsity soccer players at
such national powerhouses as N.C.
State and UNC-Chapel Hill. They
have won the league champion-
ship in each of the past five years
and ECU finished runner-up to
them last season, falling in the fi-
nal game, 2-0. In the regular sea-
son meeting last year, ECU was
the only team to score on Raleigh
in a 4-2 loss. The Pirates had been
waiting for the opportunity to
avenge these losses, and the play
in this game was inspired.
East Carolina started a little
slowly partially due to the wet
field conditions and the nervous
energy that had been building up
for months. Raleigh took advan-
tage of this and pressured the Pi-
rate goal early in the match, but
goalkeeper Jaime Pierce turned the
chances away. At the 10 minute
mark, a Raleigh forward broke
through the Pirate defense, and
although Pierce was able to get a
hand on the shot, it slid past her
and into the net for a 1-0 Raleigh
lead. Two minutes later, a scary
situation developed. ECU stop-
per Stephanie Aicher went up
for a head ball, and was hit in the
back of the neck by a Raleigh
attacker. She fell to the ground
and temporarily lost conscious-
ness. The game was delayed for
almost 30 minutes while an am-
bulance was called and she was
taken to the hospital. Fortunately,
she suffered only a mild concus-
sion, and she was not kept over-
night.
After the restart, ECU did an
excellent job of concentrating
their energies on the game and at
the 25 minute mark in the game,
halfback Jennie Haines sent a
cross from the right side of the
field all the way to the left wing
where Kellie Troy fired a shot at
the goal. Raleigh goalie Kathy
Koss stopped the shot, but fresh-
man halfback Mandy Caster put
the rebound in to tie the game at
See SOCCER page 10
���� tmmmmmm
��.p. maimip'
"





November 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
Ruggers lose to Richmond Spiders
Staff Writer
The East Carolina rugby team
fa iled toobta in a seed in the regiona Is
for the second straight year. The Pi-
rate ruggers fell to the University of
Richmond, 23-6.
The game site was sltifted to a
narrow field due to rain, which
plagued the match. Richmond broke
the game open with two trick plays
for trys. When the Pirates tried to
come back, they generated a lot of
offense and dominated the opposi-
ti( n for iong periods. However, they
could not get the ball into In goal.
Pirate scoring was limited to two
penalty' goals by Richard Moss.
"We were competitive, but we
didn't have the finish� that killer
instinct to get the jobdone said lock
Jay Keller. Teamcaptain Jason Webb
mirrored these feelings, saying that
"We've got to take our game more
seriously if we want to play in the
post-season. We keep getting
matches that count, we just seem to
come up short
"We may have expected too
much this season said coach Larry
Babits. "Only three players have
morethanayear'sexperienceattheir
position and over two-thirds of the
team are underclassmen. We've been
playing older, more experienced
sides for the last five weeks and it
shows
Four of the Richmond game
starters are freshmen. The fluid na-
ture of a rugby match dictates that
playersinitiateand react toplay with-
out having a chance to huddle and
discussoptions.Atthe higher levels,
the speed of play is such that sec-
ondscountdramaticallyandexperi-
ence is essential. The Pirates simply
did not have enough experience,
much less high-level competition to
enable them to withstand the Rich-
mond onslaught.
When the Pirates stepped up to
big-time competition, they were de-
feated four times. Since these losses
came against teams going to regional
tournaments, the scores must be in-
dicative of where the young Pirates
stand. The B Team Pirates play at
home Saturday in their season fi-
nale.
Several marks set in loss to Hurricanes
FIGHT
continued from page 8
felony reckless endangerment and
criminal trespass, and soon after
other charges were added. "We're
not laughing at all Santucci said.
"Shea Stadium is not the new sky-
diving center of the universe
That was October. By Decem-
ber of the same year, either moved
by the Mets' series win or the spirit
of the season, Sergio plead guilty
to criminal trespassing and pros-
ecutors dropped the remaining
charges.
Queens Criminal Court Jus-
tice Phyllis Flug took it a step fur-
ther. Before sentencing Santucci to
MX) hours of community service
and fining him $500, she read her
take-off on the poem, "A Visit from
St. Nicholas
It concluded: "But jail's not
the answer in a case of this sort.
To balance the equities is the job
of this court
Bad enough. But we would
do well to remember a Germar
court did even worse sentenc-
ing the man who stabbed Seles
in Hamburg. Judge Elke Bosse
found GuntherParcheguilty of
the a Hack, but also found he had
a "highly abnormal personal-
ity" and su spended his sentence.
Athletes are scared � with
justification. The reason they
perform so flawlessly in front of
so many is because it was once
an article of faith that the many
watching would just sit and
scream.
(SID)�1. EastCarolina'sJun-
ior Smith (Jr RB) set a school and
Ficklen Stadium record with 282
rushing yards on 31 carries and
three touchdowns (8, 65 and 50
yards), in the Pirates' 52-26 loss to
Tulsa on Saturday in Ficklen Sta-
dium. The old ECU mark was245
yards set by Billy Wightman
against Davidson on Nov. 8,1969.
Smith now has two of the three
top rushing games at East Caro-
lina. Last year, against Arkansas
State, Smith rushed for 232 yards
on 31 carries, which is now third
in school history.
2. Smith now has 1,137 rushing
yards this season on 223 carries,
an average of 5.09 yards per carry.
Smith has averaged 1263 yards
per game this season. Smith now
ranks second in school history for
single-season rushing yards. The
list is below:
1. CarlesterCrumpler(1972)
1309 yards
2. JUNIOR SMITH (1993)
1,137 yards
3. Butch Colson (1967)
1,135 yards
Smith needs to average 86
yards per game for the remaining
games to pass Crumpler's season
mark. The Pirates finish the sea-
son at Kentucky and at Cincin-
nati.
3. Smith now has 2326 career
rushing yards, which is fifth in
school history. He is 187 yards
behind fourth-place Butch Colson
(1967-69), who had 2312 yards.
Here is a look at the list:
1. CarlesterCrumpler (1971-73)
2,889 yards
2. Tony Baker (1982-85)
2,825 yards
3. Theodore Sutton (1977-80)
2,730 yards
4. Butch Colson (1967-69)
2312 yards
5. JUNIOR SMITH (1991-)
2326 yards
4. Tulsa's Chris Penn set an ECU
opponent and Ficklen Stadium
record with 16catchesan259yards
receiving.
The old mark belonged to
Tulane's Wilbert Ursin, who had
15 catches for 206 yards, in 1991.
5. Carlester Crumpler failed to
catch a pass for the first time since
the Peach Bowl (Jan. 1, 1992)
against N.C. State.
The senior All-America candi-
date from Greenville, N.C, had
caughtat least two passes in each of
the last 12 games and 18 of the last
19 games.
For the season, Crumpler still
has 26 catches for 283 yards and a
touchdown.
6. East Carolina finishes its 1993
home season witha 2-3 mark. ECU
drew 134,482 fans in 1993 for five
home dates, an average of 26,896
per game.
Little insulation left on Logan's nerves after Saturday
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
East Carolina has reached the point
in the season that it simply looks
ahead to the next opponent.
"Winning or losing, it's that
time of the year Pirate coach
Steve Logan said at his weekly
news conference Monday.
"There's not much insulation left
on the nerve endings
Logan's nerves were a little
more frayed after a 52-26 loss last
weekend to Tulsa. All the Pirates
can do now is get ready for Ken-
tucky, the second Southeastern
Conference team East Carolina has
faced mis season.
South Carolina downed the
Pirates 27-3.
"We went out and had a spir-
ited, peppy workout Sunday
Logan said. "Ihaveacoreof players
thatl work with and I have talked to
several of them in my office about
where they are mentally, physically
and spiritually. And it seems that
they are doing fine
That's more than Logan can
say for his special teams. Although
they didn't matter, East Carolina
missed its first two point-after at-
tempts Saturday.
"I had a freshman holder who
was unaware it was raining Satur-
day Logan said. "Mistakes like
we made are inexcusable
Smith ranked fourth in nation
VI
Greenville, N.C. (SID)�Junior
Smith, who set an ECU and Ficklen
Stadium record with 282yardson31
carries against Tulsa on Saturday, is
currently ranked fourth in the na-
tion in the latest NCAA football sta-
tistics.
Sniith,ajuniorrunningbackfrom
Fayetteville,N.Chasrushedforl,137
yardson 223 carries, foranaverage of
5.1 yards per carry. Smith has also
averaged 1263 yards per game this
season.
The leading rusher in the nation
isNorthern Illinois'LeShon Johnson,
who is averaging 191.7 yards per
game on the ground. Byron Morris
fromTexasTechtssecond,averaging
145.22 yards per game and
Wisconsin's Brent Moss is third, av-
eraging 13422 yards per game.
Smith isalso 19th in the nation in
all purpose rushing, averaging 136.4
yards per game.
The Pirates travel to Lexington,
Ky. this weekend to face the Ken-
tucky Wildcats in a 1 p jn. kkkoff on
Saturday.
I3IBII111111111111111111
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Typing and Word Processing
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� Proofreading � Spelling
� Grammjtr corrections
1.50 Per Page Call: 355-3611 anytime
imiiiumiiai
y
iv
THE ECU HONORS PROGRAM
OFFERINGS FOR SPRING SEMESTER 1994 INCLUDE
Encountering Folk Arts and Artists" "Managerial Accounting"
"Horror Literature"
"CSXewis"
"Chemistry and the Environment"
"Electronic Information Processing"
"Research Process in Biology"
"Human Genetics"
"Rocks, Landscapes, and National Parks" "Statistics for Business"
"History and Philosophy of Technology" "Spanish American Literature (in trans.)
as well as ANrH 1000; ASES 2001; EDUC 3200, ENGL 1200,1250,2000.3420;
FORL2221; INTL 1000: HLTH 1000.4501; HIST 1551.1553; MATH 2172; PHIL
1110,1696; PSYC 1060; SOC1 2110: SPAN 1004; SPED 2000; WOST 2000 & 2400.
ALL ECU STUDENTS WITH 3.4 GPA OR BETTER QUALIFY TO TAKE
HONOR COURSES. REGISTER FOR THEM IN REGULAR REGISTRA-
TION. THEN, BRING YOUR COMPLETED REGISTRATION FORMS TO
THE HONORS OFFICE CALL DR.DAVID SANDERS (757-6373) IN GCB
2026 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Central Book &
Night
EverTuesday
�All well drinks and domestic beets are only
$1 all night long
�Anyone who comes in the door between
9 and 10:30 wins afreet-shirt
�This ad gets you in free between 9 and 10:30
or $1 off the cover after 10:30.
Don't miss $1 night this Tuesday at the Greenville Hilton Inn.
Jeans and T-smrts allowed.
Greenville
inn
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
C ireenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
Remember, Thursday November 11, 1993 is the
deadline to register for the New York trip over the
Thanksgiving Holiday -just a friendly reminder
from The East Carolinian
Vt� "TV-H- � �'�� � n �.� �t � fl �� I -t T� �.T�1.t1W V t � T "WV 1�t���.
W: '
Sssh!
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You'll love our prices!
TGIF
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210 E. 5th St.
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mffimsmmmm
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FREE DELIVERY
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November 9. 1993
The East Carolinian 9
Ruggers lose to Richmond Spiders
Staff Writer
TtV a rugby team
failed toobtnna seed intheregjonals
forth traight year. The Pi-
rate ruggers fell to the University of
Richmond, 23-6.
The game site was shifted to a
narrow field due to rain, which
plagued the ma tch. Richmond broke
the game open with two trick plays
for trys. When the Pirates tried to
come back, they generated a lot of
offense and dominated the opposi-
ig periods. However, they
not get the ball into In goal.
Pirate scoring was limited to two
enalry goals by Richard Moss.
"We were competitive, but we
didn't have the finish� that killer
instinct to get the job done said lock
Jay Keller. Teamcaptain Jason Webb
mirrored these feelings, saying that
"We've got to take our game more
seriously if we want to play in the
post-season. We keep getting
matches that count, we just seem to
come up short
"We may have expected too
much this season said coach Larry
Babits. "Only three players have
rrKirethanayear'sexperienceattheir
position and over two-thirds of the
team are underclassmen. We've been
playing older, more experienced
sides for the last five weeks and it
shows
Four of the Richmond game
starters are freshmen. The fluid na-
ture of a rugby match dictates that
players ini tia te and react to play with-
out having a chance to huddle and
discussoptions. At the higher levels,
the speed of play is such that sec-
ondscount dramatically and experi-
ence is essential. The Pirates simply
did not have enough experience,
much less high-level competition to
enable them to withstand the Rich-
mond onslaught.
When the Pirates stepped up to
big-time competition, they were de-
feated four times. Since these losses
cameagainstteams going toregional
tournaments, the scores must be in-
dicative of where the young Pirates
stand. Tne B Team Pirates play at
home Saturday in their season fi-
nale.
Several marks set in loss to Hurricanes
FIGHT
continued from page 8
felony reckless endanger tent and
criminal trespass, and r after
other charges were added. "We're
not iaughing at all Sanrucci said.
"Shea Stadium is not the new sky-
diving center of the universe
That was October. By Decem-
ber of the same year, either moved
by the Mets'series win or the spirit
of the season, Sergio plead guilty
to criminal trespassing and pros-
ecutors dropped the remaining
charges.
Queens Criminal Court Jus-
tice Phyllis Flug took it a step fur-
ther. Before sentencing Santucci to
1IX) hours of community service
and fining him $500, she read her
take-off on the poem, "A Visit from
St. Nicholas
It concluded: "But jail's not
the answer in a case of this sort.
To balance the equities is the job
of this court
Bad enough. But we would
do well to remember a German
court did even worse sentenc-
ing the man who stabbed Seles
in Hamburg. Judge Elke Bosse
found Gunther Parche guilty of
theattack,butalso found he had
a "highly abnormal personal-
ity" and suspended his sentence.
Athletes are scared � with
justification. The reason they
perform so flawlessly in front of
so many is because it was once
an article of faith that the many
watching would just sit and
scream.
(SID)�1. EastCarolina'sJun-
ior Smith (Jr RB) set a school and
Ficklen Stadium record with 282
rushing yards on 31 carries and
three touchdowns (8, 65 and 50
yards), in the Pirates' 52-26 loss to
Tulsa on Saturday in Ficklen Sta-
dium. The old ECU mark was 245
yards set by Billy Wightman
against Davidson on Nov. 8,1969.
Smith now has two of the three
top rushing games at East Caro-
lina. Last year, against Arkansas
State, Smith rushed for 232 yards
on 31 carries, which is now third
in school history.
2. Smith now has 1,137 rushing
yards this season on 223 carries,
an average of 5.09 ya rds per carry.
Smith has averaged 1263 yards
per game this season. Smith now
ranks second in school history for
single-season rushing yards. The
list is below:
1. CarlesterCrumpler(1972)
1,309 yards
2. JUNIOR SMITH (1993)
1,137 yards
3. Butch Colson (1967)
1,135 yards
Smith needs to average 86
yards per game for the remaining
games to pass Crumpler's season
mark. The Pirates finish the sea-
son at Kentucky and at Cincin-
nati.
3. Smith now has 2326 career
rushing yards, which is fifth in
school history. He is 187 yards
behind fourth-placeButchColson
(1967-69), who had 2312 yards.
Here is a look at the list:
1. CarlesterCrumpler (1971-73)
2,889 yards
2. Tony Baker (1982-85)
2,825 yards
3. Theodore Sutton (1977-80)
2,730 yards
4. Butch Colson (1967-69)
2312 yards
5. JUNIOR SMITH (1991-)
2326 yards
4. Tulsa's Chris Penn set an ECU
opponent and Ficklen Stadium
record wi th 16catchesan 259 yards
receiving.
The old mark belonged to
Tulane's Wilbert Ursin, who had
15 catches for 206 yards, in 1991.
5. Carlester Crumpler failed to
catch a pass for the first time since
the Peach Bowl (Jan. 1, 1992)
against N.C. State.
The senior All-America candi-
date from Greenville, N.C, had
caught at least two passes in each of
the last 12 games and 18 of the last
19 games.
For the season, Crumpler still
has 26 catches for 283 yards and a
touchdown.
6. East Carolina finishes its 1993
home season with a 2-3 mark. ECU
drew 134,482 fans in 1993 for five
home dates, an average of 26,896
per game.
Remember, Thursday November 11, 1993 is the
deadline to register for the New York trip over the
Thanksgiving Holiday -just a friendly reminder
from The East Carolinian
Sssht
It's A Weil-Kept Secret. . .
We can't say what garment labels have been
cut . come by and you'll recognize them.
You'll love our prices!
TGIF
Division of U.B.E.
210 E. 5th St.
Little insulation left on Logan's nerves after Saturday
OUTLET M-S 10-6
i m
wmmmmimmm
GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) �
East Carolina has reached the point
in the season that it simply looks
ahead to the next opponent.
"Winning or losing, it's that
time of the year Pirate coach
Steve Logan said at his weekly
news conference Monday.
"There's not much insulation left
on the nerve endings
Logan's nerves were a little
more frayed after a 52-26 loss last
weekend to Tulsa. All the Pirates
can do now is get ready for Ken-
tucky, the second Southeastern
Conference team East Carolina has
faced this season.
South Carolina downed the
Pirates 27-3.
"We went out and had a spir-
ited, peppy workout Sunday
Logansaid. "Ihaveacoreof players
that I work with and I have talked to
several of them in my office about
where they are mentally, physically
and spiritually. And it seems that
they are doing fine
That's more than Logan can
say for his special teams. Although
they didn't matter, East Carolina
missed its first two point-after at-
tempts Saturday.
"I had a freshman holder who
was unaware it was raining Satur-
day Logan said. "Mistakes like
we made are inexcusable
We deliver to Dorms
ALFREDO'S fai
ECU'S Favorite Pizza Place
Smith ranked fourth in nation
mm mm iimmiiiiiiimimmiiim
Greenville, N.C (SID)�Junior
Smith, who set an ECU and Ficklen
Stadiumrecord with282yardson31
carries against Tulsa on Saturday, is
currently ranked fourth in the na-
tion in the latest NCAA football sta-
tistics.
Smith,ajunkxrunningbackfrorn
FayetteviIle,N.Chasrushed for 1,137
yardson 223 carries, foranaverage of
5.1 yards per carry. Smith has also
averaged 1263 yards per game this
season.
The leading rusher in the nation
isNorthem Illinois'LeShon Johnson,
who is averaging 191.7 yards per
game on the ground. Byron Morris
fromTexasTechissecond,averaging
145.22 yards per game and
Wisconsin's Brent Moss is third, av-
eraging 13422 yards per game.
Smith isalso 19th in the nation in
all purpose rushing, averaging 136.4
yards per game.
The Pirates travel to Lexington,
Ky. this weekend to face the Ken-
tucky Wildcats in a 1 port, kickoff on
Saturday.
5
Professional
Typing and Word Processing
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� Grammar corrections
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IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIII
THE ECU HONORS PROGRAM
OFFERINGS FOR SPRING SEMESTER 1994 INCLUDE
Encountering Folk Arts and Artists"
"Horror Literature"
"CSXewis"
"Chemistry and the Environment"
"Managerial Accounting"
" Electronic Information Processing"
" Research Process in Biology "
" Human Genetics "
"Rocks Landscapes, and National Parks" "Statistics for Business"
"Hist ryand Philosophy of Technology "Spanish American Literature (in trans.)
as well as ANTH 1000; ASES 2001; EDUC 3200; ENGL 1200.1250.2000,3420;
FORL2221; INTL 1000; HLTH 1000.4501; HIST 1551,1553; MATH 2172; PHIL
1110.1696; PSYC 1060; SOCI 2110; SPAN 1004; SPED 2000; WOST 2000 & 2400.
ALL ECU STUDENTS WITH 3.4 GPA OR BETTER QUALIFY TO TAKE
HONORS COURSES. REGISTER FOR THEM IN REGULAR REGISTRA-
TION. THEN, BRING YOUR COMPLETED REGISTRATION FORMS TO
THE HONORS OFFICE. CALL DK.DAVID SANDERS (757-6373) IN GCB
2026 FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Central Book &
Night
twtyTuesday
AtHiefc?
�All well drinks and domestic beers are only
$1 all night long
�Anyone who comes in the door between
9 and 10:30 wins afreet-shirt
�This ad gets you in free between 9 and 10: JO
or$loffthe cover after 10:30.
Don't missI niqht this Tuesday at the Greenville Hilton Inn.
Jeans and T-shirts allowed
jW Greenville
fif&jfy� Astepab&ue the rest.
W INN 207 SW Greenville Blvd � 355-5000
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
C irccnville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Call 1 -800-ECU-ARTS for more information.
(NOT RECOMENDED FOR YOUNG CHILDREN)
Breakfast
� You must register for Success at Sunrise.
Call SLOP at 757-496 no later than 4:00 pm, Friday,
to hear David Bailev's leadership and success secrets.
Receive wake-up calf, local ride to MSC, and breakfast!
Free for
students!
Bailey
United
Sponsored by Student Leaderstii





November 9, 1993
TULSA
continued from page 8
theBuc:
iint
However, the rain could not
slow down a highly-talented
Tulsa offense. Quarterback Gus
Frerotte and receiver Chris Perm
abused the ECU aecondary. Perm
caught the ball 16 times for 259
yards to set a Ficklen record. He
also celebrated four touchdown
receptions.
"We saw a Sunday afternoon
wide receiver that's a good foot-
ball player Logan said about
Perm. "He overcame the elements
like a true football player should
and could,and I give Tulsa all the
credit offensively
The Pirates used man-to-man
coverage all game and did not
make the necessary adjustments
to stop the passing onslaught.
"Today I got beat by the num-
ber-two receiver in the nation �
got beat three times by the num-
;ber-two receiver in the nation'
.senior comerbackTravis Render
!said. "It was my job to cover the
"man, and I didn't cover him so 1
accept responsibility for that
The Pirates watched their 12-
0 lead start to unravel. Tulsa
kicker Brandon Brister connected
on a 22-yard field goal to make it
12-3 in the first quarter.
The second quarter was all
Tulsa. Perm scored his firstTDon
a five yard-pass from Frerotte to
bring it to 12-10. Then two ECU
penalties on the next possession
set up Perm's second TD with
13:32 left in the second quarter
and the score at half-time was 17-
12.
Then came the tough third
or the Pirates. Tulsa
would march 71 yards in four
plays, marked by Penn's third
uchdown catch to move the
re to 24-12. Then Garrick
Jackson's interception return for
a TD made the score 31-12.
However, Smith would slash
through a Tulsa defense over and
over to gain an ECU record 282
yards rushing. He was able to
break the l,000yard mark for the
season and now has 1,137 yards
rushing on 223 carries. Smith is
averaging 126.3 yards per game
and 5.09 avg. per carry, good for
fourth in the nation.
"Junior is just a blessing to
me personally and to this football
program and to the University
Logan said. "Nothing he ever
does surprises me. If he runs for
500 or he runs for five, he goes
out and plays lights-out. My hat
is off to him
Smith now stands fifth in
ECU career rushing yards with
2,326. Smith only needs 172 yards
in the final two games to break
the single-season rushing record
set by Carlester Crumpler, Sr.
"I wanted to go in and give
110 percent for the seniors, for
myself and for my family, "Smith
said. "We worked hard all week
in practice on the set goals for this
week and just try to have a good
consistent game. Unfortunately,
we didn't get the win but I feel
that I gave 100 percent and that's
all I can ask of myself
As a team, the Pirates ran for
377 yards on a wet and sloppy I
field. The offensive line played
exceptionally well against Tulsa's
large defensive line.
Quarterback Perez Mattison
is still enduring a tough learning
process as a starting quarterback.
The rainy weather did not help
his stats: 4-19 passing for 38 yards
and two interceptions.
Ail-American candidate,
tightendCarlesterCrumpler,did
not catch a pass in his final home
game and marked the first time
he went a game without a catch
since the Peach Bowigamenearly
two years ago.
The Pirates got on the board
again in the third quarter. Smith
broke a 65-yard run and
Mattison's rush for the two-point
conversion made the score31-20.
However, Tulsa tight end Phil
Nitowski caught a one-yard pass
with 24 seconds remaining in the
third to up the score to 38-20.
Frerotte hooked up with Penn
on a 14-yard pass for another TD
to bring the score to 45-20.
Then the Pirates put their fi-
nal points on the board when
Smith rushed for an eight-yard
TD. The failed conversion pitted
the score, 45-26.
The final score came on an-
other Frerotte TD pass and
Brister's kick made the final 52-
26.
NASCAR legend Richard
Petty was honored at half-time.
Greenvile gave the living legend
a key to the city for his accom-
plishments. The small Ficklen
crowd seemed toclearoutassoon
"The King" left.
SOCCER
1.Raleigh consistentlytried to build
attacks through their star forward,
but ECU midfielder Maureen
Corcoran did an excellent job of
shadow-marking her throughout
the game, and she was unable to
get on track.
In the second half, the game
flowed from end to end with nei-
ther team able to gain an advan-
tage. Fifteen minutes into the half,
Toni DeRose beat a defender and
had a one-on-one with the Raleigh
keeper. The keeper grabbed
DeRose's legs and a penalty kick
was awarded to East Carolina.
DeRose's pena 1 ty shot was headed
for the right side of the goal, but the
Look for
The Namgator
Nov. 18. It is
your guide
for Pirate
basketball.
Ad space still
available
GET APPLICATIONS
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NOV. GBA MEETING
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Distinguished Speaker:
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Maritime History Bldg. Corner of 9th and Cotanche St.
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For Information, call 757-0630 (evenings)
Madrigal 'Dinners
iDecemSer2,3, 4 - 7:00 p.m.
tDecem6er 5 � 5:00 p.m.
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East Carolina Zlniversity
The Lorde andLadye of the. Manor,
James andfranceine fyes,
invite you to join them for this wonderful
evening of music, dance, andfeUowship
reminiscent of the TJbzabethan Teriod.
Menu includes:
�WaldorfSalad
Prime Kj6 au Jus
or
pastedCfticksn 'Breast with
fruited !Rjce Stuffing
Qreen (Beans Mnondine
Kpus and'Butter
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Wassail, Icedlea, and Coffee
�PrtmiumScatiiuj � f2S tgu!wStating - $20
Cfdtdnn (12 and under) $15.
Ca�Cl-800ECU-JUySfJr more information
continued from page 8
goalkeeper made a fantastic save
to deny the Pirates a golden oppor-
tunity. Six minutes later, the left
wing for Raleigh sent a corner kick
in frontof the Pirategoal, and after
the cross, another Raleigh player
rifled a half volley into the net to
put Raleigh up 2-1. With 15 min-
utes left in the game, ECU had a
free kick from the left side of the
penalty area from 25 yards out.
Fullback Missy Cone pounded a
shot into the crossbar and once
again Gaster was there to follow it
up.
The game ended in a 2-2 tie,
but it was a moral victory for the
Pirates as Raleigh had beaten them
in their previous seven meetings.
Following the game ECU coach
Doug Silver said, "I think that we
have finally removed the aura of
invincibility from this Raleigh
team. Wehadchancestoboth win
this game and let it slip away.
Hopefully we will build on this
experience and beat this team
when we play in the Spring sea-
son.
The women's soccer club is
going to Boone, N.C. this week-
end to compete in a tournament.
They will face teams from Ten-
nessee,Clemson,Tennessee-Chat-
tanooga, Appalachian State,
UNC-G and South Carolina.
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'






Title
The East Carolinian, November 9, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 09, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.974
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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