The East Carolinian, November 4, 1993






4lt�i
� �aw�
Awareness
j Jimmy "12-Gear" B.
st soul in
� What
Joes jj7
See Chapter 10 on page 2.
Sports
King of the Road
Richard Petty will be
appearing at half time of the
last home game of the
season against Tulsa this
Saturday at Flcklen Stadium.
Story page 11.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 64 rimi-ofi� nnnn " ����
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
University bond passes
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Regardless of the low-voter turnout, the University Bond passed. Here
K. Michelle Johnson (ECU graduate student) prepares to vote.
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
No more warehouse. No
more sitting in the halls. No more
talk of losing accreditation. And
no more begging the General As-
sembly to renovate Joyner Li-
brary. North Carolina voters ap-
proved a $310 million bond ref-
erendum Tuesday to finance
capital improvements at state
universities, including ECU.
ECU will receive about 10
percent of the referendum's $310
million, to be divided among two
campus projects. $29.5 million
will go toward the construction
of a new addition to Joyner Li-
brary while $5 million will be
spent to acquire the former J. H.
Rose High School property.
The vote on the university
bonds was closer than many ex-
pected on a day in which turn-
out was low. Early returns to-
taled 413,477, or 53 percent for
the bonds and 369,684, or 47 per-
cent against them.
ECU should receive its por-
tion of the money in the near
future. UNC President C. D.
Spangler said that the state trea-
surer will sell the bonds imme-
diately, and within six months
almost all projects statewide
should be underway.
"We are looking to begin
construction in early spring
Chancellor Richard Eakin said
Tuesday night after an unoffi-
:ial ground-breaking ceremony
for the Joyner additions. "The
project should be completed in
two or two and a half years. This
is a tremendous investment in
the future. It is a way to provide
for our children and our grand-
children
The university bonds got a
boost from the relatively large
voter turnout in communities as-
sociated with the university sys-
tem. More than 16,000 people,
or 31 percent of registered vot-
ers cast ballots in Pitt County.
Board of Elections Supervisor
Margaret Hardee said that was a
good turnout considering the
lack of nationwide or statewide
races on the ballot.
Many ECU students helped
campaign for the bond issue. The
SGA produced "Let's Bond" and
"Vote Yes" T-shirts along with
"Vote for Your New Library"
buttons. Students also distrib-
uted banners and yard signs
throughout the community.
In addition to the univer-
sity bonds, voters approved
three other bond projects as well.
The $250 million Community
College bond package passed
with 56 percent, the $145 million
Water and Sewer bond garnered
59 percent and the $35 million
State Parks bond received 56
percent.
Pitt Community College,
See BOND page 4
��; 6 � "� unom- see BUND pe
Kash of attacks prompt Safety Act
By Maureen Rich Safety Act. The recommend. surh a r,rr�w k�1 " .
By Maureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Student Govern-
ment Association (SGA) refuses
to sit idly by and watch campus
crime increasingly threaten and
frighten students, faculty, staff
and visitors.
With the support of Chan-
cellor Richard R. Eakin, Dean of
Students Ronald Speier and
ECU Lt. Keith Knox, the SGA
recently proposed a Campus
Safety Act. The recommend
tion was authored and spon-
sored by SGA Speaker Brynn
Thomas.
"Practicing responsible be-
havior that promotes personal
safety is the key aspect to re-
ducing the robberies on our
campus Thomas said in the
proposal's cover letter.
Recent on-campus assaults
and robberies prompted the
SGA to step up their efforts to
pass this act, but initiative for
such a project began over the
summer.
"The Student Government
Association wants the students
of ECU to know that we are
responding to their needs the
letter reads. "We also want to
send a message to the people
responsible for these robberies
that we will not tolerate their
actions on our campus, and that
we will do whatever it takes to
maintain ECU's reputation for
having a safe campus
The Campus Safety Act
consists of five phases, and
while phase one is already in
progress, phases two through
four are planned for the near
future.
Phase one, which was cre-
ated and approved by the SGA
Executive Council during the
Summer Legislature, provided
two bicycles for Public Safety.
They will be used to patrol cam-
See SGA page 4
Finance club visits NYSE
The ECU Financial Management Club traveled to New York City last
month and got a rare view of the Stock Exchange floor.
BysonWilliams
Staff Writer7
It's one of the most hectic
places in America. Harried trad-
ers scurry from telephone to
computer terminal, buying and
selling millions of dollars worth
of stock each day. The place is
the New York Stock Exchange
and a lucky group of ECU stu-
dents got to walk on floor dur-
ing business hours.
The ECU Financial Man-
agement Club traveled last
month to New York City to get
a glimpse of Wall Street. Thirty-
six students and 10 faculty
members drove up to New York
on Oct. 21. The group stayed
in downtown Manhattan.
The following day, the
group met at the VIP lounge at
the Stock Exchange for a lec-
ture on trading and commodi-
ties exchange and then went
to the Federal Reserve Bank in
New York. Afterwards, stu-
dents chose to go to either the
Futures Exchange or the Cot-
ton Exchange and the Merrill
Lynch and Lehman Brothers
Brokerage Houses.
Later that day, the group
reconvened at the stock ex-
change to visit the floor. The
See STOCK page 2
Foreign policy specialist to provide a recap of Watereate
By Stephanie Lassiter � . &
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
ECU will revisit Watergate
tonight d uring a guest lecture given
by Joan Hoff, a specialist in 20th
century foreign policy and poli-
tics.
"She is an outstanding histo-
rian of foreign policy and women's
history said Mary Jo Bratton, act-
ing chair of the history department.
The lecture, which is the 12th
annual Lawrence Brewster Lecture
in History, will begin a 18:15 in the
Francis Speight Auditorium. It is
free and open to the public.
Hoff, who is former execu-
tive secretary of the Organization
of American Historians and au-
thor of the forthcoming book Nixon
Without Watergate: A Presidency
Reconsidered, received her PhD
degree at the University of Califor-
nia, Berkeley.
She is currently a member of
the Indiana University faculty. Pre-
viously, she taught at California
State University-Sacramento, Ari-
zona State University, Dartmouth
College and the University of Vir-
ginia.
"She is an outstanding and
stimulatingspeaker Brattonsaid.
Hoff received a Guggenheim
Fellowship and Fulbright awards
for teaching and lecturing in Aus-
tralia and Ireland. Also, she has
received awards for studies at
Harvard Law School, Radcliffe
Institute and the Brookings Insti-
tution.
She wrote Law, Gender and
Injustice: A Legal History of U.S.
Women, published in 1991 and ed-
ited the 1986 book The Rights of
Passage: The Past, Present, and Fu-
ture of the Equal Rights Amendment.
Other books Hoff has writ-
ten are a revisionist biography,
Herbert Hoover: Forgotten Progres-
sive (1975) and Sexism and the Law:
Male Beliefs and Legal Bias in Britain
and the U.S. (1978), co-authored by
Albie Sachs.
"We would be happy to ha ve
students and faculty attend this
controversial lecture, years after
Watergate Bratton said.
Black Panther
dispels myths
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Irememberbeingatsum-
mer camp when I was 12 and
being told if I didn't go to sleep
the Black Panthers would come
through the corn field and kill
me. This is yet another fabrica-
tion created by American soci-
ety.
David Hilliard, former
chief of staff of the Black Pan-
ther Party, discussed both the
myths and the truths of the
party to a group of nearly 200
in Mendenhall Tuesday night.
According to Hilliard, the
Black Panther Party was "born
out ot the stresses of Hie Civil
Rights Movement
Contrary to popular be-
lief, the party did not promote
violence, but did believe in self-
defense. Hilliard said that the
media played on the party's
possession of weaponry and
its protests against gun laws.
Because of the media, people
developed negative images of
the Black Panther Party.
"You saw Bobby Seale
going into the state capital with
a delegation of Panther Party
members protesting gun laws
in the State of California
Hilliard said.
Rather than killing inno-
cent campers in corn fields, the
party dealt with the basic needs
of blacks. Programs such as free
breakfast for school children
were begun by the Black Pan-
ther Party.
"We recognized that
nourishmentwas synonymous
with education he said.
Many of the facets of the
party's 10-point program are
now, 20 years later, being rec-
ognized. Decent housing, full-
time employment and a free
health care system are a few of
the points that Hilliard and his
cohorts struggled for in the late
60s and early 70s. Today, as a
nation, all ethnic groups face
these problems.
The Black Panther
Party was started in 1966 at a
junior college in Oakland by
Bobby Seale and Huey New-
ton. Originally, there were
two Black Panther groups.
One dealt with self-defense,
and the other dealt with po-
litical issues. The Black Pan-
ther Party for self-defense
carried exposed weapons
and patrolled policemen to
be certain that blacks, or oth-
ers, were not being treated
unjustly.
Although the party
members carried guns, they
were not breaking any laws.
Hilliard said Huey Newton,
also a law student, carried a
shotgun under one arm and
a law book under the other.
"When we went out on
those patrols, Huey was al-
ways there to tell the police
that we were not in violation
of the law, that we were
merely there to observe them
carrying out their duties
Hilliard said.
Eventually, Hilliard
and other party members
weie involved in a 90-minute
shoot-out with the Oakland
Police where a party mem-
ber was killed. Hilliard, as a
result of the shoot-out, re-
ceived a four-year prison sen-
tence.
By the 1970s, the Black
Panthers were providing free
breakfast for schoolchildren,
a senior transport service for
the elderly receiving senior
citizen's checks and free
medical and legal services for
the poor.
"We were very effec-
tive in terms of our commu-
nity organizing programs
See PANTHER page 3
r�, � . � . c . , Photo by Harold Wise
Uavid Hilliard, former chief of staff oi the Black Panther Party
spoke on campus Tuesday, in an attempt to dispel long held myths.





November 4, 993
yses
ECU chair wins award
?sJk
has nearh ,1c
m from their
home w .is the most horrih ing
my life She later leai
� destroyed theii old apartment But her father ma
i o lucky. "1 haven't heard n in a yeai and
lid "1 have no idea where he is, or if he's alive
Practice Zen for your tests
eat this phrase several times: 'Grades do not mattei
Grades do nol matter So uh.it it midterms are coming up and
� majoi papersdue Keep repeating, "Grades do not
�rtsj I.Gibbs a professor of criminology at Indiana
ennsylvania (libbs, author of Dancing With You
suggests th.it students practice
nd thezone to leam how to score high grades. He
etips to get in the on mode: Clear our mind through
meditation and deep breathing. I et go ol other tasks, times and
places and make a commitment to study for a set amount of time
Settle into studying and absorb the material. I dismiss thoughts
thal ! ing from the task. Study as if it's the onl) reasonyou
were put on this earth.
Dartmouth explores alcohol programs
recent independent study has shown th.it Dartmouth
College undergraduates who drink consume almosl twice .is
much alcohol per week as students at other colleges and univer-
sities. Asa result t that study, the college is stepping up efforts
at alcohol education to complement enforcement of the college's
policy on alcohol. I hose who drink consume an average ot nine
dnnks per u eek. 1 he national average, based on a studyof 56,000
students at 78 colleges an.I universities, is 5.1 drinks week!)
rhose numbers combined with a major increase in the number of
alcohol-related disciplinary actions, have Dartmouth officials
working to improve the situation.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
in.l being a ti e on several . om
mitt
At the state level. Wood re
��" ond ceived the c association s dis
t of I lealth tinguished member .m ard in 1985
nt in the when she served as its vice-presi-
S ien.es. dent and president
lushed Wood is a current member
' ard by the American ol the national house ot delegates
: m Management for the association,
its annual commit- t"he $5,000 member associa-
v- � Georgia. tion does not elect a recipient oi
iciation presents the the award yearly.
hed Member Award to "Since 1960, only about 15
ivho has shown in- people have earned it Wood
thi ,iss(H i.ition at said,
both the state and national level Being acknowledged as
elieveitWood distinguished member grants
sa'o leel proud and Wood automatic lifetime member-
humble at the same time ship in the association
wood served as the national "It made me realize that
president from 1985 to 1986, as people do recognize your efforts
well as holding ,i membership and appreciate you doing things
position ol the bo,nd ol directors for them Wood said.
Drugs suspect in actor's death
STOCK
Continued from page 1
I OS , , 5 lAp, Xn
autops on River Phoenix was m-
coik lusive ,uk nut sfigators are
awaiting test result u rtether
drugs played a role in the death of
the rising I toll w ot star, the
coroner's office s.ns.
Coroner's spokesman Scot!
I artier s.iuf the toxicology results
won't be available for weeks.
But the 1V news magazine
I lank op i iting an anonymous
hospital source, said thatblood tests
at (, edars Sinai Medical c enter,
where the 2 I year old actoi died
early Sunday, found cocaine and
V,ilium
Paramedics were told the ac-
tor had been taking drugs, county
me (.apt Ray Ribarsaid,
It was the i iassic cocaine
overre.n tion it just nails some
'people' ond stops the heart he
s.lld.
Phoenix, who played a tough
kid who stands up to bullies in the
1986 movie Stand by Me and won
an Oscar nomination tor the 1988
Runningon Empty, collapsed out-
side the Viper Room nightclub
He was writhing on the side-
walk � flopping around like "a
fish out of water one witness
s.iid - as his brother screamed
into the phone: "He's dying
"You must get here, please,
you must get here, please
foaquin I eaf" Phoenix, 19, told a
911 dispatcher. "I'm thinking he
had Valium or something
Phoenix s other movies in-
cluded The Mosquito Coast, My
c hen Private Idaho and Indiana Jones
and the Last Crusade.
I larrison Ford, who played
Phoenix's father in The Mosquito
Coast, said "He played my son
once and I came to love him like a
son, and was proud to watch him
grow into a man of such talent and
integrity and compassion. We will
all miss him
Funeral arrangements were
incomplete.
EAST
I
Chapter 10
I he trucker and I s.it down in
� me of Hurt's dimly lit booths for a
more private conversation I lifted
m hand tor Hurt to brm; over a
coupleof beers, though I really didn't
wantanothei one after the kid. Some
how I thought I would need one
though - this trucker showing up
was ust too convenient
As the trucker took a long swal-
low ol his beer, I studied him a little
morei losely. I lehad thislookabout
him, see � like he could knock the
helloutofan) cuiveliferrtightthrow
at him. With his faded denim shirt
and his casual attitude, I knew that
tins guy had never had a serious
problem in his life. I hat's why the
first words out of his mouth threw
me so badly.
'Buddy, I need some help find-
ing this guy named Cohol I almost
choked on my own beer, but he
didn't seem to notice Asl w ipedmy
mouth with the back of m hand, he
went on. "See, I been on this long
haul ten stops so tar, two to go
but I can'l seem to find my wav to
the next one. l map ain't helping
none, either "
He pulled out a rolled-uppiece
i hmentandflattened itouton
n front ol me. As 1 leaned
o er the table and looked at the map
w ith him, he continued.
"See, this is where I started I le
pointed to the left side of the map,
vesting his finger on i dot in the
middle. "We'll just call it step 1 for
now Here 1 admit that I have a prob-
lem with Cohol thataffects my whole
life As he went on, his ringer tra ed
along the map.
Step 2 is where I come to re.il-
ize that I need some help getting
ei im problem. Steplets rne
ept tl it 1 need something other
than myself to provide direction.
Step 4 makes me take a look at the
negath ethingswheri I'm witht ohol
and the positive things when I'm
not. Sort : ti is and i ons thing
the true! er stopped tor a minuu to
(
J
' a
Cv

EAST
CAROLINIAN
The Bretvery.
place where dreams are made and unmade . , i ; an turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kepi one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy aero the street. Basically, a place
V aiiere a man can forget his troubles and drown his
� J" , �- ' ,rv � sorrows for awhile.
"Y'f -A " Mick Hammered had sioorn never to set foot
; - yL0 'J? s,w BreioerV aSain Setting out to find his old
l T 3 friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermenh d world if the Brewery
! very Thursdayin Tltel , irolinian Ait A
will meetacltaracterwhozvilli xpose Uinaioholcnezvlivht. When it - finally
over and done with Mick�and the reader - willbefacedwithoneofthemosl
important questions either has evei fat ed.
What place does Al t 'ohol hare in my I

�ym
5 uncorks that bottle ot
guilt and frustration, letting all m
I isi .at into theopen 6 and
ne awareof m old behav
lets me know that I i an
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane's Hummer ami Hammett's Spade
loel Keggsy The Beersborough Gazette
change it I want to I stopped him
by raising my hand.
I fold on a second, Mac. What
does this do for you? What s the
point I w.is still reeling from this
guy looking for Al, too. He even
had. .i in.ii tor Chrissakes Where
had he gotten it? More importantly,
who had given it to him?
"Heats me. buddy. All 1 know
is that before I started on it, the only
direction I was going was down-
hill I nodded mv head in agree
ment, remembering the main times
I had felt the same w ay ike going
60-miles-an-hour, putting your foot
on the brake, and having it go all the
way down to the floor Not good.
"Steps 8 and l' trs to make
amends to anyone or anything I
may have hurt when I was with this
guv. I'm not looking lor forgive-
ness, mind you, I just want to bal-
ance the scales it I can I le looked
at me tor understanding until nod-
ded my head for him to continue.
"steps Id, and 1 help pro-
mote mv new behav ioi and encour-
ages me to help others th ough m
own past. I he thing is I'm not too
sure where to go next. Guess I'll
find out when I get there, huh1
I he trucker stood up and stuck
his hand out Before I even knew it,
he was pumping my hand like a
pistonin.inn ingcarengine 'Jimmy
Bs the name, buddy, and thanks
forthehelp keep the map. you look
like you need it more than me ' I le
turned and walked out the door
'Help ' What are you ?" I
grabbed the map and ran after him.
No wa was he lea mg without an
explanation. Hut as! burst outol the
door, the trucker's rig was gone
Vanished like it wasnevei there
s I stood on the dustv street
the � mpty, dustv street this
voice i a me oul of nowhere. "You
are now entering a dimension nol
only ot barlev and hops, hut of
wheat A world ol liquoi and spir-
its, ol firewater and booze 1 felt a
w hirring sensation in my gut I ike a
w hirlpool had settled there and w s
dragging me doi n u ith it.
"A signpost up ahead, ou'll
now listen to rales from the Drunk
Side
HI PS
204 1 Mil M
") () J
students were di ided into were al M ui, u, p s
groups ol three oi foui and .is- usualh on I rid
signed to a trader I he trade. I illianW ilsl ident
walked the students through of the Financial Managemenl
then trans.u tionsand gave them lub
Pointers in finance the trip cost about $100
Students usualh aren'tal per person, rheclub was able
lowed on the floor Di Stan to raise money through a raffl.
! akins professorol financesaid held earlier in th- semester
"I think the traders were tickled .he) were able to get on
about the students being out the floor through personal con
there w ith them. no, tions.
"It looked like chaos at "One of the students has
lust, but when we met with the a cousin who has been a trader
specialists on the floor, they for years Eakinssaid
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November 4, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
PANTHER
Continued from page 1
. itn ivi-
onal sales near
Isocamefrom
munit) fund-
tiling homemade
I lilliard told the CBS news team
that the party "did not ask for
violence One commentator im-
plied that a party newspaper slo-
gan was 'Kill the Pigs Milliard
remarked that the partv only ad-
vocated killing those who killed
them.
The hosts asked how long
the Black Panthers intended to con-
tinue righting for its cause.
Hilliard replied, "There is no
blueprint for the revolution. We
are prepared to struggle 40 or 50
years, however long it takes
Hilliard spoke, both on the
video and during lis lecture, on
the FBI's infiltration of the party.
Apparently, the FBI and other gov-
ernment organizations used
sneaky tactics to lead to the party's
descent in 1974.
After the video presentation,
Hilliard opened a questionan-
swer session. He told the audi-
ence that much of the funding for
i i no
government erant
get tied into
he said.
"he 90s' struggle for blacks
was also addressed, but Hilliard
said the people of today face
struggles tar more difficult than
civil rights. He mentioned AIDS,
environmental issues, unemploy-
ment and a faltering educational
system. He said he was glad to be
on his side of the generation gap.
Hilliard said the primarv
problem for American blacks is
fratricide, the violence against each
other.
"In 1969, you could walk the
street at three in the morning and
not worry about being shot he
said. "There was respect for the
race
Students questioned the
roles that current rappers plav in
society. Hilliard said rappers like
Ice-T, who performs "Cop Killer
are irresponsible.
"We the Partv were not in-
discriminately killing cops he
said. "It is irresponsible for Ice-T
to tell our youth to go out and do
that
He compared Ice-T to him-
sel t a 124 years of age when he was
going around cursing preachers.
Huev Newton told Hilliard that
the party was not about that.
"They rappers are making
money at the expense of other gen-
erations being warped Hilliard
said.
Hilliard said that Reginald
I Jenny, who was pulled out of his
truck and beaten during the L.A.
riots, "emerged as a premiere hu-
man-being for being able to for-
give
According to Hilliard, black
women played key roles in the
Black Panther Party. Frances
Carter Hilliard (his sister-in-law)
pioneered the Bridgeport and New
Haven, Connecticut, chapters.
Elaine Brown, author of A Taste of
Power, was a leader in the party.
He compared these women to
Harriet Tubrr.an, "conductor" of
the Underground Railroad.
Hilliard's autobiography,
This Side of Glory, regresses from
the murder of his long-time friend,
also party co-founder, Huev New-
ton, to the party's formation in
1966.
Today, Hilliard lives in Ber-
kelev and continues to speak on
the racial divisions in America.
He will marry in December.
The lecture was sponsored
by the Student UnionMinority
Arts Committee.
"We felt that a lot of people
had misconceptions about the
party and we wanted to correct
these myths said Rhonda
Cummings, member of the com-
mittee.
"The Student Union Minor-
ity Arts Committee is attempting
to bring a more diversified pro-
gram to ECU said Susan Stewart,
chairperson of the committee.
"Look out for us in the spring
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Basketball game. Door Prizes will given avu
Jury selection to begin in sexual trial
WORCESTER, Mass. (AP)�
Attorneys for a Duke University
professor sought Tuesday toblock
a jury from hearing recordings of
telephone conversations he had
with a graduate student who has
accused him of sexual assault.
C. Eric Lincoln � a Method-
ist minister, author and nationally
recognized scholar on the black
church � faces charges of assault
with intent to rape, indecent as-
sault and battery, and assault and
battery.
The charges stem from an
April 21 incident in Worcester,
where Lincoln, 69, was a visiting
professor at Clark University.
The conversations appar-
ently were recorded by the gradu-
ate student within a week of the
alleged attack, which she said oc-
curred at Lincoln's apartment in
Worcester.
On Tuesday, defense attor-
neys told Worcester County Su-
perior Court Judge Charles Helly
the telephone calls were recorded
without Lincoln's knowledge or
consent, The News & Observer of
Raleigh (N.C.) reported.
"He wasn't aware he was
being recorded attorney Marga-
ret Burnum said.
Prosecutors countered that
the recordings were legal, regard-
less of any knowledge by Lincoln
that they could be used as evi-
dence.
Helly reserved judgment on
suppressing the evidence, saying
he would wait until learning more
about the tapes and seeing how
they might be used in the trial. The
judge said, however, that he would
not readily ban any evidence from
the trial.
Jury selection in Lincoln's
trial was to begin today.
His accuser, a minister and
graduate student at a Massachu-
setts university, claims Lincoln
assaulted her during a visit to his
apartment.
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- - �� � !��,��- �� � �
November 4, 1993
OAD
Continued from page 1
ret( ount and IKiinnu'tK-
i m Onslow County.
Greenville voters also gave
fenkins and theen-
un il another term in
'� uesday. "he incumbent, Ms.
defeated hei opponent
k Autry ith 5,470 votes to
s. enkins will return for
her third term.
Familiar faces will greet her
ontheCity Council as well. Incum-
bents Mildred Council from Dis-
SGA
trict . "hie, Rufus Huggins from Dis-
trict Two, Inez Fridley from Dis-
trict Three, Bob Ramey from Dis-
trict Four, Blanche Forbes from
District Fiveandat-large represen-
tative Jack Wall won reelection.
The only close race was in
District Four, where Ramey nar-
rowly defeated Mayo Allen 1,360
to 1,288. Forbes and Wall both ran
unopposed.
Continued from page 1
pus am ' escort students at night.
The l 'cycles will dissuade
students who are only looking
for a free ride home or shelter
from poor weather, Thomas
said. Several students have
abused Public Safety's services
in the past for those reasons.
SGA funded these purchases.
The SGA will recommend
phase two to the ECU Transit
Board soon. This phase focuses
on Pirate Ride, a bus service that
currently runs until 12:00 a.m.
The SGA proposes lengthening
hours to 2:30 a.m. Thursday
through Saturday nights.
Phase two also suggests
marking the Pirate Ride route
with signs at each designated
sSpp.
The third aspect of phase
two proposes having a student
patrol member ride the Pirate
Ride bus during extended hours
to assure the safety of the driver,
to check student IDs and to pre-
vent property damage. All three
steps of phase two will be
funded by the SGA.
Phase three is called "Pi-
ra te Watch This will provide a
nighttime escort service from
10:00 p.m. until 3:00 a.m. each
night. Pirate Watch members
will work in teams to escort stu-
dents walking alone or in small
groups across campus. These in-
dividuals will receive training
from Public Safety, and will
possibly be available to work
for special campus events, such
as during Halloween or at foot-
ball games.
Phase four will provide
students, primarily those resid-
ing on campus, with a brochure
covering all aspects of campus
safety. This is being devised by
Public Safety. It will include: A
map of blue light phones and
Pirate Ride stops, campus safety
tips, programs offered by Pub-
lic Safety and phone numbers
for student organizations to call
to schedule those programs,
emergency phone number0 and
other important campus safety
information.
The proposal's final phase,
phase five, will provide two
more bicycles for Public Safety's
use to patrol campus and pro-
vide escorts.
"We're not Public Safety
Thomas said. "We're just trying
to do our part
Thomas said funding for
the project will come mostly
from the SG A's Executive Coun-
cil budget.
Yesterday, Chancellor
Eakin donated $5,500 for the "Pi-
rate Watch" escort facilities pro-
vided in phase three.
"We appreciate the
Chancellor's cooperation with
our effort to make this a safer
campus Thomas said. "He was
verv receptive to the entire Cam-
pus Safety Act
Thomas said it will cost an
estimated SI ,600 to continue this
project for the remainder of the
semester. Local business spon-
sorship is a possibility for the
future, Thomas said. The entire
project must be passed by SGA
legislature.
"This campus crime is
happening right here Thomas
said. "Students need to be aware
of that
"Students have that men-
tality that 'Oh, nothing is going
to happen to me but when
you've had as many attacks as
we've had in the past few weeks,
your chances of being robbed
are much greater said SGA
President Keith Dyer.
"We don't want to have to
wait for a student to be killed
before students take this seri-
ouslv Thomas said.
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light





,
T-imriiw �
The East Carolinian
November , 1993
Opinion
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Printed on
Lindsay Fernandez, G
Gregory Dickens, Mono
Matthew A. Hege, Adve
Deborah Daniel, v. n it.
Karen Hasseil, ,v,�� i Editor
Maureen Rich, fast. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
�rat Manager
ng Editor
sing Director
Wes Tinkham. Account Executive
Kelly ktllis Account Executive
Shelley Furlough, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Joe Horst, MacGwer
100 recycled paper
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editonal in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
for decency or brevity. 77k- East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. Vie East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
Yahoo! Bond referendum '93 passes
This is absolutely amazing.
When put to the test, area voters, ECU
students and voters across the state passed
an incredibly important bond referendum
at a time when the situation looked nothing
but bleak. Well, it passed with 53 percent of
the vote, but hey, you can't complain. For
now, a very bright future (with a price tag
that totals $310 million) lies ahead for the
academic tradition that is ECU.
Mostly that means an improved Joyner
Library. H case you haven't stepped foot
inside Joyner recently (and who can blame
you), you've missed the display concerning
expansion and improvement plans, with
pictures galore! There, one will find archi-
tectural plans, a scale model and informa-
tion on the refurbishment proposals.
And you know what? The plans for the
improved library look great. In an age of too
many architectural nighmares, this layout
and design is an aesthetically-pleasing
structure and a practical one, too. Kudos to
the architectural firm, Walter Robbs
Callahan & Pierce for their innovative de-
sign. Joyner will soon look better than ever.
You see, ECU outgrew its library many
years ago. It was built in 1954 and an annex
was added in 1975. Since then, enrollment
has risen 40 percent. Joyner suffers from a
scarcity of shelf space and a severe shortage
of seating. The expanded Joyner will have
shelving space to hold more than 1.5 mil-
lion volumes.
This is welcome news to those of us
that wandered the stacks looking for a book
that was holed away in one of two ware-
houses. Does anyone else who's been in the
stacks feel like a rat looking for cheese?
Well, the stacks won't be eliminated,
but maybe you'll be lucky enough to spend
most of your time in another section of the
library.
This may be possible through plans for
the library addition. They include a state-of-
the-art electronics center that will enable com-
munication with such outside agencies as the
Library of Congress. Joyner could then trans-
mit material obtained from other libraries to
libraries throughout the region. In essence a
computer link-up with all of North Carolina
and across the nation.
This computer network will permit stu-
dents and the public to have access to data,
images, voice and video resources located
around the world � certainly a far cry from
the Joyner we know (uh, and love).
Chancellor Eakin has stated, "We see
the future of our library as being of central
importance to other libraries in eastern North
Carolina, and, in fact, to the citizens of east-
ern North Carolina. They will be able to use
us as a hub"� to access our holdings, as well
as those at other major libraries throughout
the country and throughout the world
Eakin was so pleased with the passage
of the referendum that an unofficial
groundbreaking ceremony took place Tues-
day night after most of the polls closed. "We
are looking to begin construction in early
spring. The project should be completed in
two or two and a half years he said.
A long time to wait, but certainly some-
thing to look forward to for future students
of ECU. For those who voted, give yourself a
pat on the back and know that you had a
hand in upholding ECU's outstanding aca-
demic tradition.
By Brian Hall
War on drugs threatens personal freedom
This past weekend the
actor River Phoenix suddenly
died outside a Hollywood
nightclub. As of this writing,
the coroner had not deter-
mined the cause of death,
though eyewitness accounts
and his brother's call to 911
suggest that drugs may have
been involved. If true, this will
undoubtedly cause many to
call for even stricter measures
in the war against drugs. The
only mea-
sure that
has any
chance of
really af-
fecting the
use of
drugs in
our society
would be
decrimi-
nalization.
His-
torian Barbara Tuchman has
written that a policy qualifies
as a folly when it is not only a
failure, but also is plainly
against the interests of those in
whose name it is being con-
ducted. No other present
policy so fits this description
as our "war on drugs
This war has been a com-
plete and utter failure. We
need to realize that only by
treating drugs as a health prob-
lem can we hope to reduce their
use. Those who are on drugs
need help to overcome their
weakness, not imprisonment.
The law enforcement agencies
of this country waste over $10
billion every year in a vain at-
tempt to control drugs. This
law enforcement
agencies of this
country waste over
$10 billion every
year in a vain at-
tempt to control
drugs.
money would be better spent
going after violent criminals
who are the real threat to our
society and treatment for those
who need help.
Legalization would also
greatly reduce violent crime.
Most street violence is commit-
ted by either rival drug gangs,
fighting over turf, or by addicts,
forced to rob to pay prices in-
flated by prohibition. Legaliza-
tion would end the black mar-
ket for drugs,
sharply reduc-
ing the price of
drugs and de-
priving orga-
nized crime of
approximately
one half of its
income, about
$50 billion a
year. Fewer
addicts would
need to rob to
support their habit.
Our current prohibition is
also hypocritical. The drug
which causes the greatest vio-
lence in our country is alcohol.
A Justice Department study has
shown that 54 percent of violent
acts occur just after drinking.
Alcohol and tobacco kill more
than 100 times as many every
year as all illicit drugs.
We would not only save
billions on law enforcement, we
would also reap billions in new
taxes. It is estimated that taxing
marijuana at its current rate of
consumption would bring in
over $20 billion. This money
could then be used for educa-
tion and treatment. Using these
methods, we have steadily re-
duced smoking, something as
addictive as heroin. Treating
drugs in a similar manner would
likewise greatly facilitate its re-
duction.
Prohibition has only exac-
erbated the problem. Many ad-
dicts are artificially created by
dealers, who also have no com-
punction about selling to chil-
dren. And some of the more
troublesome drugs are a direct
result of prohibition; crack was
specifically invented as a cheap
alternative to cocaine.
Most importantly, we
should seriously consider
whether the state has a right to
regulate individual morality.
One of the basic underlying
principles of a free society, best
expressed in the writing of John
Stuart Mill, is that an individual
who is harming no one else
should be left alone, especially
by the state.
The whole point of a
democratic government is that
the individual can best decide
for himself what is wrong or
right. The greatest threat to our
individual freedoms at present
is the war on drugs. Our basic
civil liberties are being steadily
undermined in the effort to save
us from the scourge of drugs.
The only way that we could
eradicate drugs would be to re-
peal the Bill of Rights and give
the police unlimited power.
Drugs are a plague which
cause many, including some
close friends of mine, terrible
pain. But our rights as indi-
viduals mean nothing unless we
are given the free choice to make
wrong decisions as well as right.
WAS THE TAR-6E7
VloLVCE
AI0VM, IN JS ITS
By Laura Wright
Recent cartoons confused with reality
I wonder how many people
went downtown on Saturday
night dressed like Beavis and
Butthead. I wonder how many
of those Beavises and Buttheads
actually needed costumes
Okay, enough B and B
bashing. I guess that I have to
admit, as much as I don't want
to, that there is something pretty
funny about those two. I don't
think that they possess any en-
dearing qualities and dressing
up like them probably wasn't a
good way to pick up women,
but Halloween is about more
than getting dates. It's about
being someone other than who
you are and it's about being
scared by things that you can
control.
I think that it's really inter-
esting that Americans can be-
come so obsessed with cartoon
characters. Television may be
dangerously influential at times
because depictions of TV vio-
lence can be very realistic, but
cartoon characters obviously ex-
ist outside the realm of reality. I
can see how Dan Quayle might
have thought that Murphy
Brown is a real person�since
this character is played by
Candice Bergen who, I think, is
a real person�but cartoon char-
acters are drawings.
Furthermore, they are
drawings of imaginary people.
Just to clear up any misunder-
standing, the houses that Beavis
and Butthead set on fire are also
drawings. So are the donuts that
Homer Simpson eats and the
hairballs that Stimpy expels.
It seems that as soon as the
controversy over one cartoon
dies down, another more con-
troversial cartoon pops up. Take
"The Simpsons for example. I
do believe that Bart Simpson has
had his day as America's most
dangerous animated juvenile
delinquent. "The Simpsons" is
threatening because it satirizes
every facet of American life and
it's scary in its accuracy.
Remember "Ren and
Stimpy the cat and dog duo
that was so offensive to Nickel-
odeon that the network fired the
series' creator? I guess that these
two were problematic because
they were incredibly disgusting,
but they were harmless and even
loved each other in a dysfunc-
tional kind of way. I speak of
them in the past tense even
though they are still around on
Nick, but the controversy
around them has died down
since Beavis and Butthead ap-
peared on the scene.
I still think that cutting TV
watching to the bare minimum
is the best way to get a grip on
what's real and what isn't. It's
understandable that reality
checks might be necessary if
TV is your only link to the
world around you. But chances
are, unless you are Dan Quayle,
you'll figure out that sitcoms,
with live or anima ted casts, aim
to amuse, not to confuse.
I have to admit, though,
that I sat through two straight
hours of Simpsons Halloween
specials on Sunday night. I
laughed at the show and got
annoyed at the commercials.
The worst one was for Crest
toothpaste. A child gets a cav-
ity because she didn' t use Crest
and her mother says, "I have
to act like a mom and think
like a dentist I got the im-
pression that being maternal
and thinking just don't mix.
But, I digress.
Right now I am experi-
encing post-Halloween de-
pression. Halloween has al-
ways been my favorite holi-
day because I like being some-
one other than myself for a
night�this is easy to do when
you have no idea who you are
on days other than Halloween.
I like graveyards, black cats
and magic. I dressed up as the
Disney version of Peter Pan,
my favorite cartoon character
of all time and even when I
was in costume, I was aware of
the fact that I couldn't really
fly-
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Is $1,250 worth the risk of losing the trust of the
students' at East Carolina University? That is the
primary question in this controversy over the recent
Student Government Secretary Election.
As member of the SGA Legislature, I am
troubled by the Election Review Boards lack of con-
cern of the actual intent behind the election rules.
Article VI. Section 7 Part B states that in the event that
a winning candidate is disqualified, a new election is
to be held. Article VI. Section 7 Part B. was expressly
put into the election rules to prevent a person from
winning an election to Student Government by de-
fault. The rationale for such a provision was that the
cost of a new election pales in comparison to the cost
of the students losing faith in how their leaders are
elected.
Does not the opinion of the 672 students who
came out to vote on September 29 matter? If the
Election Review Board is so convinced that their
actions were justified why was their October 7
hearing not opened to the campus mediaFurther-
more, why was not the content of that hearing not
revealed to the campus media until October 18?
Democracy is a fragile and precious thing. It
is essential in a democracy that the people have
faith in how their leaders are chosen. To maintain
the East Carolina University's Students' trust the
Student Government Association has no alterna-
tive but hold a new election for Student Govern-
ment Secretary as proscribed by Article VI. Section
7 Part B on the Election Rules of the Student
Government Association of East Carolina Univer-
sity.
In Humble Service to the Student Body of
East Carolina University,
Michael D. Hadley
Graduate
President Student Government Association
To the Editor:
I could not believe wha 11 read in the letter form
Ms. Susan Luddeke. Evidently, if men don't treat the
Anita Hill issue with "understanding and compas-
sion we will be to blame for whatever the ultra-
feminists decide to do afterward. It boggles my mind
that some people still think Anita Hill was the victim
of that whole circus.
Clarence Thomas is the one we should feel
sorry for because, in his own words he was the victim
of a "high-tech lynching There was no evidence to
support Ms. Hill's claims, and phone records indi-
cated she called him frequently, as well as followed
him from job to job. Is that the behavior a woman
demonstrates toward a man who sexually harasses
her? I seriously doubt it. The only reason Anita Hill
was brought forward with her allegations is that
Clarence Thomas is a black conservative republi-
can. Period. He is the biggest threat to guilty white
liberals, and other liberals as well, and they tried to
extinguish that threat with baseless charges. Thank-
fully, common sense prevailed and Ms. Hill was
sent away to make all sorts of money off of her
story while Mr. Thomas was rightfully confirmed.
Anita Hill was not the victim, Clarence Tho-
mas was. The sooner the feminists realize this, the
sooner they'll get some small amount of credibility
back.
Derek McCreight
Sophomore
Criminal Justice
mill! uiimijiijM





M�- -
'v-mtmmmtB&" -� � iim0 .iw
Page 6
�77?� Zsasf Carolinian
Classifieds
November 4, 1993
For Rent
Help Wanted I H Help Wanted
Ringgold Towers
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NONSMOKING FEMALE to share
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Rent $140mo. (includes water, sewer,
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MALE OR FEMALE to share
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cats. Available Dec. 1. Call Susan 752-
6528.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: 3-bed-
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or Jan 1. "One of Greenville's best rental
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ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP! 3-
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Please call 752-2111 ext. 252 if you
would like more details on how to
apply.
TRAVEL FREE! SPRING BREAK!
Sell quality vacations! The hottest des-
tinations! JAMAICA, CANCUN, BA-
HAM AS, SOUTH PADRE, FLORIDA.
"Professional" Tour Company, easi-
est way towards free trip! Best com-
missions! Sun Splash Tours 1 -800-426-
7710.
FREE TRIPS &CASH "Callus
and find out how hundreds of stu-
dents arealready earning FREE TRIPS
and LOTS OF CASH with America's
1 Spring Break company! Choose
Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica, Panama,
Daytona or Padre! Call now! TAKE A
BREAK STUDENT TRAVEL (800) 328-
SAVE or (617)424-8222.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $90 to
S125 phr. escorting in the Greenville
area. You must be 18 yrs. old, have
own phone and transportation. Es-
corts and exotic dancers needed. For
more information call Diamond Es-
corts at 758-0896.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
Midwest Mailers PO Box 395, Olathe,
K) 66051. Immediate Response.
AA CRUISE & TRAVEL JOPS: Earn
$2500mo Travel the World Free!
(Caribbean, Europe, Hawaii, Asia!)
Cruise Lines now hiring for busy holi-
day- Spring and Summer seasons.
Guaranteed employment! Call (919)
929-4398 ext. 11.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPARTMENT: Youth Bas-
ketball coaches. The Greenville Recre-
ation and Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12 to 16 part-time youth basket-
ball coaches for the winter youth bas-
ketball program. Applicantsmust pos-
sess some knowledge of the basket-
ball skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people, ages 9-18, in basketba 11 funda-
mentals. Hours are from 3:00pm until
7:00 pm with some night and week-
end coaching. This program will run
from the end of November to mid-
February. Salary rates start at $4.25
per hour. For more information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at 830-
4550 or 830-4567.
THE PLAYGROUND OF
GO LDSBORO is looking for enthusi-
astic entertainers. Excellent hours, easy
$$ and carpools available. Ask for Erin
at 355-4792 or (919) 734-3777.
BREAKERS! BOOK EARLY AND
SAVE! Panama Citv from $99, Ja-
maica Cancun from S439, Padre $239,
Daytona $79. Sell trips, earn cash, party
free. Call EST 1-800-234-7007.
CAMPUS ENTREPRENEUR
WANTED. Sell Personal Safety Alarm
onoff campus. Write or call for free
details. 3806 Wingate Drive, Raleigh,
NC 27609.919-876-7005.
GREEKS AND CLUBS: Raise up to
$1,000 in JUST ONE WEEK! for your
fraternity, sorority and club. Plus
$1,000 for yourself And a FREE T-
shirt just for calling. 1-800-932-0528
ext 75.
EARN UP TO $559.89 per week as-
sembling ourproducts at home! Amaz-
ing 24-hour recorded message reveals
details! Call today! 1-919-243-1835.
Leave your telephone number.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS Restaurant
is now accepting applications for wait
staff positions. Apply in person only,
2-4 pm daily. No phone calls please.
605-A Greenville Blvd. behind
Quincy's Steak House.
HELP WANTED: Yard work, win-
dow washing, painting. Well above
min. wage. 756-2027.
PIRATE PAINTBALL IS EXPAND-
ING TO NEW MARKET AREAS IN
EASTERN, NC . We need super-ener-
getic people for our Marketing Team.
This is a great opportunity for anyone
in the School of Business or Leisure
Systems Studies to sink your teeth
into a growing company. Your salary
will be based on a direct profit-shar-
ing basis. If you know anything about
Guerrilla Marketingor if you are smart
and super-energetic, CALL 752-8380.
NOW EARN up to $339.84 per week
assembling our products at home. In-
quire with Business Ventures, Box 861,
Agana, Guam 96910
TRAVEL ABROAD AND WORK.
Make up to $2,000- $4,000mo.
Teaching basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan, and S. Korea.
Many employers provide room and
board and other benefits. No teaching
background or Asian languages re-
quired. Formore information call: (206)
632-1146. ext. J5362.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is looking
for a typesetter. It you have some
Macintosh experience and can type,
please come to the Pubs Building, sec-
ond floor and fill out an application.
WE NEED YOU!
For Sale
SPRING BREAK � Plan early, save
$50 and get best rooms! Prices in-
crease 1115! Bahamas Cruise 6days
includes 12meals,$279! PanamaCity
room wkitchen, $119! Cancun from
Raleigh, $339; Jamaica from Raleigh,
$429; Key West, $249; Daytona Room
wkitchen, $149! 1-800-678-6386.
MEMBERSHIP to Club For Women
For Sale
Only. Low monthly payments! Call
Angie 931-9768.
MEN'S BICYCLE Hampton 5 speed
cruiser, great for campus. $50. Call
757-3895 evenings.
78 CIVIC wagon runs good, must
drive. $1,000. BIEFE KB 8 Classic
motorcycle helmet. Grey. $185 value,
$85. Call 758-1031.
CHRISTMAS WREATHS FOR
SALE. Three sizes: 8' for $10,12' for
$12 and 16' for $18. Plus a Christmas
tree discount. Call 931-8324 or 321-
2577 for more information.
FOR SALE: Cerwin Vega D-l home
speakers. 8" woofer. Great booksehlf
speakers! Call 931-8958.
29 GALLON saltwater fish tank.
Complete set-up stand, coral, fish
and filters $200.
6' 4" POWER tool surfboard, exc.
condition $175 OBO. Call 752-6833.
MUST SELL Women's Huffy
Multi-terrain 10-speed bike. Only
been ridden twice! Asking $70.2 Roll-
up blind s to fit window 4748" wide,
$10. Call 830-0807.
AMP- 70 Watt Crate. Brand new con-
dition. Chorus, reverb, distortion,
Celestion Speakers, etc Must sell
fast. WAY underpriced at only
$225.00 Call 758-2119.
SPEAKERS FOR SALE: 2-Kicker 10-
inch subwoofers, $80. 2-kicker, 15
inch subwoofers, $150 Prices nego-
tiable. Call Randy or Jeremy 931-
8901.
ONE-WAY AIRLINE TICKET, Ra-
leighDetroitSan Francisco, $200.
Valid until Dec. 15. Call 830-9125.
DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME!
working out without proper supple-
ments, your body needs them to
GROW. Amino acids, protein pow-
ders, vanadyl sulfate, wt. gain, tri-
chromelene, hotstuff, gainers fuel,
cybergenics and many more! Call
Charles today for tremendous dis-
count prices at 321-2158.
1Q Services Offered
. nents' flag station. As you near
their outer defenses, shots are
fired at you. As you stand to
return fire, your adventure be-
gins. Will you survive to cap-
ture the flag and win the game?
Will you be the last one left to
defend the "Alamo?" Will you
and the rest of your Special
Forces Team be able to take out
the "Predator" before it takes
you out? Come and see how much
fun you can have in a 3 12 hour
session. We are open Monday-
thru Friday for groups of 8 or
more, and Saturdays for indi-
viduals or groups from 1-40.
Call 752-8380 for Info, and res-
ervations. WE BREED EXCITE-
MENT
SSI Personals
A MEMBER OF NIGHTFALL'S en-
tourage would like to make the ac-
quaintance of Markus Anton Keinliege.
Please call 757-0991,10:00am- 1:30pm.
WRITERMUSICIAN andpoeticsoul
seeks like minded lady for frienship
and fun. Send photos and correspon-
dence to : KANE, PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835
SCOTT HALL would like to congratu-
late Randy Jensen forbeingScott Hall's
Hall Council Member of the Month.
Way to go Randy!
ALPHA DELTA PI supports PIRATE
football! Let'smake this lasthome game
our Best one � GO PIRATES!
THANK YOU SIGMA PI! We had a
great time Thursday night. Let's do it
again soon. Love, ALPHA DELTA PI.
CONGRATULATIONS FROM PHI
SIGMA PI to Lindsay Fernandez, Kelly
Kellis and Dr. Jack Thornton for being
tapped into ODK.A MEMBER OF
NIGHTFALL'S entourage would like
to make the aquaintance of Markus
Anton Keinliege.
IQ
Greek
IQ
Greek
lap Umy of Mvmtton in U S.
19,27$ TOKS -ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COO
800-351-0222
Or. rush $2.00 to: RcsMrch Information
11322 Idaho Aw 206-A. Los Angeles. CA 90025
ALPHA XI DELTA: The brothers of
Delta Sigma Pi are looking forward
to our pre-downtown tonight. It's
been too long since we've been to-
gether. Let's make it a night we won't
forget. Love, Delta Sigma Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Xi
Pledge class of "Big" Scott Lloyd,
Ethan "Big Red" Hazelrigs and
Joel "Troy" Plavec. Good luck,
Sigma Nu.
GAMMA GAMMA SIGMA
SIGMA, beat me beat me, whip
me whip me. The sisters were loose
on the caboose, the hot tub was
filled rr ost of the night, the apples
had a bite that was dyn-o-mite, the
sisters came in incognito 70s jam.
The gig was a blast, so we're look-
ing for another installment of the
"Good Times" with your a� Sin-
cerely, Sigma Nu.
PHI SIGMA PI PLEDGES �
Good iuck with SFK and the re-
mainder of your pledge period.
Love, the Brothers.
THANKS SIGMA PI � for the
great social Friday. Love, Chi
Omega.
ATTENTION all Chi Omegas and
dates, get ready for formal � it
will definitely be a weekend to
remember.
PI DELTA'S: We had a great time
at the bonfire social on Thursday
night. Hope to see you again soon.
Love, the KAPPA DELTA RHO
gentlemen.
ALPHA PHI AND STRANGER
DATES: Strangers came from all
different places. We couldn't even
recognize some of thei r faces. Some
of the costumes were really cool.
From the Brady Bunch to a harem
to a hippie who was no fool. We
may have created quite a mess,
but all and all it was a total suc-
cess.
GOOD LUCK PIRATES! BEAT
TULSA! Love, Alpha Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI: Hoe down a
hooker road was quite a sight. We
were already to play with a huge
hay fight. Thanks guys, lets do it
again. Love, Alpha Phi
PIKES: Good Luck to all our
Pledges. Keep it up. Pi Kappa Al-
pha.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Hopes every-
one had a fun Halloween.
PIKE: Mark, we wish you a fast
recovery, hang in there. The broth-
ers and pledges of Pi Kappa Al-
pha.
flllllllttlllllinillllllllligilBliiin
PIRATE PAINTBALL: We are
service-oriented and dedicated
to ensure you and your friends
a heart-pounding, adrenaline-
rushing good time. Come join us
at Pirate Paintball for a 3 12
hour session you'll never for-
get. Sneak through the cool,
clean, crisp, forest air as you
make your way to your oppo-
Professional
Typing and Word Processing
Includes:
� Proofreading -Spelling
� Grammar cotrectioas
1.50 Per Page Call: 355-3611 anytime
niHiinmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinn?
Announcements
ECU NATIVE
AMERICAN ORGANIZA-
TION
The next meeting of the ECU
Native American Organiza-
tion will be on November 8
at 7 p.m. It will be held at
Kim Sampson's house. If you
need directions or have any
questions, please call Kim at
752-5294. All members are
encouraged to attend.
SOPHOMORES
JUNIORS AND
SENIORS!
Limited copies of ECU's first
video yearbook are still
available. Come by the Me-
dia Board Office, Student
Publications Building, sec-
ond floor, 8-5 daily. Build-
ing is located across from
Joyner Library.
NURSING
rhe School of Nursing will
hold departmental meetings
as follows: NOV. 8: Declared
majors (NU on grade sheet
with nursing faculty as ad-
visor) who have not begun
clinical major. 5:00 p.m. �
Last names A-L; 6:00 p.m. �
Last name M-Z. NOV 9-5:
Students enrolling in sopho-
more level nursing couses
in January. 6:00 Students
enrolling junior level nurs-
ing courses. NOV 10: 5:00
� students enrolling in se-
nior nursing courses. 6:00
� general college with in-
tended major in nursing.
ECU ECONOMICS
SOCIETY
Tuesday, November 9th, the
Economics Society of ECU
will present Jim Wood from
IBM. This meeting is open to
all persons interested in eco-
nomics. Please bring your
related questions. A busi-
ness meeting will follow.
ATTENTION
PRE-PHYSICAL
THERAPY STUDENTS
Registration advising for
Spring semester, 1994, will
be held on November 8th,
9th, and 10th evenings from
7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the
Physical Therapy Lab of the
Carol Belk Building. Please
enter by way of the front
door of the Belk Building
and follow signs. All pre-
physical therapy general
college students MUST at-
tend one of these sessions to
have Spring semester sched-
ules approved and signed
by a physical therapy fac-
ulty advisor.
LATINO FIESTA
Sponsored by the Interna-
tional Student Association
Saturday, Nov. 13, in the
Mendenhall Student Center
Multi-Purpose Room. Ad-
mission: $4:00 (Students)-
$5:00 (General Public) For
further information contact:
Partricia Steffen 931-9809
orCentral Ticket Office: 757-
4788.
UNIVERSIIYSTUDENT
MARSHALS
Any student interested in
serving as a university mar-
shal for the 1993 fall com-
mencement may obtain an
application from A-12
Minges. Students must be
classified as a junior by the
end of spring semester '93
and have a 3.0 academic
average to be eligible. Re-
turn completed application
to A-12 Minges by Nov. 8,
1993.
FANTASY
A special sign language and
voice performing group will
be hosting a unique presen-
tation, "The Silent Beauty
and the Talking Beast to
the public on Nov. 6, 1993
at 8:00 p.m. in Wright Audi-
torium. It is based on the
adaption of a Walt Disney
Classic. Don't miss this para-
dox of cultures with excit-
ing music and acting. Ad-
mission $4 for adults and
$2 for children under 12.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COLLEGE
STUDENTS
General College Students
should contact their advis-
ers the week of Nov. 8-12 to
make arrangements for aca-
demic advising for Spring
Semester 1994. Early regis-
tration will begin Nov.
15 and end Nov. 19.
PRE-OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY STUDENTS
Early registration for
spring sessions will be-
gin Nov. 15th. There will
be an advising session
Wednesday night, Nov.
10th from 5:30-7:30 in
room 203 of the Belk
Building. If you are un-
able to attend this meet-
ing please call the OT
office for other advising
hours.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadline
Friday at 4 pm for
Tuesdays edition
Tuesday at 4 pm for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10a.m. thedaypriorto
publication; however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
.iuujij.iiijJU i.ii.iij





The East Carolinian
November 4, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
King's novel leaves you sweating
By Joe Horst
Photo courtesy of Viking Penguin Publishers
Nightmares & Dreamscapes, Stephen King's latest novel compiles short
stories into one frightening book. The hard-cover is priced at $27.50.
Staff Writer
You wake up in the middle of
the night, sweat streaming down
from your forehead. You could
have sworn you heard yourself
scream, but now you're not so sure.
As you lay your head back down
on the pillow, your heart gradually
resumes its double-thump, as op-
posed to the triple-thump you
awoke with. Falling back into that
gentle slumber, you wonder ex-
actly what it was that scared you so
badly.
This is what Stephen King has
tried to do with his latest anthol-
ogy of stories, Nightmares and
Dreamscapes. Luckily for his fans,
King has once again demonstrated
his uncanny ability to take the or-
dinary and mundane and twist it
into something that, as kids, we
feared lived under our bed.
For those who were a waiting a
return of Night Shift or Skeleton
Crew, be forewarned: King has be-
come more subtle in his old age.
The hardcover iook tota! 816
pages, making the reader hard-
pressed to remember the stories in
the beginning of the book. How-
ever, a look at the table of contents
after I finished the book brought
back some delicious feelings of fear
and dread.
"Suffer the Little Children" is
a prime example of King's ability
to punch the reader in the gut,
leaving him breathless, when he
least expects it. From his first line
("Miss Sidley was her name, and
teaching was her game) to his last
("In the end, he was hardly able to
take his eyes off them), King
weaves a story that leaves the
reader looking over his shoulder.
Never again will 1 be able to look at
a playground full of screaming
children the same. Brrrrrrrrrr.
King has never been that well-
known for his screenplays. Bombs
ike Maximum Overdrive and Golden
Years were never quite overshad-
owed by hits like Silver Bullet. How-
ever, the screenplay that he in-
cludes in this book, "Sorry, Right
Number proves the cliche that
practice makes perfect. Televised
as an episode for "Tales from the
Darkside King writes a story that
would have made even Rod Serling
proud.
Possibly the best story that
King has written in this anthology
is his sole non-fiction piece, Head
Down. A chronicle of the events
leading up to his son's Little League
baseball team going to tne state
championships, King effortlessly
captures the heart of baseball at its
finest. Baseball fans all over the
country will love this story of the
quintessential underdogs rising up
to capture the hearts of their home-
See KING page 9
'Nightmare Before Christmas' fails early
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
TimBurtonhasalwaysmanaged
to produce visually stunning films
that delight the eye. His sets and
characters live in a world unlike anv
other. Burton's magic lies in his cre-
ative imagination, which he now
unleashes in his newest creation, Tim
Burton's TJie Nightmare Before Christ-
mas.
The effects in Tlw Nightmare Be-
fore Christmas are considered anima-
tion but not of the same type seen in
Aladdin. Burton's film contains char-
acters that look like high-tech ver-
sions of the Rankin-Bass television
specials, like "Rudolph" and "Santa
Claus is Coming to Town thatwere
The nightmare that Tim Burton hoped to create falls short.
made many years ago.
One striking difference between
Nightmare and the aforementioned
TV specials is that Burton's film con-
tains a mischievous spark. Nightmare
plays much more like a Halloween
film than a Christmas film.
Tim Burtonhas been thecreative
force behind several extraordinary
films. He began with Pee Wee's Big
Adventure, a wonderful story of a
misfit that appealed to both parents
and children. Any doubters of
Burton'sability should watch BigTop
Pee Wee to appreciate the delicate bal-
ance that Burton achieved in the first
Pee Wee Herman film.
Burton's next film, Beetleju ice,
See NIGHTMARE page 9
Photo courtesy of Touchstone Pictures
In the Real World, where holidays are celebrated, a young boy looks on
in disbelief as one of Jack's "gifts" swallows the family tree.
Keynote address by chemist on tap for National Chemistry Week
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
A Nobel laureate in chemistry
will give the keynote address at an
East Carolina University program
on Nov. 12 for chemistry students,
teachers and professional chemists.
Dr. Herbert C. Brown, the 1979
Nobel Laureate and professor at
Purdue University in Indiana, will
speak at the ECU Chemistry
Department's "Student Meeting in
Miniature His presentation is at 8
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. The public is invited to attend.
The "Student Meeting in Min-
iature" coincides with National
Chemistry Week, Nov. 7-13.
The day-long Friday program
will include presentations on chem-
istry researchby undergraduate and
graduate students. Sessions begin
at 8 a.m. in the Flanagan Building.
The meeting is co-sponsored
by the Eastern North Carolina Sec-
tion of the American Chemical So-
ciety (ACS), the East Carolina ACS
Student Affiliate and the ECU
Chemistry Alumni Professional
Society.
Dr. Art Rodriguez, the program
chairperson, said the "meeting is
designed to provide undergradu-
ate and graduate students from all
fields of chemistry and chemical
engineering with an opportunity to
present their research projects to
colleagues in a professional atmo-
sphere
The conference will conclude
with a banquet and the presenta-
tion of research awards Friday
evening.
Brown, the keynote speaker, is
best known for his research on the
role of boron in organic chemistry.
His research has brought him
numerous honors.
In addition to the Nobel Prize,
he received the 1981 Priestley Medal,
the 1982 Perkin medal and the 1985
A.I.C. istry. Chemical Sciences for
1987.
Texas 2-Step a
step up from rest
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
Texas 2-Step is a classy style
club is winning crowds of all ages
from all over the area.
This 25,000 square footclubcom-
bines the rock n'rollers, poolsharks
and Country music fans into a spec-
tacular clubexperience. Itis the "New-
est image of nightclubing, two clubs
inone saysowner, Brenda Malaputi.
There are a variety of activ ities
for all ages with game rooms, both
bigand small and thedivisionof rock
n' roll on one half of the building and
Country on the other.
This place has a classy european
touch, with sunken bars, a fire place
and elegant furnishings. There are
three huge bars throughout the club.
The idea of this club is to appeal to
people of all ages. The club is in two
buildings with a connection. The
club is filled with everything, it is
justlikeamaze�don'tgetlost. The
Texas 2-Step is located just over the
bridge on the left at 507 and 509
Green St.
The club opened on Oct. 20th
and has remained low-key. They
are open from Tuesday to Sunday.
Doors open at 8:00pm except the
sports bar which is open from
5:00pm -9:00pm. The Rock N' Roll
side opens a little Lier at uupm.
Ladies are free Tuesday to Thurs-
day, with a membership. Member-
ships are $5.00 each and the club is
open for ages 18 and older.
They offer a free shuttle bus
ride to and from the club to assist
responsible drinking views. The
shuttle will stop at the comer of
See TEXAS page 9
Rapper arrested ; NYC
NEWYORK(AP)�FlavorFlav
of the rap group Public Enemy was
arrested and charged with attempted
murder after he allegedly fired a gun
athisnext-doorneighboroutsidetheir
Bronx apartment building.
ThearrestMondaycamejustone
day after another nationally known
rapper, Tupac Shakur, was charged
with shooting two off-duty officers in
Atlanta.
HavorFlav,34, whose real name
is William Drayton, may have been
arguing with his neighbor over
Drayton's girlfriend when he fired
his gun, said Sgt. Michael McGrath
said.Theneighbor,a54-year-oldman
whose name was not released, was
not injured.
McGrath said he and another
officer went to Drayton's apartment
building in the Bronx borough after
hearing shots.
The apartment's doorman told
police r -ayton fired at another resi-
dent outside the building. Drayton
sunTenderedtorx)liceinthebuilding's
lobby and took the officers to his
23rd-floor apartment, where
McGrath said they found an unli-
censed .380-caliber semiautomatic
pistol with one bullet missing from
its clip.
In Atlanta, Shakur, 22, a popu-
lar rapperwhoco-starred with Janet
Jackson in the movie "Poetic Jus-
tice was charged Sunday with two
counts of aggravated assault fol-
lowing a traffic dispute with two
officers.
Police said the shootings oc-
curred after the two officers, broth-
ers who work as deputies in the
Atlanta suburbs, were nearly hit by
two cars as they crossed a street
with their wives.
An argument ensued, one of
meofficerspulledagunandShakur
opened fire, wounding one officer
in the buttocks and the other in the
abdomen, police said. It was not
immediately clear if the two identi-
fied themselves as police officers.
His attorney, Kenneth Ellis,
saidShakurhasdeniedhehurt any-
one.
Marcovicci makes broadway
NEW YORK (AP) � There are
important milestones in a career,
Andrea Marcovicci says, and she's
reaching two of them this fall.
"Getting on Broadway means
the same thing it meant 80 or 100
years ago the singer-actress says.
"So does getting to Carnegie Hall. I
worked and worked, and now I get
both. It's a lifetime of wishes
New Yorkers may think of
Marcovicci as a cabaret singer. She.
appeared for 16 weeks straight at
the Oak Room of the Algonquin
Hotel in the winter of 1992-93.
But she thinks of herself as an
actress who sings. Currently, she's
an actress who doesn't sing very
much, playing Carmen in "Any
Given Day newly arrived at
Broadway's Longacre Theater.
In the nine-character drama,
which Frank D. Gilroy set in the
1940s, "Carmen wanted to be an
opera star, so there's a moment of
singing Marcovicci says.
"I don't have the voice for
opera. One of the tricks for me is to
sound just enough like I could
have done opera if I'd continued
my studies and not, beca use of the
Depression, been forced into an-
other kind of life
Doing a play set in the '40s
isn't a problem for Marcovicci.
The songs she likes best were writ-
See PLAY page 9
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
CD Reviews
q
Shootyz Groove
Shootyz Groove

Do we have enough bands out
there doing a raprock crossover
gig yet? I mean, sure it's an interest-
ing combination of sounds. Every
once in a while we even get some-
thing electrifying out of it, like the
angry socio-political rantings of
Rage Against the Machine. But we
also get groups like Johnny Quest, a
local favorite, who seem most at
home in a beer-addled haze of test-
osterone-charged frat boy wet
dreams. And then, somewhere in
between, lies a band called Shootyz
Groove.
Shootyz is a pretty decent ex-
ample of "Raprock They carry a
good beat, feature explosive guitar
work, and have a juicy bass line.
Whil they lack the sheer power and
intelligence of the aforementioned
Rage, they have a nice, friendly in-
tensity all their own. And they gen-
erally steer clear of lowbrow fluff,
despite the fact that "Shootyz
Groove" sounds like a particularly
nasty slan term for female genita-
lia.
The five songs collected on Re-
spect, the band's debut EP, are all
about peace and love and revolu-
tion and smoking pot. Okay, so
that's nothing very new in this field.
But Shootyz Groove sounds some-
what sincere, and they've got a
couple of really hot rappers up front.
The songs have titles like "The
Craze" and "Buddahful Day. "Make
of this what you will, but I think it
means that the band's schizoid ten-
dencies are showing.
On the one hand, they're into
peaceful brotherhood among all
mankind as well as a variety of
Eastern philosophical concepts. On
the other, they're a bunch of Nean-
derthals, rooting around for some
kind of crotch-and-gut satisfaction.
This need to slake their baser thirsts
sometimes gets the better of them;
certain material demands a softer
touch. But at least the grunt and
thrust stuff is sort of subversive.
Shootyz Groove is not a get drunk
and screw band.
In the overflowing ocean of
raprock, Respect will probal ly be
quickly swallowed up. They're nei-
ther good enough nor bad enough
to make many waves. If you're into
this kind of stuff, 1 suppose you'll
like it. If not, I'd give it a miss. In the
end, though, I must say that I like
their basic message: question au-
thority and have fun doing it. There
are worse ways to live your life.
� Mark
Brett
j Don't buy jj Take Your Chances
JJJ worth a Try ))) Definite Purchase
Chainsaw Kittens
Ansel on the Range

Usually an EP is made up of
four or five songs from a band that
wishes to tease their audience while
waiting for the full-length album to
come out. But that is not the case
with Chainsaw Kittens' newest re-
lease.
Angel on the Range is their new-
est creation and it contains seven
songs that won't
appear on any
other album.
They do have an
upcoming full
length album�
Pop Heiress�and
you won't find
these songs on
that or even on
their two albums
prior to this re-
lease. The point
is that Angei on the Range contains
some tunes that will satisfy your
craving for some new stuff (pro-
vided you like their stuff to begin
with) until their new record hits the
stores in a month or so.
The Kittens have been com-
pared to many bands ranging from
the Buzzcocks to the New York
Dolls, but they deny all these com-
parisons. All four members agree
on their one most important influ-
ence, that won-
derful quartet of
the late 70's,
Cheap Trick.
"Yes, definately
the influence we
all share is
Cheap Trick
says Tyson. And
band mate Trent
said, "If there
was any band
we could be
compared to, Cheap Trick would
make the most sense.
These guys are hard to
catagorize. You have to fuse a little
alternative or grunge with that
Cheap Trick sound to grasp any
real comparison.
Their lyrics come from some
bizzare alternate universe with
songs like: "John Wayne's Dream"
(a song inspired by a conversation
about heroin), "Kick Kid" and
"Sgt. Whore
Head Kitten, Tyson Meade,
says he draws most from bad TV.
The endless parade of worthless-
ness that appears on talk shows
and other American social pillars
that we draw our entertainment
from are the source of the band's
songs. They also draw from per-
sonal experience, but the TV is
their staple muse.
They say that their music isn't
serious and shouldn't be taken
that way, and I for one am glad of
that If you're into this sound, this
thing called the Kittens, check out
this little EP; there is a small chance
you may like it.
Kris
Hoffier
Nu!iuiuiwa
"�S�
����





November 4, 1993
NIGHTMARE
Continued from page 7
surface as The
enh r its
I'onta
with
films.
� i
n Burton
nghas
iKt it- Both man Returns
la wealthofeye-p ppingsights
ittJe story behind them. Tlie
marvelous ability to weave a capti-
vating tale was last exhibited bv Bur-
ton in Edward Scissorhands and has
not been seen since.
Tin- Nightmare Before Christmas
hasanother misfit hero in the person
of jack Skellington (voice by Chris
Sarandon, singing voice by Danny
Elfman). Jack lives in Halloween Land
where every day is spent planning
forOctober31st jack longs for some-
thingdifferent. He roams around and
discovers Christmas Land where ev-
erything seems bright and happy.
Jackderides to kidnapSantaand make
Christmas better than before in an
effort to bring some spark into his life.
While Jack Ls interesting, henever
really develops as a character. Sally
(Catherine O'Hara), the heroine of
the tale, likewise never develops.
Jack's thirst for friendship never gets
expressed although hints of an even-
tual bond between Jack and bally
exist. Jack's reasons for seeking a dif-
ferent world never getarticulated thus
muting the hero's desires.
Sally is the creation of a mad
scientist (given wonderful life by
William Hickey) who longs for a bet-
tercompanioaSallyconstantlywants
to roam and the scientist wants some-
onetostayathome with. Throughout
the him, the scientist struggles to per-
fect his creation. It is to the film's
discredit that the minor role of the
scientist provides most of the laughs
and enjoyment.
Plenty of visual effects fill the
screen�enough to keep any viewer
awake�but the oddities only hold
the viewer's attention for so long.
Without any story behind the effer �
the whole film feels hollow. A feelir
I tonny Elfman wrote the music
ricsfo! the film, hough he
� i � �� isations with his
music, as tie did in Batman, his songs
in TheNigfttmareBejbreChristmas lack
the necessary punch to capture the
viewer's attention. Though ' do not
advocate that all animated films be
like Disney cartoons, Elfman could
certimly leam somemmg from Btttiih
ami the Beast and Aladdin.
Much has been made of The
Nightmare Before Christmas and its
appeal to children. Though several
scenes do appear grotesque, most
children will have no trouble differ-
entiating the grossness from reality.
This film should appeal to most chil-
dren, although they, like the adults,
could start squirming out of
boredom.Hopefully Tim Burton'scin-
ematicmagic will return. In TlieNight-
mare Before Christmas the storytelling
skills have been subverted for the
sake of visual impact. In a film this
unique and this short (80 minutes), it
is tragic that it is so dull.
Onascaleof one to 10, TlieNight-
mare Before Christmas rates a five.
Who's There?
ATTIC
Thursday Dave Matthews
Friday Cold Sweat
Saturday Alma & Dahli Llama
TEXAS 2-STEP
Thursday Midnight Express
Friday Amsterdam
Saturday Midnight Express
PEASANT'S CAFE
Thursday Mainstream
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY PERFORMING ARTS SERIES PRESENTS
THE
fartg Uti
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$Z.SO pitchers
Friday-12 price appetizers
Saturday-LIVE ENTERTAINMENT after game
"Wyatt Stanton"(Beach Music)
Sunday- AM You Can Eat Popcorn Shrimp $5.95
Monday- $2.50 pitchers $2.50 wings
Tuesday- $1.00 domestics
Wednesday- 3201 draft $2.00
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November 4, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
Continued from page 7
; ingsimilartoKing'snoveI,77i(D�ril
� ; Potential and budding authors
1 it .Hid beware
thebad
ts and the
i after
im Raymond
ii C onan Doyle
tCasi and ' fhe
� pet ti civ. Both
istic e to that genre oi
" i mne) 'si astCase"
ting an unusual tvvist to writ-
TEXAS
a reamscapcspre-
sents King - unusual isionand tal-
enl in a light that hasn't been seen
tor seven years. Ignore the stab at
poetry and morality attheend of the
book ("Brooklyn August" and" The
Beggar and the Diamond")and you
will find yourself riveted once again
to the fears that you thought were
safely rucked away underthepileof
dirty clothesatthebackof the closet.
�s King says, "All you have to
do is hold on tight and believe
Continued from page 7
Reed Milano's. Ihey vviderangeofbandsthatwillbethere.
ssionstand for Even national bands will be sched-
�. designated uled
drivers for the evening. Oh the Country half there i a
rhere will be man) ditterent fabulous Beer Express to get the beer
bands featured slk !i as Midnight Ex- out with speed
pressand Silver Wings. A new Country and Western
RockiV Roll side will feature Store will be opening in the next 30
�the Tree Hugers and days, which will sell miscellanious
rhesearejustatasteofthe iternssuchasboots,hatsandlingerie.
PLAY
ntFt" u,
W
Cfiammount (ffhrk&
The I exas2-Stepafeooffersclance
lessons like Ballrtxim Dance on Sun-
day from 7pm-Spm.
This week from Wednesday to
Saturday, Midnight Express will be
playing and Friday night will have
Amsterdam. For a gtxxi time with a
variety in music, not tomention "new"
poohables,gototheTexas2-Stepand
live it up.
Cont'd
from pg. 7
ten between I927and 1943. "Ilivein
the past anyway she says.
I armen, she says, "is tempes-
tuous, strong-willed and extremely
intense and emotional. She has had
to deal with great disappointment
in her life, which makes her almost
bitter as well. She's fascinating. It'sa
very rich play
When Marcovicd got the part,
she prepared to move from Los
Angeles for some months. "If the
play runs, I'll be here till mid-June
shesavs. "Igobacktotlie Algonquin
again next spring, for 10 weeks
Marcovicd gets the night off
from the play the night before
Thanksgiving. That's when she
makes her Carnegie Hall concert
debut.
"Ca rnegie Ha 11 is every singer's
goal and dream she says. "I al-
ways dreamed about it I didn't
really dare to make it a reality until
Isold out 16 weeks at the Algonquin.
I don't think I felt completely wor-
thy until then
Ill riot linifbed ut your priifcer im
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Alfredo's Beer
'til 10pm Doily
T
Two Large
Sunday pitcher $2.00 One Topping Pizzas
Monday pitcher $1.50 �� q�
Tuesday pitcher $1.00 ?� i�fcD
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Si pitcher of Seer or Soft
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'til 10pm Doily
(A TRADITION SINCE LATE SEPTEMBER)
752-5855 HOE. 4th St Downtown
Thursday
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CHICKEN POT PIE �t� kbllt smith
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Saturday
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We open at 4:30 EVERY TUES FRI
COLLEGE
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TO PICK
YOUR
BRAIN.
ALL-CAMPUS TOURNAMENT
Saturday, November 13
Sunday, November 14
Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up a College Bowl Information and
Registration Packet from the Information
Desk, Mendenhall Student Center.
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union Special Events Committee
First place team member: will receive $25.00 each and a College Bowl t-shirt.
Second place team members wiil receive a College Bowl insulated mug.
For more information, contact the Student Activities Office.
210 Mendenhall. 757-47664711.





Adventures Of Kemple Boy
com�ics (kom' iks) � noun plural in form, used with a singular verb. Juxtaposed pictorial and
other images in deliberate sequence, intended to convey information andor to produce
aesthetic response in the viewer, �from Understanding Comics by Scott Mccloud
By Kemple WANG TV
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TO KiUTWf IN HIS FlMTftAlLJ
Phoebe
by Stephanie Smith
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FOR MIS WONM.W
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0 CHO�CE 6UT TO
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TO Ou PARENTS !
BUT VOU- LET ME j
SHOW NCJ WHAT fl
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TOOAN (p)CAN
5E SPOILEP 6RATS
I WAS NEVE
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Now, BACK To
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V
MVE WE Don't REALLyl
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Public?
'V-

yvvCvpn & Manning
WANG TV
By Manning & Ferguson
Omega Quest
by Childers
ROME,ITALY i
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WELCOME
MY SON.
I KNOW
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CHOSEN ONE
WILL ARRIVE SOON
VOU MlKT PREPARE
fOfl THE C0MIN6
fxnu or
tflDCALYFSF
Seigfreid and Barth
by Murphy and Davis
Demonseed





The East Carolinian
November 4, 1993
Sports
Page 11
What's On Tap?
Thursday, Nov. 4
Soccer, away
at CAA Tournament, Richmond,
Va through Sunday, TBA
M. Tennis, away
at Rolex Regional Indoor
Tourn Chapel Hill, NC,
through Sunday, TBA
Friday, Nov. 5
Volleyball, away
at Navy Forestall Classic,
Annapolis, Md through
Sunday, TBA
Saturday, Nov. 6
Football, home
Tulsa 1:30 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 7
W. Soccer, home
Raleigh Club, 11 a.m.
The 411
Saturday, Oct. 30
Lacrosse, home
beat NC State 10-7, beat NC
Wesleyan 13-5
Tuesday, Nov. 2
Volleyball, away
lost to UNC-W, (1-3), 9-15,11-
15,16-14,12-15
Please . . . No Wagering
Robert Todd, 43 points
TEC Sports Editor
Tulsa 10, 30-20
"The Hurricanes have too
many weapons. Unfortunately,
mis might be ECU's last chance
for a win this season
.Brian Olson, 46 points
TEC Assistant Sports
Editor
Tulsa 6,23-17
"ECU's offense can't seem
to put it together and Richard
Perry's presence can't help the
Pirates pull it out
Kevin Halt, 40 points
WZMB Sports Director
Tulsa9,30-21
"The Pirate seniors deserve
a good showing from both the
teamand the fans. Unfortunately,
I don't think they'll get either
Brian Bailey, 38 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
ECU6,27-21
"We break the third quarter
jinx and the defense scores the
game winner
Brad Zaruba, 38 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
ECU10,24-14
"Offense, defense, and kick-
ing game show up on the same
day
Chris Justice, 49 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
ECU -?,?-?
Not available for comment
Demetrius Carter, 25 points
ABLE President
ECU-?,?-?
Not available for comment
Mo' Rich, suest picker
Assistant New Editor
Tulsa 18,58-40
"The Pirates will do much
better if students tailgate respon-
sibly
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
Compiled by B. Olson
Beating Tulsa crucial to save season
Photo courtesy of Tulsa SID
Tulsa's Chris Penn is a dangerous weapon. The Golden Hurricanes will try to exploit ECU's secondary and
hit Penn deep as often as possible.
ByBrianOlson
Assistant Sports Editor
The Pirates are inching more
and more towards the end of the
plank and might just jump ship if
they do not win this Saturday
against Tulsa. This will be the
final home game for this dismal
'93 season and it will be time to
bid farewell to some outstanding
seniors.
ECU returns to Ficklen after
two weeks on the road. They
dropped games to Southern Miss
and Virginia Tech. In what is usu-
ally a close game between the
Hokies, VT was too much for the
Bucs last Saturday in Blacksburg,
31-12.
The Pirates stayed close at
14-12 in the third quarter, but the
third quarter plague took the
wind out the Pirates sails. ECU
has been outscored 66-7 in the
third quarter this year.
The independent Tulsa
Golden Hurricanes will storm
Hart nominated
for NCAA council
Greenville, NC (SID) � Dave
Hart, Jr director of athletics at
EastCarolina University,hasbeen
recommended by the NCAA
Nominating Committee to serve
as a Division I-At Large confer-
ence representative on the NCAA
Council.
The 46-member Council es-
tablishes and directs general
NCAA policy between annual
NCAAConventions. TheCouncil
serves, in effect, as the board of
directors of the NCAA. It is re-
sponsible for making interpreta-
tion of the constitution and by-
laws in the interim.
"Being nominated toserveon
the NCAA Council is, indeed, an
honor and privilege said Hart.
"The Council is a very prestigious
body within the framework of the
NCAA. Its task, as well as its re-
sponsibility, magnifies in light of
the current issues facing intercol-
legiate athletics in this decade. I
would hope to do whatever I could
to make a contribution to the col-
lective effort to meet those chal-
lenges which confront'all of us
The NCAA membership wil
vote on this recommendation at
the NCAA Convention in Janu-
ary. Hart's term of office would
begin at the conclusion of the Con-
vention and would end at the con-
clusion of the January 1996 Con-
vention.
Rader heading Tulsa
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Dave Rader, the head coach of
the Tulsa Golden Hurricanes, has
brought many things to the Tulsa
program. He had led the program
to two bowl appearances, in 1989's
Independence Bowl and 1991 's
Freedom Bowl. In 1991, Rader was
one of five finalists for the National
Coach of the Year award.
A formerquarterbackatTulsa,
Rader was drafted after his colle-
giate career by the NFL, where he
played for one season under the
New York Giants' Ray Perkins.
Rader joined Perkins the following
year at the University of Alabama
as a quarterbacks and receivers
coach. After a short term as an as-
sistant at Mississippi State, Rader
returned to Tulsa in 1986, where he
served as an assistant head coach
underGeorge Hensha w. Rader was
named head coach of the Golden
Hurricanes on March 8,1988.
Coach, your situation with your
Tulsa team is similar to that of the
Pirates. You have come off a seiisa-
tionall991campaignand gone through
two struggling seasons. How do you
keep focused for the remainder of the
season when your ballclub is strug-
gling?
"I think the most important
things we have at Tulsa are good
people. Asa coach, I am surrounded
by excellent leadership. I think our
players are determined and refuse
to give up. Three of our losses have
all come in the'last minute which I
think proves thatourguysare fight-
ing hard
As a former Tulsa quarterback,
what experiences did you gain that
See RADER page 13
Swimmers make big splash
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The ECU swim teams got off to
a great start for the 1993-94 season
with a victory over the Hokies of
Virginia Tech last Saturday.
"Weswamverywellforsoearly
in the season said Rick Kobe, head
coach of ECU swimming. "It was a
great team effort. They showed a lot
of poiseand spirit. Virginia Tech was
probably one of our toughest open-
ing opponents ever. Going into this
meetitlooked like things weregoing
to be tight, but we just came in and
took the meet over
The men's and women's teams
dominated the pool, with the ECU
men winning, 138-106, and the
women coasting to a 136-95 victory.
Senior Brian Soltz led the way for the
men's team, which won eight of 13
events, while the women, who were
led by sophomore Beth Humphrey,
won nine of 13.
Forthemen,Soltzhad threewins
inthe50and lOOfreeand the 400 free
relay with sophomore McGee
Moody, Pat Cassidy and John
Donovan (3:15.12). Cassidy, a junior
from Miami, Fla also helped the Pi-
rates win the 400 medley relay, along
with Chris Bembenek, Lance Tate
and sophomore David Benson.
Bembenek swam extremely well,
winning the 200 backstroke with a
time of 156.12, while senior Carlos
Ochoa won in the 200 free (1:4724).
For the women, Leslie Hawley
broke a varsity record in the 200 yard
backstroke, which is very unusual
considering that it was the first meet
of the season and swimmers usually
aren'tintheirbestshapecomparedto
the later meets.
In the diving competition, the
men were led by freshman Billy
Galleher, who totaled 508.12 points
in his victories in the one and three
meter boards. For the women, fresh-
manBeth Hanna getting the win with
a scoreof 238 pointson theonemeter,
and 231 points on the three meter.
ThePiratesnextmeetisonSatur-
day, Nov. 13 against Old Dominion
andGeorgiaSouthematMinges,start-
ingat2 p.m.
into Greenville wi th a 3-4 record
while ECU stands at 2-6. Tulsa
is coming off a victory over
Middle Tennessee, 38-17. The
Hurricanes have won both
meetings between the teams
with the last win in 1985,21-20.
This game could easily go
either way. One teamboth have
played this year is Memphis
State.
Tulsa has already beaten
MSU this season, 23-19, and the
Pirates were blown away at
home by the Tigers, 34-7.
The Hurricanes will bring a
different style of offense with
them. They will sometimes go
to a no huddle offense and will
likely try and confuse a young
and inexperienced defense.
The attack is led by quar-
terback Gus Frerotte. He is com-
ing off his best game this sea-
son, 21 of 33, with a career best
354 yards and three TDs. He
See TULSA page 13
Pirates earn CAA honors
RICHMOND, Va. (SID) - The
East Carolina soccer team has
placed two players on the 1993
Colonial Athletic Association All-
Conference squads. The all-con-
ference teams will be formally
announced at the CAA Soccer
Banquet Wednesday night in
Richmond on the eve of the CAA
Tournament.
Pirate back Drew Racine,
from Raleigh, NC, received All-
CAA First Team honors for the
second year in a row.
Last year, Racine was the
only freshman to be named to the
first team and he was East
Carolina's first player to eVer be
selected to the All-CAA First
Team.
ECU senior midfielder Jus-
tin Finck of Manassas, Va. was
named to the All-CAA Second
Team. Recently Finck wasnamed
CAA Player of the Week after
scoring the game-winning goal
to lift ECU to a 2-1 upset over
American University.
Racine came to ECU from
Raleigh's Sanderson High School
and had an immediate impact.
Racine, a sophomore, has started
every game do far in his colle-
giate career.
As a freshman he started all
16 games for the Pirates. This
season he has started in all 18
games.
Recently Racine was named
an CAA Scholar Athlete and is
planning to major in occupational
therapy.
Finck has seen success while
playing soccer at East Carolina.
He was the leading scorer for the
Pirates in 1991 and was named
the 1992 ECU Most Valuable
Player.
Finck has developed into an
important team leader and was
1992 co-Captain.
Finck is majoring in biology
and wants to coach Division I
soccer after graduation. His ca-
reer stats follow.
Year Goals Assists Points
1991 5 1 11
1992 0 1 1
122230 6
8 :
(stats provided by SID)
18
The CAA Soccer Champion-
ships are held Nov. 4-7 at the
University of Richmond.
East Carolina is the eighth
seed and will face top-seeded
James Madison Thursday, Nov.
4at5 p.m.
Justin Fink
Harts seeing playing time with Bucs
By Brian Cunninsham
Staff Writer
Everwondered whatitmightbe
like to look at someone who is a
virtual carbon copy of yourself in
basically every facet of life?
For David and Daren Hart,
redshirt freshmen twin brothers on
the ECU football team, the similari-
ties are unbelievably unique. Both
play in the secondary on
the Pirate defense, let-
tered in football, baseball
and basketball in high
school, are 5'9" and run
the 40-yard dash in 4.85
seconds, were bom on
Dec. 16, 1973, were
named to Who's Who
Among American High
School Students and, last
but not least, chose ECU
over Virginia,Westem Carolina and
Norm Carolina A&T.
"Oneofuscanbewalkingdown
thestreetsometimeand peoplemight
say 'Hi, Daren' when it was really
me David said shaking his head.
"Later on they might ask, 'Was that
you I saw today?'Sometimes I might
give them a hard time about it
David and Daren Hart grew up
in Winston-Salem,N.C, where they
were both introduced to football at
an early age.
'Inourreighborhood wealways
played with the older guys and that
helped us really get good Daren
said. "We started at die age of eight
and were just constantly involved in
a football atmosphere
Football was not the only sport
David Hart
the brothers excelled at.
Baseball and basketball also en-
tered the picture and at Carver High
School in Winston-Salem, Daren and
David helped lead the their team to
theconferaxBchampionship inbase-
ballinl98990and'91,andinbasket-
ballin'91aswell.
In the long run, though, football
was their main sport.
"My goal for a long time was to
play Division I foot-
ball Daren said.
"Football was defi-
nitely my main sport
David added. "Theex-
citement,speed,hitting
and being in the spot-
light were all appeal-
ing to me
As previously
mentioned,bothDavid
and Daren chose ECU
over some very good schools, most
notably the University of Virginia.
"UVa kept debating about us at
first because they were
skeptical aboutourheight
and were going to see if
they'd be able to recruit
any tallerplayers Daren
said. "ECU didn't worry
about our height. They
just took us in immedi-
ately. David and I just
wanted to play and that
was all we were con-
cerned about
Though many this season have
complemented the improved Tirate
defense, David and Daren are still
not satisfied with their performances.
Both brothers say that instead of
giving up so many points, they
would prefershuttingdown teams,
and defensive coordinator Larry
Coyer has challenged them to do
just that.
"That's what we want to start
doing'DarensaidThe fans might
be happy, but we aren't
With such a strong nucleus of
freshmen and sophomores on this
year's squad, there's good reason
to mink that the team will only get
better in the seasons to come and
the brothers are certainly optimis-
tic about the future.
"I feel we can be one of the top
teams in thecountry nextyear if we
stay healthy and keep our focus in
the classroom David said.
Oh the field, the brothers de-
pend a lot on the other and have a
strongamount of confidence in each
other.
"If he's behind me, I expect
him to make the play if I don't
Daren said, referring to his faith in
David. "We've been
playing with each
other for so long that
we have developed
an innertrustineach
other and we are
awfully hard on one
another i f ei ther of us
is not putting forth
onehundred percent
on every play
Whilemanycol-
lege students in today's world are
not set to make something guxi
happen in their lives, Daren and
See TWINS page 12
Daren Hart
� ��






November 4. 1993
quits basketball team
willcomptete
and then
arolina Com-
lege in Jacksonville
forward from Dixon
five newcomers to thisyear'sLady
Pirate squad. The loss cuts ECU's
rosier to 11 which included nine
sophomores and freshman.
ECU began practice for the
upcoming season on Oct. 30 and
will open the season on Nov. 30 at
Schixtl, Collins was one of Campbell University
Wheelchairs rolling into Minges
iembers of the
�nd women's bas-
teamswill participate in"
i hair basketball game
inday, N hen they
a the Rehab Rascals.
e game is being hosted by
U chap ter of TUSH (People
United to Support the Handi-
and Cisponired bv
DAWN (Disability Awareness
Network) and the Spinal Cord
Injured Association oi Pitt
County.
Halftime activities will in-
cluded a wheelchair free throw-
contest and door prizes.
Tip-off is 6 p.m. in Minges
Coliseum and admission is $4 for
adults and $2 for children 5 years
of age and older. Children under
five will be admitted free.
PUSH is a university-spon-
sored organization of students,
faculty and staff who strive to gen-
erate disabilitv awareness in the
campus community.
Wilson resigns as Duke head coach
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) � Duke
football coach Barn- Wilson an-
nounced vesterday that he will re-
t the end of the season, saying
hi. had not been able to put together
the numbers where they count.
Hie bottom line is the win and
!� isso lumn; 1 have not been able to
getthcjohdone'arired-lookingand
. hatefnotionalWilsonsaidata
�ilerence.
Wilson hasa 12-29-1 record dur-
ing his four seasons with the Blue
I including a 2-7 season so far
ir.Dukelostl7straightAtlan-
t ic G ast Conference games unti 1 de-
fea ting Wake Forest on Oct. 23.
I leave this position with good
a Hinience. I leave it with no gripes
toward anyone said Wilson, who
satbesideDukeathleticdirectorTom
Butters during the news conference.
Wilson said hedid not want the
next three weeks to be a circus about
whether he would remain as head
civich.
Wilson joined Duke as recruit-
ing cuirdinatorand tight ends coadl
for tlie 1987 and L988 seasons under
headcoachSteveSpurrier. In 1989,he
added dutiesasassistant head coach
to his job description.
Spurrier resigned from Duke,
and Wilson took over for hi m in 1990.
Wilson played col lege ba 11 a t the
University of Georgia, switchingfrom
quarterback to end at the start of his
freshman vear in 1961.
Prior to the sta rt of the 1965 sea-
son, Wilson joined the Bulldogs'
coaching staff and worked with the
freshman team for two years before
beginning a two-vear stint in the U.S.
Armv. He returned to A thensas fresh-
man etweh in 1969, then was named
an assistant varsity a wh in 1970 with
responsibilitiesforthelinebackersancl
defensive ends.
Wilson remained on Vince
Daley's staff through the 1973 sea-
son. He then became linebackers
coachat Mississippi, where hestayed
for threeyears. He then di rected Geor-
gia Tech's linebackers for six seasons.
In 1983, Wilson joined Spurrier
at the Tampa Bay Bandits of the
United States Football League.
Volleyball team finishes CAA regular season
(SID) � East Carolina's vol-
leyball team went down a bumpy
road this year. The team moved
its overall record to 10-20 and
finished regular season Colonial
Athletic Association play with a
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: Lester Lyons
was named pre-
season MVP for
the CAA
Basketball
Conference. Can
you name where
he ranks on the
ECU list of total
points scored?
'��9l s,U9ssnI ftuuos
pmpq S3 3- sjujod �S�'l
tfjtai pjttfi syuvu dy :y
9-15, 11-15, 16-14, 12-15 loss to
UNC Wilmington on Tuesday.
ECU'S CAA record is 1-4.
ECU plays in the Navy For-
estal Classic on Nov. 5-6. On Nov.
5 ECU is scheduled to take on
Navy at 4 p.m. and LeHigh at 8
p.m. After day one of play, the
teams will be seeded and at 10
a.m.on Nov. 6,Seed 1 vs. Seed 6,
Seed 2 vs. Seed 5 and Seed 3 vs.
Seed 4.
Maritime Studies Association Presents
USCG Captain's License Prep Course
DBPARTMIHT OF TKANSCORTIT 1V
m)
This course will prepare you to take tha USCG Captain's
Test - Learn the Coast Guard way of thinking
Nov. 13 and 14, 1993 8am to 4:30pm
Maritime History Bldg. Corner of 9th and Cotanche St.
Cost: $200, $50 deposit (tax deductible)
Limited space - 1 st come, 1 st served basis
Reply to MSA co ECU Maritime History Dept.
The course is taught by Capt. Rick Jones - USCG Licensed
to 1 BOO tons, 20 years experience
For Information, call 757-0630 (evenings

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TWINS
Continued
from pg. 11
Da id are an extremeexoeprion. Both
hnve established a goal setof morals
and give all their glory to God.
During high school, both were
membersoftheSpiritof Lite group in
YVinston-Salem where they traveled
toother parteof the country and sang
for God.
"A lot of people are into rap or
maybe slow songs with R&D or
country, but not us David said.
"We sing for the Lord and hope to
spread His word .I'm not shv about
it either. It's something I love to do
and 1 geta lot of my strength through
Him
Onecannothelpbutenvy Daren
and David Hart.
They haveevervthinggoing for
them and both seem to want to ac-
complish thesa me goalsinlifewhich
is to graduate on time and be suc-
cessful in their respective field of
study.
NBA sta rCharles Barkley sta ted
on a TV commercial a few months
back that it was not the professional
athlete's job to be a role model, but
rattier the parents
With David and Daren Hart's
attitude on life, Allen and Rose Hart
are nodoubt most proud ot their two
boys and they a re the type of people
Barkley was trying to tell the public
about.
Indeed, two Hartsare better than
one.
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I CAROLINIAN
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A JOB
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applications for:
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University � minimum 2.0 GPA � must know how to type must
have some experience with Macintosh computers � must be able
to meet deadlines � answer phones � pay attention to detail
Drop off your application at The East Carolinian office located
across from the Joyner Library in the Student Publication
Building on the 2nd floor.
3615 South Memorial Drive
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November 4, 1993
The East Carolinian 113
V Warn s �
Continued from page 11
m
t catches per game
and 124.6 y. rds per game. This
will surely will bea tough test for
the ECU secondary.
Running back Lamont Headd
will be used to balance the pass-
ing attack. He has compiled 633
yards this season and is averag-
ing 97.3 yards a game on the
ground. ECU has improved this
year at stopping the run, but this
week they must improve against
the pass.
Injuries ha ve hurt the Pirates
li ke a saber through the heart this
year. One more injury was added
to the long list this past Saturday.
Sophomore linebacker Morris
Foreman went down with an in-
RADER
requiresur-
ill Ix- lost for the
� m. Through
: was second in
a ith five tackles for
l;)bseb. Hi- also had two intercep-
and fumble recoveries. He
was a big play maker for the Pi-
rates and will be missed tremen-
dously.
The lulsa defense has been
more effective at stopping the
pass than the run this year. Their
only allowingan average of 189.6
through the air and are giving up
141.6 on the ground.
Freshman Perez Mattison
will be at the helm of ihe Pirate
offense again this week and is
still gaining needed experience
with every outing. The Pirates
have struggled through the air
and this might me more chances
for running back Junior Smith.
The Pirates should have more
success on the ground this week
Continued from page 11
and short passes to ha Ifback Jerris
McPhail should prove effective.
This is McPhail's first sea-
son with the Pirates since trans-
ferring from Wake Forest and he
is providing a spark to the of-
fense.
This game will mean some-
thing special to ECU head coach,
Steve Logan. He is a former high
school coach in Tulsa, Okla and
eventually became offensive co-
ordinator at Tulsa in 1983-84.
Loganalsograduated fromTulsa
in 1975.
There are also three other
ECU coaches tha t grad uated from
Tulsa: offensivecoordina tor Todd
Berry (Class of '83), inside line-
backer coach Bob Babich (Class
of '84) and defensive secondary
coach Chris Thurmond (Class of
'75).
This is not an ordinary year
for ECU football. Fansare used to
seeing a high-powered offense,
but this year, because of injuries
at quarterback, theoffense has not
been able to get going. A high
note for the Pirates is thedefense.
Under new defensive coordina-
tor, Larry Coyer, ECU has estab-
lished an aggressive style of play.
The future appears bright with a
young team.
16Pirateplayers will be play-
ing in their last home game: Ber-
nard Carter, Tom Coleman, Jeff
Cooke, Dealton Cotton, Ken
Crawford, Carlester Crumpler,
Greg Floyd, Morris Letcher,
Travis Render, Reggie Robinson,
Schizo Sherman, Greg Smith,
Robert Tate, Daryl Taylor, Derek
Taylor and Ronnie Williams.
If you did not get any treats
last weekend during Halloween,
make sure you stick around for
halftime. ECU will honor
NASCAR legend Richard Petty
for his 200 victories and for his
great career.
Central Book &
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
have possibly helped you prepare to
coach at your alma mater?
"Well, I think maybe the play-
ers understand that I have been
where they are right now and I have'
a good idea what they are going
through. I understand whatitislike
to play at their level and am aware
of the frustrations and joys they
experience through their athletics
and academics. I also think know-
ingTulsa and itspeoplehavehelped
mea greatdeal in my time of coach-
ing here
Your senior quarterback, Gus
Frerotte, seems to be performing well
this year. His interception rate is
fairly low, much like yours was in
your playing days. How did your
playing experience help you to pre-
pare him?
"I think it is probably more that
I've been around a nu mber of great
coaches in my career. This sport is a
continuing learning process and I
think that the fact that I've learned
from a number of top quality
coaches has also helped Gus this
year
Speaking of great coaches, you had
the opportunity to learn as a player
from one of the best, John Cooper.
Coach logon is also a former student of
Coojeras anassistant coach. What did
being around this great coach teach
you?
"One of the things about him
that is a little like I have here in
Tulsa is that he surrounded him-
self with grea t people. I think that's
an important lesson. I guess he
also taught me to try to be orga-
nized
The college football profession
seems to havepressures that are differ-
entfrom any other occupation. How
do you Ixmdle the day-to-day stress
associated with leading a college foot-
ball program?
"We just try to have some fun.
It's like anything else you do in life
you have to be able to enjoy it.
"You have to have the proper
focus
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 4, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 04, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.973
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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